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Sample records for regulates bmal1 gene

  1. Regulation of circadian clock transcriptional output by CLOCK:BMAL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Alexandra J.

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock relies on the transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 to coordinate the rhythmic expression of 15% of the transcriptome and control the daily regulation of biological functions. The recent characterization of CLOCK:BMAL1 cistrome revealed that although CLOCK:BMAL1 binds synchronously to all of its target genes, its transcriptional output is highly heterogeneous. By performing a meta-analysis of several independent genome-wide datasets, we found that the binding of other transcription factors at CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers likely contribute to the heterogeneity of CLOCK:BMAL1 transcriptional output. While CLOCK:BMAL1 rhythmic DNA binding promotes rhythmic nucleosome removal, it is not sufficient to generate transcriptionally active enhancers as assessed by H3K27ac signal, RNA Polymerase II recruitment, and eRNA expression. Instead, the transcriptional activity of CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers appears to rely on the activity of ubiquitously expressed transcription factors, and not tissue-specific transcription factors, recruited at nearby binding sites. The contribution of other transcription factors is exemplified by how fasting, which effects several transcription factors but not CLOCK:BMAL1, either decreases or increases the amplitude of many rhythmically expressed CLOCK:BMAL1 target genes. Together, our analysis suggests that CLOCK:BMAL1 promotes a transcriptionally permissive chromatin landscape that primes its target genes for transcription activation rather than directly activating transcription, and provides a new framework to explain how environmental or pathological conditions can reprogram the rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes. PMID:29300726

  2. Synergistic regulation of the mouse orphan nuclear receptor SHP gene promoter by CLOCK-BMAL1 and LRH-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiwa, Ako; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Miyamoto, Takahide; Yamashita, Koh; Jiang, Wei; Takeda, Teiji; Suzuki, Satoru; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP; NR0B2) is an orphan nuclear receptor and acts as a repressor for wide variety of nuclear hormone receptors. We demonstrated here that mouse SHP mRNA showed a circadian expression pattern in the liver. Transient transfection of the mSHP promoter demonstrated that CLOCK-BMAL1, core circadian clock components, bound to E-box (CACGTG), and stimulated the promoter activity by 4-fold. Liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) stimulated the mSHP promoter, and CLOCK-BMAL1 synergistically enhanced the LRH-1-mediated transactivation. Interestingly, SHP did not affect the CLOCK-BMAL1-mediated promoter activity, but strongly repressed the synergistic activation of CLOCK-BMAL1 and LRH-1. Furthermore, in vitro pull-down assays revealed the existence of direct protein-protein interaction between LRH-1 and CLOCK. In summary, this study shows that CLOCK-BMAL1, LRH-1 and SHP coordinately regulate the mSHP gene to generate the circadian oscillation. The cyclic expression of mSHP may affect daily activity of other nuclear receptors and contribute to circadian liver functions

  3. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

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    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  4. Global loss of bmal1 expression alters adipose tissue hormones, gene expression and glucose metabolism.

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    David John Kennaway

    Full Text Available The close relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and poor metabolic status is becoming increasingly evident, but role of adipokines is poorly understood. Here we investigated adipocyte function and the metabolic status of mice with a global loss of the core clock gene Bmal1 fed either a normal or a high fat diet (22% by weight. Bmal1 null mice aged 2 months were killed across 24 hours and plasma adiponectin and leptin, and adipose tissue expression of Adipoq, Lep, Retn and Nampt mRNA measured. Glucose, insulin and pyruvate tolerance tests were conducted and the expression of liver glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme mRNA determined. Bmal1 null mice displayed a pattern of increased plasma adiponectin and plasma leptin concentrations on both control and high fat diets. Bmal1 null male and female mice displayed increased adiposity (1.8 fold and 2.3 fold respectively on the normal diet, but the high fat diet did not exaggerate these differences. Despite normal glucose and insulin tolerance, Bmal1 null mice had increased production of glucose from pyruvate, implying increased liver gluconeogenesis. The Bmal1 null mice had arrhythmic clock gene expression in epigonadal fat and liver, and loss of rhythmic transcription of a range of metabolic genes. Furthermore, the expression of epigonadal fat Adipoq, Retn, Nampt, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 and liver Pfkfb3 mRNA were down-regulated. These results show for the first time that global loss of Bmal1, and the consequent arrhythmicity, results in compensatory changes in adipokines involved in the cellular control of glucose metabolism.

  5. Circadian transcription factor BMAL1 regulates innate immunity against select RNA viruses.

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    Majumdar, Tanmay; Dhar, Jayeeta; Patel, Sonal; Kondratov, Roman; Barik, Sailen

    2017-02-01

    BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1, also known as MOP3 or ARNT3) belongs to the family of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS domain-containing transcription factors, and is a key component of the molecular oscillator that generates circadian rhythms. Here, we report that BMAL1-deficient cells are significantly more susceptible to infection by two major respiratory viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family, namely RSV and PIV3. Embryonic fibroblasts from Bmal1 -/- mice produced nearly 10-fold more progeny virus than their wild type controls. These results were supported by animal studies whereby pulmonary infection of RSV produced a more severe disease and morbidity in Bmal1 -/- mice. These results show that BMAL1 can regulate cellular innate immunity against specific RNA viruses.

  6. Circadian rhythms and light responsiveness of mammalian clock gene, Clock and BMAL1, transcripts in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namihira, M; Honma, S; Abe, H; Tanahashi, Y; Ikeda, M; Honma, K

    1999-08-13

    Circadian expression and light-responsiveness of the mammalian clock genes, Clock and BMAL1, in the rat retina were examined by in situ hydbribization under constant darkness. A small but significant daily variation was detected in the Clock transcript level, but not in BMAL1. Light increased the Clock and BMAL1 expressions significantly when examined 60 min after exposure. The light-induced gene expression was phase-dependent for Clock and peaked at ZT2, while rather constant throughout the day for BMAL1. These findings suggest that Clock and BMAL1 play different roles in the generation of circadian rhytm in the retina from those in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Different roles are also suggested between the two genes in the photic signal transduction in the retina.

  7. Circadian genes, xBmal1 and xNocturnin, modulate the timing and differentiation of somites in Xenopus laevis.

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    Kristen L Curran

    Full Text Available We have been investigating whether xBmal1 and xNocturnin play a role in somitogenesis, a cyclic developmental process with an ultradian period. Previous work from our lab shows that circadian genes (xPeriod1, xPeriod2, xBmal1, and xNocturnin are expressed in developing somites. Somites eventually form the vertebrae, muscles of the back, and dermis. In Xenopus, a pair of somites is formed about every 50 minutes from anterior to posterior. We were intrigued by the co-localization of circadian genes in an embryonic tissue known to be regulated by an ultradian clock. Cyclic expression of genes involved in Notch signaling has been implicated in the somite clock. Disruption of Notch signaling in humans has been linked to skeletal defects in the vertebral column. We found that both depletion (morpholino and overexpression (mRNA of xBMAL1 protein (bHLH transcription factor or xNOCTURNIN protein (deadenylase on one side of the developing embryo led to a significant decrease in somite number with respect to the untreated side (p<0.001. These manipulations also significantly affect expression of a somite clock component (xESR9; p<0.05. We observed opposing effects on somite size. Depletion of xBMAL1 or xNOCTURNIN caused a statistically significant decrease in somite area (quantified using NIH ImageJ; p<0.002, while overexpression of these proteins caused a significant dose dependent increase in somite area (p<0.02; p<0.001, respectively. We speculate that circadian genes may play two separate roles during somitogenesis. Depletion and overexpression of xBMAL1 and NOCTURNIN both decrease somite number and influence expression of a somite clock component, suggesting that these proteins may modulate the timing of the somite clock in the undifferentiated presomitic mesoderm. The dosage dependent effects on somite area suggest that xBMAL1 and xNOCTURNIN may also act during somite differentiation to promote myogenesis.

  8. Rhythmic expression of miR-27b-3p targets the clock gene Bmal1 at the posttranscriptional level in the mouse liver.

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    Zhang, Wenxiang; Wang, Peng; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Zhao; Liang, Tingming; Liu, Chang

    2016-06-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate daily oscillations in mammalian behaviors, physiology, and gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in fine-tuning of the circadian system. However, little is known about the direct regulation of the clock genes by specific miRNAs. In this study, we found that miR-27b-3p exhibits rhythmic expression in the metabolic tissues of the mice subjected to constant darkness. MiR-27b-3p's expression is induced in livers of unfed and ob/ob mice. In addition, the oscillation phases of miR-27b-3p can be reversed by restricted feeding, suggesting a role of peripheral clock in regulating its rhythmicity. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (also known as Bmal1) may be a direct target of miR-27b-3p. Luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-27b-3p suppressed Bmal1 3' UTR activity in a dose-dependent manner, and mutagenesis of their binding site abolished this suppression. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-27b-3p dose-dependently reduced the protein expression levels of BMAL1 and impaired the endogenous BMAL1 and gluconeogenic protein rhythmicity. Collectively, our results suggest that miR-27b-3p plays an important role in the posttranscriptional regulation of BMAL1 protein in the liver. MiR-27b-3p may serve as a novel node to integrate the circadian clock and energy metabolism.-Zhang, W., Wang, P., Chen, S., Zhang, Z., Liang, T., Liu, C. Rhythmic expression of miR-27b-3p targets the clock gene Bmal1 at the posttranscriptional level in the mouse liver. © FASEB.

  9. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock.

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    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1-CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1-P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator.

  10. Vertebrate-like CRYPTOCHROME 2 from monarch regulates circadian transcription via independent repression of CLOCK and BMAL1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Markert, Matthew J; Groves, Shayna C; Hardin, Paul E; Merlin, Christine

    2017-09-05

    Circadian repression of CLOCK-BMAL1 by PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) in mammals lies at the core of the circadian timekeeping mechanism. CRY repression of CLOCK-BMAL1 and regulation of circadian period are proposed to rely primarily on competition for binding with coactivators on an α-helix located within the transactivation domain (TAD) of the BMAL1 C terminus. This model has, however, not been tested in vivo. Here, we applied CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly ( Danaus plexippus ), which possesses a vertebrate-like CRY (dpCRY2) and an ortholog of BMAL1, to show that insect CRY2 regulates circadian repression through TAD α-helix-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Monarch mutants lacking the BMAL1 C terminus including the TAD exhibited arrhythmic eclosion behavior. In contrast, mutants lacking the TAD α-helix but retaining the most distal C-terminal residues exhibited robust rhythms during the first day of constant darkness (DD1), albeit with a delayed peak of eclosion. Phase delay in this mutant on DD1 was exacerbated in the presence of a single functional allele of dpCry2 , and rhythmicity was abolished in the absence of dpCRY2. Reporter assays in Drosophila S2 cells further revealed that dpCRY2 represses through two distinct mechanisms: a TAD-dependent mechanism that involves the dpBMAL1 TAD α-helix and dpCLK W328 and a TAD-independent mechanism involving dpCLK E333. Together, our results provide evidence for independent mechanisms of vertebrate-like CRY circadian regulation on the BMAL1 C terminus and the CLK PAS-B domain and demonstrate the importance of a BMAL1 TAD-independent mechanism for generating circadian rhythms in vivo.

  11. Global but not gonadotrope-specific disruption of Bmal1 abolishes the luteinizing hormone surge without affecting ovulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Adrienne; Zhu, Lei; Blum, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    While there is evidence for a circadian regulation of the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge, the contributions of individual tissue clocks to this process remain unclear. We studied female mice deficient in the Bmal1 gene (Bmal1(-/-)), which is essential for circadian clock function, an...

  12. Genome-wide and phase-specific DNA-binding rhythms of BMAL1 control circadian output functions in mouse liver.

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    Guillaume Rey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock uses interlocked negative feedback loops in which the heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BMAL1/CLOCK is a master regulator. While there is prominent control of liver functions by the circadian clock, the detailed links between circadian regulators and downstream targets are poorly known. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with deep sequencing we obtained a time-resolved and genome-wide map of BMAL1 binding in mouse liver, which allowed us to identify over 2,000 binding sites, with peak binding narrowly centered around Zeitgeber time 6. Annotation of BMAL1 targets confirms carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as the major output of the circadian clock in mouse liver. Moreover, transcription regulators are largely overrepresented, several of which also exhibit circadian activity. Genes of the core circadian oscillator stand out as strongly bound, often at promoter and distal sites. Genomic sequence analysis of the sites identified E-boxes and tandem E1-E2 consensus elements. Electromobility shift assays showed that E1-E2 sites are bound by a dimer of BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimers with a spacing-dependent cooperative interaction, a finding that was further validated in transactivation assays. BMAL1 target genes showed cyclic mRNA expression profiles with a phase distribution centered at Zeitgeber time 10. Importantly, sites with E1-E2 elements showed tighter phases both in binding and mRNA accumulation. Finally, analyzing the temporal profiles of BMAL1 binding, precursor mRNA and mature mRNA levels showed how transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation contribute differentially to circadian expression phase. Together, our analysis of a dynamic protein-DNA interactome uncovered how genes of the core circadian oscillator crosstalk and drive phase-specific circadian output programs in a complex tissue.

  13. Circadian clocks govern calorie restriction-mediated life span extension through BMAL1- and IGF-1-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sonal A; Chaudhari, Amol; Gupta, Richa; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Kondratov, Roman V

    2016-04-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) increases longevity in many species by unknown mechanisms. The circadian clock was proposed as a potential mediator of CR. Deficiency of the core component of the circadian clock-transcriptional factor BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator]-like protein 1)-results in accelerated aging. Here we investigated the role of BMAL1 in mechanisms of CR. The 30% CR diet increased the life span of wild-type (WT) mice by 20% compared to mice on anad libitum(AL) diet but failed to increase life span ofBmal1(-/-)mice. BMAL1 deficiency impaired CR-mediated changes in the plasma levels of IGF-1 and insulin. We detected a statistically significantly reduction of IGF-1 in CRvs.AL by 50 to 70% in WT mice at several daily time points tested, while inBmal1(-/-)the reduction was not significant. Insulin levels in WT were reduced by 5 to 9%, whileBmal1(-/-)induced it by 10 to 35% at all time points tested. CR up-regulated the daily average expression ofBmal1(by 150%) and its downstream target genesPeriods(by 470% forPer1and by 130% forPer2). We propose that BMAL1 is an important mediator of CR, and activation of BMAL1 might link CR mechanisms with biologic clocks.-Patel, S. A., Chaudhari, A., Gupta, R., Velingkaar, N., Kondratov, R. V. Circadian clocks govern calorie restriction-mediated life span extension through BMAL1- and IGF-1-dependent mechanisms. © FASEB.

  14. Sleep loss reduces the DNA-binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to specific clock genes in the mouse cerebral cortex.

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    Valérie Mongrain

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset, -6, -12, and -18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and -6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven.

  15. Sleep loss reduces the DNA-binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to specific clock genes in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongrain, Valérie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory sequences of target clock genes in mice. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we first showed that, as reported for the liver, DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to target clock genes changes in function of time-of-day in the cerebral cortex. Tissue extracts were collected at ZT0 (light onset), -6, -12, and -18, and DNA enrichment of E-box or E'-box containing sequences was measured by qPCR. CLOCK and BMAL1 binding to Cry1, Dbp, Per1, and Per2 depended on time-of-day, with maximum values reached at around ZT6. We then observed that SD, performed between ZT0 and -6, significantly decreased DNA-binding of CLOCK and BMAL1 to Dbp, consistent with the observed decrease in Dbp mRNA levels after SD. The DNA-binding of NPAS2 and BMAL1 to Per2 was also decreased by SD, although SD is known to increase Per2 expression in the cortex. DNA-binding to Per1 and Cry1 was not affected by SD. Our results show that the sleep-wake history can affect the clock molecular machinery directly at the level of chromatin binding thereby altering the cortical expression of Dbp and Per2 and likely other targets. Although the precise dynamics of the relationship between DNA-binding and mRNA expression, especially for Per2, remains elusive, the results also suggest that part of the reported circadian changes in DNA-binding of core clock components in tissues peripheral to the suprachiasmatic nuclei could, in fact, be sleep-wake driven.

  16. Methylation on the Circadian Gene BMAL1 Is Associated with the Effects of a Weight Loss Intervention on Serum Lipid Levels.

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    Samblas, Mirian; Milagro, Fermin I; Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Martínez, J Alfredo; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-06-01

    The circadian clock system has been linked to the onset and development of obesity and some accompanying comorbidities. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, are putatively involved in the regulation of the circadian clock system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a weight loss intervention based on an energy-controlled Mediterranean dietary pattern in the methylation levels of 3 clock genes, BMAL1, CLOCK, and NR1D1, and the association between the methylation levels and changes induced in the serum lipid profile with the weight loss treatment. The study sample enrolled 61 women (body mass index = 28.6 ± 3.4 kg/m(2); age: 42.2 ± 11.4 years), who followed a nutritional program based on a Mediterranean dietary pattern. DNA was isolated from whole blood obtained at the beginning and end point. Methylation levels at different CpG sites of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NR1D1 were analyzed by Sequenom's MassArray. The energy-restricted intervention modified the methylation levels of different CpG sites in BMAL1 (CpGs 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, and 18) and NR1D1 (CpGs 1, 10, 17, 18, 19, and 22). Changes in cytosine methylation in the CpG 5 to 9 region of BMAL1 with the intervention positively correlated with the eveningness profile (p = 0.019). The baseline methylation of the CpG 5 to 9 region in BMAL1 positively correlated with energy (p = 0.047) and carbohydrate (p = 0.017) intake and negatively correlated with the effect of the weight loss intervention on total cholesterol (p = 0.032) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.005). Similar significant and positive correlations were found between changes in methylation levels in the CpG 5 to 9 region of BMAL1 due to the intervention and changes in serum lipids (p < 0.05). This research describes apparently for the first time an association between changes in the methylation of the BMAL1 gene with the intervention and the effects of a weight loss intervention on blood lipids levels. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Mice Lacking EGR1 Have Impaired Clock Gene (BMAL1) Oscillation, Locomotor Activity, and Body Temperature.

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    Riedel, Casper Schwartz; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Hannibal, Jens; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Early growth response transcription factor 1 (EGR1) is expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) after light stimulation. We used EGR1-deficient mice to address the role of EGR1 in the clock function and light-induced resetting of the clock. The diurnal rhythms of expression of the clock genes BMAL1 and PER1 in the SCN were evaluated by semi-quantitative in situ hybridization. We found no difference in the expression of PER1 mRNA between wildtype and EGR1-deficient mice; however, the daily rhythm of BMAL1 mRNA was completely abolished in the EGR1-deficient mice. In addition, we evaluated the circadian running wheel activity, telemetric locomotor activity, and core body temperature of the mice. Loss of EGR1 neither altered light-induced phase shifts at subjective night nor affected negative masking. Overall, circadian light entrainment was found in EGR1-deficient mice but they displayed a reduced locomotor activity and an altered temperature regulation compared to wild type mice. When placed in running wheels, a subpopulation of EGR1-deficient mice displayed a more disrupted activity rhythm with no measurable endogenous period length (tau). In conclusion, the present study provides the first evidence that the circadian clock in the SCN is disturbed in mice deficient of EGR1.

  18. Disruption of the Circadian Clock Alters Antioxidative Defense via the SIRT1-BMAL1 Pathway in 6-OHDA-Induced Models of Parkinson’s Disease

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    Yali Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and is known to involve circadian dysfunction and oxidative stress. Although antioxidative defense is regulated by the molecular circadian clock, few studies have examined their function in PD and their regulation by silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1. We hypothesize that reduced antioxidative activity in models of PD results from dysfunction of the molecular circadian clock via the SIRT1 pathway. We treated rats and SH-SY5Y cells with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and measured the expression of core circadian clock and associated nuclear receptor genes using real-time quantitative PCR as well as levels of SIRT1, brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1, and acetylated BMAL1 using Western blotting. We found that 6-OHDA treatment altered the expression patterns of clock and antioxidative molecules in vivo and in vitro. We also detected an increased ratio of acetylated BMAL1:BMAL1 and a decreased level of SIRT1. Furthermore, resveratrol, an activator of SIRT1, decreased the acetylation of BMAL1 and inhibited its binding with CRY1, thereby reversing the impaired antioxidative activity induced by 6-OHDA. These results suggest that a dysfunctional circadian clock contributes to an abnormal antioxidative response in PD via a SIRT1-dependent BMAL1 pathway.

  19. Sleep Loss Reduces the DNA-Binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to Specific Clock Genes in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Mongrain, Valerie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory s...

  20. α1B-Adrenergic receptor signaling controls circadian expression of Tnfrsf11b by regulating clock genes in osteoblasts

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    Takao Hirai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous and biological oscillations that occur with a period of <24 h. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker is localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and is linked to peripheral tissues through neural and hormonal signals. In the present study, we investigated the physiological function of the molecular clock on bone remodeling. The results of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments both indicated that the rhythmic expression of Tnfrsf11b, which encodes osteoprotegerin (OPG, was regulated by Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also showed that REV-ERBα negatively regulated Tnfrsf11b as well as Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We systematically investigated the relationship between the sympathetic nervous system and the circadian clock in osteoblasts. The administration of phenylephrine, a nonspecific α1-adrenergic receptor (AR agonist, stimulated the expression of Tnfrsf11b, whereas the genetic ablation of α1B-AR signaling led to the alteration of Tnfrsf11b expression concomitant with Bmal1 and Per2 in bone. Thus, this study demonstrated that the circadian regulation of Tnfrsf11b was regulated by the clock genes encoding REV-ERBα (Nr1d1 and Bmal1 (Bmal1, also known as Arntl, which are components of the core loop of the circadian clock in osteoblasts.

  1. Food anticipation in Bmal1-/- and AAV-Bmal1 rescued mice: a reply to Fuller et al

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    Mistlberger Ralph E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evidence that circadian food-anticipatory activity and temperature rhythms are absent in Bmal1 knockout mice and rescued by restoration of Bmal1 expression selectively in the dorsomedial hypothalamus was published in 2008 by Fuller et al and critiqued in 2009 by Mistlberger et al. Fuller et al have responded to the critique with new information. Here we update our critique in the light of this new information. We also identify and correct factual and conceptual errors in the Fuller et al response. We conclude that the original results of Fuller et al remain inconclusive and fail to clarify the role of Bmal1 or the dorsomedial hypothalamus in the generation of food-entrainable rhythms in mice.

  2. Mapping the co-localization of the circadian proteins PER2 and BMAL1 with enkephalin and substance P throughout the rodent forebrain.

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    Ariana Frederick

    Full Text Available Despite rhythmic expression of clock genes being found throughout the central nervous system, very little is known about their function outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Determining the pattern of clock gene expression across neuronal subpopulations is a key step in understanding their regulation and how they may influence the functions of various brain structures. Using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, we quantified the co-expression of the clock proteins BMAL1 and PER2 with two neuropeptides, Substance P (SubP and Enkephalin (Enk, expressed in distinct neuronal populations throughout the forebrain. Regions examined included the limbic forebrain (dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, stria terminalis, thalamus medial habenula of the thalamus, paraventricular nucleus and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the olfactory bulb. In most regions examined, BMAL1 was homogeneously expressed in nearly all neurons (~90%, and PER2 was expressed in a slightly lower proportion of cells. There was no specific correlation to SubP- or Enk- expressing subpopulations. The olfactory bulb was unique in that PER2 and BMAL1 were expressed in a much smaller percentage of cells, and Enk was rarely found in the same cells that expressed the clock proteins (SubP was undetectable. These results indicate that clock genes are not unique to specific cell types, and further studies will be required to determine the factors that contribute to the regulation of clock gene expression throughout the brain.

  3. The Circadian Clock Gene BMAL1 Coordinates Intestinal RegenerationSummary

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    Kyle Stokes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The gastrointestinal syndrome is an illness of the intestine caused by high levels of radiation. It is characterized by extensive loss of epithelial tissue integrity, which initiates a regenerative response by intestinal stem and precursor cells. The intestine has 24-hour rhythms in many physiological functions that are believed to be outputs of the circadian clock: a molecular system that produces 24-hour rhythms in transcription/translation. Certain gastrointestinal illnesses are worsened when the circadian rhythms are disrupted, but the role of the circadian clock in gastrointestinal regeneration has not been studied. Methods: We tested the timing of regeneration in the mouse intestine during the gastrointestinal syndrome. The role of the circadian clock was tested genetically using the BMAL1 loss of function mouse mutant in vivo, and in vitro using intestinal organoid culture. Results: The proliferation of the intestinal epithelium follows a 24-hour rhythm during the gastrointestinal syndrome. The circadian clock runs in the intestinal epithelium during this pathologic state, and the loss of the core clock gene, BMAL1, disrupts both the circadian clock and rhythmic proliferation. Circadian activity in the intestine involves a rhythmic production of inflammatory cytokines and subsequent rhythmic activation of the JNK stress response pathway. Conclusions: Our results show that a circadian rhythm in inflammation and regeneration occurs during the gastrointestinal syndrome. The study and treatment of radiation-induced illnesses, and other gastrointestinal illnesses, should consider 24-hour timing in physiology and pathology. Keywords: Intestine, Circadian Rhythms, Gastrointestinal Syndrome, TNF, Intestinal Stem Cells

  4. Activation of MMPs in Macrophages by Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the miR-223-BMAL1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jun; Wang, Yongli; Zhang, Zhimin; Qiu, Weiqiang

    2017-12-01

    An interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and macrophages constitutes an essential step in tuberculosis development, as macrophages exert both positive and negative effects on M. tuberculosis-triggered organ lesions. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which is responsible for lung matrix degradation and bacteria dissection, in macrophages following M. tuberculosis infection. Female BALB/c mice were intravenously injected with the M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv at 0 h zeitgeber time (ZT0) or 12 h zeitgeber time (ZT12). The expression and activity of MMP-1, -2, -3, and -9 in lungs and spleens were then evaluated. In vitro, peritoneal macrophages were harvested at ZT0 or at ZT12 and infected with 10 MOI M. tuberculosis. The expression of MMPs, microRNA-223 and BMAL1 was analyzed by qRT-PCR and/or Western blot. The binding of BMAL1 3'-UTR by miR-223 was confirmed by luciferase activity assay. Additionally, wild-type BMAL1 or NLS mut BMAL1 plasmids were transfected to evaluate the effect of BMAL1 on MMPs. The results showed a differential expression of MMPs in mice tissues infected at different times. M. tuberculosis infection caused enhanced MMP-1, -9, and miR-223 expression, with inhibited BMAL1 expression. MiR-223 modulated BMAL1 expression via the direct binding of BMAL1 3'-UTR. Furthermore, wild-type BMAL1 other than NLS mut BMAL1 attenuated MMPs expression in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. Overall, this study demonstrated a potential involvement of circadian rhythm in MMP activation by M. tuberculosis in macrophages. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4804-4812, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Slow Conformational Switch in the BMAL1 Transactivation Domain Modulates Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Chelsea L; Parsley, Nicole C; Asimgil, Hande; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Ahlbach, Christopher; Michael, Alicia K; Xu, Haiyan; Williams, Owen L; Davis, Tara L; Liu, Andrew C; Partch, Carrie L

    2017-05-18

    The C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like 1) is a regulatory hub for transcriptional coactivators and repressors that compete for binding and, consequently, contributes to period determination of the mammalian circadian clock. Here, we report the discovery of two distinct conformational states that slowly exchange within the dynamic TAD to control timing. This binary switch results from cis/trans isomerization about a highly conserved Trp-Pro imide bond in a region of the TAD that is required for normal circadian timekeeping. Both cis and trans isomers interact with transcriptional regulators, suggesting that isomerization could serve a role in assembling regulatory complexes in vivo. Toward this end, we show that locking the switch into the trans isomer leads to shortened circadian periods. Furthermore, isomerization is regulated by the cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases, highlighting the potential for regulation of BMAL1 protein dynamics in period determination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Circadian regulation of myocardial sarcomeric Titin-cap (Tcap, telethonin: identification of cardiac clock-controlled genes using open access bioinformatics data.

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    Peter S Podobed

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important for healthy cardiovascular physiology and are regulated at the molecular level by a circadian clock mechanism. We and others previously demonstrated that 9-13% of the cardiac transcriptome is rhythmic over 24 h daily cycles; the heart is genetically a different organ day versus night. However, which rhythmic mRNAs are regulated by the circadian mechanism is not known. Here, we used open access bioinformatics databases to identify 94 transcripts with expression profiles characteristic of CLOCK and BMAL1 targeted genes, using the CircaDB website and JTK_Cycle. Moreover, 22 were highly expressed in the heart as determined by the BioGPS website. Furthermore, 5 heart-enriched genes had human/mouse conserved CLOCK:BMAL1 promoter binding sites (E-boxes, as determined by UCSC table browser, circadian mammalian promoter/enhancer database PEDB, and the European Bioinformatics Institute alignment tool (EMBOSS. Lastly, we validated findings by demonstrating that Titin cap (Tcap, telethonin was targeted by transcriptional activators CLOCK and BMAL1 by showing 1 Tcap mRNA and TCAP protein had a diurnal rhythm in murine heart; 2 cardiac Tcap mRNA was rhythmic in animals kept in constant darkness; 3 Tcap and control Per2 mRNA expression and cyclic amplitude were blunted in Clock(Δ19/Δ19 hearts; 4 BMAL1 bound to the Tcap promoter by ChIP assay; 5 BMAL1 bound to Tcap promoter E-boxes by biotinylated oligonucleotide assay; and 6 CLOCK and BMAL1 induced tcap expression by luciferase reporter assay. Thus this study identifies circadian regulated genes in silico, with validation of Tcap, a critical regulator of cardiac Z-disc sarcomeric structure and function.

  8. Clock Genes Influence Gene Expression in Growth Plate and Endochondral Ossification in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Takeshi; Kodama, Ayumi; Hotta, Shogo; Mieda, Michihiro; Shimba, Shigeki; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown transient promotion by parathyroid hormone of Period-1 (Per1) expression in cultured chondrocytes. Here we show the modulation by clock genes of chondrogenic differentiation through gene transactivation of the master regulator of chondrogenesis Indian hedgehog (IHH) in chondrocytes of the growth plate. Several clock genes were expressed with oscillatory rhythmicity in cultured chondrocytes and rib growth plate in mice, whereas chondrogenesis was markedly inhibited in stable transfectants of Per1 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells and in rib growth plate chondrocytes from mice deficient of brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (BMAL1). Ihh promoter activity was regulated by different clock gene products, with clear circadian rhythmicity in expression profiles of Ihh in the growth plate. In BMAL1-null mice, a predominant decrease was seen in Ihh expression in the growth plate with a smaller body size than in wild-type mice. BMAL1 deficit led to disruption of the rhythmic expression profiles of both Per1 and Ihh in the growth plate. A clear rhythmicity was seen with Ihh expression in ATDC5 cells exposed to dexamethasone. In young mice defective of BMAL1 exclusively in chondrocytes, similar abnormalities were found in bone growth and Ihh expression. These results suggest that endochondral ossification is under the regulation of particular clock gene products expressed in chondrocytes during postnatal skeletogenesis through a mechanism relevant to the rhythmic Ihh expression. PMID:22936800

  9. Role of type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in the regulation of Circadian Per1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungtae Na

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that regulate rhythmic physiological and behavioral changes to correspond to daily light-dark cycles. Molecular dissections have revealed that transcriptional feedback loops of the circadian clock genes drive the molecular oscillation, in which PER/CRY complexes inhibit the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer to constitute a negative feedback loop. In this study, we identified the type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 as an interacting molecule of CRY1. Although the Prmt5 gene was constitutively expressed, increased interaction of PRMT5 with CRY1 was observed when the Per1 gene was repressed both in synchronized mouse liver and NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, rhythmic recruitment of PRMT5 and CRY1 to the Per1 gene promoter was found to be associated with an increased level of histone H4R3 dimethylation and Per1 gene repression. Consistently, decreased histone H4R3 dimethylation and altered rhythmic Per1 gene expression were observed in Prmt5-depleted cells. Taken together, these findings provide an insight into the link between histone arginine methylation by PRMT5 and transcriptional regulation of the circadian Per1 gene.

  10. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja Kh; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Sieh, Weiva; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Vierkant, Robert A; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Thomsen, Lotte; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Palmieri Weber, Rachel; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Schernhammer, Eva; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Amankwah, Ernest; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Kelemen, Linda E; Ramus, Susan J; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Goode, Ellen L; Narod, Steven A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovaries where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant association was rs117104877 in BMAL1 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68-0.90, p = 5.59 × 10 -4 ]. Functional analysis revealed a significant down regulation of BMAL1 expression following cMYC overexpression and increasing transformation in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells as well as alternative splicing of BMAL1 exons in ovarian and granulosa cells. These results suggest that variation in circadian genes, and specifically BMAL1 , may be associated with risk of ovarian cancer, likely through disruption of hormonal pathways.

  11. Nascent-Seq reveals novel features of mouse circadian transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menet, Jerome S; Rodriguez, Joseph; Abruzzi, Katharine C; Rosbash, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the metazoan transcriptome undergoes circadian oscillations in many cells and tissues. Based on the transcription feedback loops important for circadian timekeeping, it is commonly assumed that this mRNA cycling reflects widespread transcriptional regulation. To address this issue, we directly measured the circadian dynamics of mouse liver transcription using Nascent-Seq (genome-wide sequencing of nascent RNA). Although many genes are rhythmically transcribed, many rhythmic mRNAs manifest poor transcriptional rhythms, indicating a prominent contribution of post-transcriptional regulation to circadian mRNA expression. This analysis of rhythmic transcription also showed that the rhythmic DNA binding profile of the transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1 does not determine the transcriptional phase of most target genes. This likely reflects gene-specific collaborations of CLK:BMAL1 with other transcription factors. These insights from Nascent-Seq indicate that it should have broad applicability to many other gene expression regulatory issues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00011.001 PMID:23150795

  12. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1 −/− A y /a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the Arnt

  13. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu, E-mail: yohta@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio, E-mail: tanizawa@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  14. Association of circadian rhythm genes ARNTL/BMAL1 and CLOCK with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Lavtar

    Full Text Available Prevalence of multiple sclerosis varies with geographic latitude. We hypothesized that this fact might be partially associated with the influence of latitude on circadian rhythm and consequently that genetic variability of key circadian rhythm regulators, ARNTL and CLOCK genes, might contribute to the risk for multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to analyse selected polymorphisms of ARNTL and CLOCK, and their association with multiple sclerosis. A total of 900 Caucasian patients and 1024 healthy controls were compared for genetic signature at 8 SNPs, 4 for each of both genes. We found a statistically significant difference in genotype (ARNTL rs3789327, P = 7.5·10-5; CLOCK rs6811520 P = 0.02 distributions in patients and controls. The ARNTL rs3789327 CC genotype was associated with higher risk for multiple sclerosis at an OR of 1.67 (95% CI 1.35-2.07, P = 0.0001 and the CLOCK rs6811520 genotype CC at an OR of 1.40 (95% CI 1.13-1.73, P = 0.002. The results of this study suggest that genetic variability in the ARNTL and CLOCK genes might be associated with risk for multiple sclerosis.

  15. Circadian rhythms regulate amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Seon, Yoon Ji; Mourão, Marcio A; Schnell, Santiago; Kim, Doohak; Harada, Hidemitsu; Papagerakis, Silvana; Papagerakis, Petros

    2013-07-01

    Ameloblasts, the cells responsible for making enamel, modify their morphological features in response to specialized functions necessary for synchronized ameloblast differentiation and enamel formation. Secretory and maturation ameloblasts are characterized by the expression of stage-specific genes which follows strictly controlled repetitive patterns. Circadian rhythms are recognized as key regulators of the development and diseases of many tissues including bone. Our aim was to gain novel insights on the role of clock genes in enamel formation and to explore the potential links between circadian rhythms and amelogenesis. Our data shows definitive evidence that the main clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) oscillate in ameloblasts at regular circadian (24 h) intervals both at RNA and protein levels. This study also reveals that the two markers of ameloblast differentiation i.e. amelogenin (Amelx; a marker of secretory stage ameloblasts) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (Klk4, a marker of maturation stage ameloblasts) are downstream targets of clock genes. Both, Amelx and Klk4 show 24h oscillatory expression patterns and their expression levels are up-regulated after Bmal1 over-expression in HAT-7 ameloblast cells. Taken together, these data suggest that both the secretory and the maturation stages of amelogenesis might be under circadian control. Changes in clock gene expression patterns might result in significant alterations of enamel apposition and mineralization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An essential role for the circadian-regulated gene nocturnin in osteogenesis: the importance of local timekeeping in skeletal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntur, Anyonya R; Kawai, Masanobu; Le, Phuong; Bouxsein, Mary L; Bornstein, Sheila; Green, Carla B; Rosen, Clifford J

    2011-11-01

    The role of circadian proteins in regulating whole-body metabolism and bone turnover has been studied in detail and has led to the discovery of an elemental system for timekeeping involving the core genes Clock, Bmal1, Per, and Cry. Nocturnin (Noc; Ccrn4l), a peripheral circadian-regulated gene has been shown to play a very important role in regulating adipogenesis by deadenylation of key mRNAs and intracytoplasmic transport of PPARγ. The role that it plays in osteogenesis has previously not been studied in detail. In this report we examined in vitro and in vivo osteogenesis in the presence and absence of Noc and show that loss of Noc enhances bone formation and can rescue rosiglitazone-induced bone loss in mice. The circadian rhythm of Noc is likely to be an essential element of marrow stromal cell fate. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Mechanisms of Breast Cancer in Shift Workers: DNA Methylation in Five Core Circadian Genes in Nurses Working Night Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulin Erdem, Johanna; Skare, Øivind; Petersen-Øverleir, Marte; Notø, Heidi Ødegaard; Lie, Jenny-Anne S; Reszka, Edyta; Pepłońska, Beata; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh

    2017-01-01

    Shift work has been suggested to be associated with breast cancer risk, and circadian disruption in shift workers is hypothesized as one of the mechanisms of increased cancer risk. There is, however, insufficient molecular evidence supporting this hypothesis. Using the quantitative methodology of pyrosequencing, epigenetic changes in 5-methyl cytosine (5mC) in five circadian genes CLOCK , BMAL1 , CRY1, PER1 and PER2 in female nurses working night shift work (278 breast cancer cases, 280 controls) were analyzed. In breast cancer cases, a medium exposure to night work was associated with increased methylation levels of the CLOCK (p=0.050), BMAL1 (p=0.001) and CRY1 (p=0.040) genes, compared with controls. Within the cases, analysis of the effects of shift work on the methylation patterns showed that methylation of CRY1 was lower in those who had worked night shift and had a high exposure (p=0.006) compared with cases that had worked only days. For cases with a medium exposure to night work, an increase in BMAL1 (p=0.003) and PER1 (p=0.035) methylation was observed compared with day working (unexposed) cases. The methylation levels of the five core circadian genes were also analyzed in relation to the estrogen and progesterone receptors status of the tumors in the cases, and no correlations were observed. Furthermore, nineteen polymorphisms in the five circadian genes were assessed for their effects on the methylation levels of the respective genes, but no associations were found. In summary, our data suggest that epigenetic regulation of CLOCK , BMAL1, CRY1 and PER1 may contribute to breast cancer in shift workers.

  18. Effect of monochromatic light on circadian rhythmic expression of clock genes in the hypothalamus of chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the effect of monochromatic light on circadian clock gene expression in chick hypothalamus, a total 240 newly hatched chickens were reared under blue light (BL), green light (GL), red light (RL) and white light (WL), respectively. On the post-hatched day 14, 24-h profiles of seven core clock genes (cClock, cBmal1, cBmal2, cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3) were measured at six time points (CT 0, CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, circadian time). We found all these clock genes expressed with a significant rhythmicity in different light wavelength groups. Meanwhile, cClock and cBmal1 showed a high level under GL, and followed a corresponding high expression of cCry1. However, RL decreased the expression levels of these genes. Be consistent with the mRNA level, CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins also showed a high level under GL. The CLOCK-like immunoreactive neurons were observed not only in the SCN, but also in the non-SCN brain region such as the nucleus anterior medialis hypothalami, the periventricularis nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus and the median eminence. All these results are consistent with the auto-regulatory circadian feedback loop, and indicate that GL may play an important role on the circadian time generation and development in the chick hypothalamus. Our results also suggest that the circadian clock in the chick hypothalamus such as non-SCN brain region were involved in the regulation of photo information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in pH and NADPH regulate the DNA binding activity of neuronal PAS domain protein 2, a mammalian circadian transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Katsuhiro; Tajima, Fumihisa; Ishijima, Sumio; Sagami, Ikuko

    2015-01-20

    Neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (NPAS2) is a core clock transcription factor that forms a heterodimer with BMAL1 to bind the E-box in the promoter of clock genes and is regulated by various environmental stimuli such as heme, carbon monoxide, and NAD(P)H. In this study, we investigated the effects of pH and NADPH on the DNA binding activity of NPAS2. In an electrophoretic mobility shift (EMS) assay, the pH of the reaction mixture affected the DNA binding activity of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer but not that of the BMAL1/BMAL1 homodimer. A change in pH from 7.0 to 7.5 resulted in a 1.7-fold increase in activity in the absence of NADPH, and NADPH additively enhanced the activity up to 2.7-fold at pH 7.5. The experiments using truncated mutants revealed that N-terminal amino acids 1-61 of NPAS2 were sufficient to sense the change in both pH and NADPH. We further analyzed the kinetics of formation and DNA binding of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer at various pH values. In the absence of NADPH, a change in pH from 6.5 to 8.0 decreased the KD(app) value of the E-box from 125 to 22 nM, with an 8-fold increase in the maximal level of DNA binding for the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer. The addition of NADPH resulted in a further decrease in KD(app) to 9 nM at pH 8.0. Furthermore, NPAS2-dependent transcriptional activity in a luciferase assay using NIH3T3 cells also increased with the pH of the culture medium. These results suggest that NPAS2 has a role as a pH and metabolite sensor in regulating circadian rhythms.

  20. Glucose Alters Per2 Rhythmicity Independent of AMPK, Whereas AMPK Inhibitor Compound C Causes Profound Repression of Clock Genes and AgRP in mHypoE-37 Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanneke E Oosterman

    Full Text Available Specific neurons in the hypothalamus are regulated by peripheral hormones and nutrients to maintain proper metabolic control. It is unclear if nutrients can directly control clock gene expression. We have therefore utilized the immortalized, hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-37, which exhibits robust circadian rhythms of core clock genes. mHypoE-37 neurons were exposed to 0.5 or 5.5 mM glucose, comparable to physiological levels in the brain. Per2 and Bmal1 mRNAs were assessed every 3 hours over 36 hours. Incubation with 5.5 mM glucose significantly shortened the period and delayed the phase of Per2 mRNA levels, but had no effect on Bmal1. Glucose had no significant effect on phospho-GSK3β, whereas AMPK phosphorylation was altered. Thus, the AMPK inhibitor Compound C was utilized, and mRNA levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cryptochrome1 (Cry1, agouti-related peptide (AgRP, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (Cpt1c, and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (Ogt were measured. Remarkably, Compound C dramatically reduced transcript levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cry1, and AgRP, but not Cpt1c or Ogt. Because AMPK was not inhibited at the same time or concentrations as the clock genes, we suggest that the effect of Compound C on gene expression occurs through an AMPK-independent mechanism. The consequences of inhibition of the rhythmic expression of clock genes, and in turn downstream metabolic mediators, such as AgRP, could have detrimental effects on overall metabolic processes. Importantly, the effects of the most commonly used AMPK inhibitor Compound C should be interpreted with caution, considering its role in AMPK-independent repression of specific genes, and especially clock gene rhythm dysregulation.

  1. Glucose Alters Per2 Rhythmicity Independent of AMPK, Whereas AMPK Inhibitor Compound C Causes Profound Repression of Clock Genes and AgRP in mHypoE-37 Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-01-01

    Specific neurons in the hypothalamus are regulated by peripheral hormones and nutrients to maintain proper metabolic control. It is unclear if nutrients can directly control clock gene expression. We have therefore utilized the immortalized, hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-37, which exhibits robust circadian rhythms of core clock genes. mHypoE-37 neurons were exposed to 0.5 or 5.5 mM glucose, comparable to physiological levels in the brain. Per2 and Bmal1 mRNAs were assessed every 3 hours over 36 hours. Incubation with 5.5 mM glucose significantly shortened the period and delayed the phase of Per2 mRNA levels, but had no effect on Bmal1. Glucose had no significant effect on phospho-GSK3β, whereas AMPK phosphorylation was altered. Thus, the AMPK inhibitor Compound C was utilized, and mRNA levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cryptochrome1 (Cry1), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (Cpt1c), and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (Ogt) were measured. Remarkably, Compound C dramatically reduced transcript levels of Per2, Bmal1, Cry1, and AgRP, but not Cpt1c or Ogt. Because AMPK was not inhibited at the same time or concentrations as the clock genes, we suggest that the effect of Compound C on gene expression occurs through an AMPK-independent mechanism. The consequences of inhibition of the rhythmic expression of clock genes, and in turn downstream metabolic mediators, such as AgRP, could have detrimental effects on overall metabolic processes. Importantly, the effects of the most commonly used AMPK inhibitor Compound C should be interpreted with caution, considering its role in AMPK-independent repression of specific genes, and especially clock gene rhythm dysregulation.

  2. Astakine 2--the dark knight linking melatonin to circadian regulation in crustaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiruck Watthanasurorot

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Daily, circadian rhythms influence essentially all living organisms and affect many physiological processes from sleep and nutrition to immunity. This ability to respond to environmental daily rhythms has been conserved along evolution, and it is found among species from bacteria to mammals. The hematopoietic process of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus is under circadian control and is tightly regulated by astakines, a new family of cytokines sharing a prokineticin (PROK domain. The expression of AST1 and AST2 are light-dependent, and this suggests an evolutionarily conserved function for PROK domain proteins in mediating circadian rhythms. Vertebrate PROKs are transmitters of circadian rhythms of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN in the brain of mammals, but the mechanism by which they function is unknown. Here we demonstrate that high AST2 expression is induced by melatonin in the brain. We identify RACK1 as a binding protein of AST2 and further provide evidence that a complex between AST2 and RACK1 functions as a negative-feedback regulator of the circadian clock. By DNA mobility shift assay, we showed that the AST2-RACK1 complex will interfere with the binding between BMAL1 and CLK and inhibit the E-box binding activity of the complex BMAL1-CLK. Finally, we demonstrate by gene knockdown that AST2 is necessary for melatonin-induced inhibition of the complex formation between BMAL1 and CLK during the dark period. In summary, we provide evidence that melatonin regulates AST2 expression and thereby affects the core clock of the crustacean brain. This process may be very important in all animals that have AST2 molecules, i.e. spiders, ticks, crustaceans, scorpions, several insect groups such as Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Blattodea, but not Diptera and Coleoptera. Our findings further reveal an ancient evolutionary role for the prokineticin superfamily protein that links melatonin to direct regulation of the core clock gene feedback loops.

  3. Glucocorticoids affect 24 h clock genes expression in human adipose tissue explant cultures.

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    Purificación Gómez-Abellán

    Full Text Available to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V and subcutaneous (S adipose tissue (AT in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX on positive and negative clock genes expression.VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2 (n = 6. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR.CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements in the SAT (situation not present in VAT. A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues.24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements and PER2 (negative element mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure.

  4. Magel2, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene, modulates the activities of circadian rhythm proteins in cultured cells

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    Devos Julia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Magel2 gene is most highly expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, where its expression cycles in a circadian pattern comparable to that of clock-controlled genes. Mice lacking the Magel2 gene have hypothalamic dysfunction, including circadian defects that include reduced and fragmented total activity, excessive activity during the subjective day, but they have a normal circadian period. Magel2 is a member of the MAGE family of proteins that have various roles in cellular function, but the specific function of Magel2 is unknown. Methods We used a variety of cell-based assays to determine whether Magel2 modifies the properties of core circadian rhythm proteins. Results Magel2 represses the activity of the Clock:Bmal1 heterodimer in a Per2-luciferase assay. Magel2 interacts with Bmal1 and with Per2 as measured by co-immunoprecipitation in co-transfected cells, and exhibits a subcellular distribution consistent with these interactions when visualized by immunofluorescence. As well, Magel2 induces the redistribution of the subcellular localization of Clock towards the cytoplasm, in contrast to the nucleus-directed effect of Bmal1 on Clock subcellular localization. Conclusion Consistent with the blunted circadian rhythm observed in Magel2-null mice, these data suggest that Magel2 normally promotes negative feedback regulation of the cellular circadian cycle, through interactions with key core circadian rhythm proteins.

  5. Circadian rhythmicity of active GSK3 isoforms modulates molecular clock gene rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besing, Rachel C; Paul, Jodi R; Hablitz, Lauren M; Rogers, Courtney O; Johnson, Russell L; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprising clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least 5 core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for 2 weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 µM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Night-time restricted feeding normalises clock genes and Pai-1 gene expression in the db/db mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, T; Akiyama, M; Kuriyama, K; Sudo, M; Moriya, T; Shibata, S

    2004-08-01

    An increase in PAI-1 activity is thought to be a key factor underlying myocardial infarction. Mouse Pai-1 (mPai-1) activity shows a daily rhythm in vivo, and its transcription seems to be controlled not only by clock genes but also by humoral factors such as insulin and triglycerides. Thus, we investigated daily clock genes and mPai-1 mRNA expression in the liver of db/db mice exhibiting high levels of glucose, insulin and triglycerides. Locomotor activity was measured using an infrared detection system. RT-PCR or in situ hybridisation methods were applied to measure gene expression. Humoral factors were measured using measurement kits. The db/ db mice showed attenuated locomotor activity rhythms. The rhythmic expression of mPer2 mRNA was severely diminished and the phase of mBmal1 oscillation was advanced in the db/db mouse liver, whereas mPai-1 mRNA was highly and constitutively expressed. Night-time restricted feeding led to a recovery not only from the diminished locomotor activity, but also from the diminished Per2 and advanced mBmal1 mRNA rhythms. Expression of mPai-1 mRNA in db/db mice was reduced to levels far below normal. Pioglitazone treatment slightly normalised glucose and insulin levels, with a slight reduction in mPai-1 gene expression. We demonstrated that Type 2 diabetes impairs the oscillation of the peripheral oscillator. Night-time restricted feeding rather than pioglitazone injection led to a recovery from the diminished locomotor activity, and altered oscillation of the peripheral clock and mPai-1 mRNA rhythm. Thus, we conclude that scheduled restricted food intake may be a useful form of treatment for diabetes.

  7. Class IIa histone deacetylases are conserved regulators of circadian function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Paul C M; O'Neill, John S; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C; McIntosh, Rebecca L L; Elliott, Christopher J H; Sweeney, Sean T; Hastings, Michael H; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-12-05

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca(2+) and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. No Escaping the Rat Race: Simulated Night Shift Work Alters the Time-of-Day Variation in BMAL1 Translational Activity in the Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Andrea R; Patil, Sudarshan; Mrdalj, Jelena; Meerlo, Peter; Skrede, Silje; Pallesen, Ståle; Pedersen, Torhild T; Bramham, Clive R; Grønli, Janne

    2017-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide work during the night, resulting in disturbed circadian rhythms and sleep loss. This may cause deficits in cognitive functions, impaired alertness and increased risk of errors and accidents. Disturbed circadian rhythmicity resulting from night shift work could impair brain function and cognition through disrupted synthesis of proteins involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function. Recently, the circadian transcription factor brain-and-muscle arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1) has been identified as a promoter of mRNA translation initiation, the most highly regulated step in protein synthesis, through binding to the mRNA "cap". In this study we investigated the effects of simulated shift work on protein synthesis markers. Male rats ( n = 40) were exposed to forced activity, either in their rest phase (simulated night shift work) or in their active phase (simulated day shift work) for 3 days. Following the third work shift, experimental animals and time-matched undisturbed controls were euthanized (rest work at ZT12; active work at ZT0). Tissue lysates from two brain regions (prefrontal cortex, PFC and hippocampus) implicated in cognition and sleep loss, were analyzed with m 7 GTP (cap) pull-down to examine time-of-day variation and effects of simulated shift work on cap-bound protein translation. The results show time-of-day variation of protein synthesis markers in PFC, with increased protein synthesis at ZT12. In the hippocampus there was little difference between ZT0 and ZT12. Active phase work did not induce statistically significant changes in protein synthesis markers at ZT0 compared to time-matched undisturbed controls. Rest work, however, resulted in distinct brain-region specific changes of protein synthesis markers compared to time-matched controls at ZT12. While no changes were observed in the hippocampus, phosphorylation of cap-bound BMAL1 and its regulator S6 kinase beta-1 (S6K1) was significantly reduced in the PFC

  9. No Escaping the Rat Race: Simulated Night Shift Work Alters the Time-of-Day Variation in BMAL1 Translational Activity in the Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Marti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people worldwide work during the night, resulting in disturbed circadian rhythms and sleep loss. This may cause deficits in cognitive functions, impaired alertness and increased risk of errors and accidents. Disturbed circadian rhythmicity resulting from night shift work could impair brain function and cognition through disrupted synthesis of proteins involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function. Recently, the circadian transcription factor brain-and-muscle arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1 has been identified as a promoter of mRNA translation initiation, the most highly regulated step in protein synthesis, through binding to the mRNA “cap”. In this study we investigated the effects of simulated shift work on protein synthesis markers. Male rats (n = 40 were exposed to forced activity, either in their rest phase (simulated night shift work or in their active phase (simulated day shift work for 3 days. Following the third work shift, experimental animals and time-matched undisturbed controls were euthanized (rest work at ZT12; active work at ZT0. Tissue lysates from two brain regions (prefrontal cortex, PFC and hippocampus implicated in cognition and sleep loss, were analyzed with m7GTP (cap pull-down to examine time-of-day variation and effects of simulated shift work on cap-bound protein translation. The results show time-of-day variation of protein synthesis markers in PFC, with increased protein synthesis at ZT12. In the hippocampus there was little difference between ZT0 and ZT12. Active phase work did not induce statistically significant changes in protein synthesis markers at ZT0 compared to time-matched undisturbed controls. Rest work, however, resulted in distinct brain-region specific changes of protein synthesis markers compared to time-matched controls at ZT12. While no changes were observed in the hippocampus, phosphorylation of cap-bound BMAL1 and its regulator S6 kinase beta-1 (S6K1 was significantly reduced in

  10. Evidence for an Overlapping Role of CLOCK and NPAS2 Transcription Factors in Liver Circadian Oscillators▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolucci, Cristiano; Cavallari, Nicola; Colognesi, Ilaria; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Chen, Zheng; Caruso, Pierpaolo; Foá, Augusto; Tosini, Gianluca; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the circadian control of gene expression in peripheral tissues and influencing many biological pathways are poorly defined. Factor VII (FVII), the protease triggering blood coagulation, represents a valuable model to address this issue in liver since its plasma levels oscillate in a circadian manner and its promoter contains E-boxes, which are putative DNA-binding sites for CLOCK-BMAL1 and NPAS2-BMAL1 heterodimers and hallmarks of circadian regulation. The peaks of FVII mRNA levels in livers of wild-type mice preceded those in plasma, indicating a transcriptional regulation, and were abolished in Clock−/−; Npas2−/− mice, thus demonstrating a role for CLOCK and NPAS2 circadian transcription factors. The investigation of Npas2−/− and ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice, which express functionally defective heterodimers, revealed robust rhythms of FVII expression in both animal models, suggesting a redundant role for NPAS2 and CLOCK. The molecular bases of these observations were established through reporter gene assays. FVII transactivation activities of the NPAS2-BMAL1 and CLOCK-BMAL1 heterodimers were (i) comparable (a fourfold increase), (ii) dampened by the negative circadian regulators PER2 and CRY1, and (iii) abolished upon E-box mutagenesis. Our data provide the first evidence in peripheral oscillators for an overlapping role of CLOCK and NPAS2 in the regulation of circadianly controlled genes. PMID:18316400

  11. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Somik [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yin, Hongshan [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Third Affiliated Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050051, Hebei (China); Nam, Deokhwa [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Li, Yong [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ma, Ke, E-mail: kma@houstonmethodist.org [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  12. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1 −/− mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation

  13. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-07-13

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes.

  14. RNAi-Based Identification of Gene-Specific Nuclear Cofactor Networks Regulating Interleukin-1 Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Meier-Soelch

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The potent proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-1 triggers gene expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the cofactor requirements of strongly regulated IL-1 target genes whose expression is impaired in p65 NF-κB-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts. By two independent small-hairpin (shRNA screens, we examined 170 genes annotated to encode nuclear cofactors for their role in Cxcl2 mRNA expression and identified 22 factors that modulated basal or IL-1-inducible Cxcl2 levels. The functions of 16 of these factors were validated for Cxcl2 and further analyzed for their role in regulation of 10 additional IL-1 target genes by RT-qPCR. These data reveal that each inducible gene has its own (quantitative requirement of cofactors to maintain basal levels and to respond to IL-1. Twelve factors (Epc1, H2afz, Kdm2b, Kdm6a, Mbd3, Mta2, Phf21a, Ruvbl1, Sin3b, Suv420h1, Taf1, and Ube3a have not been previously implicated in inflammatory cytokine functions. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that they are components of complex nuclear protein networks that regulate chromatin functions and gene transcription. Collectively, these data suggest that downstream from the essential NF-κB signal each cytokine-inducible target gene has further subtle requirements for individual sets of nuclear cofactors that shape its transcriptional activation profile.

  15. Increased Sensitivity of the Circadian System to Temporal Changes in the Feeding Regime of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats - A Potential Role for Bmal2 in the Liver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Sládek, Martin; Nováková, Marta; Parkanová, Daniela; Sumová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 9 (2013), e75690 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian * clock gene * metabolism * liver * feeding regime * Bmal2 * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  16. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Lippert

    Full Text Available From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC. Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT. Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH.

  17. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Julian; Halfter, Hartmut; Heidbreder, Anna; Röhr, Dominik; Gess, Burkhard; Boentert, Mathias; Osada, Nani; Young, Peter

    2014-01-01

    From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH) in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC). Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG) and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH.

  18. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsky, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  19. Acute Sleep Loss Induces Tissue-Specific Epigenetic and Transcriptional Alterations to Circadian Clock Genes in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Osler, Megan E; Voisin, Sarah; Broman, Jan-Erik; Vogel, Heike; Dickson, Suzanne L; Zierath, Juleen R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Shift workers are at increased risk of metabolic morbidities. Clock genes are known to regulate metabolic processes in peripheral tissues, eg, glucose oxidation. This study aimed to investigate how clock genes are affected at the epigenetic and transcriptional level in peripheral human tissues following acute total sleep deprivation (TSD), mimicking shift work with extended wakefulness. In a randomized, two-period, two-condition, crossover clinical study, 15 healthy men underwent two experimental sessions: x sleep (2230-0700 h) and overnight wakefulness. On the subsequent morning, serum cortisol was measured, followed by skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies for DNA methylation and gene expression analyses of core clock genes (BMAL1, CLOCK, CRY1, PER1). Finally, baseline and 2-h post-oral glucose load plasma glucose concentrations were determined. In adipose tissue, acute sleep deprivation vs sleep increased methylation in the promoter of CRY1 (+4%; P = .026) and in two promoter-interacting enhancer regions of PER1 (+15%; P = .036; +9%; P = .026). In skeletal muscle, TSD vs sleep decreased gene expression of BMAL1 (-18%; P = .033) and CRY1 (-22%; P = .047). Concentrations of serum cortisol, which can reset peripheral tissue clocks, were decreased (2449 ± 932 vs 3178 ± 723 nmol/L; P = .039), whereas postprandial plasma glucose concentrations were elevated after TSD (7.77 ± 1.63 vs 6.59 ± 1.32 mmol/L; P = .011). Our findings demonstrate that a single night of wakefulness can alter the epigenetic and transcriptional profile of core circadian clock genes in key metabolic tissues. Tissue-specific clock alterations could explain why shift work may disrupt metabolic integrity as observed herein.

  20. Regulation of human protein S gene (PROS1) transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Cornelia de

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of the transcriptional regulation of the gene for anticoagulant plasma Protein S, PROS1. Protein S is a cofactor for Protein C in the Protein C anticoagulant pathway. The coagulation cascade is negatively regulated by this pathway through inactivation of

  1. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the HMGA1 gene by octamer-binding proteins Oct-1 and Oct-2.

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    Eusebio Chiefari

    Full Text Available The High-Mobility Group AT-Hook 1 (HMGA1 protein is an architectural transcription factor that binds to AT-rich sequences in the promoter region of DNA and functions as a specific cofactor for gene activation. Previously, we demonstrated that HMGA1 is a key regulator of the insulin receptor (INSR gene and an important downstream target of the INSR signaling cascade. Moreover, from a pathogenic point of view, overexpression of HMGA1 has been associated with human cancer, whereas functional variants of the HMGA1 gene have been recently linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. However, despite of this biological and pathological relevance, the mechanisms that control HMGA1 gene expression remain unknown. In this study, to define the molecular mechanism(s that regulate HMGA1 gene expression, the HMGA1 gene promoter was investigated by transient transfection of different cell lines, either before or after DNA and siRNA cotransfections. An octamer motif was identified as an important element of transcriptional regulation of this gene, the interaction of which with the octamer transcription factors Oct-1 and Oct-2 is crucial in modulating HMGA1 gene and protein expression. Additionally, we demonstrate that HMGA1 binds its own promoter and contributes to its transactivation by Oct-2 (but not Oct-1, supporting its role in an auto-regulatory circuit. Overall, our results provide insight into the transcriptional regulation of the HMGA1 gene, revealing a differential control exerted by both Oct-1 and Oct-2. Furthermore, they consistently support the hypothesis that a putative defect in Oct-1 and/or Oct-2, by affecting HMGA1 expression, may cause INSR dysfunction, leading to defects of the INSR signaling pathway.

  3. Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

    2000-02-01

    Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

  4. Genetic Disruption of Circadian Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Causes Helplessness, Behavioral Despair, and Anxiety-like Behavior in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Dominic; Long, Jaimie E.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Barandas, Rita; Malinow, Roberto; Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. To investigate the causal relationship between mood disorders and circadian clock disruption, previous studies in animal models have employed light/dark manipulations, global mutations of clock genes, or brain area lesions. However, light can impact mood by noncircadian mechanisms; clock genes have pleiotropic, clock-independent functions; and brain lesions not only disrupt cellular circadian rhythms but also destroy cells and eliminate important neuronal connections, including light reception pathways. Thus, a definitive causal role for functioning circadian clocks in mood regulation has not been established. Methods We stereotactically injected viral vectors encoding short hairpin RNA to knock down expression of the essential clock gene Bmal1 into the brain's master circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Results In these SCN-specific Bmal1-knockdown (SCN-Bmal1-KD) mice, circadian rhythms were greatly attenuated in the SCN, while the mice were maintained in a standard light/dark cycle, SCN neurons remained intact, and neuronal connections were undisturbed, including photic inputs. In the learned helplessness paradigm, the SCN-Bmal1-KD mice were slower to escape, even before exposure to inescapable stress. They also spent more time immobile in the tail suspension test and less time in the lighted section of a light/dark box. The SCN-Bmal1-KD mice also showed greater weight gain, an abnormal circadian pattern of corticosterone, and an attenuated increase of corticosterone in response to stress. Conclusions Disrupting SCN circadian rhythms is sufficient to cause helplessness, behavioral despair, and anxiety-like behavior in mice, establishing SCN-Bmal1-KD mice as a new animal model of depression. PMID:27113500

  5. Genetic Disruption of Circadian Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Causes Helplessness, Behavioral Despair, and Anxiety-like Behavior in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Dominic; Long, Jaimie E; Proulx, Christophe D; Barandas, Rita; Malinow, Roberto; Welsh, David K

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. To investigate the causal relationship between mood disorders and circadian clock disruption, previous studies in animal models have employed light/dark manipulations, global mutations of clock genes, or brain area lesions. However, light can impact mood by noncircadian mechanisms; clock genes have pleiotropic, clock-independent functions; and brain lesions not only disrupt cellular circadian rhythms but also destroy cells and eliminate important neuronal connections, including light reception pathways. Thus, a definitive causal role for functioning circadian clocks in mood regulation has not been established. We stereotactically injected viral vectors encoding short hairpin RNA to knock down expression of the essential clock gene Bmal1 into the brain's master circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In these SCN-specific Bmal1-knockdown (SCN-Bmal1-KD) mice, circadian rhythms were greatly attenuated in the SCN, while the mice were maintained in a standard light/dark cycle, SCN neurons remained intact, and neuronal connections were undisturbed, including photic inputs. In the learned helplessness paradigm, the SCN-Bmal1-KD mice were slower to escape, even before exposure to inescapable stress. They also spent more time immobile in the tail suspension test and less time in the lighted section of a light/dark box. The SCN-Bmal1-KD mice also showed greater weight gain, an abnormal circadian pattern of corticosterone, and an attenuated increase of corticosterone in response to stress. Disrupting SCN circadian rhythms is sufficient to cause helplessness, behavioral despair, and anxiety-like behavior in mice, establishing SCN-Bmal1-KD mice as a new animal model of depression. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  6. Medicago truncatula SOC1 Genes Are Up-regulated by Environmental Cues That Promote Flowering

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    Jared B. Fudge

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Like Arabidopsis thaliana, the flowering of the legume Medicago truncatula is promoted by long day (LD photoperiod and vernalization. However, there are differences in the molecular mechanisms involved, with orthologs of two key Arabidopsis thaliana regulators, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC and CONSTANS (CO, being absent or not having a role in flowering time function in Medicago. In Arabidopsis, the MADS-box transcription factor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (AtSOC1, plays a key role in integrating the photoperiodic and vernalization pathways. In this study, we set out to investigate whether the Medicago SOC1 genes play a role in regulating flowering time. Three Medicago SOC1 genes were identified and characterized (MtSOC1a–MtSOC1c. All three MtSOC1 genes, when heterologously expressed, were able to promote earlier flowering of the late-flowering Arabidopsis soc1-2 mutant. The three MtSOC1 genes have different patterns of expression. However, consistent with a potential role in flowering time regulation, all three MtSOC1 genes are expressed in the shoot apex and are up-regulated in the shoot apex of plants in response to LD photoperiods and vernalization. The up-regulation of MtSOC1 genes was reduced in Medicago fta1-1 mutants, indicating that they are downstream of MtFTa1. Insertion mutant alleles of Medicago soc1b do not flower late, suggestive of functional redundancy among Medicago SOC1 genes in promoting flowering.

  7. Identification of Plagl1/Zac1 binding sites and target genes establishes its role in the regulation of extracellular matrix genes and the imprinted gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrault, Annie; Dantec, Christelle; Le Digarcher, Anne; Chotard, Laëtitia; Bilanges, Benoit; Parrinello, Hugues; Dubois, Emeric; Rialle, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Bouschet, Tristan; Journot, Laurent

    2017-10-13

    PLAGL1/ZAC1 undergoes parental genomic imprinting, is paternally expressed, and is a member of the imprinted gene network (IGN). It encodes a zinc finger transcription factor with anti-proliferative activity and is a candidate tumor suppressor gene on 6q24 whose expression is frequently lost in various neoplasms. Conversely, gain of PLAGL1 function is responsible for transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, a rare genetic disease that results from defective pancreas development. In the present work, we showed that Plagl1 up-regulation was not associated with DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest. It was rather associated with physiological cell cycle exit that occurred with contact inhibition, growth factor withdrawal, or cell differentiation. To gain insights into Plagl1 mechanism of action, we identified Plagl1 target genes by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome-wide transcriptomics in transfected cell lines. Plagl1-elicited gene regulation correlated with multiple binding to the proximal promoter region through a GC-rich motif. Plagl1 target genes included numerous genes involved in signaling, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix composition, including collagens. Plagl1 targets also included 22% of the 409 genes that make up the IGN. Altogether, this work identified Plagl1 as a transcription factor that coordinated the regulation of a subset of IGN genes and controlled extracellular matrix composition. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. The ULT1 and ULT2 trxG genes play overlapping roles in Arabidopsis development and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Mona M; Carles, Cristel C; Rossignol, Pascale; Pires, Helena R; Fletcher, Jennifer C

    2013-09-01

    The epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical for ensuring the proper deployment and stability of defined genome transcription programs at specific developmental stages. The cellular memory of stable gene expression states during animal and plant development is mediated by the opposing activities of Polycomb group (PcG) factors and trithorax group (trxG) factors. Yet, despite their importance, only a few trxG factors have been characterized in plants and their roles in regulating plant development are poorly defined. In this work, we report that the closely related Arabidopsis trxG genes ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) and ULT2 have overlapping functions in regulating shoot and floral stem cell accumulation, with ULT1 playing a major role but ULT2 also making a minor contribution. The two genes also have a novel, redundant activity in establishing the apical–basal polarity axis of the gynoecium, indicating that they function in differentiating tissues. Like ULT1 proteins, ULT2 proteins have a dual nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, and the two proteins physically associate in planta. Finally, we demonstrate that ULT1 and ULT2 have very similar overexpression phenotypes and regulate a common set of key development target genes, including floral MADS-box genes and class I KNOX genes. Our results reveal that chromatin remodeling mediated by the ULT1 and ULT2 proteins is necessary to control the development of meristems and reproductive organs. They also suggest that, like their animal counterparts, plant trxG proteins may function in multi-protein complexes to up-regulate the expression of key stage- and tissue-specific developmental regulatory genes.

  9. Detection of genes regulated by Lmx1b during limb dorsalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenstra, Jennifer M; Kanaya, Kohei; Pira, Charmaine U; Hoffman, Sarah E; Eppey, Richard J; Oberg, Kerby C

    2012-05-01

    Lmx1b is a homeodomain transcription factor that regulates dorsal identity during limb development. Lmx1b knockout (KO) mice develop distal ventral-ventral limbs. Although induction of Lmx1b is linked to Wnt7a expression in the dorsal limb ectoderm, the downstream targets of Lmx1b that accomplish limb dorsalization are unknown. To identify genes targeted by Lmx1b, we compared gene arrays from Lmx1b KO and wild type mouse limbs during limb dorsalization, i.e., 11.5, 12.5, and 13.5 days post coitum. We identified 54 target genes that were differentially expressed in all three stages. Several skeletal targets, including Emx2, Matrilin1 and Matrilin4, demonstrated a loss of scapular expression in the Lmx1b KO mice, supporting a role for Lmx1b in scapula development. Furthermore, the relative abundance of extracellular matrix-related soft tissue targets regulated by Lmx1b, such as collagens and proteoglycans, suggests a mechanism that includes changes in the extracellular matrix composition to accomplish limb dorsalization. Our study provides the most comprehensive characterization of genes regulated by Lmx1b during limb development to-date and provides targets for further investigation. © 2012 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2012 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  10. Regulation of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 and isochorismate synthase gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia J R Hunter

    Full Text Available RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs function in anti-viral silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants. Salicylic acid (SA, an important defensive signal, increases RDR1 gene expression, suggesting that RDR1 contributes to SA-induced virus resistance. In Nicotiana attenuata RDR1 also regulates plant-insect interactions and is induced by another important signal, jasmonic acid (JA. Despite its importance in defense RDR1 regulation has not been investigated in detail.In Arabidopsis, SA-induced RDR1 expression was dependent on 'NON-EXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1', indicating regulation involves the same mechanism controlling many other SA- defense-related genes, including pathogenesis-related 1 (PR1. Isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1 is required for SA biosynthesis. In defensive signal transduction RDR1 lies downstream of ICS1. However, supplying exogenous SA to ics1-mutant plants did not induce RDR1 or PR1 expression to the same extent as seen in wild type plants. Analysing ICS1 gene expression using transgenic plants expressing ICS1 promoter:reporter gene (β-glucuronidase constructs and by measuring steady-state ICS1 transcript levels showed that SA positively regulates ICS1. In contrast, ICS2, which is expressed at lower levels than ICS1, is unaffected by SA. The wound-response hormone JA affects expression of Arabidopsis RDR1 but jasmonate-induced expression is independent of CORONATINE-INSENSITIVE 1, which conditions expression of many other JA-responsive genes. Transiently increased RDR1 expression following tobacco mosaic virus inoculation was due to wounding and was not a direct effect of infection. RDR1 gene expression was induced by ethylene and by abscisic acid (an important regulator of drought resistance. However, rdr1-mutant plants showed normal responses to drought.RDR1 is regulated by a much broader range of phytohormones than previously thought, indicating that it plays roles beyond those already suggested in virus

  11. Circadian rhythm genes mediate fenvalerate-induced inhibition of testosterone synthesis in mouse Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yichen; Shen, Ouxi; Han, Jingjing; Duan, Hongyu; Yang, Siyuan; Zhu, Zhenghong; Tong, Jian; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Fenvalerate (Fen), a widely used pesticide, is known to impair male reproductive functions by mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. Recent studies indicated that circadian clock genes may play an important role in successful male reproduction. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Fen on circadian clock genes involved in the biosynthesis of testosterone using TM3 cells derived from mouse Leydig cells. Data demonstrated that the circadian rhythm of testosterone synthesis in TM3 cells was disturbed following Fen treatment as evidenced by changes in the circadian rhythmicity of core clock genes (Bmal1, Rev-erbα, Rorα). Further, the observed altered rhythms were accompanied by increased intracellular Ca 2+ levels and modified steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) mRNA expression. Thus, data suggested that Fen inhibits testosterone synthesis via pathways involving intracellular Ca 2+ and clock genes (Bmal1, Rev-Erbα, Rorα) as well as StAR mRNA expression in TM3 cells.

  12. The ASK1 gene regulates B function gene expression in cooperation with UFO and LEAFY in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D; Yu, Q; Chen, M; Ma, H

    2001-07-01

    The Arabidopsis floral regulatory genes APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) are required for the B function according to the ABC model for floral organ identity. AP3 and PI expression are positively regulated by the LEAFY (LFY) and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) genes. UFO encodes an F-box protein, and we have shown previously that UFO genetically interacts with the ASK1 gene encoding a SKP1 homologue; both the F-box containing protein and SKP1 are subunits of ubiquitin ligases. We show here that the ask1-1 mutation can enhance the floral phenotypes of weak lfy and ap3 mutants; therefore, like UFO, ASK1 also interacts with LFY and AP3 genetically. Furthermore, our results from RNA in situ hybridizations indicate that ASK1 regulates early AP3 and PI expression. These results support the idea that UFO and ASK1 together positively regulate AP3 and PI expression. We propose that the UFO and ASK1 proteins are components of a ubiquitin ligase that mediates the proteolysis of a repressor of AP3 and PI expression. Our genetic studies also indicate that ASK1 and UFO play a role in regulating the number of floral organ primordia, and we discuss possible mechanisms for such a regulation.

  13. Tight regulation of the intS gene of the KplE1 prophage: a new paradigm for integrase gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Panis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperate phages have the ability to maintain their genome in their host, a process called lysogeny. For most, passive replication of the phage genome relies on integration into the host's chromosome and becoming a prophage. Prophages remain silent in the absence of stress and replicate passively within their host genome. However, when stressful conditions occur, a prophage excises itself and resumes the viral cycle. Integration and excision of phage genomes are mediated by regulated site-specific recombination catalyzed by tyrosine and serine recombinases. In the KplE1 prophage, site-specific recombination is mediated by the IntS integrase and the TorI recombination directionality factor (RDF. We previously described a sub-family of temperate phages that is characterized by an unusual organization of the recombination module. Consequently, the attL recombination region overlaps with the integrase promoter, and the integrase and RDF genes do not share a common activated promoter upon lytic induction as in the lambda prophage. In this study, we show that the intS gene is tightly regulated by its own product as well as by the TorI RDF protein. In silico analysis revealed that overlap of the attL region with the integrase promoter is widely encountered in prophages present in prokaryotic genomes, suggesting a general occurrence of negatively autoregulated integrase genes. The prediction that these integrase genes are negatively autoregulated was biologically assessed by studying the regulation of several integrase genes from two different Escherichia coli strains. Our results suggest that the majority of tRNA-associated integrase genes in prokaryotic genomes could be autoregulated and that this might be correlated with the recombination efficiency as in KplE1. The consequences of this unprecedented regulation for excessive recombination are discussed.

  14. SUMOylation of the ING1b tumor suppressor regulates gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satpathy, Shankha; Guérillon, Claire; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2014-01-01

    members of histone deacetylase complexes, whereas ING3-5 are stoichiometric components of different histone acetyltransferase complexes. The INGs target these complexes to histone marks, thus acting as epigenetic regulators. ING proteins affect angiogenesis, apoptosis, DNA repair, metastasis......1b E195A), we further demonstrate that ING1b SUMOylation regulates the binding of ING1b to the ISG15 and DGCR8 promoters, consequently regulating ISG15 and DGCR8 transcription. These results suggest a role for ING1b SUMOylation in the regulation of gene transcription....

  15. Genome wide gene expression regulation by HIP1 Protein Interactor, HIPPI: Prediction and validation

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    Lahiri Ansuman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIP1 Protein Interactor (HIPPI is a pro-apoptotic protein that induces Caspase8 mediated apoptosis in cell. We have shown earlier that HIPPI could interact with a specific 9 bp sequence motif, defined as the HIPPI binding site (HBS, present in the upstream promoter of Caspase1 gene and regulate its expression. We also have shown that HIPPI, without any known nuclear localization signal, could be transported to the nucleus by HIP1, a NLS containing nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein. Thus our present work aims at the investigation of the role of HIPPI as a global transcription regulator. Results We carried out genome wide search for the presence of HBS in the upstream sequences of genes. Our result suggests that HBS was predominantly located within 2 Kb upstream from transcription start site. Transcription factors like CREBP1, TBP, OCT1, EVI1 and P53 half site were significantly enriched in the 100 bp vicinity of HBS indicating that they might co-operate with HIPPI for transcription regulation. To illustrate the role of HIPPI on transcriptome, we performed gene expression profiling by microarray. Exogenous expression of HIPPI in HeLa cells resulted in up-regulation of 580 genes (p HIP1 was knocked down. HIPPI-P53 interaction was necessary for HIPPI mediated up-regulation of Caspase1 gene. Finally, we analyzed published microarray data obtained with post mortem brains of Huntington's disease (HD patients to investigate the possible involvement of HIPPI in HD pathogenesis. We observed that along with the transcription factors like CREB, P300, SREBP1, Sp1 etc. which are already known to be involved in HD, HIPPI binding site was also significantly over-represented in the upstream sequences of genes altered in HD. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that HIPPI could act as an important transcription regulator in cell regulating a vast array of genes, particularly transcription factors and at least, in part, play a

  16. Quantitative statistical analysis of cis-regulatory sequences in ABA/VP1- and CBF/DREB1-regulated genes of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masaharu; Ketterling, Matthew G; McCarty, Donald R

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a simple quantitative computational approach for objective analysis of cis-regulatory sequences in promoters of coregulated genes. The program, designated MotifFinder, identifies oligo sequences that are overrepresented in promoters of coregulated genes. We used this approach to analyze promoter sequences of Viviparous1 (VP1)/abscisic acid (ABA)-regulated genes and cold-regulated genes, respectively, of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We detected significantly enriched sequences in up-regulated genes but not in down-regulated genes. This result suggests that gene activation but not repression is mediated by specific and common sequence elements in promoters. The enriched motifs include several known cis-regulatory sequences as well as previously unidentified motifs. With respect to known cis-elements, we dissected the flanking nucleotides of the core sequences of Sph element, ABA response elements (ABREs), and the C repeat/dehydration-responsive element. This analysis identified the motif variants that may correlate with qualitative and quantitative differences in gene expression. While both VP1 and cold responses are mediated in part by ABA signaling via ABREs, these responses correlate with unique ABRE variants distinguished by nucleotides flanking the ACGT core. ABRE and Sph motifs are tightly associated uniquely in the coregulated set of genes showing a strict dependence on VP1 and ABA signaling. Finally, analysis of distribution of the enriched sequences revealed a striking concentration of enriched motifs in a proximal 200-base region of VP1/ABA and cold-regulated promoters. Overall, each class of coregulated genes possesses a discrete set of the enriched motifs with unique distributions in their promoters that may account for the specificity of gene regulation.

  17. Co-ordinate regulation of lactate metabolism genes in yeast: the role of the lactate permease gene JEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, T; Fontanesi, F; Guiard, B

    2002-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the first step in lactate metabolism is its transport across the plasma membrane, a proton symport process mediated by the product of the gene JEN1. Under aerobic conditions, the expression of JEN1 is regulated by the carbon source: the gene is repressed by glucose and induced by non-fermentable substrates. JEN1 expression is also controlled by oxygen availability, but is unaffected by the absence of haem biosynthesis. JEN1 is negatively regulated by the repressors Mig1p and Mig2p, and requires Cat8p for full derepression. In this report we demonstrate that, in addition to these regulators, the Hap2/3/4/5 complex interacts specifically with a CAAT-box element in the JEN1 promoter, and acts to derepress JEN1 expression. We also provide evidence for transcriptional stimulation of JEN1 by the protein kinase Snf1p. Data are presented which provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in the co-regulation of genes involved in the metabolism of lactate.

  18. Systems approach identifies an organic nitrogen-responsive gene network that is regulated by the master clock control gene CCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Stokes, Trevor L; Thum, Karen; Xu, Xiaodong; Obertello, Mariana; Katari, Manpreet S; Tanurdzic, Milos; Dean, Alexis; Nero, Damion C; McClung, C Robertson; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2008-03-25

    Understanding how nutrients affect gene expression will help us to understand the mechanisms controlling plant growth and development as a function of nutrient availability. Nitrate has been shown to serve as a signal for the control of gene expression in Arabidopsis. There is also evidence, on a gene-by-gene basis, that downstream products of nitrogen (N) assimilation such as glutamate (Glu) or glutamine (Gln) might serve as signals of organic N status that in turn regulate gene expression. To identify genome-wide responses to such organic N signals, Arabidopsis seedlings were transiently treated with ammonium nitrate in the presence or absence of MSX, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, resulting in a block of Glu/Gln synthesis. Genes that responded to organic N were identified as those whose response to ammonium nitrate treatment was blocked in the presence of MSX. We showed that some genes previously identified to be regulated by nitrate are under the control of an organic N-metabolite. Using an integrated network model of molecular interactions, we uncovered a subnetwork regulated by organic N that included CCA1 and target genes involved in N-assimilation. We validated some of the predicted interactions and showed that regulation of the master clock control gene CCA1 by Glu or a Glu-derived metabolite in turn regulates the expression of key N-assimilatory genes. Phase response curve analysis shows that distinct N-metabolites can advance or delay the CCA1 phase. Regulation of CCA1 by organic N signals may represent a novel input mechanism for N-nutrients to affect plant circadian clock function.

  19. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Gang; Chen, Jiawei; Deng, Yanqiu; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong; Zhao, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. → NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. → Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. → Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. → Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  20. Stat1-independent regulation of gene expression in response to IFN-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Gil, M. Pilar; Han, Yulong; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Stark, George R.

    2001-01-01

    Although Stat1 is essential for cells to respond fully to IFN-γ, there is substantial evidence that, in the absence of Stat1, IFN-γ can still regulate the expression of some genes, induce an antiviral state and affect cell growth. We have now identified many genes that are regulated by IFN-γ in serum-starved Stat1-null mouse fibroblasts. The proteins induced by IFN-γ in Stat1-null cells can account for the substantial biological responses that remain. Some genes are induced in both wild-type and Stat1-null cells and thus are truly Stat1-independent. Others are subject to more complex regulation in response to IFN-γ, repressed by Stat1 in wild-type cells and activated in Stat1-null cells. Many genes induced by IFN-γ in Stat1-null fibroblasts also are induced by platelet-derived growth factor in wild-type cells and thus are likely to be involved in cell proliferation. In mouse cells expressing the docking site mutant Y440F of human IFN-γ receptor subunit 1, the mouse Stat1 is not phosphorylated in response to human IFN-γ, but c-myc and c-jun are still induced, showing that the Stat1 docking site is not required for Stat1-independent signaling. PMID:11390994

  1. Age-associated disruption of molecular clock expression in skeletal muscle of the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Miyazaki

    Full Text Available It is well known that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR develop muscle pathologies with hypertension and heart failure, though the mechanism remains poorly understood. Woon et al. (2007 linked the circadian clock gene Bmal1 to hypertension and metabolic dysfunction in the SHR. Building on these findings, we compared the expression pattern of several core-clock genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged SHR (80 weeks; overt heart failure compared to aged-matched control WKY strain. Heart failure was associated with marked effects on the expression of Bmal1, Clock and Rora in addition to several non-circadian genes important in regulating skeletal muscle phenotype including Mck, Ttn and Mef2c. We next performed circadian time-course collections at a young age (8 weeks; pre-hypertensive and adult age (22 weeks; hypertensive to determine if clock gene expression was disrupted in gastrocnemius, heart and liver tissues prior to or after the rats became hypertensive. We found that hypertensive/hypertrophic SHR showed a dampening of peak Bmal1 and Rev-erb expression in the liver, and the clock-controlled gene Pgc1α in the gastrocnemius. In addition, the core-clock gene Clock and the muscle-specific, clock-controlled gene Myod1, no longer maintained a circadian pattern of expression in gastrocnemius from the hypertensive SHR. These findings provide a framework to suggest a mechanism whereby chronic heart failure leads to skeletal muscle pathologies; prolonged dysregulation of the molecular clock in skeletal muscle results in altered Clock, Pgc1α and Myod1 expression which in turn leads to the mis-regulation of target genes important for mechanical and metabolic function of skeletal muscle.

  2. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Shinya; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Togi, Sumihito; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway

  3. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd 2+ uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance

  4. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting, E-mail: qixiaoting@cnu.edu.cn

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  5. Regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okinaga, S; Takahashi, K; Takeda, K; Yoshizawa, M; Fujita, H; Sasaki, H; Shibahara, S

    1996-06-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 is an essential enzyme in heme catabolism, and its human gene promoter contains a putative heat shock element (HHO-HSE). This study was designed to analyze the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress. The amounts of heme oxygenase-1 protein were not increased by heat shock (incubation at 42 degrees C) in human alveolar macrophages and in a human erythroblastic cell line, YN-1-0-A, whereas heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was noticeably induced. However, heat shock factor does bind in vitro to HHO-HSE and the synthetic HHO-HSE by itself is sufficient to confer the increase in the transient expression of a reporter gene upon heat shock. The deletion of the sequence, located downstream from HHO-HSE, resulted in the activation of a reporter gene by heat shock. These results suggest that HHO-HSE is potentially functional but is repressed in vivo. Interestingly, heat shock abolished the remarkable increase in the levels of heme oxygenase-1 mRNA in YN-1-0-A cells treated with hemin or cadmium, in which HSP70 mRNA was noticeably induced. Furthermore, transient expression assays showed that heat shock inhibits the cadmium-mediated activation of the heme oxygenase-1 promoter, whereas the HSP70 gene promoter was activated upon heat shock. Such regulation of heme oxygenase-1 under thermal stress may be of physiologic significance in erythroid cells.

  6. TaEDS1 genes positively regulate resistance to powdery mildew in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guiping; Wei, Bo; Li, Guoliang; Gong, Caiyan; Fan, Renchun; Zhang, Xiangqi

    2018-04-01

    Three EDS1 genes were cloned from common wheat and were demonstrated to positively regulate resistance to powdery mildew in wheat. The EDS1 proteins play important roles in plant basal resistance and TIR-NB-LRR protein-triggered resistance in dicots. Until now, there have been very few studies on EDS1 in monocots, and none in wheat. Here, we report on three common wheat orthologous genes of EDS1 family (TaEDS1-5A, 5B and 5D) and their function in powdery mildew resistance. Comparisons of these genes with their orthologs in diploid ancestors revealed that EDS1 is a conserved gene family in Triticeae. The cDNA sequence similarity among the three TaEDS1 genes was greater than 96.5%, and they shared sequence similarities of more than 99.6% with the respective orthologs from diploid ancestors. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the EDS1 family originated prior to the differentiation of monocots and dicots, and EDS1 members have since undergone clear structural differentiation. The transcriptional levels of TaEDS1 genes in the leaves were obviously higher than those of the other organs, and they were induced by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) infection and salicylic acid (SA) treatment. The BSMV-VIGS experiments indicated that knock-down the transcriptional levels of the TaEDS1 genes in a powdery mildew-resistant variety of common wheat compromised resistance. Contrarily, transient overexpression of TaEDS1 genes in a susceptible common wheat variety significantly reduced the haustorium index and attenuated the growth of Bgt. Furthermore, the expression of TaEDS1 genes in the Arabidopsis mutant eds1-1 complemented its susceptible phenotype to powdery mildew. The above evidences strongly suggest that TaEDS1 acts as a positive regulator and confers resistance against powdery mildew in common wheat.

  7. The Candida albicans-specific gene EED1 encodes a key regulator of hyphal extension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Ronny

    2011-04-01

    The extension of germ tubes into elongated hyphae by Candida albicans is essential for damage of host cells. The C. albicans-specific gene EED1 plays a crucial role in this extension and maintenance of filamentous growth. eed1Δ cells failed to extend germ tubes into long filaments and switched back to yeast growth after 3 h of incubation during growth on plastic surfaces. Expression of EED1 is regulated by the transcription factor Efg1 and ectopic overexpression of EED1 restored filamentation in efg1Δ. Transcriptional profiling of eed1Δ during infection of oral tissue revealed down-regulation of hyphal associated genes including UME6, encoding another key transcriptional factor. Ectopic overexpression of EED1 or UME6 rescued filamentation and damage potential in eed1Δ. Transcriptional profiling during overexpression of UME6 identified subsets of genes regulated by Eed1 or Ume6. These data suggest that Eed1 and Ume6 act in a pathway regulating maintenance of hyphal growth thereby repressing hyphal-to-yeast transition and permitting dissemination of C. albicans within epithelial tissues.

  8. FOXN1: a master regulator gene of thymic epithelial development programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa eRomano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available T cell ontogeny is a sophisticated process, which takes place within the thymus through a series of well-defined discrete stages. The process requires a proper lympho-stromal interaction. In particular, cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (cTECs, mTECs drive T cell differentiation, education and selection processes, while the thymocyte-dependent signals allow TECs to maturate and provide an appropriate thymic microenvironment. Alterations in genes implicated in thymus organogenesis, including Tbx1, Pax1, Pax3, Pax9, Hoxa3, Eya1 and Six1, affect this well-orchestrated process, leading to disruption of thymic architecture. Of note, in both human and mice, the primordial TECs are yet unable to fully support T cell development and only after the transcriptional activation of the Forkhead-box n1 (FOXN1 gene in the thymic epithelium this essential function is acquired. FOXN1 is a master regulator in the TEC lineage specification in that it down-stream promotes transcription of genes, which, in turn, regulate TECs differentiation. In particular, FOXN1 mainly regulates TEC patterning in the fetal stage and TEC homeostasis in the postnatal thymus. An inborn null mutation in FOXN1 leads to Nude/SCID phenotype in mouse, rat and humans. In Foxn1-/- nude animals, initial formation of the primordial organ is arrested and the primordium is not colonized by hematopoietic precursors, causing a severe primary T cell immunodeficiency. In humans, the Nude/SCID phenotype is characterized by congenital alopecia of the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes, nail dystrophy and a severe T cell immunodeficiency, inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder. Aim of this review is to summarize all the scientific information so far available to better characterize the pivotal role of the master regulator FOXN1 transcription factor in the TEC lineage specifications and functionality.

  9. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ. Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte

  10. Altered Rhythm of Adrenal Clock Genes, StAR and Serum Corticosterone in VIP Receptor 2-Deficient Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    oscillator based on a group of clock genes and their protein products. Mice lacking the VPAC2 receptor display disrupted circadian rhythm of physiology and behaviour, and therefore, we using real-time RT-PCR quantified (1) the mRNAs for the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 in the adrenal gland and SCN, (2......RNA expression and serum corticosterone concentration. Double immunohistochemistry showed that the PER1 protein and StAR were co-localised in the same steroidogenic cells. Circulating corticosterone plays a role in the circadian timing system and the misaligned corticosterone rhythm in the VPAC2 receptor......The circadian time-keeping system consists of clocks in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and in peripheral organs including an adrenal clock linked to the rhythmic corticosteroid production by regulating steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Clock cells contain an autonomous molecular...

  11. Gene expression profiling following NRF2 and KEAP1 siRNA knockdown in human lung fibroblasts identifies CCL11/Eotaxin-1 as a novel NRF2 regulated gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxidative Stress contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases. The NRF2/KEAP1 axis is a key transcriptional regulator of the anti-oxidant response in cells. Nrf2 knockout mice have implicated this pathway in regulating inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma and COPD. To better understand the role the NRF2 pathway has on respiratory disease we have taken a novel approach to define NRF2 dependent gene expression in a relevant lung system. Methods Normal human lung fibroblasts were transfected with siRNA specific for NRF2 or KEAP1. Gene expression changes were measured at 30 and 48 hours using a custom Affymetrix Gene array. Changes in Eotaxin-1 gene expression and protein secretion were further measured under various inflammatory conditions with siRNAs and pharmacological tools. Results An anti-correlated gene set (inversely regulated by NRF2 and KEAP1 RNAi) that reflects specific NRF2 regulated genes was identified. Gene annotations show that NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response is the most significantly regulated pathway, followed by heme metabolism, metabolism of xenobiotics by Cytochrome P450 and O-glycan biosynthesis. Unexpectedly the key eosinophil chemokine Eotaxin-1/CCL11 was found to be up-regulated when NRF2 was inhibited and down-regulated when KEAP1 was inhibited. This transcriptional regulation leads to modulation of Eotaxin-1 secretion from human lung fibroblasts under basal and inflammatory conditions, and is specific to Eotaxin-1 as NRF2 or KEAP1 knockdown had no effect on the secretion of a set of other chemokines and cytokines. Furthermore, the known NRF2 small molecule activators CDDO and Sulphoraphane can also dose dependently inhibit Eotaxin-1 release from human lung fibroblasts. Conclusions These data uncover a previously unknown role for NRF2 in regulating Eotaxin-1 expression and further the mechanistic understanding of this pathway in modulating inflammatory lung disease. PMID:23061798

  12. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 regulates RANK gene expression in myeloid progenitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Oh Hyung; Lee, Chong-Kil; Lee, Young Ik; Paik, Sang-Gi; Lee, Hyun-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 is critical for osteoclastogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of PU.1-regulated osteoclastogenesis have not been explored. Here, we present evidence that the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) gene that has been shown to be crucial for osteoclastogenesis is a transcriptional target of PU.1. The PU.1 -/- progenitor cells failed to express the RANK gene and reconstitution of PU.1 in these cells induced RANK expression. Treatment of the PU.1 reconstituted cells with M-CSF and RANKL further augmented the RANK gene expression. To explore the regulatory mechanism of the RANK gene expression by PU.1, we have cloned the human RANK promoter. Transient transfection assays have revealed that the 2.2-kb RANK promoter was functional in a monocyte line RAW264.7, whereas co-transfection of PU.1 transactivated the RANK promoter in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PU.1 regulates the RANK gene transcription and this may represent one of the key roles of PU.1 in osteoclast differentiation

  13. The expression of melanopsin and clock genes in Xenopus laevis melanophores and their modulation by melatonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, A.P.C.; Obeid, N.N.; Castrucci, A.M.L.; Visconti, M.A. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-25

    Vertebrates have a central clock and also several peripheral clocks. Light responses might result from the integration of light signals by these clocks. The dermal melanophores of Xenopus laevis have a photoreceptor molecule denominated melanopsin (OPN4x). The mechanisms of the circadian clock involve positive and negative feedback. We hypothesize that these dermal melanophores also present peripheral clock characteristics. Using quantitative PCR, we analyzed the pattern of temporal expression of Opn4x and the clock genes Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Clock in these cells subjected to a 14-h light:10-h dark (14L:10D) regime or constant darkness (DD). Also, in view of the physiological role of melatonin in the dermal melanophores of X. laevis, we determined whether melatonin modulates the expression of these clock genes. These genes show a time-dependent expression pattern when these cells are exposed to 14L:10D, which differs from the pattern observed under DD. Cells kept in DD for 5 days exhibited overall increased mRNA expression for Opn4x and Clock, and a lower expression for Per1, Per2, and Bmal1. When the cells were kept in DD for 5 days and treated with melatonin for 1 h, 24 h before extraction, the mRNA levels tended to decrease for Opn4x and Clock, did not change for Bmal1, and increased for Per1 and Per2 at different Zeitgeber times (ZT). Although these data are limited to one-day data collection, and therefore preliminary, we suggest that the dermal melanophores of X. laevis might have some characteristics of a peripheral clock, and that melatonin modulates, to a certain extent, melanopsin and clock gene expression.

  14. The expression of melanopsin and clock genes in Xenopus laevis melanophores and their modulation by melatonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, A.P.C.; Obeid, N.N.; Castrucci, A.M.L.; Visconti, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrates have a central clock and also several peripheral clocks. Light responses might result from the integration of light signals by these clocks. The dermal melanophores of Xenopus laevis have a photoreceptor molecule denominated melanopsin (OPN4x). The mechanisms of the circadian clock involve positive and negative feedback. We hypothesize that these dermal melanophores also present peripheral clock characteristics. Using quantitative PCR, we analyzed the pattern of temporal expression of Opn4x and the clock genes Per1, Per2, Bmal1, and Clock in these cells subjected to a 14-h light:10-h dark (14L:10D) regime or constant darkness (DD). Also, in view of the physiological role of melatonin in the dermal melanophores of X. laevis, we determined whether melatonin modulates the expression of these clock genes. These genes show a time-dependent expression pattern when these cells are exposed to 14L:10D, which differs from the pattern observed under DD. Cells kept in DD for 5 days exhibited overall increased mRNA expression for Opn4x and Clock, and a lower expression for Per1, Per2, and Bmal1. When the cells were kept in DD for 5 days and treated with melatonin for 1 h, 24 h before extraction, the mRNA levels tended to decrease for Opn4x and Clock, did not change for Bmal1, and increased for Per1 and Per2 at different Zeitgeber times (ZT). Although these data are limited to one-day data collection, and therefore preliminary, we suggest that the dermal melanophores of X. laevis might have some characteristics of a peripheral clock, and that melatonin modulates, to a certain extent, melanopsin and clock gene expression

  15. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    where they regulate ovulation; circadian disruption is associated with several ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., endometriosis). However, no studies have examined variation in germline circadian genes as predictors of ovarian cancer risk and invasiveness. The goal of the current study was to examine...... single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes BMAL1, CRY2, CSNK1E, NPAS2, PER3, REV1 and TIMELESS and downstream transcription factors KLF10 and SENP3 as predictors of risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and histopathologic subtypes. The study included a test set of 3,761 EOC cases and 2......,722 controls and a validation set of 44,308 samples including 18,174 (10,316 serous) cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Analysis of genotype data from 36 genotyped SNPs and 4600 imputed SNPs indicated that the most significant...

  16. Time-of-Day Dependent Neuronal Injury After Ischemic Stroke: Implication of Circadian Clock Transcriptional Factor Bmal1 and Survival Kinase AKT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Caglayan, Berrak; Yalcin, Esra; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Turkseven, Seyma; Gurel, Busra; Kelestemur, Taha; Sertel, Elif; Sahin, Zafer; Kutlu, Selim; Kilic, Ulkan; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2018-03-01

    Occurrence of stroke cases displays a time-of-day variation in human. However, the mechanism linking circadian rhythm to the internal response mechanisms against pathophysiological events after ischemic stroke remained largely unknown. To this end, temporal changes in the susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury were investigated in mice in which the ischemic stroke induced at four different Zeitgeber time points with 6-h intervals (ZT0, ZT6, ZT12, and ZT18). Besides infarct volume and brain swelling, neuronal survival, apoptosis, ischemia, and circadian rhythm related proteins were examined using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, planar surface immune assay, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry tools. Here, we present evidence that midnight (ZT18; 24:00) I/R injury in mice resulted in significantly improved infarct volume, brain swelling, neurological deficit score, neuronal survival, and decreased apoptotic cell death compared with ischemia induced at other time points, which were associated with increased expressions of circadian proteins Bmal1, PerI, and Clock proteins and survival kinases AKT and Erk-1/2. Moreover, ribosomal protein S6, mTOR, and Bad were also significantly increased, while the levels of PRAS40, negative regulator of AKT and mTOR, and phosphorylated p53 were decreased at this time point compared to ZT0 (06:00). Furthermore, detailed proteomic analysis revealed significantly decreased CSKP, HBB-1/2, and HBA levels, while increased GNAZ, NEGR1, IMPCT, and PDE1B at midnight as compared with early morning. Our results indicate that nighttime I/R injury results in less severe neuronal damage, with increased neuronal survival, increased levels of survival kinases and circadian clock proteins, and also alters the circadian-related proteins.

  17. Basal transcription of APOBEC3G is regulated by USF1 gene in hepatocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yanli [Department of Infectious Diseases, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China); Li, Hui [The Central Hospital of Wuhan, Tongji Medical College Huazhong University of Science Technology, Wuhan, 430000 (China); Zhang, Xiaoju [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China); Shang, Jia [Department of Infectious Diseases, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China); Kang, Yi, E-mail: kykangyi@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Zhengzhou University People' s Hospital (Henan Provincial People' s Hospital), Zhengzhou, 450003 (China)

    2016-01-29

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G, A3G) exert antiviral defense as an important factor of innate immunity. A variety of cytokines such as IFN-γ,IL2,IL15,IL7 could induce the transcription of A3G. However, the regulation of other nuclear factor on the transcription of A3G have not been reported at the present. To gain new insights into the transcriptional regulation of this restriction factor, we cloned and characterized the promoter region of A3G and investigate the modulation of USF1 gene on the transcription of A3G. We identified a 232 bp region that was sufficient to regulate the activity of full promoter. Transcriptional start sites (TSS) were identified by the luciferase reporter assays of plasmids containing full or shorter fragments of the A3G promoter. The results demonstrated that the core promoter of A3G is located within the region -159/-84 relative to the TSS. Transcriptional activity of A3G core promoter regulated by USF1 was dependent on an E-box (located at position -91/-86 relative to the major TSS) and was abolished after mutation of this DNA element. USF1 gene can take part in basal transcription regulation of the human A3G gene in hepatocyte, and the identified E-box represented a binding site for the USF1. - Highlights: • The core promoter of A3G is located within the region −159/−84 relative to the TSS. • Transcriptional activity of A3G core promoter regulated by USF1 was dependent on an E-box (located at position −91/−86 relative to the major TSS). • USF1 gene can take part in basal transcription regulation of the human A3G gene in hepatocyte.

  18. Basal transcription of APOBEC3G is regulated by USF1 gene in hepatocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Yanli; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoju; Shang, Jia; Kang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G, A3G) exert antiviral defense as an important factor of innate immunity. A variety of cytokines such as IFN-γ,IL2,IL15,IL7 could induce the transcription of A3G. However, the regulation of other nuclear factor on the transcription of A3G have not been reported at the present. To gain new insights into the transcriptional regulation of this restriction factor, we cloned and characterized the promoter region of A3G and investigate the modulation of USF1 gene on the transcription of A3G. We identified a 232 bp region that was sufficient to regulate the activity of full promoter. Transcriptional start sites (TSS) were identified by the luciferase reporter assays of plasmids containing full or shorter fragments of the A3G promoter. The results demonstrated that the core promoter of A3G is located within the region -159/-84 relative to the TSS. Transcriptional activity of A3G core promoter regulated by USF1 was dependent on an E-box (located at position -91/-86 relative to the major TSS) and was abolished after mutation of this DNA element. USF1 gene can take part in basal transcription regulation of the human A3G gene in hepatocyte, and the identified E-box represented a binding site for the USF1. - Highlights: • The core promoter of A3G is located within the region −159/−84 relative to the TSS. • Transcriptional activity of A3G core promoter regulated by USF1 was dependent on an E-box (located at position −91/−86 relative to the major TSS). • USF1 gene can take part in basal transcription regulation of the human A3G gene in hepatocyte.

  19. Opposing roles of STAT4 and Dnmt3a in Th1 gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Duy; Yu, Qing; Walline, Crystal C.; Muthukrishnan, Rajarajeswari; Blum, Janice S.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription factor STAT4 is a critical regulator of Th1 differentiation and inflammatory disease. Yet, how STAT4 regulates gene expression is still unclear. In this report, we define a STAT4-dependent sequence of events including H3K4 methylation, Jmjd3 association with STAT4 target loci, and a Jmjd3-dependent decrease in H3K27 trimethylation and DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) 3a association with STAT4 target loci. Dnmt3a has an obligate role in repressing Th1 gene expression, and in Th1 cultures deficient in both STAT4 and Dnmt3a, there is recovery in the expression of a subset of Th1 genes that is sufficient to increase IFNγ production. Moreover, although STAT4-deficient mice are protected from the development of EAE, mice deficient in STAT4 and conditionally-deficient in Dnmt3a in T cells develop paralysis. Th1 genes that are de-repressed in the absence of Dnmt3a have greater induction following the ectopic expression of the Th1-associated transcription factors T-bet and Hlx1. Together, these data demonstrate that STAT4 and Dnmt3a play opposing roles in regulating Th1 gene expression, and that one mechanism for STAT4-dependent gene programming is in establishing a de-repressed genetic state susceptible to transactivation by additional fate-determining transcription factors. PMID:23772023

  20. Sp1 and CREB regulate basal transcription of the human SNF2L gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yu; Jiang Baichun; Zou Yongxin; Gao Guimin; Shang Linshan; Chen Bingxi; Liu Qiji; Gong Yaoqin

    2008-01-01

    Imitation Switch (ISWI) is a member of the SWI2/SNF2 superfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, which are involved in multiple nuclear functions, including transcriptional regulation, replication, and chromatin assembly. Mammalian genomes encode two ISWI orthologs, SNF2H and SNF2L. In order to clarify the molecular mechanisms governing the expression of human SNF2L gene, we functionally examined the transcriptional regulation of human SNF2L promoter. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that the minimal SNF2L promoter was located between positions -152 to -86 relative to the transcription start site. In this region we have identified a cAMP-response element (CRE) located at -99 to -92 and a Sp1-binding site at -145 to -135 that play a critical role in regulating basal activity of human SNF2L gene, which were proven by deletion and mutation of specific binding sites, EMSA, and down-regulating Sp1 and CREB via RNAi. This study provides the first insight into the mechanisms that control basal expression of human SNF2L gene

  1. Gene profile analysis of osteoblast genes differentially regulated by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamblin Anne-Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblast differentiation requires the coordinated stepwise expression of multiple genes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs accelerate the osteoblast differentiation process by blocking the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs, which alter gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously demonstrated that HDIs and HDAC3 shRNAs accelerate matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblast maturation genes (e.g. alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin. Identifying other genes that are differentially regulated by HDIs might identify new pathways that contribute to osteoblast differentiation. Results To identify other osteoblast genes that are altered early by HDIs, we incubated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with HDIs (trichostatin A, MS-275, or valproic acid for 18 hours in osteogenic conditions. The promotion of osteoblast differentiation by HDIs in this experiment was confirmed by osteogenic assays. Gene expression profiles relative to vehicle-treated cells were assessed by microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip 430 2.0 arrays. The regulation of several genes by HDIs in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Nine genes were differentially regulated by at least two-fold after exposure to each of the three HDIs and six were verified by PCR in osteoblasts. Four of the verified genes (solute carrier family 9 isoform 3 regulator 1 (Slc9a3r1, sorbitol dehydrogenase 1, a kinase anchor protein, and glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 were induced. Two genes (proteasome subunit, beta type 10 and adaptor-related protein complex AP-4 sigma 1 were suppressed. We also identified eight growth factors and growth factor receptor genes that are significantly altered by each of the HDIs, including Frizzled related proteins 1 and 4, which modulate the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusion This study identifies osteoblast genes that are regulated early by HDIs and indicates pathways that

  2. Identification of downstream metastasis-associated target genes regulated by LSD1 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Ding, Jie; Wang, Ziwei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Xuejian; Du, Jiyi

    2017-03-21

    This study aims to identify downstream target genes regulated by lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in colon cancer cells and investigate the molecular mechanisms of LSD1 influencing invasion and metastasis of colon cancer. We obtained the expression changes of downstream target genes regulated by small-interfering RNA-LSD1 and LSD1-overexpression via gene expression profiling in two human colon cancer cell lines. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We screened out LSD1-target gene associated with proliferation, metastasis, and invasion from DEGs via Gene Ontology and Pathway Studio. Subsequently, four key genes (CABYR, FOXF2, TLE4, and CDH1) were computationally predicted as metastasis-related LSD1-target genes. ChIp-PCR was applied after RT-PCR and Western blot validations to detect the occupancy of LSD1-target gene promoter-bound LSD1. A total of 3633 DEGs were significantly upregulated, and 4642 DEGs were downregulated in LSD1-silenced SW620 cells. A total of 4047 DEGs and 4240 DEGs were upregulated and downregulated in LSD1-overexpressed HT-29 cells, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot validated the microarray analysis results. ChIP assay results demonstrated that LSD1 might be negative regulators for target genes CABYR and CDH1. The expression level of LSD1 is negatively correlated with mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine4(H3K4) at LSD1- target gene promoter region. No significant mono-methylation and dimethylation of H3 lysine9 methylation was detected at the promoter region of CABYR and CDH1. LSD1- depletion contributed to the upregulation of CABYR and CDH1 through enhancing the dimethylation of H3K4 at the LSD1-target genes promoter. LSD1- overexpression mediated the downregulation of CABYR and CDH1expression through decreasing the mono- and dimethylation of H3K4 at LSD1-target gene promoter in colon cancer cells. CABYR and CDH1 might be potential LSD1-target genes in colon

  3. Regulation of UGT1A1 and HNF1 transcription factor gene expression by DNA methylation in colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 is a pivotal enzyme involved in metabolism of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan commonly used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer. We previously demonstrated aberrant methylation of specific CpG dinucleotides in UGT1A1-negative cells, and revealed that methylation state of the UGT1A1 5'-flanking sequence is negatively correlated with gene transcription. Interestingly, one of these CpG dinucleotides (CpG -4 is found close to a HNF1 response element (HRE, known to be involved in activation of UGT1A1 gene expression, and within an upstream stimulating factor (USF binding site. Results Gel retardation assays revealed that methylation of CpG-4 directly affect the interaction of USF1/2 with its cognate sequence without altering the binding for HNF1-alpha. Luciferase assays sustained a role for USF1/2 and HNF1-alpha in UGT1A1 regulation in colon cancer cells. Based on the differential expression profiles of HNF1A gene in colon cell lines, we also assessed whether methylation affects its expression. In agreement with the presence of CpG islands in the HNF1A promoter, treatments of UGT1A1-negative HCT116 colon cancer cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor restore HNF1A gene expression, as observed for UGT1A1. Conclusions This study reveals that basal UGT1A1 expression in colon cells is positively regulated by HNF1-alpha and USF, and negatively regulated by DNA methylation. Besides, DNA methylation of HNF1A could also play an important role in regulating additional cellular drug metabolism and transporter pathways. This process may contribute to determine local inactivation of drugs such as the anticancer agent SN-38 by glucuronidation and define tumoral response.

  4. Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 gene expression is down-regulated by LXR activators in the intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, Caroline; Touche, Veronique; Tailleux, Anne; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Fievet, Catherine; Clavey, Veronique; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 (NPC1L1) is a protein critical for intestinal cholesterol absorption. The nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) are major regulators of cholesterol homeostasis and their activation results in a reduced absorption of intestinal cholesterol. The goal of this study was to define the role of PPARα and LXR nuclear receptors in the regulation of NPC1L1 gene expression. We show that LXR activators down-regulate NPC1L1 mRNA levels in the human enterocyte cell line Caco-2/TC7, whereas PPARα ligands have no effect. Furthermore, NPC1L1 mRNA levels are decreased in vivo, in duodenum of mice treated with the LXR agonist T0901317. In conclusion, the present study identifies NPC1L1 as a novel LXR target gene further supporting a crucial role of LXR in intestinal cholesterol homeostasis

  5. Zebrafish Lacking Circadian Gene per2 Exhibit Visual Function Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-feng Huang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The retina has an intrinsic circadian clock, but the importance of this clock for vision is unknown. Zebrafish offer many advantages for studying vertebrate vision and circadian rhythm. Here, we explored the role of zebrafish per2, a light-regulated gene, in visual behavior and the underlying mechanisms. We observed that per2 mutant zebrafish larvae showed decreased contrast sensitivity and visual acuity using optokinetic response (OKR assays. Using a visual motor response (VMR assay, we observed normal OFF responses but abnormal ON responses in mutant zebrafish larvae. Immunofluorescence showed that mutants had a normal morphology of cone photoreceptor cells and retinal organization. However, electron microscopy showed that per2 mutants displayed abnormal and decreased photoreceptor ribbon synapses with arciform density, which resulted in retinal ON pathway defect. We also examined the expression of three cone opsins by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR, and the expression of long-wave-sensitive opsin (opn1lw and short-wave-sensitive opsin (opn1sw was reduced in mutant zebrafish larvae. qRT-PCR analyses also showed a down-regulation of the clock genes cry1ba and bmal1b in the adult eye of per2 mutant zebrafish. This study identified a mechanism by which a clock gene affects visual function and defined important roles of per2 in retinal information processing.

  6. Photoperiodic Modulation of Circadian Clock and Reproductive Axis Gene Expression in the Pre-Pubertal European Sea Bass Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute S T Martins

    Full Text Available The acquisition of reproductive competence requires the activation of the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG axis, which in most vertebrates, including fishes, is initiated by changes in photoperiod. In the European sea bass long-term exposure to continuous light (LL alters the rhythm of reproductive hormones, delays spermatogenesis and reduces the incidence of precocious males. In contrast, an early shift from long to short photoperiod (AP accelerates spermatogenesis. However, how photoperiod affects key genes in the brain to trigger the onset of puberty is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated if the integration of the light stimulus by clock proteins is sufficient to activate key genes that trigger the BPG axis in the European sea bass. We found that the clock genes clock, npas2, bmal1 and the BPG genes gnrh, kiss and kissr share conserved transcription factor frameworks in their promoters, suggesting co-regulation. Other gene promoters of the BGP axis were also predicted to be co-regulated by the same frameworks. Co-regulation was confirmed through gene expression analysis of brains from males exposed to LL or AP photoperiod compared to natural conditions: LL fish had suppressed gnrh1, kiss2, galr1b and esr1, while AP fish had stimulated npas2, gnrh1, gnrh2, kiss2, kiss1rb and galr1b compared to NP. It is concluded that fish exposed to different photoperiods present significant expression differences in some clock and reproductive axis related genes well before the first detectable endocrine and morphological responses of the BPG axis.

  7. Control of Secreted Protein Gene Expression and the Mammalian Secretome by the Metabolic Regulator PGC-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G

    2017-01-06

    Secreted proteins serve pivotal roles in the development of multicellular organisms, acting as structural matrix, extracellular enzymes, and signal molecules. However, how the secretome is regulated remains incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate, unexpectedly, that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), a critical transcriptional co-activator of metabolic gene expression, functions to down-regulate the expression of diverse genes encoding secreted molecules and extracellular matrix components to modulate the secretome. Using cell lines, primary cells, and mice, we show that both endogenous and exogenous PGC-1α down-regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding secreted molecules. Mechanistically, results obtained using mRNA stability measurements as well as intronic RNA expression analysis are consistent with a transcriptional effect of PGC-1α on the expression of genes encoding secreted proteins. Interestingly, PGC-1α requires the central heat shock response regulator heat shock factor protein 1 (HSF1) to affect some of its targets, and both factors co-reside on several target genes encoding secreted molecules in cells. Finally, using a mass spectrometric analysis of secreted proteins, we demonstrate that PGC-1α modulates the secretome of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our results define a link between a key pathway controlling metabolic regulation and the regulation of the mammalian secretome. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Regulation of a transcription factor network by Cdk1 coordinates late cell cycle gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Benjamin D; Mapa, Claudine E; Arsenault, Heather E; Poti, Kristin E; Benanti, Jennifer A

    2014-05-02

    To maintain genome stability, regulators of chromosome segregation must be expressed in coordination with mitotic events. Expression of these late cell cycle genes is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), which phosphorylates a network of conserved transcription factors (TFs). However, the effects of Cdk1 phosphorylation on many key TFs are not known. We find that elimination of Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of four S-phase TFs decreases expression of many late cell cycle genes, delays mitotic progression, and reduces fitness in budding yeast. Blocking phosphorylation impairs degradation of all four TFs. Consequently, phosphorylation-deficient mutants of the repressors Yox1 and Yhp1 exhibit increased promoter occupancy and decreased expression of their target genes. Interestingly, although phosphorylation of the transcriptional activator Hcm1 on its N-terminus promotes its degradation, phosphorylation on its C-terminus is required for its activity, indicating that Cdk1 both activates and inhibits a single TF. We conclude that Cdk1 promotes gene expression by both activating transcriptional activators and inactivating transcriptional repressors. Furthermore, our data suggest that coordinated regulation of the TF network by Cdk1 is necessary for faithful cell division.

  9. Nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family regulates 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) gene expression in steroidogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yunfeng; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Yazawa, Takashi; Matsumura, Takehiro; Kawabe, Shinya; Kanno, Masafumi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2012-11-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) is a rate-limiting enzyme for heme biosynthesis in mammals. Heme is essential for the catalytic activities of P450 enzymes including steroid metabolic enzymes. Nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family proteins, steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1), and liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) play pivotal roles in regulation of steroidogenic enzymes. Recently, we showed that expression of SF-1/LRH-1 induces differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into steroidogenic cells. In this study, genome-wide analysis revealed that ALAS1 was a novel SF-1-target gene in differentiated mesenchymal stem cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays revealed that SF-1/LRH-1 up-regulated ALAS1 gene transcription in steroidogenic cells via binding to a 3.5-kb upstream region of ALAS1. The ALAS1 gene was up-regulated by overexpression of SF-1/LRH-1 in steroidogenic cells and down-regulated by knockdown of SF-1 in these cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, a coactivator of nuclear receptors, also strongly coactivated expression of NR5A-target genes. Reporter analysis revealed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α strongly augmented ALAS1 gene transcription caused by SF-1 binding to the 3.5-kb upstream region. Finally knockdown of ALAS1 resulted in reduced progesterone production by steroidogenic cells. These results indicate that ALAS1 is a novel NR5A-target gene and participates in steroid hormone production.

  10. Feeding period restriction alters the expression of peripheral circadian rhythm genes without changing body weight in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagoon Jang

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that the circadian clock is closely associated with metabolic regulation. However, whether an impaired circadian clock is a direct cause of metabolic dysregulation such as body weight gain is not clearly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that body weight gain in mice is not significantly changed by restricting feeding period to daytime or nighttime. The expression of peripheral circadian clock genes was altered by feeding period restriction, while the expression of light-regulated hypothalamic circadian clock genes was unaffected by either a normal chow diet (NCD or a high-fat diet (HFD. In the liver, the expression pattern of circadian clock genes, including Bmal1, Clock, and Per2, was changed by different feeding period restrictions. Moreover, the expression of lipogenic genes, gluconeogenic genes, and fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver was also altered by feeding period restriction. Given that feeding period restriction does not affect body weight gain with a NCD or HFD, it is likely that the amount of food consumed might be a crucial factor in determining body weight. Collectively, these data suggest that feeding period restriction modulates the expression of peripheral circadian clock genes, which is uncoupled from light-sensitive hypothalamic circadian clock genes.

  11. Leucine zipper, down regulated in cancer-1 gene expression in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Salemi, Michele; Barone, Nunziata; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita A.; Recupero, Domenico; Galia, Antonio; Fraggetta, Filippo; Aiello, Anna Maria; Pepe, Pietro; Castiglione, Roberto; Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous genetic alterations have been implicated in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). DNA and protein microarrays have enabled the identification of genes associated with apoptosis, which is important in PCa development. Despite the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood, inhibition of apoptosis is a critical pathophysiological factor that contributes to the onset and progression of PCa. Leucine zipper, down-regulated in cancer 1 (LDOC-1) is a known regulator of the nuclear...

  12. Ascl1 Coordinately Regulates Gene Expression and the Chromatin Landscape during Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A.S.F. Raposo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The proneural transcription factor Ascl1 coordinates gene expression in both proliferating and differentiating progenitors along the neuronal lineage. Here, we used a cellular model of neurogenesis to investigate how Ascl1 interacts with the chromatin landscape to regulate gene expression when promoting neuronal differentiation. We find that Ascl1 binding occurs mostly at distal enhancers and is associated with activation of gene transcription. Surprisingly, the accessibility of Ascl1 to its binding sites in neural stem/progenitor cells remains largely unchanged throughout their differentiation, as Ascl1 targets regions of both readily accessible and closed chromatin in proliferating cells. Moreover, binding of Ascl1 often precedes an increase in chromatin accessibility and the appearance of new regions of open chromatin, associated with de novo gene expression during differentiation. Our results reveal a function of Ascl1 in promoting chromatin accessibility during neurogenesis, linking the chromatin landscape at Ascl1 target regions with the temporal progression of its transcriptional program.

  13. REDD1 induction regulates the skeletal muscle gene expression signature following acute aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley S; Steiner, Jennifer L; Rossetti, Michael L; Qiao, Shuxi; Ellisen, Leif W; Govindarajan, Subramaniam S; Eroshkin, Alexey M; Williamson, David L; Coen, Paul M

    2017-12-01

    The metabolic stress placed on skeletal muscle by aerobic exercise promotes acute and long-term health benefits in part through changes in gene expression. However, the transducers that mediate altered gene expression signatures have not been completely elucidated. Regulated in development and DNA damage 1 (REDD1) is a stress-induced protein whose expression is transiently increased in skeletal muscle following acute aerobic exercise. However, the role of this induction remains unclear. Because REDD1 altered gene expression in other model systems, we sought to determine whether REDD1 induction following acute exercise altered the gene expression signature in muscle. To do this, wild-type and REDD1-null mice were randomized to remain sedentary or undergo a bout of acute treadmill exercise. Exercised mice recovered for 1, 3, or 6 h before euthanization. Acute exercise induced a transient increase in REDD1 protein expression within the plantaris only at 1 h postexercise, and the induction occurred in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions. At this time point, global changes in gene expression were surveyed using microarray. REDD1 induction was required for the exercise-induced change in expression of 24 genes. Validation by RT-PCR confirmed that the exercise-mediated changes in genes related to exercise capacity, muscle protein metabolism, neuromuscular junction remodeling, and Metformin action were negated in REDD1-null mice. Finally, the exercise-mediated induction of REDD1 was partially dependent upon glucocorticoid receptor activation. In all, these data show that REDD1 induction regulates the exercise-mediated change in a distinct set of genes within skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Leucine zipper, down regulated in cancer-1 gene expression in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Michele; Barone, Nunziata; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita A.; Recupero, Domenico; Galia, Antonio; Fraggetta, Filippo; Aiello, Anna Maria; Pepe, Pietro; Castiglione, Roberto; Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous genetic alterations have been implicated in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). DNA and protein microarrays have enabled the identification of genes associated with apoptosis, which is important in PCa development. Despite the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood, inhibition of apoptosis is a critical pathophysiological factor that contributes to the onset and progression of PCa. Leucine zipper, down-regulated in cancer 1 (LDOC-1) is a known regulator of the nuclear factor (NF)-mediated pathway of apoptosis through the inhibition of NF-κB. The present study investigated the expression of the LDOC-1 gene in LNCaP, PC-3, PNT1A and PNT2 prostate cell lines by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition LDOC-1 protein expression in normal prostate tissues and PCa was studied by immunohistochemistry. LDOC-1 messenger RNA resulted overexpressed in LNCaP and PC-3 PCa cell lines compared with the two normal prostate cell lines PNT1A and PNT2. The results of immunohistochemistry demonstrated a positive cytoplasmic LDOC-1 staining in all PCa and normal prostate samples, whereas no nuclear staining was observed in any sample. Furthermore, a more intense signal was evidenced in PCa samples. LDOC-1 gene overexpression in PCa suggests an activity of LDOC-1 in PCa cell lines. PMID:27698860

  15. The death-inducer obliterator 1 (Dido1) gene regulates embryonic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinyin; Kim, Hyeung; Liang, Jiancong; Lu, Weisi; Ouyang, Bin; Liu, Dan; Songyang, Zhou

    2014-02-21

    The regulatory network of factors that center on master transcription factors such as Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2 help maintain embryonic stem (ES) cells and ensure their pluripotency. The target genes of these master transcription factors define the ES cell transcriptional landscape. In this study, we report our findings that Dido1, a target of canonical transcription factors such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, plays an important role in regulating ES cell maintenance. We found that depletion of Dido1 in mouse ES cells led to differentiation, and ectopic expression of Dido1 inhibited differentiation induced by leukemia inhibitory factor withdrawal. We further demonstrated that whereas Nanog and Oct4 could occupy the Dido1 locus and promote its transcription, Dido1 could also target to the loci of pluripotency factors such as Nanog and Oct4 and positively regulate their expression. Through this feedback and feedforward loop, Dido1 is able to regulate self-renewal of mouse ES cells.

  16. Inducible, tunable and multiplex human gene regulation using CRISPR-Cpf1-based transcription factors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeted and inducible regulation of mammalian gene expression is a broadly important research capability that may also enable development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases. Here we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive RNA-guided CRISPR-Cpf1 nuclease fused to transcriptional activation domains can up-regulate endogenous human gene expression. We engineered drug-inducible Cpf1-based activators and show how this system can be used to tune the regulation of endogenous gene transcription in human cells.

  17. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  18. Regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis by early growth response-1 gene in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure is associated with activation of certain immediate-early genes that function as transcription factors. These include members of jun or fos and early growth response (EGR) gene families. In particular, the functional role of EGR-1 in radiation-induced signaling is pivotal since the promoter of EGR-1 contains radiation-inducible CArG DNA sequences. The Egr-1 gene belongs to a family of Egr genes that includes EGR-2, EGR-3, EGR-4, EGR-α and the tumor suppressor, Wilms' tumor gene product, WT1. The Egr-1 gene product, EGR-1, is a nuclear protein that contains three zinc fingers of the C 2 H 2 subtype. The EGR-1 GC-rich consensus target sequence, 5'-GCGT/GGGGCG-3' or 5'-TCCT/ACCTCCTCC-3', has been identified in the promoter regions of transcription factors, growth factors, receptors, cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. The gene targets mediated by Egr-1 in response to ionizing radiation include TNF-α , p53, Rb and Bax, all these are effectors of apoptosis. Based on these targets, Egr-1 is a pivotal gene that initiates early signal transduction events in response to ionizing radiation leading to either growth arrest or cell death in tumor cells. There are two potential application of Egr-1 gene in therapy of cancer. First, the Egr-1 promoter contains information for appropriate spatial and temporal expression in-vivo that can be regulated by ionizing radiation to control transcription of genes that have pro-apoptotic and suicidal function. Secondly, EGR-1 protein can eliminate 'induced-radiation resistance' by inhibiting the functions of radiation-induced pro-survival genes (NFκB activity and bcl-2 expression) and activate pro-apoptotic genes (such as bax) to confer a significant radio-sensitizing effect. Together, the reported findings from my laboratory demonstrate clearly that EGR-1 is an early central gene that confers radiation sensitivity and its pro-apoptotic functions are synergized by abrogation of induced radiation

  19. Tet1 oxidase regulates neuronal gene transcription, active DNA hydroxymethylation, object location memory, and threat recognition memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the central nervous system. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  20. Cholesterol and phytosterols differentially regulate the expression of caveolin 1 and a downstream prostate cell growth-suppressor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifere, Godwin O.; Equan, Anita; Gordon, Kereen; Nagappan, Peri; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Ananaba, Godwin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to show the distinction between the apoptotic and anti-proliferative signaling of phytosterols and cholesterol enrichment in prostate cancer cell lines, mediated by the differential transcription of caveolin-1, and N-myc downstream regulated gene1 (NDRG1), a pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor suppressor. Methods PC-3 and DU145 cells were treated with sterols (cholesterol and phytosterols) for 72 h, followed by trypan blue dye exclusion measurement of necrosis and cell growth measured with a Coulter counter. Sterol induction of cell growth-suppressor gene expression was evaluated by mRNA transcription using RT-PCR, while cell cycle analysis was performed by FACS analysis. Altered expression of Ndrg1 protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Apoptosis was evaluated by real time RT-PCR amplification of P53, Bcl-2 gene and its related pro- and anti-apoptotic family members. Results Physiological doses (16 µM) of cholesterol and phytosterols were not cytotoxic in these cells. Cholesterol enrichment promoted cell growth (Pphytosterols significantly induced growth-suppression (Pphytosterols decreased mitotic subpopulations. We demonstrated for the first time that cholesterols concertedly attenuated the expression of caveolin-1(cav-1) and NDRG1 genes in both prostate cancer cell lines. Phytosterols had the opposite effect by inducing overexpression of cav-1, a known mediator of androgen-dependent signals that presumably control cell growth or apoptosis. Conclusions Cholesterol and phytosterol treatment differentially regulated the growth of prostate cancer cells and the expression of p53 and cav-1, a gene that regulates androgen-regulated signals. These sterols also differentially regulated cell cycle arrest, downstream pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor-suppressor, NDRG1 suggesting that cav-1 may mediate pro-apoptotic NDRG1 signals. Elucidation of the mechanism for sterol modulation of growth and apoptosis signaling

  1. Cdkal1, a type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene, regulates mitochondrial function in adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J. Palmer

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Cdkal1 is necessary for normal mitochondrial morphology and function in adipose tissue. These results suggest that the type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene CDKAL1 has novel functions in regulating mitochondrial activity.

  2. VEGF selectively induces Down syndrome critical region 1 gene expression in endothelial cells: a mechanism for feedback regulation of angiogenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.-G; Duh, Elia J.

    2004-01-01

    The Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) gene (also known as MCIP1, Adapt78) encodes a regulatory protein that binds to calcineurin catalytic A subunit and acts as a regulator of the calcineurin-mediated signaling pathway. We show in this study that DSCR1 is greatly induced in endothelial cells in response to VEGF, TNF-α, and A23187 treatment, and that this up-regulation is inhibited by inhibitors of the calcineurin-NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) signaling pathway as well as by PKC inhibition and a Ca 2+ chelator. We hypothesized that the up-regulation of DSCR1 gene expression in endothelial cells could act as an endogenous feedback inhibitor for angiogenesis by regulating the calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway. Our transient transfection analyses confirm that the overexpression of DSCR1 abrogates the up-regulation of reporter gene expression driven by both the cyclooxygenase 2 and DSCR1 promoters in response to stimulators. Our results indicate that DSCR1 up-regulation may represent a potential molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of angiogenic genes activated by the calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway in endothelial cells

  3. Phenotypic effects of genetic variability in human clock genes on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-31

    Dec 31, 2008 ... Circadian rhythm-related sleep disorders have also been ..... cause or an effect of the scant attention that has been paid to the Bmal2 gene, no re- .... When sleep de- prived, PER35 homozygotes exhibited much greater deficit.

  4. Tet1 Oxidase Regulates Neuronal Gene Transcription, Active DNA Hydroxy-methylation, Object Location Memory, and Threat Recognition Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Milan; Kaas, Garrett A; Lewis, John; Wang, Jing; Ross, Daniel L; Zhong, Chun; Kennedy, Andrew; Song, Hongjun; Sweatt, J David

    2015-10-01

    A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the CNS. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO) mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to: altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning) and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  5. Regulation of the Osem gene by abscisic acid and the transcriptional activator VP1: analysis of cis-acting promoter elements required for regulation by abscisic acid and VP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, T; Terada, T; Hamasuna, S

    1995-06-01

    Osem, a rice gene homologous to the wheat Em gene, which encodes one of the late-embryogenesis abundant proteins was isolated. The gene was characterized with respect to control of transcription by abscisic acid (ABA) and the transcriptional activator VP1, which is involved in the ABA-regulated gene expression during late embryo-genesis. A fusion gene (Osem-GUS) consisting of the Osem promoter and the bacterial beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene was constructed and tested in a transient expression system, using protoplasts derived from a suspension-cultured line of rice cells, for activation by ABA and by co-transfection with an expression vector (35S-Osvp1) for the rice VP1 (OSVP1) cDNA. The expression of Osem-GUS was strongly (40- to 150-fold) activated by externally applied ABA and by over-expression of (OS)VP1. The Osem promoter has three ACGTG-containing sequences, motif A, motif B and motif A', which resemble the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE) that was previously identified in the wheat Em and the rice Rab16. There is also a CATGCATG sequence, which is known as the Sph box and is shown to be essential for the regulation by VP1 of the maize anthocyanin regulatory gene C1. Focusing on these sequence elements, various mutant derivatives of the Osem promoter in the transient expression system were assayed. The analysis revealed that motif A functions not only as an ABRE but also as a sequence element required for the regulation by (OS)VP1.

  6. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the tem......Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart......, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism...... in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner....

  7. Type 1 plaminogen activator inhibitor gene: Functional analysis and glucocorticoid regulation of its promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zonneveld, A.J.; Curriden, S.A.; Loskutoff, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is an important component of the fibrinolytic system and its biosynthesis is subject to complex regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, the authors have identified and sequenced the promoter of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene. Nuclease protection experiments were performed by using endothelial cell mRNA and the transcription initiation (cap) site was established. Sequence analysis of the 5' flanking region of the gene revealed a perfect TATA box at position -28 to position -23, the conserved distance from the cap site. Comparative functional studies with the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene showed that fragments derived from this 5' flanking region exhibited high promoter activity when transfected into bovine aortic endothelial cells and mouse Ltk - fibroblasts but were inactive when introduced into HeLa cells. These studies indicate that the fragments contain the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promoter and that it is expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although the fragments were also silent in rat FTO2B hepatoma cells, their promoter activity could be induced up to 40-fold with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Promoter deletion mapping experiments and studies involving the fusion of promoter fragments to a heterologous gene indicated that dexamethasone induction is mediated by a glucocorticoid responsive element with enhancer-like properties located within the region between nucleotides -305 and +75 of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene

  8. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  9. The Inflammation-Related Gene S100A12 Is Positively Regulated by C/EBPβ and AP-1 in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyun Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available S100A12 is involved in the inflammatory response and is considered an important marker for many inflammatory diseases in humans. Our previous studies indicated that the S100A12 gene was abundant in the immune tissues of pigs and was significantly upregulated during infection with Haemophilus parasuis (HPS or porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2. In this study, the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of S100A12 was investigated in pigs. Our results showed that S100A12, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ and activator protein-1 (AP-1 genes were up-regulated in PK-15 (ATCC, CCL-33 cells when treated with LPS or Poly I: C. Additionally, the promoter activity and expression level of the S100A12 gene were significantly upregulated when C/EBPβ or AP-1 were overexpressed. We utilized electromobility shift assays (EMSA to confirm that C/EBPβ and AP-1 could directly bind the S100A12 gene promoter. We also found that the transcriptional activity and expression levels of C/EBPβ and AP-1 could positively regulate each other. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the S100A12 gene was higher when C/EBPβ and AP-1 were cotransfected than when they were transfected individually. We concluded that the S100A12 gene was cooperatively and positively regulated by C/EBPβ and AP-1 in pigs. Our study offers new insight into the transcriptional regulation of the S100A12 gene.

  10. POSSIBLE RELATED FUNCTIONS OF THE NON-HOMOLOGOUS CO-REGULATED GENE PAIR PDCD10 AND SERPINI1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Scimone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression in mammalians is a very finely controlled mechanism, and bidirectional promoters can be considered one of the most compelling examples of the accuracy of genic expression coordination. As recently reported, a bidirectional promoter regulates the expression of the PDCD10(whose mutations cause familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCMs and SERPINI1 gene pair, even though they are non-homologous genes. The aim of this study was to identify any potential common roles of these two coregulated genes. An in-silico approach was used to identify functional correlations, using the BioGraph, IPA® and Cytoscape tools and the KEGG pathway database. The results obtained show that PDCD10 and SERPINI1 may co-regulate some cellular processes, particularly those related to focal adhesion maintenance. All common pathways identified for PDCD10 and SERPINI1 are closely associated with the pathogenic characteristics of CCMs; we thus hypothesize that genes involved in these networks may contribute to the development of CCMs.

  11. Distinct Calcium Signaling Pathways Regulate Calmodulin Gene Expression in Tobacco1

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Luit, Arnold H.; Olivari, Claudio; Haley, Ann; Knight, Marc R.; Trewavas, Anthony J.

    1999-01-01

    Cold shock and wind stimuli initiate Ca2+ transients in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia) seedlings (named MAQ 2.4) containing cytoplasmic aequorin. To investigate whether these stimuli initiate Ca2+ pathways that are spatially distinct, stress-induced nuclear and cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients and the expression of a stress-induced calmodulin gene were compared. Tobacco seedlings were transformed with a construct that encodes a fusion protein between nucleoplasmin (a major oocyte nuclear protein) and aequorin. Immunocytochemical evidence indicated targeting of the fusion protein to the nucleus in these plants, which were named MAQ 7.11. Comparison between MAQ 7.11 and MAQ 2.4 seedlings confirmed that wind stimuli and cold shock invoke separate Ca2+ signaling pathways. Partial cDNAs encoding two tobacco calmodulin genes, NpCaM-1 and NpCaM-2, were identified and shown to have distinct nucleotide sequences that encode identical polypeptides. Expression of NpCaM-1, but not NpCaM-2, responded to wind and cold shock stimulation. Comparison of the Ca2+ dynamics with NpCaM-1 expression after stimulation suggested that wind-induced NpCaM-1 expression is regulated by a Ca2+ signaling pathway operational predominantly in the nucleus. In contrast, expression of NpCaM-1 in response to cold shock is regulated by a pathway operational predominantly in the cytoplasm. PMID:10557218

  12. Identification of adaptive mutations in the influenza A virus non-structural 1 gene that increase cytoplasmic localization and differentially regulate host gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Forbes

    Full Text Available The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (IAV is a multifunctional virulence factor. We have previously characterized gain-of-function mutations in the NS1 protein arising from the experimental adaptation of the human isolate A/Hong Kong/1/1968(H3N2 (HK to the mouse. The majority of these mouse adapted NS1 mutations were demonstrated to increase virulence, viral fitness, and interferon antagonism, but differ in binding to the post-transcriptional processing factor cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30. Because nuclear trafficking is a major genetic determinant of influenza virus host adaptation, we assessed subcellular localization and host gene expression of NS1 adaptive mutations. Recombinant HK viruses with adaptive mutations in the NS1 gene were assessed for NS1 protein subcellular localization in mouse and human cells using confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation. In human cells the HK wild-type (HK-wt virus NS1 protein partitioned equivalently between the cytoplasm and nucleus but was defective in cytoplasmic localization in mouse cells. Several adaptive mutations increased the proportion of NS1 in the cytoplasm of mouse cells with the greatest effects for mutations M106I and D125G. The host gene expression profile of the adaptive mutants was determined by microarray analysis of infected mouse cells to show either high or low extents of host-gene regulation (HGR or LGR phenotypes. While host genes were predominantly down regulated for the HGR group of mutants (D2N, V23A, F103L, M106I+L98S, L98S, M106V, and M106V+M124I, the LGR phenotype mutants (D125G, M106I, V180A, V226I, and R227K were characterized by a predominant up regulation of host genes. CPSF30 binding affinity of NS1 mutants did not predict effects on host gene expression. To our knowledge this is the first report of roles of adaptive NS1 mutations that impact intracellular localization and regulation of host gene expression.

  13. Replicative Stress Induces Intragenic Transcription of the ASE1 Gene that Negatively Regulates Ase1 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    McKnight, Kelly; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yanchang

    2014-01-01

    Intragenic transcripts initiate within the coding region of a gene, thereby producing shorter mRNAs and proteins. Although intragenic transcripts are widely expressed [1], their role in the functional regulation of genes remains largely unknown. In budding yeast, DNA replication stress activates the S-phase checkpoint that stabilizes replication forks and arrests cells in S-phase with a short spindle [2-4]. When yeast cells were treated with hydroxyurea (HU) to block DNA synthesis and induce ...

  14. Baculovirus p35 gene is oppositely regulated by P53 and AP-1 like factors in Spodoptera frugiperda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohareer, Krishnaveni; Sahdev, Sudhir; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Baculovirus p35 is regulated by both viral and host factors. ► Baculovirus p35 is negatively regulated by SfP53-like factor. ► Baculovirus p35 is positively regulated by SfAP-1-like factor. -- Abstract: Baculovirus p35 belongs to the early class of genes of AcMNPV and requires viral factors like Immediate Early protein-1 for its transcription. To investigate the role of host factors in regulating p35 gene expression, the putative transcription factor binding sites were examined in silico and the role of these factors in influencing the transcription of p35 gene was assessed. We focused our studies on AP-1 and P53-like factors, which are activated under oxidative stress conditions. The AP-1 motif is located at −1401 while P53 motif is at −1912 relative to p35 translation start site. The predicted AP-1 and P53 elements formed specific complexes with Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear extracts. Both AP-1 and P53 motif binding proteins were down regulated as a function of AcMNPV infection in Spodoptera cells. To address the question whether during an oxidative outburst, the p35 transcription is enhanced; we investigated the role of these oxidative stress induced host transcription factors in influencing p35 gene transcription. Reporter assays revealed that AP-1 element enhances the transcription of p35 by a factor of two. Interestingly, P53 element appears to repress the transcription of p35 gene.

  15. Baculovirus p35 gene is oppositely regulated by P53 and AP-1 like factors in Spodoptera frugiperda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohareer, Krishnaveni [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500001 (India); Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Prof. C.R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Sahdev, Sudhir [Laboratory of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500001 (India); Ranbaxy Pharmaceuticals, Gurgaon, New Delhi (India); Hasnain, Seyed E., E-mail: seh@bioschool.iitd.ac.in [Institute of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad Campus, Prof. C.R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Kusuma School of Biological Sciences, IIT Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); ILBS, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi (India); King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is regulated by both viral and host factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is negatively regulated by SfP53-like factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baculovirus p35 is positively regulated by SfAP-1-like factor. -- Abstract: Baculovirus p35 belongs to the early class of genes of AcMNPV and requires viral factors like Immediate Early protein-1 for its transcription. To investigate the role of host factors in regulating p35 gene expression, the putative transcription factor binding sites were examined in silico and the role of these factors in influencing the transcription of p35 gene was assessed. We focused our studies on AP-1 and P53-like factors, which are activated under oxidative stress conditions. The AP-1 motif is located at -1401 while P53 motif is at -1912 relative to p35 translation start site. The predicted AP-1 and P53 elements formed specific complexes with Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear extracts. Both AP-1 and P53 motif binding proteins were down regulated as a function of AcMNPV infection in Spodoptera cells. To address the question whether during an oxidative outburst, the p35 transcription is enhanced; we investigated the role of these oxidative stress induced host transcription factors in influencing p35 gene transcription. Reporter assays revealed that AP-1 element enhances the transcription of p35 by a factor of two. Interestingly, P53 element appears to repress the transcription of p35 gene.

  16. ERK1/2 mediates glucose-regulated POMC gene expression in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Yunting; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Feiyuan; Wang, Yun; Gu, Jiang; Ma, Lian; Ho, Guyu

    2015-04-01

    Hypothalamic glucose-sensing neurons regulate the expression of genes encoding feeding-related neuropetides POMC, AgRP, and NPY - the key components governing metabolic homeostasis. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is postulated to be the molecular mediator relaying glucose signals to regulate the expression of these neuropeptides. Whether other signaling mediator(s) plays a role is not clear. In this study, we investigated the role of ERK1/2 using primary hypothalamic neurons as the model system. The primary neurons were differentiated from hypothalamic progenitor cells. The differentiated neurons possessed the characteristic neuronal cell morphology and expressed neuronal post-mitotic markers as well as leptin-regulated orexigenic POMC and anorexigenic AgRP/NPY genes. Treatment of cells with glucose dose-dependently increased POMC and decreased AgRP/NPY expression with a concurrent suppression of AMPK phosphorylation. In addition, glucose treatment dose-dependently increased the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blockade of ERK1/2 activity with its specific inhibitor PD98059 partially (approximately 50%) abolished glucose-induced POMC expression, but had little effect on AgRP/NPY expression. Conversely, blockade of AMPK activity with its specific inhibitor produced a partial (approximately 50%) reversion of low-glucose-suppressed POMC expression, but almost completely blunted the low-glucose-induced AgRP/NPY expression. The results indicate that ERK1/2 mediated POMC but not AgRP/NPY expression. Confirming the in vitro findings, i.c.v. administration of PD98059 in rats similarly attenuated glucose-induced POMC expression in the hypothalamus, but again had little effect on AgRP/NPY expression. The results are indicative of a novel role of ERK1/2 in glucose-regulated POMC expression and offer new mechanistic insights into hypothalamic glucose sensing. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. Identification of let-7-regulated oncofetal genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyerinas, Benjamin; Park, Sun-Mi; Shomron, Noam

    2008-01-01

    -regulated at the end of embryonic development. Let-7 is often down-regulated early during cancer development, suggesting that let-7-regulated oncofetal genes (LOG) may become reexpressed in cancer cells. Using comparative bioinformatics, we have identified 12 conserved LOGs that include HMGA2 and IMP-1/CRD-BP. IMP-1...

  18. Nuclear factor 1 regulates adipose tissue-specific expression in the mouse GLUT4 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Shinji; Tsunoda, Nobuyo; Ikeda, Shinobu; Kai, Yuko; Cooke, David W.; Lane, M. Daniel; Ezaki, Osamu

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that an adipose tissue-specific element(s) (ASE) of the murine GLUT4 gene is located between -551 and -506 in the 5'-flanking sequence and that a high-fat responsive element(s) for down-regulation of the GLUT4 gene is located between bases -701 and -552. A binding site for nuclear factor 1 (NF1), that mediates insulin and cAMP-induced repression of GLUT4 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes is located between bases -700 and -688. To examine the role of NF1 in the regulation of GLUT4 gene expression in white adipose tissues (WAT) in vivo, we created two types of transgenic mice harboring mutated either 5' or 3' half-site of NF1-binding sites in GLUT4 minigene constructs. In both cases, the GLUT4 minigene was not expressed in WAT, while expression was maintained in brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and heart. This was an unexpected finding, since a -551 GLUT4 minigene that did not have the NF1-binding site was expressed in WAT. We propose a model that explains the requirement for both the ASE and the NF1-binding site for expression of GLUT4 in WAT

  19. Effects of Larval Density on Gene Regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans During Routine L1 Synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Io Long; Rando, Oliver J; Conine, Colin C

    2018-05-04

    Bleaching gravid C. elegans followed by a short period of starvation of the L1 larvae is a routine method performed by worm researchers for generating synchronous populations for experiments. During the process of investigating dietary effects on gene regulation in L1 stage worms by single-worm RNA-Seq, we found that the density of resuspended L1 larvae affects expression of many mRNAs. Specifically, a number of genes related to metabolism and signaling are highly expressed in worms arrested at low density, but are repressed at higher arrest densities. We generated a GFP reporter strain based on one of the most density-dependent genes in our dataset - lips-15 - and confirmed that this reporter was expressed specifically in worms arrested at relatively low density. Finally, we show that conditioned media from high density L1 cultures was able to downregulate lips-15 even in L1 animals arrested at low density, and experiments using daf-22 mutant animals demonstrated that this effect is not mediated by the ascaroside family of signaling pheromones. Together, our data implicate a soluble signaling molecule in density sensing by L1 stage C. elegans , and provide guidance for design of experiments focused on early developmental gene regulation. Copyright © 2018 Chan et al.

  20. The Schizophrenia-Associated BRD1 Gene Regulates Behavior, Neurotransmission, and Expression of Schizophrenia Risk Enriched Gene Sets in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Per; Christensen, Jane Hvarregaard; Vardya, Irina; Rajkumar, Anto Praveen; Mørk, Arne; Paternoster, Veerle; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Pallesen, Jonatan; Fryland, Tue; Dyrvig, Mads; Hauberg, Mads Engel; Lundsberg, Birgitte; Fejgin, Kim; Nyegaard, Mette; Jensen, Kimmo; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Mors, Ole; Didriksen, Michael; Børglum, Anders Dupont

    2017-07-01

    The schizophrenia-associated BRD1 gene encodes a transcriptional regulator whose comprehensive chromatin interactome is enriched with schizophrenia risk genes. However, the biology underlying the disease association of BRD1 remains speculative. This study assessed the transcriptional drive of a schizophrenia-associated BRD1 risk variant in vitro. Accordingly, to examine the effects of reduced Brd1 expression, we generated a genetically modified Brd1 +/- mouse and subjected it to behavioral, electrophysiological, molecular, and integrative genomic analyses with focus on schizophrenia-relevant parameters. Brd1 +/- mice displayed cerebral histone H3K14 hypoacetylation and a broad range of behavioral changes with translational relevance to schizophrenia. These behaviors were accompanied by striatal dopamine/serotonin abnormalities and cortical excitation-inhibition imbalances involving loss of parvalbumin immunoreactive interneurons. RNA-sequencing analyses of cortical and striatal micropunches from Brd1 +/- and wild-type mice revealed differential expression of genes enriched for schizophrenia risk, including several schizophrenia genome-wide association study risk genes (e.g., calcium channel subunits [Cacna1c and Cacnb2], cholinergic muscarinic receptor 4 [Chrm4)], dopamine receptor D 2 [Drd2], and transcription factor 4 [Tcf4]). Integrative analyses further found differentially expressed genes to cluster in functional networks and canonical pathways associated with mental illness and molecular signaling processes (e.g., glutamatergic, monoaminergic, calcium, cyclic adenosine monophosphate [cAMP], dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein 32 kDa [DARPP-32], and cAMP responsive element binding protein signaling [CREB]). Our study bridges the gap between genetic association and pathogenic effects and yields novel insights into the unfolding molecular changes in the brain of a new schizophrenia model that incorporates genetic risk at three levels: allelic

  1. MTH1 and RGT1 demonstrate combined haploinsufficiency in regulation of the hexose transporter genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietzel Kevin L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SNF3 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a low glucose sensor that regulates expression of an important subset of the hexose transporter (HXT superfamily. Null mutations of snf3 result in a defect in growth on low glucose concentrations due to the inability to relieve repression of a subset of the HXT genes. The snf3 null mutation phenotype is suppressed by the loss of either one of the downstream co-repressor proteins Rgt1p or Mth1p. The relief of repression allows expression of HXT transporter proteins, the resumption of glucose uptake and therefore of growth in the absence of a functional Snf3 sensor. Results Strains heterozygous for both the RGT1 and MTH1 genes (RGT1/rgt1Δ MTH1/mth1Δ snf3Δ/snf3Δ but homozygous for the snf3∆ were found to grow on low glucose. Since null alleles in the heterozygous state lead to suppression, MTH1 and RGT1 display the phenomenon of combined haploinsufficiency. This observed haploinsufficiency is consistent with the finding of repressor titration as a mechanism of suppression of snf3. Mutants of the STD1 homolog of MTH1 did not display haploinsufficiency singly or in combination with mutations in RGT1. HXT gene reporter fusion assays indicated that the presence of heterozygosity at the MTH1 and RGT1 alleles leads to increased expression of the HXT2 gene. Deletion of the HXT2 gene in a heterozygous diploid, RGT1/rgt1Δ MTH1/mth1Δ snf3Δ/snf3Δ hxt2Δ/hxt2Δ, prevented the suppression of snf3Δ. Conclusions These findings support the model of relief of repression as the mechanism of restoration of growth on low glucose concentrations in the absence of functional Snf3p. Further, the observation that HXT2 is the gene responsible for restoration of growth under these conditions suggests that the numbers of repressor binding domains found in the regulatory regions of members of the HXT family may have biological relevance and enable differential regulation.

  2. Rce1, a novel transcriptional repressor, regulates cellulase gene expression by antagonizing the transactivator Xyr1 in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanli; Zheng, Fanglin; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guolei; Chen, Guanjun; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Weifeng

    2017-07-01

    Cellulase gene expression in the model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei is supposed to be controlled by an intricate regulatory network involving multiple transcription factors. Here, we identified a novel transcriptional repressor of cellulase gene expression, Rce1. Disruption of the rce1 gene not only facilitated the induced expression of cellulase genes but also led to a significant delay in terminating the induction process. However, Rce1 did not participate in Cre1-mediated catabolite repression. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting assays in combination with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that Rce1 could bind directly to a cbh1 (cellobiohydrolase 1-encoding) gene promoter region containing a cluster of Xyr1 binding sites. Furthermore, competitive binding assays revealed that Rce1 antagonized Xyr1 from binding to the cbh1 promoter. These results indicate that intricate interactions exist between a variety of transcription factors to ensure tight and energy-efficient regulation of cellulase gene expression in T. reesei. This study also provides important clues regarding increased cellulase production in T. reesei. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Gene expression profiles in Parkinson disease prefrontal cortex implicate FOXO1 and genes under its transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dumitriu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with largely unknown genetic mechanisms. While the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD mainly takes place in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN region, other brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex, develop Lewy bodies, the neuropathological hallmark of PD. We generated and analyzed expression data from the prefrontal cortex Brodmann Area 9 (BA9 of 27 PD and 26 control samples using the 44K One-Color Agilent 60-mer Whole Human Genome Microarray. All samples were male, without significant Alzheimer disease pathology and with extensive pathological annotation available. 507 of the 39,122 analyzed expression probes were different between PD and control samples at false discovery rate (FDR of 5%. One of the genes with significantly increased expression in PD was the forkhead box O1 (FOXO1 transcription factor. Notably, genes carrying the FoxO1 binding site were significantly enriched in the FDR-significant group of genes (177 genes covered by 189 probes, suggesting a role for FoxO1 upstream of the observed expression changes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected from a recent meta-analysis of PD genome-wide association studies (GWAS were successfully genotyped in 50 out of the 53 microarray brains, allowing a targeted expression-SNP (eSNP analysis for 52 SNPs associated with PD affection at genome-wide significance and the 189 probes from FoxO1 regulated genes. A significant association was observed between a SNP in the cyclin G associated kinase (GAK gene and a probe in the spermine oxidase (SMOX gene. Further examination of the FOXO1 region in a meta-analysis of six available GWAS showed two SNPs significantly associated with age at onset of PD. These results implicate FOXO1 as a PD-relevant gene and warrant further functional analyses of its transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  4. The global nitrogen regulator, FNR1, regulates fungal nutrition-genes and fitness during Fusarium oxysporum pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divon, Hege Hvattum; Ziv, Carmit; Davydov, Olga; Yarden, Oded; Fluhr, Robert

    2006-11-01

    SUMMARY Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-borne pathogen that infects plants through the roots and uses the vascular system for host ingress. Specialized for this route of infection, F. oxysporum is able to adapt to the scarce nutrient environment in the xylem vessels. Here we report the cloning of the F. oxysporum global nitrogen regulator, Fnr1, and show that it is one of the determinants for fungal fitness during in planta growth. The Fnr1 gene has a single conserved GATA-type zinc finger domain and is 96% and 48% identical to AREA-GF from Gibberella fujikuroi, and NIT2 from Neurospora crassa, respectively. Fnr1 cDNA, expressed under a constitutive promoter, was able to complement functionally an N. crassa nit-2(RIP) mutant, restoring the ability of the mutant to utilize nitrate. Fnr1 disruption mutants showed high tolerance to chlorate and reduced ability to utilize several secondary nitrogen sources such as amino acids, hypoxanthine and uric acid, whereas growth on favourable nitrogen sources was not affected. Fnr1 disruption also abolished in vitro expression of nutrition genes, normally induced during the early phase of infection. In an infection assay on tomato seedlings, infection rate of disruption mutants was significantly delayed in comparison with the parental strain. Our results indicate that FNR1 mediates adaptation to nitrogen-poor conditions in planta through the regulation of secondary nitrogen acquisition, and as such acts as a determinant for fungal fitness during infection.

  5. Ataxin1L is a regulator of HSC function highlighting the utility of cross-tissue comparisons for gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette J Kahle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are rare quiescent cells that continuously replenish the cellular components of the peripheral blood. Observing that the ataxia-associated gene Ataxin-1-like (Atxn1L was highly expressed in HSCs, we examined its role in HSC function through in vitro and in vivo assays. Mice lacking Atxn1L had greater numbers of HSCs that regenerated the blood more quickly than their wild-type counterparts. Molecular analyses indicated Atxn1L null HSCs had gene expression changes that regulate a program consistent with their higher level of proliferation, suggesting that Atxn1L is a novel regulator of HSC quiescence. To determine if additional brain-associated genes were candidates for hematologic regulation, we examined genes encoding proteins from autism- and ataxia-associated protein-protein interaction networks for their representation in hematopoietic cell populations. The interactomes were found to be highly enriched for proteins encoded by genes specifically expressed in HSCs relative to their differentiated progeny. Our data suggest a heretofore unappreciated similarity between regulatory modules in the brain and HSCs, offering a new strategy for novel gene discovery in both systems.

  6. Identification of a STOP1-like protein in Eucalyptus that regulates transcription of Al tolerance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaki, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Kihara-Doi, Tomonori; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Kawazu, Tetsu; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Iuchi, Satoshi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Tolerance to soil acidity is an important trait for eucalyptus clones that are introduced to commercial forestry plantations in pacific Asian countries, where acidic soil is dominant in many locations. A conserved transcription factor regulating aluminum (Al) and proton (H⁺) tolerance in land-plant species, STOP1 (SENSITIVE TOPROTON RHIZOTOXICITY 1)-like protein, was isolated by polymerase chain reaction-based cloning, and then suppressed by RNA interference in hairy roots produced by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Eucalyptus STOP1-like protein complemented proton tolerance in an Arabidopsis thaliana stop1-mutant, and localized to the nucleus in a transient assay of a green fluorescent protein fusion protein expressed in tobacco leaves by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Genes encoding a citrate transporting MULTIDRUGS AND TOXIC COMPOUND EXTRUSION protein and an orthologue of ALUMINUM SENSITIVE 3 were suppressed in transgenic hairy roots in which the STOP1 orthologue was knocked down. In summary, we identified a series of genes for Al-tolerance in eucalyptus, including a gene for STOP1-like protein and the Al-tolerance genes it regulates. These genes may be useful for molecular breeding and genomic selection of elite clones to introduce into acid soil regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CmWRKY1 Enhances the Dehydration Tolerance of Chrysanthemum through the Regulation of ABA-Associated Genes.

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    Qingqing Fan

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors serve as antagonistic or synergistic regulators in a variety of abiotic stress responses in plants. Here, we show that CmWRKY1, a member of the group IIb WRKY family isolated from Chrysanthemum morifolium, exhibits no transcriptional activation in yeast cells. The subcellular localization examination showed that CmWRKY1 localizes to the nucleus in vivo. Furthermore, CmWRKY1-overexpressing transgenic lines exhibit enhanced dehydration tolerance in response to polyethylene glycol (PEG treatment compared with wild-type plants. We further confirmed that the transgenic plants exhibit suppressed expression levels of genes negatively regulated by ABA, such as PP2C, ABI1 and ABI2, and activated expression levels of genes positively regulated by ABA, such as PYL2, SnRK2.2, ABF4, MYB2, RAB18, and DREB1A. Taken together, our results indicate that CmWRKY1 plays an important role in the response to drought in chrysanthemum through an ABA-mediated pathway.

  8. Bimodal regulation of mPeriod promoters by CREB-dependent signaling and CLOCK/BMAL1 activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníčková, Zdeňka; Cermakian, N.; Reppert, S. M.; Sassone-Corsi, P.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 11 (2002), s. 7728-7733 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : circadian * period gene * cell signalling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.701, year: 2002

  9. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 regulates IGFBP-1 gene transcription through the Thymine-rich Insulin Response Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquez Rodolfo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatic expression of several gene products involved in glucose metabolism, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1, is rapidly and completely inhibited by insulin. This inhibition is mediated through the regulation of a DNA element present in each of these gene promoters, that we call the Thymine-rich Insulin Response Element (TIRE. The insulin signalling pathway that results in the inhibition of these gene promoters requires the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase. However, the molecules that connect PI 3-kinase to these gene promoters are not yet fully defined. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3 is inhibited following activation of PI 3-kinase. We have shown previously that inhibitors of GSK-3 reduce the activity of two TIRE-containing gene promoters (PEPCK and G6Pase, whose products are required for gluconeogenesis. Results In this report we demonstrate that in H4IIE-C3 cells, four distinct classes of GSK-3 inhibitor mimic the effect of insulin on a third TIRE-containing gene, IGFBP-1. We identify the TIRE as the minimum requirement for inhibition by these agents, and demonstrate that the target of GSK-3 is unlikely to be the postulated TIRE-binding protein FOXO-1. Importantly, overexpression of GSK-3 in cells reduces the insulin regulation of TIRE activity as well as endogenous IGFBP-1 expression. Conclusions These results implicate GSK-3 as an intermediate in the pathway from the insulin receptor to the TIRE. Indeed, this is the first demonstration of an absolute requirement for GSK-3 inhibition in insulin regulation of gene transcription. These data support the potential use of GSK-3 inhibitors in the treatment of insulin resistant states such as Type 2 diabetes mellitus, but suggest that it will be important to identify all TIRE-containing genes to assess potential side effects of these agents.

  10. Trpac1, a pH response transcription regulator, is involved in cellulase gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ronglin; Ma, Lijuan; Li, Chen; Jia, Wendi; Li, Demao; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2014-12-01

    Fungi grow over a relatively wide pH range and adapt to extracellular pH through a genetic regulatory system mediated by a key component PacC, which is a pH transcription regulator. The cellulase production of the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei is sensitive to ambient pH. To investigate the connection between cellulase expression regulation and ambient pH, an ortholog of Aspergillus nidulans pacC, Trpac1, was identified and functionally characterized using a target gene deletion strategy. Deleting Trpac1 dramatically increased the cellulase production and the transcription levels of the major cellulase genes at neutral pH, which suggested Trpac1 is involved in the regulation of cellulase production. It was further observed that the expression levels of transcription factors xyr1 and ace2 also increased in the ΔTrpac1 mutant at neutral pH. In addition, the ΔTrpac1 mutant exhibited conidiation defects under neutral and alkaline pH. These results implied that Trpac1 in involved in growth and development process and cellulase gene expression in T. reesei. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fetal alcohol exposure disrupts metabolic signaling in hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons via a circadian mechanism in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapito, Maria A; Zhang, Changqing; Murugan, Sengottuvelan; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2014-07-01

    Early-life ethanol feeding (ELAF) alters the metabolic function of proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-producing neurons and the circadian expression of clock regulatory genes in the hypothalamus. We investigated whether the circadian mechanisms control the action of ELAF on metabolic signaling genes in POMC neurons. Gene expression measurements of Pomc and a selected group of metabolic signaling genes, Stat3, Sirt1, Pgc1-α, and Asb4 in laser-captured microdissected POMC neurons in the hypothalamus of POMC-enhanced green fluorescent protein mice showed circadian oscillations under light/dark and constant darkness conditions. Ethanol programmed these neurons such that the adult expression of Pomc, Stat3, Sirt, and Asb4 gene transcripts became arrhythmic. In addition, ELAF dampened the circadian peak of gene expression of Bmal1, Per1, and Per2 in POMC neurons. We crossed Per2 mutant mice with transgenic POMC-enhanced green fluorescent protein mice to determine the role of circadian mechanism in ELAF-altered metabolic signaling in POMC neurons. We found that ELAF failed to alter arrhythmic expression of most circadian genes, with the exception of the Bmal1 gene and metabolic signaling regulating genes in Per2 mutant mice. Comparison of the ELAF effects on the circadian blood glucose in wild-type and Per2 mutant mice revealed that ELAF dampened the circadian peak of glucose, whereas the Per2 mutation shifted the circadian cycle and prevented the ELAF dampening of the glucose peak. These data suggest the possibility that the Per2 gene mutation may regulate the ethanol actions on Pomc and the metabolic signaling genes in POMC neurons in the hypothalamus by blocking circadian mechanisms.

  12. Alteration of light-dependent gene regulation by the absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex in the fungus Neurospora crassa.

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    Carmen Ruger-Herreros

    Full Text Available The activation of transcription by light in the fungus Neurospora crassa requires the White Collar Complex (WCC, a photoreceptor and transcription factor complex. After light reception two WCCs interact and bind the promoters of light-regulated genes to activate transcription. This process is regulated by VVD, a small photoreceptor that disrupts the interaction between WCCs and leads to a reduction in transcription after long exposures to light. The N. crassa RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex is the homolog of the Tup1-Ssn6 repressor complex in yeast, and its absence modifies photoadaptation. We show that the absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex leads to several alterations in transcription that are gene-specific: an increase in the accumulation of mRNAs in the dark, a repression of transcription, and a derepression of transcription after long exposures to light. The absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex leads to lower VVD levels that are available for the regulation of the activity of the WCC. The reduction in the amount of VVD results in increased WCC binding to the promoters of light-regulated genes in the dark and after long exposures to light, leading to the modification of photoadaptation that has been observed in rco-1 and rcm-1 mutants. Our results show that the photoadaptation phenotype of mutants in the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex is, at least in part, an indirect consequence of the reduction of vvd transcription, and the resulting modification in the regulation of transcription by the WCC.

  13. Crosstalk between thyroid hormone receptor and liver X receptor in the regulation of selective Alzheimer's disease indicator-1 gene expression.

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    Emi Ishida

    Full Text Available Selective Alzheimer's disease (AD indicator 1 (Seladin-1 has been identified as a gene down-regulated in the degenerated lesions of AD brain. Up-regulation of Seladin-1 reduces the accumulation of β-amyloid and neuronal death. Thyroid hormone (TH exerts an important effect on the development and maintenance of central nervous systems. In the current study, we demonstrated that Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the forebrain was increased in thyrotoxic mice compared with that of euthyroid mice. However, unexpectedly, no significant decrease in the gene and protein expression was observed in hypothyroid mice. Interestingly, an agonist of liver X receptor (LXR, TO901317 (TO administration in vivo increased Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the mouse forebrain only in a hypothyroid state and in the presence of mutant TR-β, suggesting that LXR-α would compensate for TR-β function to maintain Seladin-1 gene expression in hypothyroidism and resistance to TH. TH activated the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter (-1936/+21 bp and site 2 including canonical TH response element (TRE half-site in the region between -159 and -154 bp is responsible for the positive regulation. RXR-α/TR-β heterodimerization was identified on site 2 by gel-shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed the recruitment of TR-β to site 2 and the recruitment was increased upon TH administration. On the other hand, LXR-α utilizes a distinct region from site 2 (-120 to -102 bp to activate the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter. Taking these findings together, we concluded that TH up-regulates Seladin-1 gene expression at the transcriptional level and LXR-α maintains the gene expression.

  14. Arabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stress

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baohai

    2012-10-12

    Ammonium (NH4 +) is a ubiquitous intermediate of nitrogen metabolism but is notorious for its toxic effects on most organisms. Extensive studies of the underlying mechanisms of NH4 + toxicity have been reported in plants, but it is poorly understood how plants acclimate to high levels of NH4 +. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ammonium overly sensitive1 (amos1), that displays severe chlorosis under NH4 + stress. Map-based cloning shows amos1 to carry a mutation in EGY1 (for ethylene-dependent, gravitropism-deficient, and yellow-green-like protein1), which encodes a plastid metalloprotease. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that among the genes activated in response to NH4 +, 90% are regulated dependent on AMOS1/ EGY1. Furthermore, 63% of AMOS1/EGY1-dependent NH4 +-activated genes contain an ACGTG motif in their promoter region, a core motif of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements. Consistent with this, our physiological, pharmacological, transcriptomic, and genetic data show that ABA signaling is a critical, but not the sole, downstream component of the AMOS1/EGY1-dependent pathway that regulates the expression of NH4 +-responsive genes and maintains chloroplast functionality under NH4 + stress. Importantly, abi4 mutants defective in ABA-dependent and retrograde signaling, but not ABA-deficient mutants, mimic leaf NH4 + hypersensitivity of amos1. In summary, our findings suggest that an NH4 +-responsive plastid retrograde pathway, which depends on AMOS1/EGY1 function and integrates with ABA signaling, is required for the regulation of expression of the presence of high NH4 + levels. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Arabidopsis plastid AMOS1/EGY1 integrates abscisic acid signaling to regulate global gene expression response to ammonium stress

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baohai; Li, Qing; Xiong, Liming; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Krä mer, Ute; Shi, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4 +) is a ubiquitous intermediate of nitrogen metabolism but is notorious for its toxic effects on most organisms. Extensive studies of the underlying mechanisms of NH4 + toxicity have been reported in plants, but it is poorly understood how plants acclimate to high levels of NH4 +. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, ammonium overly sensitive1 (amos1), that displays severe chlorosis under NH4 + stress. Map-based cloning shows amos1 to carry a mutation in EGY1 (for ethylene-dependent, gravitropism-deficient, and yellow-green-like protein1), which encodes a plastid metalloprotease. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that among the genes activated in response to NH4 +, 90% are regulated dependent on AMOS1/ EGY1. Furthermore, 63% of AMOS1/EGY1-dependent NH4 +-activated genes contain an ACGTG motif in their promoter region, a core motif of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements. Consistent with this, our physiological, pharmacological, transcriptomic, and genetic data show that ABA signaling is a critical, but not the sole, downstream component of the AMOS1/EGY1-dependent pathway that regulates the expression of NH4 +-responsive genes and maintains chloroplast functionality under NH4 + stress. Importantly, abi4 mutants defective in ABA-dependent and retrograde signaling, but not ABA-deficient mutants, mimic leaf NH4 + hypersensitivity of amos1. In summary, our findings suggest that an NH4 +-responsive plastid retrograde pathway, which depends on AMOS1/EGY1 function and integrates with ABA signaling, is required for the regulation of expression of the presence of high NH4 + levels. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Tumor-produced, active Interleukin-1 β regulates gene expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudas, Jozsef; Fullar, Alexandra; Bitsche, Mario; Schartinger, Volker; Kovalszky, Ilona; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Recently we described a co-culture model of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts and SCC-25 lingual squamous carcinoma cells, which resulted in conversion of normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of SCC-25 cells. We have found a constitutive high interleukin-1β (IL1-β) expression in SCC-25 cells in normal and in co-cultured conditions. In our hypothesis a constitutive IL1-β expression in SCC-25 regulates gene expression in fibroblasts during co-culture. Co-cultures were performed between PDL fibroblasts and SCC-25 cells with and without dexamethasone (DEX) treatment; IL1-β processing was investigated in SCC-25 cells, tumor cells and PDL fibroblasts were treated with IL1-β. IL1-β signaling was investigated by western blot and immunocytochemistry. IL1-β-regulated genes were analyzed by real-time qPCR. SCC-25 cells produced 16 kD active IL1-β, its receptor was upregulated in PDL fibroblasts during co-culture, which induced phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1), and nuclear translocalization of NFκBα. Several genes, including interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) were induced in CAFs during co-culture. The most enhanced induction was found for IL-6 and COX-2. Treatment of PDL fibroblasts with IL1-β reproduced a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of IL1-receptor, IL-6 and COX-2. A further proof was achieved by DEX inhibition for IL1-β-stimulated IL-6 and COX-2 gene expression. Constitutive expression of IL1-β in the tumor cells leads to IL1-β-stimulated gene expression changes in tumor-associated fibroblasts, which are involved in tumor progression. -- Graphical abstract: SCC-25 cells produce active, processed IL1-β. PDL fibroblasts possess receptor for IL1-β, and its expression is increased 4.56-times in the presence of SCC-25 tumor cells. IL1-β receptor expression in

  17. Tumor-produced, active Interleukin-1 {beta} regulates gene expression in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudas, Jozsef, E-mail: Jozsef.Dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullar, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Institute of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Ulloei ut 26, H-1085 Budapest (Hungary); Bitsche, Mario, E-mail: Mario.Bitsche@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: Volker.Schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Institute of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Ulloei ut 26, H-1085 Budapest (Hungary); Sprinzl, Georg Mathias, E-mail: Georg.Sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: Herbert.Riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2011-09-10

    Recently we described a co-culture model of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts and SCC-25 lingual squamous carcinoma cells, which resulted in conversion of normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of SCC-25 cells. We have found a constitutive high interleukin-1{beta} (IL1-{beta}) expression in SCC-25 cells in normal and in co-cultured conditions. In our hypothesis a constitutive IL1-{beta} expression in SCC-25 regulates gene expression in fibroblasts during co-culture. Co-cultures were performed between PDL fibroblasts and SCC-25 cells with and without dexamethasone (DEX) treatment; IL1-{beta} processing was investigated in SCC-25 cells, tumor cells and PDL fibroblasts were treated with IL1-{beta}. IL1-{beta} signaling was investigated by western blot and immunocytochemistry. IL1-{beta}-regulated genes were analyzed by real-time qPCR. SCC-25 cells produced 16 kD active IL1-{beta}, its receptor was upregulated in PDL fibroblasts during co-culture, which induced phosphorylation of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1), and nuclear translocalization of NF{kappa}B{alpha}. Several genes, including interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2) were induced in CAFs during co-culture. The most enhanced induction was found for IL-6 and COX-2. Treatment of PDL fibroblasts with IL1-{beta} reproduced a time- and dose-dependent upregulation of IL1-receptor, IL-6 and COX-2. A further proof was achieved by DEX inhibition for IL1-{beta}-stimulated IL-6 and COX-2 gene expression. Constitutive expression of IL1-{beta} in the tumor cells leads to IL1-{beta}-stimulated gene expression changes in tumor-associated fibroblasts, which are involved in tumor progression. -- Graphical abstract: SCC-25 cells produce active, processed IL1-{beta}. PDL fibroblasts possess receptor for IL1-{beta}, and its expression is increased 4.56-times in the

  18. Functional characterization of MAT1-1-specific mating-type genes in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora provides new insights into essential and nonessential sexual regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klix, V; Nowrousian, M; Ringelberg, C; Loros, J J; Dunlap, J C; Pöggeler, S

    2010-06-01

    Mating-type genes in fungi encode regulators of mating and sexual development. Heterothallic ascomycete species require different sets of mating-type genes to control nonself-recognition and mating of compatible partners of different mating types. Homothallic (self-fertile) species also carry mating-type genes in their genome that are essential for sexual development. To analyze the molecular basis of homothallism and the role of mating-type genes during fruiting-body development, we deleted each of the three genes, SmtA-1 (MAT1-1-1), SmtA-2 (MAT1-1-2), and SmtA-3 (MAT1-1-3), contained in the MAT1-1 part of the mating-type locus of the homothallic ascomycete species Sordaria macrospora. Phenotypic analysis of deletion mutants revealed that the PPF domain protein-encoding gene SmtA-2 is essential for sexual reproduction, whereas the alpha domain protein-encoding genes SmtA-1 and SmtA-3 play no role in fruiting-body development. By means of cross-species microarray analysis using Neurospora crassa oligonucleotide microarrays hybridized with S. macrospora targets and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified genes expressed under the control of SmtA-1 and SmtA-2. Both genes are involved in the regulation of gene expression, including that of pheromone genes.

  19. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hampel

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR, a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors.

  20. Global identification of bursicon-regulated genes in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Beerntsen Brenda

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bursicon is a heterodimer neuropeptide responsible for regulating cuticle sclerotization and wing expansion in several insect species. Recent studies indicate that the action of bursicon is mediated by a specific G protein-coupled receptor DLGR2 and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. However, little is known regarding the genes that are regulated by bursicon. The identification of bursicon-regulated genes is the focus of this investigation. Results We used DNA microarray analysis to identify bursicon-regulated genes in neck-ligated flies (Drosophila melanogaster that received recombinant bursicon (r-bursicon. Fifty four genes were found to be regulated by bursicon 1 h post r-bursicon injection, 52 being up-regulated and 2 down-regulated while 33 genes were influenced by r-bursicon 3 h post-injection (24 up-regulated and 9 down-regulated genes. Analysis of these genes by inference from the fly database http://flybase.bio.indiana.edu revealed that these genes encode proteins with diverse functions, including cell signaling, gene transcription, DNA/RNA binding, ion trafficking, proteolysis-peptidolysis, metabolism, cytoskeleton formation, immune response and cell-adhesion. Twenty eight genes randomly selected from the microarray-identified list were verified by real time PCR (qPCR which supported the microarray data. Temporal response studies of 13 identified and verified genes by qPCR revealed that the temporal expression patterns of these genes are consistent with the microarray data. Conclusion Using r-bursicon, we identified 87 genes that are regulated by bursicon, 30 of which have no previously known function. Most importantly, all genes randomly selected from the microarray-identified list were verified by real time PCR. Temporal analysis of 13 verified genes revealed that the expression of these genes was indeed induced by bursicon and correlated well with the cuticle sclerotization process. The composite data suggest that

  1. The rice YABBY1 gene is involved in the feedback regulation of gibberellin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mingqiu; Zhao, Yu; Ma, Qian; Hu, Yongfeng; Hedden, Peter; Zhang, Qifa; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2007-05-01

    Gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis is regulated by feedback control providing a mechanism for GA homeostasis in plants. However, regulatory elements involved in the feedback control are not known. In this report, we show that a rice (Oryza sativa) YABBY1 (YAB1) gene had a similar expression pattern as key rice GA biosynthetic genes GA3ox2 and GA20ox2. Overexpression of YAB1 in transgenic rice resulted in a semidwarf phenotype that could be fully rescued by applied GA. Quantification of the endogenous GA content revealed increases of GA(20) and decreases of GA(1) levels in the overexpression plants, in which the transcripts of the biosynthetic gene GA3ox2 were decreased. Cosuppression of YAB1 in transgenic plants induced expression of GA3ox2. The repression of GA3ox2 could be obtained upon treatment by dexamethasone of transgenic plants expressing a YAB1-glucocorticoid receptor fusion. Importantly, we show that YAB1 bound to a GA-responsive element within the GA3ox2 promoter. In addition, the expression of YAB1 was deregulated in GA biosynthesis and signaling mutants and could be either transiently induced by GA or repressed by a GA inhibitor. Finally, either overexpression or cosuppression of YAB1 impaired GA-mediated repression of GA3ox2. These data together suggest that YAB1 is involved in the feedback regulation of GA biosynthesis in rice.

  2. Bioinformatic detection of E47, E2F1 and SREBP1 transcription factors as potential regulators of genes associated to acquisition of endometrial receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croxatto Horacio B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endometrium is a dynamic tissue whose changes are driven by the ovarian steroidal hormones. Its main function is to provide an adequate substrate for embryo implantation. Using microarray technology, several reports have provided the gene expression patterns of human endometrial tissue during the window of implantation. However it is required that biological connections be made across these genomic datasets to take full advantage of them. The objective of this work was to perform a research synthesis of available gene expression profiles related to acquisition of endometrial receptivity for embryo implantation, in order to gain insights into its molecular basis and regulation. Methods Gene expression datasets were intersected to determine a consensus endometrial receptivity transcript list (CERTL. For this cluster of genes we determined their functional annotations using available web-based databases. In addition, promoter sequences were analyzed to identify putative transcription factor binding sites using bioinformatics tools and determined over-represented features. Results We found 40 up- and 21 down-regulated transcripts in the CERTL. Those more consistently increased were C4BPA, SPP1, APOD, CD55, CFD, CLDN4, DKK1, ID4, IL15 and MAP3K5 whereas the more consistently decreased were OLFM1, CCNB1, CRABP2, EDN3, FGFR1, MSX1 and MSX2. Functional annotation of CERTL showed it was enriched with transcripts related to the immune response, complement activation and cell cycle regulation. Promoter sequence analysis of genes revealed that DNA binding sites for E47, E2F1 and SREBP1 transcription factors were the most consistently over-represented and in both up- and down-regulated genes during the window of implantation. Conclusions Our research synthesis allowed organizing and mining high throughput data to explore endometrial receptivity and focus future research efforts on specific genes and pathways. The discovery of possible

  3. TiGER: a database for tissue-specific gene expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiong; Yu, Xueping; Zack, Donald J; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2008-06-09

    Understanding how genes are expressed and regulated in different tissues is a fundamental and challenging question. However, most of currently available biological databases do not focus on tissue-specific gene regulation. The recent development of computational methods for tissue-specific combinational gene regulation, based on transcription factor binding sites, enables us to perform a large-scale analysis of tissue-specific gene regulation in human tissues. The results are stored in a web database called TiGER (Tissue-specific Gene Expression and Regulation). The database contains three types of data including tissue-specific gene expression profiles, combinatorial gene regulations, and cis-regulatory module (CRM) detections. At present the database contains expression profiles for 19,526 UniGene genes, combinatorial regulations for 7,341 transcription factor pairs and 6,232 putative CRMs for 2,130 RefSeq genes. We have developed and made publicly available a database, TiGER, which summarizes and provides large scale data sets for tissue-specific gene expression and regulation in a variety of human tissues. This resource is available at 1.

  4. TiGER: A database for tissue-specific gene expression and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zack Donald J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how genes are expressed and regulated in different tissues is a fundamental and challenging question. However, most of currently available biological databases do not focus on tissue-specific gene regulation. Results The recent development of computational methods for tissue-specific combinational gene regulation, based on transcription factor binding sites, enables us to perform a large-scale analysis of tissue-specific gene regulation in human tissues. The results are stored in a web database called TiGER (Tissue-specific Gene Expression and Regulation. The database contains three types of data including tissue-specific gene expression profiles, combinatorial gene regulations, and cis-regulatory module (CRM detections. At present the database contains expression profiles for 19,526 UniGene genes, combinatorial regulations for 7,341 transcription factor pairs and 6,232 putative CRMs for 2,130 RefSeq genes. Conclusion We have developed and made publicly available a database, TiGER, which summarizes and provides large scale data sets for tissue-specific gene expression and regulation in a variety of human tissues. This resource is available at 1.

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of macrophage ABCA1, an early response gene to IFN-γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro Leon, Martha Leticia; Evans, Glenn F.; Farmen, Mark W.; Zuckerman, Steven H.

    2005-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) down-regulates receptors associated with reverse cholesterol transport including ABCA1. In the present study, the kinetics and mechanism of ABCA1 down-regulation were determined in mouse peritoneal macrophages. IFN-γ decreased ABCA1 mRNA 1 h following IFN-γ addition and was maximally reduced by 3 h. Down-regulation was protein synthesis dependent and involved post-transcriptional processes. ABCA1 message had a T 1/2 of 115 min in actinomycin treated cells that was reduced to a T 1/2 of 37 min by IFN-γ. The decrease in message stability was also associated with a rapid loss of ABCA1 protein, significant 3 h following IFN-γ addition. The kinetics of ABCA1 message and protein decrease was consistent with the early IFN-γ-induced changes in Stat1 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation observed in these cells. Therefore, ABCA1 can be considered as an early response gene to macrophage activation by IFN-γ with down-regulation occurring by message destabilization

  6. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  7. A Functional Role for the Epigenetic Regulator ING1 in Activity-induced Gene Expression in Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Laura J; Zhao, Qiongyi; Li, Xiang; Dai, Chuanyang; Marshall, Paul R; Liu, Sha; Wang, Yi; Zajaczkowski, Esmi L; Khandelwal, Nitin; Kumar, Arvind; Bredy, Timothy W; Wei, Wei

    2018-01-15

    Epigenetic regulation of activity-induced gene expression involves multiple levels of molecular interaction, including histone and DNA modifications, as well as mechanisms of DNA repair. Here we demonstrate that the genome-wide deposition of inhibitor of growth family member 1 (ING1), which is a central epigenetic regulatory protein, is dynamically regulated in response to activity in primary cortical neurons. ING1 knockdown leads to decreased expression of genes related to synaptic plasticity, including the regulatory subunit of calcineurin, Ppp3r1. In addition, ING1 binding at a site upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of Ppp3r1 depends on yet another group of neuroepigenetic regulatory proteins, the Piwi-like family, which are also involved in DNA repair. These findings provide new insight into a novel mode of activity-induced gene expression, which involves the interaction between different epigenetic regulatory mechanisms traditionally associated with gene repression and DNA repair. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ATAF1 transcription factor directly regulates abscisic acid biosynthetic gene NCED3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Lindemose, Søren; De Masi, Federico

    2013-01-01

    ATAF1, an Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factor, plays important roles in plant adaptation to environmental stress and development. To search for ATAF1 target genes, we used protein binding microarrays and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP). This identified T[A,C,G]CGT[A,G] and TT[A,C,G...... abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone biosynthetic gene NCED3. ChIP-qPCR and expression analysis showed that ATAF1 binding to the NCED3 promoter correlated with increased NCED3 expression and ABA hormone levels. These results indicate that ATAF1 regulates ABA biosynthesis....

  9. Differential regulation of the human progesterone receptor gene through an estrogen response element half site and Sp1 sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petz, Larry N; Ziegler, Yvonne S; Schultz, Jennifer R; Kim, Hwajin; Kemper, J Kim; Nardulli, Ann M

    2004-02-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) gene is regulated by estrogen in normal reproductive tissues and in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Although it is generally thought that estrogen responsiveness is mediated by interaction of the ligand-occupied estrogen receptor (ER) with estrogen response elements (EREs) in target genes, the human progesterone receptor (PR) gene lacks a palindromic ERE. Promoter A of the PR gene does, however, contain an ERE half site upstream of two adjacent Sp1 sites from +571 to +595, the +571 ERE/Sp1 site. We have examined the individual contributions of the ERE half site and the two Sp1 sites in regulating estrogen responsiveness. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that both Sp1 sites were critical for estrogen-mediated activation of the PR gene. Interestingly, rather than decreasing transcription, mutations in the ERE half site increased transcription substantially suggesting that this site plays a role in limiting transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that Sp1 was associated with the +571 ERE/Sp1 site in the endogenous PR gene in the absence and in the presence of estrogen, but that ERalpha was only associated with this region of the PR gene after MCF-7 cells had been treated with estrogen. Our studies provide evidence that effective regulation of transcription through the +571 ERE/Sp1 site requires the binding of ERalpha and Sp1 to their respective cis elements and the appropriate interaction of ERalpha and Sp1 with other coregulatory proteins and transcription factors.

  10. Altered cellular redox status, sirtuin abundance and clock gene expression in a mouse model of developmentally primed NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Szczepankiewicz, Dawid; Sihota, Kiran K; Ravindraanandan, Manoj; Thomas, Hugh; Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C; Hanson, Mark A; Byrne, Christopher D; Cagampang, Felino R

    2016-07-01

    We have previously shown that high fat (HF) feeding during pregnancy primes the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatits (NASH) in the adult offspring. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Since the endogenous molecular clock can regulate hepatic lipid metabolism, we investigated whether exposure to a HF diet during development could alter hepatic clock gene expression and contribute to NASH onset in later life. Female mice were fed either a control (C, 7%kcal fat) or HF (45%kcal fat) diet. Offspring were fed either a C or HF diet resulting in four offspring groups: C/C, C/HF, HF/C and HF/HF. NAFLD progression, cellular redox status, sirtuin expression (Sirt1, Sirt3), and the expression of core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry2) and clock-controlled genes involved in lipid metabolism (Rev-Erbα, Rev-Erbβ, RORα, and Srebp1c) were measured in offspring livers. Offspring fed a HF diet developed NAFLD. However HF fed offspring of mothers fed a HF diet developed NASH, coupled with significantly reduced NAD(+)/NADH (pNASH in adulthood, involving altered cellular redox status, reduced sirtuin abundance, and desynchronized clock gene expression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. LHX3 interacts with inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase complex subunits LANP and TAF-1β to modulate pituitary gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Chad S; Malik, Raleigh E; Witzmann, Frank A; Rhodes, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    LIM-homeodomain 3 (LHX3) is a transcription factor required for mammalian pituitary gland and nervous system development. Human patients and animal models with LHX3 gene mutations present with severe pediatric syndromes that feature hormone deficiencies and symptoms associated with nervous system dysfunction. The carboxyl terminus of the LHX3 protein is required for pituitary gene regulation, but the mechanism by which this domain operates is unknown. In order to better understand LHX3-dependent pituitary hormone gene transcription, we used biochemical and mass spectrometry approaches to identify and characterize proteins that interact with the LHX3 carboxyl terminus. This approach identified the LANP/pp32 and TAF-1β/SET proteins, which are components of the inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase (INHAT) multi-subunit complex that serves as a multifunctional repressor to inhibit histone acetylation and modulate chromatin structure. The protein domains of LANP and TAF-1β that interact with LHX3 were mapped using biochemical techniques. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that LANP and TAF-1β are associated with LHX3 target genes in pituitary cells, and experimental alterations of LANP and TAF-1β levels affected LHX3-mediated pituitary gene regulation. Together, these data suggest that transcriptional regulation of pituitary genes by LHX3 involves regulated interactions with the INHAT complex.

  12. Fine-Mapping Resolves Eae23 into Two QTLs and Implicates ZEB1 as a Candidate Gene Regulating Experimental Neuroinflammation in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Stridh, Pernilla; Thessen Hedreul, Melanie; Beyeen, Amennai Daniel; Adzemovic, Milena Z.; Laaksonen, Hannes; Gillett, Alan; ?ckinger, Johan; Marta, Monica; Lassmann, Hans; Becanovic, Kristina; Jagodic, Maja; Olsson, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To elucidate mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis (MS), we studied genetic regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats, assuming a conservation of pathogenic pathways. In this study, we focused on Eae23, originally identified to regulate EAE in a (LEW.1AV1xPVG.1AV1)F2 cross. Our aim was to determine whether one or more genes within the 67 Mb region regulate EAE and to define candidate risk genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used high resolutio...

  13. Transcriptome analysis uncovers Arabidopsis F-BOX STRESS INDUCED 1 as a regulator of jasmonic acid and abscisic acid stress gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Lauren E; Keller, Kristen; Chan, Karen X; Gessel, Megan M; Thines, Bryan C

    2017-07-17

    The ubiquitin 26S proteasome system (UPS) selectively degrades cellular proteins, which results in physiological changes to eukaryotic cells. F-box proteins are substrate adaptors within the UPS and are responsible for the diversity of potential protein targets. Plant genomes are enriched in F-box genes, but the vast majority of these have unknown roles. This work investigated the Arabidopsis F-box gene F-BOX STRESS INDUCED 1 (FBS1) for its effects on gene expression in order elucidate its previously unknown biological function. Using publically available Affymetrix ATH1 microarray data, we show that FBS1 is significantly co-expressed in abiotic stresses with other well-characterized stress response genes, including important stress-related transcriptional regulators. This gene suite is most highly expressed in roots under cold and salt stresses. Transcriptome analysis of fbs1-1 knock-out plants grown at a chilling temperature shows that hundreds of genes require FBS1 for appropriate expression, and that these genes are enriched in those having roles in both abiotic and biotic stress responses. Based on both this genome-wide expression data set and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis, it is apparent that FBS1 is required for elevated expression of many jasmonic acid (JA) genes that have established roles in combatting environmental stresses, and that it also controls a subset of JA biosynthesis genes. FBS1 also significantly impacts abscisic acid (ABA) regulated genes, but this interaction is more complex, as FBS1 has both positive and negative effects on ABA-inducible and ABA-repressible gene modules. One noteworthy effect of FBS1 on ABA-related stress processes, however, is the restraint it imposes on the expression of multiple class I LIPID TRANSFER PROTEIN (LTP) gene family members that have demonstrated protective effects in water deficit-related stresses. FBS1 impacts plant stress responses by regulating hundreds of genes that respond to the plant

  14. The NSL Complex Regulates Housekeeping Genes in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sunil Jayaramaiah; Holz, Herbert; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Manke, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2012-01-01

    MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16) acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP–seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2) throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5%) of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP–seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication–related Element (DRE). Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription. PMID:22723752

  15. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  16. Transcriptome analyses reveal the involvement of both C and N termini of cryptochrome 1 in its regulation of phytohormone-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiu eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cryptochromes (CRY are blue-light photoreceptors that mediate various light responses in plants and animals. It has long been demonstrated that Arabidopsis CRY (CRY1 and CRY2 C termini (CCT1 and CCT2 mediate light signaling through direct interaction with COP1. Most recently, CRY1 N terminus (CNT1 has been found to be involved in CRY1 signaling independent of CCT1, and implicated in the inhibition of gibberellin acids (GA/brassinosteroids (BR/auxin-responsive gene expression. Here, we performed RNA-Seq assay using transgenic plants expressing CCT1 fused to β-glucuronidase (GUS-CCT1, abbreviated as CCT1, which exhibit a constitutively photomorphogenic phenotype, and compared the results with those obtained previously from cry1cry2 mutant and the transgenic plants expressing CNT1 fused to nuclear localization signal sequence (NLS-tagged YFP (CNT1-NLS-YFP, abbreviated as CNT1, which display enhanced responsiveness to blue light. We found that 2,903 (67.85% of the CRY-regulated genes are regulated by CCT1 and that 1,095 of these CCT1-regulated genes are also regulated by CNT1. After annotating the gene functions, we found that CCT1 is involved in mediating CRY1 regulation of phytohormone-responsive genes, like CNT1, and that about half of the up-regulated genes by GA/BR/auxin are down-regulated by CCT1 and CNT1, consistent with the antagonistic role for CRY1 and these phytohormones in regulating hypocotyl elongation. Physiological studies showed that both CCT1 and CNT1 are likely involved in mediating CRY1 reduction of seedlings sensitivity to GA under blue light. Furthermore, protein expression studies demonstrate that the inhibition of GA promotion of HY5 degradation by CRY1 is likely mediated by CCT1, but not by CNT1. These results give genome-wide transcriptome information concerning the signaling mechanism of CRY1, unraveling possible involvement of its C and N termini in its regulation of response of GA and likely other phytohormones.

  17. Hypoxic regulation of the expression of genes encoded estrogen related proteins in U87 glioma cells: eff ect of IRE1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchenko, D O; Riabovol, O O; Ratushna, O O; Minchenko, O H

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling, mediated by IRE1 (inositol requiring enzyme 1), which is a central mediator of the unfolded protein response on the expression of genes encoded estrogen related proteins (NRIP1/RIP140, TRIM16/EBBP, ESRRA/NR3B1, FAM162A/E2IG5, PGRMC2/PMBP, and SLC39A6/LIV-1) and their hypoxic regulation in U87 glioma cells for evaluation of their possible significance in the control of glioma cells proliferation. The expression of NRIP1, EBBP, ESRRA, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes in U87 glioma cells, transfected by empty vector pcDNA3.1 (control) and cells without IRE1 signaling enzyme function (transfected by dnIRE1) upon hypoxia, was studied by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Inhibition of both enzymatic activities (kinase and endoribonuclease) of IRE1 signaling enzyme function up-regulates the expression of EBBP, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes is in U87 glioma cells in comparison with the control glioma cells, with more significant changes for E2IG5 and PGRMC2 genes. At the same time, the expression of NRIP1 and ESRRA genes is strongly down-regulated in glioma cells upon inhibition of IRE1. We also showed that hypoxia increases the expression of E2IG5, PGRMC2, and EBBP genes and decreases NRIP1 and ESRRA genes expression in control glioma cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of IRE1 in U87 glioma cells decreases the eff ect of hypoxia on the expression of E2IG5 and PGRMC2 genes, eliminates hypoxic regulation of NRIP1 gene, and enhances the sensitivity of ESRRA gene to hypoxic condition. Furthermore, the expression of SLC39A6 gene is resistant to hypoxia in both the glioma cells with and without IRE1 signaling enzyme function. Results of this investigation demonstrate that inhibition of IRE1 signaling enzyme function affects the expression of NRIP1, EBBP, ESRRA, E2IG5, PGRMC2, and SLC39A6 genes in U87 glioma cells in gene specific manner and these changes

  18. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuloaga, R.; Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP 3 /calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation

  19. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuloaga, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Valdés, J.A., E-mail: jvaldes@unab.cl [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  20. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciados, Mark; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2016-12-13

    these genes are involved with brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Brain Neoplasms. For example, the search of enriched pathways showed that top ten E2 interacting genes in AD- APOE , APP , ATP5A1 , CALM1 , CASP3 , GSK3B , IL1B , MAPT , PSEN2 and TNF- underlie the enrichment of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) AD pathway. With AD, the six E2-responsive genes are NRF1 target genes: APBB2 , DPYSL2 , EIF2S1 , ENO1 , MAPT , and PAXIP1 . These genes are also responsive to the following EEDs: ethinyl estradiol ( APBB2 , DPYSL2 , EIF2S1 , ENO1 , MAPT , and PAXIP1 ), BPA ( APBB2 , EIF2S1 , ENO1 , MAPT , and PAXIP1 ), dibutyl phthalate (DPYSL2, EIF2S1, and ENO1), diethylhexyl phthalate ( DPYSL2 and MAPT ). To validate findings from Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) curated data, we used Bayesian network (BN) analysis on microarray data of AD patients. We observed that both gender and NRF1 were associated with AD. The female NRF1 gene network is completely different from male human AD patients. AD-associated NRF1 target genes- APLP1 , APP , GRIN1 , GRIN2B , MAPT , PSEN2 , PEN2 , and IDE -are also regulated by E2. NRF1 regulates targets genes with diverse functions, including cell growth, apoptosis/autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, genomic instability, neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, synaptogenesis, and senescence. By activating or repressing the genes involved in cell proliferation, growth suppression, DNA damage/repair, apoptosis/autophagy, angiogenesis, estrogen signaling, neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and senescence, and inducing a wide range of DNA damage, genomic instability and DNA methylation and transcriptional repression, NRF1 may act as a major regulator of EEDs-induced brain health deficits. In summary, estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals-modified genes in brain health deficits are part of both estrogen and NRF1

  1. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    panel of breast cancer cell lines. Subnetwork enrichment of these genes has identifed 35 common regulators with 6 or more predicted markers. In addition to identifying epigenetically regulated genes, we show evidence of differentially expressed methylation patterns between the basal and luminal subtypes. Our results indicate that the proposed computational protocol is a viable platform for identifying epigenetically regulated genes. Our protocol has generated a list of predictors including COL1A2, TOP2A, TFF1, and VAV3, genes whose key roles in epigenetic regulation is documented in the literature. Subnetwork enrichment of these predicted markers further suggests that epigenetic regulation of individual genes occurs in a coordinated fashion and through common regulators.

  2. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Preciados

    2016-12-01

    NRF1. Some of these genes are involved with brain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, Parkinson’s Disease, Huntington’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Brain Neoplasms. For example, the search of enriched pathways showed that top ten E2 interacting genes in AD—APOE, APP, ATP5A1, CALM1, CASP3, GSK3B, IL1B, MAPT, PSEN2 and TNF—underlie the enrichment of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG AD pathway. With AD, the six E2-responsive genes are NRF1 target genes: APBB2, DPYSL2, EIF2S1, ENO1, MAPT, and PAXIP1. These genes are also responsive to the following EEDs: ethinyl estradiol (APBB2, DPYSL2, EIF2S1, ENO1, MAPT, and PAXIP1, BPA (APBB2, EIF2S1, ENO1, MAPT, and PAXIP1, dibutyl phthalate (DPYSL2, EIF2S1, and ENO1, diethylhexyl phthalate (DPYSL2 and MAPT. To validate findings from Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD curated data, we used Bayesian network (BN analysis on microarray data of AD patients. We observed that both gender and NRF1 were associated with AD. The female NRF1 gene network is completely different from male human AD patients. AD-associated NRF1 target genes—APLP1, APP, GRIN1, GRIN2B, MAPT, PSEN2, PEN2, and IDE—are also regulated by E2. NRF1 regulates targets genes with diverse functions, including cell growth, apoptosis/autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, genomic instability, neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, synaptogenesis, and senescence. By activating or repressing the genes involved in cell proliferation, growth suppression, DNA damage/repair, apoptosis/autophagy, angiogenesis, estrogen signaling, neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and senescence, and inducing a wide range of DNA damage, genomic instability and DNA methylation and transcriptional repression, NRF1 may act as a major regulator of EEDs-induced brain health deficits. In summary, estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals-modified genes in brain health deficits are part of both estrogen and NRF1 signaling pathways. Our

  3. Altered expression pattern of clock genes in a rat model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Bouzinova, Elena; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormalities in circadian rhythms may be causal factors in development of major depressive disorder. The biology underlying a causal relationship between circadian rhythm disturbances and depression is slowly being unraveled. Although there is no direct evidence of dysregulation...... of clock gene expression in depressive patients many studies have reported single-nucleotide polymorphisms in clock genes in these patients. METHODS: In the present study we investigated whether a depression-like state in rats associates with alternations of the diurnal expression of clock genes....... The validated chronic mild stress (CMS) animal model of depression was used to investigate rhythmic expression of three clock genes; Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. Brain and liver tissue was collected from 96 animals after 3.5 weeks of CMS (48 control and 48 depression-like rats) at 4 h sampling interval within 24 h. We...

  4. NTL8 Regulates Trichome Formation in Arabidopsis by Directly Activating R3 MYB Genes TRY and TCL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hainan; Wang, Xianling; Guo, Hongyan; Cheng, Yuxin; Hou, Chunjiang; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2017-08-01

    The NAM, ATAF1/2, and CUC (NAC) are plant-specific transcription factors that regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development and plant response to environmental stimuli. We report here the identification of NTM1-LIKE8 (NTL8), a membrane-associated NAC transcription factor, as a novel regulator of trichome formation in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ). From an activation-tagged Arabidopsis population, we identified a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with glabrous inflorescence stem. By using plasmid rescue and RT-PCR analyses, we found that NTL8 was tagged; thus, the mutant was named ntl8-1 Dominant ( ntl8-1D ). Recapitulation experiment further confirmed that the phenotype observed in the ntl8-1D mutant was caused by elevated expression of NTL8 Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that the expression level of the single-repeat R3 MYB genes TRIPTYCHON ( TRY ) and TRICHOMELESS1 ( TCL1 ) was elevated in the ntl8-1D mutant. Genetic analyses demonstrated that NTL8 acts upstream of TRY and TCL1 in the regulation of trichome formation. When recruited to the promoter region of the reporter gene Gal4:GUS by a fused GAL4 DNA-binding domain, NTL8 activated the expression of the reporter gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that TRY and TCL1 are direct targets of NTL8. However, NTL8 did not interact with SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE9, another transcription factor that regulates the expression of TRY and TCL1 , in yeast and plant cells. Taken together, our results suggest that NTL8 negatively regulates trichome formation in Arabidopsis by directly activating the expression of TRY and TCL1 . © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene negatively regulates ER stress signaling in rodent and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Sonya G; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Oslowski, Christine M; Lu, Simin; Lipson, Kathryn L; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Hayashi, Emiko; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Permutt, M Alan; Urano, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by nonautoimmune loss of beta cells, and neurological dysfunctions. We have previously shown that mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene cause Wolfram syndrome and that WFS1 has a protective function against ER stress. However, it remained to be determined how WFS1 mitigates ER stress. Here we have shown in rodent and human cell lines that WFS1 negatively regulates a key transcription factor involved in ER stress signaling, activating transcription factor 6alpha (ATF6alpha), through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. WFS1 suppressed expression of ATF6alpha target genes and repressed ATF6alpha-mediated activation of the ER stress response element (ERSE) promoter. Moreover, WFS1 stabilized the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, brought ATF6alpha to the proteasome, and enhanced its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, leading to suppression of ER stress signaling. Consistent with these data, beta cells from WFS1-deficient mice and lymphocytes from patients with Wolfram syndrome exhibited dysregulated ER stress signaling through upregulation of ATF6alpha and downregulation of HRD1. These results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of ER stress signaling and in the pathogenesis of diseases involving chronic, unresolvable ER stress, such as pancreatic beta cell death in diabetes.

  6. Down-regulation of SFRP1 as a putative tumor suppressor gene can contribute to human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Yun-Li; Teng, Xiao-Mei; Lin, Yun; Zheng, Da-Li; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Han, Ze-Guang

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world. SFRP1 (the secreted frizzled-related protein 1), a putative tumor suppressor gene mapped onto chromosome 8p12-p11.1, the frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) region in human HCC, encodes a Wingless-type (Wnt) signaling antagonist and is frequently inactivated by promoter methylation in many human cancers. However, whether the down-regulation of SFRP1 can contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis still remains unclear. We investigated the expression of SFRP1 through real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. The cell growth and colony formation were observed as the overexpression and knockdown of SFRP1. The DNA methylation status within SFRP1 promoter was analyzed through methylation-specific PCR or bisulphate-treated DNA sequencing assays. Loss of heterozygosity was here detected with microsatellite markers. SFRP1 was significantly down-regulated in 76.1% (35/46) HCC specimens at mRNA level and in 30% (30/100) HCCs indicated by immunohistochemistry staining, as compared to adjacent non-cancerous livers. The overexpression of SFRP1 can significantly inhibit the cell growth and colony formation of YY-8103, SMMC7721, and Hep3B cells. The RNA interference against the constitutional SFRP1 in the offspring SMMC7721 cells, which were stably transfected by ectopic SFRP1, can markedly promote cell growth of these cells. LOH of both microsatellite markers D8S532 and D8SAC016868 flanking the gene locus was found in 13% (6 of 46 HCCs) and 6.5% (3 of 46 HCCs) of the informative cases, respectively, where 5 of 8 HCC specimens with LOH showed the down-regulation of SFRP1. DNA hypermethylation within SFRP1 promoter was identified in two of three HCC specimens without SFRP1 expression. Moreover, the DNA methylation of SFRP1 promoter was significantly reduced, along with the re-expression of the gene, in those HCC cell lines, Bel7404, QGY7701, and MHCC-H, as treated by DAC. Our data suggested that the

  7. Regulation of hepatic PPARγ2 and lipogenic gene expression by melanocortin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poritsanos, Nicole J.; Wong, Davie; Vrontakis, Maria E.; Mizuno, Tooru M.

    2008-01-01

    The central melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism. Hepatic lipogenic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2). However, it is unclear if central melanocortin signaling regulates hepatic lipogenic gene expression through the activation of these transcription factors. To delineate the molecular mechanisms by which the melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism, we examined the effect of intracerebroventricular injection of SHU9119, a melanocortin receptor antagonist, on hepatic expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism in mice. SHU9119 treatment increased hepatic triglyceride content and mRNA levels of lipogenic genes, SREBP-1c, and PPARγ2, whereas it did not cause any changes in hepatic ChREBP mRNA levels. These findings suggest that reduced central melanocortin signaling increases hepatic lipid deposition by stimulating hepatic lipogenic gene expression at least partly through the activation of SREBP-1c and PPARγ2

  8. Gene program-specific regulation of PGC-1{alpha} activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren F; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) activation coordinates induction of the hepatic fasting response through coactivation of numerous transcription factors and gene programs. In the June 15, 2011, issue of Genes & Development, Lustig and colleagues (pp....... 1232-1244) demonstrated that phosphorylation of PGC-1α by the p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) specifically interfered with the interaction between PGC-1α and HNF4α in liver and blocked the coactivation of the gluconeogenic target genes. This demonstrates how independent fine-tuning of gene...

  9. Regulation of glycogen metabolism by the CRE-1, RCO-1 and RCM-1 proteins in Neurospora crassa. The role of CRE-1 as the central transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Virgilio, Stela; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Candido, Thiago de Souza; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2015-04-01

    The transcription factor CreA/Mig1/CRE-1 is a repressor protein that regulates the use of alternative carbon sources via a mechanism known as Carbon Catabolite Repression (CCR). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mig1 recruits the complex Ssn6-Tup1, the Neurospora crassa RCM-1 and RCO-1 orthologous proteins, respectively, to bind to promoters of glucose-repressible genes. We have been studying the regulation of glycogen metabolism in N. crassa and the identification of the RCO-1 corepressor as a regulator led us to investigate the regulatory role of CRE-1 in this process. Glycogen content is misregulated in the rco-1(KO), rcm-1(RIP) and cre-1(KO) strains, and the glycogen synthase phosphorylation is decreased in all strains, showing that CRE-1, RCO-1 and RCM-1 proteins are involved in glycogen accumulation and in the regulation of GSN activity by phosphorylation. We also confirmed the regulatory role of CRE-1 in CCR and its nuclear localization under repressing condition in N. crassa. The expression of all glycogenic genes is misregulated in the cre-1(KO) strain, suggesting that CRE-1 also controls glycogen metabolism by regulating gene expression. The existence of a high number of the Aspergillus nidulans CreA motif (5'-SYGGRG-3') in the glycogenic gene promoters led us to analyze the binding of CRE-1 to some DNA motifs both in vitro by DNA gel shift and in vivo by ChIP-qPCR analysis. CRE-1 bound in vivo to all motifs analyzed demonstrating that it down-regulates glycogen metabolism by controlling gene expression and GSN phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The characterization of DNA methylation-mediated regulation of bovine placental lactogen and bovine prolactin-related protein-1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Osman V

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine trophoblast binucleate cells (BNC express a plethora of molecules including bovine placental lactogen (bPL, gene name is bCSH1 and bovine prolactin-related protein-1 (bPRP1. BCSH1 and bPRP1 are members of the growth hormone (GH/prolactin (PRL gene family, which are expressed simultaneously in BNC and are central to placentation and the progression of pregnancy in cattle. However, there is a paucity of information on the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of both the bCSH1 and bPRP1 genes. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that the expression of a number of genes is controlled by the methylation status of their promoter region. In the present study, we examined the cell-type-specific epigenetic alterations of the 5'-flanking region of the bCSH1 and bPRP1 genes to gain an insight into their regulatory mechanisms. Results Analysis of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment demonstrated that bCSH1 expression is moderately induced in fibroblast cultures but enhanced in BT-1 cells. Sodium bisulfite based sequencing revealed that bCSH1 is hypomethylated in the cotyledonary tissue but not in the fetal skin, and this pattern was not altered with the progression of pregnancy. On the other hand, the methylation status of bPRP1 was similar between the cotyledon and fetal skin. The bPRP1 gene was exclusively hypermethylated in a bovine trophoblast cell-derived BT-1 cell-line. While the activity of bCSH1 was similar in both BT-1 and bovine fibroblast cells, that of bPRP1 was specific to BT-1. Treatment with a demethylating agent and luciferase assays provided in vitro evidence of the positive regulation of bCSH1 but not bPRP1. Conclusion This is the first report to identify the differential regulatory mechanisms of the bCSH1 and bPRP1 genes and indicates that bCSH1 might potentially be the only transcript that is subject to DNA methyltransferase regulation. The data indicates the possibility of novel kinetics of induction of

  11. Involvement of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 Protein in the Regulation of Botrytis Virulence- and Tomato Defense-Related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eriston V; Ulhoa, Cirano J; Cardoza, Rosa E; Silva, Roberto N; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Several Trichoderma spp. are well known for their ability to: (i) act as important biocontrol agents against phytopathogenic fungi; (ii) function as biofertilizers; (iii) increase the tolerance of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses; and (iv) induce plant defense responses via the production and secretion of elicitor molecules. In this study, we analyzed the gene-regulation effects of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 protein during the interactions of mutant Δ epl-1 or wild-type T. harzianum strains with: (a) the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea and (b) with tomato plants, on short (24 h hydroponic cultures) and long periods (4-weeks old plants) after Trichoderma inoculation. Our results indicate that T. harzianum Epl-1 protein affects the in vitro expression of B. cinerea virulence genes, especially those involved in the botrydial biosynthesis ( BcBOT genes), during the mycoparasitism interaction. The tomato defense-related genes were also affected, indicating that Epl-1 is involved in the elicitation of the salicylic acid pathway. Moreover, Epl-1 also regulates the priming effect in host tomato plants and contributes to enhance the interaction with the host tomato plant during the early stage of root colonization.

  12. Involvement of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 Protein in the Regulation of Botrytis Virulence- and Tomato Defense-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriston V. Gomes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Several Trichoderma spp. are well known for their ability to: (i act as important biocontrol agents against phytopathogenic fungi; (ii function as biofertilizers; (iii increase the tolerance of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses; and (iv induce plant defense responses via the production and secretion of elicitor molecules. In this study, we analyzed the gene-regulation effects of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 protein during the interactions of mutant Δepl-1 or wild-type T. harzianum strains with: (a the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea and (b with tomato plants, on short (24 h hydroponic cultures and long periods (4-weeks old plants after Trichoderma inoculation. Our results indicate that T. harzianum Epl-1 protein affects the in vitro expression of B. cinerea virulence genes, especially those involved in the botrydial biosynthesis (BcBOT genes, during the mycoparasitism interaction. The tomato defense-related genes were also affected, indicating that Epl-1 is involved in the elicitation of the salicylic acid pathway. Moreover, Epl-1 also regulates the priming effect in host tomato plants and contributes to enhance the interaction with the host tomato plant during the early stage of root colonization.

  13. Taurine up-regulated gene 1 functions as a master regulator to coordinate glycolysis and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Wu, Meng-Han; Huang, Ya-Hui; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Chung, I-Hsiao; Chen, Ching-Ying; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2018-01-01

    Cancer cells display altered glucose metabolism characterized by a preference for aerobic glycolysis. The aerobic glycolytic phenotype of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often correlated with tumor progression and poorer clinical outcomes. However, the issue of whether glycolytic metabolism influences metastasis in HCC remains unclear. In the current study, we showed that knockdown of taurine up-regulated gene 1 (TUG1) induces marked inhibition of cell migration, invasion, and glycolysis through suppression of microRNA (miR)-455-3p. MiR-455-3p, which is transcriptionally repressed by p21, directly targets the 3' untranslated region of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase subunit beta 2 (AMPKβ2). The TUG1/miR-455-3p/AMPKβ2 axis regulates cell growth, metastasis, and glycolysis through regulation of hexokinase 2 (HK2). TUG1 is clearly associated with HK2 overexpression and unfavorable prognosis in HCC patients. Our data collectively highlight that novel regulatory associations among TUG1, miR-455-3p, AMPKβ2, and HK2 are an important determinant of glycolytic metabolism and metastasis in HCC cells and support the potential utility of targeting TUG1/HK2 as a therapeutic strategy for HCC. (Hepatology 2018;67:188-203). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ishikane, Shin; Kawabe, Shinya; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are synthesized from cholesterol in various tissues, mainly in the adrenal glands and gonads. Because these lipid-soluble steroid hormones immediately diffuse through the cells in which they are produced, their secretion directly reflects the activity of the genes related to their production. Progesterone is important not only for luteinization and maintenance of pregnancy, but also as a substrate for most other steroids. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerase (3β-HSD) are well-known proteins essential for progesterone production. In addition to them, glutathione S-transferase A1-1 and A3-3 are shown to exert Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerization activity to produce progesterone in a cooperative fashion with 3β-HSD. 5-Aminolevulinic acid synthase 1, ferredoxin 1, and ferredoxin reductase also play a role in steroidogenesis as accessory factors. Members of the nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family (steroidogenic factor 1 and liver receptor homolog 1) play a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The NR5A family activates these genes by binding to NR5A responsive elements present within their promoter regions, as well as to the elements far from their promoters. In addition, various NR5A-interacting proteins including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (DAX-1), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) are involved in the transcription of NR5A target genes and regulate the transcription either positively or negatively under both basal and tropic hormone-stimulated conditions. In this review, we describe the transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production.

  15. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is ... case, the expression of human lysozyme could be regulated by the endogenous cis-element of αs1- casein gene in .... Mouse mammary epithelial C127 cells (Cell Bank, Chinese. Academy of ...

  16. Down-regulation of HSP40 gene family following OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mirzaei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The OCT4B1, as one of OCT4 variants, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tissues more than other variants and plays an important role in apoptosis and stress (heat shock protein pathways. The present study was designed to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on expressional profile of HSP40 gene family expression in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: The OCT4B1 expression was suppressed by specific siRNA transfection in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma, 5637 (bladder tumor and U-87MG (brain tumor cell lines employing Lipofectamine reagent. Real-time PCR array technique was employed for RNA qualification. The fold changes were calculated using RT2 Profiler PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results: Our results indicated that fifteen genes (from 36 studied genes were down-regulated and two genes (DNAJC11 and DNAJC5B were up-regulated in all three studied tumor cell lines by approximately more than two folds. The result of other studied genes (19 genes showed different expressional pattern (up or down-expression based on tumor cell lines. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, we may suggest that there is a direct correlation between OCT4B1 expression in tumor cell lines (and tissues and HSP40 family gene expressions to escape from apoptosis and cancer expansion.

  17. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Guang-feng [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Department of Critical Care Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun [Department of Geriatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Zhou, Hong-hao [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Zhao-qian, E-mail: liuzhaoqian63@126.com [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China)

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  18. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Guang-feng; Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing; Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders

  19. Ras-dva is a novel Pit-1- and glucocorticoid-regulated gene in the embryonic anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellestad, Laura E; Porter, Tom E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a role in functional differentiation of pituitary somatotrophs and lactotrophs during embryogenesis. Ras-dva was identified as a gene regulated by anterior neural fold protein-1/homeobox expressed in embryonic stem cells-1, a transcription factor known to be critical in pituitary development, and has an expression profile in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland that is consistent with in vivo regulation by glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was to characterize expression and regulation of ras-dva mRNA in the developing chicken anterior pituitary. Pituitary ras-dva mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on embryonic day (e) 18 and then decreased and remained low or undetectable after hatch. Ras-dva expression was highly enriched in the pituitary gland on e18 relative to other tissues examined. Glucocorticoid treatment of pituitary cells from mid- and late-stage embryos rapidly increased ras-dva mRNA, suggesting it may be a direct transcriptional target of glucocorticoids. A reporter construct driven by 4 kb of the chicken ras-dva 5'-flanking region, containing six putative pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) binding sites and two potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites, was highly activated in embryonic pituitary cells and up-regulated by corticosterone. Mutagenesis of the most proximal Pit-1 site decreased promoter activity in chicken e11 pituitary cells, indicating regulation of ras-dva by Pit-1. However, mutating putative GR binding sites did not substantially reduce induction of ras-dva promoter activity by corticosterone, suggesting additional DNA elements within the 5'-flanking region are responsible for glucocorticoid regulation. We have identified ras-dva as a glucocorticoid-regulated gene that is likely expressed in cells of the Pit-1 lineage within the developing anterior pituitary gland.

  20. Dissecting Daily and Circadian Expression Rhythms of Clock-Controlled Genes in Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Karolina; Ackermann, Katrin; Revell, Victoria L; Lao, Oscar; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    The identification and investigation of novel clock-controlled genes (CCGs) has been conducted thus far mainly in model organisms such as nocturnal rodents, with limited information in humans. Here, we aimed to characterize daily and circadian expression rhythms of CCGs in human peripheral blood during a sleep/sleep deprivation (S/SD) study and a constant routine (CR) study. Blood expression levels of 9 candidate CCGs (SREBF1, TRIB1, USF1, THRA1, SIRT1, STAT3, CAPRIN1, MKNK2, and ROCK2), were measured across 48 h in 12 participants in the S/SD study and across 33 h in 12 participants in the CR study. Statistically significant rhythms in expression were observed for STAT3, SREBF1, TRIB1, and THRA1 in samples from both the S/SD and the CR studies, indicating that their rhythmicity is driven by the endogenous clock. The MKNK2 gene was significantly rhythmic in the S/SD but not the CR study, which implies its exogenously driven rhythmic expression. In addition, we confirmed the circadian expression of PER1, PER3, and REV-ERBα in the CR study samples, while BMAL1 and HSPA1B were not significantly rhythmic in the CR samples; all 5 genes previously showed significant expression in the S/SD study samples. Overall, our results demonstrate that rhythmic expression patterns of clock and selected clock-controlled genes in human blood cells are in part determined by exogenous factors (sleep and fasting state) and in part by the endogenous circadian timing system. Knowledge of the exogenous and endogenous regulation of gene expression rhythms is needed prior to the selection of potential candidate marker genes for future applications in medical and forensic settings. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Transcriptional regulation of human RANK ligand gene expression by E2F1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yan; Sun Meng; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou Wei; Pinder, Elaine; Gao, Allen C.

    2008-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) is a critical osteoclastogenic factor involved in the regulation of bone resorption, immune function, the development of mammary gland and cardiovascular system. To understand the transcriptional regulation of RANKL, we amplified and characterized a 1890 bp 5'-flanking sequence of human RANKL gene (-1782 bp to +108 bp relative to the transcription start site). Using a series of deletion mutations of the 1890 bp RANKL promoter, we identified a 72 bp region (-172 to -100 bp) mediating RANKL basal transcriptional activity. Sequence analysis revealed a putative E2F binding site within this 72 bp region in the human RANKL promoter. Overexpression of E2F1 increased RANKL promoter activity, while down-regulation of E2F1 expression by small interfering RNA decreased RANKL promoter activity. RT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) further demonstrated that E2F1 induced the expression of RANKL. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSA) and antibody competition assays confirmed that E2F1 proteins bind to the consensus E2F binding site in the RANKL promoter. Mutation of the E2F consensus binding site in the RANKL promoter profoundly reduced the basal promoter activity and abolished the transcriptional modulation of RANKL by E2F1. These results suggest that E2F1 plays an important role in regulating RANKL transcription through binding to the E2F consensus binding site

  2. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Andrew C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1 leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA

  3. Microarray profiling of progesterone-regulated endometrial genes during the rhesus monkey secretory phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okulicz William C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the endometrium the steroid hormone progesterone (P, acting through its nuclear receptors, regulates the expression of specific target genes and gene networks required for endometrial maturation. Proper endometrial maturation is considered a requirement for embryo implantation. Endometrial receptivity is a complex process that is spatially and temporally restricted and the identity of genes that regulate receptivity has been pursued by a number of investigators. Methods In this study we have used high density oligonucleotide microarrays to screen for changes in mRNA transcript levels between normal proliferative and adequate secretory phases in Rhesus monkey artificial menstrual cycles. Biotinylated cRNA was prepared from day 13 and days 21–23 of the reproductive cycle and transcript levels were compared by hybridization to Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. Results Of ~12,000 genes profiled, we identified 108 genes that were significantly regulated during the shift from a proliferative to an adequate secretory endometrium. Of these genes, 39 were up-regulated at days 21–23 versus day 13, and 69 were down-regulated. Genes up-regulated in P-dominant tissue included: secretoglobin (uteroglobin, histone 2A, polo-like kinase (PLK, spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase 2 (SAT2, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI and metallothionein 1G (MT1G, all of which have been previously documented as elevated in the Rhesus monkey or human endometrium during the secretory phase. Genes down-regulated included: transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI or BIGH3, matrix metalloproteinase 11 (stromelysin 3, proenkephalin (PENK, cysteine/glycine-rich protein 2 (CSRP2, collagen type VII alpha 1 (COL7A1, secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4, progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, chemokine (C-X-C ligand 12 (CXCL12 and biglycan (BGN. In addition, many novel/unknown genes were also identified. Validation of array data

  4. Inferring Gene Regulatory Networks Using Conditional Regulation Pattern to Guide Candidate Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    Full Text Available Combining path consistency (PC algorithms with conditional mutual information (CMI are widely used in reconstruction of gene regulatory networks. CMI has many advantages over Pearson correlation coefficient in measuring non-linear dependence to infer gene regulatory networks. It can also discriminate the direct regulations from indirect ones. However, it is still a challenge to select the conditional genes in an optimal way, which affects the performance and computation complexity of the PC algorithm. In this study, we develop a novel conditional mutual information-based algorithm, namely RPNI (Regulation Pattern based Network Inference, to infer gene regulatory networks. For conditional gene selection, we define the co-regulation pattern, indirect-regulation pattern and mixture-regulation pattern as three candidate patterns to guide the selection of candidate genes. To demonstrate the potential of our algorithm, we apply it to gene expression data from DREAM challenge. Experimental results show that RPNI outperforms existing conditional mutual information-based methods in both accuracy and time complexity for different sizes of gene samples. Furthermore, the robustness of our algorithm is demonstrated by noisy interference analysis using different types of noise.

  5. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes regulated by vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2015-01-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, a variety of fermentation inhibitors, including acetic acid and vanillin, are released. Using DNA microarray analysis, this study explored genes of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that respond to vanillin-induced stress. The expression of 273 genes was upregulated and that of 205 genes was downregulated under vanillin stress. Significantly induced genes included MCH2, SNG1, GPH1, and TMA10, whereas NOP2, UTP18, FUR1, and SPR1 were down regulated. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of upregulated genes suggested that vanillin might regulate gene expression in a stress response element (STRE)-dependent manner, in addition to a pathway that involved the transcription factor Yap1p. Retardation in the cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1, and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. Deletion of the genes whose expression levels were decreased under vanillin stress did not result in a notable change in S. cerevisiae growth under vanillin stress. This study will provide the basis for a better understanding of the stress response of the yeast S. cerevisiae to fermentation inhibitors.

  6. Frequent down-regulation of ABC transporter genes in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidenko, Rita; Razanauskas, Deividas; Daniunaite, Kristina; Lazutka, Juozas Rimantas; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins responsible for the efflux of a wide variety of substrates, including steroid metabolites, through the cellular membranes. For better characterization of the role of ABC transporters in prostate cancer (PCa) development, the profile of ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed in PCa and noncancerous prostate tissues (NPT). TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) human ABC transporter plates were used for the gene expression profiling in 10 PCa and 6 NPT specimens. ABCB1 transcript level was evaluated in a larger set of PCa cases (N = 78) and NPT (N = 15) by real-time PCR, the same PCa cases were assessed for the gene promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of eight ABC transporter genes (ABCA8, ABCB1, ABCC6, ABCC9, ABCC10, ABCD2, ABCG2, and ABCG4) was significantly down-regulated in PCa as compared to NPT, and only two genes (ABCC4 and ABCG1) were up-regulated. Down-regulation of ABC transporter genes was prevalent in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative cases. A detailed analysis of ABCB1 expression confirmed TLDA results: a reduced level of the transcript was identified in PCa in comparison to NPT (p = 0.048). Moreover, the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative PCa cases showed significantly lower expression of ABCB1 in comparison to NPT (p = 0.003) or the fusion-positive tumors (p = 0.002). Promoter methylation of ABCB1 predominantly occurred in PCa and was rarely detected in NPT (p < 0.001). The study suggests frequent down-regulation of the ABC transporter genes in PCa, especially in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative tumors. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1689-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  7. NF-1 Dependent Gene Regulation in Drosophila Melanogaster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Yi

    2004-01-01

    .... We have used an Affymetrix whole genome chip, containing all 13,500 genes of the fruit fly Drosophila, to identify 93 genes with altered expression patterns in flies that have no NF1 protein compared...

  8. In vitro selection of mutants: Inducible gene regulation for salt tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winicov, I.; Bastola, D.R.; Deutch, C.E.; Pethe, V.V.; Petrusa, L.

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of differentially expressed genes in plants may be involved in inducing tolerance to stress. Isogenic salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant alfalfa lines were investigated for molecular differences in their response to salt. The genes, which are differentially induced by salt in the salt-tolerant alfalfa cells and are also regulated by salt at the whole plant level, were cloned. Both transcriptional and post- transcriptional mechanisms influenced salt-induced product accumulation in the salt-tolerant alfalfa. The salt-tolerant plants doubled proline concentration rapidly in roots, while salt-sensitive plants showed a delayed response. To understand the regulatory system in the salt-tolerant alfalfa, two genes that are expressed in roots were studied. Alfin1 encodes a zinc-finger type putative DNA transcription factor conserved in alfalfa, rice and Arabidopsis, and MsPRP2 encodes a protein that serves as a cell wall- membrane linker in roots. Recombinant Alfin1 protein was selected, amplified, cloned and its consensus sequence was identified. The recombinant Alfin1 also bound specifically to fragments of the MsPRP2 promoter in vitro, containing the Alfin1 binding consensus sequence. The results show unambiguously binding specificity of Alfin1 DNA, supporting its role in gene regulation. Alfin1 function was tested in transformed alfalfa in vivo by over-expressing Alfin1 from 35S CaMV promoter. The transgenic plants appeared normal. However, plants harboring the anti-sense construct did not grow well in soil, indicating that Alfin1 expression was essential. Alfin1 over-expression in transgenic alfalfa led to enhanced levels of MsPRP2 transcript accumulation, demonstrating that Alfin1 functioned in vivo in gene regulation. Since MsPRP2 gene is also induced by salt, it is likely that Alfin1 is an important transcription factor for gene regulation in salt-tolerant alfalfa, and an excellent target for manipulation to improve salt tolerance. (author)

  9. Genome-wide analysis of SREBP1 activity around the clock reveals its combined dependency on nutrient and circadian signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Gilardi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the circadian clock allows them to anticipate and adapt physiology around the 24 hours. Conversely, metabolism and food consumption regulate the internal clock, pointing the existence of an intricate relationship between nutrient state and circadian homeostasis that is far from being understood. The Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 (SREBP1 is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis. Hepatic SREBP1 function is influenced by the nutrient-response cycle, but also by the circadian machinery. To systematically understand how the interplay of circadian clock and nutrient-driven rhythm regulates SREBP1 activity, we evaluated the genome-wide binding of SREBP1 to its targets throughout the day in C57BL/6 mice. The recruitment of SREBP1 to the DNA showed a highly circadian behaviour, with a maximum during the fed status. However, the temporal expression of SREBP1 targets was not always synchronized with its binding pattern. In particular, different expression phases were observed for SREBP1 target genes depending on their function, suggesting the involvement of other transcription factors in their regulation. Binding sites for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 (HNF4 were specifically enriched in the close proximity of SREBP1 peaks of genes, whose expression was shifted by about 8 hours with respect to SREBP1 binding. Thus, the cross-talk between hepatic HNF4 and SREBP1 may underlie the expression timing of this subgroup of SREBP1 targets. Interestingly, the proper temporal expression profile of these genes was dramatically changed in Bmal1-/- mice upon time-restricted feeding, for which a rhythmic, but slightly delayed, binding of SREBP1 was maintained. Collectively, our results show that besides the nutrient-driven regulation of SREBP1 nuclear translocation, a second layer of modulation of SREBP1 transcriptional activity, strongly dependent from the circadian clock, exists. This system allows us to fine tune the expression timing of SREBP1

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of SREBP1 Activity around the Clock Reveals Its Combined Dependency on Nutrient and Circadian Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Aurélien; Baruchet, Michaël; Canella, Donatella; Le Martelot, Gwendal; Guex, Nicolas; Desvergne, Béatrice; Delorenzi, Mauro; Deplancke, Bart; Desvergne, Béatrice; Guex, Nicolas; Herr, Winship; Naef, Felix; Rougemont, Jacques; Schibler, Ueli; Deplancke, Bart; Guex, Nicolas; Herr, Winship; Guex, Nicolas; Andersin, Teemu; Cousin, Pascal; Gilardi, Federica; Gos, Pascal; Martelot, Gwendal Le; Lammers, Fabienne; Canella, Donatella; Gilardi, Federica; Raghav, Sunil; Fabbretti, Roberto; Fortier, Arnaud; Long, Li; Vlegel, Volker; Xenarios, Ioannis; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Praz, Viviane; Guex, Nicolas; Naef, Felix; Rougemont, Jacques; David, Fabrice; Jarosz, Yohan; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Liechti, Robin; Martin, Olivier; Delafontaine, Julien; Sinclair, Lucas; Cajan, Julia; Krier, Irina; Leleu, Marion; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Molina, Nacho; Naldi, Aurélien; Rey, Guillaume; Symul, Laura; Guex, Nicolas; Naef, Felix; Rougemont, Jacques; Bernasconi, David; Delorenzi, Mauro; Andersin, Teemu; Canella, Donatella; Gilardi, Federica; Martelot, Gwendal Le; Lammers, Fabienne; Baruchet, Michaël; Raghav, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the circadian clock allows them to anticipate and adapt physiology around the 24 hours. Conversely, metabolism and food consumption regulate the internal clock, pointing the existence of an intricate relationship between nutrient state and circadian homeostasis that is far from being understood. The Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 (SREBP1) is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis. Hepatic SREBP1 function is influenced by the nutrient-response cycle, but also by the circadian machinery. To systematically understand how the interplay of circadian clock and nutrient-driven rhythm regulates SREBP1 activity, we evaluated the genome-wide binding of SREBP1 to its targets throughout the day in C57BL/6 mice. The recruitment of SREBP1 to the DNA showed a highly circadian behaviour, with a maximum during the fed status. However, the temporal expression of SREBP1 targets was not always synchronized with its binding pattern. In particular, different expression phases were observed for SREBP1 target genes depending on their function, suggesting the involvement of other transcription factors in their regulation. Binding sites for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 (HNF4) were specifically enriched in the close proximity of SREBP1 peaks of genes, whose expression was shifted by about 8 hours with respect to SREBP1 binding. Thus, the cross-talk between hepatic HNF4 and SREBP1 may underlie the expression timing of this subgroup of SREBP1 targets. Interestingly, the proper temporal expression profile of these genes was dramatically changed in Bmal1 −/− mice upon time-restricted feeding, for which a rhythmic, but slightly delayed, binding of SREBP1 was maintained. Collectively, our results show that besides the nutrient-driven regulation of SREBP1 nuclear translocation, a second layer of modulation of SREBP1 transcriptional activity, strongly dependent from the circadian clock, exists. This system allows us to fine tune the expression timing of SREBP1 target genes

  11. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-03-25

    Hoxgenes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hoxgenes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteranBombyx mori In this species,Antennapedia(Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antpcan regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antpin the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such assericin-3,fhxh4, and fhxh5 These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antpactivates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putativesericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antpdirectly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. moriand the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori We suggest that Hoxgenes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The Aurora A-HP1γ pathway regulates gene expression and mitosis in cells from the sperm lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Phoebe H; Grzenda, Adrienne; Mathison, Angela; Morbeck, Dean E; Fredrickson, Jolene R; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Christensen, Trace; Salisbury, Jeffrey; Calvo, Ezequiel; Iovanna, Juan; Coddington, Charles C; Urrutia, Raul; Lomberk, Gwen

    2015-05-29

    HP1γ, a well-known regulator of gene expression, has been recently identified to be a target of Aurora A, a mitotic kinase which is important for both gametogenesis and embryogenesis. The purpose of this study was to define whether the Aurora A-HP1γ pathway supports cell division of gametes and/or early embryos, using western blot, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, shRNA-based knockdown, site-directed mutagenesis, and Affymetrix-based genome-wide expression profiles. We find that the form of HP1γ phosphorylated by Aurora A, P-Ser83 HP1γ, is a passenger protein, which localizes to the spermatozoa centriole and axoneme. In addition, disruption in this pathway causes centrosomal abnormalities and aberrations in cell division. Expression profiling of male germ cell lines demonstrates that HP1γ phosphorylation is critical for the regulation of mitosis-associated gene expression networks. In female gametes, we observe that P-Ser83-HP1γ is not present in meiotic centrosomes of M2 oocytes, but after syngamy, it becomes detectable during cleavage divisions, coinciding with early embryonic genome activation. These results support the idea that phosphorylation of HP1γ by Aurora A plays a role in the regulation of gene expression and mitotic cell division in cells from the sperm lineage and in early embryos. Combined, this data is relevant to better understanding the function of HP1γ in reproductive biology.

  13. Co-regulation of the DAF-16 target gene, cyp-35B1/dod-13, by HSF-1 in C. elegans dauer larvae and daf-2 insulin pathway mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy B Iser

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin/IGF-I-like signaling (IIS has both cell autonomous and non-autonomous functions. In some cases, targets through which IIS regulates cell-autonomous functions, such as cell growth and metabolism, have been identified. In contrast, targets for many non-autonomous IIS functions, such as C. elegans dauer morphogenesis, remain elusive. Here, we report the use of genomic and genetic approaches to identify potential non-autonomous targets of C. elegans IIS. First, we used transcriptional microarrays to identify target genes regulated non-autonomously by IIS in the intestine or in neurons. C. elegans IIS controls expression of a number of stress response genes, which were differentially regulated by tissue-restricted IIS. In particular, expression of sod-3, a MnSOD enzyme, was not regulated by tissue-restricted IIS on the microarrays, while expression of hsp-16 genes was rescued back to wildtype by tissue restricted IIS. One IIS target regulated non-autonomously by age-1 was cyp-35B1/dod-13, encoding a cytochrome P450. Genetic analysis of the cyp-35B1 promoter showed both DAF-16 and HSF-1 are direct regulators. Based on these findings, we propose that hsf-1 may participate in the pathways mediating non-autonomous activities of age-1 in C. elegans.

  14. Co-regulation of the DAF-16 target gene, cyp-35B1/dod-13, by HSF-1 in C. elegans dauer larvae and daf-2 insulin pathway mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, Wendy B; Wilson, Mark A; Wood, William H; Becker, Kevin; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2011-03-09

    Insulin/IGF-I-like signaling (IIS) has both cell autonomous and non-autonomous functions. In some cases, targets through which IIS regulates cell-autonomous functions, such as cell growth and metabolism, have been identified. In contrast, targets for many non-autonomous IIS functions, such as C. elegans dauer morphogenesis, remain elusive. Here, we report the use of genomic and genetic approaches to identify potential non-autonomous targets of C. elegans IIS. First, we used transcriptional microarrays to identify target genes regulated non-autonomously by IIS in the intestine or in neurons. C. elegans IIS controls expression of a number of stress response genes, which were differentially regulated by tissue-restricted IIS. In particular, expression of sod-3, a MnSOD enzyme, was not regulated by tissue-restricted IIS on the microarrays, while expression of hsp-16 genes was rescued back to wildtype by tissue restricted IIS. One IIS target regulated non-autonomously by age-1 was cyp-35B1/dod-13, encoding a cytochrome P450. Genetic analysis of the cyp-35B1 promoter showed both DAF-16 and HSF-1 are direct regulators. Based on these findings, we propose that hsf-1 may participate in the pathways mediating non-autonomous activities of age-1 in C. elegans.

  15. Circadian gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes of rotating night shift nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reszka, Edyta; Peplonska, Beata; Wieczorek, Edyta; Sobala, Wojciech; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Lie, Jenny-Anne; Kjuus, Helge; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2013-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the underlying mechanism of elevated breast cancer risk among long-term, night-working women involves circadian genes expression alteration caused by exposure to light at night and/or irregular work hours. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of rotating night shift work on expression of selected core circadian genes. The cross-sectional study was conducted on 184 matched nurses and midwives, who currently work either day or rotating night shifts, to determine the effect of irregular work at night on circadian gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes. Transcript levels of BMAL1, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, PER1, PER2, and PER3 were determined by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After adjusting for hour of blood collection, there were no statistically significant changes of investigated circadian genes among nurses and midwives currently working rotating night shifts compared to nurses working day shifts. The highest expression of PER1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was observed for women currently working shifts who had worked >15 years in rotating night shift work. PER1 gene expression was associated with the lifetime duration of rotating night shift work among women currently working night shifts (P=0.04). PER1 and PER3 transcript levels in blood leukocytes were significantly down-regulated in the later versus early hours of the morning between 06.00-10.00 hours (β-coefficient -0.226, P=0.001 and β-coefficient -0.181, Pnight shift work does not affect circadian gene expression in human circulating leukocytes. In analysis of the peripheral clock in human studies, the hour of blood collection should be precisely specified.

  16. Mustn1: A Developmentally Regulated Pan-Musculoskeletal Cell Marker and Regulatory Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hadjiargyrou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mustn1 gene encodes a small nuclear protein (~9.6 kDa that does not belong to any known family. Its genomic organization consists of three exons interspersed by two introns and it is highly homologous across vertebrate species. Promoter analyses revealed that its expression is regulated by the AP family of transcription factors, especially c-Fos, Fra-2 and JunD. Mustn1 is predominantly expressed in the major tissues of the musculoskeletal system: bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle and tendon. Its expression has been associated with normal embryonic development, postnatal growth, exercise, and regeneration of bone and skeletal muscle. Moreover, its expression has also been detected in various musculoskeletal pathologies, including arthritis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, other skeletal muscle myopathies, clubfoot and diabetes associated muscle pathology. In vitro and in vivo functional perturbation revealed that Mustn1 is a key regulatory molecule in myogenic and chondrogenic lineages. This comprehensive review summarizes our current knowledge of Mustn1 and proposes that it is a new developmentally regulated pan-musculoskeletal marker as well as a key regulatory protein for cell differentiation and tissue growth.

  17. Rice PLASTOCHRON genes regulate leaf maturation downstream of the gibberellin signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Manaki; Nagato, Yasuo; Itoh, Jun-Ichi

    2012-05-01

    Rice PLASTOCHRON 1 (PLA1) and PLA2 genes regulate leaf maturation and plastochron, and their loss-of-function mutants exhibit small organs and rapid leaf emergence. They encode a cytochrome P450 protein CYP78A11 and an RNA-binding protein, respectively. Their homologs in Arabidopsis and maize are also associated with plant development/organ size. Despite the importance of PLA genes in plant development, their molecular functions remain unknown. Here, we investigated how PLA1 and PLA2 genes are related to phytohormones. We found that gibberellin (GA) is the major phytohormone that promotes PLA1 and PLA2 expression. GA induced PLA1 and PLA2 expression, and conversely the GA-inhibitor uniconazole suppressed PLA1 and PLA2 expression. In pla1-4 and pla2-1 seedlings, expression levels of GA biosynthesis genes and the signal transduction gene were similar to those in wild-type seedlings. GA treatment slightly down-regulated the GA biosynthesis gene GA20ox2 and up-regulated the GA-catabolizing gene GA2ox4, whereas the GA biosynthesis inhibitor uniconazole up-regulated GA20ox2 and down-regulated GA2ox4 both in wild-type and pla mutants, suggesting that the GA feedback mechanism is not impaired in pla1 and pla2. To reveal how GA signal transduction affects the expression of PLA1 and PLA2, PLA expression in GA-signaling mutants was examined. In GA-insensitive mutant, gid1 and less-sensitive mutant, Slr1-d1, PLA1 and PLA2 expression was down-regulated. On the other hand, the expression levels of PLA1 and PLA2 were highly enhanced in a GA-constitutive-active mutant, slr1-1, causing ectopic overexpression. These results indicate that both PLA1 and PLA2 act downstream of the GA signal transduction pathway to regulate leaf development.

  18. Virus-induced down-regulation of GmERA1A and GmERA1B genes enhances the stomatal response to abscisic acid and drought resistance in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Ogata

    Full Text Available Drought is a major threat to global soybean production. The limited transformation potential and polyploid nature of soybean have hindered functional analysis of soybean genes. Previous research has implicated farnesylation in the plant's response to abscisic acid (ABA and drought tolerance. We therefore used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS to evaluate farnesyltransferase genes, GmERA1A and GmERA1B (Glycine max Enhanced Response to ABA1-A and -B, as potential targets for increasing drought resistance in soybean. Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV-mediated GmERA1-down-regulated soybean leaves displayed an enhanced stomatal response to ABA and reduced water loss and wilting under dehydration conditions, suggesting that GmERA1A and GmERA1B negatively regulate ABA signaling in soybean guard cells. The findings provide evidence that the ALSV-VIGS system, which bypasses the need to generate transgenic plants, is a useful tool for analyzing gene function using only a single down-regulated leaf. Thus, the ALSV-VIGS system could constitute part of a next-generation molecular breeding pipeline to accelerate drought resistance breeding in soybean.

  19. Expression of core clock genes in colorectal tumour cells compared with normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnes, S; Donatsky, A M; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Experimental studies have shown that some circadian core clock genes may act as tumour suppressors and have an important role in the response to oncological treatment. This study investigated the evidence regarding modified expression of core clock genes in colorectal cancer and its...... expression of colorectal cancer cells compared with healthy mucosa cells from specimens analysed by real-time or quantitative real-time polymer chain reaction. The expression of the core clock genes Period, Cryptochrome, Bmal1 and Clock in colorectal tumours were compared with healthy mucosa and correlated...... with clinicopathological features and survival. RESULTS: Seventy-four articles were identified and 11 studies were included. Overall, gene expression of Period was significantly decreased in colorectal cancer cells compared with healthy mucosa cells. This tendency was also seen in the gene expression of Clock. Other core...

  20. Regulation of Neph3 gene in podocytes - key roles of transcription factors NF-kappaB and Sp1

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ristola, Mervi

    2009-08-24

    Abstract Background Neph3 (filtrin) is expressed in the glomerular podocytes where it localizes at the specialized cell adhesion structures of the foot processes called slit diaphragms which form the outermost layer of the glomerular filtration barrier. Neph3 protein shows homology and structural similarity to Neph1, Neph2 and nephrin, which all are crucial for maintaining the normal glomerular ultrafiltration function. The exact function of Neph3 in the kidney is not known but we have previously shown that the level of Neph3 mRNA is decreased in proteinuric diseases. This suggests that Neph3 may play a role in the pathogenesis of kidney damage, and emphasizes the need to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of Neph3 gene. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of Neph3 gene by identifying transcription factors that control Neph3 expression. Results We cloned and characterized approximately 5 kb fragment upstream of the Neph3 gene. Neph3 proximal promoter near the transcription start site was found to be devoid of TATA and CAAT boxes, but to contain a highly GC-rich area. Using promoter reporter gene constructs, we localized the main activating regulatory region of Neph3 gene in its proximal promoter region from -105 to -57. Within this region, putative transcription factor binding sites for NF-κB and Sp1 were found by computational analysis. Mutational screening indicated that NF-κB and Sp1 response elements are essential for the basal transcriptional activity of the Neph3 promoter. Co-transfection studies further showed that NF-κB and Sp1 regulate Neph3 promoter activity. In addition, overexpression of NF-κB increased endogenous Neph3 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using cultured human podocytes demonstrated that both NF-κB and Sp1 interact with the Neph3 promoter. Conclusion Our results show that NF-κB and Sp1 are key regulators of Neph3 expression at the basal level in podocytes, therefore providing new insight

  1. Stress affects expression of the clock gene Bmal1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of neonatal rats via glucocorticoid‐dependent mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejníková, Lucie; Polidarová, Lenka; Sumová, Alena

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 223, č. 1 (2018), č. článku e13020. ISSN 1748-1708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03932S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : clock genes * development * glucocorticoids * mifepristone * restricted feeding * stress * suprachiasmatic nuclei Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 4.867, year: 2016

  2. The C-terminal domain of Nrf1 negatively regulates the full-length CNC-bZIP factor and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β; both are also inhibited by the small dominant-negative Nrf1γ/δ isoforms that down-regulate ARE-battery gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Qiu, Lu; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Chen, Jiayu; Ren, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD, aa 686-741) of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 1 (Nrf1) shares 53% amino acid sequence identity with the equivalent Neh3 domain of Nrf2, a homologous transcription factor. The Neh3 positively regulates Nrf2, but whether the Neh3-like (Neh3L) CTD of Nrf1 has a similar role in regulating Nrf1-target gene expression is unknown. Herein, we report that CTD negatively regulates the full-length Nrf1 (i.e. 120-kDa glycoprotein and 95-kDa deglycoprotein) and its shorter isoform LCR-F1/Nrf1β (55-kDa). Attachment of its CTD-adjoining 112-aa to the C-terminus of Nrf2 yields the chimaeric Nrf2-C112Nrf1 factor with a markedly decreased activity. Live-cell imaging of GFP-CTD reveals that the extra-nuclear portion of the fusion protein is allowed to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane through the amphipathic Neh3L region of Nrf1 and its basic c-tail. Thus removal of either the entire CTD or the essential Neh3L portion within CTD from Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2-C112Nrf1, results in an increase in their transcriptional ability to regulate antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven reporter genes. Further examinations unravel that two smaller isoforms, 36-kDa Nrf1γ and 25-kDa Nrf1δ, act as dominant-negative inhibitors to compete against Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β and Nrf2. Relative to Nrf1, LCR-F1/Nrf1β is a weak activator, that is positively regulated by its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and acidic domain 2 (AD2). Like AD1 of Nrf1, both AD2 and NST domain of LCR-F1/Nrf1β fused within two different chimaeric contexts to yield Gal4D:Nrf1β607 and Nrf1β:C270Nrf2, positively regulate their transactivation activity of cognate Gal4- and Nrf2-target reporter genes. More importantly, differential expression of endogenous ARE-battery genes is attributable to up-regulation by Nrf1 and LCR-F1/Nrf1β and down-regulation by Nrf1γ and Nrf1δ.

  3. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (PMRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  4. EBP1 is a novel E2F target gene regulated by transforming growth factor-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Judah

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of gene expression requires transcription factor binding to specific DNA elements, and a large body of work has focused on the identification of such sequences. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that eukaryotic transcription factors can exhibit widespread, nonfunctional binding to genomic DNA sites. Conversely, some of these proteins, such as E2F, can also modulate gene expression by binding to non-consensus elements. E2F comprises a family of transcription factors that play key roles in a wide variety of cellular functions, including survival, differentiation, activation during tissue regeneration, metabolism, and proliferation. E2F factors bind to the Erb3-binding protein 1 (EBP1 promoter in live cells. We now show that E2F binding to the EBP1 promoter occurs through two tandem DNA elements that do not conform to typical consensus E2F motifs. Exogenously expressed E2F1 activates EBP1 reporters lacking one, but not both sites, suggesting a degree of redundancy under certain conditions. E2F1 increases the levels of endogenous EBP1 mRNA in breast carcinoma and other transformed cell lines. In contrast, in non-transformed primary epidermal keratinocytes, E2F, together with the retinoblastoma family of proteins, appears to be involved in decreasing EBP1 mRNA abundance in response to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor-β1. Thus, E2F is likely a central coordinator of multiple responses that culminate in regulation of EBP1 gene expression, and which may vary depending on cell type and context.

  5. EBP1 is a novel E2F target gene regulated by transforming growth factor-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judah, David; Chang, Wing Y; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-11-10

    Regulation of gene expression requires transcription factor binding to specific DNA elements, and a large body of work has focused on the identification of such sequences. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that eukaryotic transcription factors can exhibit widespread, nonfunctional binding to genomic DNA sites. Conversely, some of these proteins, such as E2F, can also modulate gene expression by binding to non-consensus elements. E2F comprises a family of transcription factors that play key roles in a wide variety of cellular functions, including survival, differentiation, activation during tissue regeneration, metabolism, and proliferation. E2F factors bind to the Erb3-binding protein 1 (EBP1) promoter in live cells. We now show that E2F binding to the EBP1 promoter occurs through two tandem DNA elements that do not conform to typical consensus E2F motifs. Exogenously expressed E2F1 activates EBP1 reporters lacking one, but not both sites, suggesting a degree of redundancy under certain conditions. E2F1 increases the levels of endogenous EBP1 mRNA in breast carcinoma and other transformed cell lines. In contrast, in non-transformed primary epidermal keratinocytes, E2F, together with the retinoblastoma family of proteins, appears to be involved in decreasing EBP1 mRNA abundance in response to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor-β1. Thus, E2F is likely a central coordinator of multiple responses that culminate in regulation of EBP1 gene expression, and which may vary depending on cell type and context.

  6. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bo; Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo

    2011-01-01

    To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene...... is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  7. Fine-mapping resolves Eae23 into two QTLs and implicates ZEB1 as a candidate gene regulating experimental neuroinflammation in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Stridh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To elucidate mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis (MS, we studied genetic regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in rats, assuming a conservation of pathogenic pathways. In this study, we focused on Eae23, originally identified to regulate EAE in a (LEW.1AV1xPVG.1AV1F2 cross. Our aim was to determine whether one or more genes within the 67 Mb region regulate EAE and to define candidate risk genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used high resolution quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis in the 10th generation (G10 of an advanced intercross line (AIL to resolve Eae23 into two QTLs that independently regulate EAE, namely Eae23a and Eae23b. We established a congenic strain to validate the effect of this region on disease. PVG alleles in Eae23 resulted in significant protection from EAE and attenuated CNS inflammation/demyelination. Disease amelioration was accompanied with increased levels of Foxp3(+ cells in the CNS of the congenic strain compared to DA. We then focused on candidate gene investigation in Eae23b, a 9 Mb region linked to all clinical phenotypes. Affymetrix exon arrays were used to study expression of the genes in Eae23b in the parental strains, where none showed differential expression. However, we found lower expression of exon 4 of ZEB1, which is specific for splice-variant Zfhep1. ZEB1 is an interleukin 2 (IL2 repressor involved in T cell development. The splice-specific variance prompted us to next analyze the expression of ZEB1 and its two splice variants, Zfhep1 and Zfhep2, in both lymph node and spleen. We demonstrated that ZEB1 splice-variants are differentially expressed; severity of EAE and higher IL2 levels were associated with down-regulation of Zfhep1 and up-regulation of Zfhep2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We speculate that the balance between splice-variants of ZEB1 could influence the regulation of EAE. Further functional studies of ZEB1 and the splice-variants may unravel

  8. The human luteinizing hormone receptor gene promoter: activation by Sp1 and Sp3 and inhibitory regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Y; Tsai-Morris, C H; Zhang, Y; Dufau, M L

    1999-09-24

    To understand the transcriptional mechanism(s) of human LH receptor (LHR) gene expression, we have identified the dominant functional cis-elements that regulate the activity of the promoter domain (-1 to -176 bp from ATG). Mutagenesis demonstrated that the promoter activity was dependent on two Sp1 domains (-79 bp, -120 bp) in a transformed normal placental cell (PLC) and the choriocarcinoma JAR cell. Both elements interacted with endogenous Sp1 and Sp3 factors but not with Sp2 or Sp4. In Drosophila SL2 cells, the promoter was activated by either Sp1 or Sp3. An ERE half-site (EREhs) at -174 bp was inhibitory (by 100%), but was unresponsive to estradiol and did not bind the estrogen receptor or orphan receptors ERR1 and SF-1. The 5' upstream sequence (-177 to -2056 bp) inhibited promoter activity in PLC by 60%, but only minimally in JAR cells. Activation of the human LHR promoter through Sp1/3 factors is negatively regulated through EREhs and upstream sequences to exert control of gene expression. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Regulation of FOXO1-mediated transcription and cell proliferation by PARP-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamaki, Jun-ichi; Daitoku, Hiroaki; Yoshimochi, Kenji [Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Miwa, Masanao [Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Fukamizu, Akiyoshi, E-mail: akif@tara.tsukuba.ac.jp [Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2009-05-08

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors play an important role in a wide range of biological processes, including cell cycle control, apoptosis, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and gluconeogenesis through regulation of gene expression. In this study, we demonstrated that PARP-1 functions as a negative regulator of FOXO1. We showed that PARP-1 directly binds to and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ates FOXO1 protein. PARP-1 represses FOXO1-mediated expression of cell cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} gene. Notably, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity was not required for the repressive effect of PARP-1 on FOXO1 function. Furthermore, knockdown of PARP-1 led to a decrease in cell proliferation in a manner dependent on FOXO1 function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that PARP-1 is recruited to the p27{sup Kip1} gene promoter through a binding to FOXO1. These results suggest that PARP-1 acts as a corepressor for FOXO1, which could play an important role in proper cell proliferation by regulating p27{sup Kip1} gene expression.

  10. Regulation of Nuclear Receptor Interacting Protein 1 (NRIP1) Gene Expression in Response to Weight Loss and Exercise in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Marinis, Yang Z; Sun, Jiangming; Bompada, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Nuclear receptor interacting protein 1 (NRIP1) is an important energy regulator, but few studies have addressed its role in humans. This study investigated adipose tissue and skeletal muscle NRIP1 gene expression and serum levels in response to weight loss and exercise in humans. Methods...... network/module. Conclusions: NRIP1 gene expression and serum levels are strongly associated with metabolic states such as obesity, weight loss, different types of exercise, and peripheral tissue insulin resistance, potentially as a mediator of sedentary effects.......: In patients with obesity, adipose tissue NRIP1 mRNA expression increased during weight loss and weight maintenance and showed strong associations with metabolic markers and anthropometric parameters. Serum NRIP1 protein levels also increased after weight loss. In skeletal muscle, imposed rest increased NRIP1...

  11. Genome-wide identification of KANADI1 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz Merelo

    Full Text Available Plant organ development and polarity establishment is mediated by the action of several transcription factors. Among these, the KANADI (KAN subclade of the GARP protein family plays important roles in polarity-associated processes during embryo, shoot and root patterning. In this study, we have identified a set of potential direct target genes of KAN1 through a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation/DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq and genome-wide transcriptional profiling using tiling arrays. Target genes are over-represented for genes involved in the regulation of organ development as well as in the response to auxin. KAN1 affects directly the expression of several genes previously shown to be important in the establishment of polarity during lateral organ and vascular tissue development. We also show that KAN1 controls through its target genes auxin effects on organ development at different levels: transport and its regulation, and signaling. In addition, KAN1 regulates genes involved in the response to abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins. The role of KAN1 in organ polarity is antagonized by HD-ZIPIII transcription factors, including REVOLUTA (REV. A comparison of their target genes reveals that the REV/KAN1 module acts in organ patterning through opposite regulation of shared targets. Evidence of mutual repression between closely related family members is also shown.

  12. A role for circadian evening elements in cold-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Michael D; Thomashow, Michael F

    2009-10-01

    The plant transcriptome is dramatically altered in response to low temperature. The cis-acting DNA regulatory elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the majority of cold-regulated genes are unknown. Previous bioinformatic analysis has indicated that the promoters of cold-induced genes are enriched in the Evening Element (EE), AAAATATCT, a DNA regulatory element that has a role in circadian-regulated gene expression. Here we tested the role of EE and EE-like (EEL) elements in cold-induced expression of two Arabidopsis genes, CONSTANS-like 1 (COL1; At5g54470) and a gene encoding a 27-kDa protein of unknown function that we designated COLD-REGULATED GENE 27 (COR27; At5g42900). Mutational analysis indicated that the EE/EEL elements were required for cold induction of COL1 and COR27, and that their action was amplified through coupling with ABA response element (ABRE)-like (ABREL) motifs. An artificial promoter consisting solely of four EE motifs interspersed with three ABREL motifs was sufficient to impart cold-induced gene expression. Both COL1 and COR27 were found to be regulated by the circadian clock at warm growth temperatures and cold-induction of COR27 was gated by the clock. These results suggest that cold- and clock-regulated gene expression are integrated through regulatory proteins that bind to EE and EEL elements supported by transcription factors acting at ABREL sequences. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the coupling of EE and EEL motifs with ABREL motifs is highly enriched in cold-induced genes and thus may constitute a DNA regulatory element pair with a significant role in configuring the low-temperature transcriptome.

  13. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, B.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10...

  14. Role of protein farnesylation events in the ABA-mediated regulation of the Pinoresinol-Lariciresinol Reductase 1 (LuPLR1) gene expression and lignan biosynthesis in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Cyrielle; Decourtil, Cédric; Marosevic, Djurdjica; Bailly, Marlène; Lopez, Tatiana; Renouard, Sullivan; Doussot, Joël; Dutilleul, Christelle; Auguin, Daniel; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Lainé, Eric; Lamblin, Frédéric; Hano, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    A Linum usitatissimum LuERA1 gene encoding a putative ortholog of the ERA1 (Enhanced Response to ABA 1) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana (encoding the beta subunit of a farnesyltransferase) was analyzed in silico and for its expression in flax. The gene and the protein sequences are highly similar to other sequences already characterized in plants and all the features of a farnesyltransferase were detected. Molecular modeling of LuERA1 protein confirmed its farnesyltransferase nature. LuERA1 is expressed in the vegetative organs and also in the outer seedcoat of the flaxseed, where it could modulate the previously observed regulation operated by ABA on lignan synthesis. This effect could be mediated by the regulation of the transcription of a key gene for lignan synthesis in flax, the LuPLR1 gene, encoding a pinoresinol lariciresinol reductase. The positive effect of manumycin A, a specific inhibitor of farnesyltransferase, on lignan biosynthesis in flax cell suspension systems supports the hypothesis of the involvement of such an enzyme in the negative regulation of ABA action. In Arabidopsis, ERA1 is able to negatively regulate the ABA effects and the mutant era1 has an enhanced sensitivity to ABA. When expressed in an Arabidopsis cell suspension (heterologous system) LuERA1 is able to reverse the effect of the era1 mutation. RNAi experiments in flax targeting the farnesyltransferase β-subunit encoded by the LuERA1 gene led to an increase LuPLR1 expression level associated with an increased content of lignan in transgenic calli. Altogether these results strongly suggest a role of the product of this LuERA1 gene in the ABA-mediated upregulation of lignan biosynthesis in flax cells through the activation of LuPLR1 promoter. This ABA signaling pathway involving ERA1 probably acts through the ABRE box found in the promoter sequence of LuPLR1, a key gene for lignan synthesis in flax, as demonstrated by LuPLR1 gene promoter-reporter experiments in flax cells using wild

  15. Frequent down-regulation of ABC transporter genes in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidenko, Rita; Razanauskas, Deividas; Daniunaite, Kristina; Lazutka, Juozas Rimantas; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-10-12

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins responsible for the efflux of a wide variety of substrates, including steroid metabolites, through the cellular membranes. For better characterization of the role of ABC transporters in prostate cancer (PCa) development, the profile of ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed in PCa and noncancerous prostate tissues (NPT). TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) human ABC transporter plates were used for the gene expression profiling in 10 PCa and 6 NPT specimens. ABCB1 transcript level was evaluated in a larger set of PCa cases (N = 78) and NPT (N = 15) by real-time PCR, the same PCa cases were assessed for the gene promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR. Expression of eight ABC transporter genes (ABCA8, ABCB1, ABCC6, ABCC9, ABCC10, ABCD2, ABCG2, and ABCG4) was significantly down-regulated in PCa as compared to NPT, and only two genes (ABCC4 and ABCG1) were up-regulated. Down-regulation of ABC transporter genes was prevalent in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative cases. A detailed analysis of ABCB1 expression confirmed TLDA results: a reduced level of the transcript was identified in PCa in comparison to NPT (p = 0.048). Moreover, the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative PCa cases showed significantly lower expression of ABCB1 in comparison to NPT (p = 0.003) or the fusion-positive tumors (p = 0.002). Promoter methylation of ABCB1 predominantly occurred in PCa and was rarely detected in NPT (p ABC transporter genes in PCa, especially in the TMPRSS2-ERG-negative tumors.

  16. Regulation of eucaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, R.; Ptashne, M.S

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a method of regulating the expression of a gene in a eucaryotic cell. The method consists of: providing in the eucaryotic cell, a peptide, derived from or substantially similar to a peptide of a procaryotic cell able to bind to DNA upstream from or within the gene, the amount of the peptide being sufficient to bind to the gene and thereby control expression of the gene.

  17. Yes-associated protein and WW-containing transcription regulator 1 regulate the expression of sex-determining genes in Sertoli cells, but their inactivation does not cause sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Adrien; Paquet, Marilène; Boerboom, Derek; Boyer, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) and WW-containing transcription regulator 1 (WWTR1) are two functionally redundant transcriptional regulators that are downstream effectors of the Hippo signaling pathway, and that act as major regulators of cell growth and differentiation. To elucidate their role in Sertoli cells, primary Sertoli cell culture from Yapflox/flox; Wwtr1flox/flox animals were infected with a Cre recombinase-expressing adenovirus. Concomitant inactivation of Yap and Wwtr1 resulted in a decrease in the mRNA levels of the male sex differentiation genes Dhh, Dmrt1, Sox9, and Wt1, whereas those of genes involved in female differentiation (Wnt4, Rspo1, and Foxl2) were induced. SOX9, FOXL2, and WNT4 proteins were regulated in the same manner as their mRNAs in response to loss of YAP and WWTR1. To further characterize the role of YAP and WWTR1 in Sertoli cells, we generated a mouse model (Yapflox/flox; Wwtr1flox/flox; Amhcre/+) in which Yap and Wwtr1 were conditionally deleted in Sertoli cells. An increase in the number of apoptotic cells was observed in the seminiferous tubules of 4 dpp mutant mice, leading to a reduction in testis weights and a decrease in the number of Sertoli cells in adult animals. Gene expression analyses of testes from 4 dpp Yapflox/flox; Wwtr1flox/flox; Amhcre/+ mice showed that Sertoli cell differentiation is initially altered, as Dhh, Dmrt1, and Sox9 mRNA levels were downregulated, whereas Wnt4 mRNA levels were increased. However, expression of these genes was not changed in older animals. Together, these results suggest a novel role of the Hippo signaling pathway in the mechanisms of sex differentiation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. miRNA-mediated functional changes through co-regulating function related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs play important roles in various biological processes involving fairly complex mechanism. Analysis of genome-wide miRNA microarray demonstrate that a single miRNA can regulate hundreds of genes, but the regulative extent on most individual genes is surprisingly mild so that it is difficult to understand how a miRNA provokes detectable functional changes with such mild regulation. RESULTS: To explore the internal mechanism of miRNA-mediated regulation, we re-analyzed the data collected from genome-wide miRNA microarray with bioinformatics assay, and found that the transfection of miR-181b and miR-34a in Hela and HCT-116 tumor cells regulated large numbers of genes, among which, the genes related to cell growth and cell death demonstrated high Enrichment scores, suggesting that these miRNAs may be important in cell growth and cell death. MiR-181b induced changes in protein expression of most genes that were seemingly related to enhancing cell growth and decreasing cell death, while miR-34a mediated contrary changes of gene expression. Cell growth assays further confirmed this finding. In further study on miR-20b-mediated osteogenesis in hMSCs, miR-20b was found to enhance osteogenesis by activating BMPs/Runx2 signaling pathway in several stages by co-repressing of PPARγ, Bambi and Crim1. CONCLUSIONS: With its multi-target characteristics, miR-181b, miR-34a and miR-20b provoked detectable functional changes by co-regulating functionally-related gene groups or several genes in the same signaling pathway, and thus mild regulation from individual miRNA targeting genes could have contributed to an additive effect. This might also be one of the modes of miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  19. Direct Regulation of tRNA and 5S rRNA Gene Transcription by Polo-like Kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairley, Jennifer A.; Mitchell, Louise E.; Berg, Tracy; Kenneth, Niall S.; von Schubert, Conrad; Sillje, Herman H. W.; Medema, Rene H.; Nigg, Erich A.; White, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase Plk1 controls numerous aspects of cell-cycle progression. We show that it associates with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes and regulates their transcription by RNA polymerase Ill (pol Ill) through direct binding and phosphorylation of transcription factor Brit During interphase, Plk1 promotes

  20. The silkworm Bombyx mori cuticular protein CPR55 gene is regulated by the transcription factor βFTZ-F1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saheb Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The insect cuticle is composed of various proteins and formed during the moult under a complex biological process that depends on the cross talk between hormone levels and gene expression. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the ecdysone-dependent temporal regulation mechanisms of cuticular proteins expression and the underlying control of Bombyx mori metamorphosis. The expression of CPR55 was observed from the W3 early stage and peaked at pupation when the ecdysteroid titre declined. CPR55 was induced by the ecdysone pulse, and their expression peaked at 24 h after transfer to a hormone free medium. Transcripts of CPR55 were neither observed after the 20E pulse treatment in the presence of cycloheximide nor after the addition of 20E in V4 wing discs. We analysed the upstream region of the CPR55 gene using a transient reporter assay with a gene gun system which identified only one βFTZ-F1 binding site important for cis-acting elements for the transcription activation of the luciferase reporter gene by an ecdysone pulse. Site-directed mutagenesis of this element in the context of the 589-bp promoter fragment drastically decreased the reporter activity. The nuclear protein bound to βFTZ-F1 sites was identified by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggesting that CPR55 expression was regulated by βFTZ-F1 through the ecdysone pulse. The results confirmed that transcription factor, BmβFTZ-F1, binds to the cis-regulatory elements in the promoter of the gene coding for cuticle protein, CPR55, and regulates its expression during B. mori metamorphosis.

  1. A genome scale RNAi screen identifies GLI1 as a novel gene regulating vorinostat sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, K J; Newbold, A; Gould, C M; Luu, J; Trapani, J A; Matthews, G M; Simpson, K J; Johnstone, R W

    2016-07-01

    Vorinostat is an FDA-approved histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that has proven clinical success in some patients; however, it remains unclear why certain patients remain unresponsive to this agent and other HDACis. Constitutive STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) activation, overexpression of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins and loss of HR23B have been identified as potential biomarkers of HDACi resistance; however, none have yet been used to aid the clinical utility of HDACi. Herein, we aimed to further elucidate vorinostat-resistance mechanisms through a functional genomics screen to identify novel genes that when knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) sensitized cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis. A synthetic lethal functional screen using a whole-genome protein-coding RNAi library was used to identify genes that when knocked down cooperated with vorinostat to induce tumor cell apoptosis in otherwise resistant cells. Through iterative screening, we identified 10 vorinostat-resistance candidate genes that sensitized specifically to vorinostat. One of these vorinostat-resistance genes was GLI1, an oncogene not previously known to regulate the activity of HDACi. Treatment of vorinostat-resistant cells with the GLI1 small-molecule inhibitor, GANT61, phenocopied the effect of GLI1 knockdown. The mechanism by which GLI1 loss of function sensitized tumor cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis is at least in part through interactions with vorinostat to alter gene expression in a manner that favored apoptosis. Upon GLI1 knockdown and vorinostat treatment, BCL2L1 expression was repressed and overexpression of BCL2L1 inhibited GLI1-knockdown-mediated vorinostat sensitization. Taken together, we present the identification and characterization of GLI1 as a new HDACi resistance gene, providing a strong rationale for development of GLI1 inhibitors for clinical use in combination with HDACi therapy.

  2. In silico identification of NF-kappaB-regulated genes in pancreatic beta-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eizirik Decio L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic beta-cells are the target of an autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This is mediated in part by cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1β and interferon (IFN-γ. These cytokines modify the expression of hundreds of genes, leading to beta-cell dysfunction and death by apoptosis. Several of these cytokine-induced genes are potentially regulated by the IL-1β-activated transcription factor (TF nuclear factor (NF-κB, and previous studies by our group have shown that cytokine-induced NF-κB activation is pro-apoptotic in beta-cells. To identify NF-κB-regulated gene networks in beta-cells we presently used a discriminant analysis-based approach to predict NF-κB responding genes on the basis of putative regulatory elements. Results The performance of linear and quadratic discriminant analysis (LDA, QDA in identifying NF-κB-responding genes was examined on a dataset of 240 positive and negative examples of NF-κB regulation, using stratified cross-validation with an internal leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV loop for automated feature selection and noise reduction. LDA performed slightly better than QDA, achieving 61% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 87% positive predictive value, and allowing the identification of 231, 251 and 580 NF-κB putative target genes in insulin-producing INS-1E cells, primary rat beta-cells and human pancreatic islets, respectively. Predicted NF-κB targets had a significant enrichment in genes regulated by cytokines (IL-1β or IL-1β + IFN-γ and double stranded RNA (dsRNA, as compared to genes not regulated by these NF-κB-dependent stimuli. We increased the confidence of the predictions by selecting only evolutionary stable genes, i.e. genes with homologs predicted as NF-κB targets in rat, mouse, human and chimpanzee. Conclusion The present in silico analysis allowed us to identify novel regulatory targets of NF-κB using a supervised classification method based on

  3. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahi, Mehdi H; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Eberhart, Charles G; Rey, Juan A; Fan, Xing; Castresana, Javier S

    2010-01-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63%) and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%), but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes

  4. PARP-1 and YY1 are important novel regulators of CXCL12 gene transcription in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Marković

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12 transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1 in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the

  5. The precise regulation of different COR genes by individual CBF transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yihao; Huang, Jiaying; Sun, Tianshu; Wang, Xuefei; Zhu, Chenqi; Ai, Yuxi; Gu, Hongya

    2017-02-01

    The transcription factors CBF1/2/3 are reported to play a dominant role in the cold responsive network of Arabidopsis by directly regulating the expression levels of cold responsive (COR) genes. In this study, we obtained CRISPR/Cas9-mediated loss-of-function mutants of cbf1∼3. Over 3,000 COR genes identified by RNA-seq analysis showed a slight but significant change in their expression levels in the mutants compared to the wild-type plants after being treated at 4 °C for 12 h. The C-repeat (CRT) motif (5'-CCGAC-3') was enriched in promoters of genes that were up-regulated by CBF2 and CBF3 but not in promoters of genes up-regulated by CBF1. These data suggest that CBF2 and CBF3 play a more important role in directing the cold response by regulating different sets of downstream COR genes. More than 2/3 of COR genes were co-regulated by two or three CBFs and were involved mainly in cellular signal transduction and metabolic processes; less than 1/3 of the genes were regulated by one CBF, and those genes up-regulated were enriched in cold-related abiotic stress responses. Our results indicate that CBFs play an important role in the trade-off between cold tolerance and plant growth through the precise regulation of COR genes in the complicated transcriptional network. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. YY1 regulates melanocyte development and function by cooperating with MITF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juying Li

    Full Text Available Studies of coat color mutants have greatly contributed to the discovery of genes that regulate melanocyte development and function. Here, we generated Yy1 conditional knockout mice in the melanocyte-lineage and observed profound melanocyte deficiency and premature gray hair, similar to the loss of melanocytes in human piebaldism and Waardenburg syndrome. Although YY1 is a ubiquitous transcription factor, YY1 interacts with M-MITF, the Waardenburg Syndrome IIA gene and a master transcriptional regulator of melanocytes. YY1 cooperates with M-MITF in regulating the expression of piebaldism gene KIT and multiple additional pigmentation genes. Moreover, ChIP-seq identified genome-wide YY1 targets in the melanocyte lineage. These studies mechanistically link genes implicated in human conditions of melanocyte deficiency and reveal how a ubiquitous factor (YY1 gains lineage-specific functions by co-regulating gene expression with a lineage-restricted factor (M-MITF-a general mechanism which may confer tissue-specific gene expression in multiple lineages.

  7. Zac1, an Sp1-like protein, regulates human p21WAF1/Cip1 gene expression in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Pei-Yao; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Liu, Shu-Ting; Chang, Yung-Lung; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Wang, Wei-Ming; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Zac1 functions as both a transcription factor and a transcriptional cofactor for p53, nuclear receptors (NRs) and NR coactivators. Zac1 might also act as a transcriptional repressor via the recruitment of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). The ability of Zac1 to interact directly with GC-specific elements indicates that Zac1 possibly binds to Sp1-responsive elements. In the present study, our data show that Zac1 is able to interact directly with the Sp1-responsive element in the p21 WAF1/Cip1 gene promoter and enhance the transactivation activity of Sp1 through direct physical interaction. Our data further demonstrate that Zac1 might enhance Sp1-specific promoter activity by interacting with the Sp1-responsive element, affecting the transactivation activity of Sp1 via a protein–protein interaction, or competing the HDAC1 protein away from the pre-existing Sp1/HDAC1 complex. Finally, the synergistic regulation of p21 WAF1/Cip1 gene expression by Zac1 and Sp1 is mediated by endogenous p53 protein and p53-responsive elements in HeLa cells. Our work suggests that Zac1 might serve as an Sp1-like protein that directly interacts with the Sp1-responsive element to oligomerize with and/or to coactivate Sp1.

  8. Sugar regulation of SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1 (STP1) expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba, Elizabeth; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise Lizeth; Hernández-Bernal, Alma Fabiola; Ramos-Vega, Maricela; León, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Sugars regulate the expression of many genes at the transcriptional level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, sugars induce or repress the expression of >1800 genes, including the STP1 (SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1) gene, which encodes an H+/monosaccharide cotransporter. STP1 transcript levels decrease more rapidly after the addition of low concentrations of sugars than the levels of other repressed genes, such as DIN6 (DARK-INDUCED 6). We found that this regulation is exerted at the transcriptional level and is initiated by phosphorylatable sugars. Interestingly, the sugar signal that modulates STP1 expression is transmitted through a HEXOKINASE 1-independent signalling pathway. Finally, analysis of the STP1 5′ regulatory region allowed us to delimit a region of 309bp that contains the cis elements implicated in the glucose regulation of STP1 expression. Putative cis-acting elements involved in this response were identified. PMID:25281700

  9. Network-based differential gene expression analysis suggests cell cycle related genes regulated by E2F1 underlie the molecular difference between smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Differential gene expression (DGE) analysis is commonly used to reveal the deregulated molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. However, traditional DGE analysis (e.g., the t test or the rank sum test) tests each gene independently without considering interactions between them. Top-ranked differentially regulated genes prioritized by the analysis may not directly relate to the coherent molecular changes underlying complex diseases. Joint analyses of co-expression and DGE have been applied to reveal the deregulated molecular modules underlying complex diseases. Most of these methods consist of separate steps: first to identify gene-gene relationships under the studied phenotype then to integrate them with gene expression changes for prioritizing signature genes, or vice versa. It is warrant a method that can simultaneously consider gene-gene co-expression strength and corresponding expression level changes so that both types of information can be leveraged optimally. Results In this paper, we develop a gene module based method for differential gene expression analysis, named network-based differential gene expression (nDGE) analysis, a one-step integrative process for prioritizing deregulated genes and grouping them into gene modules. We demonstrate that nDGE outperforms existing methods in prioritizing deregulated genes and discovering deregulated gene modules using simulated data sets. When tested on a series of smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma data sets, we show that top differentially regulated genes identified by the rank sum test in different sets are not consistent while top ranked genes defined by nDGE in different data sets significantly overlap. nDGE results suggest that a differentially regulated gene module, which is enriched for cell cycle related genes and E2F1 targeted genes, plays a role in the molecular differences between smoker and non-smoker lung adenocarcinoma. Conclusions In this paper, we develop nDGE to prioritize

  10. Differential maturation of rhythmic clock gene expression during early development in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Ines H; Lahiri, Kajori; Lopez-Olmeda, Jose Fernando; Loosli, Felix; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Vallone, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    One key challenge for the field of chronobiology is to identify how circadian clock function emerges during early embryonic development. Teleosts such as the zebrafish are ideal models for studying circadian clock ontogeny since the entire process of development occurs ex utero in an optically transparent chorion. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) represents another powerful fish model for exploring early clock function with, like the zebrafish, many tools available for detailed genetic analysis. However, to date there have been no reports documenting circadian clock gene expression during medaka development. Here we have characterized the expression of key clock genes in various developmental stages and in adult tissues of medaka. As previously reported for other fish, light dark cycles are required for the emergence of clock gene expression rhythms in this species. While rhythmic expression of per and cry genes is detected very early during development and seems to be light driven, rhythmic clock and bmal expression appears much later around hatching time. Furthermore, the maturation of clock function seems to correlate with the appearance of rhythmic expression of these positive elements of the clock feedback loop. By accelerating development through elevated temperatures or by artificially removing the chorion, we show an earlier onset of rhythmicity in clock and bmal expression. Thus, differential maturation of key elements of the medaka clock mechanism depends on the developmental stage and the presence of the chorion.

  11. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this case, the ...

  12. Clock genes in depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie Laage; Bouzinova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Data demonstrate that abnormal regulation of the circadian system can result in cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, immune dysfunction, increased risk for cancer, reproductive complications, etc. It is highly individual among depressed patients and may be expressed as a phase...... in the brain and liver: expression of Per2 is sensitive to stress and changes in Bmal1 mostly associated with depressive behavior. The Per1 expression is sustainable in maintaining the circadian rhythm. A normalization of the expression patterns is likely to be essential for the recovery from the pathological...... state. Depression is a high prevalent disorder. The number of incidents is rising due to changes in lifestyle. The symptomatology is inconsistent and it is difficult to agree on one hypothesis. The disturbances of the 24 h circadian rhythm may be a factor in the development of major depressive disorder...

  13. Altered energy intake and the amplitude of the body temperature rhythm are associated with changes in phase, but not amplitude, of clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Grace H; Mark, Peter J; Maloney, Shane K

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are driven by a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In vitro, temperature cycles within the physiological range can act as potent entraining cues for biological clocks. We altered the body temperature (Tc) rhythm in rats by manipulating energy intake (EI) to determine whether EI-induced changes in Tc oscillations are associated with changes in SCN clock gene rhythms in vivo. Male Wistar rats (n = 16 per diet) were maintained on either an ad libitum diet (CON), a high energy cafeteria diet (CAF), or a calorie restricted diet (CR), and Tc was recorded every 30 min for 6-7 weeks. SCN tissue was harvested from rats at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0, ZT6, ZT12, or ZT18. Expression of the clock genes Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα, the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1, and the heat shock protein Hsp90aa1, were determined using qPCR. The circadian profile of gene expression for each gene was characterized using cosinor analysis. Compared to the CON rats, the amplitude of Tc was decreased in CAF rats by 0.1 °C (p  0.25). Compared to CON, phase advances of the Tc, Bmal1, and Per2 rhythms were observed with CR feeding (p < 0.05), but CAF feeding elicited no significant changes in phase. The present results indicate that in vivo, the SCN is largely resistant to entrainment by EI-induced changes in the Tc rhythm, although some phase entrainment may occur.

  14. Nitric Oxide- and Hydrogen Peroxide-Responsive Gene Regulation during Cell Death Induction in Tobacco1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Elisa; Morsa, Stijn; Dat, James F.; Alard, Philippe; Ferrarini, Alberto; Inzé, Dirk; Delledonne, Massimo; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are regulatory molecules in various developmental processes and stress responses. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves exposed to moderate high light dramatically potentiated NO-mediated cell death in catalase-deficient (CAT1AS) but not in wild-type plants, providing genetic evidence for a partnership between NO and H2O2 during the induction of programmed cell death. With this experimental model system, the specific impact on gene expression was characterized by either NO or H2O2 alone or both molecules combined. By means of genome-wide cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, transcriptional changes were compared in high light-treated CAT1AS and wild-type leaves treated with or without the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. Differential gene expression was detected for 214 of the approximately 8,000 transcript fragments examined. For 108 fragments, sequence analysis revealed homology to genes with a role in signal transduction, defense response, hormone interplay, proteolysis, transport, and metabolism. Surprisingly, only 16 genes were specifically induced by the combined action of NO and H2O2, whereas the majority were regulated by either of them alone. At least seven transcription factors were mutually up-regulated, indicating significant overlap between NO and H2O2 signaling pathways. These results consolidate significant cross-talk between NO and H2O2, provide new insight into the early transcriptional response of plants to increased NO and H2O2 levels, and identify target genes of the combined action of NO and H2O2 during the induction of plant cell death. PMID:16603664

  15. Tyrosine kinase chromosomal translocations mediate distinct and overlapping gene regulation events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hani; Gillis, Lisa C; Jarvis, Jordan D; Yang, Stuart; Huang, Kai; Der, Sandy; Barber, Dwayne L

    2011-01-01

    Leukemia is a heterogeneous disease commonly associated with recurrent chromosomal translocations that involve tyrosine kinases including BCR-ABL, TEL-PDGFRB and TEL-JAK2. Most studies on the activated tyrosine kinases have focused on proximal signaling events, but little is known about gene transcription regulated by these fusions. Oligonucleotide microarray was performed to compare mRNA changes attributable to BCR-ABL, TEL-PDGFRB and TEL-JAK2 after 1 week of activation of each fusion in Ba/F3 cell lines. Imatinib was used to control the activation of BCR-ABL and TEL-PDGFRB, and TEL-JAK2-mediated gene expression was examined 1 week after Ba/F3-TEL-JAK2 cells were switched to factor-independent conditions. Microarray analysis revealed between 800 to 2000 genes induced or suppressed by two-fold or greater by each tyrosine kinase, with a subset of these genes commonly induced or suppressed among the three fusions. Validation by Quantitative PCR confirmed that eight genes (Dok2, Mrvi1, Isg20, Id1, gp49b, Cxcl10, Scinderin, and collagen Vα1(Col5a1)) displayed an overlapping regulation among the three tested fusion proteins. Stat1 and Gbp1 were induced uniquely by TEL-PDGFRB. Our results suggest that BCR-ABL, TEL-PDGFRB and TEL-JAK2 regulate distinct and overlapping gene transcription profiles. Many of the genes identified are known to be involved in processes associated with leukemogenesis, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. This study offers the basis for further work that could lead to an understanding of the specificity of diseases caused by these three chromosomal translocations

  16. Synergistic Effect of Auto-Activation and Small RNA Regulation on Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li-Ping; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Tang, Lei-Han

    2010-09-01

    Auto-activation and small ribonucleic acid (RNA)-mediated regulation are two important mechanisms in controlling gene expression. We study the synergistic effect of these two regulations on gene expression. It is found that under this combinatorial regulation, gene expression exhibits bistable behaviors at the transition regime, while each of these two regulations, if working solely, only leads to monostability. Within the stochastic framework, the base pairing strength between sRNA and mRNA plays an important role in controlling the transition time between on and off states. The noise strength of protein number in the off state approaches 1 and is smaller than that in the on state. The noise strength also depends on which parameters, the feedback strength or the synthesis rate of small RNA, are tuned in switching the gene expression on and off. Our findings may provide a new insight into gene-regulation mechanism and can be applied in synthetic biology.

  17. Synergistic Effect of Auto-Activation and Small RNA Regulation on Gene Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Ping, Xiong; Yu-Qiang, Ma; Lei-Han, Tang

    2010-01-01

    Auto-activation and small ribonucleic acid (RNA)-mediated regulation are two important mechanisms in controlling gene expression. We study the synergistic effect of these two regulations on gene expression. It is found that under this combinatorial regulation, gene expression exhibits bistable behaviors at the transition regime, while each of these two regulations, if working solely, only leads to monostability. Within the stochastic framework, the base pairing strength between sRNA and mRNA plays an important role in controlling the transition time between on and off states. The noise strength of protein number in the off state approaches 1 and is smaller than that in the on state. The noise strength also depends on which parameters, the feedback strength or the synthesis rate of small RNA, are tuned in switching the gene expression on and off. Our findings may provide a new insight into gene-regulation mechanism and can be applied in synthetic biology

  18. Stabilizing in vitro ultrasound-mediated gene transfection by regulating cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chia-Wen; Desjouy, Cyril; Chen, Shing-Ru; Lee, Jyun-Lin; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that acoustic cavitation can facilitate the inward transport of genetic materials across cell membranes (sonoporation). However, partially due to the unstationary behavior of the initiation and leveling of cavitation, the sonoporation effect is usually unstable, especially in low intensity conditions. A system which is able to regulate the cavitation level during sonication by modulating the applied acoustic intensity with a feedback loop is implemented and its effect on in vitro gene transfection is tested. The regulated system provided better time stability and reproducibility of the cavitation levels than the unregulated conditions. Cultured hepatoma cells (BNL) mixed with 10 μg luciferase plasmids are exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound with or without cavitation regulation, and the gene transfection efficiency and cell viability are subsequently assessed. Experimental results show that for all exposure intensities (low, medium, and high), stable and intensity dependent, although not higher, gene expression could be achieved in the regulated cavitation system than the unregulated conditions. The cavitation regulation system provides a better control of cavitation and its bioeffect which are crucial important for clinical applications of ultrasound-mediated gene transfection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of simulated microgravity on clock genes expression rhythmicity and underlying blood circulating miRNAs-mRNA co-expression regulatory mechanism in C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ke; Qu, Lina

    that the maximum and minimum value of mRNA relative expression levels of clock and bmal1 during clinorotation were both found approximately at the time points 6h and 18h, respectively. The period length of experimental group was about 16h longer than control group. The peak phase and peak time of clock and bmal1 with simulated weightlessness group were ahead of control group. (3) At the Zeitgeber time 2 (ZT2), we found that 23 miRNAs in the SCN and 60 miRNAs in liver were significantly altered on the basis of an adjusted FC>2 among 611 miRNAs. At the ZT14, 23 miRNAs in the SCN and 57 miRNAs in liver were altered compared with the control group (FC>2). (a) Effects of clock knock out altered expression of miRNA. We analyzed the miRNA profile in SCN and liver of clock knonck out and WT mouse at two different time points using miRNA microarray. Of these, miR-122,miR-144, miR-210 and miR-669b at ZT2, miR-200a, miR-200b, miR-429, miR-455, miR-669d and miR-96 at ZT14 were both changed in SCN and liver, respectively. Interestingly, the miR-122, a tissue specific miRNA of liver was also changed in SCN at ZT2. (b) Effects of light altered expression of miRNA: Light is an important environmental factors to regulate circadian genes expression. In clock mutant mice, all altered miRNAs except miR-144 were down-regulated in SCN while up-regulated in liver at ZT14 compared to ZT2. Interestingly, the miRNAs expression profiling in SCN and liver were opposite of WT mice at ZT14 compared to ZT2. (c) Effects of clock mutant on mRNA expression: To test whether the alteration in expression of miRNAs correlates with the gene expression pattern, cDNA microarray of SCN were assayed. The results revealed that the expression of nearly 1285 genes was altered substantially with at least 1 fold change absolute in the absence of clock. Among these altered genes, we chose the mRNAs with at least 4 fold changes to further study. Only 23 genes were altered in clock knockout compared with WT at ZT2, but

  20. The Liver X Receptor Ligand T0901317 Down-regulates APOA5 GeneExpression through Activation of SREBP-1c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakel, Heidelinde; Nowak, Maxime; Moitrot, Emanuelle; Dehondt, Helene; Hum, Dean W.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart,Jean-Charles

    2004-07-23

    Alterations in the expression of the recently discovered apolipoprotein A5 gene strongly affect plasma triglyceride levels. In this study, we investigated the contribution of APOA5 to the liver X-receptor (LXR) ligand mediated effect on plasma triglyceride levels.Following treatment with the LXR ligand T0901317, we found that APOA5mRNA levels were decreased in hepatoma cell lines. The observation that no down-regulation of APOA5 promoter activity was obtained by LXR-retinoid X receptor (RXR) co-transfection prompted us to explore the possible involvement of the known LXR target gene SREBP-1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c). In fact, we found that co-transfection with the active form of SREBP-1c down-regulated APOA5promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. We then scanned the human APOA5 promoter sequence and identified two putative E-box elements that were able to bind specifically SREBP-1c in gel-shift assays and were shown to be functional by mutation analysis. Subsequent suppression of SREBP-1 mRNA through small interfering RNA interference abolished the decrease of APOA5 mRNA in response to T0901317. Finally, administration of T0901317 to hAPOA5 transgenic mice revealed a significant decrease OF APOA5 mRNA in liver tissue and circulating apolipoprotein AV protein in plasma, confirming that the described down-regulation also occurs in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that APOA5 gene expression is regulated by the LXR ligand T0901317 in a negative manner through SREBP-1c. These findings may provide a new mechanism responsible for the elevation of plasma triglyceride levels by LXR ligands and support the development of selective LXR agonists, not affecting SREBP-1c, as beneficial modulators of lipid metabolism.

  1. Domestication-driven Gossypium profilin 1 (GhPRF1) gene transduces early flowering phenotype in tobacco by spatial alteration of apical/floral-meristem related gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Dhananjay K; Chaudhary, Bhupendra

    2016-05-13

    Plant profilin genes encode core cell-wall structural proteins and are evidenced for their up-regulation under cotton domestication. Notwithstanding striking discoveries in the genetics of cell-wall organization in plants, little is explicit about the manner in which profilin-mediated molecular interplay and corresponding networks are altered, especially during cellular signalling of apical meristem determinacy and flower development. Here we show that the ectopic expression of GhPRF1 gene in tobacco resulted in the hyperactivation of apical meristem and early flowering phenotype with increased flower number in comparison to the control plants. Spatial expression alteration in CLV1, a key meristem-determinacy gene, is induced by the GhPRF1 overexpression in a WUS-dependent manner and mediates cell signalling to promote flowering. But no such expression alterations are recorded in the GhPRF1-RNAi lines. The GhPRF1 transduces key positive flowering regulator AP1 gene via coordinated expression of FT4, SOC1, FLC1 and FT1 genes involved in the apical-to-floral meristem signalling cascade which is consistent with our in silico profilin interaction data. Remarkably, these positive and negative flowering regulators are spatially controlled by the Actin-Related Protein (ARP) genes, specifically ARP4 and ARP6 in proximate association with profilins. This study provides a novel and systematic link between GhPRF1 gene expression and the flower primordium initiation via up-regulation of the ARP genes, and an insight into the functional characterization of GhPRF1 gene acting upstream to the flowering mechanism. Also, the transgenic plants expressing GhPRF1 gene show an increase in the plant height, internode length, leaf size and plant vigor. Overexpression of GhPRF1 gene induced early and increased flowering in tobacco with enhanced plant vigor. During apical meristem determinacy and flower development, the GhPRF1 gene directly influences key flowering regulators through ARP-genes

  2. Oxygen-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator Hap1p Limits Glucose Uptake by Repressing the Expression of the Major Glucose Transporter Gene RAG1 in Kluyveromyces lactis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wei-Guo; Guiard, Bernard; Fang, Zi-An; Donnini, Claudia; Gervais, Michel; Passos, Flavia M. Lopes; Ferrero, Iliana; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique

    2008-01-01

    The HAP1 (CYP1) gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to regulate the transcription of many genes in response to oxygen availability. This response varies according to yeast species, probably reflecting the specific nature of their oxidative metabolism. It is suspected that a difference in the interaction of Hap1p with its target genes may explain some of the species-related variation in oxygen responses. As opposed to the fermentative S. cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis is an aerobic yeast species which shows different oxygen responses. We examined the role of the HAP1-equivalent gene (KlHAP1) in K. lactis. KlHap1p showed a number of sequence features and some gene targets (such as KlCYC1) in common with its S. cerevisiae counterpart, and KlHAP1 was capable of complementing the hap1 mutation. However, the KlHAP1 disruptant showed temperature-sensitive growth on glucose, especially at low glucose concentrations. At normal temperature, 28°C, the mutant grew well, the colony size being even greater than that of the wild type. The most striking observation was that KlHap1p repressed the expression of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1 and reduced the glucose uptake rate. This suggested an involvement of KlHap1p in the regulation of glycolytic flux through the glucose transport system. The ΔKlhap1 mutant showed an increased ability to produce ethanol during aerobic growth, indicating a possible transformation of its physiological property to Crabtree positivity or partial Crabtree positivity. Dual roles of KlHap1p in activating respiration and repressing fermentation may be seen as a basis of the Crabtree-negative physiology of K. lactis. PMID:18806211

  3. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis via the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway and other cancer signaling genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Min; Botnen, James H

    2009-09-01

    Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo, and our previous study demonstrated that submicromolar methylselenol generated by incubating methionase with seleno-l-methionine inhibits the migration and invasive potential of HT1080 tumor cells. However, little is known about the association between cancer signal pathways and methylselenol's inhibition of tumor cell invasion. In this study, we demonstrated that methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and we used a cancer signal pathway-specific array containing 15 different signal transduction pathways involved in oncogenesis to study the effect of methylselenol on cellular signaling. Using real-time RT-PCR, we confirmed that cellular mRNA levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C), heme oxygenase 1, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule, and PPARgamma genes were upregulated to 2.8- to 5.7-fold of the control. BCL2-related protein A1, hedgehog interacting protein, and p53 target zinc finger protein genes were downregulated to 26-52% of the control, because of methylselenol exposure. These genes are directly related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Methylselenol increased apoptotic cells up to 3.4-fold of the control and inhibited the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling and cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) expression. Taken together, our studies identify 7 novel methylselenol responsive genes and demonstrate that methylselenol inhibits ERK1/2 pathway activation and c-Myc expression. The regulation of these genes is likely to play a key role in G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which may contribute to the inhibition of tumor cell invasion.

  4. RNA-Mediated Regulation of HMGA1 Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt G. Benecke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1 is a master regulator of chromatin structure mediating its major gene regulatory activity by direct interactions with A/T-rich DNA sequences located in the promoter and enhancer regions of a large variety of genes. HMGA1 DNA-binding through three AT-hook motifs results in an open chromatin structure and subsequently leads to changes in gene expression. Apart from its significant expression during development, HMGA1 is over-expressed in virtually every cancer, where HMGA1 expression levels correlate with tumor malignancy. The exogenous overexpression of HMGA1 can lead to malignant cell transformation, assigning the protein a key role during cancerogenesis. Recent studies have unveiled highly specific competitive interactions of HMGA1 with cellular and viral RNAs also through an AT-hook domain of the protein, significantly impacting the HMGA1-dependent gene expression. In this review, we discuss the structure and function of HMGA1-RNA complexes during transcription and epigenomic regulation and their implications in HMGA1-related diseases.

  5. Zac1, an Sp1-like protein, regulates human p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} gene expression in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pei-Yao [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Shu-Ting; Chang, Yung-Lung [Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Wei-Shiang [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Wei-Ming, E-mail: ades0431@ms38.hinet.net [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Dermatology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Shih-Ming, E-mail: shihming@ndmctsgh.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Biochemistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-12-10

    Zac1 functions as both a transcription factor and a transcriptional cofactor for p53, nuclear receptors (NRs) and NR coactivators. Zac1 might also act as a transcriptional repressor via the recruitment of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). The ability of Zac1 to interact directly with GC-specific elements indicates that Zac1 possibly binds to Sp1-responsive elements. In the present study, our data show that Zac1 is able to interact directly with the Sp1-responsive element in the p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} gene promoter and enhance the transactivation activity of Sp1 through direct physical interaction. Our data further demonstrate that Zac1 might enhance Sp1-specific promoter activity by interacting with the Sp1-responsive element, affecting the transactivation activity of Sp1 via a protein-protein interaction, or competing the HDAC1 protein away from the pre-existing Sp1/HDAC1 complex. Finally, the synergistic regulation of p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} gene expression by Zac1 and Sp1 is mediated by endogenous p53 protein and p53-responsive elements in HeLa cells. Our work suggests that Zac1 might serve as an Sp1-like protein that directly interacts with the Sp1-responsive element to oligomerize with and/or to coactivate Sp1.

  6. Iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana: transcriptomic analyses reveal novel FIT-regulated genes, iron deficiency marker genes and functional gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Hans-Jörg; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Bauer, Petra

    2016-10-03

    FIT (FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR) is the central regulator of iron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We performed transcriptome analyses of six day-old seedlings and roots of six week-old plants using wild type, a fit knock-out mutant and a FIT over-expression line grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. We compared genes regulated in a FIT-dependent manner depending on the developmental stage of the plants. We assembled a high likelihood dataset which we used to perform co-expression and functional analysis of the most stably iron deficiency-induced genes. 448 genes were found FIT-regulated. Out of these, 34 genes were robustly FIT-regulated in root and seedling samples and included 13 novel FIT-dependent genes. Three hundred thirty-one genes showed differential regulation in response to the presence and absence of FIT only in the root samples, while this was the case for 83 genes in the seedling samples. We assembled a virtual dataset of iron-regulated genes based on a total of 14 transcriptomic analyses of iron-deficient and iron-sufficient wild-type plants to pinpoint the best marker genes for iron deficiency and analyzed this dataset in depth. Co-expression analysis of this dataset revealed 13 distinct regulons part of which predominantly contained functionally related genes. We could enlarge the list of FIT-dependent genes and discriminate between genes that are robustly FIT-regulated in roots and seedlings or only in one of those. FIT-regulated genes were mostly induced, few of them were repressed by FIT. With the analysis of a virtual dataset we could filter out and pinpoint new candidates among the most reliable marker genes for iron deficiency. Moreover, co-expression and functional analysis of this virtual dataset revealed iron deficiency-induced and functionally distinct regulons.

  7. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhart Charles G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. Methods We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Results Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63% and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%, but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Conclusions Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes.

  8. Distinctive features and differential regulation of the DRTS genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniga, Antonio; Ghisaura, Stefania; Perrotta, Lara; Marche, Maria Giovanna; Cella, Rino; Albani, Diego

    2017-01-01

    In plants and protists, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TS) are part of a bifunctional enzyme (DRTS) that allows efficient recycling of the dihydrofolate resulting from TS activity. Arabidopsis thaliana possesses three DRTS genes, called AtDRTS1, AtDRTS2 and AtDRTS3, that are located downstream of three members of the sec14-like SFH gene family. In this study, a characterization of the AtDRTS genes identified alternatively spliced transcripts coding for AtDRTS isoforms which may account for monofunctional DHFR enzymes supporting pathways unrelated to DNA synthesis. Moreover, we discovered a complex differential regulation of the AtDRTS genes that confirms the expected involvement of the AtDRTS genes in cell proliferation and endoreduplication, but indicates also functions related to other cellular activities. AtDRTS1 is widely expressed in both meristematic and differentiated tissues, whereas AtDRTS2 expression is almost exclusively limited to the apical meristems and AtDRTS3 is preferentially expressed in the shoot apex, in stipules and in root cap cells. The differential regulation of the AtDRTS genes is associated to distinctive promoter architectures and the expression of AtDRTS1 in the apical meristems is strictly dependent on the presence of an intragenic region that includes the second intron of the gene. Upon activation of cell proliferation in germinating seeds, the activity of the AtDRTS1 and AtDRTS2 promoters in meristematic cells appears to be maximal at the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. In addition, the promoters of AtDRTS2 and AtDRTS3 are negatively regulated through E2F cis-acting elements and both genes, but not AtDRTS1, are downregulated in plants overexpressing the AtE2Fa factor. Our study provides new information concerning the function and the regulation of plant DRTS genes and opens the way to further investigations addressing the importance of folate synthesis with respect to specific cellular activities.

  9. Forkhead Box C1 Regulates Human Primary Keratinocyte Terminal Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianghua Bin

    Full Text Available The epidermis serves as a critical protective barrier between the internal and external environment of the human body. Its remarkable barrier function is established through the keratinocyte (KC terminal differentiation program. The transcription factors specifically regulating terminal differentiation remain largely unknown. Using a RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq profiling approach, we found that forkhead box c 1 (FOXC1 was significantly up-regulated in human normal primary KC during the course of differentiation. This observation was validated in human normal primary KC from several different donors and human skin biopsies. Silencing FOXC1 in human normal primary KC undergoing differentiation led to significant down-regulation of late terminal differentiation genes markers including epidermal differentiation complex genes, keratinization genes, sphingolipid/ceramide metabolic process genes and epidermal specific cell-cell adhesion genes. We further demonstrated that FOXC1 works down-stream of ZNF750 and KLF4, and upstream of GRHL3. Thus, this study defines FOXC1 as a regulator specific for KC terminal differentiation and establishes its potential position in the genetic regulatory network.

  10. HDAC4 regulates satellite cell proliferation and differentiation by targeting P21 and Sharp1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroncelli, Nicoletta; Bianchi, Marzia; Bertin, Marco; Consalvi, Silvia; Saccone, Valentina; De Bardi, Marco; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Palacios, Daniela; Adamo, Sergio; Moresi, Viviana

    2018-02-22

    Skeletal muscle exhibits a high regenerative capacity, mainly due to the ability of satellite cells to replicate and differentiate in response to appropriate stimuli. Epigenetic control is effective at different stages of this process. It has been shown that the chromatin-remodeling factor HDAC4 is able to regulate satellite cell proliferation and commitment. However, its molecular targets are still uncovered. To explain the signaling pathways regulated by HDAC4 in satellite cells, we generated tamoxifen-inducible mice with conditional inactivation of HDAC4 in Pax7 + cells (HDAC4 KO mice). We found that the proliferation and differentiation of HDAC4 KO satellite cells were compromised, although similar amounts of satellite cells were found in mice. Moreover, we found that the inhibition of HDAC4 in satellite cells was sufficient to block the differentiation process. By RNA-sequencing analysis we identified P21 and Sharp1 as HDAC4 target genes. Reducing the expression of these target genes in HDAC4 KO satellite cells, we also defined the molecular pathways regulated by HDAC4 in the epigenetic control of satellite cell expansion and fusion.

  11. [Regulation of heat shock gene expression in response to stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuz, D G

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) genes, or stress genes, code for a number of proteins that collectively form the most ancient and universal stress defense system. The system determines the cell capability of adaptation to various adverse factors and performs a variety of auxiliary functions in normal physiological conditions. Common stress factors, such as higher temperatures, hypoxia, heavy metals, and others, suppress transcription and translation for the majority of genes, while HS genes are upregulated. Transcription of HS genes is controlled by transcription factors of the HS factor (HSF) family. Certain HSFs are activated on exposure to higher temperatures or other adverse factors to ensure stress-induced HS gene expression, while other HSFs are specifically activated at particular developmental stages. The regulation of the main mammalian stress-inducible factor HSF1 and Drosophila melanogaster HSF includes many components, such as a variety of early warning signals indicative of abnormal cell activity (e.g., increases in intracellular ceramide, cytosolic calcium ions, or partly denatured proteins); protein kinases, which phosphorylate HSFs at various Ser residues; acetyltransferases; and regulatory proteins, such as SUMO and HSBP1. Transcription factors other than HSFs are also involved in activating HS gene transcription; the set includes D. melanogaster GAF, mammalian Sp1 and NF-Y, and other factors. Transcription of several stress genes coding for molecular chaperones of the glucose-regulated protein (GRP) family is predominantly regulated by another stress-detecting system, which is known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) system and is activated in response to massive protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial matrix. A translational fine tuning of HS protein expression occurs via changing the phosphorylation status of several proteins involved in translation initiation. In addition, specific signal sequences in the 5'-UTRs of some HS

  12. Identification of genes differentially regulated in rat alveolar bone wound healing by subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, T; Myokai, F; Shiomi, N; Yamashiro, K; Yamamoto, T; Murayama, Y; Arai, H; Nishimura, F; Takashiba, S

    2004-07-01

    Periodontal healing requires the participation of regulatory molecules, cells, and scaffold or matrix. Here, we hypothesized that a certain set of genes is expressed in alveolar bone wound healing. Reciprocal subtraction gave 400 clones from the injured alveolar bone of Wistar rats. Identification of 34 genes and analysis of their expression in injured tissue revealed several clusters of unique gene regulation patterns, including the up-regulation at 1 wk of cytochrome c oxidase regulating electron transfer and energy metabolism, presumably occurring at the site of inflammation; up-regulation at 2.5 wks of pro-alpha-2 type I collagen involving the formation of a connective tissue structure; and up-regulation at 1 and 2 wks and down-regulation at 2.5 and 4 wks of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase l3 involving cell cycle, DNA repair, and stress response. The differential expression of genes may be associated with the processes of inflammation, wound contraction, and formation of a connective tissue structure.

  13. Heme-dependent up-regulation of the α-globin gene expression by transcriptional repressor Bach1 in erythroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Tsuyoshi; Sun Jiying; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Taketani, Shigeru

    2004-01-01

    The transcriptional factor Bach1 forms a heterodimer with small Maf family, and functions as a repressor of the Maf recognition element (MARE) in vivo. To investigate the involvement of Bach1 in the heme-dependent regulation of the expression of the α-globin gene, human erythroleukemia K562 cells were cultured with succinylacetone (SA), a heme biosynthetic inhibitor, and the level of α-globin mRNA was examined. A decrease of α-globin mRNA was observed in SA-treated cells, which was restored by the addition of hemin. The heme-dependent expression of α-globin occurred at the transcriptional level since the expression of human α-globin gene promoter-reporter gene containing hypersensitive site-40 (HS-40) was decreased when K562 cells were cultured with SA. Hemin treatment restored the decrease of the promoter activity by SA. The regulation of the HS-40 activity by heme was dependent on the NF-E2/AP-1 (NA) site, which is similar to MARE. The NA site-binding activity of Bach1 in K562 increased upon SA-treatment, and the increase was diminished by the addition of hemin. The transient expression of Bach1 and mutated Bach1 lacking CP motifs suppressed the HS-40 activity, and cancellation of the repressor activity by hemin was observed when wild-type Bach1 was expressed. The expression of NF-E2 strengthened the restoration of the Bach1-effect by hemin. Interestingly, nuclear localization of Bach1 increased when cells were treated with SA, while hemin induced the nuclear export of Bach1. These results indicated that heme plays an important role in the induction of α-globin gene expression through disrupting the interaction of Bach1 and the NA site in HS-40 enhancer in erythroid cells

  14. Androgen receptor and its splice variant, AR-V7, differentially regulate FOXA1 sensitive genes in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, William C; Shafi, Ayesha A; Nakka, Manjula; Weigel, Nancy L

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is an androgen-dependent disease, and tumors that are resistant to androgen ablation therapy often remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Among the contributors to castration-resistant PCa are AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Instead, they have small amounts of unique sequence derived from cryptic exons or from out of frame translation. The AR-V7 (or AR3) variant is constitutively active and is expressed under conditions consistent with CRPC. AR-V7 is reported to regulate a transcriptional program that is similar but not identical to that of AR. However, it is unknown whether these differences are due to the unique sequence in AR-V7, or simply to loss of the LBD. To examine transcriptional regulation by AR-V7, we have used lentiviruses encoding AR-V7 (amino acids 1-627 of AR with the 16 amino acids unique to the variant) to prepare a derivative of the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7. An additional cell line was generated with regulated expression of AR-NTD (amino acids 1-660 of AR); this mutant lacks the LBD but does not have the AR-V7 specific sequence. We find that AR and AR-V7 have distinct activities on target genes that are co-regulated by FOXA1. Transcripts regulated by AR-V7 were similarly regulated by AR-NTD, indicating that loss of the LBD is sufficient for the observed differences. Differential regulation of target genes correlates with preferential recruitment of AR or AR-V7 to specific cis-regulatory DNA sequences providing an explanation for some of the observed differences in target gene regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The targeting expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene in endothelial cells regulated by HRE.ppET-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangrong; Zhang, Shangshang; Yang, Yujia; Wang, Xia; Zhong, Le; Yu, Xiaohe

    2008-11-01

    The success of gene therapy depends largely on the efficacy of gene delivery vector systems that can deliver genes to target organs or cells selectively and efficiently with minimal toxicity. Here, we show that by using the HRE.ppET-1 regulatory element, we were able to restrict expression of the transgene of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to endothelial cells exclusively in hypoxic conditions. Eukaryotic expression vectors such as pEGFP-HRE.ppET-1, pcDNA3.1-VEGF+Pa, pcDNA3.1-ppET-1+ EGF+Pa, and pcDNA3.1-HRE.ppET-1+VEGF+Pa were constructed by using a series of nuclear molecule handling methods like PCR, enzyme digestion. The recombinant vectors were transfected into HUVEC cells and HL7702 cells by the lipofectin method. GFP expression was observed with a fluorescence microscope to validate the specificity of expression in endothelial cells under the regulation of HRE.ppET-1 element. Cobalt chloride (final concentration 100 mumol/L) was added to the medium to mimic hypoxia in vitro. After transfection of vectors, the expression of VEGF mRNA was detected by RT-PCR, and the expression of VEGF was detected by Western blotting and ELISA methods under normoxia and hypoxia, respectively. The cell proliferation rate was detected by the MTT test. The expression of GFP revealed that the exterior gene was transcripted effectively in endothelial cells regulated by the HRE.ppET-1 element, while the expression of GFP was very weak in nonendothelial cells. The results of RT-PCR, Western blotting and ELISA showed that VEGF gene expression in the pcDNA3.1-HRE.ppET-1+VEGF+Pa group and in the pcDNA3.1-ppET-1+VEGF+Pa group was higher in hypoxia than it was in normoxia (PHRE.ppET-1 element was expressed specifically in endothelial cells, and can increase the expression of VEGF in hypoxia and stimulate proliferation of endothelial cells. Taking advantage of these facts could greatly improve the efficiency of gene therapy. The vector would be valuable for various gene transfer

  16. [On the role of selective silencer Freud-1 in the regulation of the brain 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, V S; Osipova, D V; Tsybko, A S

    2010-01-01

    Selective 5-HT(1A) receptor silencer (Freud-1) is known to be one of the main factors for transcriptional regulation of brain serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor. However, there is a lack of data on implication of Freud-1 in the mechanisms underlying genetically determined and experimentally altered 5-HT(1A) receptor system state in vivo. In the present study we have found a difference in the 5-HT(1A) gene expression in the midbrain of AKR and CBA inbred mouse strains. At the same time no distinction in Freud-1 expression was observed. We have revealed 90.3% of homology between mouse and rat 5-HT(1A) receptor DRE-element, whereas there was no difference in DRE-element sequence between AKR and CBA mice. This indicates the absence of differences in Freud-1 binding site in these mouse strains. In the model of 5-HT(1A) receptor desensitization produced by chronic 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist administration, a significant reduction of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression together with considerable increase of Freud-1 expression were found. These data allow us to conclude that the selective silencer of 5-HT(1A) receptor, Freud-1, is involved in the compensatory mechanisms that modulate the functional state of brain serotonin system, although it is not the only factor for 5-HT(1A) receptor transcriptional regulation.

  17. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chatenay-Lapointe

    Full Text Available Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  18. Gene expression and stress response mediated by the epigenetic regulation of a transposable element small RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D McCue

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The epigenetic activity of transposable elements (TEs can influence the regulation of genes; though, this regulation is confined to the genes, promoters, and enhancers that neighbor the TE. This local cis regulation of genes therefore limits the influence of the TE's epigenetic regulation on the genome. TE activity is suppressed by small RNAs, which also inhibit viruses and regulate the expression of genes. The production of TE heterochromatin-associated endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana is mechanistically distinct from gene-regulating small RNAs, such as microRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs. Previous research identified a TE small RNA that potentially regulates the UBP1b mRNA, which encodes an RNA-binding protein involved in stress granule formation. We demonstrate that this siRNA, siRNA854, is under the same trans-generational epigenetic control as the Athila family LTR retrotransposons from which it is produced. The epigenetic activation of Athila elements results in a shift in small RNA processing pathways, and new 21-22 nucleotide versions of Athila siRNAs are produced by protein components normally not responsible for processing TE siRNAs. This processing results in siRNA854's incorporation into ARGONAUTE1 protein complexes in a similar fashion to gene-regulating tasiRNAs. We have used reporter transgenes to demonstrate that the UPB1b 3' untranslated region directly responds to the epigenetic status of Athila TEs and the accumulation of siRNA854. The regulation of the UPB1b 3' untranslated region occurs both on the post-transcriptional and translational levels when Athila TEs are epigenetically activated, and this regulation results in the phenocopy of the ubp1b mutant stress-sensitive phenotype. This demonstrates that a TE's epigenetic activity can modulate the host organism's stress response. In addition, the ability of this TE siRNA to regulate a gene's expression in trans blurs

  19. The progress of tumor gene-radiotherapy induced by Egr-1 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Rui; Li Biao

    2010-01-01

    The promoter of early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) is a cis-acting element of Egr-1, and its activity is regulated by inducers such as ionizing radiation, free radical. In designated gene-radiotherapy system, radiation combined with therapeutic gene (such as tumor necrosis factor-α gene, suicide gene) can spatially and temporally regulate therapeutic gene expression in the irradiated field, produced a marked effect, while little systemic toxicities were observed. The combination of radiotherapy and gene therapy is promising in tumor therapy. (authors)

  20. Role of NPR1 dependent and NPR1 independent genes in response to Salicylic acid

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    Neha Agarwal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available NPR1 (Nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related gene is a transcription coactivator and central regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR pathway. It controls wide range of pathogenesis related genes involved in various defense responses, acts by sensing SAR signal molecule, Salicylic acid (SA. Mutation in NPR1 results in increased susceptibility to pathogen infection and less expression of pathogenesis related genes. The present study aimed to identify the role of NPR1 in gene expression after the Salicylic acid induction. For this RNA-seq was performed in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and npr1-1 in response to Salicylic acid. RNA-seq analysis revealed a total of 3811 differentially expressed gene in which 2109 genes are up-regulated and 1702 genes are down-regulated. We have divided these genes in 6 categories SA induced (SI, SA repressed (SR, NPR1 dependent SI (ND-SI, NPR1 dependent SR (ND-SR, NPR1 independent SI (NI-SI, NPR1 independent SR (NI-SR. Further, Gene ontology and MapMan pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested variety of biological processes and metabolic pathways that are enriched during SAR defense pathway. These results contribute to shed light on importance of both NPR1-dependent (ND and NPR1-independent (NI gene acting downstream to Salicylic acid induction in SAR pathway. The present study aimed to identify the role of NPR1 in gene expression after the Salicylic acid induction.

  1. GAPDH-mediated posttranscriptional regulations of sodium channel Scn1a and Scn3a genes under seizure and ketogenic diet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guo-Wang; Lu, Ping; Zeng, Tao; Tang, Hui-Ling; Chen, Yong-Hong; Liu, Shu-Jing; Gao, Mei-Mei; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Yi, Yong-Hong; Long, Yue-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal expressions of sodium channel SCN1A and SCN3A genes alter neural excitability that are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of epilepsy, a long-term risk of recurrent seizures. Ketogenic diet (KD), a high-fat and low-carbohydrate treatment for difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children, has been suggested to reverse gene expression patterns. Here, we reveal a novel role of GAPDH on the posttranscriptional regulation of mouse Scn1a and Scn3a expressions under seizure and KD conditions. We show that GAPDH binds to a conserved region in the 3' UTRs of human and mouse SCN1A and SCN3A genes, which decreases and increases genes' expressions by affecting mRNA stability through SCN1A 3' UTR and SCN3A 3' UTR, respectively. In seizure mice, the upregulation and phosphorylation of GAPDH enhance its binding to the 3' UTR, which lead to downregulation of Scn1a and upregulation of Scn3a. Furthermore, administration of KD generates β-hydroxybutyric acid which rescues the abnormal expressions of Scn1a and Scn3a by weakening the GAPDH's binding to the element. Taken together, these data suggest that GAPDH-mediated expression regulation of sodium channel genes may be associated with epilepsy and the anticonvulsant action of KD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SETD1A modulates cell cycle progression through a miRNA network that regulates p53 target genes

    OpenAIRE

    Tajima, Ken; Yae, Toshifumi; Javaid, Sarah; Tam, Oliver; Comaills, Valentine; Morris, Robert; Wittner, Ben S.; Liu, Mingzhu; Engstrom, Amanda; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Black, Joshua C.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshihiro; Hammell, Molly; Haber, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the p53-inducible antiproliferative gene BTG2 is suppressed in many cancers in the absence of inactivating gene mutations, suggesting alternative mechanisms of silencing. Using a shRNA screen targeting 43 histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), we show that SETD1A suppresses BTG2 expression through its induction of several BTG2-targeting miRNAs. This indirect but highly specific mechanism, by which a chromatin regulator that mediates transcriptional activating marks can lead t...

  3. Oestrogen regulates the expression of cathepsin E-A-like gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hang Zheng

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... 1College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural .... evaluated the expression regulation mechanism of the gene ... C with ad libitum water and food. ... embryonic liver following the method previously described .... Cloning and sequence analysis of chicken cathepsin E-A-like gene.

  4. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  5. H-ferritin-regulated microRNAs modulate gene expression in K562 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Biamonte

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that the silencing of the heavy subunit (FHC offerritin, the central iron storage molecule in the cell, is accompanied by a modification in global gene expression. In this work, we explored whether different FHC amounts might modulate miRNA expression levels in K562 cells and studied the impact of miRNAs in gene expression profile modifications. To this aim, we performed a miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in K562 silenced for FHC (K562shFHC comparing it with K562 transduced with scrambled RNA (K562shRNA. Four miRNAs, namely hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7f, hsa-let-7i and hsa-miR-125b, were significantly up-regulated in silenced cells. The remarkable down-regulation of these miRNAs, following FHC expression rescue, supports a specific relation between FHC silencing and miRNA-modulation. The integration of target predictions with miRNA and gene expression profiles led to the identification of a regulatory network which includes the miRNAs up-regulated by FHC silencing, as well as91 down-regulated putative target genes. These genes were further classified in 9 networks; the highest scoring network, "Cell Death and Survival, Hematological System Development and Function, Hematopoiesis", is composed by 18 focus molecules including RAF1 and ERK1/2. We confirmed that, following FHC silencing, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is severely impaired and that RAF1 mRNA is significantly down-regulated. Taken all together, our data indicate that, in our experimental model, FHC silencing may affect RAF1/pERK1/2 levels through the modulation of a specific set of miRNAs and add new insights in to the relationship among iron homeostasis and miRNAs.

  6. The Chromatin Regulator Brpf1 Regulates Embryo Development and Cell Proliferation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Linya; Yan, Kezhi; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    With hundreds of chromatin regulators identified in mammals, an emerging issue is how they modulate biological and pathological processes. BRPF1 (bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1) is a unique chromatin regulator possessing two PHD fingers, one bromodomain and a PWWP domain for recognizing multiple histone modifications. In addition, it binds to the acetyltransferases MOZ, MORF, and HBO1 (also known as KAT6A, KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively) to promote complex formation, restrict substrate specificity, and enhance enzymatic activity. We have recently showed that ablation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes embryonic lethality at E9.5. Here we present systematic analyses of the mutant animals and demonstrate that the ablation leads to vascular defects in the placenta, yolk sac, and embryo proper, as well as abnormal neural tube closure. At the cellular level, Brpf1 loss inhibits proliferation of embryonic fibroblasts and hematopoietic progenitors. Molecularly, the loss reduces transcription of a ribosomal protein L10 (Rpl10)-like gene and the cell cycle inhibitor p27, and increases expression of the cell-cycle inhibitor p16 and a novel protein homologous to Scp3, a synaptonemal complex protein critical for chromosome association and embryo survival. These results uncover a crucial role of Brpf1 in controlling mouse embryo development and regulating cellular and gene expression programs. PMID:25773539

  7. Cloning of the rat Waf1/Cip1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinsky, S.A.; Middleton, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    The progression of eukaryotic cells through the cell cycle involves the sequential expression of specific genes. This process is regulated by both external and internal stimuli that prevent the cell from prematurely entering the next phase before all macromolecular events have been completed. The activation and subsequent inactivation of cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks) represent one internal stimuli required to regulate the transit of cells from one stage of the cell cycle to the next. Another member of this regulatory cascade is the p53 tumor suppressor gene, which controls a G 1 checkpoint at which the cell cycle can be arrested prior to the initiation of DNA synthesis. Following DNA damage, p53 protein levels rise, and entry into S phase is delayed, presumably to allow time for repair of the lesions. When p53 function is lost, cells containing damaged DNA template enter S phase leading to fixation and propagation of genetic alterations. Recently, evidence linking the growth-suppressing activity of p53 and inactivation of Cdks has been provided by the cloning of the Waf1/Cip1 gene. Waf1/Cip1 encodes a protein of M r 21,000 (p21), which inhibits Cdks in vitro. The overexpression of Waf1/Cip1 in cells inhibits cell growth, suggesting that p21 is a downstream mediator of p53 function. Loss of Waf1/Cip1 gene function could lead to deregulation of the cell cycle and contribute to the development of the neoplastic phenotype in tumors that do not contain mutations in the p53 gene. The purpose of the present investigation was to clone the rat Waf1/Cip1 gene,then determine the frequency for alteration of this gene in lung tumors induced by X-rays

  8. The WOPR Protein Ros1 Is a Master Regulator of Sporogenesis and Late Effector Gene Expression in the Maize Pathogen Ustilago maydis.

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    Marie Tollot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The biotrophic basidiomycete fungus Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize. Hallmarks of the disease are large tumors that develop on all aerial parts of the host in which dark pigmented teliospores are formed. We have identified a member of the WOPR family of transcription factors, Ros1, as major regulator of spore formation in U. maydis. ros1 expression is induced only late during infection and hence Ros1 is neither involved in plant colonization of dikaryotic fungal hyphae nor in plant tumor formation. However, during late stages of infection Ros1 is essential for fungal karyogamy, massive proliferation of diploid fungal cells and spore formation. Premature expression of ros1 revealed that Ros1 counteracts the b-dependent filamentation program and induces morphological alterations resembling the early steps of sporogenesis. Transcriptional profiling and ChIP-seq analyses uncovered that Ros1 remodels expression of about 30% of all U. maydis genes with 40% of these being direct targets. In total the expression of 80 transcription factor genes is controlled by Ros1. Four of the upregulated transcription factor genes were deleted and two of the mutants were affected in spore development. A large number of b-dependent genes were differentially regulated by Ros1, suggesting substantial changes in this regulatory cascade that controls filamentation and pathogenic development. Interestingly, 128 genes encoding secreted effectors involved in the establishment of biotrophic development were downregulated by Ros1 while a set of 70 "late effectors" was upregulated. These results indicate that Ros1 is a master regulator of late development in U. maydis and show that the biotrophic interaction during sporogenesis involves a drastic shift in expression of the fungal effectome including the downregulation of effectors that are essential during early stages of infection.

  9. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

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    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  10. Regulation of Gene Expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Electron Acceptor Limitation and Bacterial Nanowire Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchinger, Sarah E.; Pirbadian, Sahand; Baker, Carol S.; Leung, Kar Man; Burroughs, Nigel J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In limiting oxygen as an electron acceptor, the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 rapidly forms nanowires, extensions of its outer membrane containing the cytochromes MtrC and OmcA needed for extracellular electron transfer. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis was employed to determine differential gene expression over time from triplicate chemostat cultures that were limited for oxygen. We identified 465 genes with decreased expression and 677 genes with increased expression. The coordinated increased expression of heme biosynthesis, cytochrome maturation, and transport pathways indicates that S. oneidensis MR-1 increases cytochrome production, including the transcription of genes encoding MtrA, MtrC, and OmcA, and transports these decaheme cytochromes across the cytoplasmic membrane during electron acceptor limitation and nanowire formation. In contrast, the expression of the mtrA and mtrC homologs mtrF and mtrD either remains unaffected or decreases under these conditions. The ompW gene, encoding a small outer membrane porin, has 40-fold higher expression during oxygen limitation, and it is proposed that OmpW plays a role in cation transport to maintain electrical neutrality during electron transfer. The genes encoding the anaerobic respiration regulator cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor RpoE are among the transcription factor genes with increased expression. RpoE might function by signaling the initial response to oxygen limitation. Our results show that RpoE activates transcription from promoters upstream of mtrC and omcA. The transcriptome and mutant analyses of S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowire production are consistent with independent regulatory mechanisms for extending the outer membrane into tubular structures and for ensuring the electron transfer function of the nanowires. IMPORTANCE Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to transfer electrons to its external surface

  11. Trojan Horse Strategy for Non-invasive Interference of Clock Gene in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Perrigault, Mickael; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Marcel, Anjara; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Tran, Damien

    2017-08-01

    RNA interference is a powerful method to inhibit specific gene expression. Recently, silencing target genes by feeding has been successfully carried out in nematodes, insects, and small aquatic organisms. A non-invasive feeding-based RNA interference is reported here for the first time in a mollusk bivalve, the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In this Trojan horse strategy, the unicellular alga Heterocapsa triquetra is the food supply used as a vector to feed oysters with Escherichia coli strain HT115 engineered to express the double-stranded RNA targeting gene. To test the efficacy of the method, the Clock gene, a central gene of the circadian clock, was targeted for knockout. Results demonstrated specific and systemic efficiency of the Trojan horse strategy in reducing Clock mRNA abundance. Consequences of Clock disruption were observed in Clock-related genes (Bmal, Tim1, Per, Cry1, Cry2, Rev.-erb, and Ror) and triploid oysters were more sensitive than diploid to the interference. This non-invasive approach shows an involvement of the circadian clock in oyster bioaccumulation of toxins produced by the harmful alga Alexandrium minutum.

  12. Gene Regulation, Modulation, and Their Applications in Gene Expression Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Flores

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Common microarray and next-generation sequencing data analysis concentrate on tumor subtype classification, marker detection, and transcriptional regulation discovery during biological processes by exploring the correlated gene expression patterns and their shared functions. Genetic regulatory network (GRN based approaches have been employed in many large studies in order to scrutinize for dysregulation and potential treatment controls. In addition to gene regulation and network construction, the concept of the network modulator that has significant systemic impact has been proposed, and detection algorithms have been developed in past years. Here we provide a unified mathematic description of these methods, followed with a brief survey of these modulator identification algorithms. As an early attempt to extend the concept to new RNA regulation mechanism, competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA, into a modulator framework, we provide two applications to illustrate the network construction, modulation effect, and the preliminary finding from these networks. Those methods we surveyed and developed are used to dissect the regulated network under different modulators. Not limit to these, the concept of “modulation” can adapt to various biological mechanisms to discover the novel gene regulation mechanisms.

  13. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of HIV-1 host factor COMMD1 by the Sp family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Eriko; Taura, Manabu; Suico, Mary Ann; Goto, Hiroki; Kai, Hirofumi; Okada, Seiji

    2018-04-01

    Copper metabolism Murr1 domain containing 1 (COMMD1) has multiple functions in the regulation of protein stability at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. However, the regulation of COMMD1 transcriptional has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, the 5'‑flanking region (‑1,192/+83 bp) of the human COMMD1 gene was cloned. It was observed that the COMMD1 promoter region contains GC‑rich region that has 7 putative Sp1‑binding sites via in silico analysis. The proximal promoter region at ‑289/+83 bp was required for COMMD1 basal promoter activity by deletion constructs of COMMD1 promoter. Moreover, Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A, suppressed basal COMMD1 promoter activity. The Sp1‑binding site (‑11/‑1 bp) in the proximal promoter region was a critical site for COMMD1 gene regulation by Sp1 and Sp3. Sp1 upregulated COMMD1 promoter activity, whereas Sp3 suppressed it. Endogenous Sp1 and Sp3 bound to the proximal promoter region of COMMD1. Taken together, Sp1 constitutively regulates the basal expression of the COMMD1 gene in human epithelial cell lines.

  15. The Petunia GRAS Transcription Factor ATA/RAM1 Regulates Symbiotic Gene Expression and Fungal Morphogenesis in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Mélanie K.

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is a mutual symbiosis that involves a complex symbiotic interface over which nutrients are exchanged between the plant host and the AM fungus. Dozens of genes in the host are required for the establishment and functioning of the interaction, among them nutrient transporters that mediate the uptake of mineral nutrients delivered by the fungal arbuscules. We have isolated in a genetic mutant screen a petunia (Petunia hybrida) GIBBERELLIC ACID INSENSITIVE, REPRESSOR of GIBBERELLIC ACID INSENSITIVE, and SCARECROW (GRAS)-type transcription factor, ATYPICAL ARBUSCULE (ATA), that acts as the central regulator of AM-related genes and is required for the morphogenesis of arbuscules. Forced mycorrhizal inoculations from neighboring wild-type plants revealed an additional role of ATA in restricting mycorrhizal colonization of the root meristem. The lack of ATA, which represents the ortholog of REQUIRED FOR ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA1 in Medicago truncatula, renders the interaction completely ineffective, hence demonstrating the central role of AM-related genes for arbuscule development and function. PMID:25971550

  16. Regulation of gene expression by low levels of ultraviolet-B radiation in Pisum sativum: Isolation of novel genes by suppression subtractive hybridisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sävenstrand, H.; Brosché, M.; Strid, A.

    2002-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridisation was used to isolate genes differentially regulated by low levels (UV-B BE,300 0.13 W m -2 ) of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B; 290–320 nm) in Pisum sativum. Six genes were regulated, two of which were novel. The mRNA levels for these two (PsTSDC and PsUOS1) were increased and depressed by UV-B treatment, respectively. Domains in the PsTSDC translation product was similar to TIR (Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor-similar) domains and a NB-ARC domain (nucleotide-binding domain in APAF-1, R gene products and CED-4). The PsUOS1 translation product was similar to an open reading frame in Arabidopsis. Genes encoding embryo-abundant protein (PsEMB) and S-adenosyl-l-methionine synthase (PsSAMS) were induced by UV-B, whereas the transcript levels for genes encoding sucrose transport protein (PsSUT) or ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase (PsR5P3E) were decreased. These regulation patterns are novel, and the PsEMB and PsR5P3E sequences are reported for the first time. The stress-specificity of regulation of these genes were tested by ozone fumigation (100 ppb O 3 ). Qualitatively, the similarity of expression after both UV-B and ozone exposure suggests that, for these genes, similar stress-response pathways are in action. (author)

  17. DNA demethylases target promoter transposable elements to positively regulate stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Ngoc; Schumann, Ulrike; Smith, Neil A; Tiwari, Sameer; Au, Phil Chi Khang; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kazan, Kemal; Llewellyn, Danny J; Zhang, Ren; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-09-17

    DNA demethylases regulate DNA methylation levels in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis encodes four DNA demethylases, DEMETER (DME), REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1), DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), and DML3. While DME is involved in maternal specific gene expression during seed development, the biological function of the remaining DNA demethylases remains unclear. We show that ROS1, DML2, and DML3 play a role in fungal disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A triple DNA demethylase mutant, rdd (ros1 dml2 dml3), shows increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We identify 348 genes differentially expressed in rdd relative to wild type, and a significant proportion of these genes are downregulated in rdd and have functions in stress response, suggesting that DNA demethylases maintain or positively regulate the expression of stress response genes required for F. oxysporum resistance. The rdd-downregulated stress response genes are enriched for short transposable element sequences in their promoters. Many of these transposable elements and their surrounding sequences show localized DNA methylation changes in rdd, and a general reduction in CHH methylation, suggesting that RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), responsible for CHH methylation, may participate in DNA demethylase-mediated regulation of stress response genes. Many of the rdd-downregulated stress response genes are downregulated in the RdDM mutants nrpd1 and nrpe1, and the RdDM mutants nrpe1 and ago4 show enhanced susceptibility to F. oxysporum infection. Our results suggest that a primary function of DNA demethylases in plants is to regulate the expression of stress response genes by targeting promoter transposable element sequences.

  18. Insecticide-Mediated Up-Regulation of Cytochrome P450 Genes in the Red Flour Beetle (Tribolium castaneum

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    Xiao Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Some cytochrome P450 (CYP genes are known for their rapid up-regulation in response to insecticide exposures in insects. To date, however, limited information is available with respect to the relationships among the insecticide type, insecticide concentration, exposure duration and the up-regulated CYP genes. In this study, we examined the transcriptional response of eight selected CYP genes, including CYP4G7, CYP4Q4, CYP4BR3, CYP12H1, CYP6BK11, CYP9D4, CYP9Z5 and CYP345A1, to each of four insecticides in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR revealed that CYP4G7 and CYP345A1 can be significantly up-regulated by cypermethrin (1.97- and 2.06-fold, respectively, permethrin (2.00- and 2.03-fold and lambda-cyhalothrin (1.73- and 1.81-fold, whereas CYP4BR3 and CYP345A1 can be significantly up-regulated by imidacloprid (1.99- and 1.83-fold when 20-day larvae were exposed to each of these insecticides at the concentration of LC20 for 24 h. Our studies also showed that similar levels of up-regulation can be achieved for CYP4G7, CYP4BR3 and CYP345A1 by cypermethrin, permethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin or imidacloprid with approximately one fourth of LC20 in 6 h. Our study demonstrated that up-regulation of these CYP genes was rapid and only required low concentrations of insecticides, and the up-regulation not only depended on the CYP genes but also the type of insecticides. Our results along with those from previous studies also indicated that there were no specific patterns for predicting the up-regulation of specific CYP gene families based on the insecticide classification.

  19. Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthetic Genes in Germinating Arabidopsis Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubasek, WL; Shirley, BW; McKillop, A; Goodman, HM; Briggs, W; Ausubel, FM

    1992-01-01

    Many higher plants, including Arabidopsis, transiently display purple anthocyanin pigments just after seed germination. We observed that steady state levels of mRNAs encoded by four flavonoid biosynthetic genes, PAL1 (encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 1), CHS (encoding chalcone synthase), CHI (encoding chalcone isomerase), and DFR (encoding dihydroflavonol reductase), were temporally regulated, peaking in 3-day-old seedlings grown in continuous white light. Except for the case of PAL1 mRNA, mRNA levels for these flavonoid genes were very low in seedlings grown in darkness. Light induction studies using seedlings grown in darkness showed that PAL1 mRNA began to accumulate before CHS and CHI mRNAs, which, in turn, began to accumulate before DFR mRNA. This order of induction is the same as the order of the biosynthetic steps in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results suggest that the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is coordinately regulated by a developmental timing mechanism during germination. Blue light and UVB light induction experiments using red light- and dark-grown seedlings showed that the flavonoid biosynthetic genes are induced most effectively by UVB light and that blue light induction is mediated by a specific blue light receptor. PMID:12297632

  20. N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 promotes oxaliplatin-triggered apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells via enhancing the ubiquitination of Bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Zhu, Fan; Yu, Chaoran; Lu, Jiaoyang; Zhang, Luyang; Lv, Yanfeng; Sun, Jing; Zheng, Minhua

    2017-07-18

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene1 (NDRG1) has been identified as a potent tumor suppressor gene. The molecular mechanisms of anti-tumor activity of NDRG1 involve its suppressive effects on a variety of tumorigenic signaling pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of NDRG1 in the apoptosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We first collected the clinical data of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients receiving oxaliplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our medical center. Correlation analysis revealed that NDRG1 positively associated with the downstaging rates and prognosis of patients. Then, the effects of over-expression and depletion of NDRG1 gene on apoptosis of colorectal cancer were tested in vitro and in vivo. NDRG1 over-expression promoted apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells whereas depletion of NDRG1 resulted in resistance to oxaliplatin treatment. Furthermore, we observed that Bcl-2, a major anti-apoptotic protein, was regulated by NDRG1 at post-transcriptional level. By binding Protein kinase Cα (PKCα), a classical regulating factor of Bcl-2, NDRG1 enhanced the ubiquitination and degradation of Bcl-2, thus promoting apoptosis in CRC cells. In addition, NDRG1 inhibited tumor growth and promoted apoptosis in mouse xenograft model. In conclusion,NDRG1 promotes oxaliplatin-triggered apoptosis in colorectal cancer. Therefore, colorectal cancer patients can be stratified by the expression level of NDRG1. NDRG1-positive patients may benefit from oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy regimens whereas those with negative NDRG1 expression should avoid the usage of this cytotoxic drug.

  1. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  2. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 regulates pokemon gene transcription through p53 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengnan; Liu, Feng; Xie, Zhenhua; Zu, Xuyu; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2010-08-27

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy.

  3. Studying gene regulation in methanogenic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Michael; Sattler, Christian; Stock, Tilmann

    2011-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are a unique group of strictly anaerobic microorganisms characterized by their ability, and dependence, to convert simple C1 and C2 compounds to methane for growth. The major models for studying the biology of methanogens are members of the Methanococcus and Methanosarcina species. Recent development of sophisticated tools for molecular analysis and for genetic manipulation allows investigating not only their metabolism but also their cell cycle, and their interaction with the environment in great detail. One aspect of such analyses is assessment and dissection of methanoarchaeal gene regulation, for which, at present, only a handful of cases have been investigated thoroughly, partly due to the great methodological effort required. However, it becomes more and more evident that many new regulatory paradigms can be unraveled in this unique archaeal group. Here, we report both molecular and physiological/genetic methods to assess gene regulation in Methanococcus maripaludis and Methanosarcina acetivorans, which should, however, be applicable for other methanogens as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epigenetic regulation on the gene expression signature in esophagus adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ting; Zhang, Guizhi

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms represents an important step in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic measures of esophagus adenocarcinoma (NOS). The objective of this study is to identify the epigenetic regulation on gene expression in NOS, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms of NOS. In this study, 78 patients with NOS were included and the data of mRNA, miRNA and DNA methylation of were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differential analysis between NOS and controls was performed in terms of gene expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation. Bioinformatic analysis was followed to explore the regulation mechanisms of miRNA and DNA methylationon gene expression. Totally, up to 1320 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 32 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified. 240 DEGs that were not only the target genes but also negatively correlated with the screened differentially expressed miRNAs. 101 DEGs were found to be highlymethylated in CpG islands. Then, 8 differentially methylated genes (DMGs) were selected, which showed down-regulated expression in NOS. Among of these genes, 6 genes including ADHFE1, DPP6, GRIA4, CNKSR2, RPS6KA6 and ZNF135 were target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-335, hsa-mir-18a, hsa-mir-93, hsa-mir-106b and hsa-mir-21). The identified altered miRNA, genes and DNA methylation site may be applied as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of NOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel genes and pathways modulated by syndecan-1: implications for the proliferation and cell-cycle regulation of malignant mesothelioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tünde Szatmári

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a highly malignant tumor, originating from mesothelial cells of the serous cavities. In mesothelioma the expression of syndecan-1 correlates to epithelioid morphology and inhibition of growth and migration. Our previous data suggest a complex role of syndecan-1 in mesothelioma cell proliferation although the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely elucidated. The aim of this study is therefore to disclose critical genes and pathways affected by syndecan-1 in mesothelioma; in order to better understand its importance for tumor cell growth and proliferation. We modulated the expression of syndecan-1 in a human mesothelioma cell line via both overexpression and silencing, and followed the transcriptomic responses with microarray analysis. To project the transcriptome analysis on the full-dimensional picture of cellular regulation, we applied pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA and a novel method of network enrichment analysis (NEA which elucidated signaling relations between differentially expressed genes and pathways acting via various molecular mechanisms. Syndecan-1 overexpression had profound effects on genes involved in regulation of cell growth, cell cycle progression, adhesion, migration and extracellular matrix organization. In particular, expression of several growth factors, interleukins, and enzymes of importance for heparan sulfate sulfation pattern, extracellular matrix proteins and proteoglycans were significantly altered. Syndecan-1 silencing had less powerful effect on the transcriptome compared to overexpression, which can be explained by the already low initial syndecan-1 level of these cells. Nevertheless, 14 genes showed response to both up- and downregulation of syndecan-1. The "cytokine - cytokine-receptor interaction", the TGF-β, EGF, VEGF and ERK/MAPK pathways were enriched in both experimental settings. Most strikingly, nearly all analyzed pathways

  6. Gene-expression signature regulated by the KEAP1-NRF2-CUL3 axis is associated with a poor prognosis in head and neck squamous cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Akhileshwar; Matiur Rahaman, Md; Chen, Ming; Tang, Xiuwen

    2018-01-06

    NRF2 is the key regulator of oxidative stress in normal cells and aberrant expression of the NRF2 pathway due to genetic alterations in the KEAP1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1)-NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2 like 2)-CUL3 (cullin 3) axis leads to tumorigenesis and drug resistance in many cancers including head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The main goal of this study was to identify specific genes regulated by the KEAP1-NRF2-CUL3 axis in HNSCC patients, to assess the prognostic value of this gene signature in different cohorts, and to reveal potential biomarkers. RNA-Seq V2 level 3 data from 279 tumor samples along with 37 adjacent normal samples from patients enrolled in the The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-HNSCC study were used to identify upregulated genes using two methods (altered KEAP1-NRF2-CUL3 versus normal, and altered KEAP1-NRF2-CUL3 versus wild-type). We then used a new approach to identify the combined gene signature by integrating both datasets and subsequently tested this signature in 4 independent HNSCC datasets to assess its prognostic value. In addition, functional annotation using the DAVID v6.8 database and protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis using the STRING v10 database were performed on the signature. A signature composed of a subset of 17 genes regulated by the KEAP1-NRF2-CUL3 axis was identified by overlapping both the upregulated genes of altered versus normal (251 genes) and altered versus wild-type (25 genes) datasets. We showed that increased expression was significantly associated with poor survival in 4 independent HNSCC datasets, including the TCGA-HNSCC dataset. Furthermore, Gene Ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and PPI analysis revealed that most of the genes in this signature are associated with drug metabolism and glutathione metabolic pathways. Altogether, our study emphasizes the discovery of a gene signature regulated by the KEAP1-NRF2-CUL3 axis which is strongly associated with

  7. Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids regulate metabolism gene expression in livers of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun-Yan; Xu, Ya-Sha; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Qin; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie; Shi, Jing-Shan

    2017-10-01

    In our previous studies, Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids (DNLA) has been shown to have glucose-lowering and antihyperlipidaemia effects in diabetic rats, in rats fed with high-fat diets, and in mice challenged with adrenaline. This study aimed to examine the effects of DNLA on the expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in livers of mice. Mice were given DNLA at doses of 10-80 mg/kg, po for 8 days, and livers were removed for total RNA and protein isolation to perform real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Dendrobium nobile Lindl. alkaloids increased PGC1α at mRNA and protein levels and increased glucose metabolism gene Glut2 and FoxO1 expression. DNLA also increased the expression of fatty acid β-oxidation genes Acox1 and Cpt1a. The lipid synthesis regulator Srebp1 (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1) was decreased, while the lipolysis gene ATGL was increased. Interestingly, DNLA increased the expression of antioxidant gene metallothionein-1 and NADPH quinone oxidoreductase-1 (Nqo1) in livers of mice. Western blot on selected proteins confirmed these changes including the increased expression of GLUT4 and PPARα. DNLA has beneficial effects on liver glucose and lipid metabolism gene expressions, and enhances the Nrf2-antioxidant pathway gene expressions, which could play integrated roles in regulating metabolic disorders. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Divergent regulation of Arabidopsis SAUR genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, van Hilda; Dijk, van Aalt D.J.; Stortenbeker, Niek; Angenent, Gerco C.; Bemer, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Small Auxin-Upregulated RNA (SAUR) genes encode growth regulators that induce cell elongation. Arabidopsis contains more than 70 SAUR genes, of which the growth-promoting function has been unveiled in seedlings, while their role in other tissues remained largely unknown. Here, we

  9. Role of plnB gene in the regulation of bacteriocin production in Lactobacillus paraplantarum L-XM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangmei; Shang, Nan; Zhang, Xu; Gui, Meng; Li, Pinglan

    2013-06-12

    Homologues of plnB gene have been shown to participate in regulation of bacteriocin production through quorum sensing system in other organisms, to investigate the possible role of plnB gene in Lactobacillus paraplantarum L-XM1, we cloned and insertionally inactivated the plnB gene. The plnB knockout mutant ΔplnB21 showed loss of bacteriocin production, its Bac⁺ phenotype could not be restored even after the addition of PlnA. Furthermore, reverse transcription-PCR analysis from total RNA preparations showed that the bacteriocin structural genes of the plnEF and plnJK were not transcribed in the plnB knockout mutant compared with the wild-type strain. It was therefore concluded that plnB is invovled in a quorum sensing based bacteriocin production. This is the first demonstration of a role for plnB by gene knockout in L. paraplantarum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. PPARγ regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPARγ has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPARγ regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPARγ promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPARγ knockout (PPARγ KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXRα and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPARγ would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPARγ) to restore PPARγ expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPARγ KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPARγ KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPARγ (1) induced transcription of LXRα and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPARγ regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  11. Low pH induces co-ordinate regulation of gene expression in oesophageal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Shane P; Gallagher, William M; Fox, Edward J P; Abdel-Latif, Mohammed M; Reynolds, John V; Kelleher, Dermot

    2006-02-01

    The development of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is known to be a causative risk factor in the evolution of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus. The major component of this reflux is gastric acid. However, the impact of low pH on gene expression has not been extensively studied in oesophageal cells. This study utilizes a transcriptomic and bioinformatic approach to assess regulation of gene expression in response to low pH. In more detail, oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines were exposed to a range of pH environments. Affymetrix microarrays were used for gene-expression analysis and results were validated using cycle limitation and real-time RT-PCR analysis, as well as northern and western blotting. Comparative promoter transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis (MatInspector) of hierarchically clustered gene-expression data was employed to identify the elements which may co-ordinately regulate individual gene clusters. Initial experiments demonstrated maximal induction of EGR1 gene expression at pH 6.5. Subsequent array experimentation revealed significant induction of gene expression from such functional categories as DNA damage response (EGR1-4, ATF3) and cell-cycle control (GADD34, GADD45, p57). Changes in expression of EGR1, EGR3, ATF3, MKP-1, FOSB, CTGF and CYR61 were verified in separate experiments and in a variety of oesophageal cell lines. TFBS analysis of promoters identified transcription factors that may co-ordinately regulate gene-expression clusters, Cluster 1: Oct-1, AP4R; Cluster 2: NF-kB, EGRF; Cluster 3: IKRS, AP-1F. Low pH has the ability to induce genes and pathways which can provide an environment suitable for the progression of malignancy. Further functional analysis of the genes and clusters identified in this low pH study is likely to lead to new insights into the pathogenesis and therapeutics of GORD and oesophageal cancer.

  12. Transcriptomic and proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed genes and proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking chloroplastic 1 and cytosolic FBPases reveals several levels of metabolic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Suárez, Mauricio; Serrato, Antonio J; Rojas-González, José A; Bautista, Rocío; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2016-12-01

    During the photosynthesis, two isoforms of the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), the chloroplastidial (cFBP1) and the cytosolic (cyFBP), catalyse the first irreversible step during the conversion of triose phosphates (TP) to starch or sucrose, respectively. Deficiency in cyFBP and cFBP1 isoforms provokes an imbalance of the starch/sucrose ratio, causing a dramatic effect on plant development when the plastidial enzyme is lacking. We study the correlation between the transcriptome and proteome profile in rosettes and roots when cFBP1 or cyFBP genes are disrupted in Arabidopsis thaliana knock-out mutants. By using a 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing the genome of Arabidopsis we were able to identify 1067 and 1243 genes whose expressions are altered in the rosettes and roots of the cfbp1 mutant respectively; whilst in rosettes and roots of cyfbp mutant 1068 and 1079 genes are being up- or down-regulated respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR validated 100% of a set of 14 selected genes differentially expressed according to our microarray analysis. Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis-based proteomic analysis revealed quantitative differences in 36 and 26 proteins regulated in rosettes and roots of cfbp1, respectively, whereas the 18 and 48 others were regulated in rosettes and roots of cyfbp mutant, respectively. The genes differentially expressed and the proteins more or less abundant revealed changes in protein metabolism, RNA regulation, cell signalling and organization, carbon metabolism, redox regulation, and transport together with biotic and abiotic stress. Notably, a significant set (25%) of the proteins identified were also found to be regulated at a transcriptional level. This transcriptomic and proteomic analysis is the first comprehensive and comparative study of the gene/protein re-adjustment that occurs in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organs of Arabidopsis mutants lacking FBPase isoforms.

  13. The calcitonin receptor gene is a candidate for regulation of susceptibility to herpes simplex type 1 neuronal infection leading to encephalitis in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS predominantly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1. Factors regulating the susceptibility to HSE are still largely unknown. To identify host gene(s regulating HSE susceptibility we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in an intercross between the susceptible DA and the resistant PVG rat. We found one major quantitative trait locus (QTL, Hse1, on rat chromosome 4 (confidence interval 24.3-31 Mb; LOD score 29.5 governing disease susceptibility. Fine mapping of Hse1 using recombinants, haplotype mapping and sequencing, as well as expression analysis of all genes in the interval identified the calcitonin receptor gene (Calcr as the main candidate, which also is supported by functional studies. Thus, using unbiased genetic approach variability in Calcr was identified as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the CNS and subsequent HSE development.

  14. Conservation of AtTZF1, AtTZF2 and AtTZF3 homolog gene regulation by salt stress in evolutionarily distant plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eD'Orso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Arginine-rich tandem zinc-finger proteins (RR-TZF participate in a wide range of plant developmental processes and adaptive responses to abiotic stress, such as cold, salt and drought. This study investigates the conservation of the genes AtTZF1-5 at the level of their sequences and expression across plant species. The genomic sequences of the two RR-TZF genes TdTZF1-A and TdTZF1-B were isolated in durum wheat and assigned to chromosomes 3A and 3B, respectively. Sequence comparisons revealed that they encode proteins that are highly homologous to AtTZF1, AtTZF2 and AtTZF3. The expression profiles of these RR-TZF durum wheat and Arabidopsis proteins support a common function in the regulation of seed germination and responses to abiotic stress. In particular, analysis of plants with attenuated and overexpressed AtTZF3 indicate that AtTZF3 is a negative regulator of seed germination under conditions of salt stress. Finally, comparative sequence analyses establish that the RR-TZF genes are encoded by lower plants, including the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The regulation of the Physcomitrella AtTZF1-2-3-like genes by salt stress strongly suggests that a subgroup of the RR-TZF proteins has a function that has been conserved throughout evolution.

  15. Global regulator SATB1 recruits beta-catenin and regulates T(H2 differentiation in Wnt-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimple Notani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, the conserved Wnt signalling cascade promotes the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin, which then associates with the lymphoid enhancer factor/T cell factor proteins (LEF/TCFs to activate target genes. Wnt/beta -catenin signalling is essential for T cell development and differentiation. Here we show that special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1, the T lineage-enriched chromatin organizer and global regulator, interacts with beta-catenin and recruits it to SATB1's genomic binding sites. Gene expression profiling revealed that the genes repressed by SATB1 are upregulated upon Wnt signalling. Competition between SATB1 and TCF affects the transcription of TCF-regulated genes upon beta-catenin signalling. GATA-3 is a T helper type 2 (T(H2 specific transcription factor that regulates production of T(H2 cytokines and functions as T(H2 lineage determinant. SATB1 positively regulated GATA-3 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of SATB1 downregulated GATA-3 expression in differentiating human CD4(+ T cells, suggesting that SATB1 influences T(H2 lineage commitment by reprogramming gene expression. In the presence of Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1, an inhibitor of Wnt signalling, GATA-3 is downregulated and the expression of signature T(H2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 is reduced, indicating that Wnt signalling is essential for T(H2 differentiation. Knockdown of beta-catenin also produced similar results, confirming the role of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling in T(H2 differentiation. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that SATB1 recruits beta-catenin and p300 acetyltransferase on GATA-3 promoter in differentiating T(H2 cells in a Wnt-dependent manner. SATB1 coordinates T(H2 lineage commitment by reprogramming gene expression. The SATB1:beta-catenin complex activates a number of SATB1 regulated genes, and hence this study has potential to find novel Wnt responsive genes. These results demonstrate that SATB1

  16. Regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression by Nrf2 and c-Jun in tertiary butylhydroquinone-stimulated rat primary astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in rat primary astrocytes. • tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an ARE-dependent manner. • tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. • Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. • Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction. - Abstract: Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a phase II antioxidant enzyme that is primarily involved in detoxification and cytoprotection in a variety of tissues. However, the mechanism underlying HO-1 gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of HO-1 expression in primary cultured astrocytes by using the natural antioxidant compound tertiary butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). We found that tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis revealed that tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent manner. In addition, tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments demonstrated that Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. Thus, Nrf2 knockdown reduced the basal level of HO-1 expression but did not affect the fold induction by tBHQ. On the other hand, knockdown of c-Jun diminished tBHQ-mediated induction of HO-1 without affecting basal expression. The data suggest that Nrf2 generally modulates the basal expression of HO-1, while c-Jun mediates HO-1 induction in response to tBHQ. The results of co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a physical interaction between Nrf2 and c-Jun in tBHQ-treated astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction in tBHQ-treated rat primary astrocytes

  17. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  18. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohta, Shinji [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Fukusaki, Eiichiro [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  19. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: →We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. → Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. → Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. → Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. → Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The Δuga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for Δuga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan extension. These results strongly suggest

  20. NeuroD1: developmental expression and regulated genes in the rodent pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Estela M; Bailey, Michael J; Rath, Martin F

    2007-01-01

    NeuroD1/BETA2, a member of the bHLH transcription factor family, is known to influence the fate of specific neuronal, endocrine and retinal cells. We report here that NeuroD1 mRNA is highly abundant in the developing and adult rat pineal gland. Pineal expression begins in the 17-day embryo at which...... time it is also detectable in other brain regions. Expression in the pineal gland increases during the embryonic period and is maintained thereafter at levels equivalent to those found in the cerebellum and retina. In contrast, NeuroD1 mRNA decreases markedly in non-cerebellar brain regions during...... development. Pineal NeuroD1 levels are similar during the day and night, and do not appear to be influenced by sympathetic neural input. Gene expression analysis of the pineal glands from neonatal NeuroD1 knockout mice identifies 127 transcripts that are down-regulated (>twofold, p

  1. Prostate Cancer Epigenetics: A Review on Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Diaw

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in western countries, and its incidence is increasing steadily worldwide. Molecular changes including both genetic and epigenetic events underlying the development and progression of this disease are still not well understood. Epigenetic events are involved in gene regulation and occur through different mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modifi cations. Both DNA methylation and histone modifi cations affect gene regulation and play important roles either independently or by interaction in tumor initiation and progression. This review will discuss the genes associated with epigenetic alterations in prostate cancer progression: their regulation and importance as possible markers for the disease.

  2. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Haney

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  3. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 Regulates Pokemon Gene Transcription Through p53 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (Pgp, encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1 gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy.

  4. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene specific DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Benoukraf, Touati; Amabile, Giovanni; Goff, Loyal A.; Terragni, Joylon; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; De Figureido Pontes, Lorena Lobo; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, Pu; Wu, Mengchu; D’Alò, Francesco; Melnick, Ari; Leone, Giuseppe; Ebralidze, Konstantin K.; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Rinn, John L.; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation was described almost a century ago. However, the rules governing its establishment and maintenance remain elusive. Here, we present data demonstrating that active transcription regulates levels of genomic methylation. We identified a novel RNA arising from the CEBPA gene locus critical in regulating the local DNA methylation profile. This RNA binds to DNMT1 and prevents CEBPA gene locus methylation. Deep sequencing of transcripts associated with DNMT1 combined with genome-scale methylation and expression profiling extended the generality of this finding to numerous gene loci. Collectively, these results delineate the nature of DNMT1-RNA interactions and suggest strategies for gene selective demethylation of therapeutic targets in disease. PMID:24107992

  5. Gene regulation is governed by a core network in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zuguang; Zhang, Chenyu; Wang, Jin

    2012-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, and the mechanisms that lead to the disease are still relatively unclear. However, with the development of high-throughput technologies it is possible to gain a systematic view of biological systems to enhance the understanding of the roles of genes associated with HCC. Thus, analysis of the mechanism of molecule interactions in the context of gene regulatory networks can reveal specific sub-networks that lead to the development of HCC. In this study, we aimed to identify the most important gene regulations that are dysfunctional in HCC generation. Our method for constructing gene regulatory network is based on predicted target interactions, experimentally-supported interactions, and co-expression model. Regulators in the network included both transcription factors and microRNAs to provide a complete view of gene regulation. Analysis of gene regulatory network revealed that gene regulation in HCC is highly modular, in which different sets of regulators take charge of specific biological processes. We found that microRNAs mainly control biological functions related to mitochondria and oxidative reduction, while transcription factors control immune responses, extracellular activity and the cell cycle. On the higher level of gene regulation, there exists a core network that organizes regulations between different modules and maintains the robustness of the whole network. There is direct experimental evidence for most of the regulators in the core gene regulatory network relating to HCC. We infer it is the central controller of gene regulation. Finally, we explored the influence of the core gene regulatory network on biological pathways. Our analysis provides insights into the mechanism of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control in HCC. In particular, we highlight the importance of the core gene regulatory network; we propose that it is highly related to HCC and we believe further

  6. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  7. Regulating ehrlich and demethiolation pathways for alcohols production by the expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Jia, Kai-Zhi; Xia, Shi-Tao; Xu, Yang-Hua; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-02-10

    Ehrlich and demethiolation pathways as two competing branches converted amino acid into alcohols. Controlling both pathways offers considerable potential for industrial applications including alcohols overproduction, flavor-quality control and developing new flavors. While how to regulate ehrlich and demethiolation pathways is still not applicable. Taking the conversion of methionine into methionol and methanethiol for example, we constructed two suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of Clonostachys rosea by using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology for screening regulators controlling the conversion. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1 screened from forward SSH library was validated to be related with the biosynthesis of end products. Overexpressing HUWE1 in C. rosea and S. cerevisiae significantly increased the biosynthesis of methanethiol and its derivatives in demethiolation pathway, while suppressed the biosynthesis of methional and methionol in ehrlich pathway. These results attained the directional regulation of both pathways by overexpressing HUWE1. Thus, HUWE1 has potential to be a key target for controlling and enhancing alcohols production by metabolic engineering.

  8. Methylation of the PMEPA1 gene, a negative regulator of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharad, Shashwat; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; Haffner, Michael C; Li, Hua; Yan, Wusheng; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Chen, Yongmei; Ali, Amina; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy; McLeod, David G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Srivastava, Shiv; Dobi, Albert; Petrovics, Gyorgy

    2014-06-01

    The prostate transmembrane protein androgen induced 1 (PMEPA1) gene is highly expressed in prostate epithelial cells and is a direct transcriptional target for the androgen receptor (AR). AR protein levels are controlled by the AR-PMEPA1 negative feedback loop through NEDD4-E3 ligase. Reduced expression of PMEPA1 observed in prostate tumors, suggests that loss of PMEPA1 may play critical roles in prostate tumorigenesis. This study focuses on epigenetic mechanisms of reduced PMEPA1 expression in the cancer of the prostate (CaP). Benign (n = 77) and matched malignant (n = 77) prostate epithelial cells were laser capture micro-dissected from optimum cutting temperature embedded frozen prostate sections from 42 Caucasian American (CA) and 35 African American (AA) cases. Purified DNA specimens were analyzed for CpG methylation of the PMEPA1 gene. PMEPA1 mRNA expression levels were evaluated by qRT-PCR. Analysis of PMEPA1 methylation and mRNA expression in the same tumor cell populations indicated a significant inverse correlation between mRNA expression and methylation in CaP (P = 0.0115). We noted higher frequency of CpG methylation within the evaluated first intronic region of the PMEPA1 gene in prostate tumors of CA men as compared with AA. In CaP cell lines, PMEPA1 expression was induced and AR protein levels were diminished in response to treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine). Cell culture-based studies demonstrated that decitabine restores PMEPA1 expression in AR-positive CaP cell lines. This report reveals the potential role of PMEPA1 gene methylation in the regulation of AR stability. Thus, downregulation of PMEPA1 may result in increased AR protein levels and function in CaP cells, contributing to prostate tumorigenesis.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide-regulated genes in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrio, Emilie; Marino, Daniel; Marmeys, Anthony; de Segonzac, Marion Dunoyer; Damiani, Isabelle; Genre, Andrea; Huguet, Stéphanie; Frendo, Pierre; Puppo, Alain; Pauly, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), play an important role in signalling in various cellular processes. The involvement of H(2)O(2) in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiotic interaction raises questions about its effect on gene expression. A transcriptome analysis was performed on inoculated roots of M. truncatula in which ROS production was inhibited with diphenylene iodonium (DPI). In total, 301 genes potentially regulated by ROS content were identified 2 d after inoculation. These genes included MtSpk1, which encodes a putative protein kinase and is induced by exogenous H(2)O(2) treatment. MtSpk1 gene expression was also induced by nodulation factor treatment. MtSpk1 transcription was observed in infected root hair cells, nodule primordia and the infection zone of mature nodules. Analysis with a fluorescent protein probe specific for H(2)O(2) showed that MtSpk1 expression and H(2)O(2) were similarly distributed in the nodule infection zone. Finally, the establishment of symbiosis was impaired by MtSpk1 downregulation with an artificial micro-RNA. Several genes regulated by H(2)O(2) during the establishment of rhizobial symbiosis were identified. The involvement of MtSpk1 in the establishment of the symbiosis is proposed. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from

  11. Regulation of IGF-1 signaling by microRNAs

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    Hwa Jin eJung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 signaling pathway regulates critical biological processes including development, homeostasis, and aging. Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in a myriad of diseases such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic disorders, making the IGF-1 signaling pathway a prime target to develop therapeutic and intervention strategies. Recently, small non-coding RNA molecules in ~22 nucleotide length, microRNAs (miRNAs, have emerged as a new regulator of biological processes in virtually all organ systems and increasing studies are linking altered miRNA function to disease mechanisms. A miRNA binds to 3’UTRs of multiple target genes and coordinately down-regulates their expression, thereby exerting a profound influence on gene regulatory networks. Here we review the components of the IGF-1 signaling pathway that are known targets of miRNA regulation, and highlight recent studies that suggest therapeutic potential of these miRNAs against various diseases.

  12. Ribonuclease inhibitor 1 regulates erythropoiesis by controlling GATA1 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Veiga, Diogo Ft; Maslowski, Kendle M; Andina, Nicola; Tardivel, Aubry; Yu, Eric Chi-Wang; Stilinovic, Martina; Simillion, Cedric; Duchosal, Michel A; Quadroni, Manfredo; Roberts, Irene; Sankaran, Vijay G; MacDonald, H Robson; Fasel, Nicolas; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Schneider, Pascal; Hoang, Trang; Allam, Ramanjaneyulu

    2018-04-02

    Ribosomal proteins (RP) regulate specific gene expression by selectively translating subsets of mRNAs. Indeed, in Diamond-Blackfan anemia and 5q- syndrome, mutations in RP genes lead to a specific defect in erythroid gene translation and cause anemia. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of selective mRNA translation and involvement of ribosomal-associated factors in this process. Ribonuclease inhibitor 1 (RNH1) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds to and inhibits pancreatic-type ribonucleases. Here, we report that RNH1 binds to ribosomes and regulates erythropoiesis by controlling translation of the erythroid transcription factor GATA1. Rnh1-deficient mice die between embryonic days E8.5 and E10 due to impaired production of mature erythroid cells from progenitor cells. In Rnh1-deficient embryos, mRNA levels of Gata1 are normal, but GATA1 protein levels are decreased. At the molecular level, we found that RNH1 binds to the 40S subunit of ribosomes and facilitates polysome formation on Gata1 mRNA to confer transcript-specific translation. Further, RNH1 knockdown in human CD34+ progenitor cells decreased erythroid differentiation without affecting myelopoiesis. Our results reveal an unsuspected role for RNH1 in the control of GATA1 mRNA translation and erythropoiesis.

  13. AIB1 regulates the ovarian cancer cell cycle through TUG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Gan, Z-H; Qin, L; Jiao, S-H; Shi, Y

    2017-12-01

    To explore the mechanism of amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) to promote ovarian cancer progress. Cor correlation analysis was performed to obtain the top 100 lncRNAs that were positively correlated with AIB1. The relationship of taurine upregulated gene 1 (TUG1) and clinicopathological characteristics. Moreover, Gene Ontology (GO) and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) were performed to predict the biological process where TUG1 may be involved in. At last, Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), colon formation and flow cytometry were conducted to explore the biological process that TUG1 may influence. Meanwhile, Western blot was performed to explore the mechanism of TUG1. In this study, it was found that P73 antisense RNA 1T (TP73-AS1), LINC00654 and TUG1 had the tumor-promoting effect in the top 100 lncRNAs that were positively correlated with AIB1. The expression level of TUG1 was significantly decreased after intervention of AIB1. Then, the clinical data were analyzed and the results showed that TUG1 was related to the tumor residue, tumor staging, tumor grade and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, the bioinformatics analysis revealed that TUG1 was mainly involved in the regulation of cell cycle. After intervention in TUG1, it was found that the cell proliferation capacity was significantly decreased, and the cell cycle was arrested in G1 phase. Finally, Western blot revealed that the expressions of G1 phase-related proteins were significantly changed. This study indicated that AIB1 regulates the cycle of ovarian cancer cells through TUG1. This study proved that AIB1 can regulate the cell cycle through regulating TUG1.

  14. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (UTSMC)

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates.

  15. Accessory Gene Regulator-1 Locus Is Essential for Virulence and Pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Darkoh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is responsible for most of the definable cases of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide and is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant anaerobic pathogen, causes disease by producing toxins A and B, which are controlled by an accessory gene regulator (Agr quorum signaling system. Some C. difficile strains encode two Agr loci in their genomes, designated agr1 and agr2. The agr1 locus is present in all of the C. difficile strains sequenced to date, whereas the agr2 locus is present in a few strains. The functional roles of agr1 and agr2 in C. difficile toxin regulation and pathogenesis were unknown until now. Using allelic exchange, we deleted components of both agr loci and examined the mutants for toxin production and virulence. The results showed that the agr1 mutant cannot produce toxins A and B; toxin production can be restored by complementation with wild-type agr1. Furthermore, the agr1 mutant is able to colonize but unable to cause disease in a murine CDI model. These findings have profound implications for CDI treatment because we have uncovered a promising therapeutic target for the development of nonantibiotic drugs to treat this life-threatening emerging pathogen by targeting the toxins directly responsible for disease.

  16. Motif analysis unveils the possible co-regulation of chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Jun; Daniell, Henry; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2012-09-01

    Chloroplasts play critical roles in land plant cells. Despite their importance and the availability of at least 200 sequenced chloroplast genomes, the number of known DNA regulatory sequences in chloroplast genomes are limited. In this paper, we designed computational methods to systematically study putative DNA regulatory sequences in intergenic regions near chloroplast genes in seven plant species and in promoter sequences of nuclear genes in Arabidopsis and rice. We found that -35/-10 elements alone cannot explain the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes. We also concluded that there are unlikely motifs shared by intergenic sequences of most of chloroplast genes, indicating that these genes are regulated differently. Finally and surprisingly, we found five conserved motifs, each of which occurs in no more than six chloroplast intergenic sequences, are significantly shared by promoters of nuclear-genes encoding chloroplast proteins. By integrating information from gene function annotation, protein subcellular localization analyses, protein-protein interaction data, and gene expression data, we further showed support of the functionality of these conserved motifs. Our study implies the existence of unknown nuclear-encoded transcription factors that regulate both chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast protein, which sheds light on the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes.

  17. Evolution of stress-regulated gene expression in duplicate genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Cheng Zou

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the selection pressure imposed by highly variable environmental conditions, stress sensing and regulatory response mechanisms in plants are expected to evolve rapidly. One potential source of innovation in plant stress response mechanisms is gene duplication. In this study, we examined the evolution of stress-regulated gene expression among duplicated genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Key to this analysis was reconstructing the putative ancestral stress regulation pattern. By comparing the expression patterns of duplicated genes with the patterns of their ancestors, duplicated genes likely lost and gained stress responses at a rapid rate initially, but the rate is close to zero when the synonymous substitution rate (a proxy for time is > approximately 0.8. When considering duplicated gene pairs, we found that partitioning of putative ancestral stress responses occurred more frequently compared to cases of parallel retention and loss. Furthermore, the pattern of stress response partitioning was extremely asymmetric. An analysis of putative cis-acting DNA regulatory elements in the promoters of the duplicated stress-regulated genes indicated that the asymmetric partitioning of ancestral stress responses are likely due, at least in part, to differential loss of DNA regulatory elements; the duplicated genes losing most of their stress responses were those that had lost more of the putative cis-acting elements. Finally, duplicate genes that lost most or all of the ancestral responses are more likely to have gained responses to other stresses. Therefore, the retention of duplicates that inherit few or no functions seems to be coupled to neofunctionalization. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the patterns of evolutionary changes in gene stress responses after duplication and lay the foundation for testing the adaptive significance of stress regulatory changes under highly variable biotic and abiotic environments.

  18. A previously uncharacterized gene stm0551 plays a repressive role in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ke-Chuan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium produces surface-associated fimbriae that facilitate adherence of the bacteria to a variety of cells and tissues. Type 1 fimbriae with binding specificity to mannose residues are the most commonly found fimbrial type. In vitro, static-broth culture favors the growth of S. Typhimurium with type 1 fimbriae, whereas non-type 1 fimbriate bacteria are obtained by culture on solid-agar media. Previous studies demonstrated that the phenotypic expression of type 1 fimbriae is the result of the interaction and cooperation of the regulatory genes fimZ, fimY, fimW, and fimU within the fim gene cluster. Genome sequencing revealed a novel gene, stm0551, located between fimY and fimW that encodes an 11.4-kDa putative phosphodiesterase specific for the bacterial second messenger cyclic-diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP. The role of stm0551 in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae in S. Typhimurium remains unclear. Results A stm0551-deleted stain constructed by allelic exchange constitutively produced type 1 fimbriae in both static-broth and solid-agar medium conditions. Quantative RT-PCR revealed that expression of the fimbrial major subunit gene, fimA, and one of the regulatory genes, fimZ, were comparably increased in the stm0551-deleted strain compared with those of the parental strain when grown on the solid-agar medium, a condition that normally inhibits expression of type 1 fimbriae. Following transformation with a plasmid possessing the coding sequence of stm0551, expression of fimA and fimZ decreased in the stm0551 mutant strain in both culture conditions, whereas transformation with the control vector pACYC184 relieved this repression. A purified STM0551 protein exhibited a phosphodiesterase activity in vitro while a point mutation in the putative EAL domain, substituting glutamic acid (E with alanine (A, of STM0551 or a FimY protein abolished this activity. Conclusions The finding that the

  19. DAG1, no gene for RNA regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Andrea

    2012-04-10

    DAG1 encodes for a precursor protein that liberates the two subunits featured by the dystroglycan (DG) adhesion complex that are involved in an increasing number of cellular functions in a wide variety of cells and tissues. Aside from the proteolytic events producing the α and β subunits, especially the former undergoes extensive "post-production" modifications taking place within the ER/Golgi where its core protein is both N- and O-decorated with sugars. These post-translational events, that are mainly orchestrated by a plethora of certified, or putative, glycosyltransferases, prelude to the excocytosis-mediated trafficking and targeting of the DG complex to the plasma membrane. Extensive genetic and biochemical evidences have been accumulated so far on α-DG glycosylation, while little is know on possible regulatory events underlying the chromatine activation, transcription or post-transcription (splicing and escape from the nucleus) of DAG1 or of its mRNA. A scenario is envisaged in which cells would use a sort of preferential, and scarcely regulated, route for DAG1 activation, that would imply fast mRNA transcription, maturation and export to the cytosol, and would prelude to the multiple time-consuming enzymatic post-translational activities needed for its glycosylation. Such a provocative view might be helpful to trigger future work aiming at disclosing the complete molecular mechanisms underlying DAG1 activation and at improving our knowledge of any pre-translational step that is involved in dystroglycan regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A vigilant, hypoxia-regulated heme oxygenase-1 gene vector in the heart limits cardiac injury after ischemia-reperfusion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao Liang; Qian, Keping; Zhang, Y Clare; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2005-12-01

    The effect of a cardiac specific, hypoxia-regulated, human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) vector to provide cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion injury was assessed. When myocardial ischemia and reperfusion is asymptomatic, the damaging effects are cumulative and patients miss timely treatment. A gene therapy approach that expresses therapeutic genes only when ischemia is experienced is a desirable strategy. We have developed a cardiac-specific, hypoxia-regulated gene therapy "vigilant vector'' system that amplifies cardioprotective gene expression. Vigilant hHO-1 plasmids, LacZ plasmids, or saline (n = 40 per group) were injected into mouse heart 2 days in advance of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Animals were exposed to 60 minutes of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. For that term (24 hours) effects, the protein levels of HO-1, inflammatory responses, apoptosis, and infarct size were determined. For long-term (3 week) effects, the left ventricular remodeling and recovery of cardiac function were assessed. Ischemia-reperfusion resulted in a timely overexpression of HO-1 protein. Infarct size at 24 hours after ischemia-reperfusion was significantly reduced in the HO-1-treated animals compared with the LacZ-treated group or saline-treated group (P < .001). The reduction of infarct size was accompanied by a decrease in lipid peroxidant activity, inflammatory cell infiltration, and proapoptotic protein level in ischemia-reperfusion-injured myocardium. The long-term study demonstrated that timely, hypoxia-induced HO-1 overexpression is beneficial in conserving cardiac function and attenuating left ventricle remodelling. The vigilant HO-1 vector provides a protective therapy in the heart for reducing cellular damage during ischemia-reperfusion injury and preserving heart function.

  1. The rules of gene expression in plants: Organ identity and gene body methylation are key factors for regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Rodrigo A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology is a widely used approach for monitoring genome-wide gene expression. For Arabidopsis, there are over 1,800 microarray hybridizations representing many different experimental conditions on Affymetrix™ ATH1 gene chips alone. This huge amount of data offers a unique opportunity to infer the principles that govern the regulation of gene expression in plants. Results We used bioinformatics methods to analyze publicly available data obtained using the ATH1 chip from Affymetrix. A total of 1887 ATH1 hybridizations were normalized and filtered to eliminate low-quality hybridizations. We classified and compared control and treatment hybridizations and determined differential gene expression. The largest differences in gene expression were observed when comparing samples obtained from different organs. On average, ten-fold more genes were differentially expressed between organs as compared to any other experimental variable. We defined "gene responsiveness" as the number of comparisons in which a gene changed its expression significantly. We defined genes with the highest and lowest responsiveness levels as hypervariable and housekeeping genes, respectively. Remarkably, housekeeping genes were best distinguished from hypervariable genes by differences in methylation status in their transcribed regions. Moreover, methylation in the transcribed region was inversely correlated (R2 = 0.8 with gene responsiveness on a genome-wide scale. We provide an example of this negative relationship using genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes, by contrasting their regulatory responsiveness to nitrate and methylation status in their transcribed regions. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Arabidopsis transcriptome is largely established during development and is comparatively stable when faced with external perturbations. We suggest a novel functional role for DNA methylation in the transcribed region as a key determinant

  2. Integration of TP53, DREAM, MMB-FOXM1 and RB-E2F target gene analyses identifies cell cycle gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin; Grossmann, Patrick; Padi, Megha; DeCaprio, James A

    2016-07-27

    Cell cycle (CC) and TP53 regulatory networks are frequently deregulated in cancer. While numerous genome-wide studies of TP53 and CC-regulated genes have been performed, significant variation between studies has made it difficult to assess regulation of any given gene of interest. To overcome the limitation of individual studies, we developed a meta-analysis approach to identify high confidence target genes that reflect their frequency of identification in independent datasets. Gene regulatory networks were generated by comparing differential expression of TP53 and CC-regulated genes with chromatin immunoprecipitation studies for TP53, RB1, E2F, DREAM, B-MYB, FOXM1 and MuvB. RNA-seq data from p21-null cells revealed that gene downregulation by TP53 generally requires p21 (CDKN1A). Genes downregulated by TP53 were also identified as CC genes bound by the DREAM complex. The transcription factors RB, E2F1 and E2F7 bind to a subset of DREAM target genes that function in G1/S of the CC while B-MYB, FOXM1 and MuvB control G2/M gene expression. Our approach yields high confidence ranked target gene maps for TP53, DREAM, MMB-FOXM1 and RB-E2F and enables prediction and distinction of CC regulation. A web-based atlas at www.targetgenereg.org enables assessing the regulation of any human gene of interest. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. cis- and trans-acting elements of the estrogen-regulated vitellogenin gene B1 of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahli, W; Martinez, E; Corthésy, B; Cardinaux, J R

    1989-01-01

    Vitellogenin genes are expressed under strict estrogen control in the liver of female oviparous vertebrates. Gene transfer experiments using estrogen-responsive cells have shown that the 13 bp perfect palindromic element GGTCACTGTGACC found upstream of the Xenopus laevis vitellogenin gene A2 promoter mediates hormonal stimulation and thus, was called the estrogen-responsive element (ERE). In the Xenopus vitellogenin genes B1 and B2 there are two closely adjacent EREs with one or more base substitutions when compared to the consensus ERE GGTCANNNTGACC. On their own, these degenerated elements have only a low or no regulatory capacity at all but act together synergistically to form an estrogen-responsive unit (ERU) with the same strength as the perfect palindromic 13 bp element. Analysis of estrogen receptor binding to the gene B1 ERU revealed a cooperative interaction of receptor dimers to the two adjacent imperfect EREs which most likely explains the synergistic stimulation observed in vivo. Furthermore, a promoter activator element located between positions --113 and --42 of the gene B1 and functional in the human MCF-7 and the Xenopus B3.2 cells has been identified and shown to be involved in the high level of induced transcription activity when the ERE is placed at a distance from the promoter. Finally, a hormone-controlled in vitro transcription system derived from Xenopus liver nuclear extracts was exploited to characterize two additional novel cis-acting elements within the vitellogenin gene B1 promoter. One of them, a negative regulatory element (NRE), is responsible for repression of promoter activity in the absence of hormone. The second is related to the NF-I binding site and is required, together with the ERE, to mediate hormonal induction. Moreover, we detected three trans-acting activities in Xenopus liver nuclear extracts that interact with these regions and demonstrated that they participate in the regulation of the expression of the vitellogenin

  4. Genetic variability of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated regulation of the human UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A4 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erichsen, Thomas J; Ehmer, Ursula; Kalthoff, Sandra; Lankisch, Tim O; Mueller, Tordis M [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover, Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Munzel, Peter A [Department of Toxicology, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Tubingen, Tubingen (Germany); Manns, Michael P [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover, Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Strassburg, Christian P. [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover, Medical School, Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: strassburg.christian@mh-hannover.de

    2008-07-15

    UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) play an important role for drug detoxification and toxicity. UGT function is genetically modulated by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which lead to the expression of functionally altered protein, or altered expression levels. UGT1A4 activity includes anticonvulsants, antidepressants and environmental mutagens. In this study the induction of the human UGT1A4 gene and a potential influence of genetic variation in its promoter region were analyzed. SNPs at bp - 219 and - 163 occurred in 9% among 109 blood donors reducing UGT1A4 transcription by 40%. UGT1A4 transcription was dioxin inducible. Reporter gene experiments identified 2 xenobiotic response elements (XRE), which were functionally confirmed by mutagenesis analyses, and binding was demonstrated by electromobility shift assays. Constitutive human UGT1A4 gene expression and induction was aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent, and reduced in the presence of SNPs at bp - 219 and - 163. AhR-mediated regulation of the human UGT1A4 gene by two XRE and a modulation by naturally occurring genetic variability by SNPs is demonstrated, which indicates gene-environment interaction with potential relevance for drug metabolism.

  5. Genetic variability of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated regulation of the human UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A4 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erichsen, Thomas J.; Ehmer, Ursula; Kalthoff, Sandra; Lankisch, Tim O.; Mueller, Tordis M.; Munzel, Peter A.; Manns, Michael P.; Strassburg, Christian P.

    2008-01-01

    UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) play an important role for drug detoxification and toxicity. UGT function is genetically modulated by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which lead to the expression of functionally altered protein, or altered expression levels. UGT1A4 activity includes anticonvulsants, antidepressants and environmental mutagens. In this study the induction of the human UGT1A4 gene and a potential influence of genetic variation in its promoter region were analyzed. SNPs at bp - 219 and - 163 occurred in 9% among 109 blood donors reducing UGT1A4 transcription by 40%. UGT1A4 transcription was dioxin inducible. Reporter gene experiments identified 2 xenobiotic response elements (XRE), which were functionally confirmed by mutagenesis analyses, and binding was demonstrated by electromobility shift assays. Constitutive human UGT1A4 gene expression and induction was aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent, and reduced in the presence of SNPs at bp - 219 and - 163. AhR-mediated regulation of the human UGT1A4 gene by two XRE and a modulation by naturally occurring genetic variability by SNPs is demonstrated, which indicates gene-environment interaction with potential relevance for drug metabolism

  6. MicroRNAs differentially regulate carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1 gene expression dependent on the allele status of the common polymorphic variant rs9024.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Kalabus

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs responsible for the post-transcriptional regulation of a variety of human genes. To date, their involvement in the regulation of CBR1 is unknown. This study reports for the first time the identification of microRNA-574-5p (hsa-miR-574-5p and microRNA-921 (hsa-miR-921 as two miRNAs capable of interacting with the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR of the CBR1 gene and downregulating CBR1 expression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a common single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the CBR1 3'-UTR (rs9024, CBR1 1096G>A differentially impacts the regulation of CBR1 by hsa-miR-574-5p and hsa-miR-921 dependent on genotype. First, four candidate miRNAs were selected based on bioinformatic analyses, and were tested in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells transfected with CBR1 3'-UTR constructs harboring either the G or A allele for rs9024. We found that hsa-miR-574-5p and hsa-miR-921 significantly decreased luciferase activity in CHO cells transfected with the CBR1 3'-UTR construct carrying the major rs9024 G allele by 35% and 46%, respectively. The influence of these miRNAs was different in cells transfected with a CBR1 3'-UTR construct containing the minor rs9024 A allele in that only hsa-miR-574-5p had a demonstrable effect (i.e., 52% decrease in lucifersase activity. To further determine the functional effects of miRNA-mediated regulation of polymorphic CBR1, we assessed CBR1 protein expression and CBR1 enzymatic activity for the prototypical substrate menadione in human lymphoblastoid cell lines with distinct rs9024 genotypes. We found that hsa-miR-574-5p and hsa-miR-921 significantly decreased CBR1 protein (48% and 40%, respectively and CBR1 menadione activity (54% and 18%, respectively in lymphoblastoid cells homozygous for the major rs9024 G allele. In contrast, only hsa-miR-574-5p decreased CBR1 protein and CBR1 activity in cells homozygous for the minor rs9024 A allele, and did so by 49% and 56%, respectively. These

  7. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N. [Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Dai, Shunhong [Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  8. Non-circadian expression masking clock-driven weak transcription rhythms in U2OS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hoffmann

    Full Text Available U2OS cells harbor a circadian clock but express only a few rhythmic genes in constant conditions. We identified 3040 binding sites of the circadian regulators BMAL1, CLOCK and CRY1 in the U2OS genome. Most binding sites even in promoters do not correlate with detectable rhythmic transcript levels. Luciferase fusions reveal that the circadian clock supports robust but low amplitude transcription rhythms of representative promoters. However, rhythmic transcription of these potentially clock-controlled genes is masked by non-circadian transcription that overwrites the weaker contribution of the clock in constant conditions. Our data suggest that U2OS cells harbor an intrinsically rather weak circadian oscillator. The oscillator has the potential to regulate a large number of genes. The contribution of circadian versus non-circadian transcription is dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and may determine the apparent complexity of the circadian transcriptome.

  9. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  10. The dynamic landscape of gene regulation during Bombyx mori oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Wei; Sun, Bang-Yong; Xiao, Yang; Zhang, Ze

    2017-09-11

    Oogenesis in the domestic silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a complex process involving previtellogenesis, vitellogenesis and choriogenesis. During this process, follicles show drastic morphological and physiological changes. However, the genome-wide regulatory profiles of gene expression during oogenesis remain to be determined. In this study, we obtained time-series transcriptome data and used these data to reveal the dynamic landscape of gene regulation during oogenesis. A total of 1932 genes were identified to be differentially expressed among different stages, most of which occurred during the transition from late vitellogenesis to early choriogenesis. Using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified six stage-specific gene modules that correspond to multiple regulatory pathways. Strikingly, the biosynthesis pathway of the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) was enriched in one of the modules. Further analysis showed that the ecdysteroid 20-hydroxylase gene (CYP314A1) of steroidgenesis genes was mainly expressed in previtellogenesis and early vitellogenesis. However, the 20E-inactivated genes, particularly the ecdysteroid 26-hydroxylase encoding gene (Cyp18a1), were highly expressed in late vitellogenesis. These distinct expression patterns between 20E synthesis and catabolism-related genes might ensure the rapid decline of the hormone titer at the transition point from vitellogenesis to choriogenesis. In addition, we compared landscapes of gene regulation between silkworm (Lepidoptera) and fruit fly (Diptera) oogeneses. Our results show that there is some consensus in the modules of gene co-expression during oogenesis in these insects. The data presented in this study provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms underlying oogenesis in insects with polytrophic meroistic ovaries. The results also provide clues for further investigating the roles of epigenetic reconfiguration and circadian rhythm in insect oogenesis.

  11. MiR-210 disturbs mitotic progression through regulating a group of mitosis-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Wu, Jiangbin; Xu, Naihan; Xie, Weidong; Li, Mengnan; Li, Jianna; Jiang, Yuyang; Yang, Burton B; Zhang, Yaou

    2013-01-07

    MiR-210 is up-regulated in multiple cancer types but its function is disputable and further investigation is necessary. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified the putative target genes of miR-210 in hypoxia-induced CNE cells from genome-wide scale. Two functional gene groups related to cell cycle and RNA processing were recognized as the major targets of miR-210. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism and biological consequence of miR-210 in cell cycle regulation, particularly mitosis. Hypoxia-induced up-regulation of miR-210 was highly correlated with the down-regulation of a group of mitosis-related genes, including Plk1, Cdc25B, Cyclin F, Bub1B and Fam83D. MiR-210 suppressed the expression of these genes by directly targeting their 3'-UTRs. Over-expression of exogenous miR-210 disturbed mitotic progression and caused aberrant mitosis. Furthermore, miR-210 mimic with pharmacological doses reduced tumor formation in a mouse metastatic tumor model. Taken together, these results implicate that miR-210 disturbs mitosis through targeting multi-genes involved in mitotic progression, which may contribute to its inhibitory role on tumor formation.

  12. Anticancer drugs and the regulation of Hedgehog genes GLI1 and PTCH1, a comparative study in nonmelanoma skin cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe H; Bojesen, Sophie; Gehl, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans, comprising mainly basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). BCC proliferation is highly dependent on the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We aimed to investigate a panel of anticancer drugs with known activity against skin...... of immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT), BCC (UWBCC1 and BCC77015), and SCC (A431 and SCC25) cell lines. The impact of treatment on the regulation of Hedgehog pathway target genes (GLI1 and PTCH1), measured by real-time PCR, was compared between UWBCC1 and HaCaT. Varying cell line sensitivity profiles...... to the examined anticancer drugs were observed. Generally, 24-h drug exposure was sufficient to reduce cell viability. We found that 5-FU, MTX, and cisplatin significantly downregulated the expression of two genes controlled by the Hedgehog pathway (≤25-, 2.9-, and 12.5-fold, respectively, for GLI1 in UWBCC1...

  13. Regulation of the cytochrome P450 2A genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Ting; Ding Xinxin

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of the CYP2A subfamily play important roles in xenobiotic disposition in the liver and in metabolic activation in extrahepatic tissues. Many of the CYP2A transcripts and enzymes are inducible by xenobiotic compounds, and the expression of at least some of the CYP2A genes is influenced by physiological status, such as circadian rhythm, and pathological conditions, such as inflammation, microbial infection, and tumorigenesis. Variability in the expression of the CYP2A genes, which differs by species, animal strain, gender, and organ, may alter the risks of chemical toxicity for numerous compounds that are CYP2A substrates. The mechanistic bases of these variabilities are generally not well understood. However, recent studies have yielded interesting findings in several areas, such as the role of nuclear factor 1 in the tissue-selective expression of CYP2A genes in the olfactory mucosa (OM); the roles of constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), and possibly, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in transcriptional regulation of the Cyp2a5 gene; and the involvement of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 in pyrazole-induced stabilization of CYP2A5 mRNA. The aims of this minireview are to summarize current knowledge of the regulation of the CYP2A genes in rodents and humans, and to stimulate further mechanistic studies that will ultimately improve our ability to determine, and to understand, these variabilities in humans

  14. The Pochonia chlamydosporia serine protease gene vcp1 is subject to regulation by carbon, nitrogen and pH: implications for nematode biocontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Elaine; Kerry, Brian R; Manzanilla-López, Rosa H; Mutua, Gerald; Devonshire, Jean; Kimenju, John; Hirsch, Penny R

    2012-01-01

    The alkaline serine protease VCP1 of the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia belongs to a family of subtilisin-like enzymes that are involved in infection of nematode and insect hosts. It is involved early in the infection process, removing the outer proteinaceous vitelline membrane of nematode eggs. Little is known about the regulation of this gene, even though an understanding of how nutrients and other factors affect its expression is critical for ensuring its efficacy as a biocontrol agent. This paper provides new information on the regulation of vcp1 expression. Sequence analysis of the upstream regulatory region of this gene in 30 isolates revealed that it was highly conserved and contained sequence motifs characteristic of genes that are subject to carbon, nitrogen and pH-regulation. Expression studies, monitoring enzyme activity and mRNA, confirmed that these factors affect VCP1 production. As expected, glucose reduced VCP1 expression and for a few hours so did ammonium chloride. Surprisingly, however, by 24 h VCP1 levels were increased in the presence of ammonium chloride for most isolates. Ambient pH also regulated VCP1 expression, with most isolates producing more VCP1 under alkaline conditions. There were some differences in the response of one isolate with a distinctive upstream sequence including a variant regulatory-motif profile. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the presence of nematode eggs stimulates VCP1 production by P. chlamydosporia, but only where the two are in close contact. Overall, the results indicate that readily-metabolisable carbon sources and unfavourable pH in the rhizosphere/egg-mass environment may compromise nematode parasitism by P. chlamydosporia. However, contrary to previous indications using other nematophagous and entomopathogenic fungi, ammonium nitrate (e.g. from fertilizers) may enhance biocontrol potential in some circumstances.

  15. The Pochonia chlamydosporia serine protease gene vcp1 is subject to regulation by carbon, nitrogen and pH: implications for nematode biocontrol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ward

    Full Text Available The alkaline serine protease VCP1 of the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia belongs to a family of subtilisin-like enzymes that are involved in infection of nematode and insect hosts. It is involved early in the infection process, removing the outer proteinaceous vitelline membrane of nematode eggs. Little is known about the regulation of this gene, even though an understanding of how nutrients and other factors affect its expression is critical for ensuring its efficacy as a biocontrol agent. This paper provides new information on the regulation of vcp1 expression. Sequence analysis of the upstream regulatory region of this gene in 30 isolates revealed that it was highly conserved and contained sequence motifs characteristic of genes that are subject to carbon, nitrogen and pH-regulation. Expression studies, monitoring enzyme activity and mRNA, confirmed that these factors affect VCP1 production. As expected, glucose reduced VCP1 expression and for a few hours so did ammonium chloride. Surprisingly, however, by 24 h VCP1 levels were increased in the presence of ammonium chloride for most isolates. Ambient pH also regulated VCP1 expression, with most isolates producing more VCP1 under alkaline conditions. There were some differences in the response of one isolate with a distinctive upstream sequence including a variant regulatory-motif profile. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the presence of nematode eggs stimulates VCP1 production by P. chlamydosporia, but only where the two are in close contact. Overall, the results indicate that readily-metabolisable carbon sources and unfavourable pH in the rhizosphere/egg-mass environment may compromise nematode parasitism by P. chlamydosporia. However, contrary to previous indications using other nematophagous and entomopathogenic fungi, ammonium nitrate (e.g. from fertilizers may enhance biocontrol potential in some circumstances.

  16. Pou1f1, the key transcription factor related to somatic growth in tilapia (Orechromis niloticus), is regulated by two independent post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongfang; Qin, Jingkai; Jia, Jirong; Yan, Peipei; Li, Wensheng

    2017-01-29

    This study aims to determine the post-transcriptional regulation mechanism of the transcription factor pou1f1 (pou class 1 homeobox 1), which is the key gene for pituitary development, somatic growth in vertebrates, and transcription of several hormone genes in teleost fish. MicroRNA miR-223-3p was identified as a bona fide target of pou1f; overexpression of miR-223-3p in primary pituitary cells led to the down-regulation of pou1f1 and downstream genes, and inhibition of miR-223-3p led to the up-regulation of pou1f1 in Nile tilapia dispersed primary pituitary cells. An adenylate-uridylate-rich element (AU-Rich element) was found in the 3'UTR of pou1f1 mRNA, and deletion of the AU-Rich element led to slower mRNA decay and therefore more protein output. A potential mutual relationship between miR-223-3p and the AU-rich element was also investigated, and the results demonstrated that with or without the AU-Rich element, miR-223-3p induced the up-regulation of a reporter system under serum starvation conditions, indicating that miR-223-3p and the AU-Rich element function independent of each other. This study is the first to investigate the post-transcriptional mechanism of pou1f1, which revealed that miR-223-3p down-regulated pou1f1 and downstream gene expressions, and the AU-Rich element led to rapid decay of pou1f1 mRNA. MicroRNA miR-223-3p and the AU-Rich element co-regulated the post-transcriptional expression of pou1f1 independently in Nile tilapia, demonstrating that pou1f1 is under the control of a dual post-transcription regulation mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a "seesaw model" in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors.

  18. Intrinsic limits to gene regulation by global crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Tamar; Prizak, Roshan; Guet, Călin C.; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation relies on the specificity of transcription factor (TF)–DNA interactions. Limited specificity may lead to crosstalk: a regulatory state in which a gene is either incorrectly activated due to noncognate TF–DNA interactions or remains erroneously inactive. As each TF can have numerous interactions with noncognate cis-regulatory elements, crosstalk is inherently a global problem, yet has previously not been studied as such. We construct a theoretical framework to analyse the effects of global crosstalk on gene regulation. We find that crosstalk presents a significant challenge for organisms with low-specificity TFs, such as metazoans. Crosstalk is not easily mitigated by known regulatory schemes acting at equilibrium, including variants of cooperativity and combinatorial regulation. Our results suggest that crosstalk imposes a previously unexplored global constraint on the functioning and evolution of regulatory networks, which is qualitatively distinct from the known constraints that act at the level of individual gene regulatory elements. PMID:27489144

  19. Sp1-mediated transcription regulation of TAF-Ialpha gene encoding a histone chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Masamitsu N; Murano, Kensaku; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2008-11-28

    TAF-I, one of histone chaperones, consists of two subtypes, TAF-Ialpha and TAF-Ibeta. The histone chaperone activity of TAF-I is regulated by dimer patterns of these subtypes. TAF-Ibeta is expressed ubiquitously, while the expression level of TAF-Ialpha with less activity than TAF-Ibeta differs among cell types. It is, therefore, assumed that the expression level of TAF-Ialpha in a cell is important for the TAF-I activity level. Here, we found that TAF-Ialpha and TAF-Ibeta genes are under the control of distinct promoters. Reporter assays and gel shift assays demonstrated that Sp1 binds to three regions in the TAF-Ialpha promoter and two or all mutaions of the three Sp1 binding regions reduced the TAF-Ialpha promoter activity. ChIP assays demonstrated that Sp1 binds to the TAF-Ialpha promoter in vivo. Furthermore, the expression level of TAF-Ialpha mRNA was reduced by knockdown of Sp1 using siRNA method. These studies indicated that the TAF-Ialpha promoter is under the control of Sp1.

  20. Cross-species microarray hybridization to identify developmentally regulated genes in the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrousian, Minou; Ringelberg, Carol; Dunlap, Jay C; Loros, Jennifer J; Kück, Ulrich

    2005-04-01

    The filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora forms complex three-dimensional fruiting bodies that protect the developing ascospores and ensure their proper discharge. Several regulatory genes essential for fruiting body development were previously isolated by complementation of the sterile mutants pro1, pro11 and pro22. To establish the genetic relationships between these genes and to identify downstream targets, we have conducted cross-species microarray hybridizations using cDNA arrays derived from the closely related fungus Neurospora crassa and RNA probes prepared from wild-type S. macrospora and the three developmental mutants. Of the 1,420 genes which gave a signal with the probes from all the strains used, 172 (12%) were regulated differently in at least one of the three mutants compared to the wild type, and 17 (1.2%) were regulated differently in all three mutant strains. Microarray data were verified by Northern analysis or quantitative real time PCR. Among the genes that are up- or down-regulated in the mutant strains are genes encoding the pheromone precursors, enzymes involved in melanin biosynthesis and a lectin-like protein. Analysis of gene expression in double mutants revealed a complex network of interaction between the pro gene products.

  1. Mel-18, a mammalian Polycomb gene, regulates angiogenic gene expression of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Choi, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Minhyung; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong-Won; Kim, Young-Myeong; Hwang, Daehee; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2010-10-01

    Mel-18 is a mammalian homolog of Polycomb group (PcG) genes. Microarray analysis revealed that Mel-18 expression was induced during endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) differentiation and correlates with the expression of EC-specific protein markers. Overexpression of Mel-18 promoted EPC differentiation and angiogenic activity of ECs. Accordingly, silencing Mel-18 inhibited EC migration and tube formation in vitro. Gene expression profiling showed that Mel-18 regulates angiogenic genes including kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), claudin 5, and angiopoietin-like 2. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that Mel-18 plays a significant role in the angiogenic function of ECs by regulating endothelial gene expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    , designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences

  3. Identification of pathogenic genes and upstream regulators in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Mengya; Xu, Jing; Li, Min; Yu, Yuhui

    2017-06-26

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in older individuals. Our study aims to identify the key genes and upstream regulators in AMD. To screen pathogenic genes of AMD, an integrated analysis was performed by using the microarray datasets in AMD derived from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The functional annotation and potential pathways of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were further discovered by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis. We constructed the AMD-specific transcriptional regulatory network to find the crucial transcriptional factors (TFs) which target the DEGs in AMD. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to verify the DEGs and TFs obtained by integrated analysis. From two GEO datasets obtained, we identified 1280 DEGs (730 up-regulated and 550 down-regulated genes) between AMD and normal control (NC). After KEGG analysis, steroid biosynthesis is a significantly enriched pathway for DEGs. The expression of 8 genes (TNC, GRP, TRAF6, ADAMTS5, GPX3, FAP, DHCR7 and FDFT1) was detected. Except for TNC and GPX3, the other 6 genes in qRT-PCR played the same pattern with that in our integrated analysis. The dysregulation of these eight genes may involve with the process of AMD. Two crucial transcription factors (c-rel and myogenin) were concluded to play a role in AMD. Especially, myogenin was associated with AMD by regulating TNC, GRP and FAP. Our finding can contribute to developing new potential biomarkers, revealing the underlying pathogenesis, and further raising new therapeutic targets for AMD.

  4. Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1a positively regulates euchromatic gene expression through RNA transcript association and interaction with hnRNPs in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Piacentini

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1a is a well-known conserved protein involved in heterochromatin formation and gene silencing in different species including humans. A general model has been proposed for heterochromatin formation and epigenetic gene silencing in different species that implies an essential role for HP1a. According to the model, histone methyltransferase enzymes (HMTases methylate the histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me, creating selective binding sites for itself and the chromodomain of HP1a. This complex is thought to form a higher order chromatin state that represses gene activity. It has also been found that HP1a plays a role in telomere capping. Surprisingly, recent studies have shown that HP1a is present at many euchromatic sites along polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster, including the developmental and heat-shock-induced puffs, and that this protein can be removed from these sites by in vivo RNase treatment, thus suggesting an association of HP1a with the transcripts of many active genes. To test this suggestion, we performed an extensive screening by RIP-chip assay (RNA-immunoprecipitation on microarrays, and we found that HP1a is associated with transcripts of more than one hundred euchromatic genes. An expression analysis in HP1a mutants shows that HP1a is required for positive regulation of these genes. Cytogenetic and molecular assays show that HP1a also interacts with the well known proteins DDP1, HRB87F, and PEP, which belong to different classes of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs involved in RNA processing. Surprisingly, we found that all these hnRNP proteins also bind heterochromatin and are dominant suppressors of position effect variegation. Together, our data show novel and unexpected functions for HP1a and hnRNPs proteins. All these proteins are in fact involved both in RNA transcript processing and in heterochromatin formation. This suggests that, in general, similar epigenetic mechanisms

  5. Regulation of Corticosteroidogenic Genes by MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy Robertson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of normal regulation of corticosteroid secretion is important in the development of cardiovascular disease. We previously showed that microRNAs regulate the terminal stages of corticosteroid biosynthesis. Here, we assess microRNA regulation across the whole corticosteroid pathway. Knockdown of microRNA using Dicer1 siRNA in H295R adrenocortical cells increased levels of CYP11A1, CYP21A1, and CYP17A1 mRNA and the secretion of cortisol, corticosterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone, 18-hydroxycorticosterone, and aldosterone. Bioinformatic analysis of genes involved in corticosteroid biosynthesis or metabolism identified many putative microRNA-binding sites, and some were selected for further study. Manipulation of individual microRNA levels demonstrated a direct effect of miR-125a-5p and miR-125b-5p on CYP11B2 and of miR-320a-3p levels on CYP11A1 and CYP17A1 mRNA. Finally, comparison of microRNA expression profiles from human aldosterone-producing adenoma and normal adrenal tissue showed levels of various microRNAs, including miR-125a-5p to be significantly different. This study demonstrates that corticosteroidogenesis is regulated at multiple points by several microRNAs and that certain of these microRNAs are differentially expressed in tumorous adrenal tissue, which may contribute to dysregulation of corticosteroid secretion. These findings provide new insights into the regulation of corticosteroid production and have implications for understanding the pathology of disease states where abnormal hormone secretion is a feature.

  6. cDREM: inferring dynamic combinatorial gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Aaron; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2015-04-01

    Genes are often combinatorially regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Such combinatorial regulation plays an important role in development and facilitates the ability of cells to respond to different stresses. While a number of approaches have utilized sequence and ChIP-based datasets to study combinational regulation, these have often ignored the combinational logic and the dynamics associated with such regulation. Here we present cDREM, a new method for reconstructing dynamic models of combinatorial regulation. cDREM integrates time series gene expression data with (static) protein interaction data. The method is based on a hidden Markov model and utilizes the sparse group Lasso to identify small subsets of combinatorially active TFs, their time of activation, and the logical function they implement. We tested cDREM on yeast and human data sets. Using yeast we show that the predicted combinatorial sets agree with other high throughput genomic datasets and improve upon prior methods developed to infer combinatorial regulation. Applying cDREM to study human response to flu, we were able to identify several combinatorial TF sets, some of which were known to regulate immune response while others represent novel combinations of important TFs.

  7. Frequency Modulation of Transcriptional Bursting Enables Sensitive and Rapid Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Congxin; Cesbron, François; Oehler, Michael; Brunner, Michael; Höfer, Thomas

    2018-04-25

    Gene regulation is a complex non-equilibrium process. Here, we show that quantitating the temporal regulation of key gene states (transcriptionally inactive, active, and refractory) provides a parsimonious framework for analyzing gene regulation. Our theory makes two non-intuitive predictions. First, for transcription factors (TFs) that regulate transcription burst frequency, as opposed to amplitude or duration, weak TF binding is sufficient to elicit strong transcriptional responses. Second, refractoriness of a gene after a transcription burst enables rapid responses to stimuli. We validate both predictions experimentally by exploiting the natural, optogenetic-like responsiveness of the Neurospora GATA-type TF White Collar Complex (WCC) to blue light. Further, we demonstrate that differential regulation of WCC target genes is caused by different gene activation rates, not different TF occupancy, and that these rates are tuned by both the core promoter and the distance between TF-binding site and core promoter. In total, our work demonstrates the relevance of a kinetic, non-equilibrium framework for understanding transcriptional regulation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Co-expression of the transcription factors CEH-14 and TTX-1 regulates AFD neuron-specific genes gcy-8 and gcy-18 in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoshima, Hiroshi; Kohara, Yuji

    2015-03-15

    A wide variety of cells are generated by the expression of characteristic sets of genes, primarily those regulated by cell-specific transcription. To elucidate the mechanism regulating cell-specific gene expression in a highly specialized cell, AFD thermosensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans, we analyzed the promoter sequences of guanylyl cyclase genes, gcy-8 and gcy-18, exclusively expressed in AFD. In this study, we showed that AFD-specific expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 requires the co-expression of homeodomain proteins, CEH-14/LHX3 and TTX-1/OTX1. We observed that mutation of ttx-1 or ceh-14 caused a reduction in the expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 and that the expression was completely lost in double mutants. This synergy effect was also observed with other AFD marker genes, such as ntc-1, nlp-21and cng-3. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed direct interaction of CEH-14 and TTX-1 proteins with gcy-8 and gcy-18 promoters in vitro. The binding sites of CEH-14 and TTX-1 proteins were confirmed to be essential for AFD-specific expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 in vivo. We also demonstrated that forced expression of CEH-14 and TTX-1 in AWB chemosensory neurons induced ectopic expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 reporters in this neuron. Finally, we showed that the regulation of gcy-8 and gcy-18 expression by ceh-14 and ttx-1 is evolutionally conserved in five Caenorhabditis species. Taken together, ceh-14 and ttx-1 expression determines the fate of AFD as terminal selector genes at the final step of cell specification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using riboswitches to regulate gene expression and define gene function in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vlack, Erik R; Seeliger, Jessica C

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria include both environmental species and many pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen that is the causative agent of tuberculosis in humans. Inducible gene expression is a powerful tool for examining gene function and essentiality, both in in vitro culture and in host cell infections. The theophylline-inducible artificial riboswitch has recently emerged as an alternative to protein repressor-based systems. The riboswitch is translationally regulated and is combined with a mycobacterial promoter that provides transcriptional control. We here provide methods used by our laboratory to characterize the riboswitch response to theophylline in reporter strains, recombinant organisms containing riboswitch-regulated endogenous genes, and in host cell infections. These protocols should facilitate the application of both existing and novel artificial riboswitches to the exploration of gene function in mycobacteria. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. C/EBPβ Mediates Growth Hormone-Regulated Expression of Multiple Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tracy X.; Lin, Grace; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Rathore, Maanjot; Streeter, Cale; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Lanning, Nathan; Jin, Hui; Carter-Su, Christin; Qin, Zhaohui S.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of c-Fos transcription by GH is mediated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ). This study examines the role of C/EBPβ in mediating GH activation of other early response genes, including Cyr61, Btg2, Socs3, Zfp36, and Socs1. C/EBPβ depletion using short hairpin RNA impaired responsiveness of these genes to GH, as seen for c-Fos. Rescue with wild-type C/EBPβ led to GH-dependent recruitment of the coactivator p300 to the c-Fos promoter. In contrast, rescue with C/EBPβ mutated at the ERK phosphorylation site at T188 failed to induce GH-dependent recruitment of p300, indicating that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at T188 is required for GH-induced recruitment of p300 to c-Fos. GH also induced the occupancy of phosphorylated C/EBPβ and p300 on Cyr61, Btg2, and Socs3 at predicted C/EBP-cAMP response element-binding protein motifs in their promoters. Consistent with a role for ERKs in GH-induced expression of these genes, treatment with U0126 to block ERK phosphorylation inhibited their GH-induced expression. In contrast, GH-dependent expression of Zfp36 and Socs1 was not inhibited by U0126. Thus, induction of multiple early response genes by GH in 3T3-F442A cells is mediated by C/EBPβ. A subset of these genes is regulated similarly to c-Fos, through a mechanism involving GH-stimulated ERK 1/2 activation, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ, and recruitment of p300. Overall, these studies suggest that C/EBPβ, like the signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, regulates multiple genes in response to GH. PMID:21292824

  11. Characterization of the Second LysR-Type Regulator in the Biphenyl-Catabolic Gene Cluster of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takahito; Fujihara, Hidehiko; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 possesses a biphenyl-catabolic (bph) gene cluster consisting of bphR1A1A2-(orf3)-bphA3A4BCX0X1X2X3D. The bphR1 (formerly orf0) gene product, which belongs to the GntR family, is a positive regulator for itself and bphX0X1X2X3D. Further analysis in this study revealed that a second regulator belonging to the LysR family (designated bphR2) is involved in the regulation of the bph genes in KF707. The bphR2 gene was not located near the bph gene cluster, and it...

  12. CHD1 regulates cell fate determination by activation of differentiation-induced genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgart, Simon J; Najafova, Zeynab; Hossan, Tareq

    2017-01-01

    The coordinated temporal and spatial activation of gene expression is essential for proper stem cell differentiation. The Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (CHD1) is a chromatin remodeler closely associated with transcription and nucleosome turnover downstream of the transcriptional start...... site (TSS). In this study, we show that CHD1 is required for the induction of osteoblast-specific gene expression, extracellular-matrix mineralization and ectopic bone formation in vivo. Genome-wide occupancy analyses revealed increased CHD1 occupancy around the TSS of differentiation-activated genes....... Furthermore, we observed that CHD1-dependent genes are mainly induced during osteoblast differentiation and are characterized by higher levels of CHD1 occupancy around the TSS. Interestingly, CHD1 depletion resulted in increased pausing of RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) and decreased H2A.Z occupancy close...

  13. Regulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) gene expression by cocaine self-administration and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ronald; Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T; Healey, Kati L; Williams, Emily A; Reissner, Kathryn J

    2018-01-01

    Downregulation of the astroglial glutamate transporter GLT-1 is observed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following administration of multiple drugs of abuse. The decrease in GLT-1 protein expression following cocaine self-administration is dependent on both the amount of cocaine self-administered and the length of withdrawal, with longer access to cocaine and longer withdrawal periods leading to greater decreases in GLT-1 protein. However, the mechanism(s) by which cocaine downregulates GLT-1 protein remains unknown. We used qRT-PCR to examine gene expression of GLT-1 splice isoforms (GLT-1A, GLT-1B) in the NAc, prelimbic cortex (PL) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) of rats, following two widely used models of cocaine self-administration: short-access (ShA) self-administration, and the long-access (LgA) self-administration/incubation model. While downregulation of GLT-1 protein is observed following ShA cocaine self-administration and extinction, this model did not lead to a change in GLT-1A or GLT-1B gene expression in any brain region examined. Forced abstinence following ShA cocaine self-administration also was without effect. In contrast, LgA cocaine self-administration and prolonged abstinence significantly decreased GLT-1A gene expression in the NAc and BLA, and significantly decreased GLT-1B gene expression in the PL. No change was observed in NAc GLT-1A gene expression one day after LgA cocaine self-administration, indicating withdrawal-induced decreases in GLT-1A mRNA. In addition, LgA cocaine self-administration and withdrawal induced hypermethylation of the GLT-1 gene in the NAc. These results indicate that a decrease in NAc GLT-1 mRNA is only observed after extended access to cocaine combined with protracted abstinence, and that epigenetic mechanisms likely contribute to this effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of Hypoxic Up-Regulation of Versican Gene Expression in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattah Sotoodehnejadnematalahi

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a hallmark of many pathological tissues. Macrophages accumulate in hypoxic sites and up-regulate a range of hypoxia-inducible genes. The matrix proteoglycan versican has been identified as one such gene, but the mechanisms responsible for hypoxic induction are not fully characterised. Here we investigate the up-regulation of versican by hypoxia in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM, and, intriguingly, show that versican mRNA is up-regulated much more highly (>600 fold by long term hypoxia (5 days than by 1 day of hypoxia (48 fold. We report that versican mRNA decay rates are not affected by hypoxia, demonstrating that hypoxic induction of versican mRNA is mediated by increased transcription. Deletion analysis of the promoter identified two regions required for high level promoter activity of luciferase reporter constructs in human macrophages. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1 has previously been implicated as a key potential regulator of versican expression in hypoxia, however our data suggest that HIF-1 up-regulation is unlikely to be principally responsible for the high levels of induction observed in HMDM. Treatment of HMDM with two distinct specific inhibitors of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, LY290042 and wortmannin, significantly reduced induction of versican mRNA by hypoxia and provides evidence of a role for PI3K in hypoxic up-regulation of versican expression.

  15. Regulation of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase by LXRα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoriko Sakane

    Full Text Available The iodothyronine deiodinases are selenoenzymes that regulate the activity of thyroid hormone via specific inner- or outer-ring deiodination. In humans, type 1 deiodinase (D1 is highly expressed in the liver, but the mechanism by which its gene expression is regulated remains to be elucidated. Liver X receptor α (LXRα, a transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is highly expressed in the liver, where it functions as a sensor for excess intracellular oxysterols. LXRα interacts with other nuclear receptors on promoters of genes that contain a binding core sequence for nuclear receptors. In addition, it is reported that the promoter of the gene encoding human D1 (hDIO1 contains the core sequence for one of nuclear receptors, thyroid hormone receptor (TR. We investigated the involvement of LXRα in the regulation of hDIO1, in the liver. We performed hDIO1 promoter-reporter assays using a synthetic LXR agonist, T0901317, and compared promoter activity between a human liver carcinoma cell line, HepG2, and a clone of human embryonic kidney cells, TSA201. We defined the region between nucleotides -131 and -114, especially nucleotides -126 and -125, of the hDIO1 promoter as critical for basal and LXRα-mediated specific transcriptional activation in HepG2 cells. An increase in hDIO1 expression was observed in LXRα-stimulated cells, but absent in cycloheximide-treated cells, indicating that new protein synthesis is required for LXRα-mediated regulation of hDIO1. On the other hand, electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that LXRα and RXRα bound to the hDIO1 promoter. We also demonstrated that LXRα and TRβ compete with each other on this specific region of the promoter. In conclusion, our results indicated that LXRα plays a specific and important role in activation of TH by regulating D1, and that LXRα binds to and regulates the hDIO1 promoter, competing with TRβ on specific sequences within the promoter.

  16. The SFP1 gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates G2/M transitions during the mitotic cell cycle and DNA-damage response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Norris, D.

    1998-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, checkpoint pathways arrest cell-cycle progression if a particular event has failed to complete appropriately or if an important intracellular structure is defective or damaged. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that lack the SFP1 gene fail to arrest at the G2 DNA-damage checkpoint in response to genomic injury, but maintain their ability to arrest at the replication and spindle-assembly checkpoints. sfp1D mutants are characterized by a premature entrance into mitosis during a normal (undamaged) cell cycle, while strains that overexpress Sfp1p exhibit delays in G2. Sfp1p therefore acts as a repressor of the G2/M transition, both in the normal cell cycle and in the G2 checkpoint pathway. Sfp1 is a nuclear protein with two Cys2His2 zinc-finger domains commonly found in transcription factors. We propose that Sfp1p regulates the expression of gene products involved in the G2/M transition during the mitotic cell cycle and the DNA-damage response. In support of this model, overexpression of Sfp1p induces the expression of the PDS1 gene, which is known to encode a protein that regulates the G2 checkpoint. (author)

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α regulates chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells through directly transactivating the CX3CR1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiansuo Zhao

    Full Text Available CX3CR1 is an important chemokine receptor and regulates the chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Up to now, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Here, we report that hypoxia upregulates the expression of CX3CR1 in pancreatic cancer cells. When hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α expression was knocked down in vitro and in vivo, the expression of CX3CR1 was significantly decreased. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that HIF-1α bound to the hypoxia-response element (HRE; 5'-A/GCGTG-3' of CX3CR1 promoter under normoxia, and this binding was significantly enhanced under hypoxia. Overexpression of HIF-1α significantly upregulated the expression of luciferase reporter gene under the control of the CX3CR1 promoter in pancreatic cancer cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that HIF-1α may regulate cancer cell migration through CX3CR1. The HIF-1α/CX3CR1 pathway might represent a valuable therapeutic target to prevent invasion and distant metastasis in PDAC.

  18. Activity-regulated genes as mediators of neural circuit plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Jennifer H; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-08-01

    Modifications of neuronal circuits allow the brain to adapt and change with experience. This plasticity manifests during development and throughout life, and can be remarkably long lasting. Evidence has linked activity-regulated gene expression to the long-term structural and electrophysiological adaptations that take place during developmental critical periods, learning and memory, and alterations to sensory map representations in the adult. In all these cases, the cellular response to neuronal activity integrates multiple tightly coordinated mechanisms to precisely orchestrate long-lasting, functional and structural changes in brain circuits. Experience-dependent plasticity is triggered when neuronal excitation activates cellular signaling pathways from the synapse to the nucleus that initiate new programs of gene expression. The protein products of activity-regulated genes then work via a diverse array of cellular mechanisms to modify neuronal functional properties. Synaptic strengthening or weakening can reweight existing circuit connections, while structural changes including synapse addition and elimination create new connections. Posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, often also dependent on activity, further modulate activity-regulated gene transcript and protein function. Thus, activity-regulated genes implement varied forms of structural and functional plasticity to fine-tune brain circuit wiring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Posttranscriptional Regulation of the Neurofibromatosis 2 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    signaling and division were downregulated, including an apoptosis - related, putative tumor suppressor gene, LUCA-15, which was downregulated in seven of... embryologically from the outgrowth of the developing brain (Martinez-Morales et al., 2004). It is comprised of two major layers, the inner layer (prospective...eight genes involved with cell signaling and division were down- regulated. These include an apoptosis -related, putative tumor suppressor gene LUCA-15

  20. DYRK1A (Dual-Specificity Tyrosine-Phosphorylated and -Regulated Kinase 1A: A Gene with Dosage Effect During Development and Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dierssen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available DYRKs (dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases are an emerging family of evolutionarily conserved dual-specificity kinases that play key roles in cell proliferation, survival, and development. The research in the last years suggests a relevant conserved function during neuronal development, related to proliferation and/or differentiation for DYRK1A. It is expressed in neural progenitor cells and has been proposed to participate in the signaling mechanisms that regulate dendrite differentiation. In Drosophila, disruption of the homolog minibrain gene results in flies with reduced neuroblast proliferation, decreased numbers of central brain neurons, and learning/memory deficits. Knockout DYRK1A mice are embryonic lethal, and heterozygotes show decreased viability and region-specific reductions in brain size. In humans, DYRK1A has been proposed to be involved in the neurodevelopmental alterations associated with Down syndrome. The large number of protein interaction and putative substrates described for DYRK1A suggest multiple pathways and functions to be involved in its developmental function. This review focuses on the functional role that DYRK1A plays in brain development.

  1. Involvement of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 Protein in the Regulation of Botrytis Virulence- and Tomato Defense-Related Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Eriston V.; Ulhoa, Cirano J.; Cardoza, Rosa E.; Silva, Roberto N.; Guti?rrez, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Several Trichoderma spp. are well known for their ability to: (i) act as important biocontrol agents against phytopathogenic fungi; (ii) function as biofertilizers; (iii) increase the tolerance of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses; and (iv) induce plant defense responses via the production and secretion of elicitor molecules. In this study, we analyzed the gene-regulation effects of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 protein during the interactions of mutant Δepl-1 or wild-type T. harzianum stra...

  2. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  3. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. Arbeitman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation.

  4. Transcription factor VdCmr1 is required for pigment production, protection from UV irradiation, and regulates expression of melanin biosynthetic genes in Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonglin; Hu, Xiaoping; Fang, Yulin; Anchieta, Amy; Goldman, Polly H; Hernandez, Gustavo; Klosterman, Steven J

    2018-04-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne fungus that causes vascular wilt diseases on numerous plant species worldwide. The production of darkly melanized microsclerotia is crucial in the disease cycle of V. dahliae, as these