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Sample records for regulated delayed expression

  1. Regulated expression of a cytokinin biosynthesis gene IPT delays leaf senescence and improves yield under rainfed and irrigated conditions in canola (Brassica napus L..

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    Surya Kant

    Full Text Available Delay of leaf senescence through genetic modification can potentially improve crop yield, through maintenance of photosynthetically active leaves for a longer period. Plant growth hormones such as cytokinin regulate and delay leaf senescence. Here, the structural gene (IPT encoding the cytokinin biosynthetic enzyme isopentenyltransferase was fused to a functionally active fragment of the AtMYB32 promoter and was transformed into canola plants. Expression of the AtMYB32xs::IPT gene cassette delayed the leaf senescence in transgenic plants grown under controlled environment conditions and field experiments conducted for a single season at two geographic locations. The transgenic canola plants retained higher chlorophyll levels for an extended period and produced significantly higher seed yield with similar growth and phenology compared to wild type and null control plants under rainfed and irrigated treatments. The yield increase in transgenic plants was in the range of 16% to 23% and 7% to 16% under rainfed and irrigated conditions, respectively, compared to control plants. Most of the seed quality parameters in transgenic plants were similar, and with elevated oleic acid content in all transgenic lines and higher oil content and lower glucosinolate content in one specific transgenic line as compared to control plants. The results suggest that by delaying leaf senescence using the AtMYB32xs::IPT technology, productivity in crop plants can be improved under water stress and well-watered conditions.

  2. Regulated expression of a cytokinin biosynthesis gene IPT delays leaf senescence and improves yield under rainfed and irrigated conditions in canola (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Surya; Burch, David; Badenhorst, Pieter; Palanisamy, Rajasekaran; Mason, John; Spangenberg, German

    2015-01-01

    Delay of leaf senescence through genetic modification can potentially improve crop yield, through maintenance of photosynthetically active leaves for a longer period. Plant growth hormones such as cytokinin regulate and delay leaf senescence. Here, the structural gene (IPT) encoding the cytokinin biosynthetic enzyme isopentenyltransferase was fused to a functionally active fragment of the AtMYB32 promoter and was transformed into canola plants. Expression of the AtMYB32xs::IPT gene cassette delayed the leaf senescence in transgenic plants grown under controlled environment conditions and field experiments conducted for a single season at two geographic locations. The transgenic canola plants retained higher chlorophyll levels for an extended period and produced significantly higher seed yield with similar growth and phenology compared to wild type and null control plants under rainfed and irrigated treatments. The yield increase in transgenic plants was in the range of 16% to 23% and 7% to 16% under rainfed and irrigated conditions, respectively, compared to control plants. Most of the seed quality parameters in transgenic plants were similar, and with elevated oleic acid content in all transgenic lines and higher oil content and lower glucosinolate content in one specific transgenic line as compared to control plants. The results suggest that by delaying leaf senescence using the AtMYB32xs::IPT technology, productivity in crop plants can be improved under water stress and well-watered conditions.

  3. Hot air treatment reduces postharvest decay and delays softening of cherry tomato by regulating gene expression and activities of cell wall-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingying; Zhou, Dandan; Wang, Zhenjie; Tu, Sicong; Shao, Xingfeng; Peng, Jing; Pan, Leiqing; Tu, Kang

    2017-09-25

    Fruit softening facilitates pathogen infection and postharvest decay, leading to the reduction of shelf-life. Hot air (HA) treatment at 38 °C for 12 h is effective in reducing postharvest disease and chilling injury of tomato fruit. To explore the effect and mechanism of HA treatment on reducing postharvest decay and softening of cherry tomato, fruit at the mature green stage were treated with HA and then stored at 20 °C for 15 days. Changes in natural decay incidence, firmness, cell wall compositions, activities and gene expression of cell wall-degrading enzymes of cherry tomatoes were assessed. HA treatment reduced natural decay incidence, postponed the firmness decline, inhibited the respiration rate and ethylene production, and retarded pectin solubilization and cellulose degradation of cherry tomatoes. Enzymatic activities and gene expression of pectin methylesterase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and β-galactosidase were inhibited by HA treatment. In addition, the gene expression of LeEXP1 was reduced, while LeEXT was up-regulated after HA treatment. Our findings suggested that HA treatment could inhibit cell wall degradation and postpone softening of cherry tomatoes by regulating gene expression and activities of cell wall-degrading enzymes, resulting in the reduction of postharvest decay. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Regret Expression and Social Learning Increases Delay to Sexual Gratification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Quisenberry

    Full Text Available Modification and prevention of risky sexual behavior is important to individuals' health and public health policy. This study employed a novel sexual discounting task to elucidate the effects of social learning and regret expression on delay to sexual gratification in a behavioral task.Amazon Mechanical Turk Workers were assigned to hear one of three scenarios about a friend who engages in similar sexual behavior. The scenarios included a positive health consequence, a negative health consequence or a negative health consequence with the expression of regret. After reading one scenario, participants were asked to select from 60 images, those with whom they would have casual sex. Of the selected images, participants chose one image each for the person they most and least want to have sex with and person most and least likely to have a sexually transmitted infection. They then answered questions about engaging in unprotected sex now or waiting some delay for condom-protected sex in each partner condition.Results indicate that the negative health outcome scenario with regret expression resulted in delayed sexual gratification in the most attractive and least STI partner conditions, whereas in the least attractive and most STI partner conditions the negative health outcome with and without regret resulted in delayed sexual gratification.Results suggest that the sexual discounting task is a relevant laboratory measure and the framing of information to include regret expression may be relevant for prevention of risky sexual behavior.

  5. Regret Expression and Social Learning Increases Delay to Sexual Gratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisenberry, Amanda J; Eddy, Celia R; Patterson, David L; Franck, Christopher T; Bickel, Warren K

    2015-01-01

    Modification and prevention of risky sexual behavior is important to individuals' health and public health policy. This study employed a novel sexual discounting task to elucidate the effects of social learning and regret expression on delay to sexual gratification in a behavioral task. Amazon Mechanical Turk Workers were assigned to hear one of three scenarios about a friend who engages in similar sexual behavior. The scenarios included a positive health consequence, a negative health consequence or a negative health consequence with the expression of regret. After reading one scenario, participants were asked to select from 60 images, those with whom they would have casual sex. Of the selected images, participants chose one image each for the person they most and least want to have sex with and person most and least likely to have a sexually transmitted infection. They then answered questions about engaging in unprotected sex now or waiting some delay for condom-protected sex in each partner condition. Results indicate that the negative health outcome scenario with regret expression resulted in delayed sexual gratification in the most attractive and least STI partner conditions, whereas in the least attractive and most STI partner conditions the negative health outcome with and without regret resulted in delayed sexual gratification. Results suggest that the sexual discounting task is a relevant laboratory measure and the framing of information to include regret expression may be relevant for prevention of risky sexual behavior.

  6. Kisspeptin regulates ovarian steroidogenesis during delayed embryonic development in the fruit bat, Cynopterus sphinx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha; Krishna, Amitabh

    2017-11-01

    Cynopterus sphinx, a fruit bat, undergoes delayed embryonic development during the winter months, a period that corresponds to low levels of progesterone and estradiol synthesis by the ovary. Kisspeptins (KPs) are a group of neuropeptide hormones that act via G-protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) to stimulate hypothalamic secretion of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, thereby regulating ovarian steroidogenesis, folliculogenesis, and ovulation. GPR54 is also expressed in the ovary, suggesting a direct role for KPs in ovarian steroidogenesis. The aim of present study was to determine if a low serum level of KP is responsible for reduced progesterone and estradiol levels during the period of delayed embryonic development in C. sphinx. Indeed, low serum KP abundance corresponded to reduced expression of GPR54 in ovarian luteal cells during the period of delayed development compared to normal development. In vitro and in vivo treatment with KP increased GPR54 abundance, via Extracellular signal regulated kinase and its downstream mediators, leading to increased progesterone synthesis in the ovary during delayed embryonic development. KP treatment also increased cholesterol uptake and elevated expression of Luteinizing hormone receptor and Steroid acute regulatory protein in the ovary, suggesting that elevation in circulating KP during delayed embryonic development may reactivate luteal activity. KPs may also enhance cell survival (BCL-2, reduced Caspase 3 activity) and angiogenesis (Vascular endothelium growth factor) during this period. The findings of this study thus demonstrate a regulatory role for KPs in the maintenance of luteal steroidogenesis during pregnancy in C. sphinx. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Price regulation and relative delays in generic drug adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Font, Joan; McGuire, Alistair; Varol, Nebibe

    2014-12-01

    Increasing the adoption of generic drugs has the potential to improve static efficiency in a health system without harming pharmaceutical innovation. However, very little is known about the timing of generic adoption and diffusion. No prior study has empirically examined the differential launch times of generics across a comprehensive set of markets, or more specifically the delays in country specific adoption of generics relative to the first country of (generic) adoption. Drawing on data containing significant country and product variation across a lengthy time period (1999-2008), we use duration analysis to examine relative delays, across countries, in the adoption of generic drugs. Our results suggest that price regulation has a significant effect on reducing the time to launch of generics, with faster adoption in higher priced markets. The latter result is dependent on the degree of competition and the expected market size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental delays in emotion regulation strategies in preschoolers with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuske, Heather J; Hedley, Darren; Woollacott, Alexandra; Thomson, Phoebe; Macari, Suzanne; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2017-11-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) commonly present with difficulty regulating negative emotions, which has been found to impact their behavioral and mental health. Little research has documented the strategies that children with ASD use to regulate their emotion to understand whether they use qualitatively different strategies to children without ASD, whether these are developmentally delayed, or both. Forty-four children with ASD and 29 typically-developing children (2-4 years) were given tasks designed to mimic everyday life experiences requiring children to manage low-level stress (e.g., waiting for a snack) and children's emotion regulation strategies were coded. Parents reported on their child's mental health, wellbeing, and self-development. The results suggest differences in using emotion regulation strategies in children with ASD, reflecting a delay, rather than a deviance when compared to those used by children without ASD. Only children with ASD relied on their family members for physical and communicative soothing; the typically developing children relied on people outside of their family for help regulating their emotion. More frequent approach/less frequent avoidance was related to a higher self-evaluation in both groups, but was only additionally related to higher self-recognition and autonomy in the ASD group. These findings help to identify important emotion regulation intervention targets for this population, including supporting communication with people outside of the family and independence. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1808-1822. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Results suggest that children with autism had more difficulty using communication strategies to manage stress only with people outside the family; they used these strategies with family members as often as children without autism. For all children, more task approach/less avoidance was related to children's higher self-evaluation. These

  9. Reduced Mid1 expression and delayed neuromotor development in daDREAM transgenic mice

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    Mara eDierssen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Previous work has shown a role for DREAM in cerebellar function regulating the expression of the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3 in cerebellar granular neurons to control Ca2+ homeostasis and survival of these neurons. To achieve a global view of the genes regulated by DREAM in the cerebellum, we performed a genome-wide analysis in transgenic cerebellum expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM. Here we show that DREAM regulates the expression of the midline 1 (Mid1 gene early after birth. As a consequence, daDREAM mice exhibit a significant shortening of the rostro-caudal axis of the cerebellum and a severe delay in neuromotor development early after birth. Our results indicate a role for DREAM in cerebellar function.

  10. Nongenomic regulation of gene expression.

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    Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Monk, David

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent advances in epigenetic regulation and chromatin biology for a better understanding of gene regulation related to human disease. Alterations to chromatin influence genomic function, including gene transcription. At its most simple level, this involves DNA methylation and posttranscriptional histone modifications. However, recent developments in biochemical and molecular techniques have revealed that transcriptional regulation is far more complex, involving combinations of histone modifications and discriminating transcription factor binding, and long-range chromatin loops with enhancers, to generate a multifaceted code. Here, we describe the most recent advances, culminating in the example of genomic imprinting, the parent-of-origin monoallelic expression that utilizes the majority of these mechanisms to attain one active and one repressed allele. It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms work in unison to maintain tight control of gene expression and genome function. With the wealth of knowledge gained from recent molecular studies, future goals should focus on the application of this information in deciphering their role in developmental diseases.

  11. Discovery of time-delayed gene regulatory networks based on temporal gene expression profiling

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    Guo Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is one of the ultimate goals for modern biological research to fully elucidate the intricate interplays and the regulations of the molecular determinants that propel and characterize the progression of versatile life phenomena, to name a few, cell cycling, developmental biology, aging, and the progressive and recurrent pathogenesis of complex diseases. The vast amount of large-scale and genome-wide time-resolved data is becoming increasing available, which provides the golden opportunity to unravel the challenging reverse-engineering problem of time-delayed gene regulatory networks. Results In particular, this methodological paper aims to reconstruct regulatory networks from temporal gene expression data by using delayed correlations between genes, i.e., pairwise overlaps of expression levels shifted in time relative each other. We have thus developed a novel model-free computational toolbox termed TdGRN (Time-delayed Gene Regulatory Network to address the underlying regulations of genes that can span any unit(s of time intervals. This bioinformatics toolbox has provided a unified approach to uncovering time trends of gene regulations through decision analysis of the newly designed time-delayed gene expression matrix. We have applied the proposed method to yeast cell cycling and human HeLa cell cycling and have discovered most of the underlying time-delayed regulations that are supported by multiple lines of experimental evidence and that are remarkably consistent with the current knowledge on phase characteristics for the cell cyclings. Conclusion We established a usable and powerful model-free approach to dissecting high-order dynamic trends of gene-gene interactions. We have carefully validated the proposed algorithm by applying it to two publicly available cell cycling datasets. In addition to uncovering the time trends of gene regulations for cell cycling, this unified approach can also be used to study the complex

  12. YUCCA6 over-expression demonstrates auxin function in delaying leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Jeong Im

    2011-04-21

    The Arabidopsis thaliana YUCCA family of flavin monooxygenase proteins catalyses a rate-limiting step in de novo auxin biosynthesis. A YUCCA6 activation mutant, yuc6-1D, has been shown to contain an elevated free IAA level and to display typical high-auxin phenotypes. It is reported here that Arabidopsis plants over-expressing YUCCA6, such as the yuc6-1D activation mutant and 35S:YUC6 transgenic plants, displayed dramatic longevity. In addition, plants over-expressing YUCCA6 exhibited classical, delayed dark-induced and hormone-induced senescence in assays using detached rosette leaves. However, plants over-expressing an allele of YUCCA6, that carries mutations in the NADPH cofactor binding site, exhibited neither delayed leaf senescence phenotypes nor phenotypes typical of auxin overproduction. When the level of free IAA was reduced in yuc6-1D by conjugation to lysine, yuc6-1D leaves senesced at a rate similar to the wild-type leaves. Dark-induced senescence in detached leaves was accompanied by a decrease in their free IAA content, by the reduced expression of auxin biosynthesis enzymes such as YUCCA1 and YUCCA6 that increase cellular free IAA levels, and by the increased expression of auxin-conjugating enzymes encoded by the GH3 genes that reduce the cellular free auxin levels. Reduced transcript abundances of SAG12, NAC1, and NAC6 during senescence in yuc6-1D compared with the wild type suggested that auxin delays senescence by directly or indirectly regulating the expression of senescence-associated genes. 2011 The Author(s).

  13. Inference of biological pathway from gene expression profiles by time delay boolean networks.

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    Tung-Hung Chueh

    Full Text Available One great challenge of genomic research is to efficiently and accurately identify complex gene regulatory networks. The development of high-throughput technologies provides numerous experimental data such as DNA sequences, protein sequence, and RNA expression profiles makes it possible to study interactions and regulations among genes or other substance in an organism. However, it is crucial to make inference of genetic regulatory networks from gene expression profiles and protein interaction data for systems biology. This study will develop a new approach to reconstruct time delay boolean networks as a tool for exploring biological pathways. In the inference strategy, we will compare all pairs of input genes in those basic relationships by their corresponding p-scores for every output gene. Then, we will combine those consistent relationships to reveal the most probable relationship and reconstruct the genetic network. Specifically, we will prove that O(log n state transition pairs are sufficient and necessary to reconstruct the time delay boolean network of n nodes with high accuracy if the number of input genes to each gene is bounded. We also have implemented this method on simulated and empirical yeast gene expression data sets. The test results show that this proposed method is extensible for realistic networks.

  14. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in rice induced by submergence, salt and drought stresses. Md Imtiaz Uddin, Maki Kihara, Lina Yin, Mst Farida Perveen, Kiyoshi Tanaka ...

  15. Academic Delay of Gratification, Future Goals, and Self-Regulated Learning.

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    Bembenutty, Hefer; Karabenick, Stuart A.

    This paper reviews the association between delay of gratification and future time perspective, which can be incorporated within the theoretical perspective of self-regulation of learning. It proposes that delay of gratification in academic contexts along with facilitative beliefs about the future increase the likelihood of completing academic…

  16. Relations between Self Regulation, Future Time Perspective and the Delay of Gratification in University Students

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    Avci, Suleyman

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted on 508 (331 female, 144 male) first grade university students in order to investigate the relations between self regulation, the future time perspectives, and the delay of gratification in the academic field. A future time perspective scale, an academic delay of gratification scale and a motivational strategies for…

  17. Inherent Association Between Academic Delay of Gratification, Future Time Perspective, and Self-Regulated Learning

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    Bembenutty, Hefer; Karabenick, Stuart A.

    2004-01-01

    We review the association between delay of gratification and future time perspective (FTP), which can be incorporated within the theoretical perspective of self-regulation of learning. We propose that delay of gratification in academic contexts, along with facilitative beliefs about the future, increase the likelihood of completing academic tasks.…

  18. Comparing Active Delay and Procrastination from a Self-Regulated Learning Perspective

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    Corkin, Danya M.; Yu, Shirley L.; Lindt, Suzanne F.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have proposed that the act of postponing academic work may be divided into a traditional definition of procrastination, viewed as maladaptive, and adaptive forms of delay. Adaptive forms of delay may be more consistent with certain facets of self-regulated learning. The current study investigated this issue by examining whether the…

  19. Regulation of gene expression by retinoids.

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    Amann, P M; Eichmüller, S B; Schmidt, J; Bazhin, A V

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A serves as substrate for the biosynthesis of several derivates (retinoids) which are important for cell growth and cell differentiation as well as for vision. Retinoic acid is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A regulating the expression of different genes. At present, hundreds of genes are known to be regulated by retinoic acid. This regulation is very complex and is, in turn, regulated on many levels. To date, two families of retinoid nuclear receptors have been identified: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors, which are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. In order to regulate gene expression, all-trans retinal needs to be oxidized to retinoic acid. All-trans retinal, in turn, can be produced during oxidation of all-trans retinol or in a retinol-independent metabolic pathway through cleavage of β-carotene with all-trans retinal as an intermediate metabolite. Recently it has been shown that not only retinoic acid is an active form of vitamin A, but also that all-trans retinal can play an important role in gene regulation. In this review we comprehensively summarize recent literature on regulation of gene expression by retinoids, biochemistry of retinoid receptors, and molecular mechanisms of retinoid-mediated effects on gene regulation.

  20. Lola regulates glutamate receptor expression at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

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    Ai Fukui

    2012-02-01

    Communication between pre- and post-synaptic cells is a key process in the development and modulation of synapses. Reciprocal induction between pre- and postsynaptic cells involves regulation of gene transcription, yet the underlying genetic program remains largely unknown. To investigate how innervation-dependent gene expression in postsynaptic cells supports synaptic differentiation, we performed comparative microarray analysis of Drosophila muscles before and after innervation, and of prospero mutants, which show a delay in motor axon outgrowth. We identified 84 candidate genes that are potentially up- or downregulated in response to innervation. By systematic functional analysis, we found that one of the downregulated genes, longitudinals lacking (lola, which encodes a BTB-Zn-finger transcription factor, is required for proper expression of glutamate receptors. When the function of lola was knocked down in muscles by RNAi, the abundance of glutamate receptors (GluRs, GluRIIA, GluRIIB and GluRIII, as well as that of p-21 activated kinase (PAK, was greatly reduced at the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs. Recordings of the synaptic response revealed a decrease in postsynaptic quantal size, consistent with the reduction in GluR levels. Lola appears to regulate the expression of GluRs and PAK at the level of transcription, because the amount of mRNAs encoding these molecules was also reduced in the mutants. The transcriptional level of lola, in turn, is downregulated by increased neural activity. We propose that Lola coordinates expression of multiple postsynaptic components by transcriptional regulation.

  1. Self-Regulation of Learning and Academic Delay of Gratification among Korean College Students

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    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between Korean students' motivation for learning, use of self-regulation of learning strategies, and delay of gratification Self-regulation of learning is a process that required students to get involved in their personal, behavioral, motivational, and cognitive learning tasks in order…

  2. Expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Md. Imtiaz Uddin

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... We examined the expression and subcellular localization of antiporter regulating protein OsARP in a submergence tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar FR13A. In the public databases, this protein was designated as putative Os02g0465900 protein. The cDNA containing the full-length sequence of OsARP.

  3. Bifurcation Regulations Governed by Delay Self-Control Feedback in a Stochastic Birhythmic System

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    Ma, Zhidan; Ning, Lijuan

    2017-12-01

    We aim to investigate bifurcation behaviors in a stochastic birhythmic van der Pol (BVDP) system subjected to delay self-control feedback. First, the harmonic approximation is adopted to drive the delay self-control feedback to state variables without delay. Then, Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation and stationary probability density function (SPDF) for amplitude are obtained by applying stochastic averaging method. Finally, dynamical scenarios of the change of delay self-control feedback as well as noise that markedly influence bifurcation performance are observed. It is found that: the big feedback strength and delay will suppress the large amplitude limit cycle (LC) while the relatively big noise strength facilitates the large amplitude LC, which imply the proposed regulation strategies are feasible. Interestingly enough, the inner LC is never destroyed due to noise. Furthermore, the validity of analytical results was verified by Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics.

  4. Ectopic expression of Capsicum-specific cell wall protein Capsicum annuum senescence-delaying 1 (CaSD1) delays senescence and induces trichome formation in Nicotiana benthamiana.

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    Seo, Eunyoung; Yeom, Seon-In; Jo, Sunghwan; Jeong, Heejin; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Choi, Doil

    2012-04-01

    Secreted proteins are known to have multiple roles in plant development, metabolism, and stress response. In a previous study to understand the roles of secreted proteins, Capsicum annuum secreted proteins (CaS) were isolated by yeast secretion trap. Among the secreted proteins, we further characterized Capsicum annuum senescence-delaying 1 (CaSD1), a gene encoding a novel secreted protein that is present only in the genus Capsicum. The deduced CaSD1 contains multiple repeats of the amino acid sequence KPPIHNHKPTDYDRS. Interestingly, the number of repeats varied among cultivars and species in the Capsicum genus. CaSD1 is constitutively expressed in roots, and Agrobacterium-mediated transient overexpression of CaSD1 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves resulted in delayed senescence with a dramatically increased number of trichomes and enlarged epidermal cells. Furthermore, senescence- and cell division-related genes were differentially regulated by CaSD1-overexpressing plants. These observations imply that the pepper-specific cell wall protein CaSD1 plays roles in plant growth and development by regulating cell division and differentiation.

  5. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

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    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  6. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Drug perturbations of human cells lead to complex responses upon target binding. One of the known mechanisms is a (positive or negative) feedback loop that adjusts the expression level of the respective target protein. To quantify this mechanism systems-wide in an unbiased way, drug...... further newly identified drug-induced differential regulation of Lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, Endoplasmin, DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha and Calmodulin 1. The feedback regulation in these and other targets is likely to be relevant for the success or failure of the molecular intervention....

  7. Early and Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy Results in Comparable Reductions in CD8+T Cell Exhaustion Marker Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Rachel Lena; Hartogensis, Wendy; Deguit, Christian Deo; Krone, Melissa; Hoh, Rebecca; Hecht, Frederick M; Pilcher, Christopher D; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter W; McCune, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    In untreated HIV infection, CD8 + T cell exhaustion (i.e., decreased proliferative and effector capacity) is associated with high levels of expression of coinhibitory receptors, including PD-1, T cell immunoreceptor with Ig and ITIM domains (TIGIT), CD160, and 2B4. This is evident for both HIV-specific and non-HIV-specific CD8 + T cells. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiated during chronic infection decreases but may not completely normalize the expression of such "exhaustion markers." Compared to initiation of ART later in the course of disease, initiation soon after infection reduces some parameters of chronic inflammation and adaptive immune dysfunction. However, it is not known if Early ART (e.g., initiated within the first 6 months after HIV infection) versus Delayed ART (e.g., initiated during chronic infection) preferentially reduces expression of exhaustion markers. We evaluated exhaustion marker expression on subsets of circulating effector and memory CD8 + T cells at longitudinal pre- and post-ART (2 and 5 years on ART) time points from n = 19 (Early ART) and n = 23 (Delayed ART) individuals. Before ART, TIGIT and CD160 were expressed on a statistically significantly higher proportion of effector and transitional memory cells from individuals in the Delayed ART group: the timing of ART initiation, however, did not consistently affect the expression of the exhaustion markers once viral suppression was achieved. Understanding which factors do and do not regulate aspects of CD8 + T cell exhaustion, including the expression of exhaustion markers, is critical to inform the rational design of CD8 + T cell-based therapies to treat HIV, for which CD8 + T cell exhaustion remains an important barrier to efficacy.

  8. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Physiological Profiles during Delay of Gratification: Associations with Emotionality, Self-Regulation, and Adjustment Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna C.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Tininenko, Jennifer; Taylor, Adam; Trancik, Anika

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal study utilized a community sample of children (N = 91, 45% female, 8-11 years at time 1) to investigate physiological responses (heart rate reactivity [HRR] and electrodermal responding [EDR]) during delay of gratification in relation to emotionality, self-regulation, and adjustment problems. Cluster analyses identified three…

  10. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  11. Methylation regulates HEY1 expression in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Andrew J; Guda, Maheedhara R; Asuthkar, Swapna; Labak, Collin M; Purvis, Ian J; Lu, Yining; Jain, Neha; Bach, Sarah E; Prasad, Durbaka V R; Velpula, Kiran K

    2017-07-04

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains one of the most lethal and difficult-to-treat cancers of the central nervous system. The poor prognosis in GBM patients is due in part to its resistance to available treatments, which calls for identifying novel molecular therapeutic targets. In this study, we identified a mediator of Notch signaling, HEY1, whose methylation status contributes to the pathogenesis of GBM. Datamining studies, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis showed that HEY1 is highly expressed in GBM patient specimens. Since methylation status of HEY1 may control its expression, we conducted bisulphite sequencing on patient samples and found that the HEY1 promoter region was hypermethylated in normal brain when compared to GBM specimens. Treatment on 4910 and 5310 xenograft cell lines with sodium butyrate (NaB) significantly decreased HEY1 expression with a concomitant increase in DNMT1 expression, confirming that promoter methylation may regulate HEY1 expression in GBM. NaB treatment also induced apoptosis of GBM cells as measured by flow cytometric analysis. Further, silencing of HEY1 reduced invasion, migration and proliferation in 4910 and 5310 cells. Furthermore, immunoblot and q-PCR analysis showed the existence of a potential positive regulatory loop between HEY1 and p53. Additionally, transcription factor interaction array with HEY1 recombinant protein predicted a correlation with p53 and provided various bonafide targets of HEY1. Collectively, these studies suggest HEY1 may be an important predictive marker for GBM and potential target for future GBM therapy.

  12. The Max-Min High-Order Dynamic Bayesian Network for Learning Gene Regulatory Networks with Time-Delayed Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Haifen; Zheng, Jie; Ngom, Alioune

    2016-01-01

    Accurately reconstructing gene regulatory network (GRN) from gene expression data is a challenging task in systems biology. Although some progresses have been made, the performance of GRN reconstruction still has much room for improvement. Because many regulatory events are asynchronous, learning gene interactions with multiple time delays is an effective way to improve the accuracy of GRN reconstruction. Here, we propose a new approach, called Max-Min high-order dynamic Bayesian network (MMHO-DBN) by extending the Max-Min hill-climbing Bayesian network technique originally devised for learning a Bayesian network's structure from static data. Our MMHO-DBN can explicitly model the time lags between regulators and targets in an efficient manner. It first uses constraint-based ideas to limit the space of potential structures, and then applies search-and-score ideas to search for an optimal HO-DBN structure. The performance of MMHO-DBN to GRN reconstruction was evaluated using both synthetic and real gene expression time-series data. Results show that MMHO-DBN is more accurate than current time-delayed GRN learning methods, and has an intermediate computing performance. Furthermore, it is able to learn long time-delayed relationships between genes. We applied sensitivity analysis on our model to study the performance variation along different parameter settings. The result provides hints on the setting of parameters of MMHO-DBN.

  13. Early Lexical Expression in Typically Developing Maltese Children: Implications for the Identification of Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Daniela; Grech, Helen; Dodd, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Limited word production may be the first indicator of impaired language development. The unavailability of normative data and standardized assessments for young Maltese children hinders the identification of early language delays. This study aimed to document Maltese children's expressive vocabulary growth and accompanying range of variation, to…

  14. Evolutionary roots of arginase expression and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Maria Dzik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Two main types of macrophage functions are known: classical (M1, producing nitric oxide, NO, and M2, in which arginase activity is primarily expressed. Ornithine, the product of arginase, is a substrate for synthesis of polyamines and collagen, important for growth and ontogeny of animals. M2 macrophages, expressing high level of mitochondrial arginase, have been implicated in promoting cell division and deposition of collagen during ontogeny and wound repair. Arginase expression is the default mode of tissue macrophages, but can also be amplified by signals, such as IL4/13 or TGF-β that accelerates wound healing and tissue repair. In worms, the induction of collagen gene is coupled with induction of immune response genes, both depending on the same TGF-β-like pathway. This suggests that the main function of M2 heal type macrophages is originally connected with the TGF-β superfamily of proteins, which are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis. Excretory-secretory products of metazoan parasites are able to induce M2 type of macrophage responses promoting wound healing without participation of Th2 cytokines IL4/IL13. The expression of arginase in lower animals can be induced by the presence of parasite antigens and TGF-β signals leading to collagen synthesis. This also means that the main proteins, which, in primitive metazoans, are involved in regulation of tissue and organ differentiation in embryogenesis are produced by innate immunity. The signaling function of NO is known already from the sponge stage of animal evolution. The cytotoxic role of NO molecule appeared later, as documented in immunity of marine mollusks and some insects. This implies that the M2-wound healing promoting function predates the defensive role of NO, a characteristic of M1 macrophages. Understanding when and how the M1 and M2 activities came to be in animals is useful for understanding how macrophage immunity, and immune

  15. LICORN: learning cooperative regulation networks from gene expression data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elati, Mohamed; Neuvial, Pierre; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Barillot, Emmanuel; Radvanyi, François; Rouveirol, Céline

    2007-01-01

    .... The goal is to identify, for each gene expressed in a particular cellular context, the regulators affecting its transcription, and the co-ordination of several regulators in specific types of regulation...

  16. Regulation of Hepatic Paraoxonase-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Fuhrman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is a member of the paraoxonases family (PON1, PON2, and PON3. PON1 is synthesized and secreted by the liver, and in circulation it is associated with HDL. PON1 has antioxidative properties, which are associated with the enzyme’s capability to decrease oxidative stress in atherosclerotic lesions and to attenuate atherosclerosis development. Epidemiological evidence demonstrates that low PON1 activity is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events and cardiovascular disease and is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Therefore, pharmacological modulation of PON1 activity or PON1 gene expression could constitute a useful approach for preventing atherosclerosis. A primary determinant of serum PON1 levels is the availability of the enzyme for release by the liver, the principal site of PON1 production. Together with the enzyme secretion rate, enzymatic turnover, and protein stability, the level of PON1 gene expression is a major determinant of PON1 status. This paper summarizes recent progress in understanding the regulation of PON1 expression in hepatocytes.

  17. Melatonin regulates delayed embryonic development in the short-nosed fruit bat, Cynopterus sphinx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arnab; Meenakumari, K J; Udin, S; Krishna, A

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the seasonal variation in serum melatonin levels and their relationship to the changes in the serum progesterone level, ovarian steroidogenesis, and embryonic development during two successive pregnancies of Cynopterus sphinx. Circulating melatonin concentrations showed two peaks; one coincided with the period of low progesterone synthesis and delayed embryonic development, whereas the second peak coincided with regressing corpus luteum. This finding suggests that increased serum melatonin level during November-December may be responsible for delayed embryonic development by suppressing progesterone synthesis. The study showed increased melatonin receptors (MTNR1A and MTNR1B) in the corpus luteum and in the utero-embryonic unit during the period of delayed embryonic development. The in vitro study showed that a high dose of melatonin suppressed progesterone synthesis, whereas a lower dose of melatonin increased progesterone synthesis by the ovary. The effects of melatonin on ovarian steroidogenesis are mediated through changes in the expression of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme, and LH receptor proteins. This study further showed a suppressive impact of melatonin on the progesterone receptor (PGR) in the utero-embryonic unit; this effect might contribute to delayed embryonic development in C. sphinx. The results of the present study thus suggest that a high circulating melatonin level has a dual contribution in retarding embryonic development in C. sphinx by impairing progesterone synthesis as well as by inhibiting progesterone action by reducing expression of PGR in the utero-embryonic unit.

  18. Persistence: what does research on self-regulation and delay of gratification have to say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Vivian; Günaydin, Gül; Pandey, Gayathri

    2013-12-01

    Despite the simplicity of Kurzban et al.'s framework, we argue that important information is lost in their simplification. We discuss research on delay of gratification and self-regulation that identifies key situational and psychological factors affecting how people represent rewards and costs. These factors affect the expected utilities of behavioral options and thus dramatically influence whether individuals persist on a difficult task.

  19. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional-but often neglected-layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an

  20. Regulation of neuraminidase expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualdi Luciana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid; NeuNAc is one of the most important carbohydrates for Streptococcus pneumoniae due of its role as a carbon and energy source, receptor for adhesion and invasion and molecular signal for promotion of biofilm formation, nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion of the lung. Results In this work, NeuNAc and its metabolic derivative N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc were used to analyze regulatory mechanisms of the neuraminidase locus expression. Genomic and metabolic comparison to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus sanguinis elucidates the metabolic association of the two amino sugars to different parts of the locus coding for the two main pneumococcal neuraminidases and confirms the substrate specificity of the respective ABC transporters. Quantitative gene expression analysis shows repression of the locus by glucose and induction of all predicted transcriptional units by ManNAc and NeuNAc, each inducing with higher efficiency the operon encoding for the transporter with higher specificity for the respective amino sugar. Cytofluorimetric analysis demonstrated enhanced surface exposure of NanA on pneumococci grown in NeuNAc and ManNAc and an activity assay allowed to quantify approximately twelve times as much neuraminidase activity on induced cells as opposed to glucose grown cells. Conclusions The present data increase the understanding of metabolic regulation of the nanAB locus and indicate that experiments aimed at the elucidation of the relevance of neuraminidases in pneumococcal virulence should possibly not be carried out on bacteria grown in glucose containing media.

  1. Expression and regulation of brain metallothionein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, M; Iversen, P L; Hao, R; Cerutis, D R; Rojas, P; Happe, H K; Murrin, L C; Pfeiffer, R F

    1995-07-01

    Many, but not all, zinc-containing neurons in the brain are a subclass of the glutamatergic neurons, and they are found predominantly in the telencephalon. These neurons store zinc in their presynaptic terminals and release it by a calcium-dependent mechanism. These "vesicular" pools of zinc are viewed as endogenous modulators of ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels. Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight zinc-binding proteins consisting of 25-30% cysteine, with no aromatic amino acids or disulfide bonds. The areas of the brain containing high contents of zinc such as the retina, the pineal gland, and the hippocampus synthesize unique isoforms of MT on a continuous basis. The four MT isoforms are thought to provide the neurons and glial elements with mechanisms to distribute, donate, and sequester zinc at presynaptic terminals; or buffer the excess zinc at synaptic junctions. In this cause, glutathione disulfide may participate in releasing zinc from MT. A similar nucleotide and amino acid sequence has made it difficult to obtain cDNA probes and antibodies capable of distinguishing indisputably among MT isoforms. MT-I and MT-II isoforms are found in the brain and in the peripheral tissues; MT-III isoform, possessing an additional seven amino acids, is expressed mostly in the brain and to a very minute extent in the intestine and pancreas; whereas MT-IV isoform is found in tissues containing stratified squamous epithelial cells. Since MTs are expressed in neurons that sequester zinc in their synaptic vesicles, the regulation of the expression of MT isoforms is extremely important in terms of maintaining the steady-state level of zinc and controlling redox potentials. The concentration of zinc has been shown to be altered in an extensive number of disorders of the central nervous system, including alcoholism. Alzheimer-type dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Down's syndrome, epilepsy, Friedreich's ataxia, Guillaine-Barré syndrome, hepatic

  2. Causal relationships among academic delay of gratification, motivation, and self-regulated learning in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Maruno, Shun'ichi

    2010-10-01

    Academic delay of gratification refers to the postponement of immediate rewards by students and the pursuit of more important, temporally remote academic goals. A path model was designed to identify the causal relationships among academic delay of gratification and motivation, self-regulated learning strategies (as specified in the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire), and grades among 386 Chinese elementary school children. Academic delay of gratification was found to be positively related to motivation and metacognition. Cognitive strategy, resource management, and grades mediated these two factors and were indirectly related to academic delay of gratification.

  3. The Influence of Gene Expression Time Delays on Gierer–Meinhardt Pattern Formation Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    There are numerous examples of morphogen gradients controlling long range signalling in developmental and cellular systems. The prospect of two such interacting morphogens instigating long range self-organisation in biological systems via a Turing bifurcation has been explored, postulated, or implicated in the context of numerous developmental processes. However, modelling investigations of cellular systems typically neglect the influence of gene expression on such dynamics, even though transcription and translation are observed to be important in morphogenetic systems. In particular, the influence of gene expression on a large class of Turing bifurcation models, namely those with pure kinetics such as the Gierer-Meinhardt system, is unexplored. Our investigations demonstrate that the behaviour of the Gierer-Meinhardt model profoundly changes on the inclusion of gene expression dynamics and is sensitive to the sub-cellular details of gene expression. Features such as concentration blow up, morphogen oscillations and radical sensitivities to the duration of gene expression are observed and, at best, severely restrict the possible parameter spaces for feasible biological behaviour. These results also indicate that the behaviour of Turing pattern formation systems on the inclusion of gene expression time delays may provide a means of distinguishing between possible forms of interaction kinetics. Finally, this study also emphasises that sub-cellular and gene expression dynamics should not be simply neglected in models of long range biological pattern formation via morphogens. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  4. A novel mechanism of immune regulation: interferon-γ regulates retention of CD4+ T cells during delayed type hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Tim J; Borron, Paul J; Dudler, Lisbeth; Hay, John B; Young, Alan J

    2005-01-01

    The local immune response is characterized by an increase in the rate of entry of lymphocytes from the blood into regional lymph nodes and changes in the output of cells in lymph. While significant data are available regarding the role of inflammation-induced vascular adhesion processes in regulating lymphocyte entry into inflamed tissues and lymph nodes, relatively little is known about the molecular processes governing lymphocyte exit into efferent lymph. We have defined a novel role for lymphatic endothelial cells in the regulation of lymphocyte exit during a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to mycobacterial purified protein derivative (PPD). Soluble, pro-adhesive factors were identified in efferent lymph concomitant with reduced lymphocyte output in lymph, which significantly increased lymphocyte binding to lymphatic endothelial cells. While all lymphocyte subsets were retained, CD4+ T cells appeared less susceptible than others. Among a panel of cytokines in inflammatory lymph plasma, interferon (IFN)-γ alone appeared responsible for this retention. In vitro adhesion assays using physiological levels of IFN-γ confirmed the interaction between recirculating lymphocytes and lymphatic endothelium. These data demonstrate a new level of immune regulation, whereby the exit of recirculating lymphocytes from lymph nodes is selectively and sequentially regulated by cytokines in a manner equally as complex as lymphocyte recruitment. PMID:16162267

  5. Effects of Light-Emitting Diode Therapy on Muscle Hypertrophy, Gene Expression, Performance, Damage, and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Bertucci, Danilo; Schiavinato, Josiane; Reiff, Rodrigo; Araújo, Amélia; Panepucci, Rodrigo; Matheucci, Euclides; Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Arakelian, Vivian Maria; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo; Bagnato, Vanderlei

    2016-01-01

    Ferraresi C, Bertucci D, Schiavinato J, Reiff R, Araújo A, Panepucci R, Matheucci E, Cunha AF, Arakelian VM, Hamblin MR, Parizotto N, Bagnato V: Effects of light-emitting diode therapy on muscle hypertrophy, gene expression, performance, damage, and delayed-onset muscle soreness: case-control study with a pair of identical twins. Objective The aim of this study was to verify how a pair of monozygotic twins would respond to light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) or placebo combined with a strength-training program during 12 weeks. Design This case-control study enrolled a pair of male monozygotic twins, allocated randomly to LEDT or placebo therapies. Light-emitting diode therapy or placebo was applied from a flexible light-emitting diode array (λ = 850 nm, total energy = 75 J, t = 15 seconds) to both quadriceps femoris muscles of each twin immediately after each strength training session (3 times/wk for 12 weeks) consisting of leg press and leg extension exercises with load of 80% and 50% of the 1-repetition maximum test, respectively. Muscle biopsies, magnetic resonance imaging, maximal load, and fatigue resistance tests were conducted before and after the training program to assess gene expression, muscle hypertrophy and performance, respectively. Creatine kinase levels in blood and visual analog scale assessed muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness, respectively, during the training program. Results Compared with placebo, LEDT increased the maximal load in exercise and reduced fatigue, creatine kinase, and visual analog scale. Gene expression analyses showed decreases in markers of inflammation (interleukin 1β) and muscle atrophy (myostatin) with LEDT. Protein synthesis (mammalian target of rapamycin) and oxidative stress defense (SOD2 [mitochondrial superoxide dismutase]) were up-regulated with LEDT, together with increases in thigh muscle hypertrophy. Conclusions Light-emitting diode therapy can be useful to reduce muscle damage, pain, and atrophy, as

  6. Uterine Micro-Environment and Estrogen-Dependent Regulation of Osteopontin Expression in Mouse Blastocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhen Xie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation is a highly synchronized bioprocess between an activated blastocyst and a receptive uterus. In mice, successful implantation relies on the dynamic interplay of estrogen and progesterone; however, the key mediators downstream of these hormones that act on blastocyst competency and endometrium receptivity acquisition are largely unknown. In this study, we showed that the expression of osteopontin (OPN in mouse blastocysts is regulated by ovarian estrogen and uterine micro-environment. OPN mRNA is up-regulated in mouse blastocyst on day 4 of pregnancy, which is associated with ovarian estrogen secretion peak. Hormone treatment in vivo demonstrated that OPN expression in a blastocyst is regulated by estrogen through an estrogen receptor (ER. Our results of the delayed and activated implantation model showed that OPN expression is induced after estrogen injection. While estrogen treatment during embryo culture in vitro showed less effect on OPN expression, the tubal ligation model on day 3 of pregnancy confirmed that the regulation of estrogen on OPN expression in blastocyst might, through some specific cytokines, have existed in a uterine micro-environment. Collectively, our study presents that estrogen regulates OPN expression and it may play an important role during embryo implantation by activating blastocyst competence and facilitating the endometrium acceptable for active blastocyst.

  7. BCL-3 attenuation of TNFA expression involves an incoherent feed-forward loop regulated by chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walker

    Full Text Available Induction of genes is rarely an isolated event; more typically occurring as part of a web of parallel interactions, or motifs, which act to refine and control gene expression. Here, we define an Incoherent Feed-forward Loop motif in which TNFα-induced NF-κB signalling activates expression of the TNFA gene itself and also controls synthesis of the negative regulator BCL-3. While sharing a common inductive signal, the two genes have distinct temporal expression profiles. Notably, while the TNFA gene promoter is primed to respond immediately to activated NF-κB in the nucleus, induction of BCL3 expression only occurs after a time delay of about 1h. We show that this time delay is defined by remodelling of the BCL3 gene promoter, which is required to activate gene expression, and characterise the chromatin delayed induction of BCL3 expression using mathematical models. The models show how a delay in inhibitor production effectively uncouples the rate of response to inflammatory cues from the final magnitude of inhibition. Hence, within this regulatory motif, a delayed (incoherent feed-forward loop together with differential rates of TNFA (fast and BCL3 (slow mRNA turnover provide robust, pulsatile expression of TNFα . We propose that the structure of the BCL-3-dependent regulatory motif has a beneficial role in modulating expression dynamics and the inflammatory response while minimising the risk of pathological hyper-inflammation.

  8. BCL-3 attenuation of TNFA expression involves an incoherent feed-forward loop regulated by chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas; Adamson, Antony; Jackson, Dean A

    2013-01-01

    Induction of genes is rarely an isolated event; more typically occurring as part of a web of parallel interactions, or motifs, which act to refine and control gene expression. Here, we define an Incoherent Feed-forward Loop motif in which TNFα-induced NF-κB signalling activates expression of the TNFA gene itself and also controls synthesis of the negative regulator BCL-3. While sharing a common inductive signal, the two genes have distinct temporal expression profiles. Notably, while the TNFA gene promoter is primed to respond immediately to activated NF-κB in the nucleus, induction of BCL3 expression only occurs after a time delay of about 1h. We show that this time delay is defined by remodelling of the BCL3 gene promoter, which is required to activate gene expression, and characterise the chromatin delayed induction of BCL3 expression using mathematical models. The models show how a delay in inhibitor production effectively uncouples the rate of response to inflammatory cues from the final magnitude of inhibition. Hence, within this regulatory motif, a delayed (incoherent) feed-forward loop together with differential rates of TNFA (fast) and BCL3 (slow) mRNA turnover provide robust, pulsatile expression of TNFα . We propose that the structure of the BCL-3-dependent regulatory motif has a beneficial role in modulating expression dynamics and the inflammatory response while minimising the risk of pathological hyper-inflammation.

  9. Preschoolers' Emotion Expression and Regulation: Relations with School Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Kristina J.; Bailey, Craig S.; Shewark, Elizabeth A.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.

    2013-01-01

    Children's expression and regulation of emotions are building blocks of their experiences in classrooms. Thus, the authors' primary goal was to investigate whether preschoolers' expression or ability to regulate emotions were associated with teachers' ratings of school adjustment. A secondary goal was to investigate how boys and girls differed…

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 gene induction as an intrinsic regulation against delayed cerebral vasospasm in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Kanamaru, Kenji; Tsunoda, Hiroshi; Inada, Hiroyasu; Kuroki, Minoru; Sun, Hong; Waga, Shiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes cerebral ischemia and infarction. To date, the pathogenesis and gene expression associated with vasospasm remain poorly understood. The present study used fluorescent differential display to identify differentially expressed genes in a rat model of SAH. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA was prominently induced in the basilar artery and modestly in brain tissue in a rat vasospasm model. A significant correlation was observed between the degree of vasospasm and HO-1 mRNA levels in the basilar arteries exhibiting vasospasm. Intracisternal injection of antisense HO-1 oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) significantly delayed the clearance of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin from the subarachnoid space and aggravated angiographic vasospasm. Antisense HO-1 ODN inhibited HO-1 induction in the basilar arteries but not in the whole brain tissue. This phenomenon was not observed in the nontreated, sense HO-1 ODN–treated, or scrambled ODN–treated arteries. We report the protective effects of HO-1 gene induction in cerebral vasospasm after SAH, a finding that should provide a novel therapeutic approach for cerebral vasospasm. PMID:10393699

  11. Polymorphic cis- and trans-regulation of human gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian G Cheung

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Expression levels of human genes vary extensively among individuals. This variation facilitates analyses of expression levels as quantitative phenotypes in genetic studies where the entire genome can be scanned for regulators without prior knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms, thus enabling the identification of unknown regulatory relationships. Here, we carried out such genetic analyses with a large sample size and identified cis- and trans-acting polymorphic regulators for about 1,000 human genes. We validated the cis-acting regulators by demonstrating differential allelic expression with sequencing of transcriptomes (RNA-Seq and the trans-regulators by gene knockdown, metabolic assays, and chromosome conformation capture analysis. The majority of the regulators act in trans to the target (regulated genes. Most of these trans-regulators were not known to play a role in gene expression regulation. The identification of these regulators enabled the characterization of polymorphic regulation of human gene expression at a resolution that was unattainable in the past.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of monoallelic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Hiroshi; Takayama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Monoallelic expression from biallelic genes is frequently observed in diploid eukaryotic organisms. Classic examples of this phenomenon include the well-characterized cases of genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. However, recent studies have shown that monoallelic expression is widespread in autosomal genes. This discovery was met with great interest because it represents another mechanism to generate diversity in gene expression that can affect cell fate and physiology. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. In our original study describing the dominant ⁄ recessive relationships of pollen- determinant alleles in Brassica self-incompatibility, we found that the recessive allele was specifically methylated and silenced through the action of small RNA derived from the dominant allele. In this review, we focus on recent studies of monoallelic expression in autosomal genes, and discuss the possible mechanisms driving this form of monoallelic gene suppression.

  13. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  14. Delayed Mesoderm and Erythroid Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells in the Absence of the Transcriptional Regulator FUBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Wesely

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional regulator far upstream binding protein 1 (FUBP1 is essential for fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal, and the constitutive absence of FUBP1 activity during early development leads to embryonic lethality in homozygous mutant mice. To investigate the role of FUBP1 in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs and in particular during differentiation into hematopoietic lineages, we generated Fubp1 knockout (KO ESC clones using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Although FUBP1 is expressed in undifferentiated ESCs and during spontaneous differentiation following aggregation into embryoid bodies (EBs, absence of FUBP1 did not affect ESC maintenance. Interestingly, we observed a delayed differentiation of FUBP1-deficient ESCs into the mesoderm germ layer, as indicated by impaired expression of several mesoderm markers including Brachyury at an early time point of ESC differentiation upon aggregation to EBs. Coculture experiments with OP9 cells in the presence of erythropoietin revealed a diminished differentiation capacity of Fubp1 KO ESCs into the erythroid lineage. Our data showed that FUBP1 is important for the onset of mesoderm differentiation and maturation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the erythroid lineage, a finding that is supported by the phenotype of FUBP1-deficient mice.

  15. A Recombinant Antibody-Expressing Influenza Virus Delays Tumor Growth in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Hamilton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV has shown promise as an oncolytic agent. To improve IAV as an oncolytic virus, we sought to design a transgenic virus expressing an immune checkpoint-inhibiting antibody during the viral life cycle. To test whether it was possible to express an antibody during infection, an influenza virus was constructed encoding the heavy chain of an antibody on the PB1 segment and the light chain of an antibody on the PA segment. This antibody-expressing IAV grows to high titers, and the antibodies secreted from infected cells exhibit comparable functionality with hybridoma-produced antibodies. To enhance the anti-cancer activity of IAV, an influenza virus was engineered to express a single-chain antibody antagonizing the immune checkpoint CTLA4 (IAV-CTLA4. In mice implanted with the aggressive B16-F10 melanoma, intratumoral injection with IAV-CTLA4 delayed the growth of treated tumors, mediated an abscopal effect, and increased overall survival.

  16. Zooming in on children's behavior during delay of gratification: Disentangling impulsigenic and volitional processes underlying self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Regula; Blair, Clancy

    2017-02-01

    When delaying gratification, both motivational and regulatory processes are likely to be at play; however, the relative contributions of motivational and regulatory influences on delay behavior are unclear. By examining behavioral responses during a delay task, this study sought to examine the motivational (anticipatory behavior) and regulatory mechanisms (executive function and self-control strategies) underlying children's self-regulation. The participants, 65 5- to 9-year-old children (Mage=7.19years, SD=0.89), were video-recorded during a delay procedure and later coded for anticipatory behaviors (e.g., gazing intensely at the tablet) and self-control strategies. Children also completed two executive function (EF) tasks. We found that anticipatory behavior was curvilinearly related to delay time. Children showing either very low or very high levels of anticipatory behavior were not able to wait the entire time. Furthermore, our results indicated that anticipatory behavior interacted with EF to predict delay time. Specifically, anticipatory behavior was negatively related to delay time only if EF abilities were low. Finally, self-control strategies also interacted with EF to predict children's ability to delay. Spontaneous engagement in self-control strategies such as fidgeting and engagement in alternative activities were beneficial for children with low EF but were unrelated to delay time for children with high EF. Results indicate the value of examining motivational and regulatory influences on delay behavior. Lapses in self-regulation may be due to the combination of powerful impulsigenic (i.e., anticipatory behavior) and weak volitional processes (i.e., EF, self-control strategies). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    OpenAIRE

    Fatouma Alimirah; Ravichandran Panchanathan; Jianming Chen; Xiang Zhang; Shuk-Mei Ho; Divaker Choubey

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer (PC) is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in hu...

  18. Classification of topological domains based on gene expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Shi, Hongbo; Ahituv, Nadav

    2013-07-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression is thought to be one of the major forces shaping mammalian gene order. A recent study that used whole-genome chromosome conformation assays has shown that the mammalian genome is divided into specific topological domains that are shared between different tissues and organisms. Here, we wanted to assess whether gene expression and regulation are involved in shaping these domains and can be used to classify them. We analyzed gene expression and regulation levels in these domains by using RNA-seq and enhancer-associated ChIP-seq datasets for 17 different mouse tissues. We found 162 domains that are active (high gene expression and regulation) in all 17 tissues. These domains are significantly shorter, contain less repeats, and have more housekeeping genes. In contrast, we found 29 domains that are inactive (low gene expression and regulation) in all analyzed tissues and are significantly longer, have more repeats, and gene deserts. Tissue-specific active domains showed some correlation with tissue-type and gene ontology. Domain temporal gene regulation and expression differences also displayed some gene ontology terms fitting their temporal function. Combined, our results provide a catalog of shared and tissue-specific topological domains and suggest that gene expression and regulation could have a role in shaping them.

  19. Regulation of core expression during the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad Sohail; Alsaleh, Khaled; Farhat, Rayan; Belouzard, Sandrine; Danneels, Adeline; Descamps, Véronique; Duverlie, Gilles; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Zaidi, Najam us Sahar Sadaf; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2015-02-01

    Core plays a critical role during hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly, not only as a structural component of the virion, but also as a regulator of the formation of assembly sites. In this study, we observed that core is expressed later than other HCV proteins in a single viral cycle assay, resulting in a relative increase of core expression during a late step of the viral life cycle. This delayed core expression results from an increase of core half-life, indicating that core is initially degraded and is stabilized at a late step of the HCV life cycle. Stabilization-mediated delayed kinetics of core expression were also observed using heterologous expression systems. Core stabilization did not depend on its interaction with non-structural proteins or lipid droplets but was correlated with its expression levels and its oligomerization status. Therefore in the course of a HCV infection, core stabilization is likely to occur when the prior amplification of the viral genome during an initial replication step allows core to be synthesized at higher levels as a stable protein, during the assembly step of the viral life cycle. © 2015 The Authors.

  20. NFATc1 regulation of TRAIL expression in human intestinal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingding Wang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; Apo2 has been shown to promote intestinal cell differentiation. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT participates in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes, including differentiation. Here, we examined the role of NFAT in the regulation of TRAIL in human intestinal cells. Treatment with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA plus the calcium ionophore A23187 (Io increased NFAT activation and TRAIL expression; pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, an antagonist of NFAT signaling, diminished NFAT activation and TRAIL induction. In addition, knockdown of NFATc1, NFATc2, NFATc3, and NFATc4 blocked PMA/Io increased TRAIL protein expression. Expression of NFATc1 activated TRAIL promoter activity and increased TRAIL mRNA and protein expression. Deletion of NFAT binding sites from the TRAIL promoter did not significantly abrogate NFATc1-increased TRAIL promoter activity, suggesting an indirect regulation of TRAIL expression by NFAT activation. Knockdown of NFATc1 increased Sp1 transcription factor binding to the TRAIL promoter and, importantly, inhibition of Sp1, by chemical inhibition or RNA interference, increased TRAIL expression. These studies identify a novel mechanism for TRAIL regulation by which activation of NFATc1 increases TRAIL expression through negative regulation of Sp1 binding to the TRAIL promoter.

  1. Regulation of gene expression in entomopathogenic fungi in three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The entomopathogenic fungi are subject to regulation system known as signal transduction that regulates the expression of the different genes required for each life stage, first comprising cuticle adhesion and degradation, later the survival in the hemolymph, and finally the fungal growth in soils. There are two ...

  2. Down-regulation of aquaporins (AQP3) expression by RNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquaporins (AQPs) represent a family of homologous water channels expressed in many epithelial and endothelial cells. Most tumors have been shown to exhibit high vascular permeability and interstitial fluid pressure. Here, we tested the regulation on the expression of AQP3 by RNA interference (RNAi) in the human lung ...

  3. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with severe HIV encephalitis (Carlson et al. 2004b), and be- ing regulated by interactions with the Tat protein (Carlson et al. 2004a). In contrast, OTK18 is ubiquitously expressed in all normal human tissues, and OTK18 expression in HIV-1 infected MDM is not significantly different at day 9 post- infection when compared to ...

  4. Regulation of proteinaceous effector expression in phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kar-Chun; Oliver, Richard P

    2017-04-01

    Effectors are molecules used by microbial pathogens to facilitate infection via effector-triggered susceptibility or tissue necrosis in their host. Much research has been focussed on the identification and elucidating the function of fungal effectors during plant pathogenesis. By comparison, knowledge of how phytopathogenic fungi regulate the expression of effector genes has been lagging. Several recent studies have illustrated the role of various transcription factors, chromosome-based control, effector epistasis, and mobilisation of endosomes within the fungal hyphae in regulating effector expression and virulence on the host plant. Improved knowledge of effector regulation is likely to assist in improving novel crop protection strategies.

  5. Regulation of proteinaceous effector expression in phytopathogenic fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar-Chun Tan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Effectors are molecules used by microbial pathogens to facilitate infection via effector-triggered susceptibility or tissue necrosis in their host. Much research has been focussed on the identification and elucidating the function of fungal effectors during plant pathogenesis. By comparison, knowledge of how phytopathogenic fungi regulate the expression of effector genes has been lagging. Several recent studies have illustrated the role of various transcription factors, chromosome-based control, effector epistasis, and mobilisation of endosomes within the fungal hyphae in regulating effector expression and virulence on the host plant. Improved knowledge of effector regulation is likely to assist in improving novel crop protection strategies.

  6. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  7. Too proud to regulate: The differential effect of pride versus joy on children's ability to delay gratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Einav; Asbe, Marwa; Eyal, Tal; Berger, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of the distinct positive emotions pride and joy on children's self-regulation, focusing on their ability to delay gratification (i.e., resist a temptation in favor of a long-term goal). We hypothesized that because pride corresponds to the attainment of long-term goals and joy corresponds to the attainment of immediate desires, the experience of pride may signal sufficient progress toward a long-term goal, resulting in less delay of gratification than the experience of joy. To test this hypothesis, we induced an experience of pride or joy in 8-year-old children. At this age, the ability to self-regulate--and to experience pride and joy distinctively--is relatively mature. We then measured performance in a delay discounting task. We found that, compared with the joy condition and a control condition, children who experienced pride performed worse on the delay discounting task (p=.045), indicating poorer self-regulation. This result suggests that emotions may function as cues for sufficient goal pursuit, thereby influencing self-regulation from a very young age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adult-type hypolactasia and regulation of lactase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2005-01-01

    , the main carbohydrate in milk. Individuals with adult-type hypolactasia lose their lactase expression before adulthood and consequently often become lactose intolerant with associated digestive problems (e.g. diarrhoea). In contrast, lactase persistent individuals have a lifelong lactase expression......A common genetically determined polymorphism in the human population leads to two distinct phenotypes in adults, lactase persistence and adult-type hypolactasia (lactase non-persistence). All healthy newborn children express high levels of lactase and are able to digest large quantities of lactose...... and are able to digest lactose as adults. Lactase persistence can be regarded as the mutant phenotype since other mammals down-regulate their lactase expression after weaning (the postweaning decline). This phenomenon does not occur in lactase persistent individuals. The regulation of lactase expression...

  9. Enhanced at Puberty-1 (Eap1 Expression Critically Regulates the Onset of Puberty Independent of Hypothalamic Kiss1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Enhance at puberty-1 (Eap1 is an intronless gene that regulates the onset of puberty through a network of hypothalamic genes. However, precise mechanistic events essential for Eap1-regulation of puberty have not been fully elucidated. Eap1 is thought to promote the initiation of puberty through regulation of the hypothalamic metastasis-suppressor KiSS1. We aim to investigate this hypothesis by genetically perturbing Eap1 through RNA interference in vivo. Methods: We first engineered and optimized four sets of shRNAs that target rat Eap1 mRNA as well as one negative control shRNA. After generating lentiviral (LV particles, we examined the suppression of Eap1 in NRK-54E cell line to select the most efficient one. Sequencelly, LV-Eap1-shRNA or controls including LV-eGFP and saline were intraventricular microinjected into 21-day-old rats. Rats were raised in appropriate conditions and we examined the time of vaginal opening, ovary physiology as well as hypothalamic puberty-regulatory genes at three developmental stages: juvenile (postnatal day PND25, early puberty (PND35, adult (PND42. Results: Hypothalamic suppression of Eap1 delayed the onset of rat vaginal opening. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining revealed a significant reduction of corpus luteum (CL at PND35, but at PND42 CL levels were normal relative to control. In conjunction with differences in phenotype and ovary morphology, GnRH expression and transcripts were also reduced at PND25 and PND35, while their levels were similar to control at PND42. KiSS1 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly different at all three developmental stages. Conclusion: Eap1 expression critically regulates puberty as well as GnRH expression. However, Eap1-regulation of puberty may not necessitate KiSS1/GPR54 signaling.

  10. Enhanced at Puberty-1 (Eap1) Expression Critically Regulates the Onset of Puberty Independent of Hypothalamic Kiss1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Pin

    2017-01-01

    Enhance at puberty-1 (Eap1) is an intronless gene that regulates the onset of puberty through a network of hypothalamic genes. However, precise mechanistic events essential for Eap1-regulation of puberty have not been fully elucidated. Eap1 is thought to promote the initiation of puberty through regulation of the hypothalamic metastasis-suppressor KiSS1. We aim to investigate this hypothesis by genetically perturbing Eap1 through RNA interference in vivo. We first engineered and optimized four sets of shRNAs that target rat Eap1 mRNA as well as one negative control shRNA. After generating lentiviral (LV) particles, we examined the suppression of Eap1 in NRK-54E cell line to select the most efficient one. Sequencelly, LV-Eap1-shRNA or controls including LV-eGFP and saline were intraventricular microinjected into 21-day-old rats. Rats were raised in appropriate conditions and we examined the time of vaginal opening, ovary physiology as well as hypothalamic puberty-regulatory genes at three developmental stages: juvenile (postnatal day PND25), early puberty (PND35), adult (PND42). Hypothalamic suppression of Eap1 delayed the onset of rat vaginal opening. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed a significant reduction of corpus luteum (CL) at PND35, but at PND42 CL levels were normal relative to control. In conjunction with differences in phenotype and ovary morphology, GnRH expression and transcripts were also reduced at PND25 and PND35, while their levels were similar to control at PND42. KiSS1 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly different at all three developmental stages. Eap1 expression critically regulates puberty as well as GnRH expression. However, Eap1-regulation of puberty may not necessitate KiSS1/GPR54 signaling. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The cardiomyocyte molecular clock regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2 and contributes to ventricular repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Elizabeth A; Burgess, Don E; Zhang, Xiping; Lefta, Mellani; Smith, Jennifer L; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Bartos, Daniel C; Elayi, Claude S; Esser, Karyn A; Delisle, Brian P

    2015-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) follows a diurnal variation. Data suggest the timing of SCD is influenced by circadian (~24-hour) changes in neurohumoral and cardiomyocyte-specific regulation of the heart's electrical properties. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors brain muscle arnt-like1 (BMAL1) and circadian locomotor output control kaput (CLOCK) coordinate the circadian expression of select genes. We sought to test whether Bmal1 expression in cardiomyocytes contributes to K(+) channel expression and diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization. We used transgenic mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1(-/-)). We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction, voltage clamping, promoter-reporter bioluminescence assays, and electrocardiographic telemetry. Although several K(+) channel gene transcripts were downregulated in iCSΔBmal1(-/-)mouse hearts, only Kcnh2 exhibited a robust circadian pattern of expression that was disrupted in iCSΔBmal1(-/-) hearts. Kcnh2 underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K(+) current, and the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K(+) current recorded from iCSΔBmal1(-/-) ventricular cardiomyocytes was ~50% smaller than control ventricular myocytes. Promoter-reporter assays demonstrated that the human Kcnh2 promoter is transactivated by the coexpression of BMAL1 and CLOCK. Electrocardiographic analysis showed that iCSΔBmal1(-/-) mice developed a prolongation in the heart rate-corrected QT interval during the light (resting) phase. This was secondary to an augmented circadian rhythm in the uncorrected QT interval without a corresponding change in the RR interval. The molecular clock in the heart regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2, modifies K(+) channel gene expression, and is important for normal ventricular repolarization. Disruption of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock mechanism likely unmasks diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization that could contribute

  12. Simplified and Expanded Input in a Focused Stimulation Program for a Child with Expressive Language Delay (ELD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Donna L.; Heilmann, John

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable debate regarding the simplification of adults' language when talking to young children with expressive language delays (ELD). While simplified input, also called telegraphic speech, is used by many parents and clinicians working with young children, its use has been discouraged in much of the clinical literature. In addition…

  13. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bo; Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications.......To improve the design process efficiency, this paper proposes the principle and methodology that design process gene controls the characteristics of design process under the framework of design process reuse and optimization based on design process gene. First, the concept of design process gene...

  14. Emotion Regulation and Test Anxiety: The Contribution of Academic Delay of Gratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer; McKeachie, Wilbert J.; Lin, Yi-Guang

    The ability to delay gratification among learners could serve as an effective learning strategy useful to diminish the detrimental effect of test anxiety. Academic delay of gratification refers to students' postponement of immediately available opportunities to satisfy impulses in favor of pursuing chosen important academic rewards or goals that…

  15. Regulation of bacterial gene expression by ribosome stalling and rescuing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongxin; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-05-01

    Ribosome is responsible for protein synthesis and is able to monitor the sequence and structure of the nascent peptide. Such ability plays an important role in determining overall gene expression profile of the bacteria through ribosome stalling and rescuing. In this review, we briefly summarize our current understanding of the regulation of gene expression through ribosome stalling and rescuing in bacteria, as well as mechanisms that modulate ribosome activity. Understanding the mechanisms of how bacteria modulate ribosome activity will provide not only fundamental insights into bacterial gene regulation, but also new candidate targets for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  16. Meteorin regulates mesendoderm development by enhancing nodal expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Young Kim

    Full Text Available During gastrulation, distinct lineage specification into three germ layers, the mesoderm, endoderm and ectoderm, occurs through an elaborate harmony between signaling molecules along the embryonic proximo-distal and anterior-posterior axes, and Nodal signaling plays a key role in the early embryonic development governing embryonic axis formation, mesoderm and endoderm specification, and left-right asymmetry determination. However, the mechanism by which Nodal expression is regulated is largely unknown. Here, we show that Meteorin regulates Nodal expression and is required for mesendoderm development. It is highly expressed in the inner cell mass of blastocysts and further in the epiblast and extra-embryonic ectoderm during gastrulation. Genetic ablation of the Meteorin gene resulted in early embryonic lethality, presumably due to impaired lineage allocation and subsequent cell accumulation. Embryoid body culture using Meteorin-null embryonic stem (ES cells showed reduced Nodal expression and concomitant impairment of mesendoderm specification. Meteorin-null embryos displayed reduced levels of Nodal transcripts before the gastrulation stage, and impaired expression of Goosecoid, a definitive endoderm marker, during gastrulation, while the proximo-distal and anterior-posterior axes and primitive streak formation were preserved. Our results show that Meteorin is a novel regulator of Nodal transcription and is required to maintain sufficient Nodal levels for endoderm formation, thereby providing new insights in the regulation of mesendoderm allocation.

  17. Genetic variants regulating expression levels and isoform diversity during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Enrico; Koelling, Nils; Harnett, Dermot; Garfield, David; Casale, Francesco P; Ciglar, Lucia; Gustafson, Hilary E; Viales, Rebecca R; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Degner, Jacob F; Zhao, Bingqing; Stegle, Oliver; Birney, Ewan; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2017-01-19

    Embryonic development is driven by tightly regulated patterns of gene expression, despite extensive genetic variation among individuals. Studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) indicate that genetic variation frequently alters gene expression in cell-culture models and differentiated tissues. However, the extent and types of genetic variation impacting embryonic gene expression, and their interactions with developmental programs, remain largely unknown. Here we assessed the effect of genetic variation on transcriptional (expression levels) and post-transcriptional (3' RNA processing) regulation across multiple stages of metazoan development, using 80 inbred Drosophila wild isolates, identifying thousands of developmental-stage-specific and shared QTL. Given the small blocks of linkage disequilibrium in Drosophila, we obtain near base-pair resolution, resolving causal mutations in developmental enhancers, validated transcription-factor-binding sites and RNA motifs. This fine-grain mapping uncovered extensive allelic interactions within enhancers that have opposite effects, thereby buffering their impact on enhancer activity. QTL affecting 3' RNA processing identify new functional motifs leading to transcript isoform diversity and changes in the lengths of 3' untranslated regions. These results highlight how developmental stage influences the effects of genetic variation and uncover multiple mechanisms that regulate and buffer expression variation during embryogenesis.

  18. Oxygen-dependent regulation of aquaporin-3 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogewijs D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Hoogewijs,1,2 Melanie Vogler,3 Eveline Zwenger,3 Sabine Krull,3 Anke Zieseniss3 1Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Institute of Physiology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Cardiovascular Physiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyAbstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether aquaporin-3 (AQP3 expression is altered in hypoxia and whether hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF-1 regulates the hypoxic expression. AQP3 mRNA expression was studied in L929 fibrosarcoma cells and in several tissues derived from mice that were subjected to hypoxia. Computational analysis of the AQP3 promoter revealed conserved HIF binding sites within close proximity to the translational start site, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed binding of HIF-1 to the endogenous hypoxia response elements. Furthermore, hypoxia resulted in increased expression of AQP3 mRNA in L929 fibrosarcoma cells. Consistently, shRNA-mediated knockdown of HIF-1 greatly reduced the hypoxic induction of AQP3. In addition, mRNA analysis of organs from mice exposed to inspiratory hypoxia demonstrated pronounced hypoxia-inducible expression of AQP3 in the kidney. Overall, our findings suggest that AQP3 expression can be regulated at the transcriptional level and that AQP3 represents a novel HIF-1 target gene. Keywords: transcriptional regulation, oxygen, hypoxia-inducible factor, hypoxia response element

  19. Measuring ability to enhance and suppress emotional expression: The Flexible Regulation of Emotional Expression (FREE) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Charles L; Bonanno, George A

    2016-08-01

    Flexibility in self-regulatory behaviors has proved to be an important quality for adjusting to stressful life events and requires individuals to have a diverse repertoire of emotion regulation abilities. However, the most commonly used emotion regulation questionnaires assess frequency of behavior rather than ability, with little evidence linking these measures to observable capacity to enact a behavior. The aim of the current investigation was to develop and validate a Flexible Regulation of Emotional Expression (FREE) Scale that measures a person's ability to enhance and suppress displayed emotion across an array of hypothetical contexts. In Studies 1 and 2, a series of confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the FREE Scale consists of 4 first-order factors divided by regulation and emotional valence type that can contribute to 2 higher order factors: expressive enhancement ability and suppression ability. In Study 1, we also compared the FREE Scale to other commonly used emotion regulation measures, which revealed that suppression ability is conceptually distinct from suppression frequency. In Study 3, we compared the FREE Scale with a composite of traditional frequency-based indices of expressive regulation to predict performance in a previously validated emotional modulation paradigm. Participants' enhancement and suppression ability scores on the FREE Scale predicted their corresponding performance on the laboratory task, even when controlling for baseline expressiveness. These studies suggest that the FREE Scale is a valid and flexible measure of expressive regulation ability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Epigenetic regulation on the gene expression signature in esophagus adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ting; Zhang, Guizhi

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms represents an important step in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic measures of esophagus adenocarcinoma (NOS). The objective of this study is to identify the epigenetic regulation on gene expression in NOS, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms of NOS. In this study, 78 patients with NOS were included and the data of mRNA, miRNA and DNA methylation of were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differential analysis between NOS and controls was performed in terms of gene expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation. Bioinformatic analysis was followed to explore the regulation mechanisms of miRNA and DNA methylationon gene expression. Totally, up to 1320 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 32 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified. 240 DEGs that were not only the target genes but also negatively correlated with the screened differentially expressed miRNAs. 101 DEGs were found to be highlymethylated in CpG islands. Then, 8 differentially methylated genes (DMGs) were selected, which showed down-regulated expression in NOS. Among of these genes, 6 genes including ADHFE1, DPP6, GRIA4, CNKSR2, RPS6KA6 and ZNF135 were target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-335, hsa-mir-18a, hsa-mir-93, hsa-mir-106b and hsa-mir-21). The identified altered miRNA, genes and DNA methylation site may be applied as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of NOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced sleep schedules affect circadian gene expression in young adults with delayed sleep schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Fu, Alan; Hoffman, Aaron E; Figueiro, Mariana G; Carskadon, Mary A; Sharkey, Katherine M; Rea, Mark S

    2013-05-01

    Human circadian rhythms are regulated by the interplay between circadian genes and environmental stimuli. The influence of altered sleep-wake schedules or light on human circadian gene expression patterns is not well characterized. Twenty-one young adults were asked to keep to their usual sleep schedules and two blood samples were drawn at the end of the first week from each subject based on estimated time of dim light melatonin onset (DLMO); the first sample was obtained one and a half hours before the estimated DLMO and the second three hours later, at one and a half hours after the estimated DLMO. During the second week, participants were randomized into two groups, one that received a one hour blue-light (λmax=470 nm) exposure in the morning and one that received a comparable morning dim-light exposure. Two blood samples were obtained at the same clock times as the previous week at the end of the second week. We measured the expression of 10 circadian genes in response to sleep-wake schedule advancement and morning blue-light stimulation in the peripheral blood of 21 participants during a two-week field study. We found that nine of the 10 circadian genes showed significant expression changes from the first to the second week for participants in both the blue-light and dim-light groups, likely reflecting significant advances in circadian phase. This wholesale change in circadian gene expression may reflect considerable advances in circadian phase (i.e., advance in DLMO) from the first to the second week resulting from the advanced, daily personal light exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of Mu Opioid Receptor Expression in Developing T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lily; Belkowski, Judith Sliker; Briscoe, Tammi; Rogers, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that functionally active μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are constitutively expressed at relatively low levels by developing T cells in the thymus. However, very little is known about the regulation of MOR expression by immature T cells. In this report, we first attempted to determine the effect of T cell receptor-induced T cell activation on the expression of MOR. We activated T cells with either the combination of anti-CD3 and CD28, or with superantigen, and observed a ...

  3. CAP1 expression is developmentally regulated in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhosrowShahian, F; Hubberstey, A V; Crawford, M J

    2002-05-01

    We have cloned and characterized a Xenopus member of the cyclase associated protein (CAP) gene family. xCAP1 is expressed as a maternal transcript, but is up-regulated prior to gastrulation and subsequently localizes to head mesenchyme, lens, otic vesicle, and trunk mesoderm including the pronephros. At different stages, the gene also appears to differentiate surface from deep (sensorial) ectoderm. As in Drosophila, Xenopus CAP1 is expressed in the developing eye, specifically in the differentiating lens. However, in distinction to Drosophila, Xenopus CAP1 does not express in periodically arrayed neural bands.

  4. Regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, the epigenetic enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mposhi, Archibold; Van der Wijst, Monique Gp; Faber, Klaas Nico; Rots, Marianne G

    2017-03-01

    Epigenetics provides an important layer of information on top of the DNA sequence and is essential for establishing gene expression profiles. Extensive studies have shown that nuclear DNA methylation and histone modifications influence nuclear gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) undergoes similar epigenetic changes to regulate mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that mtDNA is differentially methylated in various diseases such as diabetes and colorectal cancer. Interestingly, this differential methylation was often associated with altered mitochondrial gene expression. However, the direct role of mtDNA methylation on gene expression remains elusive. Alternatively, the activity of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a protein involved in mtDNA packaging, might also influence gene expression. This review discusses the role of mtDNA methylation and potential epigenetic-like modifications of TFAM with respect to mtDNA transcription and replication. We suggest three mechanisms: (1) methylation within the non-coding D-loop, (2) methylation at gene start sites (GSS) and (3) post-translational modifications (PTMs) of TFAM. Unraveling mitochondrial gene expression regulation could open new therapeutic avenues for mitochondrial diseases.

  5. Gene Expression Profiling of Apoptosis Regulators in Patients with Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwerf, Jacobien J.; van Zoelen, Marieke A.; Wiersinga, W. Joost; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F.; de Boer, Anita; Schultz, Marcus J.; Hooibrink, Berend; de Jonge, Evert; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Sepsis is associated with a dysregulation of apoptosis in immune cells, which has been implicated in both immunosuppression and multiple organ failure. We describe the expression profiles of genes encoding key regulators of apoptosis in highly purified monocytes, granulocytes and CD4+

  6. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  7. Barley plants over-expressing the NAC transcription factor gene HvNAC005 show stunting and delay in development combined with early senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Michael W.; Matthewman, Colette; Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara Agata

    2016-01-01

    The plant-specific NAC transcription factors have attracted particular attention because of their involvement in stress responses, senescence, and nutrient remobilization. The HvNAC005 gene of barley encodes a protein belonging to subgroup NAC-a6 of the NAC family. This study shows that HvNAC005...... is associated with developmental senescence. It was significantly up-regulated following ABA treatment, supported by ABA-responsive elements in its promoter, but it was not up-regulated during dark-induced senescence. The C-termini of proteins closely related to HvNAC005 showed overall high divergence but also...... contained conserved short motifs. A serine- and leucine-containing central motif was essential for transcriptional activity of the HvNAC005 C-terminus in yeast. Over-expression of HvNAC005 in barley resulted in a strong phenotype with delayed development combined with precocious senescence. The over...

  8. Psoriasis is characterized by deficient negative immune regulation compared to transient delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gulati, Nicholas; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G

    2015-01-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that causes delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in human skin, and is used as a topical therapeutic for alopecia areata, warts, and cutaneous melanoma metastases...

  9. Dcf1 regulates neuropeptide expression and maintains energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Yu; Li, Qian; Wu, Liang; Wen, Tieqiao

    2017-05-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain that plays a pivotal role in food intake and energy storage. Although many studies have focused on these functions, the regulation of NPY expression remains unclear. Here we showed that dendritic cell factor 1 (Dcf1) regulates NPY expression and maintains energy balance. We found that NPY expression is significantly reduced in the hypothalamus of Dcf1 knockout (Dcf1-/-, KO) mice. In contrast, Dcf1 overexpression significantly increases NPY expression in the cell line. We also found that Dcf1 acts upstream of the NPY gene to regulate NPY expression and modulates the NPY-NPY receptor 1-GABA signal. Notably, we observed a significant increase in the ATP concentration in Dcf1-/- mice, suggesting a greater demand for energy in the absence of Dcf1. We studied the relationship between Dcf1 and NPY and revealed that Dcf1 plays a critical role in energy balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Thyroid hormones regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Mittag

    Full Text Available Impaired expression of selenium-containing proteins leads to perturbed thyroid hormone (TH levels, indicating the central importance of selenium for TH homeostasis. Moreover, critically ill patients with declining serum selenium develop a syndrome of low circulating TH and a central downregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This prompted us to test the reciprocal effect, i.e., if TH status would also regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium levels. To investigate the TH dependency of selenium metabolism, we analyzed mice expressing a mutant TH receptor α1 (TRα1+m that confers a receptor-mediated hypothyroidism. Serum selenium was reduced in these animals, which was a direct consequence of the mutant TRα1 and not related to their metabolic alterations. Accordingly, hyperthyroidism, genetically caused by the inactivation of TRβ or by oral TH treatment of adult mice, increased serum selenium levels in TRα1+m and controls, thus demonstrating a novel and specific role for TRα1 in selenium metabolism. Furthermore, TH affected the mRNA levels for several enzymes involved in selenoprotein biosynthesis as well as serum selenoprotein P concentrations and the expression of other antioxidative selenoproteins. Taken together, our results show that TH positively affects the serum selenium status and regulates the expression of several selenoproteins. This demonstrates that selenium and TH metabolism are interconnected through a feed-forward regulation, which can in part explain the rapid parallel downregulation of both systems in critical illness.

  11. Regulation of catalase expression in healthy and cancerous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Zamocky, Marcel; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2015-10-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that dismutates hydrogen peroxide into water and molecular oxygen. The catalase gene has all the characteristics of a housekeeping gene (no TATA box, no initiator element sequence, high GC content in promoter) and a core promoter that is highly conserved among species. We demonstrate in this review that within this core promoter, the presence of DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-Y and Sp1, plays an essential role in the positive regulation of catalase expression. Additional transcription factors, such as FoxO3a, are also involved in this regulatory process. There is strong evidence that the protein Akt/PKB in the PI3K signaling pathway plays a major role in the expression of catalase by modulating the activity of FoxO3a. Over the past decade, other transcription factors (PPARγ, Oct-1, etc.), as well as genetic, epigenetic, and posttranscriptional processes, have emerged as crucial contributors to the regulation of catalase expression. Altered expression levels of catalase have been reported in cancer tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase expression could, therefore, be of crucial importance for the future development of pro-oxidant cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. INTRINSIC REGULATION OF HEMOGLOBIN EXPRESSION BY VARIABLE SUBUNIT INTERFACE STRENGTHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, James M.; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Padovan, Julio C.; Chait, Brian T.; Manning, Lois R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The expression of the six types of human hemoglobin subunits over time is currently considered to be regulated mainly by transcription factors that bind to upstream control regions of the gene (the “extrinsic” component of regulation). Here we describe how subunit pairing and further assembly to tetramers in the liganded state is influenced by the affinity of subunits for one another (the “intrinsic” component of regulation). The adult hemoglobin dimers have the strongest subunit interfaces and the embryonic hemoglobins are the weakest with fetal hemoglobins of intermediate strength, corresponding to the temporal order of their expression. These variable subunit binding strengths and the attenuating effects of acetylation contribute to the differences with which these hemoglobin types form functional O2-binding tetramers consistent with gene switching. PMID:22129306

  13. DMBT1 expression is down-regulated in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braidotti, P; Nuciforo, P G; Mollenhauer, J

    2004-01-01

    and hyperplastic mammary cells positive with DMBTh12 were also MCM5-positive. CONCLUSIONS: The redistribution and up-regulation of DMBT1 in normal and hyperplastic tissues flanking malignant tumours and its down-regulation in carcinomas suggests a potential role in breast cancer. Moreover, the concomitant......BACKGROUND: We studied the expression of DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1), a putative tumor suppressor gene, in normal, proliferative, and malignant breast epithelium and its possible relation to cell cycle. METHODS: Sections from 17 benign lesions and 55 carcinomas were immunostained...... expression was down-regulated in the cancerous lesions compared to the normal and/or hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas (3/55 positive carcinomas versus 33/42 positive normal/hyperplastic epithelia; p = 0.0001). In 72% of cases RT-PCR confirmed immunohistochemical results. Most of normal...

  14. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  15. Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 expression accelerates skin cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Velidi H; Vogel, Kristen; Yanagida, Jodi K; Marwaha, Nitin; Kandel, Amrit; Trempus, Carol; Repertinger, Susan K; Hansen, Laura A

    2015-10-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause severe damage to the skin and is the primary cause of most skin cancer. UV radiation causes DNA damage leading to mutations and also activates the Erbb2/HER2 receptor through indirect mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species. We hypothesized that Erbb2 activation accelerates the malignant progression of UV-induced skin cancer. Following the induction of benign squamous papillomas by UV exposure of v-ras(Ha) transgenic Tg.AC mice, mice were treated topically with the Erbb2 inhibitor AG825 and tumor progression monitored. AG825 treatment reduced tumor volume, increased tumor regression, and delayed the development of malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Progression to malignancy was associated with increased Erbb2 and ADAM12 (A Disintegin And Metalloproteinase 12) transcripts and protein, while inhibition of Erbb2 blocked the increase in ADAM12 message upon malignant progression. Similarly, human SCC and SCC cell lines had increased ADAM12 protein and transcripts when compared to normal controls. To determine whether Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 contributed to malignant progression of skin cancer, Erbb2 expression was modulated in cultured SCC cells using forced over-expression or siRNA targeting, demonstrating up-regulation of ADAM12 by Erbb2. Furthermore, ADAM12 transfection or siRNA targeting revealed that ADAM12 increased both the migration and invasion of cutaneous SCC cells. Collectively, these results suggest Erbb2 up-regulation of ADAM12 as a novel mechanism contributing to the malignant progression of UV-induced skin cancer. Inhibition of Erbb2/HER2 reduced tumor burden, increased tumor regression, and delayed the progression of benign skin tumors to malignant SCC in UV-exposed mice. Inhibition of Erbb2 suppressed the increase in metalloproteinase ADAM12 expression in skin tumors, which in turn increased migration and tumor cell invasiveness. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  17. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gukhan [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Won [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon [Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung-Whan, E-mail: swkim7@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  18. Regulation of VDR expression in rat and human intestine and liver - Consequences for CYP3A expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Ansar A.; Dragt, Bieuwke S.; Porte, Robert J.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) regulates the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in intestine and liver, but the regulation of VDR expression in intestine and liver is incompletely understood. We studied the regulation of VDR mRNA expression by ligands for VDR, farnesoid X

  19. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  20. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sourav; Saha, Tusar T; Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation-regulated mainly by HR3-occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  1. Regulation of Gene Expression Patterns in Mosquito Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lisa; Zhao, Bo; Ha, Jisu; White, Kevin P.; Girke, Thomas; Zou, Zhen; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, development, growth and reproduction require coordinated expression of numerous functional and regulatory genes. Insects, in addition to being the most speciose animal group with enormous biological and economical significance, represent outstanding model organisms for studying regulation of synchronized gene expression due to their rapid development and reproduction. Disease-transmitting female mosquitoes have adapted uniquely for ingestion and utilization of the huge blood meal required for swift reproductive events to complete egg development within a 72-h period. We investigated the network of regulatory factors mediating sequential gene expression in the fat body, a multifunctional organ analogous to the vertebrate liver and adipose tissue, of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. Transcriptomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ~7500 transcripts are differentially expressed in four sequential waves during the 72-h reproductive period. A combination of RNA-interference gene-silencing and in-vitro organ culture identified the major regulators for each of these waves. Amino acids (AAs) regulate the first wave of gene activation between 3 h and 12 h post-blood meal (PBM). During the second wave, between 12 h and 36 h, most genes are highly upregulated by a synergistic action of AAs, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and the Ecdysone-Receptor (EcR). Between 36 h and 48 h, the third wave of gene activation—regulated mainly by HR3—occurs. Juvenile Hormone (JH) and its receptor Methoprene-Tolerant (Met) are major regulators for the final wave between 48 h and 72 h. Each of these key regulators also has repressive effects on one or more gene sets. Our study provides a better understanding of the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms related to temporal coordination of gene expression during reproduction. We have detected the novel function of 20E/EcR responsible for transcriptional repression. This study also reveals the previously

  2. Family Emotion Expressiveness Mediates the Relations Between Maternal Emotion Regulation and Child Emotion Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are, Funlola; Shaffer, Anne

    2016-10-01

    While there is a growing body of literature examining the influence of emotion socialization on children's emotional and social development, there is less research on what predicts emotion socialization behaviors among parents. The current study explores maternal emotion regulation difficulties as a predictor of emotion socialization practices, specifically, family emotion expressiveness. Further, the current study examines the role of family emotion expressiveness as a possible mediator of the relations between maternal and child emotion regulation in a community sample of 110 mother-child dyads with preschool-aged children. Analyses revealed that positive family expressiveness mediated the relations between maternal emotion dysregulation and child emotion regulation and thus presents important clinical implications for existing emotion socialization interventions.

  3. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  4. α2A -Adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and mRNA expression levels are associated with delay discounting in cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havranek, Michael M; Hulka, Lea M; Tasiudi, Eve; Eisenegger, Christoph; Vonmoos, Matthias; Preller, Katrin H; Mössner, Rainald; Baumgartner, Markus R; Seifritz, Erich; Grünblatt, Edna; Quednow, Boris B

    2017-03-01

    Cocaine users characteristically display preferences for smaller immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards, and this delay discounting (DD) has been proposed as an endophenotype of cocaine addiction. Recent evidence suggests that the norepinephrine system and more specifically the α2A -adrenergic receptor (ADRA2A) are impacted by chronic cocaine use while also being potentially involved in the neural mechanisms underlying DD. Hence, we investigated the effects of ADRA2A polymorphisms and ADRA2A mRNA expression levels on DD of cocaine users and stimulant-naïve controls. Two hundred and twenty-three participants (129 cocaine users and 94 stimulant-naïve healthy controls) completed a computerized DD paradigm and were genotyped for three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1800544, rs521674 and rs602618) in the ADRA2A gene, while their peripheral ADRA2A mRNA expression was quantified in whole blood samples. The three SNPs were in near-perfect linkage disequilibrium. Accordingly, significant group*genotype interactions were found for all three ADRA2A variants revealing steeper DD in cocaine users (but not in controls) carrying the G-allele of SNP rs1800544, the T-allele of rs521674 and the C-allele of rs602618. Similarly, high ADRA2A mRNA expression levels were significantly associated with a reduced tendency to choose smaller more immediate rewards (over larger delayed rewards) in cocaine users but not in controls. As the relationship between DD and cocaine use was moderated by ADRA2A SNPs and by peripheral ADRA2A gene expression, we propose that the norepinephrine system is involved in DD deficits observed in cocaine using individuals. Consequently, pharmacological compounds targeting ADRA2As might be considered for the symptom-specific treatment of delay aversion in stimulant addiction. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Hypoxia-inhibited dual-specificity phosphatase-2 expression in endometriotic cells regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Hsing; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Hsiao, Kuei-Yang; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq

    2011-11-01

    Endometriosis is one of the most common gynaecological diseases that significantly reduces the life qualify of affected women and their families. Aberrant expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and thus over-production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) has been shown to play critical roles in the development of this disease. However, the mechanism responsible for COX-2 over-expression remains obscure. Here, we provide evidence for what we believe is a novel mechanism in regulating COX-2 expression in endometriotic stromal cells. Dual-specificity phosphatase-2 (DUSP2), a nuclear phosphatase that inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is markedly down-regulated in stromal cells of ectopic endometriotic tissues, which results in prolonged activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 MAPK and increased COX-2 expression. Expression of DUSP2 is inhibited by hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) at the transcriptional level. Treatment of normal endometrial stromal cells with hypoxia, or chemicals that cause HIF-1α accumulation, results in DUSP2 down-regulation, prolonged ERK phosphorylation and COX-2 over-expression. In contrast, forced expression of DUSP2 under hypoxia abolishes HIF-1α-induced ERK phosphorylation and COX-2 expression. Furthermore, suppression of DUSP2 by HIF-1α in eutopic endometrial stromal cells increases sensitivity of cox-2 gene to interleukin-1β stimulation, a phenomenon resembling endometriotic stromal cell characteristics. Taken together, these data suggest that DUSP2 is an important molecule in endometrial physiology and that hypoxia-inhibited DUSP2 expression is a critical factor for the development of endometriosis. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Posttranscriptional Regulation Controls Calretinin Expression in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Kresoja-Rakic

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Calretinin (CALB2 is a diagnostic and prognostic marker in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM. We previously reported that calretinin expression is regulated at the mRNA level. The presence of a medium-sized (573 nucleotide 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR predicted to contain binding sites for miR-30a/b/c/d/e and miR-9 as well as an adenine/uridine-rich element (ARE in all three transcripts arising from the CALB2 gene, suggests that calretinin expression is regulated via posttranscriptional mechanisms. Our aim was to investigate the role of the CALB2-3′UTR in the posttranscriptional regulation of calretinin expression in MPM. CALB2-3′UTR was inserted downstream of the luciferase reporter gene using pmiRGLO vector and reporter expression was determined after transfection into MPM cells. Targeted mutagenesis was used to generate variants harboring mutated miR-30 family and ARE binding sites. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to test for the presence of ARE binding proteins. CALB2-3′UTR significantly decreased luciferase activity in MPM cells. Analysis of mutation in the ARE site revealed a further destabilization of the reporter and human antigen R (HuR binding to the ARE sequence was detected. The mutation of two miR-30 binding sites abolished CALB2-3′UTR destabilization effect; a transient delivery of miR-30e-5p mimics or anti-miR into MPM cells resulted in a significant decrease/increase of the luciferase reporter expression and calretinin protein, respectively. Moreover, overexpression of CALB2-3′UTR quenched the effect of miR-30e-5p mimics on calretinin protein levels, possibly by sequestering the mimics, thereby suggesting a competitive endogenous RNA network. Finally, by data mining we observed that expression of miR-30e-5p was negatively correlated with the calretinin expression in a cohort of MPM patient samples. Our data show the role of (1 adenine-uridine (AU-binding proteins in calretinin stabilization and (2

  7. The regulation of APAF1 expression during development and tumourigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickman, E S; Helin, K

    2002-01-01

    Apoptosis Protease-Activating Factor 1, APAF1, was originally isolated four years ago and shown to be the mammalian homologue of the C. elegans pro-apoptotic ced4 gene. Since then, the expression of APAF1 has been demonstrated to be involved in several cell death pathways, including the induction...... of apoptosis by the p53 tumour suppressor protein and neuronal apoptosis. In this review we will focus on the regulation of APAF1 expression, in particular with regard to recent developments in our understanding of the role of APAF1 in both tumourigenesis and mammalian development....

  8. Analytical expressions for group-delay dispersion and third-order dispersion of a reflection grism-pair compressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Juan; Feng, Guoying

    2012-05-10

    We provide a detailed analytical expression of group-delay dispersion (GDD) and third-order dispersion (TOD) for a reflection grism-pair compressor without the first-order approximation of grating diffraction. The analytical expressions can be used to design a grism-pair compressor for compensating the dispersive material without ray tracing. Furthermore, the dispersion performance of the grism pair compressor, depending on compressor parameters, is comprehensively analyzed. Results are shown that we can adjust several parameters to obtain a certain GDD and TOD, such as the incidence angle of the beam, refractive index of the prism, grating constant, and the separation of the grism pair.

  9. Myocardin-related transcription factor regulates Nox4 protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam

    2016-01-01

    translocation of MRTF. Because the Nox4 promoter harbors a serum response factor/MRTF cis-element (CC(A/T)6GG box), we asked if MRTF (and thus cytoskeleton organization) could regulate Nox4 expression. We show that Nox4 protein is robustly induced in kidney tubular cells exclusively by combined application......TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator...... of serum response factor, drives myofibroblast transition from various precursors. We have shown that TGFβ is necessary but insufficient for epithelial-myofibroblast transition in intact epithelia; the other prerequisite is the uncoupling of intercellular contacts, which induces Rho-dependent nuclear...

  10. Expression and regulation of nampt in human islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kover

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt is a rate-limiting enzyme in the mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis of a salvage pathway and exists in 2 known forms, intracellular Nampt (iNampt and a secreted form, extracellular Nampt (eNampt. eNampt can generate an intermediate product, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN, which has been reported to support insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. Nampt has been reported to be expressed in the pancreas but islet specific expression has not been adequately defined. The aim of this study was to characterize Nampt expression, secretion and regulation by glucose in human islets. Gene and protein expression of Nampt was assessed in human pancreatic tissue and isolated islets by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence/confocal imaging respectively. Variable amounts of Nampt mRNA were detected in pancreatic tissue and isolated islets. Immunofluorescence staining for Nampt was found in the exocrine and endocrine tissue of fetal pancreas. However, in adulthood, Nampt expression was localized predominantly in beta cells. Isolated human islets secreted increasing amounts of eNampt in response to high glucose (20 mM in a static glucose-stimulated insulin secretion assay (GSIS. In addition to an increase in eNampt secretion, exposure to 20 mM glucose also increased Nampt mRNA levels but not protein content. The secretion of eNampt was attenuated by the addition of membrane depolarization inhibitors, diazoxide and nifedipine. Islet-secreted eNampt showed enzymatic activity in a reaction with increasing production of NAD+/NADH over time. In summary, we show that Nampt is expressed in both exocrine and endocrine tissue early in life but in adulthood expression is localized to endocrine tissue. Enzymatically active eNampt is secreted by human islets, is regulated by glucose and requires membrane depolarization.

  11. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Deng; Qi Peng; Fuping Song; Didier Lereclus

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcr...

  12. Regulation of cry gene expression in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Peng, Qi; Song, Fuping; Lereclus, Didier

    2014-07-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels.

  13. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels.

  14. Histone H3 tail clipping regulates gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Rosa, Helena; Kirmizis, Antonis; Nelson, Christopher; Bartke, Till; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques; Kouzarides, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Induction of gene expression in yeast and human cells involves changes in histone modifications associated with promoters. Here we identify a histone H3 endopeptidase activity in S. cerevisiae that may regulate these events. The endopeptidase cleaves H3 after alanine 21, generating a histone lacking the first 21 residues and displays a preference for H3 tails carrying repressive modifications. In vivo, the H3 N-terminus is clipped, specifically within the promoter of genes following the induc...

  15. Self-Regulation of Learning and Academic Delay of Gratification: Individual Differences among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    This study examined whether there were gender and ethnic differences in students' willingness to delay gratification, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, self-efficacy beliefs, use of cognitive strategies (such as rehearsal, organization, elaboration, and metacognition), and use of learning strategies (help seeking, time management, effort…

  16. Trichinella spiralis: inhibition of muscle larva growth and development is associated with a delay in expression of infected skeletal muscle characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Neary, S M

    1994-05-01

    Infection of skeletal muscle cells by Trichinella spiralis induces host cells to reenter the cell cycle and these cells subsequently become persistently suspended in apparent G2/M. To investigate the role of the parasite in this process, parasite growth and development within the infected cell was inhibited by irradiation of newborn larvae (48 and 80 krad) prior to infection of host muscle cells. Although larvae entered skeletal muscle cells, irradiation inhibited their subsequent growth and stichosome development, including development of alpha and beta stichocytes. A distinct delay in cell cycle reentry was demonstrated for irradiated larva-infected muscle cells, indicating an interaction between parasite and host factors affecting this host process. Despite effects on stichosome development and this delay, infected muscle cells reentered the cell cycle, expressed increased levels of acid phosphatase, were inhibited in myosin heavy-chain expression, and developed collagen capsules. The results indicate that normal alpha and beta stichocyte development is not required for inducing the infected cell characteristics studied. The model system may be useful in analysis of parasite products that are candidates for regulating various aspects of the infected cell phenotype.

  17. Intron retention as a component of regulated gene expression programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aishwarya G; Smith, Christopher W J

    2017-09-01

    Intron retention has long been an exemplar of regulated splicing with case studies of individual events serving as models that provided key mechanistic insights into the process of splicing control. In organisms such as plants and budding yeast, intron retention is well understood as a major mechanism of gene expression regulation. In contrast, in mammalian systems, the extent and functional significance of intron retention have, until recently, remained greatly underappreciated. Technical challenges to the global detection and quantitation of transcripts with retained introns have often led to intron retention being overlooked or dismissed as "noise". Now, however, with the wealth of information available from high-throughput deep sequencing, combined with focused computational and statistical analyses, we are able to distinguish clear intron retention patterns in various physiological and pathological contexts. Several recent studies have demonstrated intron retention as a central component of gene expression programs during normal development as well as in response to stress and disease. Furthermore, these studies revealed various ways in which intron retention regulates protein isoform production, RNA stability and translation efficiency, and rapid induction of expression via post-transcriptional splicing of retained introns. In this review, we highlight critical findings from these transcriptomic studies and discuss commonalties in the patterns prevalent in intron retention networks at the functional and regulatory levels.

  18. The Role of Bromodomain Proteins in Regulating Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Duffy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important in regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Of the numerous histone modifications which have been identified, acetylation is one of the best characterised and is generally associated with active genes. Histone acetylation can directly affect chromatin structure by neutralising charges on the histone tail, and can also function as a binding site for proteins which can directly or indirectly regulate transcription. Bromodomains specifically bind to acetylated lysine residues on histone tails, and bromodomain proteins play an important role in anchoring the complexes of which they are a part to acetylated chromatin. Bromodomain proteins are involved in a diverse range of functions, such as acetylating histones, remodeling chromatin, and recruiting other factors necessary for transcription. These proteins thus play a critical role in the regulation of transcription.

  19. REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE GENOMIC CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor J Atkinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan life is dependent on the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression within the many cells—essentially all with the identical genome—that make up the organism. While much is understood about how individual gene regulatory elements function, many questions remain about how they interact to maintain correct regulation globally throughout the genome. In this review we summarize the basic features and functions of the crucial regulatory elements promoters, enhancers, and insulators and discuss some of the ways in which proper interactions between these elements is realized. We focus in particular on the role of core promoter sequences and propose explanations for some of the contradictory results seen in experiments aimed at understanding insulator function. We suggest that gene regulation depends on local genomic context and argue that more holistic in vivo investigations that take into account multiple local features will be necessary to understand how genome-wide gene regulation is maintained.

  20. BDNF expression in cat striate cortex is regulated by binocular pattern deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowska-Macios, Karolina; Arckens, Lutgarde; Kossut, Małgorzata; Burnat, Kalina

    2017-01-01

    Deprivation of patterned visual information, as in early onset congenital cataract patients, results in a severe impairment in global motion perception. Previously we reported a delayed maturation of the peripheral visual field representation in primary visual area 17, based on a 2-D DIGE screen for protein expression changes and in situ hybridization for the activity reporter gene ZIF268. To corroborate these findings we here explore the binocular pattern deprivation (BD)-regulated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-described neurotrophin precipitously regulated by early visual experience. To assess the timing of maturation-related BDNF expression we compared the central and the peripheral visual field representations of area 17 of 1, 2, 4 and 6-month-old and adult cats reared under normal visual conditions. To scrutinize the outcome of BD, four different deprivation strategies were compared, including early onset BD from birth and lasting for 2, 4 or 6 months (2BD, 4BD, 6BD), and late onset BD for 2 months upon 2 months of normal vision (2N2BD), as animal models of congenital and delayed onset cataract. During normal cortical development the BDNF transcript levels, measured by quantitative RT-PCR, remained stable. Higher BDNF mRNA levels were found in central area 17 of 2BD and 6BD animals compared to age-matched controls. In central area 17, the high BDNF mRNA levels at the end of the BD period may activate a mechanism by which plastic processes, halted by deprivation, may begin. We here confirm that the peripheral visual field representation of area 17 matures slower than its central counterpart. Only in central area 17 normal visual input upon BD could upregulate BDNF mRNA which may lead to a fast activation of local plastic adaptations.

  1. Regulation of stem cell factor expression in inflammation and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A Da Silva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a major mast cell growth factor, which could be involved in the local increase of mast cell number in the asthmatic airways. In vivo, SCF expression increases in asthmatic patients and this is reversed after treatment with glucocorticoids. In vitro in human lung fibroblasts in culture, IL-1beta, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, confirms this increased SCF mRNA and protein expression implying the MAP kinases p38 and ERK1/2 very early post-treatment, and glucocorticoids confirm this decrease. Surprisingly, glucocorticoids potentiate the IL-1beta-enhanced SCF expression at short term treatment, implying increased SCF mRNA stability and SCF gene transcription rate. This potentiation involves p38 and ERK1/2. Transfection experiments with the SCF promoter including intron1 also confirm this increase and decrease of SCF expression by IL-1beta and glucocorticoids, and the potentiation by glucocorticoids of the IL-1beta-induced SCF expression. Deletion of the GRE or kappaB sites abolishes this potentiation, and the effect of IL-1beta or glucocorticoids alone. DNA binding of GR and NF-kappaB are also demonstrated for these effects. In conclusion, this review concerns new mechanisms of regulation of SCF expression in inflammation that could lead to potential therapeutic strategy allowing to control mast cell number in the asthmatic airways.

  2. TRPV1 expression-dependent initiation and regulation of filopodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, C; Hucho, T

    2007-11-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel, is present endogenously in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. It is involved in the recognition of various pain producing physical and chemical stimuli. In this work, we demonstrate that expression of TRPV1 induces neurite-like structures and filopodia and that the expressed protein is localized at the filopodial tips. Exogenous expression of TRPV1 induces filopodia both in DRG neuron-derived F11 cells and in non-neuronal cells, such as HeLa and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. We find that some of the TRPV1 expression-induced filopodia contain microtubules and microtubule-associated components, and establish cell-to-cell extensions. Using live cell microscopy, we demonstrate that the filopodia are responsive to TRPV1-specific ligands. But both, initiation and subsequent cell-to-cell extension formation, is independent of TRPV1 channel activity. The N-terminal intracellular domain of TRPV1 is sufficient for filopodial structure initiation while the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain is involved in the stabilization of microtubules within these structures. In addition, exogenous expression of TRPV1 results in altered cellular distribution and in enhanced endogenous expression of non-conventional myosin motors, namely myosin IIA and myosin IIIA. These data indicate a novel role of TRPV1 in the regulation of cellular morphology and cellular contact formation.

  3. Social Regulation of Gene Expression in Threespine Sticklebacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K Greenwood

    Full Text Available Identifying genes that are differentially expressed in response to social interactions is informative for understanding the molecular basis of social behavior. To address this question, we described changes in gene expression as a result of differences in the extent of social interactions. We housed threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus females in either group conditions or individually for one week, then measured levels of gene expression in three brain regions using RNA-sequencing. We found that numerous genes in the hindbrain/cerebellum had altered expression in response to group or individual housing. However, relatively few genes were differentially expressed in either the diencephalon or telencephalon. The list of genes upregulated in fish from social groups included many genes related to neural development and cell adhesion as well as genes with functions in sensory signaling, stress, and social and reproductive behavior. The list of genes expressed at higher levels in individually-housed fish included several genes previously identified as regulated by social interactions in other animals. The identified genes are interesting targets for future research on the molecular mechanisms of normal social interactions.

  4. Differential regulation of dentin matrix protein 1 expression during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongbo; Zhang, Shubin; Xie, Yixia; Pi, Yuli; Feng, Jian Q

    2005-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in mineralized tooth and bone. Both in vitro and in vivo data show that DMP1 is critical for mineralization and tooth morphogenesis (growth and development). In this study, we studied Dmp1 gene regulation. The in vitro transient transfection assay identified two important DNA fragments, the 2.4- and 9.6-kb promoter regions. We next generated and analyzed transgenic mice bearing the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter gene driven by the 2.4- or 9.6-kb promoter with the complete 4-kb intron 1. The 9.6-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice conferred a DMP1 expression pattern in odontoblasts identical to that in the endogenous Dmp1 gene. This is reflected by lacZ expression in Dmp1-lacZ knock-in mice during all stages of odontogenesis. In contrast, the 2.4-kb Dmp1-lacZ mice display activity in odontoblast cells only at the early stage of odontogenesis. Thus, we propose that different transcription factors regulate early or later cis-regulatory domains of the Dmp1 promoter, which gives rise to the unique spatial and temporal expression pattern of Dmp1 gene at different stages of tooth development. 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Osmotic pressure can regulate matrix gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Shmuel M; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; McLoon, Anna; Chai, Liraz; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard; Weitz, David A

    2012-10-01

    Many bacteria organize themselves into structurally complex communities known as biofilms in which the cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. In general, the amount of extracellular matrix is related to the robustness of the biofilm. Yet, the specific signals that regulate the synthesis of matrix remain poorly understood. Here we show that the matrix itself can be a cue that regulates the expression of the genes involved in matrix synthesis in Bacillus subtilis. The presence of the exopolysaccharide component of the matrix causes an increase in osmotic pressure that leads to an inhibition of matrix gene expression. We further show that non-specific changes in osmotic pressure also inhibit matrix gene expression and do so by activating the histidine kinase KinD. KinD, in turn, directs the phosphorylation of the master regulatory protein Spo0A, which at high levels represses matrix gene expression. Sensing a physical cue such as osmotic pressure, in addition to chemical cues, could be a strategy to non-specifically co-ordinate the behaviour of cells in communities composed of many different species. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Regulation of period 1 expression in cultured rat pineal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Dirden, James C.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro expression of Period 1 (Per1), Period 2 (Per2) and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) genes in the rat pineal gland to understand the mechanism(s) regulating the expression of these genes in this organ. Pineals, when maintained in vitro for 5 days, did not show circadian rhythmicity in the expression of any of the three genes monitored. Norepinephrine (NE) induced AA-NAT and Per1, whereas its effect on Per2 was negligible. Contrary to what was observed in other systems, NE stimulation did not induce circadian expression of Per1. The effect of NE on Per1 level was dose- and receptor subtype-dependent, and both cAMP and cGMP induced Per1. Per1 was not induced by repeated NE - or forskolin - stimulation. Protein synthesis was not necessary for NE-induced Per1, but it was for reduction of Per1 following NE stimulation. Per1 transcription in pinealocytes was activated by BMAL1/CLOCK. Our results indicate that important differences are present in the regulation of these genes in the mammalian pineal. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Methods and compositions for regulating gene expression in plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachy, Roger N. (Inventor); Luis, Maria Isabel Ordiz (Inventor); Dai, Shunhong (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel chimeric plant promoter sequences are provided, together with plant gene expression cassettes comprising such sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the chimeric plant promoters comprise the BoxII cis element and/or derivatives thereof. In addition, novel transcription factors are provided, together with nucleic acid sequences encoding such transcription factors and plant gene expression cassettes comprising such nucleic acid sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the novel transcription factors comprise the acidic domain, or fragments thereof, of the RF2a transcription factor. Methods for using the chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors in regulating the expression of at least one gene of interest are provided, together with transgenic plants comprising such chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors.

  8. Sleep Phase Delay in Cystic Fibrosis: A Potential New Manifestation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Judy L; Jones, Christopher R; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Packer, Kristyn A; Adler, Frederick R; Liou, Theodore G

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein dysfunction causes CF. Improving survival allows detection of increasingly subtle disease manifestations. CFTR dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) may disturb circadian rhythm and thus sleep phase. We studied sleep in adults to better understand potential CNS CFTR dysfunction. We recruited participants from April 2012 through April 2015 and administered the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ). We compared free-day sleep measurements between CF and non-CF participants and investigated associations with CF survival predictors. We recruited 23 female and 22 male adults with CF aged 18 to 46 years and 26 female and 22 male volunteers aged 18 to 45 years. Compared with volunteers without CF, patients with CF had delayed sleep onset (0.612 h; P = .015), midsleep (1.11 h; P < .001), and wake (1.15 h; P < .001) times and prolonged sleep latency (7.21 min; P = .05) and duration (0.489 h; P = .05). Every hour delay in sleep onset was associated with shorter sleep duration by 0.29 h in patients with CF and 0.75 h in subjects without CF (P = .007) and longer sleep latency by 7.51 min in patients with CF and 1.6 min in volunteers without CF (P = .035). Among patients with CF, FEV1 % predicted, prior acute pulmonary exacerbations, and weight were independent of all free-day sleep measurements. CF in adults is associated with marked delays in sleep phase consistent with circadian rhythm phase delays. Independence from disease characteristics predictive of survival suggests that sleep phase delay is a primary manifestation of CFTR dysfunction in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential roles of two delayed rectifier potassium currents in regulation of ventricular action potential duration and arrhythmia susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenyi, Ryan A; Ortega, Francis A; Groenendaal, Willemijn; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J; Sobie, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    Arrhythmias result from disruptions to cardiac electrical activity, although the factors that control cellular action potentials are incompletely understood. We combined mathematical modelling with experiments in heart cells from guinea pigs to determine how cellular electrical activity is regulated. A mismatch between modelling predictions and the experimental results allowed us to construct an improved, more predictive mathematical model. The balance between two particular potassium currents dictates how heart cells respond to perturbations and their susceptibility to arrhythmias. Imbalances of ionic currents can destabilize the cardiac action potential and potentially trigger lethal cardiac arrhythmias. In the present study, we combined mathematical modelling with information-rich dynamic clamp experiments to determine the regulation of action potential morphology in guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Parameter sensitivity analysis was used to predict how changes in ionic currents alter action potential duration, and these were tested experimentally using dynamic clamp, a technique that allows for multiple perturbations to be tested in each cell. Surprisingly, we found that a leading mathematical model, developed with traditional approaches, systematically underestimated experimental responses to dynamic clamp perturbations. We then re-parameterized the model using a genetic algorithm, which allowed us to estimate ionic current levels in each of the cells studied. This unbiased model adjustment consistently predicted an increase in the rapid delayed rectifier K + current and a drastic decrease in the slow delayed rectifier K + current, and this prediction was validated experimentally. Subsequent simulations with the adjusted model generated the clinically relevant prediction that the slow delayed rectifier is better able to stabilize the action potential and suppress pro-arrhythmic events than the rapid delayed rectifier. In summary, iterative coupling of

  10. Population differences in transcript-regulator expression quantitative trait loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre R Bushel

    Full Text Available Gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL are useful for identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with diseases. At times, a genetic variant may be associated with a master regulator involved in the manifestation of a disease. The downstream target genes of the master regulator are typically co-expressed and share biological function. Therefore, it is practical to screen for eQTLs by identifying SNPs associated with the targets of a transcript-regulator (TR. We used a multivariate regression with the gene expression of known targets of TRs and SNPs to identify TReQTLs in European (CEU and African (YRI HapMap populations. A nominal p-value of <1×10(-6 revealed 234 SNPs in CEU and 154 in YRI as TReQTLs. These represent 36 independent (tag SNPs in CEU and 39 in YRI affecting the downstream targets of 25 and 36 TRs respectively. At a false discovery rate (FDR = 45%, one cis-acting tag SNP (within 1 kb of a gene in each population was identified as a TReQTL. In CEU, the SNP (rs16858621 in Pcnxl2 was found to be associated with the genes regulated by CREM whereas in YRI, the SNP (rs16909324 was linked to the targets of miRNA hsa-miR-125a. To infer the pathways that regulate expression, we ranked TReQTLs by connectivity within the structure of biological process subtrees. One TReQTL SNP (rs3790904 in CEU maps to Lphn2 and is associated (nominal p-value = 8.1×10(-7 with the targets of the X-linked breast cancer suppressor Foxp3. The structure of the biological process subtree and a gene interaction network of the TReQTL revealed that tumor necrosis factor, NF-kappaB and variants in G-protein coupled receptors signaling may play a central role as communicators in Foxp3 functional regulation. The potential pleiotropic effect of the Foxp3 TReQTLs was gleaned from integrating mRNA-Seq data and SNP-set enrichment into the analysis.

  11. Reduced and delayed expression of GDF9 and BMP15 in ovarian tissues from women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li-Na; Huang, Rui; Li, Li-Lin; Fang, Cong; Li, Yi; Liang, Xiao-Yan

    2014-11-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) play crucial roles in follicular development and oocyte maturation. This study aimed to investigate and compare the expression of these proteins in ovarian tissues of women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ovarian tissues from 28 patients with PCOS and 26 normal ovulatory women were collected, and the expression of GDF9 and BMP15 in oocytes and granulosa cells was evaluated via immunohistochemical staining. GDF9 and BMP15 were first expressed in primordial follicles at very low levels, and their expression increased gradually with follicular development, reaching the highest levels in Graafian follicles. However, less GDF9 and BMP15 expression was observed in primordial, primary, and secondary follicles in ovarian tissues of PCOS patients compared with levels in the control tissues (P  0.05). The expression of GDF9 and BMP15 in ovarian tissues varies among the developmental stages in both oocytes and granulosa cells in human ovarian tissues. The expression of these proteins is reduced and delayed in the early follicular stage in PCOS ovarian tissues, and these differences in expression may be associated with aberrant follicular development in patients with PCOS.

  12. Characterization of Gravity Regulated Osteoprotegerin Expression in Fish Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, J.; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, R.; Alestrom, P.; Seibt, D.; Goerlich, R.; Schartl, M.; Winkler, C.

    Human osteoprotegerin (opg) is a secreted protein of 401 amino acids that acts as a decoy receptor for RANKL (receptor activator of NFB ligand). Opg prevents binding of RANKL to its receptor, which is present on osteoclasts and their precursors. Thereby, opg blocks the formation, differentiation and activation of osteoclasts and stimulates apoptosis of mature osteoclasts. As a consequence, opg regulates the degree of bone resorption in order to keep a constant bone mass under normal gravity conditions. Recently, clinorotation experiments using mammalian cell cultures have shown that the opg gene is down-regulated in simulated microgravity at the transcriptional level (Kanematsu et al., Bone 30, 2002). We have identified opg genes in the fish models Medaka and zebrafish to study gravity regulation of opg expression in these models at the organismal level. In Medaka embryos, opg expression starts at stages when first skeletal elements are already detectable. Putative consensus binding sites for transcription factors were identified in the promoter region of the Medaka opg gene indicating possible evolutionary conservation of gene regulatory mechanisms between fish and mammals. To analyze, whether model fish species are suitable tools to study microgravity induced changes at the molecular level in vivo, we investigated regulation of fish opg genes as a consequence of altered gravity. For this, we performed centrifugation and clinorotation experiments, subjecting fish larvae to hypergravity and simulated microgravity, and analyzed expression profiles of skeletal genes by real-time PCR. Our data represent the first experiments using whole animal model organisms to study gravity induced alteration of skeletal factors at the molecular level. Acknowledgement: This work is supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (50 WB 0152) and the European Space Agency (AO-LS-99-MAP-LSS-003).

  13. Mechanisms of biotin-regulated gene expression in microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Satiaputra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biotin is an essential micronutrient that acts as a co-factor for biotin-dependent metabolic enzymes. In bacteria, the supply of biotin can be achieved by de novo synthesis or import from exogenous sources. Certain bacteria are able to obtain biotin through both mechanisms while others can only fulfill their biotin requirement through de novo synthesis. Inability to fulfill their cellular demand for biotin can have detrimental consequences on cell viability and virulence. Therefore understanding the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate biotin biosynthesis and transport will extend our knowledge about bacterial survival and metabolic adaptation during pathogenesis when the supply of biotin is limited. The most extensively characterized protein that regulates biotin synthesis and uptake is BirA. In certain bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, BirA is a bi-functional protein that serves as a transcriptional repressor to regulate biotin biosynthesis genes, as well as acting as a ligase to catalyze the biotinylation of biotin-dependent enzymes. Recent studies have identified two other proteins that also regulate biotin synthesis and transport, namely BioQ and BioR. This review summarizes the different transcriptional repressors and their mechanism of action. Moreover, the ability to regulate the expression of target genes through the activity of a vitamin, such as biotin, may have biotechnological applications in synthetic biology.

  14. Hierarchical Post-transcriptional Regulation of Colicin E2 Expression in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Lechner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a crucial role in many bacterial pathways. In particular, the translation of mRNA can be regulated by trans-acting, small, non-coding RNAs (sRNAs or mRNA-binding proteins, each of which has been successfully treated theoretically using two-component models. An important system that includes a combination of these modes of post-transcriptional regulation is the Colicin E2 system. DNA damage, by triggering the SOS response, leads to the heterogeneous expression of the Colicin E2 operon including the cea gene encoding the toxin colicin E2, and the cel gene that codes for the induction of cell lysis and release of colicin. Although previous studies have uncovered the system's basic regulatory interactions, its dynamical behavior is still unknown. Here, we develop a simple, yet comprehensive, mathematical model of the colicin E2 regulatory network, and study its dynamics. Its post-transcriptional regulation can be reduced to three hierarchically ordered components: the mRNA including the cel gene, the mRNA-binding protein CsrA, and an effective sRNA that regulates CsrA. We demonstrate that the stationary state of this system exhibits a pronounced threshold in the abundance of free mRNA. As post-transcriptional regulation is known to be noisy, we performed a detailed stochastic analysis, and found fluctuations to be largest at production rates close to the threshold. The magnitude of fluctuations can be tuned by the rate of production of the sRNA. To study the dynamics in response to an SOS signal, we incorporated the LexA-RecA SOS response network into our model. We found that CsrA regulation filtered out short-lived activation peaks and caused a delay in lysis gene expression for prolonged SOS signals, which is also seen in experiments. Moreover, we showed that a stochastic SOS signal creates a broad lysis time distribution. Our model thus theoretically describes Colicin E2 expression dynamics

  15. Facial expression recognition and emotional regulation in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, Sophie; Croisier Langenier, Muriel; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-04-01

    Cataplexy is pathognomonic of narcolepsy with cataplexy, and defined by a transient loss of muscle tone triggered by strong emotions. Recent researches suggest abnormal amygdala function in narcolepsy with cataplexy. Emotion treatment and emotional regulation strategies are complex functions involving cortical and limbic structures, like the amygdala. As the amygdala has been shown to play a role in facial emotion recognition, we tested the hypothesis that patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy would have impaired recognition of facial emotional expressions compared with patients affected with central hypersomnia without cataplexy and healthy controls. We also aimed to determine whether cataplexy modulates emotional regulation strategies. Emotional intensity, arousal and valence ratings on Ekman faces displaying happiness, surprise, fear, anger, disgust, sadness and neutral expressions of 21 drug-free patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy were compared with 23 drug-free sex-, age- and intellectual level-matched adult patients with hypersomnia without cataplexy and 21 healthy controls. All participants underwent polysomnography recording and multiple sleep latency tests, and completed depression, anxiety and emotional regulation questionnaires. Performance of patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy did not differ from patients with hypersomnia without cataplexy or healthy controls on both intensity rating of each emotion on its prototypical label and mean ratings for valence and arousal. Moreover, patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy did not use different emotional regulation strategies. The level of depressive and anxious symptoms in narcolepsy with cataplexy did not differ from the other groups. Our results demonstrate that narcolepsy with cataplexy accurately perceives and discriminates facial emotions, and regulates emotions normally. The absence of alteration of perceived affective valence remains a major clinical interest in narcolepsy with cataplexy

  16. Prion protein expression regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Miranda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular prion protein (PRNP is a glycoprotein involved in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. Although the physiological function of PRNP is largely unknown, its key role in prion infection has been extensively documented. This study examines the functionality of PRNP during the course of embryoid body (EB differentiation in mouse Prnp-null (KO and WT embryonic stem cell (ESC lines. The first feature observed was a new population of EBs that only appeared in the KO line after 5 days of differentiation. These EBs were characterized by their expression of several primordial germ cell (PGC markers until Day 13. In a comparative mRNA expression analysis of genes playing an important developmental role during ESC differentiation to EBs, Prnp was found to participate in the transcription of a key pluripotency marker such as Nanog. A clear switching off of this gene on Day 5 was observed in the KO line as opposed to the WT line, in which maximum Prnp and Nanog mRNA levels appeared at this time. Using a specific antibody against PRNP to block PRNP pathways, reduced Nanog expression was confirmed in the WT line. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of ITGB5 (integrin αvβ5 in the KO line rescued the low expression of Nanog on Day 5, suggesting the regulation of Nanog transcription by Prnp via this Itgb5. mRNA expression analysis of the PRNP-related proteins PRND (Doppel and SPRN (Shadoo, whose PRNP function is known to be redundant, revealed their incapacity to compensate for the absence of PRNP during early ESC differentiation. Our findings provide strong evidence for a relationship between Prnp and several key pluripotency genes and attribute Prnp a crucial role in regulating self-renewal/differentiation status of ESC, confirming the participation of PRNP during early embryogenesis.

  17. Pulsatile Versus Oscillatory Shear Stress Regulates NADPH Oxidase Subunit Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Juliana; Ing, Michael H.; Salazar, Adler; Lassègue, Bernard; Griendling, Kathy; Navab, Mohamad; Sevanian, Alex; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2015-01-01

    Shear stress regulates endothelial nitric oxide and superoxide (O2−·) production, implicating the role of NADPH oxidase activity. It is unknown whether shear stress regulates the sources of reactive species production, consequent low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modification, and initiation of inflammatory events. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) in the presence of 50 μg/mL of native LDL were exposed to (1) pulsatile flow with a mean shear stress (τave) of 25 dyne/cm2 and (2) oscillating flow at τave of 0. After 4 hours, aliquots of culture medium were collected for high-performance liquid chromatography analyses of electronegative LDL species, described as LDL− and LDL2−. In response to oscillatory shear stress, gp91phox mRNA expression was upregulated by 2.9±0.3-fold, and its homologue, Nox4, by 3.9±0.9-fold (PBAEC binding (PBAEC binding. The flow-dependent LDL oxidation is determined in part by the NADPH oxidase activity. The formation of modified LDL via O2−· production may also affect the regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and monocyte/BAEC binding. PMID:14593003

  18. Identifying local co-regulation relationships in gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yonggang; Gao, Qinghui; Li, Juntao; Zhao, Xiting

    2014-11-07

    Identifying interesting relationships between pairs of genes, presented over some of experimental conditions in gene expression data set, is useful for discovering novel functional gene interactions. In this paper, we introduce a new method for id entifying L ocal C o-regulation R elationships (IdLCR). These local relationships describe the behaviors of pairwise genes, which are either up- or down-regulated throughout the identified condition subset. IdLCR firstly detects the pairwise gene-gene relationships taking functional forms and the condition subsets by using a regression spline model. Then it measures the relationships using a penalized Pearson correlation and ranks the responding gene pairs by their scores. By this way, those relationships without clearly biological interpretations can be filtered out and the local co-regulation relationships can be obtained. In the simulation data sets, ten different functional relationships are embedded. Applying IdLCR to these data sets, the results show its ability to identify functional relationships and the condition subsets. For micro-array and RNA-seq gene expression data, IdLCR can identify novel biological relationships which are different from those uncovered by IFGR and MINE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  20. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  1. Gene expression dosage regulation in an allopolyploid fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Matos

    Full Text Available How allopolyploids are able not only to cope but profit from their condition is a question that remains elusive, but is of great importance within the context of successful allopolyploid evolution. One outstanding example of successful allopolyploidy is the endemic Iberian cyprinid Squalius alburnoides. Previously, based on the evaluation of a few genes, it was reported that the transcription levels between diploid and triploid S. alburnoides were similar. If this phenomenon occurs on a full genomic scale, a wide functional ''diploidization'' could be related to the success of these polyploids. We generated RNA-seq data from whole juvenile fish and from adult livers, to perform the first comparative quantitative transcriptomic analysis between diploid and triploid individuals of a vertebrate allopolyploid. Together with an assay to estimate relative expression per cell, it was possible to infer the relative sizes of transcriptomes. This showed that diploid and triploid S. alburnoides hybrids have similar liver transcriptome sizes. This in turn made it valid to directly compare the S. alburnoides RNA-seq transcript data sets and obtain a profile of dosage responses across the S. alburnoides transcriptome. We found that 64% of transcripts in juveniles' samples and 44% in liver samples differed less than twofold between diploid and triploid hybrids (similar expression. Yet, respectively 29% and 15% of transcripts presented accurate dosage compensation (PAA/PA expression ratio of 1 instead of 1.5. Therefore, an exact functional diploidization of the triploid genome does not occur, but a significant down regulation of gene expression in triploids was observed. However, for those genes with similar expression levels between diploids and triploids, expression is not globally strictly proportional to gene dosage nor is it set to a perfect diploid level. This quantitative expression flexibility may be a strong contributor to overcome the genomic shock

  2. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huaqun, E-mail: chenhuaqun@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Li, Chaojun, E-mail: licj@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Model Animal Research Center (MARC) and The School of Medicine, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  3. Expression of BMP-2 in Vascular Endothelial Cells of Recipient May Predict Delayed Graft Function After Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic-Jukic, Nikolina; Gulin, Marijana; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Kastelan, Zeljko; Katalinic, Lea; Coric, Marijana; Veda, Marija Varnai; Ivkovic, Vanja; Kes, Petar; Jelakovic, Bojan

    2016-01-01

    Delayed graft function (DGF) is associated with adverse outcomes after renal transplantation. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is involved in both endothelial function and immunological events. We compared expression of BMP-2 in epigastric artery of renal transplant recipients with immediate graft function (IGF) and DGF. 79 patients were included in this prospective study. Patients were divided in IGF group (64 patients) and DGF group (15 patients). BMP-2 expression in intima media (BMP2m) and endothelium (BMP2e) of epigastric artery was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Lower intensity of BMP2e staining was recorded in DGF compared to IGF. In DGF patients, 93% had no expression of BMP2e and 7% had 1st grade expression, compared to 45% and 41% in IGF group, respectively (P=0.001) (P<0.001 for no expression and P = 0.015 for 1st grade expression). Patients who had BMP2e staining positive had lower odds for DGF (OR 0.059 [0.007, 0.477]) and this remained significant even after adjustment for donor and recipient variables, cold ischemia time, and immunological matching (OR 0.038 [0.003, 0.492]). Our results demonstrate that BMP-2 expression in endothelial cells of epigastric arteries may predict development of DGF. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Multiple upstream modules regulate zebrafish myf5 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Chih-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myf5 is one member of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, and it functions as a myogenic factor that is important for the specification and differentiation of muscle cells. The expression of myf5 is somite- and stage-dependent during embryogenesis through a delicate regulation. However, this complex regulatory mechanism of myf5 is not clearly understood. Results We isolated a 156-kb bacterial artificial chromosome clone that includes an upstream 80-kb region and a downstream 70-kb region of zebrafish myf5 and generated a transgenic line carrying this 156-kb segment fused to a green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene. We find strong GFP expression in the most rostral somite and in the presomitic mesoderm during segmentation stages, similar to endogenous myf5 expression. Later, the GFP signals persist in caudal somites near the tail bud but are down-regulated in the older, rostral somites. During the pharyngula period, we detect GFP signals in pectoral fin buds, dorsal rostral myotomes, hypaxial myotomes, and inferior oblique and superior oblique muscles, a pattern that also corresponds well with endogenous myf5 transcripts. To characterize the specific upstream cis-elements that regulate this complex and dynamic expression pattern, we also generated several transgenic lines that harbor various lengths within the upstream 80-kb segment. We find that (1 the -80 kb/-9977 segment contains a fin and cranial muscle element and a notochord repressor; (2 the -9977/-6213 segment contains a strong repressive element that does not include the notochord-specific repressor; (3 the -6212/-2938 segment contains tissue-specific elements for bone and spinal cord; (4 the -2937/-291 segment contains an eye enhancer, and the -2937/-2457 segment is required for notochord and myocyte expression; and (5 the -290/-1 segment is responsible for basal transcription in somites and the presomitic mesoderm. Conclusion We suggest

  5. YY1 positively regulates human UBIAD1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funahashi, Nobuaki, E-mail: nfunahashi@ri.ncgm.go.jp [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Department of Metabolic Disorder, Diabetes Research Center, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirota, Yoshihisa [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka (Japan); Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natumi; Watanabe, Masato [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan); Suhara, Yoshitomo [Department of Bioscience and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan); Okano, Toshio [Department of Hygienic Sciences, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin K is involved in bone formation and blood coagulation. Natural vitamin K compounds are composed of the plant form phylloquinone (vitamin K{sub 1}) and a series of bacterial menaquionones (MK-n; vitamin K{sub 2}). Menadione (vitamin K{sub 3}) is an artificial vitamin K compound. MK-4 contains 4-isoprenyl as a side group in the 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone common structure and has various bioactivities. UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1 or TERE1) is the menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme. UBIAD1 transcript expression significantly decreases in patients with prostate carcinoma and overexpressing UBIAD1 inhibits proliferation of a tumour cell line. UBIAD1 mRNA expression is ubiquitous in mouse tissues, and higher UBIAD1 mRNA expression levels are detected in the brain, heart, kidneys and pancreas. Several functions of UBIAD1 have been reported; however, regulation of the human UBIAD1 gene has not been elucidated. Here we report cloning and characterisation of the human UBIAD1 promoter. A 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis revealed that the main transcriptional start site was 306 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Deletion and mutation analyses revealed the functional importance of the YY1 consensus motif. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. In addition, YY1 small interfering RNA decreased endogenous UBIAD1 mRNA expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity. These results suggest that YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1 promoter. - Highlights: • We cloned the human UBIAD1 promoter. • The functional importance of the YY1 motif was identified in the UBIAD1 promoter. • YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. • Knockdown of YY1 significantly decreased UBIAD1 expression. • YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1

  6. OsBBX14 delays heading date by repressing florigen gene expression under long and short-day conditions in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bo; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yaping; Zhang, Fang; Zhou, Jinjun; Chen, Fan; Xie, Xianzhi

    2016-06-01

    B-box (BBX) proteins are zinc finger proteins containing B-box domains, which have roles in Arabidopsis growth and development. However, little is known concerning rice BBXs. Herein, we identified a rice BBX protein, Oryza sativa BBX14 (OsBBX14). OsBBX14 is highly expressed in flag leaf blades. OsBBX14 expression shows a diurnal rhythm under photoperiodic conditions and subsequent continuous white light. OsBBX14 is located in the nucleus and has transcriptional activation potential. OsBBX14-overexpression (OsBBX14-OX) lines exhibited delayed heading date under long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) conditions, whereas RNAi lines of OsBBX14 lines had similar heading dates to the WT. The florigen genes, Hd3a and RFT1, were downregulated in the OsBBX14-OX lines under LD and SD conditions. Under LD conditions, Hd1 was expressed higher in the OsBBX14-OX lines than in the wild type (WT), and the rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes, OsLHY and OsPRR1, was changed in OsBBX14-OX lines. Thus, OsBBX14 acts as a floral repressor by promoting Hd1 expression under LD conditions, probably because of crosstalk with the circadian clock. Under SD conditions, Ehd1 expression was reduced in OsBBX14-OX lines, but Hd1 and circadian clock gene expressions were unaffected, indicating that OsBBX14 acts as a repressor of Ehd1. Our findings suggested that OsBBX14 regulates heading date differently under LD and SD conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Delayed cutaneous wound healing and aberrant expression of hair follicle stem cell markers in mice selectively lacking Ctip2 in epidermis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Liang

    Full Text Available COUP-TF interacting protein 2 [(Ctip2, also known as Bcl11b] is an important regulator of skin homeostasis, and is overexpressed in head and neck cancer. Ctip2(ep-/- mice, selectively ablated for Ctip2 in epidermal keratinocytes, exhibited impaired terminal differentiation and delayed epidermal permeability barrier (EPB establishment during development, similar to what was observed in Ctip2 null (Ctip2(-/- mice. Considering that as an important role of Ctip2, and the fact that molecular networks which underlie cancer progression partially overlap with those responsible for tissue remodeling, we sought to determine the role of Ctip2 during cutaneous wound healing.Full thickness excisional wound healing experiments were performed on Ctip2(L2/L2 and Ctip2(ep-/- animals per time point and used for harvesting samples for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblotting. Results demonstrated inherent defects in proliferation and migration of Ctip2 lacking keratinocytes during re-epithelialization. Mutant mice exhibited reduced epidermal proliferation, delayed keratinocyte activation, altered cell-cell adhesion and impaired ECM development. Post wounding, Ctip2(ep-/- mice wounds displayed lack of E-Cadherin suppression in the migratory tongue, insufficient expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha SMA in the dermis, and robust induction of K8. Importantly, dysregulated expression of several hair follicle (HF stem cell markers such as K15, NFATc1, CD133, CD34 and Lrig1 was observed in mutant skin during wound repair.Results confirm a cell autonomous role of keratinocytic Ctip2 to modulate cell migration, proliferation and/or differentiation, and to maintain HF stem cells during cutaneous wounding. Furthermore, Ctip2 in a non-cell autonomous manner regulated granulation tissue formation and tissue contraction during wound closure.

  8. Delay of gratification and executive performance in individuals with schizophrenia: putative role for eating behavior and body weight regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolle-Veentjer, Silja; Huth, Verena; Ferstl, Roman; Aldenhoff, Josef Bernd; Hinze-Selch, Dunja

    2008-01-01

    Impairment in executive functions and disturbed weight regulation are common features in individuals with schizophrenia on antipsychotics. Still, the clinical management of weight gain, including educational programs, is insufficient. Therefore, we hypothesized that distinct executive impairment is associated with the inability to self-control food intake. In the present study we investigated the performance in a paradigm analyzing the executive subfunction "delay of gratification" in individuals with schizophrenia (n=29) compared with controls (n=23) and the interrelationship between delay of gratification, overall executive functioning, reported eating behavior and the BMI. We applied a board-game paradigm to operationalize delay of gratification: on designated fields individuals need to decide about a small amount of immediate reinforcement versus double the amount in the end. Appetite and eating behavior were assessed by self-report scales, executive functioning by BADS. We found that the patients performed significantly worse in our paradigm and that this is associated with lower executive functioning. However, the interrelationship between all parameters is complex: there is a significant positive correlation between the reported perceived appetite and executive functioning whereas the reported restrained eating behavior, significantly more frequent in patients, is correlated with low executive functioning and high disinhibition in eating situations. We conclude that executive functions are necessary to successfully manage eating behavior. Thus, better understanding of the cognitive mechanisms might help to support the patients more efficiently in their tough job to keep control.

  9. Bacterial expression system with tightly regulated gene expression and plasmid copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Lisa M; Lapoint, Kathleen; Anthony, Larry; Pluciennik, Anna; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2004-09-29

    A new Escherichia coli host/vector system has been engineered to allow tight and uniform modulation of gene expression and gamma origin (ori) plasmid copy number. Regulation of gamma ori plasmid copy number is achieved through arabinose-inducible expression of the necessary Rep protein, pi, whose gene was integrated into the chromosome of the host strain under control of the P(BAD) promoter. gamma ori replication can be uniformly modulated over 100-fold by changing the concentration of l-arabinose in the growth medium. This strain avoids the problem of all-or-nothing induction of P(BAD) because it is deficient in both arabinose uptake and degradation genes. Arabinose enters the cell by a mutant LacY transporter, LacYA177C, which is expressed from the host chromosome. Although this strain could be compatible with any gamma ori plasmid, we describe the utility of a gamma ori expression vector that allows especially tight regulation of gene expression. With this host/vector system, it is possible to independently modulate gene expression and gene dosage, facilitating the cloning and overproduction of toxic gene products. We describe the successful use of this system for cloning a highly potent toxin, Colicin E3, in the absence of its cognate immunity protein. This system could be useful for cloning genes encoding other potent toxins, screening libraries for potential toxins, and maintaining any gamma ori vector at precise copy levels in a cell.

  10. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  11. Coordinate regulation of DNA methyltransferase expression during oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestor Timothy H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal mammalian development requires the action of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs for the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation within repeat elements and imprinted genes. Here we report the expression dynamics of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, as well as a regulator of DNA methylation, Dnmt3L, in isolated female germ cells. Results Our results indicate that these enzymes are coordinately regulated and that their expression peaks during the stage of postnatal oocyte development when maternal methylation imprints are established. We find that Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Dnmt3L and Dnmt1o transcript accumulation is related to oocyte diameter. Furthermore, DNMT3L deficient 15 dpp oocytes have aberrantly methylated Snrpn, Peg3 and Igf2r DMRs, but normal IAP and LINE-1 methylation levels, thereby highlighting a male germ cell specific role for DNMT3L in the establishment of DNA methylation at repeat elements. Finally, real-time RT-PCR analysis indicates that the depletion of either DNMT3L or DNMT1o in growing oocytes results in the increased expression of the de novo methyltransferase Dnmt3b, suggesting a potential compensation mechanism by this enzyme for the loss of one of the other DNA methyltransferases. Conclusion Together these results provide a better understanding of the developmental regulation of Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b and Dnmt3L at the time of de novo methylation during oogenesis and demonstrate that the involvement of DNMT3L in retrotransposon silencing is restricted to the male germ line. This in turn suggests the existence of other factors in the oocyte that direct DNA methylation to transposons.

  12. Regulation of bcl-2 expression by Ubc9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaohui; Wu, Hailong; Mo, Yin-Yuan

    2006-06-10

    Posttranslational modifications mediated by ubiquitin-like proteins have been implicated in regulating a variety of cellular pathways. Although small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a new member of this family, it has caught a great deal of attention recently because of its novel and distinguished functions. Sumoylation is a multiple-step process, involving maturation, activation, conjugation and ligation. Ubc9 is an E2 conjugating enzyme essential for sumoylation. We have previously shown that suppression of sumoylation by a dominant negative Ubc9 mutant (Ubc9-DN) in the estrogen receptor (ER) positive MCF-7 cells is associated with alterations of tumor cell's response to anticancer drugs as well as tumor growth in a xenograft mouse carcinoma model. To dissect the underlying mechanism of Ubc9-associated alterations of drug responsiveness and tumor growth, we profiled gene expression for the cells expressing wild type Ubc9 (Ubc9-WT) and Ubc9-DN. We found that several tumorigenesis-related genes were downregulated in the Ubc9-DN cells. Within this group, we found that over 10 genes are known to be regulated by ER. Experiments using the estrogen response element fused to the luciferase reporter showed that the basal level of luciferase activity was significantly reduced in the Ubc9-DN cells when compared to the vector alone or the Ubc9-WT cells. Furthermore, we found that both the stability and the subcellular localization of steroid hormone receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) were altered in the Ubc9-DN cells. Together, these results suggest that Ubc9 might regulate bcl-2 expression through the ER signaling pathway, which ultimately contributes to the alterations of drug responsiveness and tumor growth.

  13. Neonatal maternal separation delays the GABA excitatory-to-inhibitory functional switch by inhibiting KCC2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Minami; Tsukahara, Takao; Tomita, Kazuo; Iwai, Haruki; Sonomura, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Sato, Tomoaki

    2017-11-25

    The excitatory-to-inhibitory functional switch of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA; GABA switch), which normally occurs in the first to the second postnatal week in the hippocampus, is necessary for the development of appropriate central nervous system function. A deficit in GABAergic inhibitory function could cause excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) neuron imbalance that is found in many neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we examined whether neonatal stress can affect the timing of the GABA functional switch and cause disorders during adolescence. Neonatal stress was induced in C57BL/6J male mouse pups by maternal separation (MS) on postnatal days (PND) 1-21. Histological quantification of K+-Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) and Ca2+ imaging were performed to examine the timing of the GABA switch during the MS period. To evaluate the influence of neonatal MS on adolescent hippocampal function, we quantified KCC2 expression and evaluated hippocampal-related behavioral tasks at PND35-38. We showed that MS delayed the timing of the GABA switch in the hippocampus and inhibited the increase in membrane KCC2 expression, with KCC2 expression inhibition persisting until adolescence. Behavioral tests showed impaired cognition, declined attention, hyperlocomotion, and aggressive character in maternally separated mice. Taken together, our results show that neonatal stress delayed the timing of the GABA switch, which could change the E/I balance and cause neurodegenerative disorders in later life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Laccases: Production, Expression Regulation, and Applications in Pharmaceutical Biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laccases are a family of copper-containing oxidases with important applications in bioremediation and other various industrial and biotechnological areas. There have been over two dozen reviews on laccases since 2010 covering various aspects of this group of versatile enzymes, from their occurrence, biochemical properties, and expression to immobilization and applications. This review is not intended to be all-encompassing; instead, we highlighted some of the latest developments in basic and applied laccase research with an emphasis on laccase-mediated bioremediation of pharmaceuticals, especially antibiotics. Pharmaceuticals are a broad class of emerging organic contaminants that are recalcitrant and prevalent. The recent surge in the relevant literature justifies a short review on the topic. Since low laccase yields in natural and genetically modified hosts constitute a bottleneck to industrial-scale applications, we also accentuated a genus of laccase-producing white-rot fungi, Cerrena, and included a discussion with regards to regulation of laccase expression.

  15. An optimized, chemically regulated gene expression system for Chlamydomonas.

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    Paola Ferrante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for algal and cell biology and is used for biotechnological applications, such as molecular farming or biological hydrogen production. The Chlamydomonas metal-responsive CYC6 promoter is repressed by copper and induced by nickel ions. However, induction by nickel is weak in some strains, poorly reversible by chelating agents like EDTA, and causes, at high concentrations, toxicity side effects on Chlamydomonas growth. Removal of these bottlenecks will encourage the wide use of this promoter as a chemically regulated gene expression system. METHODOLOGY: Using a codon-optimized Renilla luciferase as a reporter gene, we explored several strategies to improve the strength and reversibility of CYC6 promoter induction. Use of the first intron of the RBCS2 gene or of a modified TAP medium increases the strength of CYC6 induction up to 20-fold. In the modified medium, induction is also obtained after addition of specific copper chelators, like TETA. At low concentrations (up to 10 microM TETA is a more efficient inducer than Ni, which becomes a very efficient inducer at higher concentrations (50 microM. Neither TETA nor Ni show toxicity effects at the concentrations used. Unlike induction by Ni, induction by TETA is completely reversible by micromolar copper concentrations, thus resulting in a transient "wave" in luciferase activity, which can be repeated in subsequent growth cycles. CONCLUSIONS: We have worked out a chemically regulated gene expression system that can be finely tuned to produce temporally controlled "waves" in gene expression. The use of cassettes containing the CYC6 promoter, and of modified growth media, is a reliable and economically sustainable system for the temporally controlled expression of foreign genes in Chlamydomonas.

  16. Maternal obesity regulates gene expression in the hearts of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raipuria, M; Hardy, G O; Bahari, H; Morris, M J

    2015-09-01

    Growing evidence suggests maternal obesity leads to adverse outcomes for offspring, including increased cardiovascular disease (CVD). Alterations in taste preferences of offspring from mothers consuming a high fat diet (HFD) have also been reported. Given recent reports describing cardiac taste receptors, we examined whether the expression of umami and bitter taste receptors is modulated by maternal obesity, and compared this with the physiological challenge of maternal exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed chow (C) or HFD (F) and half of each were provided with a running wheel to enable voluntary exercise (CE or FE), the others remaining sedentary (CS or FS). Two pups from each mother were killed at postnatal day 19. Both lean and obese dams undertook similar amounts of exercise (8.1 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 1.5 km). Maternal obesity increased offspring body weight, adiposity, net and weight-corrected heart ventricle weight, with no effect of exercise. Maternal obesity also increased offspring plasma leptin concentrations, which were normalised by maternal exercise. Cardiac ventricle mRNA expression of bitter taste receptors, β-adrenoceptor (Adrbk1) and angiotensin II receptor type 1a (Agtr1a) were significantly decreased in response to maternal obesity, with maternal exercise decreasing Agtr1a in FE offspring. No changes in umami receptors were observed. FTO mRNA expression was down-regulated by maternal HFD with an up-regulation in offspring of CE mothers. Maternal obesity affected the expression of bitter taste receptors and other genes in the heart ventricle, potentially implicating these genes in the development of CVD associated with maternal obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling gene regulation from paired expression and chromatin accessibility data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, Zhana; Chen, Xi; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Yong; Wong, Wing Hung

    2017-06-20

    The rapid increase of genome-wide datasets on gene expression, chromatin states, and transcription factor (TF) binding locations offers an exciting opportunity to interpret the information encoded in genomes and epigenomes. This task can be challenging as it requires joint modeling of context-specific activation of cis-regulatory elements (REs) and the effects on transcription of associated regulatory factors. To meet this challenge, we propose a statistical approach based on paired expression and chromatin accessibility (PECA) data across diverse cellular contexts. In our approach, we model (i) the localization to REs of chromatin regulators (CRs) based on their interaction with sequence-specific TFs, (ii) the activation of REs due to CRs that are localized to them, and (iii) the effect of TFs bound to activated REs on the transcription of target genes (TGs). The transcriptional regulatory network inferred by PECA provides a detailed view of how trans- and cis-regulatory elements work together to affect gene expression in a context-specific manner. We illustrate the feasibility of this approach by analyzing paired expression and accessibility data from the mouse Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and explore various applications of the resulting model.

  18. Down-Regulation of Angiopoietin-1 Expression in Menorrhagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Peter; Nijjar, Sarbjit; Shams, Munjiba; Morgan, Susan; Gupta, Janesh; Ahmed, Asif

    2002-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential component of endometrial repair and regeneration following menses. Perturbation of this process is associated with menorrhagia, a common gynecological disorder that results in excessive menstrual bleeding. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) promotes vascular maturation via the Tie-2 receptor, while angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is its natural antagonist that destabilizes vessels and initiates neovascularization in the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor. To test the hypothesis that menorrhagia arises as a result of poor signal for vascular maturation, we have examined the expression of Ang-1, Ang-2, and Tie-2 in endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle from 30 normal women and 28 patients with menorrhagia. Ribonuclease protection assay and Western blot analysis showed Ang-2 expression was consistently higher than Ang-1 in normal endometrium throughout the cycle. However, with menorrhagia Ang-1 mRNA and protein were not detected or down-regulated, while Ang-2 was observed at similar levels in both normal and menorrhagic endometrium resulting in a greater than a 50% decrease in the ratio of Ang-1 to Ang-2 protein. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical studies supported these findings and revealed cyclical changes in the expression of Ang-1 and Ang-2. These results suggest that the angiopoietin/Tie-2 system promotes vascular remodeling in endometrium and loss of normal Ang-1 expression may contribute to the excessive blood loss observed in menorrhagia. PMID:11891175

  19. The Mind-Tranquilizing and Menstruation-Regulating Method for Acupuncture Treatment of Delayed Menstrual Cycle——A Clinical Controlled Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xue-mei; WU Jie

    2009-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method with the routine acupuncture method in treating delayed menstrual cycle. Methods: 40 patients with delayed menstrual cycle were randomly divided into a treatment group of 23 cases (treated by the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method),and a control group of 17 cases (treated by the routine acupuncture method for delayed menstrual cycle due to stagnation of the liver-qi). The treatment involved three menstrual cycles. The evaluations were done by scoring the symptoms before treatment and at the end of each menstrual cycle. Results: After treatment,significant differences were found between the two groups in the therapeutic effects (P<0.05). Conclusion: The therapeutic effect of the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method is significantly superior to that of the routine acupuncture method for delayed menstrual cycle.

  20. Expression of BMP-2 in Vascular Endothelial Cells of Recipient May Predict Delayed Graft Function After Renal Transplantation

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    Nikolina Basic-Jukic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Delayed graft function (DGF is associated with adverse outcomes after renal transplantation. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 is involved in both endothelial function and immunological events. We compared expression of BMP-2 in epigastric artery of renal transplant recipients with immediate graft function (IGF and DGF. Methods: 79 patients were included in this prospective study. Patients were divided in IGF group (64 patients and DGF group (15 patients. BMP-2 expression in intima media (BMP2m and endothelium (BMP2e of epigastric artery was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Lower intensity of BMP2e staining was recorded in DGF compared to IGF. In DGF patients, 93% had no expression of BMP2e and 7% had 1st grade expression, compared to 45% and 41% in IGF group, respectively (P=0.001 (Pst grade expression. Patients who had BMP2e staining positive had lower odds for DGF (OR 0.059 [0.007, 0.477] and this remained significant even after adjustment for donor and recipient variables, cold ischemia time, and immunological matching (OR 0.038 [0.003, 0.492]. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that BMP-2 expression in endothelial cells of epigastric arteries may predict development of DGF.

  1. Improved expression systems for regulated expression in Salmonella infecting eukaryotic cells.

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    Carlos Medina

    Full Text Available In this work we describe a series of improvements to the Salmonella-based salicylate-inducible cascade expression system comprised of a plasmid-borne expression module, where target gene expression is driven by the P(m promoter governed by the XylS2 regulator, and a genome-integrated regulatory module controlled by the nahR/P(sal system. We have constructed a set of high and low-copy number plasmids bearing modified versions of the expression module with a more versatile multiple cloning site and different combinations of the following elements: (i the nasF transcriptional attenuator, which reduces basal expression levels, (ii a strong ribosome binding site, and (iii the Type III Secretion System (TTSS signal peptide from the effector protein SspH2 to deliver proteins directly to the eukaryotic cytosol following bacterial infection of animal cells. We show that different expression module versions can be used to direct a broad range of protein production levels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficient reduction of basal expression by the nasF attenuator allows the cloning of genes encoding highly cytotoxic proteins such as colicin E3 even in the absence of its immunity protein. Additionally, we show that the Salmonella TTSS is able to translocate most of the protein produced by this regulatory cascade to the cytoplasm of infected HeLa cells. Our results indicate that these vectors represent useful tools for the regulated overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial culture or in animal cells, for the cloning and expression of genes encoding toxic proteins and for pathogenesis studies.

  2. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

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    Ali J Vetter

    Full Text Available The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  3. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA) Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX (USA)); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  4. Dietary regulation of P-gp function and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxia; Han, Yi; Lim, Siok Lam; Lim, Lee Yong

    2009-07-01

    Food-drug interactions have been associated with clinically important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of a drug. The aim of this paper is to review the regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by dietary components and to correlate the changes in cellular P-gp function and expression with drug bioavailability. In summary, the published literature has provided extensive data supporting the modulation of drug bioavailability through P-gp regulation by components in food groups such as fruit juices, spices, herbs, cruciferous vegetables and green tea. Most of these data were, however, derived from in vitro cell models and, except for the St John's wort, the clinical significance of most reported interactions remains to be clarified. Studies on piperine and capsaicin have underscored an often poor correlation between in vivo and in vitro data, whereas experiments involving curcumin highlighted differences between acute and chronic consumption of a dietary component on P-gp function and expression in vivo. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of the dietary components will aid in addressing these knowledge gaps.

  5. LINE-1 retrotransposition events regulate gene expression after X-ray irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaz-Yaşar, Ferya; Gedik, Nilgün; Karahan, Selda; Diaz-Carballo, David; Bongartz, Birthe M; Ergün, Süleyman

    2012-09-01

    Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons are mobile elements that insert into new genomic locations via reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. The mechanism of retrotransposition is not entirely understood. The integration of these elements occurs by target-primed reverse transcription (TPRT), which initiates double-strand breaks (DSBs) during the LINE-1 integration. Also, X-ray is known to induce DNA damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of LINE-1 de novo retrotransposition on the expression of different genes after X-ray irradiation in human endothelial cells. After stable transfection of the human hybrid endothelial cell line EA.hy926 with the human LINE-1 element, we analyzed the expression of different genes after irradiation with 5 Gy X-rays by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We determine the expression level of phosphorylated p53 and γ-histone H2AX protein levels upon X-ray irradiation with 5 Gy for 24 h. Our results showed that EA.hy926 LINE-1 cell clones react with a strong upregulation of phosphorylated p53 protein, already 15 min after irradiation compared to the wild type (WT) cells. Also, the expression of γ-histone H2AX protein was elevated in the cell clones with retrotransposition events 15 min after irradiation, whereas the WT cells have a delayed expression of phosphorylated histone H2AX protein. Taken together, our findings provide that LINE-1 retrotransposition events regulate different gene expression after irradiation in the EA.hy926 cell line.

  6. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  7. Cholesterol regulates HERG K+ channel activation by increasing phospholipase C β1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Yoon Sun; Oh, Hyun Geun; Park, Myoung Kyu; Cho, Hana; Chung, Sungkwon

    2013-01-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) K+ channel underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ conductance (IKr) during normal cardiac repolarization. Also, it may regulate excitability in many neuronal cells. Recently, we showed that enrichment of cell membrane with cholesterol inhibits HERG channels by reducing the levels of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] due to the activation of phospholipase C (PLC). In this study, we further explored the effect of cholesterol enrichment on HERG channel kinetics. When membrane cholesterol level was mildly increased in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing HERG channel, the inactivation and deactivation kinetics of HERG current were not affected, but the activation rate was significantly decelerated at all voltages tested. The application of PtdIns(4,5)P2 or inhibitor for PLC prevented the effect of cholesterol enrichment, while the presence of antibody against PtdIns(4,5)P2 in pipette solution mimicked the effect of cholesterol enrichment. These results indicate that the effect of cholesterol enrichment on HERG channel is due to the depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P2. We also found that cholesterol enrichment significantly increases the expression of β1 and β3 isoforms of PLC (PLCβ1, PLCβ3) in the membrane. Since the effects of cholesterol enrichment on HERG channel were prevented by inhibiting transcription or by inhibiting PLCβ1 expression, we conclude that increased PLCβ1 expression leads to the deceleration of HERG channel activation rate via downregulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2. These results confirm a crosstalk between two plasma membrane-enriched lipids, cholesterol and PtdIns(4,5)P2, in the regulation of HERG channels. PMID:23793622

  8. Artificial transcription factor-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tol, Niels; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2014-08-01

    The transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes with artificial transcription factors (TFs) can offer new tools for plant biotechnology. Three systems are available for mediating site-specific DNA recognition of artificial TFs: those based on zinc fingers, TALEs, and on the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Artificial TFs require an effector domain that controls the frequency of transcription initiation at endogenous target genes. These effector domains can be transcriptional activators or repressors, but can also have enzymatic activities involved in chromatin remodeling or epigenetic regulation. Artificial TFs are able to regulate gene expression in trans, thus allowing them to evoke dominant mutant phenotypes. Large scale changes in transcriptional activity are induced when the DNA binding domain is deliberately designed to have lower binding specificity. This technique, known as genome interrogation, is a powerful tool for generating novel mutant phenotypes. Genome interrogation has clear mechanistic and practical advantages over activation tagging, which is the technique most closely resembling it. Most notably, genome interrogation can lead to the discovery of mutant phenotypes that are unlikely to be found when using more conventional single gene-based approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulation of gene expression by CAR: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Mari; Honkakoski, Paavo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a well-known xenosensor that regulates hepatic drug metabolism and detoxification. CAR activation can be elicited by a large variety of xenobiotics, including phenobarbital (PB) which is not a directly binding CAR ligand. The mechanism of CAR activation is complex and involves translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, followed by further activation steps in the nucleus. Recently, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been identified as a PB-responsive receptor, and PB activates CAR by inhibiting the EGFR signaling. In addition to regulation of drug metabolism, activation of CAR has multiple biological end points such as modulation of xenobiotic-elicited liver injury, and the role of CAR in endobiotic functions such as glucose metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis is increasingly recognized. Thus, investigations on the molecular mechanism of CAR activation are critical for the real understanding of CAR-mediated processes. Here, we summarize the current understanding of mechanisms by which CAR activators regulate gene expression through cellular signaling pathways and the roles of CAR on xenobiotic-elicited hepatocellular carcinoma, liver injury, glucose metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis.

  10. Facial expression primes and implicit regulation of negative emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, HeungSik; Kim, Shin Ah; Kim, Sang Hee

    2015-06-17

    An individual's responses to emotional information are influenced not only by the emotional quality of the information, but also by the context in which the information is presented. We hypothesized that facial expressions of happiness and anger would serve as primes to modulate subjective and neural responses to subsequently presented negative information. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a functional MRI study in which the brains of healthy adults were scanned while they performed an emotion-rating task. During the task, participants viewed a series of negative and neutral photos, one at a time; each photo was presented after a picture showing a face expressing a happy, angry, or neutral emotion. Brain imaging results showed that compared with neutral primes, happy facial primes increased activation during negative emotion in the dorsal anterior cingulated cortex and the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, which are typically implicated in conflict detection and implicit emotion control, respectively. Conversely, relative to neutral primes, angry primes activated the right middle temporal gyrus and the left supramarginal gyrus during the experience of negative emotion. Activity in the amygdala in response to negative emotion was marginally reduced after exposure to happy primes compared with angry primes. Relative to neutral primes, angry facial primes increased the subjectively experienced intensity of negative emotion. The current study results suggest that prior exposure to facial expressions of emotions modulates the subsequent experience of negative emotion by implicitly activating the emotion-regulation system.

  11. Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Delay of Gratification, and Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2008-01-01

    Teachers educate children in a way that potentially leads these learners to become active agents in constructing a better world. The present study examined teacher candidates' beliefs about the characteristics of self-regulated teacher. Specifically, teacher candidates (N = 71) described the characteristics of a teacher with high teacher's…

  12. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages by Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vivek; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Liao, Chang; Kaushal, Naveen; Carlson, Bradley A.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases plays a pivotal role in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Given the importance of dietary selenium in mitigating inflammation, we hypothesized that selenium supplementation may regulate inflammatory gene expression at the epigenetic level. The effect of selenium towards histone acetylation was examined in both in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and immunoblotting. Our results indicated that selenium supplementation, as selenite, decreased acetylation of histone H4 at K12 and K16 in COX-2 and TNF promoters, and of the p65 subunit of the redox sensitive transcription factor NFκB in primary and immortalized macrophages. On the other hand, selenomethionine had a much weaker effect. Selenite treatment of HIV-1 infected human monocytes also significantly decreased the acetylation of H4 at K12 and K16 on the HIV-1 promoter, supporting the downregulation of proviral expression by selenium. A similar decrease in histone acetylation was also seen in the colonic extracts of mice treated with dextran sodium sulfate that correlated well with the levels of selenium in the diet. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Trspfl/flCreLysM mice that lack expression of selenoproteins in macrophages confirmed the important role of selenoproteins in the inhibition of histone H4 acetylation. Our studies suggest that the ability of selenoproteins to skew the metabolism of arachidonic acid to contribute, in part, to their ability to inhibit histone acetylation. In summary, our studies suggest a new role for selenoproteins in the epigenetic modulation of pro-inflammatory genes. PMID:25458528

  14. Autoimmune regulator expression in thymomas with or without autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yimei; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Fanjie; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Yuanguo; Yao, Yuanyuan; Qi, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) regulates autoimmunity and self-antigen expression, such as acetylcholine receptor (AchR), in the thymus. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can down-regulate autoimmunity, but also promote tumor growth. The objective of this study was to examine the levels of AIRE, AchR, and Foxp3 expression in thymomas. The relative levels of AIRE, AchR, and Foxp3 mRNA transcripts and the frequency of AIRE+, AchR+, and Foxp3+ cells were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in 79 thymoma tissue samples from 21 patients with simple thymoma (the Tm group), 39 patients with myasthenia gravis (the MG group) and 19 patients with myasthenia gravis and one other autoimmune disease (the AD group). The numbers of peripheral blood CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs were determined by flow cytometry analysis. The relative levels of AIRE and AchR mRNA transcripts in the MG group were significantly lower than that in the Tm group (p=0.04, p=0.03), but higher than that in the AD group (p=0.03, p=0.04). The relative levels of Foxp3 mRNA transcripts in the Tm group were significantly higher than that in the MG and AD groups (p=0.03 for both). A similar pattern of the percentages of AIRE+, AchR+, and Foxp3+ cells in the thymoma tissues and the numbers of peripheral blood Tregs were detected in these patients. The levels of AIRE mRNA transcripts were correlated positively with that of the AchR and Foxp3 in this population. The levels of AIRE and AchR mRNA transcripts in the A/AB/B1 types of thymomas were significantly higher than that in the B2/B3/C types of thymomas in this population. Significantly lower levels of AIRE, AchR, and Foxp3 expression are associated with the development of thymoma-related autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Drosha regulates gene expression independently of RNA cleavage function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N......-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression....

  16. Drosha Regulates Gene Expression Independently of RNA Cleavage Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gromak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression.

  17. Chemical regulation of sex expression in certain olive cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Hegazi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The modifying effect of growth regulators on bud burst, flower bud formation and sex expression in olives varies greatly according to cultivar, concentration and time of application. Cycocel 200, 500 mg/l, ethephon 200 mg/l and SADH 2000 mg/l stimulated bud burst and flower bud formation in the 'Blanquetta' cv. A noticeable increase in the percentage of perfect flowers was obtained by 100 mg/l of kinetin, and 200 mg/l of Cycocel in the cv. 'Picual', Ethephon 200/1, Cycocel 200 mg/l and SADH 2000 mg/l considerably increased the percentage of perfect flowers in the cvs 'Blanquetta', 'Serrana' and 'Picual'. Treatments at green cluster stage were not effective.

  18. Growth hormone regulates the expression of UCP2 in myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futawaka, Kumi; Tagami, Tetsuya; Fukuda, Yuki; Koyama, Rie; Nushida, Ayaka; Nezu, Syoko; Imamoto, Miyuki; Kasahara, Masato; Moriyama, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    To determine if and how growth hormone (GH) signaling is involved in energy metabolism. We used human embryonic kidney TSA201 cells, human H-EMC-SS chondrosarcoma cells, rat L6 skeletal muscle cells, and murine C2C12 skeletal muscle myoblasts to investigate GH-induced expression of uncoupling protein2 (UCP2) to the GHR/JAK/STAT5 pathway by a combination of a reporter assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting. We demonstrated that the regulation energy metabolism, which was hypothesized to be directly acted on by GH, involves UCP2 via activated STAT5B, a signal transducer downstream of GH. We also showed that the sequence at the -586 'TTCnGA' may function as a novel putative consensus sequence of STAT5s. The results suggest that GH regulates energy metabolism directly in myocytes and that UCP2 participates in the signal transduction pathway that functions downstream of the GHR/JAK/STAT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation cascade of flagellar expression in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutourina, Olga A; Bertin, Philippe N

    2003-10-01

    Flagellar motility helps bacteria to reach the most favourable environments and to successfully compete with other micro-organisms. These complex organelles also play an important role in adhesion to substrates, biofilm formation and virulence process. In addition, because their synthesis and functioning are very expensive for the cell (about 2% of biosynthetic energy expenditure in Escherichia coli) and may induce a strong immune response in the host organism, the expression of flagellar genes is highly regulated by environmental conditions. In the past few years, many data have been published about the regulation of motility in polarly and laterally flagellated bacteria. However, the mechanism of motility control by environmental factors and by some regulatory proteins remains largely unknown. In this respect, recent experimental data suggest that the master regulatory protein-encoding genes at the first level of the cascade are the main target for many environmental factors. This mechanism might require DNA topology alterations of their regulatory regions. Finally, despite some differences the polar and lateral flagellar cascades share many functional similarities, including a similar hierarchical organisation of flagellar systems. The remarkable parallelism in the functional organisation of flagellar systems suggests an evolutionary conservation of regulatory mechanisms in Gram-negative bacteria.

  20. Feeding Regulates the Expression of Pancreatic Genes in Gastric Mucosa

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    Maria Rita De Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ineffective short-term control of feeding behavior compromises energy homeostasis and can lead to obesity. The gastrointestinal tract secretes several regulatory peptides. However, little is known about the stomach peptide contribution to the acute regulation of intake. In an attempt to identify new gastric signals, the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE method was used for the transcription profiling of stomach mucosa in 7 groups of mice: fasting and sacrificed 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours after a low-fat (LF or high-fat (HF ad libitum meal. In total, 35 genes were differentially modulated by LF and HF meals compared to fasting, including 15 mRNAs coding for digestive enzymes/secretory proteins, and 10 novel transcripts. Although the basic expression profile did not undergo substantial variations, both LF and HF meals influenced the transcription. This study represents the first global analysis of stomach transcriptome as induced by different nutritional stimuli. Further studies including the characterization of novel genes may help to identify new targets for the therapy and prevention of obesity.

  1. Down-regulation of EZH2 expression in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, Monica; Wei, Yue; Yang, Hui; Ganan-Gomez, Irene; Bohannan, Zach; Colla, Simona; Marchesini, Matteo; Bravo, Guillermo Montalban; Takahashi, Koichi; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    EZH2 genetic mutations are common in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), which implies that this gene has a pathophysiological role in the disease. To further characterize molecular alterations of EZH2, and their potential prognostic impact in MDS, we assessed EZH2 RNA expression in primary bone marrow CD34+ cells from 78 patients. We found that 47% of patients have reduced EZH2 expression compared to normal controls. Further analyses revealed that EZH2 is significantly underexpressed in patients bearing chromosome 7 or 7q deletions (7-alt) when compared to controls, diploid patients, and patients with other cytogenetic alterations (pEZH2 underexpression (median OS 55 vs. 36 months; p=0.71). Importantly, this trend became significant when the analysis was restricted to the subset of cases without alterations in chromosome 7 (62 vs. 36 months; p=0.033). Furthermore, our previous work has identified a spectrum of innate immune genes in MDS CD34+ cells that are deregulated via abnormal promoter histone methylation. Because EZH2 is a key regulator of histone methylation, we assessed the relationship between deregulation of these genes and EZH2 underexpression. We observed that the mRNA levels of 11 immune genes were higher in the EZH2 underexpression group and that immune gene expression was significantly higher in patients with concomitant EZH2 underexpression and KDM6B (also known as JMJD3, an H3K27 demethylase) overexpression. Taken together, these data indicate that EZH2 underexpression may have unique impact on the molecular pathogenesis and prognosis in MDS and be an important marker for patients without chromosome 7 alteration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTOR GENE: REGULATION OF EXPRESSION

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    Geoffrey Noel Hendy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The human calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR has 8 exons, and localizes to chromosome 3q. Exons 1A and 1B encode alternative 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs that splice to exon 2 encoding the AUG initiation codon. Exons 2-7 encode the CaSR protein of 1078 amino acids. Promoter P1 has TATA and CCAAT boxes upstream of exon 1A, and promoter P2 has Sp1/3 motifs at the start site of exon 1B. Exon 1A transcripts from the P1 promoter are reduced in parathyroid tumors and colon carcinomas. Studies of colon carcinomas and neuroblastomas have emphasized the importance of epigenetic changes – promoter methylation of the GC-rich P2 promoter, histone acetylation – as well as involvement of microRNAs in bringing about CASR gene silencing and reduced CaSR expression. Functional cis-elements in the CASR promoters responsive to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH2D], proinflammatory cytokines, and the transcription factor glial cells missing-2 (GCM2 have been characterized. Reduced levels of CaSR and reduced responsiveness to active vitamin D in parathyroid neoplasia and colon carcinoma may blunt the tumor suppressor activity of the CaSR. The hypocalcemia of critically ill patients with burn injury or sepsis is associated with CASR gene upregulation by TNF-alpha and IL-1beta via kappaB elements, and by IL-6 via Stat1/3 and Sp1/3 elements in the CASR gene promoters, respectively. The CASR is transactivated by GCM2 – the expression of which is essential for parathyroid gland development. Hyperactive forms of GCM2 may contribute to later parathyroid hyperactivity or tumorigenesis. The expression of the CaSR––the calciostat––is regulated physiologically and pathophysiologically at the gene level.

  3. Regulation of bradykinin B2-receptor expression by oestrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Demontis, Maria Piera; Anania, Vittorio; Gorioso, Nicola; Chao, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein is overexpressed in the kidney of female rats, this sexual dimorphism being associated with a greater effect of early blockade of bradykinin B2-receptors on female blood pressure phenotype. We evaluated the effect of ovariectomy and oestradiol benzoate (50 μg kg−1 every two days for two weeks) on the vasodepressor response to intra-arterial injection of bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) and on the expression of bradykinin B2-receptors.Ovariectomy reduced the magnitude of the vasodepressor response to bradykinin and unmasked a secondary vasopressor effect. Oestrogen replacement restored the vasodepressor response to bradykinin in ovariectomized rats.The vasodepressor responses to sodium nitroprusside (3–18 μg kg−1), acetylcholine (30–600 ng kg−1), desArg9-bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) or prostaglandin E2 (30–600 ng kg−1) were significantly reduced by ovariectomy. Oestrogen restored to normal the responses to desArg9-bradykinin, acetylcholine and prostaglandin E2, but not that to sodium nitroprusside.B2-receptor mRNA levels were decreased by ovariectomy in the aorta and kidney and they were restored to normal levels by oestrogen. Neither ovariectomy nor oestradiol affected receptor expression in the heart and uterus.These results indicate that oestrogen regulates B2-receptor gene expression and function. Since kinins exert a cardiovascular protective action, reduction in their vasodilator activity after menopause might contribute to the increased risk of pathological cardiovascular events. Conversely, the cardioprotective effects of oestrogen replacement might be, at least in part, mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. PMID:9283715

  4. Delayed Expression of Circulating TGF-β1 and BMP-2 Levels in Human Nonunion Long Bone Fracture Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yoshiaki; Ghazizadeh, Mohammad; Shimizu, Hajime; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Saito, Nobuyuki; Yagi, Takanori; Mashiko, Kazuki; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Kawai, Makoto; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The healing process of bone fracture requires a well-controlled multistage and sequential order beginning immediately after the injury. However, complications leading to nonunion exist, creating serious problems and costs for patients. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) are two major growth factors involved in human bone fracture healing by promoting various stages of bone ossification. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of these factors during the fracture healing of human long bones and assess their impacts on nonunion condition. We performed a comprehensive analysis of plasma TGF-β1 and BMP-2 levels in blood samples from 10 patients with proved nonunion and 10 matched patients with normal union following a predetermined time schedule. The concentrations of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 were measured at each time point using a solid-phase ELISA. TGF-β1 and BMP-2 levels were detectable in all patients. For all patients, a maximal peak for TGF-β1 was found at 3-week. In normal union group, TGF-β1 showed a maximal peak at 2-week while nonunion group had a delayed maximal peak at 3-week. Plasma levels of BMP-2 for all patients and for normal union group reached a maximal peak at 1-week, but nonunion group showed a delayed maximal peak at 2-week. In general, plasma TGF-β1 or BMP-2 level was not significantly different between normal union and nonunion groups. The expression levels of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 appeared to be delayed in nonunion patients which could play an important role in developing an early marker of fracture union condition and facilitate improved patient's management.

  5. Influence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator on expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Luis EN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. Infections of the respiratory tract are a hallmark in CF. The host immune responses in CF are not adequate to eradicate pathogens, such as P. aeruginosa. Dendritic cells (DC are crucial in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Changes in DC function could contribute to abnormal immune responses on multiple levels. The role of DC in CF lung disease remains unknown. Methods This study investigated the expression of CFTR gene in bone marrow-derived DC. We compared the differentiation and maturation profile of DC from CF and wild type (WT mice. We analyzed the gene expression levels in DC from naive CF and WT mice or following P. aeruginosa infection. Results CFTR is expressed in DC with lower level compared to lung tissue. DC from CF mice showed a delayed in the early phase of differentiation. Gene expression analysis in DC generated from naive CF and WT mice revealed decreased expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav1, a membrane lipid raft protein, in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Consistently, protein and activity levels of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, a negative regulator of Cav1 expression, were increased in CF DC. Following exposure to P. aeruginosa, expression of 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2, two enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism that are also regulated by SREBP, was less decreased in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Conclusion These results suggest that CFTR dysfunction in DC affects factors involved in membrane structure and lipid-metabolism, which may contribute to the abnormal inflammatory and immune response characteristic of CF.

  6. HDAC2 expression in parvalbumin interneurons regulates synaptic plasticity in the mouse visual cortex

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    Alexi Nott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experience-dependent postnatal increase in GABAergic inhibition in the visual cortex is important for the closure of a critical period of enhanced synaptic plasticity. Although maturation of the subclass of parvalbumin (Pv–expressing GABAergic interneurons is known to contribute to critical period closure, the role of epigenetics on cortical inhibition and synaptic plasticity has not been explored. The transcription regulator, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2, has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity and learning processes in hippocampal excitatory neurons. We found that genetic deletion of HDAC2 specifically from Pv interneurons reduces inhibitory input in the visual cortex of adult mice and coincides with enhanced long-term depression that is more typical of young mice. These findings show that HDAC2 loss in Pv interneurons leads to a delayed closure of the critical period in the visual cortex and supports the hypothesis that HDAC2 is a key negative regulator of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain.

  7. HDAC2 expression in parvalbumin interneurons regulates synaptic plasticity in the mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Alexi; Cho, Sukhee; Seo, Jinsoo; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-01-01

    An experience-dependent postnatal increase in GABAergic inhibition in the visual cortex is important for the closure of a critical period of enhanced synaptic plasticity. Although maturation of the subclass of Parvalbumin (Pv)-expressing GABAergic interneurons is known to contribute to critical period closure, the role of epigenetics on cortical inhibition and synaptic plasticity has not been explored. The transcription regulator, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity and learning processes in hippocampal excitatory neurons. We found that genetic deletion of HDAC2 specifically from Pv-interneurons reduces inhibitory input in the visual cortex of adult mice, and coincides with enhanced long-term depression (LTD) that is more typical of young mice. These findings show that HDAC2 loss in Pv-interneurons leads to a delayed closure of the critical period in the visual cortex and supports the hypothesis that HDAC2 is a key negative regulator of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain.

  8. A comparison of receptive-expressive language profiles between toddlers with autism spectrum disorder and developmental language delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Kyeong In; Song, Seung Ha; Kim, Ka Lim; Oh, Seung Taek; Kim, Young Tae; Im, Woo Young; Song, Dong Ho; Cheon, Keun-Ah

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that expressive language impairment is commonly less severe than receptive language impairment in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, this result is based on experiments in Western countries with Western language scales. This study tries to find whether the result above is applicable for toddlers in a non-Western country; more specifically, in Korea with non-Western language scales. The participants were 166 toddlers aged between 20 months and 50 months who visited the clinic from December 2010 to January 2013. The number of toddlers diagnosed as ASD and developmental language delay (DLD) was 103 and 63, respectively. Language development level was assessed using Sequenced Language Scale for Infants (SELSI), a Korean language scale. Using SELSI, each group was divided into 3 sub-groups. Moreover, the group difference by age was observed by dividing them into three age groups. Chi-square test and linear-by-linear association was used for analysis. Receptive language ability of the DLD group was superior to that of the ASD group in all age groups. However, expressive language ability in both groups showed no difference in all age groups. A greater proportion of expressive dominant type was found in ASD. The 20-29 months group in ASD showed the largest proportion of expressive language dominant type in the three age groups, suggesting that the younger the ASD toddler is, the more severe the receptive language impairment is. These findings suggest that receptive-expressive language characteristics in ASD at earlier age could be useful in the early detection of ASD.

  9. Emotional Expressivity and Emotion Regulation: Relation to Academic Functioning among Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyongboon; Hanrahan, Amanda R.; Kupzyk, Kevin A.

    2017-01-01

    We examined emotional expressivity (i.e., happiness, sadness, and anger) and emotion regulation (regulation of exuberance, sadness, and anger) as they relate to academic functioning (motivation, engagement, and achievement). Also, we tested the premise that emotional expressivity and emotion regulation are indirectly associated with achievement…

  10. Mothers' Emotional Expressivity and Children' Behavior Problems and Social Competence: Mediation through Children's Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Gershoff, Elizabeth Thompson; Fabes, Richard A.; Shepard, Stephanie A.; Cumberland, Amanda J.; Losoya, Sandra H.; Guthrie, Ivanna K.; Murphy, Bridget C.

    2001-01-01

    Examined relations between mothers' expressed positive and negative emotion and 55- to 79-month-olds' regulation, social competence, and adjustment. Structural equation modeling revealed unique effects of positive and negative maternal expressed emotion on children's regulation, and the relations of maternal expressed emotion to children's…

  11. Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF6 modulates the expression of Kermit 2/XGIPC in IGF- regulated eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, N; Tussellino, M; Carotenuto, R; Ronca, R; Rizzolio, S; Biffo, S; Campanella, C

    2017-07-01

    The eukaryotic initiation translation factor eIF6 is a highly conserved, essential protein implicated in translation. eIF6 is regulated in vivo by extracellular signals, such as IGF signaling (for a review see Miluzio et al., 2009). In Xenopus, eif6 over-expression causes a delay in eye development (De Marco et al., 2011). In this study we showed that eif6 co-immunoprecipitates with the insulin-like growth factor receptor (igfr) and may function downstream of igf in eye formation. The relationship between eif6 and gipc2, a protein partner of a variety of molecules including membrane proteins, was investigated. gipc2 is required for maintaining igf-induced akt activation on eye development (Wu et al., 2006). Significantly eif6 and gipc2 have opposite effects in eye development. While eif6 is required for eye formation below threshold levels, gipc2 knockdown impairs eye development (De Marco et al., 2011; Wu et al., 2006). In this study, it was shown that in eif6 over-expressors, the delay in eye morphogenesis is reversed by gipc2 injection, while the injection of eif6 down-regulates gipc2 expression. Real-time-PCR indicates that eif6 regulates gipc2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, gipc2 knockdown has no significant effect on eif6 mRNA levels. These results suggest that eif6 regulation of gipc2 enables correct morphogenesis of Xenopus eye and stimulate questions on the molecular network implicated in this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of neuronal APL-1 expression by cholesterol starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Mary; Antebi, Adam; Zheng, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques composed primarily of the amyloid-β peptide, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). While mutations in APP lead to the development of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD), sporadic AD has only one clear genetic modifier: the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene. Cholesterol starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans leads to molting and arrest phenotypes similar to loss-of-function mutants of the APP ortholog, apl-1 (amyloid precursor-like protein 1), and lrp-1 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1), suggesting a potential interaction between apl-1 and cholesterol metabolism. Previously, we found that RNAi knock-down of apl-1 leads to aldicarb hypersensitivity, indicating a defect in synaptic function. Here we find the same defect is recapitulated during lrp-1 knock-down and by cholesterol starvation. A cholesterol-free diet or loss of lrp-1 directly affects APL-1 levels as both lead to loss of APL-1::GFP fluorescence in neurons. However, loss of cholesterol does not affect global transcription or protein levels as seen by qPCR and Western blot. Our results show that cholesterol and lrp-1 are involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission, similar to apl-1. Both are able to modulate APL-1 protein levels in neurons, however cholesterol changes do not affect global apl-1 transcription or APL-1 protein indicating the changes are specific to neurons. Thus, regulation of synaptic transmission and molting by LRP-1 and cholesterol may be mediated by their ability to control APL-1 neuronal protein expression.

  13. Regulation of neuronal APL-1 expression by cholesterol starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Wiese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques composed primarily of the amyloid-β peptide, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. While mutations in APP lead to the development of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD, sporadic AD has only one clear genetic modifier: the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE gene. Cholesterol starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans leads to molting and arrest phenotypes similar to loss-of-function mutants of the APP ortholog, apl-1 (amyloid precursor-like protein 1, and lrp-1 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, suggesting a potential interaction between apl-1 and cholesterol metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previously, we found that RNAi knock-down of apl-1 leads to aldicarb hypersensitivity, indicating a defect in synaptic function. Here we find the same defect is recapitulated during lrp-1 knock-down and by cholesterol starvation. A cholesterol-free diet or loss of lrp-1 directly affects APL-1 levels as both lead to loss of APL-1::GFP fluorescence in neurons. However, loss of cholesterol does not affect global transcription or protein levels as seen by qPCR and Western blot. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that cholesterol and lrp-1 are involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission, similar to apl-1. Both are able to modulate APL-1 protein levels in neurons, however cholesterol changes do not affect global apl-1 transcription or APL-1 protein indicating the changes are specific to neurons. Thus, regulation of synaptic transmission and molting by LRP-1 and cholesterol may be mediated by their ability to control APL-1 neuronal protein expression.

  14. Impact of delay to cryopreservation on RNA integrity and genome-wide expression profiles in resected tumor samples.

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    Elodie Caboux

    Full Text Available The quality of tissue samples and extracted mRNA is a major source of variability in tumor transcriptome analysis using genome-wide expression microarrays. During and immediately after surgical tumor resection, tissues are exposed to metabolic, biochemical and physical stresses characterized as "warm ischemia". Current practice advocates cryopreservation of biosamples within 30 minutes of resection, but this recommendation has not been systematically validated by measurements of mRNA decay over time. Using Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 Expression BeadChips, providing a genome-wide coverage of over 24,000 genes, we have analyzed gene expression variation in samples of 3 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC and 3 lung carcinomas (LC cryopreserved at times up to 2 hours after resection. RNA Integrity Numbers (RIN revealed no significant deterioration of mRNA up to 2 hours after resection. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis detected non-significant gene expression variations of -3.5%/hr (95% CI: -7.0%/hr to 0.1%/hr; p = 0.054. In LC, no consistent gene expression pattern was detected in relation with warm ischemia. In HCC, a signature of 6 up-regulated genes (CYP2E1, IGLL1, CABYR, CLDN2, NQO1, SCL13A5 and 6 down-regulated genes (MT1G, MT1H, MT1E, MT1F, HABP2, SPINK1 was identified (FDR <0.05. Overall, our observations support current recommendation of time to cryopreservation of up to 30 minutes and emphasize the need for identifying tissue-specific genes deregulated following resection to avoid misinterpreting expression changes induced by warm ischemia as pathologically significant changes.

  15. Delayed cystogenesis and increased ciliogenesis associated with the re-expression of polaris in Tg737 mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicole E; Murcia, Noel S

    2003-04-01

    Renal cysts and shortened cilia on renal tubular epithelia have been observed in Tg737orpk (orpk) mutant mice, suggesting a potential connection between cystogenesis and ciliogenesis. To further test this hypothesis we have characterized the progression of cystic disease and cilia expression in orpk, orpk;Tg737Rsq (orpk rescue), and Tg737 Delta 2-3 beta Gal;Tg737Rsq (KO rescue) mice. Methods. Orpk, orpk rescue, and KO rescue animals were generated and analyzed from postnatal day (P) 0 to P21 (orpk mutants) or from P0 to P210 (orpk rescue and KO rescue animals). Proximal tubules (PT) and collecting tubules (CT) were identified by immunohistochemistry using segment-specific lectins and a segment-specific cystic index was calculated. Scanning electron microscopy was utilized to observe and measure cilia expression in cysts from orpk, orpk rescue, and KO rescue animals. KO rescue and orpk rescue animals develop adult-onset autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Ultrastructural analysis of cilia expression revealed that cysts from orpk expressed short cilia, whereas cysts from KO rescue animals expressed normal length cilia and cysts from orpk rescue animals expressed cilia that are two to five times longer than wild type. While this data is consistent with a role for polaris in ciliogenesis, it does not support a direct connection between ciliogenesis and cystic disease. Similarities in cyst formation and striking differences in cilia expression associated with these ARPKD mouse models indicates that cyst formation and cilia expression are independent phenotypic features regulated by polaris.

  16. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  17. The mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating method for acupuncture treatment of delayed menstrual cycle--a clinical controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xue-mei; Wu, Jie

    2009-03-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method with the routine acupuncture method in treating delayed menstrual cycle. 40 patients with delayed menstrual cycle were randomly divided into a treatment group of 23 cases (treated by the mind-tranquilizing and menstruation-regulating acupuncture method), and a control group of 17 cases (treated by the routine acupuncture method for delayed menstrual cycle due to stagnation of the liver-qi). The treatment involved three menstrual cycles. The evaluations were done by scoring the symptoms before treatment and at the end of each menstrual cycle. After treatment, significant differences were found between the two groups in the therapeutic effects (Pmenstrual cycle.

  18. THE EXPRESSION, COMMUNICATION, AND REGULATION OF BIOLOGICAL EMOTIONS: SEX AND CULTURAL DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BUCK, Ross; POWERS, Stacie Renfro

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes sex and cultural differences and similarities in the expression, communication, and regulation of biological emotions from the viewpoint of developmental-interactionist theory...

  19. Express attentional re-engagement but delayed entry into consciousness following invalid spatial cues in visual search.

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    Benoit Brisson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In predictive spatial cueing studies, reaction times (RT are shorter for targets appearing at cued locations (valid trials than at other locations (invalid trials. An increase in the amplitude of early P1 and/or N1 event-related potential (ERP components is also present for items appearing at cued locations, reflecting early attentional sensory gain control mechanisms. However, it is still unknown at which stage in the processing stream these early amplitude effects are translated into latency effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we measured the latency of two ERP components, the N2pc and the sustained posterior contralateral negativity (SPCN, to evaluate whether visual selection (as indexed by the N2pc and visual-short term memory processes (as indexed by the SPCN are delayed in invalid trials compared to valid trials. The P1 was larger contralateral to the cued side, indicating that attention was deployed to the cued location prior to the target onset. Despite these early amplitude effects, the N2pc onset latency was unaffected by cue validity, indicating an express, quasi-instantaneous re-engagement of attention in invalid trials. In contrast, latency effects were observed for the SPCN, and these were correlated to the RT effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results show that latency differences that could explain the RT cueing effects must occur after visual selection processes giving rise to the N2pc, but at or before transfer in visual short-term memory, as reflected by the SPCN, at least in discrimination tasks in which the target is presented concurrently with at least one distractor. Given that the SPCN was previously associated to conscious report, these results further show that entry into consciousness is delayed following invalid cues.

  20. Regulation of DREAM Expression by Group I mGluR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinu; Kim, Insook; Oh, So Ra; Ko, Suk Jin; Lim, Mi Kyung; Kim, Dong Goo

    2011-01-01

    DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator) is a calcium-binding protein that regulates dynorphin expression, promotes potassium channel surface expression, and enhances presenilin processing in an expression level-dependent manner. However, no molecular mechanism has yet explained how protein levels of DREAM are regulated. Here we identified group I mGluR (mGluR1/5) as a positive regulator of DREAM protein expression. Overexpression of mGluR1/5 increased the cellular level of DREAM. Up-regulation of DREAM resulted in increased DREAM protein in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, where the protein acts as a transcriptional repressor and a modulator of its interacting proteins, respectively. DHPG (3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine), a group I mGluR agonist, also up-regulated DREAM expression in cortical neurons. These results suggest that group I mGluR is the first identified receptor that may regulate DREAM activity in neurons. PMID:21660149

  1. Low concentrations of salicylic acid delay methyl jasmonate-induced leaf senescence by up-regulating nitric oxide synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yingbin; Liu, Jian; Xing, Da

    2016-09-01

    In plants, extensive efforts have been devoted to understanding the crosstalk between salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling in pathogen defenses, but this crosstalk has scarcely been addressed during senescence. In this study, the effect of SA application on methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced leaf senescence was assessed. We found that low concentrations of SA (1-50 μM) played a delayed role against the senescence promoted by MeJA. Furthermore, low concentrations of SA enhanced plant antioxidant defenses and restricted reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in MeJA-treated leaves. When applied simultaneously with MeJA, low concentrations of SA triggered a nitric oxide (NO) burst, and the elevated NO levels were linked to the nitric oxide associated 1 (NOA1)-dependent pathway via nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. The ability of SA to up-regulate plant antioxidant defenses, reduce ROS accumulation, and suppress leaf senescence was lost in NO-deficient Atnoa1 plants. In a converse manner, exogenous addition of NO donors increased the plant antioxidant capacity and lowered the ROS levels in MeJA-treated leaves. Taken together, the results indicate that SA at low concentrations counteracts MeJA-induced leaf senescence through NOA1-dependent NO signaling and strengthening of the antioxidant defense. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Regulation-Structured Dynamic Metabolic Model Provides a Potential Mechanism for Delayed Enzyme Response in Denitrification Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Thomas, Dennis G.; Stegen, James C.; Li, Minjing; Liu, Chongxuan; Song, Xuehang; Chen, Xingyuan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2017-09-29

    In a recent study of denitrification dynamics in hyporheic zone sediments, we observed a significant time lag (up to several days) in enzymatic response to the changes in substrate concentration. To explore an underlying mechanism and understand the interactive dynamics between enzymes and nutrients, we developed a trait-based model that associates a community’s traits with functional enzymes, instead of typically used species guilds (or functional guilds). This enzyme-based formulation allows to collectively describe biogeochemical functions of microbial communities without directly parameterizing the dynamics of species guilds, therefore being scalable to complex communities. As a key component of modeling, we accounted for microbial regulation occurring through transcriptional and translational processes, the dynamics of which was parameterized based on the temporal profiles of enzyme concentrations measured using a new signature peptide-based method. The simulation results using the resulting model showed several days of a time lag in enzymatic responses as observed in experiments. Further, the model showed that the delayed enzymatic reactions could be primarily controlled by transcriptional responses and that the dynamics of transcripts and enzymes are closely correlated. The developed model can serve as a useful tool for predicting biogeochemical processes in natural environments, either independently or through integration with hydrologic flow simulators.

  3. Transmigrated neutrophils down-regulate the expression of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells and inhibit the adhesion of flowing lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Philip C W; Lally, Frank; Rahman, Mahbub; Smith, Emily; Buckley, Christopher D; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed

    2005-01-01

    As the first leukocytes recruited during inflammation, neutrophils are ideally situated to regulate the subsequent recruitment of mononuclear leukocytes. Here, we found that human neutrophils recruited by endothelial cells (EC), which had been stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha for 4 h, inhibited the adhesion of flowing, mixed mononuclear cells or purified lymphocytes over the subsequent 20 h but did not affect the adhesion of a secondary bolus of neutrophils. The degree of inhibition of lymphocyte adhesion increased with the duration of neutrophil-EC contact and with the number of recruited neutrophils. Antibody-blocking studies showed that lymphocyte adhesion was mediated predominantly by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Recruited neutrophils reduced the EC expression of VCAM-1 but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) or E-selectin in a manner that mirrored the time- and number-dependent reduction in lymphocyte adhesion. VCAM-1 was not shed into the culture supernatant, and a panel of protease inhibitors was unable to reverse its down-regulation, indicating that it was not proteolytically degraded by neutrophils. In EC that had been in contact with neutrophils, the mRNA message for VCAM-1 but not ICAM-1 was down-regulated, indicating that alterations in transcriptional activity were responsible for the reduction in VCAM-1. Thus, under some inflammatory milieu, neutrophils may delay the recruitment of mononuclear leukocytes by regulating the expression of EC adhesion receptors.

  4. Constitutive and regulated expression vectors to construct polyphosphate deficient bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerez Carlos A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP, a polymer of tens or hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like bonds, is found in all organisms and performs a wide variety of functions. PolyP is synthesized in bacterial cells by the actions of polyphosphate kinases (PPK1 and PPK2 and degraded by an exopolyphosphatase (PPX. Bacterial cells with polyP deficiencies are impaired in many structural and important cellular functions such as motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence. Knockout mutants of the ppk1 gene have been the most frequent strategy employed to generate polyP deficient cells. Results As an alternative method to construct polyP-deficient bacteria we developed constitutive and regulated broad-host-range vectors for depleting the cellular polyP content. This was achieved by the overexpression of yeast exopolyphosphatase (PPX1. Using this approach in a polyphosphate accumulating bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. B4, we were able to eliminate most of the cellular polyP (>95%. Furthermore, the effect of overexpression of PPX1 resembled the functional defects found in motility and biofilm formation in a ppk1 mutant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The plasmids constructed were also successfully replicated in other bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Burkholderia and Salmonella. Conclusion To deplete polyP contents in bacteria broad-host-range expression vectors can be used as an alternative and more efficient method compared with the deletion of ppk genes. It is of great importance to understand why polyP deficiency affects vital cellular processes in bacteria. The construction reported in this work will be of great relevance to study the role of polyP in microorganisms with non-sequenced genomes or those in which orthologs to ppk genes have not been identified.

  5. miR-381 Regulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation via Regulating Hes1 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Shi

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are self-renewing, multipotent and undifferentiated precursors that retain the capacity for differentiation into both glial (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neuronal lineages. Neural stem cells offer cell-based therapies for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and spinal cord injuries. However, their cellular behavior is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs involved in cell development, proliferation and differentiation through regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The role of miR-381 in the development of neural stem cells remains unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of miR-381 promoted neural stem cells proliferation. It induced the neural stem cells differentiation to neurons and inhibited their differentiation to astrocytes. Furthermore, we identified HES1 as a direct target of miR-381 in neural stem cells. Moreover, re-expression of HES1 impaired miR-381-induced promotion of neural stem cells proliferation and induce neural stem cells differentiation to neurons. In conclusion, miR-381 played important role in neural stem cells proliferation and differentiation.

  6. The heterologous expression of a chrysanthemum TCP-P transcription factor CmTCP14 suppresses organ size and delays senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Qu, Yixin; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Jingjing; Song, Aiping; Hu, Yueheng; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi

    2017-06-01

    TCP transcription factors are important for plant growth and development, but their activity in chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) has not been thoroughly explored. Here, a chrysanthemum TCP-P sequence, which encodes a protein harboring the conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif, was shown to be related phylogenetically to the Arabidopsis thaliana gene AtTCP14. A yeast-one hybrid assay showed that the encoding protein had no transcriptional activation ability, and a localization experiment indicated that it was localized in the nucleus. Transcription profiling established that the gene was most active in the stem and leaf. Its heterologous expression in A. thaliana down-regulated certain cell cycle-related genes, reduced the size of various organs and increased the chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of the leaf which led to delayed senescence and a prolonged flowering period. Moreover, by screening the cDNA library of chrysanthemum, we found that the CmTCP14 can interact with CmFTL2 and some CmDELLAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The GATA factor Serpent cross-regulates lozenge and u-shaped expression during Drosophila blood cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratoglu, Selen; Hough, Barry; Mon, Soe T.; Fossett, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila GATA factor Serpent interacts with the RUNX factor Lozenge to activate the crystal cell program, whereas SerpentNC binds the Friend of GATA protein U-shaped to limit crystal cell production. Here, we identified a lozenge minimal hematopoietic cis-regulatory module and showed that lozenge-lacZ reporter-gene expression was autoregulated by Serpent and Lozenge. We also showed that upregulation of u-shaped was delayed until after lozenge activation, consistent with our previous results that showed u-shaped expression in the crystal cell lineage is dependent on both Serpent and Lozenge. Together, these observations describe a feed forward regulatory motif, which controls the temporal expression of u-shaped. Finally, we showed that lozenge reporter-gene activity increased in a u-shaped mutant background and that forced expression of SerpentNC with U-shaped blocked lozenge- and u-shaped-lacZ reporter-gene activity. This is the first demonstration of GATA:FOG regulation of Runx and Fog gene expression. Moreover, these results identify components of a Serpent cross-regulatory sub-circuit that can modulate lozenge expression. Based on the sub-circuit design and the combinatorial control of crystal cell production, we present a model for the specification of a dynamic bi-potential regulatory state that contributes to the selection between a Lozenge-positive and Lozenge-negative state. PMID:17869239

  8. Using gene expression noise to understand gene regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsky, B.; Neuert, G.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic variation is ubiquitous in biology and is often traceable to underlying genetic and environmental variation. However, even genetically identical cells in identical environments display variable phenotypes. Stochastic gene expression, or gene expression "noise," has been suggested as a

  9. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  10. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N. Arbeitman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster. Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation.

  11. Sex Differences in Drosophila Somatic Gene Expression: Variation and Regulation by doublesex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeitman, Michelle N; New, Felicia N; Fear, Justin M; Howard, Tiffany S; Dalton, Justin E; Graze, Rita M

    2016-07-07

    Sex differences in gene expression have been widely studied in Drosophila melanogaster Sex differences vary across strains, but many molecular studies focus on only a single strain, or on genes that show sexually dimorphic expression in many strains. How extensive variability is and whether this variability occurs among genes regulated by sex determination hierarchy terminal transcription factors is unknown. To address these questions, we examine differences in sexually dimorphic gene expression between two strains in Drosophila adult head tissues. We also examine gene expression in doublesex (dsx) mutant strains to determine which sex-differentially expressed genes are regulated by DSX, and the mode by which DSX regulates expression. We find substantial variation in sex-differential expression. The sets of genes with sexually dimorphic expression in each strain show little overlap. The prevalence of different DSX regulatory modes also varies between the two strains. Neither the patterns of DSX DNA occupancy, nor mode of DSX regulation explain why some genes show consistent sex-differential expression across strains. We find that the genes identified as regulated by DSX in this study are enriched with known sites of DSX DNA occupancy. Finally, we find that sex-differentially expressed genes and genes regulated by DSX are highly enriched on the fourth chromosome. These results provide insights into a more complete pool of potential DSX targets, as well as revealing the molecular flexibility of DSX regulation. Copyright © 2016 Arbeitman et al.

  12. Using GeneReg to construct time delay gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ziliang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding gene expression and regulation is essential for understanding biological mechanisms. Because gene expression profiling has been widely used in basic biological research, especially in transcription regulation studies, we have developed GeneReg, an easy-to-use R package, to construct gene regulatory networks from time course gene expression profiling data; More importantly, this package can provide information about time delays between expression change in a regulator and that of its target genes. Findings The R package GeneReg is based on time delay linear regression, which can generate a model of the expression levels of regulators at a given time point against the expression levels of their target genes at a later time point. There are two parameters in the model, time delay and regulation coefficient. Time delay is the time lag during which expression change of the regulator is transmitted to change in target gene expression. Regulation coefficient expresses the regulation effect: a positive regulation coefficient indicates activation and negative indicates repression. GeneReg was implemented on a real Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle dataset; more than thirty percent of the modeled regulations, based entirely on gene expression files, were found to be consistent with previous discoveries from known databases. Conclusions GeneReg is an easy-to-use, simple, fast R package for gene regulatory network construction from short time course gene expression data. It may be applied to study time-related biological processes such as cell cycle, cell differentiation, or causal inference.

  13. Ectopic Expression of Capsicum-Specific Cell Wall Protein Capsicum annuum Senescence-Delaying 1 (CaSD1) Delays Senescence and Induces Trichome Formation in Nicotiana benthamiana

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Eunyoung; Yeom, Seon-In; Jo, SungHwan; Jeong, Heejin; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Choi, Doil

    2012-01-01

    Secreted proteins are known to have multiple roles in plant development, metabolism, and stress response. In a previous study to understand the roles of secreted proteins, Capsicum annuum secreted proteins (CaS) were isolated by yeast secretion trap. Among the secreted proteins, we further characterized Capsicum annuum senescence-delaying 1 (CaSD1), a gene encoding a novel secreted protein that is present only in the genus Capsicum. The deduced CaSD1 contains multiple repeats of the amino aci...

  14. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression: impact of diet, sex, metabolic status, and cis genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Viguerie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification of environmental and individual factors controlling AT adaptation is therefore essential. Here, expression of 271 transcripts, selected for regulation according to obesity and weight changes, was determined in 515 individuals before, after 8-week low-calorie diet-induced weight loss, and after 26-week ad libitum weight maintenance diets. For 175 genes, opposite regulation was observed during calorie restriction and weight maintenance phases, independently of variations in body weight. Metabolism and immunity genes showed inverse profiles. During the dietary intervention, network-based analyses revealed strong interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic control of AT gene expression by cis signals was observed for 46 genes. Dietary intervention, sex, and cis genetic variants independently controlled AT gene expression. These analyses help understanding the relative importance of environmental and individual factors that control the expression of human AT genes and therefore may foster strategies aimed at improving AT function in metabolic diseases.

  15. Facial expression recognition and emotional regulation in narcolepsy with cataplexy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bayard, Sophie; Croisier Langenier, Muriel; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    .... Recent researches suggest abnormal amygdala function in narcolepsy with cataplexy. Emotion treatment and emotional regulation strategies are complex functions involving cortical and limbic structures, like the amygdala...

  16. Coffee consumption delays the hepatitis and suppresses the inflammation related gene expression in the Long-Evans Cinnamon rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Masafumi; Donai, Kenichiro; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Ohtomo, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Makoto; Kuroda, Kengo; Kodama, Hiroko; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Kasai, Noriyuki; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Uchida, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi; Isogai, Emiko; Sone, Hideko; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that drinking more than two cups of coffee per day reduces the risks of hepatitis and liver cancer. However, the heterogeneity of the human genome requires studies of experimental animal models with defined genetic backgrounds to evaluate the coffee effects on liver diseases. We evaluated the efficacy of coffee consumption with one of experimental animal models for human disease. We used the Long Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, which onsets severe hepatitis and high incidence of liver cancer, due to the accumulation of copper and iron in livers caused by the genetic mutation in Atp7B gene, and leading to the continuous oxidative stress. We determined the expression of inflammation related genes, and amounts of copper and iron in livers, and incidence of the pre-neoplastic foci in the liver tissue of LEC rats. Coffee administration for 25 weeks delayed the occurrence of hepatitis by two weeks, significantly improved survival, reduced the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and reduced the incidence of small pre-neoplastic liver foci in LEC rats. There was no significant difference in the accumulation of copper and iron in livers, indicating that coffee administration does not affect to the metabolism of these metals. These findings indicate that drinking coffee potentially prevents hepatitis and liver carcinogenesis through its anti-inflammatory effects. This study showed the efficacy of coffee in the prevention of hepatitis and liver carcinogenesis in the LEC model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Patterns and timing in expression of early auxin-induced genes imply involvement of phospholipases A (pPLAs) in the regulation of auxin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labusch, Corinna; Shishova, Maria; Effendi, Yunus; Li, Maoyin; Wang, Xuemin; Scherer, Günther F E

    2013-09-01

    While it is known that patatin-related phospholipase A (pPLA) activity is rapidly activated within 3 min by auxin, hardly anything is known about how this signal influences downstream responses like transcription of early auxin-induced genes or other physiological responses. We screened mutants with T-DNA insertions in members of the pPLA gene family for molecular and physiological phenotypes related to auxin. Only one in nine Arabidopsis thaliana ppla knockdown mutants displayed an obvious constitutive auxin-related phenotype. Compared to wild-type, ppla-IIIδ mutant seedlings had decreased main root lengths and increased lateral root numbers. We tested auxin-induced gene expression as a molecular readout for primary molecular auxin responses in nine ppla mutants and found delayed up-regulation of auxin-responsive gene expression in all of them. Thirty minutes after auxin treatment, up-regulation of up to 40% of auxin-induced genes was delayed in mutant seedlings. We observed only a few cases with hypersensitive auxin-induced gene expression in ppla mutants. While, in three ppla mutants, which were investigated in detail, rapid up-regulation (as early as 10min after auxin stimulus) of auxin-regulated genes was impaired, late transcriptional responses were wild-type-like. This regulatory or dynamic phenotype was consistently observed in different ppla mutants with delayed up-regulation that frequently affected the same genes. This defect was not affected by pPLA transcript levels which remained constant. This indicates a posttranslational mechanism as a functional link of pPLAs to auxin signaling. The need for a receptor triggering an auxin response without employing transcription regulation is discussed.

  18. Self-Regulation of Learning in the 21st Century: Understanding the Role of Academic Delay of Gratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    This study examined college students' motivational tendencies as predictors of academic outcomes and tested how students' goal orientations and academic delay of gratification mediated these associations. The study used data, previously analyzed in 1999, on academic delay of gratification, personal achievement goal orientations, self-efficacy,…

  19. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial func...

  20. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial func...

  1. Expression and chromatin structures of cellulolytic enzyme gene regulated by heterochromatin protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiujun; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, homologue HepA in Penicillium oxalicum) binding is associated with a highly compact chromatin state accompanied by gene silencing or repression. HP1 loss leads to the derepression of gene expression. We investigated HepA roles in regulating cellulolytic enzyme gene expression, as an increasingly number of studies have suggested that cellulolytic enzyme gene expression is not only regulated by transcription factors, but is also affected by the chromat...

  2. Choice between reinforcer delays versus choice between reinforcer magnitudes: differential Fos expression in the orbital prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Araújo, S; Body, S; Valencia Torres, L; Olarte Sanchez, C M; Bak, V K; Deakin, J F W; Anderson, I M; Bradshaw, C M; Szabadi, E

    2010-12-01

    Lesions of the orbital prefrontal cortex (OPFC) and the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC) can disrupt performance in inter-temporal choice tasks, possibly by increasing the organism's sensitivity to delay and/or magnitude of reinforcement. This experiment examined whether exposure to an inter-temporal choice would induce neuronal activation in these areas, as indicated by enhanced expression of the Fos protein. Twelve rats were trained to press levers A and B under an adjusting-delay schedule in which a response on A delivered 50 microl of a sucrose reinforcer after 2 or 18s, whereas a response on B delivered the same reinforcer after a delay that was adjusted in accordance with the rat's choices. Another 12 rats were trained under a similar schedule in which a response on A delivered an immediate reinforcer of size 20 or 180 microl, whereas a response on B delivered an immediate reinforcer whose size was adjusted in accordance with the rat's choices. A third group received training under a schedule that did not entail variation of reinforcer size or delay, or choice between reinforcers, and a control group underwent food restriction without behavioural training. Exposure to the adjusting-delay schedule was associated with enhanced Fos expression in both the OPFC and AcbC, whereas exposure to the adjusting-magnitude schedule was associated with enhanced Fos expression in the OPFC but not the AcbC, compared to the control group. The results are consistent with previous findings that implicated the AcbC and OPFC in delay discounting, and the OPFC in sensitivity to reinforcer size. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional Architectures of Local and Distal Regulation of Gene Expression in Multiple Human Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuanyao; Finucane, Hilary K; Gusev, Alexander; Bhatia, Gaurav; Gazal, Steven; O'Connor, Luke; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Wright, Fred A; Sullivan, Patrick F; Neale, Benjamin M; Price, Alkes L

    2017-04-06

    Genetic variants that modulate gene expression levels play an important role in the etiology of human diseases and complex traits. Although large-scale eQTL mapping studies routinely identify many local eQTLs, the molecular mechanisms by which genetic variants regulate expression remain unclear, particularly for distal eQTLs, which these studies are not well powered to detect. Here, we leveraged all variants (not just those that pass stringent significance thresholds) to analyze the functional architecture of local and distal regulation of gene expression in 15 human tissues by employing an extension of stratified LD-score regression that produces robust results in simulations. The top enriched functional categories in local regulation of peripheral-blood gene expression included coding regions (11.41×), conserved regions (4.67×), and four histone marks (p regulation of peripheral-blood gene expression: coding regions (4.47×), conserved regions (4.51×), and two histone marks (p gene expression across tissues confirmed that local regulation of gene expression is largely shared across tissues but that distal regulation is highly tissue specific. Our results elucidate the functional components of the genetic architecture of local and distal regulation of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aspects of Regulating Freedom of Expression on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cucereanu, D.

    2008-01-01

    It is common knowledge that the internet has profoundly affected the manner in which people communicate, obtain information and express themselves. What is less explored is exactly how freedom of expression and the internet interact, and what may be the legal consequences of the special features of

  5. Transgenic overexpression of BAFF regulates the expression of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LI ZHANG

    Kawakami, Division of Molecular and Developmental. Biology, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka,. Japan. The pT2AL200R150G (Tol2) vector contains a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression cassette com- posed of the Xenopus EF1 enhancer/promoter for ubiquitous expression, the rabbit globin intron, ...

  6. Regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, the epigenetic enigma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mposhi, Archibold; van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Rots, Marianne G.

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetics provides an important layer of information on top of the DNA sequence and is essential for establishing gene expression profiles. Extensive studies have shown that nuclear DNA methylation and histone modifications influence nuclear gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether

  7. Differential timing of gene expression regulation between leptocephali of North Atlantic eels in the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatchez, Louis; Saint-Cyr, Jérôme; Maes, Gregory E.

    2011-01-01

    the alternative hypotheses of (1) differential timing of gene expression regulation during early development versus (2) species-specific differences in expression of particular genes. Our results provide much stronger support for the former hypothesis since no gene showed consistent significant differences...... in expression levels between the two species. In contrast, 146 genes showed differential timings of expression between species, although the observed expression level differences between the species were generally small. Consequently, species-specific gene expression regulation seems to play a minor role...... in species differentiation. Overall, these results show that the basis of the early developmental divergence between the American and European eel is probably influenced by differences in the timing of gene expression regulation for genes involved in a large array of biological functions...

  8. CIBZ Regulates Mesodermal and Cardiac Differentiation of by Suppressing T and Mesp1 Expression in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoku, Tomomi; Kosaka, Koji; Nishio, Miki; Ishida, Yasumasa; Kawaichi, Masashi; Matsuda, Eishou

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying mesodermal and cardiac specification from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are not fully understood. Here, we showed that the BTB domain-containing zinc finger protein CIBZ is expressed in mouse ESCs but is dramatically downregulated during ESC differentiation. CIBZ deletion in ESCs induced specification toward mesoderm phenotypes and their differentiation into cardiomyocytes, whereas overexpression of CIBZ delayed these processes. During ESC differentiation, CIBZ loss-and-gain-of-function data indicate that CIBZ negatively regulates the expressions of Brachyury (T) and Mesp1, the key transcriptional factors responsible for the specification of mammalian mesoderm and cardiac progenitors, respectively. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CIBZ binds to T and Mesp1 promoters in undifferentiated ESCs, and luciferase assays indicate that CIBZ suppresses T and Mesp1 promoters. These findings demonstrate that CIBZ is a novel regulator of mesodermal and cardiac differentiation of ESCs, and suggest that CIBZ-mediated cardiac differentiation depends on the regulation of these two genes. PMID:27659197

  9. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase is a molecular partner of Wolfram syndrome 1 protein, which negatively regulates its expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatyka, Malgorzata; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Bellomo, Elisa A.; Leadbeater, Wendy; Astuti, Dewi; Smith, Joel; Michelangeli, Frank; Rutter, Guy A.; Barrett, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and diabetes mellitus. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that is involved in the regulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), intracellular ion homeostasis, cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In this study, single cell Ca2+ imaging with fura-2 and direct measurements of free cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]CYT) with adenovirally expressed luciferase confirmed a reduced and delayed rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]CYT), and additionally, diminished [ATP]CYT rises in response to elevated glucose concentrations in WFS1-depleted MIN6 cells. We also observed that sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) expression was elevated in several WFS1-depleted cell models and primary islets. We demonstrated a novel interaction between WFS1 and SERCA by co-immunoprecipitation in Cos7 cells and with endogenous proteins in human neuroblastoma cells. This interaction was reduced when cells were treated with the ER stress inducer dithiothreitol. Treatment of WFS1-depleted neuroblastoma cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 resulted in reduced accumulation of SERCA levels compared with wild-type cells. Together these results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of SERCA and provide further insights into the function of WFS1 in calcium homeostasis. PMID:25274773

  10. Down-regulation of ROBO2 Expression in Prostate Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Youn Jin; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence exist that axon guidance genes are involved in cancer pathogenesis. Axon guidance genes ROBO1 and ROBO2 are candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG). The aim of our study was to address whether ROBO1 and ROBO2 expressions are altered in prostate cancers (PCA). In this study, we analyzed ROBO1 and ROBO2 expressions in 107 PCAs. In the immunohistochemistry, loss of ROBO2 expression was identified in 66 % of PCAs and was significantly higher than that in normal cells (p 

  11. Down-regulation of ROBO2 expression in prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youn Jin; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2014-07-01

    Several lines of evidence exist that axon guidance genes are involved in cancer pathogenesis. Axon guidance genes ROBO1 and ROBO2 are candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG). The aim of our study was to address whether ROBO1 and ROBO2 expressions are altered in prostate cancers (PCA). In this study, we analyzed ROBO1 and ROBO2 expressions in 107 PCAs. In the immunohistochemistry, loss of ROBO2 expression was identified in 66 % of PCAs and was significantly higher than that in normal cells (p ROBO1 expression between normal and PCAs. Our results indicate that axon guidance protein ROBO2 is frequently lost in PCA and that ROBO2 might be involved in PCA pathogenesis as a candidate TSG.

  12. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Expression of Neuregulin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Ammosova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1, a cellular serine/threonine phosphatase, is targeted to cellular promoters by its major regulatory subunits, PP1 nuclear targeting subunit, nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1 and RepoMan. PP1 is also targeted to RNA polymerase II (RNAPII by NIPP1 where it can dephosphorylate RNAPII and cycle-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9. Here, we show that treatment of cells with a small molecule activator of PP1 increases the abundance of a neuregulin-1 (NRG-1-derived peptide. NRG-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the cells stably or transiently expressing mutant NIPP1 (mNIPP1 that does not bind PP1, but not in the cells expressing NIPP1. Expression of mNIPP1 also activated the NRG-1 promoter in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Analysis of extracts from mNIPP1 expressing cells by glycerol gradient centrifugation showed a redistribution of PP1 and CDK9 between large and small molecular weight complexes, and increased CDK9 Thr-186 phosphorylation. This correlated with the increased CDK9 activity. Further, RNAPII co-precipitated with mNIPP1, and phosphorylation of RNAPII C-terminal domain (CTD Ser-2 residues was greater in cells expressing mNIPP1. In mNIPP1 expressing cells, okadaic acid, a cell-permeable inhibitor of PP1, did not increase Ser-2 CTD phosphorylation inhibited by flavopiridol, in contrast to the NIPP1 expressing cells, suggesting that PP1 was no longer involved in RNAPII dephosphorylation. Finally, media conditioned with mNIPP1 cells induced the proliferation of wild type 84-31 cells, consistent with a role of neuregulin-1 as a growth promoting factor. Our study indicates that deregulation of PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme activates NRG-1 expression through RNAPII and CDK9 phosphorylation in a NF-κB dependent manner.

  13. Tissue expression and developmental regulation of chicken cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanta Mallika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathelicidins are a major family of antimicrobial peptides present in vertebrate animals with potent microbicidal and immunomodulatory activities. Four cathelicidins, namely fowlicidins 1 to 3 and cathelicidin B1, have been identified in chickens. As a first step to understand their role in early innate host defense of chickens, we examined the tissue and developmental expression patterns of all four cathelicidins. Real-time PCR revealed an abundant expression of four cathelicidins throughout the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts as well as in all primary and secondary immune organs of chickens. Fowlicidins 1 to 3 exhibited a similar tissue expression pattern with the highest expression in the bone marrow and lung, while cathelicidin B1 was synthesized most abundantly in the bursa of Fabricius. Additionally, a tissue-specific regulatory pattern was evident for all four cathelicidins during the first 28 days after hatching. The expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 showed an age-dependent increase both in the cecal tonsil and lung, whereas all four cathelicidins were peaked in the bursa on day 4 after hatching, with a gradual decline by day 28. An abrupt augmentation in the expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 was also observed in the cecum on day 28, while the highest expression of cathelicidin B1 was seen in both the lung and cecal tonsil on day 14. Collectively, the presence of cathelicidins in a broad range of tissues and their largely enhanced expression during development are suggestive of their potential important role in early host defense and disease resistance of chickens.

  14. A light-switchable bidirectional expression module allowing simultaneous regulation of multiple genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Yang, Yi

    2015-10-02

    Several light-regulated genetic circuits have been applied to spatiotemporally control transgene expression in mammalian cells. However, simultaneous regulation of multiple genes using one genetic device by light has not yet been reported. In this study, we engineered a bidirectional expression module based on LightOn system. Our data showed that both reporter genes could be regulated at defined and quantitative levels. Simultaneous regulation of four genes was further achieved in cultured cells and mice. Additionally, we successfully utilized the bidirectional expression module to monitor the expression of a suicide gene, showing potential for photodynamic gene therapy. Collectively, we provide a robust and useful tool to simultaneously control multiple genes expression by light, which will be widely used in biomedical research and biotechnology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HOXB4 Gene Expression Is Regulated by CDX2 in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen; Coshun, Mehmet; Mikkelsen Homburg, Keld

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) plays a key role in the homeobox regulatory network and is essential in regulating the expression of several homeobox (HOX) genes during embryonic development, particularly in the gut. Genome-wide CDX2 chromatin immunoprecipitation...... analysis and expression data from Caco2 cells also suggests a role for CDX2 in the regulation of HOXB4 gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HOXB4 gene expression is regulated by CDX2 in the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated binding of CDX...... demonstrating the CDX2 regulation of HOXB4 gene expression in the developed intestinal epithelium, indicating a possible role for HOXB4 in intestinal homeostasis....

  16. Comparative analysis of gene expression and regulation of replicative aging associated genes in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhami, Sukhraj Pal Singh; Mittal, Nitish; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Roy, Nilanjan

    2011-02-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial and complex phenomenon. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is developed as a model of aging and has been widely studied in order to understand the mechanism of lifespan regulation. A large number of high-throughput studies were conducted to identify the genes which modulate lifespan. These studies provide the list of genes that regulates the lifespan in yeast; however the regulation of these aging associated genes had not been fully understood. In this study, we have shown that deletion of the genes which increase the replicative lifespan (RLS) of yeast show discrete expression patterns when compared with the genes that, on deletion, cause a decrease in lifespan. Expression of longlived (LL) genes decreases as the cell progresses from mid log to stationary phase, whereas expression of shortlived (SL) genes remains unchanged. This distinct expression of LL and SL gene-sets suggests their differential gene regulation. Further analysis of transcriptional regulation by transcription factors and epigenetic regulators (acetylation and methylation) suggests that this differential expression of the two gene-sets is due to their differential epigenetic regulations, rather than regulation by transcription factors. These results accentuate the importance of epigenetic modifications in aging. We deduce that future focused studies on epigenetic modification regulation will help lead to a better understanding of the aging process.

  17. Exogenous alpha 1-antitrypsin down-regulates SERPINA1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadagi, Ahmad; Johansson, Helene; Zemack, Helen; Salipalli, Sandeep; Mörk, Lisa-Mari; Kannisto, Kristina; Jorns, Carl; Gramignoli, Roberto; Strom, Stephen; Stokkeland, Knut; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Jonigk, Danny; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Nowak, Greg; Ellis, Ewa C S

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of the therapy with purified human plasma alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is to increase A1AT levels and to prevent lungs from elastolytic activity in patients with PiZZ (Glu342Lys) A1AT deficiency-related emphysema. Potential hepatic gains of this therapy are unknown. Herein, we investigated the effect of A1AT therapy on SERPINA1 (gene encoding A1AT) expression. The expression of SERPINA1 was determined in A1AT or A1AT plus Oncostatin M (OSM) treated primary human hepatocytes isolated from liver tissues from A1AT deficient patients and control liver tissues. In addition, SERPINA1 mRNA was assessed in lung tissues from PiZZ emphysema patients with and without A1AT therapy, and in adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from healthy PiMM donors. In a dose-dependent manner purified A1AT lowered SERPINA1 expression in hepatocytes. This latter effect was more prominent in hepatocytes stimulated with OSM. Although it did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.0539)-analysis of lung tissues showed lower SERPINA1 expression in PiZZ emphysema patients receiving augmentation therapy relative to those without therapy. Finally, exogenously added purified A1AT (1mg/ml) reduced SERPINA1 expression in naïve as well as in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human adherent PBMCs. Exogenous A1AT protein reduces its own endogenous expression. Hence, augmentation with native M-A1AT protein and a parallel reduction in expression of dysfunctional mutant Z-A1AT may be beneficial for PiZZ liver, and this motivates further studies.

  18. Exogenous alpha 1-antitrypsin down-regulates SERPINA1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Karadagi

    Full Text Available The main goal of the therapy with purified human plasma alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT is to increase A1AT levels and to prevent lungs from elastolytic activity in patients with PiZZ (Glu342Lys A1AT deficiency-related emphysema. Potential hepatic gains of this therapy are unknown. Herein, we investigated the effect of A1AT therapy on SERPINA1 (gene encoding A1AT expression. The expression of SERPINA1 was determined in A1AT or A1AT plus Oncostatin M (OSM treated primary human hepatocytes isolated from liver tissues from A1AT deficient patients and control liver tissues. In addition, SERPINA1 mRNA was assessed in lung tissues from PiZZ emphysema patients with and without A1AT therapy, and in adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC isolated from healthy PiMM donors. In a dose-dependent manner purified A1AT lowered SERPINA1 expression in hepatocytes. This latter effect was more prominent in hepatocytes stimulated with OSM. Although it did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.0539-analysis of lung tissues showed lower SERPINA1 expression in PiZZ emphysema patients receiving augmentation therapy relative to those without therapy. Finally, exogenously added purified A1AT (1mg/ml reduced SERPINA1 expression in naïve as well as in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated human adherent PBMCs. Exogenous A1AT protein reduces its own endogenous expression. Hence, augmentation with native M-A1AT protein and a parallel reduction in expression of dysfunctional mutant Z-A1AT may be beneficial for PiZZ liver, and this motivates further studies.

  19. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, Birgitte; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells....... expression aiming to identify the receptor and the signaling proteins involved. The PACAP receptor subtype PAC1 induced VIP gene expression as (i) PACAP and the PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan were equally efficient and approximately 200-fold more potent than VIP, and (ii) PACAP6-38 and PG99-465, antagonists...

  20. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, B.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10...... expression aiming to identify the receptor and the signaling proteins involved. The PACAP receptor subtype PAC1 induced VIP gene expression as (i) PACAP and the PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan were equally efficient and similar to 200-fold more potent than VIP, and (ii) PACAP6-38 and PG99-465, antagonists...

  1. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-03-01

    Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

  2. Ectopic expression of a phytochrome B gene from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) in Arabidopsis thaliana promotes seedling de-etiolation, dwarfing in mature plants, and delayed flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mei-Fang; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Pei; Shang, Hong-Zhong; Gu, Hai-Ke; Li, Jing-Juan; Xiao, Yang; Guo, Lin; Su, Liang; Gao, Jian-Wei; Yang, Jian-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Phytochrome B (phyB) is an essential red light receptor that predominantly mediates seedling de-etiolation, shade-avoidance response, and flowering time. In this study, we isolate a full-length cDNA of PHYB, designated BrPHYB, from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis), and we find that BrphyB protein has high amino acid sequence similarity and the closest evolutionary relationship to Arabidopsis thaliana phyB (i.e., AtphyB). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results indicate that the BrPHYB gene is ubiquitously expressed in different tissues under all light conditions. Constitutive expression of the BrPHYB gene in A. thaliana significantly enhances seedling de-etiolation under red- and white-light conditions, and causes dwarf stature in mature plants. Unexpectedly, overexpression of BrPHYB in transgenic A. thaliana resulted in reduced expression of gibberellins biosynthesis genes and delayed flowering under short-day conditions, whereas AtPHYB overexpression caused enhanced expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T and earlier flowering. Our results suggest that BrphyB might play an important role in regulating the development of Chinese cabbage. BrphyB and AtphyB have conserved functions during de-etiolation and vegetative plant growth and divergent functions in the regulation of flowering time.

  3. Cybersex: regulating sexually explicit expression on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cate, F H

    1996-01-01

    While the First Amendment restricts the power of the government to control access by adults to sexually explicit expression that is not obscene, the government may restrict access by children, provided that those restrictions do not limit adults to reading only "what is fit for children." Controlling access by children presents special problems in the context of broadcasting, because broadcast programming is accessible to children too young to read and because of the impossibility of segregating adults and children in the audience. The Supreme Court therefore permits the government to require "channeling" of sexually explicit programming to times when fewer unsupervised children are in the audience, to facilitate parental control over children's access to sexually explicit material. Although Internet content includes less than one percent of sexually explicit expression, that material has been the subject of intensive media and government attention. Much of that attention ignores (1) the high level of constitutional protection applicable to non-obscene, sexually explicit expression; (2) features of the Internet which facilitate controlling access by children to sexually explicit expression far more effectively than in broadcasting or print media; and (3) the First Amendment values served by permitting expression of all forms on the Internet.

  4. Development-dependent expression of DNA repair genes and epigenetic regulators in Arabidopsis plants exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidler, Corinne; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2015-02-01

    Both plant senescence and plant response to ionizing radiation involve changes in gene expression and epigenetic profiles, that rely on the formation of reactive oxygen species. However, how the developmental stage of a plant affects its response to ionizing radiation has not been extensively studied. In this study, our experiments showed that exposure to low (10 Gy) and high (100 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation causes developmental delays in plants that may result in reduced biomass or even death of the organism. In particular, 20-day-old plants, which are in the process of transitioning to reproductive growth, showed a distinct response to irradiation compared to 10- or 30-day-old irradiated plants that affects the expression of DNA repair genes. Specifically, we found that the expression of mismatch repair genes was increased in 20-day-old plants, while RAD51 was increased in 10- and 30-day-old plants. Furthermore, we found increased expression of MET1, CMT3 and SUVH5 epigenetic regulators that paralleled decreased ONSEN transcript levels in 20-day-old irradiated plants. These findings suggest that plants exposed during early reproductive growth exhibit a tighter control over genome stability in response to ionizing irradiation compared to plants irradiated at other developmental stages.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of miR-212 expression in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarosaria Incoronato

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown that microRNA expression in cancer may be regulated by epigenetic events. Recently, we found that in lung cancer miR-212 was strongly down-regulated. However, mechanisms involved in the regulation of miR-212 expression are unknown. Therefore, we addressed this point by investigating the molecular mechanisms of miR-212 silencing in lung cancer. We identified histone modifications rather than DNA hypermethylation as epigenetic events that regulate miR-212 levels in NSCLC. Moreover, we found that miR-212 silencing in vivo is closely associated with the severity of the disease.

  6. Developmentally regulated expression of reporter gene in adult ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. The genetic regulation of adult brain development has re- mained enigmatic to developmental biologists since long. The practical difficulty in understanding the adult brain de- velopment is that most of the mutational searches done for genes in different model systems yield mutations inducing embryonic ...

  7. Nitrogen regulates chitinase gene expression in a marine bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpin, Marina; Goodman, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ammonium concentration and nitrogen source regulate promoter activity and use for the transcription of chiA, the major chitinase gene of Pseudoalteromonas sp. S91 and S91CX, an S91 transposon lacZ fusion mutant. The activity of chiA was quantified by beta-galactosidase assay of S91CX cultures...

  8. Characterization of gene expression regulated by human OTK18 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One hypothesis is that OTK18 aids in the regulation of the innate immune system. To test this hypothesis, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the total RNA extracted from Drosophila melanogaster embryonic Schneider 2 (S2) cells transfected with either pEGFP-OTK18 (enhanced green fluorescent protein) or ...

  9. Regulation of early signaling and gene expression in the α-particle and bystander response of IMR-90 human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hei Tom K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of a radiation bystander effect, in which non-irradiated cells respond to signals from irradiated cells, is well established. To understand early signaling and gene regulation in bystander cells, we used a bio-informatics approach, measuring global gene expression at 30 minutes and signaling pathways between 30 minutes and 4 hours after exposure to α-particles in IMR-90 fibroblasts. Methods We used whole human genome microarrays and real time quantitative PCR to measure and validate gene expression. Microarray analysis was done using BRB-Array Tools; pathway and ontology analyses were done using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and PANTHER, respectively. We studied signaling in irradiated and bystander cells using immunoblotting and semi-quantitative image analysis. Results Gene ontology suggested signal transduction and transcriptional regulation responding 30 minutes after treatment affected cell structure, motility and adhesion, and interleukin synthesis. We measured time-dependent expression of genes controlled by the NF-κB pathway; matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3; chemokine ligands 2, 3 and 5 and interleukins 1β, 6 and 33. There was an increased response of this set of genes 30 minutes after treatment and another wave of induction at 4 hours. We investigated AKT-GSK3β signaling and found both AKT and GSK3β are hyper-phosphorylated 30 minutes after irradiation and this effect is maintained through 4 hours. In bystander cells, a similar response was seen with a delay of 30 minutes. We proposed a network model where the observed decrease in phosphorylation of β-catenin protein after GSK3β dependent inactivation can trigger target gene expression at later times after radiation exposure Conclusions These results are the first to show that the radiation induced bystander signal induces a widespread gene expression response at 30 minutes after treatment and these changes are accompanied by modification of

  10. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  11. Mechanisms for the environmental regulation of gene expression ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-01-07

    Jan 7, 2005 ... Here, the nervous system monitors the environment and transfers signals to the endocrine system. The endocrine hormones can then alter gene expression. The second route involves environmental factors that change the methylation pattern of genes, thereby altering their transcriptional capabilities.

  12. Regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical epithelial cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. HIV receptor .... PCR product. Results were calculated using the comparative cycle threshold ... data were expressed relative to an endogenous control of HeLa cell. cDNA included in ... Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the ...

  13. Regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical epithelial cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of HeLa cells with LPS increased expression of the primary HIV chemokine ... and several alternative HIV receptors including CCR2b (p<0.01), CXCR6 (p<0.05) and GPR1 ... Cervical cancer tissue specimens were obtained at the time of surgery ..... body, including the gastrointestinal tract, prostate and cervix, has.

  14. Nfix Regulates Temporal Progression of Muscle Regeneration through Modulation of Myostatin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Rossi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nfix belongs to a family of four highly conserved proteins that act as transcriptional activators and/or repressors of cellular and viral genes. We previously showed a pivotal role for Nfix in regulating the transcriptional switch from embryonic to fetal myogenesis. Here, we show that Nfix directly represses the Myostatin promoter, thus controlling the proper timing of satellite cell differentiation and muscle regeneration. Nfix-null mice display delayed regeneration after injury, and this deficit is reversed upon in vivo Myostatin silencing. Conditional deletion of Nfix in satellite cells results in a similar delay in regeneration, confirming the functional requirement for Nfix in satellite cells. Moreover, mice lacking Nfix show reduced myofiber cross sectional area and a predominant slow twitching phenotype. These data define a role for Nfix in postnatal skeletal muscle and unveil a mechanism for Myostatin regulation, thus providing insights into the modulation of its complex signaling pathway.

  15. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukasaki, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Atsushi, E-mail: yamadaa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, Dai [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Aizawa, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyazono, Agasa [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Morimura, Naoko [Laboratory for Comparative Neurogenesis, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 2-1-1 Kitasenzoku, Ohta, Tokyo 145-8515 (Japan); Kamijo, Ryutaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, 1-5-8 Hatanodai, Shinagawa, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM gene expression. {yields} Inhibition of POEM gene expression is caused by NF-{kappa}B activation by TNF-{alpha}. {yields} Over-expression of POEM recovers inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-{alpha}-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-{alpha} in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-{alpha}-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM expression through the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B., E-mail: Sanne.Hermsen@rivm.nl [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Pronk, Tessa E. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht (Netherlands); Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den [Centre for Environmental Quality, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Ven, Leo T.M. van der [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.178, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  17. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  18. Circadian yin-yang regulation and its manipulation to globally reprogram gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Weyman, Philip D; Umetani, Miki; Xiong, Jing; Qin, Ximing; Xu, Qing; Iwasaki, Hideo; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-12-02

    The cyanobacterial circadian program exerts genome-wide control of gene expression. KaiC undergoes rhythms of phosphorylation that are regulated by interactions with KaiA and KaiB. The phosphorylation status of KaiC is thought to mediate global transcription via output factors SasA, CikA, LabA, RpaA, and RpaB. Overexpression of kaiC has been reported to globally repress gene expression. Here, we show that the positive circadian component KaiA upregulates "subjective dusk" genes and that its overexpression deactivates rhythmic gene expression without significantly affecting growth rates in constant light. We analyze the global patterns of expression that are regulated by KaiA versus KaiC and find in contrast to the previous report of KaiC repression that there is a "yin-yang" regulation of gene expression whereby kaiA overexpression activates "dusk genes" and represses "dawn genes," whereas kaiC overexpression complementarily activates dawn genes and represses dusk genes. Moreover, continuous induction of kaiA latched KaiABC-regulated gene expression to provide constitutively increased transcript levels of diverse endogenous and heterologous genes that are expressed in the predominant subjective dusk phase. In addition to analyzing KaiA regulation of endogenous gene expression, we apply these insights to the expression of heterologous proteins whose products are of potential value, namely human proinsulin, foreign luciferase, and exogenous hydrogenase. Both KaiC and KaiA complementarily contribute to the regulation of circadian gene expression via yin-yang switching. Circadian patterns can be reprogrammed by overexpression of kaiA or kaiC to constitutively enhance gene expression, and this reprogramming can improve 24/7 production of heterologous proteins that are useful as pharmaceuticals or biofuels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Serum amyloid P down-regulates CCL-1 expression, and inhibits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum amyloid P down-regulates CCL-1 expression, and inhibits Ras/MAPK signaling and development of breast cancer. Shuhong Ding, Hongzhi Li, Xiaohui Li, Wenwen Wang, Xiuling Du, Guoying Dong, Ping Zhang ...

  20. Gene expression density profiles characterize modes of genomic regulation: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Hans; Wirth, Henry; Galle, Jörg

    2010-09-01

    Our study addresses modes of genomic regulation and their characterization using the distribution of expression values. A simple model of transcriptional regulation is introduced to characterize the response of the global expression pattern to the changing properties of basal regulatory building blocks. Random genomes are generated which express and bind transcription factors according to the appearance of short motifs of coding and binding sequences. Regulation of transcriptional activity is described using a thermodynamic model. Our model predicts single-peaked distributions of expression values the flanks of which decay according to power laws. The characteristic exponent is inversely related to the product of the connectivity of the network times the regulatory strength of bound transcription factors. Such 'expression spectra' were calculated and analyzed for different model genomes. Information on structural properties and on the interactions of regulatory elements is used to build up a framework of basic characteristics of expression spectra. We analyze examples addressing different biological issues. Peak position and width of the experimental expression spectra vary with the biological context. We demonstrate that the study of the global expression pattern provides valuable information about transcriptional regulation which complements conventional searches for differentially expressed single genes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  2. Identification of human HK genes and gene expression regulation study in cancer from transcriptomics data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer.

  3. Time-dependent regulation analysis dissects shifts between metabolic and gen-expression regulation during differentiation of bloodstream forms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, K.; Bouwman, J.; Lindenbergh, P.A.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Bakker, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent regulation analysis is a new methodology that allows us to unravel, both quantitatively and dynamically, how and when functional changes in the cell are brought about by the interplay of gene expression and metabolism. In this first experimental implementation, we dissect the initial

  4. Time-dependent regulation analysis dissects shifts between metabolic and gene-expression regulation during nitrogen starvation in baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Bouwman, Jildau; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent regulation analysis is a new methodology that allows us to unravel, both quantitatively and dynamically, how and when functional changes in the cell are brought about by the interplay of gene expression and metabolism. In this first experimental implementation, we dissect the initial

  5. Nitric oxide directly regulates gene expression during Drosophila development: need some gas to drive into metamorphosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Naoki; O'Connor, Michael B

    2011-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger involved in numerous biological processes, but how it regulates gene expression is not well understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, Cáceres and colleagues (pp. 1476-1485) report a critical requirement of NO as a direct regulator of gene expression through its binding to a heme-containing nuclear receptor in Drosophila. This may be an anciently evolved mechanism to coordinate behavior and metabolism during animal development.

  6. Multiple oscillators regulate circadian gene expression in Neurospora

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Alejandro; Lewis, Zachary A.; Greene, Andrew V.; March, Irene J.; Gomer, Richard H.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    High-density microarrays were used to profile circadian gene expression in Neurospora crassa cultures grown in constant darkness. We identified 145 clock-controlled genes (ccgs). The ccgs peaked in mRNA accumulation at all phases of the day, with the majority peaking in the late night to early morning. The predicted or known functions of the ccgs demonstrate that the clock contributes to a wide range of cellular processes, including cell signaling, development, metabolism, and stress response...

  7. Poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase-1 expression is related to cold ischemia, acute tubular necrosis, and delayed renal function in kidney transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco O'Valle

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Cold ischemia time especially impacts on outcomes of expanded-criteria donor (ECD transplantation. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury produces excessive poly[ADP-Ribose] Polymerase-1 (PARP-1 activation. The present study explored the hypothesis that increased tubular expression of PARP-1 contributes to delayed renal function in suboptimal ECD kidney allografts and in non-ECD allografts that develop posttransplant acute tubular necrosis (ATN. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nuclear PARP-1 immunohistochemical expression was studied in 326 paraffin-embedded renal allograft biopsies (193 with different degrees of ATN and 133 controls and in murine Parp-1 knockout model of IR injury. RESULTS: PARP-1 expression showed a significant relationship with cold ischemia time (r coefficient = 0.603, time to effective diuresis (r = 0.770, serum creatinine levels at biopsy (r = 0.649, and degree of ATN (r = 0.810 (p = 0.001, Pearson test. In the murine IR model, western blot showed an increase in PARP-1 that was blocked by Parp-1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemical study of PARP-1 in kidney allograft biopsies would allow early detection of possible delayed renal function, and the administration of PARP-1 inhibitors may offer a therapeutic option to reduce damage from IR in donor kidneys by preventing or minimizing ATN. In summary, these results suggest a pivotal role for PARP-1 in the ATN of renal transplantation. We propose the immunohistochemical assessment of PARP-1 in kidney allograft biopsies for early detection of a possible delayed renal function.

  8. Food intake regulating-neuropeptides are expressed and regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction in rat placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepeda Libia A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY, agouti related peptide (AgRP, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART and melanocortins, the products of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC, are hypothalamic peptides involved in feeding regulation and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence has demonstrated their expression in rat and human placenta. Methods In the current study, we have investigated the expression of those neuropeptides in the rat placenta by real-time PCR using a model of maternal food restriction. Results Our results showed that placental-derived neuropeptides were regulated through pregnancy and following food restriction. Conclusion These data could indicate that placental-derived neuropeptides represent a local regulatory circuit that may fine-tune control of energy balance during pregnancy.

  9. Regulation of gene expression in adeno-associated virus vectors in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Rebecca P; McCown, Thomas J

    2002-10-01

    Regulated adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have broad utility in both experimental and applied gene therapy, and to date, several regulation systems have exhibited a capability to control gene expression from viral vectors over two orders of magnitude. The tetracycline responsive system has been the most used in AAV, although other regulation systems such as RU486- and rapamycin-responsive systems are reasonable options. AAV vectors influence how regulation systems function by several mechanisms, leading to increased background gene expression and restricted induction. Methods to reduce background expression continue to be explored and systems not yet tried in AAV may prove quite functional. Although regulated promoters are often assumed to exhibit ubiquitous expression, the tropism of different neuronal subtypes can be altered dramatically by changing promoters in recombinant AAV vectors. Differences in promoter-directed tropism have significant consequences for proper expression of gene products as well as the utility of dual vector regulation. Thus regulated vector systems must be carefully optimized for each application. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  10. POTATO GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE PROMOTER-CONTROLLED GUS EXPRESSION - REGULATION OF EXPRESSION AFTER TRANSIENT AND STABLE TRANSFORMATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSTEEGE, G; NIEBOER, M; SWAVING, J; TEMPELAAR, MJ

    1992-01-01

    Chimaeric genes of promoter sequences from the potato gene encoding granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were used to study GBSS expression and regulation. Analysis of stable transformants revealed that a GBSS promoter sequence of 0.4 kb was sufficient

  11. Prostacyclin synthase expression and epigenetic regulation in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary-Clare

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) metabolizes prostaglandin H(2), into prostacyclin. This study aimed to determine the expression profile of PGIS in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and examine potential mechanisms involved in PGIS regulation. METHODS: PGIS expression was examined in human NSCLC and matched controls by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western analysis, and immunohistochemistry. A 204-patient NSCLC tissue microarray was stained for PGIS and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression. Staining intensity was correlated with clinical parameters. Epigenetic mechanisms underpinning PGIS promoter expression were examined using RT-PCR, methylation-specific PCR, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. RESULTS: PGIS expression was reduced\\/absent in human NSCLC protein samples (P < .0001), but not mRNA relative to matched controls. PGIS tissue expression was higher in squamous cell carcinoma (P = .004) and in male patients (P < .05). No significant correlation of PGIS or COX2 expression with overall patient survival was observed, although COX2 was prognostic for short-term (2-year) survival (P < .001). PGIS mRNA expression was regulated by DNA CpG methylation and histone acetylation in NSCLC cell lines, with chromatin remodeling taking place directly at the PGIS gene. PGIS mRNA expression was increased by both demethylation agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors. Protein levels were unaffected by demethylation agents, whereas PGIS protein stability was negatively affected by histone deacetylase inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: PGIS protein expression is reduced in NSCLC, and does not correlate with overall patient survival. PGIS expression is regulated through epigenetic mechanisms. Differences in expression patterns between mRNA and protein levels suggest that PGIS expression and protein stability are regulated post-translationally. PGIS protein stability may have an important therapeutic role in NSCLC.

  12. ADAM10-Interacting Tetraspanins Tspan5 and Tspan17 Regulate VE-Cadherin Expression and Promote T Lymphocyte Transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyat, Jasmeet S; Chimen, Myriam; Noy, Peter J; Szyroka, Justyna; Rainger, G Ed; Tomlinson, Michael G

    2017-07-15

    The recruitment of blood leukocytes across the endothelium to sites of tissue infection is central to inflammation, but also promotes chronic inflammatory diseases. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) is a ubiquitous transmembrane molecular scissor that is implicated in leukocyte transmigration by proteolytically cleaving its endothelial substrates. These include VE-cadherin, a homotypic adhesion molecule that regulates endothelial barrier function, and transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1 and CXCL16, which have receptors on leukocytes. However, a definitive role for endothelial ADAM10 in transmigration of freshly isolated primary leukocytes under flow has not been demonstrated, and the relative importance of distinct ADAM10 substrates is unknown. Emerging evidence suggests that ADAM10 can be regarded as six different molecular scissors with different substrate specificities, depending on which of six TspanC8 tetraspanins it is associated with, but TspanC8s remain unstudied in leukocyte transmigration. In the current study, ADAM10 knockdown on primary HUVECs was found to impair transmigration of freshly isolated human peripheral blood T lymphocytes, but not neutrophils or B lymphocytes, in an in vitro flow assay. This impairment was due to delayed transmigration rather than a complete block, and was overcome in the presence of neutrophils. Transmigration of purified lymphocytes was dependent on ADAM10 regulation of VE-cadherin, but not CX3CL1 and CXCL16. Tspan5 and Tspan17, the two most closely related TspanC8s by sequence, were the only TspanC8s that regulated VE-cadherin expression and were required for lymphocyte transmigration. Therefore endothelial Tspan5- and Tspan17-ADAM10 complexes may regulate inflammation by maintaining normal VE-cadherin expression and promoting T lymphocyte transmigration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Emotion Regulation in Adolescence: A Prospective Study of Expressive Suppression and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Junilla K.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Geenen, Rinie; van Middendorp, Henriet; English, Tammy; Gross, James J.; Ha, Thao; Evers, Catharine; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown a positive association between expressive suppression and depressive symptoms. These results have been interpreted as reflecting the impact of emotion regulation efforts on depression. However, it is also possible that depression may alter emotion regulation tendencies. The goal of the present study was to…

  14. Regulating Emotionally Expressive Behavior: Implications of Goals and Social Partner from Middle Childhood to Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Kimberly L.; Zeman, Janice L.; Stegall, Sheri

    2001-01-01

    Examined emotion regulation decisions and outcome expectations following emotionally expressive behavior in fifth, eighth, and eleventh graders as a function of goals, age, and gender. Found that participants distinguished between vignettes characterized by prosocial versus self-protective goals. Goal type influenced emotional regulation decisions…

  15. Autism and increased paternal age related changes in global levels of gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Alter

    Full Text Available A causal role of mutations in multiple general transcription factors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism suggested that alterations in global levels of gene expression regulation might also relate to disease risk in sporadic cases of autism. This premise can be tested by evaluating for changes in the overall distribution of gene expression levels. For instance, in mice, variability in hippocampal-dependent behaviors was associated with variability in the pattern of the overall distribution of gene expression levels, as assessed by variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that a similar change in variance might be found in children with autism. Gene expression microarrays covering greater than 47,000 unique RNA transcripts were done on RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of children with autism (n = 82 and controls (n = 64. Variance in the distribution of gene expression levels from each microarray was compared between groups of children. Also tested was whether a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age, was associated with variance. A decrease in the variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in PBL was associated with the diagnosis of autism and a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age. Traditional approaches to microarray analysis of gene expression suggested a possible mechanism for decreased variance in gene expression. Gene expression pathways involved in transcriptional regulation were down-regulated in the blood of children with autism and children of older fathers. Thus, results from global and gene specific approaches to studying microarray data were complimentary and supported the hypothesis that alterations at the global level of gene expression regulation are related to autism and increased paternal age. Global regulation of transcription, thus, represents a possible point of convergence for multiple etiologies of autism and other

  16. The influence of emotion regulation, attribution prompts, and delay, on response aggressiveness in antisocial boys. [IF 1.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orobio de Castro, B.; Bosch, J.D.; Veerman, J.W.; Koops, W.

    2003-01-01

    Boys with aggressive behavior problems are frequently taught to "stop and think" before they act. In provocative situations, pausing to monitor their own feelings, to consider the feelings of others, or to delay their response is believed to reduce aggressive behavior. This study aimed to test these

  17. NeuroD1: developmental expression and regulated genes in the rodent pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, Estela M; Bailey, Michael J; Rath, Martin F

    2007-01-01

    -regulated (>twofold, p 5C ( approximately 100-fold) and the most dramatically up-regulated gene is glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 ( approximately fourfold). Other impacted transcripts encode proteins involved...... development. Pineal NeuroD1 levels are similar during the day and night, and do not appear to be influenced by sympathetic neural input. Gene expression analysis of the pineal glands from neonatal NeuroD1 knockout mice identifies 127 transcripts that are down-regulated (>twofold, p

  18. The expression and regulation of glucose transporters in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter proteins are involved in many physiological and biochemical processes. In particular, the high expressions of sodium-glucose cotransporter and glucose transporter proteins in tumor cells show that these two transporters play a key role in tumor cell metabolism. Studying the crystal structure and conformation of human glucose transporter proteins has enabled the development of drugs based on specific binding sites, opening up a new path towards more effective cancer treatments. This mini review serves to summarize our existing understanding of the metabolic pathways of tumor cells, focusing on the roles of glucose transporter proteins.

  19. Regulation of gene expression in vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Jaime J; Rigby, Peter W J

    2010-11-01

    During embryonic development the integration of numerous synergistic signalling pathways turns a single cell into a multicellular organism with specialized cell types and highly structured, organized tissues. To achieve this, cells must grow, proliferate, differentiate and die according to their spatiotemporal position. Unravelling the mechanisms by which a cell adopts the correct fate in response to its local environment remains one of the fundamental goals of biological research. In vertebrates skeletal myogenesis is coordinated by the activation of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) in response to signals that are interpreted by their associated regulatory elements in different precursor cells during development. The MRFs trigger a cascade of transcription factors and downstream structural genes, ultimately resulting in the generation of one of the fundamental histotypes. In this review we discuss the regulation of the different MRFs in relation to their position in the myogenic cascade, the changes in the general transcriptional machinery during muscle differentiation and the emerging importance of miRNA regulation in skeletal myogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of cyclooxygenase expression in cultured vascular cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pash, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolism in vascular tissue results in synthesis of prostacylin. The key enzyme in this synthesis pathway, cyclooxygenase, is down-regulated through self-inactivation. An analogous refractory state is produced by aspirin which irreversibly acetylates the enzyme. To further understand this phenomenon, the inactivation and recovery of cyclooxygenase activity was assayed in cultured ray vascular smooth muscle cells using exogenously added arachidonic acid. Self-inactivation of cyclooxygenase was observed following treatment with micromolar amounts of arachidonic acid. The recovery of cyclooxygenase activity following self-inactivation was analogous to that observed following aspirin-inactivation in that it depended on protein synthesis and required either serum or EGF. Two additional factors, TGF-{beta} and uric acid, were found to enhance the stimulation of cyclooxygenase recovery by EGF. A defined medium containing 10 ng/mL EGF, 1 ng/mL TGF{beta} and 0.1 mM uric acid duplicated the cyclooxygenase recovery activity of 10% serum. Stimulation of cyclooxygenase activity by EGF and TGF-{beta} was inhibited by cycloheximide but not by actinomycin-D, indicating a link to increased translation of pre-existing mRNA. A lack of significant effect on overall protein synthesis by EGF and TGF-{beta}, measured by ({sup 35}S)-methionine incorporation under conditions where a multi-fold increase in cyclooxygenase activity was seen, indicates that the translational regulation of a small fraction of total mRNA and possibly cyclooxygenase is occurring.

  1. NPAT expression is regulated by E2F and is essential for cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Guang; Bracken, Adrian P; Burkard, Karina

    2003-01-01

    of NPAT is regulated by E2F. Consistently, we find that the E2F sites in the NPAT promoter are required for its activation during the G(1)/S-phase transition. Moreover, we show that the expression of NPAT accelerates S-phase entry in cells released from quiescence. The inhibition of NPAT expression...

  2. Mouse Protocadherin-1 Gene Expression Is Regulated by Cigarette Smoke Exposure In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Henk; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; den Boef, Lisette E.; Gras, Renee; Reinders-Luinge, Marjan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van der Toorn, Marco; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Sayers, Ian; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Protocadherin-1 (PCDH1) is a novel susceptibility gene for airway hyperresponsiveness, first identified in families exposed to cigarette smoke and is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells. Here, we asked how mouse Pcdh1 expression is regulated in lung structural cells in vivo under physiological

  3. Regulation of the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of the glutamine synthetase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; Hakvoort, T. B.; van Hemert, F. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase, the enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonia into glutamine, is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner. The first part of this review focuses on its spatiotemporal pattern of expression, the factors that regulate

  4. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-24

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically 'leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  5. LncRNA-ANCR down-regulation suppresses invasion and migration of colorectal cancer cells by regulating EZH2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao-Yang; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Ying-Li; Liu, Bao; Wang, Meng; Hong, Xuan; Yu, Yan; Zhou, Yao-Hui; Zeng, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Our study aimed to explore the effects of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA)-ANCR on the invasion and migration of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells by regulating enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) expression. CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were collected and CRC SW620 cells line and normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIECs) were incubated. CRC SW620 cells line was transfected with ANCR-siRNA. The expressions of ANCR and EZH2 mRNA were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). EZH2 and trimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27me3) protein expressions were detected using Western blotting. The relationship between ANCR and EZH2 was determined through RNA pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays. Cell invasion and migration were determined by Trans-well and cell scratch assays. ANCR, EZH2 and H3K27me3 expressions were up-regulated in CRC tissues and SW620 cells (all P EZH2 mRNA and protein expressions (all P EZH2. The results of Trans-well and cell scratch tests showed that when ANCR expression was decreased, the invasion and migration abilities of SW620 cells significantly declined (both P EZH2.

  6. The plant nuclear envelope and regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Geraint

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) separates the key mechanisms of transcription and translation, and as such is a critical control point in all eukaryotic cells. In plants, the proteins of the NE influence a number of processes including the control of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of RNA and protein, chromatin localization to the nuclear periphery, and direct chromatin binding by members of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). In this review I attempt to bring these roles under the umbrella of their effect on gene expression, even though the complex nature of this cellular environment means there is considerable overlap of effects. Although the volume of research in plant cells has greatly improved over recent years, it is clear that our understanding of how the components of the NE either directly or indirectly influence gene expression is still in its infancy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Regulation of semaphorin 4D expression and cell proliferation of ovarian cancer by ERalpha and ERbeta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Semaphorin 4D (sema 4D is involved in the progress of multiple cancers. In the presence of estrogen-like ligands, estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ participate in the progress of breast and ovarian cancers by transcriptional regulation. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of sema 4D and elucidate the regulatory pattern of ERα and ERβ on sema 4D expression in ovarian cancers. Sema 4D levels were up-regulated in ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells. Patients with malignant ovarian cancers had significantly higher sema 4D levels than controls, suggesting an oncogene role of sema 4D in ovarian cancer. ERα expressions were up-regulated in SKOV-3 cells compared with normal ovarian IOSE80 epithelial cells. Conversely, down-regulation of ERβ was observed in SKOV-3 cells. Forced over-expression of ERα and ERβ in SKOV-3 cells was manipulated to establish ERα+ and ERβ+ SKOV-3 cell lines. Incubation of ERα+ SKOV-3 cells with ERs agonist 17β-estradiol (E2 significantly enhanced sema 4D expression and rate of cell proliferation. Incubated with E2, ERβ+ SKOV-3 cells showed lower sema 4D expression and cell proliferation. Blocking ERα and ERβ activities with ICI182-780 inhibitor, sema 4D expressions and cell proliferation of ERα+ and ERβ+ SKOV-3 cells were recovered to control levels. Taken together, the data showed that sema 4D expression was positively correlated with the progress of ovarian cancer. ERα positively regulated sema 4D expression and accelerated cell proliferation. ERβ negatively regulated sema 4D expression and inhibited cell multiplication.

  8. Aberrant Behaviours of Reaction Diffusion Self-organisation Models on Growing Domains in the Presence of Gene Expression Time Delays

    KAUST Repository

    Seirin Lee, S.

    2010-03-23

    Turing\\'s pattern formation mechanism exhibits sensitivity to the details of the initial conditions suggesting that, in isolation, it cannot robustly generate pattern within noisy biological environments. Nonetheless, secondary aspects of developmental self-organisation, such as a growing domain, have been shown to ameliorate this aberrant model behaviour. Furthermore, while in-situ hybridisation reveals the presence of gene expression in developmental processes, the influence of such dynamics on Turing\\'s model has received limited attention. Here, we novelly focus on the Gierer-Meinhardt reaction diffusion system considering delays due the time taken for gene expression, while incorporating a number of different domain growth profiles to further explore the influence and interplay of domain growth and gene expression on Turing\\'s mechanism. We find extensive pathological model behaviour, exhibiting one or more of the following: temporal oscillations with no spatial structure, a failure of the Turing instability and an extreme sensitivity to the initial conditions, the growth profile and the duration of gene expression. This deviant behaviour is even more severe than observed in previous studies of Schnakenberg kinetics on exponentially growing domains in the presence of gene expression (Gaffney and Monk in Bull. Math. Biol. 68:99-130, 2006). Our results emphasise that gene expression dynamics induce unrealistic behaviour in Turing\\'s model for multiple choices of kinetics and thus such aberrant modelling predictions are likely to be generic. They also highlight that domain growth can no longer ameliorate the excessive sensitivity of Turing\\'s mechanism in the presence of gene expression time delays. The above, extensive, pathologies suggest that, in the presence of gene expression, Turing\\'s mechanism would generally require a novel and extensive secondary mechanism to control reaction diffusion patterning. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  9. Apoptosis and JNK activation are differentially regulated by Fas expression level in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Koepke, A; Jarad, G; Schlessman, K; Cleveland, R P; Wang, B; Konieczkowski, M; Schelling, J R

    2001-07-01

    In chronic renal disease, renal tubular epithelial cell (RTC) Fas expression is up-regulated, leading to apoptotic RTC deletion and tubular atrophy. In vitro, cytokine- or hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Fas expression is associated with RTC apoptosis. In contrast, constitutively expressed, low level RTC Fas does not mediate apoptosis, suggesting that Fas may be coupled to expression level-dependent RTC signaling pathways. Fas is known to signal through JNK in many systems, but the requirement of JNK activation for apoptosis remains controversial. To determine if RTC Fas regulates JNK activity and apoptosis, human RTC were transfected with graded concentrations of a eukaryotic expression vector for murine Fas. Apoptosis was measured by annexin V, TUNEL and PARP cleavage assays. JNK activity was determined by immune complex kinase assay and/or immunoblots with phospho-specific JNK antibodies, in the presence or absence of co-expressed dominant negative JNK constructs. Fas antibody stimulation of RTC with high Fas expression levels (to model RTC phenotype in renal disease) caused a tenfold increase in apoptosis, while RTC with low level Fas expression (to model normal RTC phenotype) were apoptosis-resistant. Fas ligation activated JNK in RTC expressing low levels of Fas, but not in apoptosis-sensitive RTC with increased Fas expression. Dominant negative JNK co-expression failed to inhibit apoptosis in RTC expressing high levels of Fas, suggesting that JNK is neither necessary, nor sufficient, for Fas-dependent apoptosis. At high levels of expression, RTC Fas promotes apoptosis in a JNK-independent manner. At low basal expression, Fas induces JNK activation, but not apoptosis, consistent with novel roles for RTC Fas as a mediator of cell stress or chronic inflammation.

  10. Regulation of gene expression by FSP27 in white and brown adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Bofu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT play critical roles in controlling energy homeostasis and in the development of obesity and diabetes. The mouse Fat-Specific protein 27 (FSP27, a member of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE family, is expressed in both BAT and WAT and is associated with lipid droplets. Over-expression of FSP27 promotes lipid storage, whereas FSP27 deficient mice have improved insulin sensitivity and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. In addition, FSP27-deficient white adipocytes have reduced lipid storage, smaller lipid droplets, increased mitochondrial activity and a higher expression of several BAT-selective genes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which FSP27 controls lipid storage and gene expression in WAT and BAT, we systematically analyzed the gene expression profile of FSP27-deficient WAT by microarray analysis and compared the expression levels of a specific set of genes in WAT and BAT by semi-quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Results BAT-selective genes were significantly up-regulated, whereas WAT-selective genes were down-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression of the BAT-selective genes was also dramatically up-regulated in the WAT of leptin/FSP27 double deficient mice. In addition, the expression levels of genes involved in multiple metabolic pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, the TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation, were increased in the FSP27-deficient WAT. In contrast, the expression levels for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, the classic complement pathway and TGF-β signaling were down-regulated in the FSP27-deficient WAT. Most importantly, the expression levels of regulatory factors that determine BAT identity, such as CEBPα/β, PRDM16 and major components of the cAMP pathway, were markedly up-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression levels of these regulatory

  11. Regulation of gene expression by FSP27 in white and brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De; Zhang, Yinxin; Xu, Li; Zhou, Linkang; Wang, Yue; Xue, Bofu; Wen, Zilong; Li, Peng; Sang, Jianli

    2010-07-22

    Brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT) play critical roles in controlling energy homeostasis and in the development of obesity and diabetes. The mouse Fat-Specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE) family, is expressed in both BAT and WAT and is associated with lipid droplets. Over-expression of FSP27 promotes lipid storage, whereas FSP27 deficient mice have improved insulin sensitivity and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. In addition, FSP27-deficient white adipocytes have reduced lipid storage, smaller lipid droplets, increased mitochondrial activity and a higher expression of several BAT-selective genes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which FSP27 controls lipid storage and gene expression in WAT and BAT, we systematically analyzed the gene expression profile of FSP27-deficient WAT by microarray analysis and compared the expression levels of a specific set of genes in WAT and BAT by semi-quantitative real-time PCR analysis. BAT-selective genes were significantly up-regulated, whereas WAT-selective genes were down-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression of the BAT-selective genes was also dramatically up-regulated in the WAT of leptin/FSP27 double deficient mice. In addition, the expression levels of genes involved in multiple metabolic pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, the TCA cycle, fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation, were increased in the FSP27-deficient WAT. In contrast, the expression levels for genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, the classic complement pathway and TGF-beta signaling were down-regulated in the FSP27-deficient WAT. Most importantly, the expression levels of regulatory factors that determine BAT identity, such as CEBP alpha/beta, PRDM16 and major components of the cAMP pathway, were markedly up-regulated in the WAT of FSP27-deficient mice. The expression levels of these regulatory factors were also up-regulated in

  12. The DAF-7 TGF-β signaling pathway regulates chemosensory receptor gene expression in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Katherine M.; Sarafi-Reinach, Trina R.; Horne, Jennifer G.; Saffer, Adam M.; Sengupta, Piali

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression in response to environmental or developmental cues provides a mechanism by which animals can alter their sensory responses. Here we demonstrate a role for the daf-7 TGF-β pathway in the regulation of expression of a subset of chemoreceptor genes in Caenorhabditis elegans. We describe a novel role of this pathway in maintaining receptor gene expression in the adult and show that the DAF-4 type II TGF-β receptor functions cell-autonomously to modulate...

  13. Multiple oscillators regulate circadian gene expression in Neurospora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Alejandro; Lewis, Zachary A.; Greene, Andrew V.; March, Irene J.; Gomer, Richard H.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    High-density microarrays were used to profile circadian gene expression in Neurospora crassa cultures grown in constant darkness. We identified 145 clock-controlled genes (ccgs). The ccgs peaked in mRNA accumulation at all phases of the day, with the majority peaking in the late night to early morning. The predicted or known functions of the ccgs demonstrate that the clock contributes to a wide range of cellular processes, including cell signaling, development, metabolism, and stress responses. Although the period of rhythm of most of the ccgs was found to depend on the well characterized frequency (FRQ)-based oscillator, three ccgs appeared to have a rhythm that was significantly short in the long period (29-h) frq7 mutant strain. These ccgs accumulate mRNA rhythmically with a circadian period in a frq-null strain, confirming the existence of a second oscillator in N. crassa. PMID:14597725

  14. Expression and Location of Glucose-regulated Protein 78 in Testis and Epididymis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To know the role of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78/BiP/HSPA5 in spermatogenesis and its expression and location in the testis and epididymis. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect GRP78 location and expression in the testis and epididymis. Results: Glucose-regulated protein 78 was observed in spermatocytes, round spermatids and interstitial cells of the testis and in principal cells of the epididymis. Glucose-regulated protein 78 was first detected in the rat testis at postnatal day 14. Thereafter, the protein level increased gradually with age and was maintained at a high and stable state after postnatal day 28. In the rat, GRP78 was expressed in the principal cells but not in clear cells of the epididymis. Conclusion: Glucose-regulated protein 78 participates in the process of spermatogenesis.

  15. Sugar regulation of SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1 (STP1) expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba, Elizabeth; Aceves-Zamudio, Denise Lizeth; Hernández-Bernal, Alma Fabiola; Ramos-Vega, Maricela; León, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Sugars regulate the expression of many genes at the transcriptional level. In Arabidopsis thaliana, sugars induce or repress the expression of >1800 genes, including the STP1 (SUGAR TRANSPORTER PROTEIN 1) gene, which encodes an H+/monosaccharide cotransporter. STP1 transcript levels decrease more rapidly after the addition of low concentrations of sugars than the levels of other repressed genes, such as DIN6 (DARK-INDUCED 6). We found that this regulation is exerted at the transcriptional level and is initiated by phosphorylatable sugars. Interestingly, the sugar signal that modulates STP1 expression is transmitted through a HEXOKINASE 1-independent signalling pathway. Finally, analysis of the STP1 5′ regulatory region allowed us to delimit a region of 309bp that contains the cis elements implicated in the glucose regulation of STP1 expression. Putative cis-acting elements involved in this response were identified. PMID:25281700

  16. Regulation of action potential delays via voltage-gated potassium Kv1.1 channels in dentate granule cells during hippocampal epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eKirchheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Action potential (AP responses of dentate gyrus granule (DG cells have to be tightly regulated to maintain hippocampal function. However, which ion channels control the response delay of DG cells is not known. In some neuron types, spike latency is influenced by a dendrotoxin (DTX-sensitive delay current (ID mediated by unidentified combinations of voltage-gated K+ (Kv channels of the Kv1 family Kv1.1-6. In DG cells, the ID has not been characterized and its molecular basis is unknown. The response phenotype of mature DG cells is usually considered homogenous but intrinsic adaptations likely occur in particular in conditions of hyperexcitability, for example during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. In this study, we examined response delays of DG cells and underlying ion channel molecules by employing a new combination of gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp recordings in acute brain slices and single-cell reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SC RT-qPCR experiments. An in vivo mouse model of TLE consisting of intrahippocampal kainate (KA injection was used to examine epilepsy-related plasticity. Response delays of DG cells were DTX-sensitive and strongly increased in KA-injected hippocampi; Kv1.1 mRNA was elevated 10-fold, and the response delays correlated with Kv1.1 mRNA abundance on the single cell level. Other Kv1 subunits did not show overt changes in mRNA levels. Kv1.1 immunolabeling was enhanced in KA DG cells. The biophysical properties of ID and the delay heterogeneity between inner and outer DG cell layer were characterized. Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs, where KA incubation also induced ID upregulation, reversibility and neuroprotective potential for DG cells were tested. In summary, the AP timing of DG cells is effectively controlled via scaling of Kv1.1 subunit transcription. With this antiepileptic mechanism, DG cells delay their

  17. NDRG2 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma adhesion, migration and invasion by regulating CD24 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yurong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis of most hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients is poor due to the high metastatic rate of the disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC metastasis is extremely urgent. The role of CD24 and NDRG2 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, has not yet been explored in HCC. Methods The mRNA and protein expression of CD24 and NDRG2 was analyzed in MHCC97H, Huh7 and L-02 cells. Changes in cell adhesion, migration and invasion were detected by up- or down-regulating NDRG2 by adenovirus or siRNA. The expression pattern of NDRG2 and CD24 in HCC tissues and the relationship between NDRG2 and HCC clinical features was analyzed by immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis. Results NDRG2 expression was negatively correlated with malignancy in HCC. NDRG2 exerted anti-tumor activity by regulating CD24, a molecule that mediates cell-cell interaction, tumor proliferation and adhesion. NDRG2 up-regulation decreased CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. By contrast, NDRG2 down-regulation enhanced CD24 expression and cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Immunohistochemical analysis of 50 human HCC clinical specimens showed a strong correlation between NDRG2 down-regulation and CD24 overexpression (P = 0.04. In addition, increased frequency of NDRG2 down-regulation was observed in patients with elevated AFP serum level (P = 0.006, late TNM stage (P = 0.009, poor differentiation grade (P = 0.002, tumor invasion (P = 0.004 and recurrence (P = 0.024. Conclusions Our findings indicate that NDRG2 and CD24 regulate HCC adhesion, migration and invasion. The expression level of NDRG2 is closely related to the clinical features of HCC. Thus, NDRG2 plays an important physiological role in HCC metastasis.

  18. Look before you regulate: differential perceptual strategies underlying expressive suppression and cognitive reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, Genna M; Franconeri, Steven L; Ochsner, Kevin N; Chiao, Joan Y

    2011-08-01

    Successful emotion regulation is important for maintaining psychological well-being. Although it is known that emotion regulation strategies, such as cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, may have divergent consequences for emotional responses, the cognitive processes underlying these differences remain unclear. Here we used eye-tracking to investigate the role of attentional deployment in emotion regulation success. We hypothesized that differences in the deployment of attention to emotional areas of complex visual scenes may be a contributing factor to the differential effects of these two strategies on emotional experience. Eye-movements, pupil size, and self-reported negative emotional experience were measured while healthy young adult participants viewed negative IAPS images and regulated their emotional responses using either cognitive reappraisal or expressive suppression. Consistent with prior work, reappraisers reported feeling significantly less negative than suppressers when regulating emotion as compared to a baseline condition. Across both groups, participants looked away from emotional areas during emotion regulation, an effect that was more pronounced for suppressers. Critically, irrespective of emotion regulation strategy, participants who looked toward emotional areas of a complex visual scene were more likely to experience emotion regulation success. Taken together, these results demonstrate that attentional deployment varies across emotion regulation strategies and that successful emotion regulation depends on the extent to which people look toward emotional content in complex visual scenes. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Regulation of CCN2 gene expression and possible roles in developing tooth germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyama, Manabu; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Sugito, Hiroki; Nagayama, Motohiko; Kuboki, Takuo; Pacifici, Maurizio; Koyama, Eiki

    2013-11-01

    CCN proteins are extracellular and cell-associated molecules involved in several developmental processes, but their expression patterns and regulation in tooth development remain unclear. Here we first determined the expression patterns of CCN genes in mouse tooth germs. We found that at early stages CCN2 was detected in dental lamina, dental mesenchyme, and primary enamel knot, while other CCN family members were expressed broadly. By the bell stage, all members were expressed in differentiating odontoblasts and ameloblasts, but CCN1 and CCN2 transcripts were conspicuous in differentiating osteoblasts in dental follicle. Next, we asked what signalling molecules regulate CCN2 expression and what roles CCN2 may have. We found that upon surgical removal of dental epithelium CCN2 was not longer expressed in dental mesenchyme in cultured bud stage germs. Implantation of beads pre-coated with BMPs and FGFs onto E12-13 mandibular explants induced CCN2 expression in dental mesenchyme. There was a dose-dependent effect of BMP-4 on CCN2 induction; a concentration of 100 ng/μl was able to induce strong CCN2 expression while a minimum concentration of 25 ng/μl was needed to elicit appreciable expression. Importantly, Noggin treatment inhibited endogenous and BMP-induced CCN2 expression, verifying that CCN2 expression in developing tooth germs requires BMP signalling. Lastly, we found that rCCN2 stimulated proliferation in dental mesenchyme in a dose-dependent manner. Together, the data indicate that expression of CCN genes is spatio-temporally regulated in developing tooth germs. CCN2 expression appears to depend on epithelial and mesenchymal-derived signalling factors, and CCN2 can elicit strong proliferation in dental mesenchyme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CB1 cannabinoid receptor expression in the striatum: Association with corticostriatal circuits and developmental regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eVan Waes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticostriatal circuits mediate various aspects of goal-directed behavior and are critically important for basal ganglia-related disorders. Activity in these circuits is regulated by the endocannabinoid system via stimulation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. CB1 receptors are highly expressed in projection neurons and select interneurons of the striatum, but expression levels vary considerably between different striatal regions (functional domains. We investigated CB1 receptor expression within specific corticostriatal circuits by mapping CB1 mRNA levels in striatal sectors defined by their cortical inputs in rats. We also assessed changes in CB1 expression in the striatum during development. Our results show that CB1 expression is highest in juveniles (P25 and then progressively decreases towards adolescent (P40 and adult (P70 levels. At every age, CB1 receptors are predominantly expressed in sensorimotor striatal sectors, with considerably lower expression in associative and limbic sectors. Moreover, for most corticostriatal circuits there is an inverse relationship between cortical and striatal expression levels. Thus, striatal sectors with high CB1 expression (sensorimotor sectors tend to receive inputs from cortical areas with low expression, while striatal sectors with low expression (associative/limbic sectors receive inputs from cortical regions with higher expression (medial prefrontal cortex. In so far as CB1 mRNA levels reflect receptor function, our findings suggest differential CB1 signaling between different developmental stages and between sensorimotor and associative/limbic circuits. The regional distribution of CB1 receptor expression in the striatum further suggests that, in sensorimotor sectors, CB1 receptors mostly regulate GABA inputs from local axon collaterals of projection neurons, whereas in associative/limbic sectors, CB1 regulation of GABA inputs from interneurons and glutamate inputs may be more important.

  1. Drug Pricing Program Ceiling Price and Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties Regulation. Final rule; further delay of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) administers section 340B of the Public Health Service Act (PHSA), known as the "340B Drug Pricing Program" or the "340B Program." HRSA published a final rule on January 5, 2017, that set forth the calculation of the ceiling price and application of civil monetary penalties. The final rule applied to all drug manufacturers that are required to make their drugs available to covered entities under the 340B Program. On August 21, 2017, HHS solicited comments on further delaying the effective date of the January 5, 2017, final rule to July 1, 2018 (82 FR 39553). HHS proposed this action to allow a more deliberate process of considering alternative and supplemental regulatory provisions and to allow for sufficient time for additional rulemaking. After consideration of the comments received on the proposed rule, HHS is delaying the effective date of the January 5, 2017, final rule, to July 1, 2018.

  2. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a “seesaw model” in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors. PMID:26360497

  3. Cell cycle-regulated expression of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hateboer, G; Wobst, A; Petersen, B O

    1998-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are essential regulators of cell growth in multicellular organisms, controlling the expression of a number of genes whose products are involved in DNA replication and cell proliferation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MBF and SBF transcription complexes have...... functions similar to those of E2F proteins in higher eukaryotes, by regulating the timed expression of genes implicated in cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis. The CDC6 gene is a target for MBF and SBF-regulated transcription. S. cerevisiae Cdc6p induces the formation of the prereplication complex...... and is essential for initiation of DNA replication. Interestingly, the Cdc6p homolog in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Cdc18p, is regulated by DSC1, the S. pombe homolog of MBF. By cloning the promoter for the human homolog of Cdc6p and Cdc18p, we demonstrate here that the cell cycle-regulated transcription...

  4. 340B Drug Pricing Program Ceiling Price and Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties Regulation. Final rule; further delay of effective date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-19

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) administers section 340B of the Public Health Service Act (PHSA), referred to as the "340B Drug Pricing Program" or the "340B Program." HRSA published a final rule on January 5, 2017, that set forth the calculation of the ceiling price and application of civil monetary penalties. The final rule applied to all drug manufacturers that are required to make their drugs available to covered entities under the 340B Program. In accordance with a January 20, 2017, memorandum from the Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff, entitled "Regulatory Freeze Pending Review," HRSA issued an interim final rule that delayed the effective date of the final rule published in the Federal Register (82 FR 1210, (January 5, 2017)) to May 22, 2017. HHS invited commenters to provide their views on whether a longer delay of the effective date to October 1, 2017, would be more appropriate. After consideration of the comments received on the interim final rule, HHS is delaying the effective date of the January 5, 2017 final rule, to October 1, 2017.

  5. Expression of orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR174 in CHO cells induced morphological changes and proliferation delay via increasing intracellular cAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Kazuya; Yamamura, Chiaki; Tabata, Ken-ichi [Laboratory of Pharmacoinformatics, Graduate School of Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Fujita, Norihisa, E-mail: nori@ph.ritsumei.ac.jp [Laboratory of Pharmacoinformatics, Graduate School of Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); School of Pharmacy, Ristumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of GPR174 in CHO cells induces morphological changes and proliferation delay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These are due to increase in intracellular cAMP concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysophosphatidylserine was identified to stimulate GPR174 leading to activate ACase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potencies of fatty acid moiety on LysoPS were oleoyl Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To stearoyl > palmitoyl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that GPR174 is a lysophosphatidylserine receptor. -- Abstract: We established cell lines that stably express orphan GPCR GPR174 using CHO cells, and studied physiological and pharmacological features of the receptor. GPR174-expressing cells showed cell-cell adhesion with localization of actin filaments to cell membrane, and revealed significant delay of cell proliferation. Since the morphological changes of GPR174-cells were very similar to mock CHO cells treated with cholera toxin, we measured the concentration of intracellular cAMP. The results showed the concentration was significantly elevated in GPR174-cells. By measuring intracellular cAMP concentration in GPR174-cells, we screened lipids and nucleotides to identify ligands for GPR174. We found that lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) stimulated increase in intracellular cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phosphorylation of Erk was elevated by LysoPS in GPR174 cells. These LysoPS responses were inhibited by NF449, an inhibitor of G{alpha}{sub s} protein. These results suggested that GPR174 was a putative LysoPS receptor conjugating with G{alpha}{sub s}, and its expression induced morphological changes in CHO cells by constitutively activating adenylyl cycles accompanied with cell conjunctions and delay of proliferation.

  6. Growth hormone regulation of rat liver gene expression assessed by SSH and microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardmo, Cissi; Swerdlow, Harold; Mode, Agneta

    2002-04-25

    The sexually dimorphic secretion of growth hormone (GH) that prevails in the rat leads to a sex-differentiated expression of GH target genes, particularly in the liver. We have used subtractive suppressive hybridization (SSH) to search for new target genes induced by the female-characteristic, near continuous, pattern of GH secretion. Microarrays and dot-blot hybridizations were used in an attempt to confirm differential ratios of expression of obtained SSH clones. Out of 173 unique SSH clones, 41 could be verified as differentially expressed. Among these, we identified 17 known genes not previously recognized as differentially regulated by the sex-specific GH pattern. Additional SSH clones may also represent genes subjected to sex-specific GH regulation since only transcripts abundantly expressed could be verified. Optimized analyses, specific for each gene, are required to fully characterize the degree of differential expression.

  7. Intronic regulation of Aire expression by Jmjd6 for self-tolerance induction in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Toyoshi; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Sato, Tetsuya; Uruno, Takehito; Duan, Xuefeng; Tomino, Takahiro; Harada, Yosuke; Watanabe, Mayuki; Wang, Yuqing; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Suyama, Mikita; Yoshinori, Fukui

    2015-11-04

    The thymus has spatially distinct microenvironments, the cortex and the medulla, where the developing T-cells are selected to mature or die through the interaction with thymic stromal cells. To establish the immunological self in the thymus, medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) express diverse sets of tissue-specific self-antigens (TSAs). This ectopic expression of TSAs largely depends on the transcriptional regulator Aire, yet the mechanism controlling Aire expression itself remains unknown. Here, we show that Jmjd6, a dioxygenase that catalyses lysyl hydroxylation of splicing regulatory proteins, is critical for Aire expression. Although Jmjd6 deficiency does not affect abundance of Aire transcript, the intron 2 of Aire gene is not effectively spliced out in the absence of Jmjd6, resulting in marked reduction of mature Aire protein in mTECs and spontaneous development of multi-organ autoimmunity in mice. These results highlight the importance of intronic regulation in controlling Aire protein expression.

  8. WISP-1 positively regulates angiogenesis by controlling VEGF-A expression in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiao-Chi; Tzeng, Huey-En; Huang, Chun-Yin; Huang, Yuan-Li; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Wang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Po-Chuan; Chang, An-Chen; Fong, Yi-Chin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2017-04-13

    In recent years, much research has focused on the role of angiogenesis in osteosarcoma, which occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults. The vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) pathway is the key regulator of angiogenesis and in osteosarcoma. VEGF-A expression has been recognized as a prognostic marker in angiogenesis. Aberrant WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein-1 (WISP-1) expression is associated with various cancers. However, the function of WISP-1 in osteosarcoma angiogenesis is poorly understood. We demonstrate a positive correlation between WISP-1 and VEGF-A expression in human osteosarcoma. Moreover, we show that WISP-1 promotes VEGF-A expression in human osteosarcoma cells, subsequently inducing human endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) migration and tube formation. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α signaling pathways were activated after WISP-1 stimulation, while FAK, JNK, and HIF-1α inhibitors or small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished WISP-1-induced VEGF-A expression and angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed down-regulation of microRNA-381 (miR-381) in WISP-1-induced VEGF-A expression and angiogenesis. Our findings reveal that WISP-1 enhances VEGF-A expression and angiogenesis through the FAK/JNK/HIF-1α signaling pathways, as well as via down-regulation of miR-381 expression. WISP-1 may be a promising target in osteosarcoma angiogenesis.

  9. Suppression of Idol expression is an additional mechanism underlying statin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LDL receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bin; Wu, Minhao; Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Liu, Jingwen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and Idol as negative regulators of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein stability. While the induction of PCSK9 transcription has been recognized as a limitation to the statin cholesterol-lowering efficacy at higher doses, it is unknown whether Idol is involved in the statin-mediated up-regulation of the hepatic LDLR. Here we report that statins exert opposite effects on PCSK9 and Idol gene expression in human hepatoma-derived cell lines and primary hepatocytes isolated from hamsters and rats. While PCSK9 expression was induced, the level of Idol mRNA rapidly declined in statin-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. This differs from the effect of the liver X receptor ligand, GW3965, which increased the expression of both PCSK9 and Idol. We further show that cellular depletion of Idol by siRNA transfection did not change PCSK9 expression levels in control and statin-treated cells; however, the basal level of LDLR protein increased by 60% in Idol siRNA transfected HepG2 cells. More importantly, the increase in LDLR protein abundance by rosuvastatin and atorvastatin treatment was compromised by Idol siRNA transfection. Collectively, our present findings suggest that the suppression of Idol gene expression in liver cells is an additional mechanism underlying the statin-induced up-regulation of hepatic LDLR expression. This may contribute to the hypocholesterolemic effects of statins observed in clinical settings.

  10. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  11. Developmental expression patterns and regulation of connexins in the mouse mammary gland: expression of connexin30 in lactogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhouk, Rabih S; Elble, Randolph C; Bassam, Rola; Daher, Mariam; Sfeir, Agnel; Mosleh, Lina Abi; El-Khoury, Hilda; Hamoui, Samar; Pauli, Bendicht U; El-Sabban, Marwan E

    2005-01-01

    The mammary gland reaches a fully differentiated phenotype at lactation, a stage characterized by the abundant expression of beta-casein. We have investigated the expression and regulation of gap junction proteins (connexins, Cx) during the various developmental stages of mouse mammary gland. Immunohistochemical analysis, with specific antibodies, reveals that Cx26 and Cx32 are expressed and confined to the cell borders of luminal epithelial cells in all developmental stages of the gland. Cx26 and Cx32 expression, at the mRNA and protein levels, increases in pregnancy and peaks in lactation. Whereas Cx43 mRNA decreases in pregnancy and lactation, the functional activity of Cx43 protein, which has been localized to myoepithelial cells, is regulated (through phosphorylation) during pregnancy and peaks during lactation. Cx30 mRNA and proteins have, for the first time, been detected in mammary gland epithelia. Using reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction and sequencing techniques, we show that Cx30 is abundant in pregnant and lactating mammary gland. Cx30 protein levels have not been detected in the mammary gland prior to day 15 of pregnancy, whereas maximum expression occurs at the onset of lactation. In mouse mammary cells in culture, Cx30 is epithelial-cell-specific and is induced by lactogenic hormones. These data identify a novel player in mammary differentiation and suggest a potential role for Cx30 in the fully differentiated gland.

  12. Mendelian and non-Mendelian regulation of gene expression in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Transcriptome variation plays an important role in affecting the phenotype of an organism. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms regulating transcriptome variation in segregating populations is still largely unknown. We sought to assess and map variation in transcript abundance in maize shoot apices in the intermated B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred line population. RNA-based sequencing (RNA-seq allowed for the detection and quantification of the transcript abundance derived from 28,603 genes. For a majority of these genes, the population mean, coefficient of variation, and segregation patterns could be predicted by the parental expression levels. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL mapping identified 30,774 eQTL including 96 trans-eQTL "hotspots," each of which regulates the expression of a large number of genes. Interestingly, genes regulated by a trans-eQTL hotspot tend to be enriched for a specific function or act in the same genetic pathway. Also, genomic structural variation appeared to contribute to cis-regulation of gene expression. Besides genes showing Mendelian inheritance in the RIL population, we also found genes whose expression level and variation in the progeny could not be predicted based on parental difference, indicating that non-Mendelian factors also contribute to expression variation. Specifically, we found 145 genes that show patterns of expression reminiscent of paramutation such that all the progeny had expression levels similar to one of the two parents. Furthermore, we identified another 210 genes that exhibited unexpected patterns of transcript presence/absence. Many of these genes are likely to be gene fragments resulting from transposition, and the presence/absence of their transcripts could influence expression levels of their ancestral syntenic genes. Overall, our results contribute to the identification of novel expression patterns and broaden the understanding of transcriptional variation in

  13. Expression and Regulation of PIWIL-Proteins and PIWI-Interacting RNAs in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Pleštilová

    Full Text Available The PIWIL (P-element induced wimpy testis like protein subfamily of argonaute proteins is essential for Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA biogenesis and their function to silence transposons during germ-line development. Here we explored their presence and regulation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA.The expression of PIWIL genes in RA and osteoarthritis (OA synovial tissues and synovial fibroblasts (SF was analysed by Real-time PCR, immunofluorescence and Western blot. The expression of piRNAs was quantified by next generation small RNA sequencing (NGS. The regulation of PIWI/piRNAs, proliferation and methylation of LINE-1 after silencing of PIWIL genes were studied.PIWIL2 and 4 mRNA were similarly expressed in synovial tissues and SF from RA and OA patients. However, on the protein level only PIWIL4 was strongly expressed in SF. Using NGS up to 300 piRNAs were identified in all SF without significant differences in expression levels between RA and OASF. Of interest, the analysis of the co-expression of the detected piRNAs revealed a less tightly regulated pattern of piRNA-823, -4153 and -16659 expression in RASF. In RASF and OASF, stimulation with TNFα+IL1β/TLR-ligands further significantly increased the expression levels of PIWIL2 and 4 mRNA and piRNA-16659 was significantly (4-fold induced upon Poly(I:C stimulation. Silencing of PIWIL2/4 neither affect LINE-1 methylation/expression nor proliferation of RASF.We detected a new class of small regulatory RNAs (piRNAs and their specific binding partners (PIWIL2/4 in synovial fibroblasts. The differential regulation of co-expression of piRNAs in RASF and the induction of piRNA/Piwi-proteins by innate immune stimulators suggest a role in inflammatory processes.

  14. Mendelian and Non-Mendelian Regulation of Gene Expression in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Petsch, Katherine; Shimizu, Rena; Liu, Sanzhen; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong; Ying, Kai; Yu, Jianming; Scanlon, Michael J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Timmermans, Marja C. P.; Springer, Nathan M.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome variation plays an important role in affecting the phenotype of an organism. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms regulating transcriptome variation in segregating populations is still largely unknown. We sought to assess and map variation in transcript abundance in maize shoot apices in the intermated B73×Mo17 recombinant inbred line population. RNA–based sequencing (RNA–seq) allowed for the detection and quantification of the transcript abundance derived from 28,603 genes. For a majority of these genes, the population mean, coefficient of variation, and segregation patterns could be predicted by the parental expression levels. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping identified 30,774 eQTL including 96 trans-eQTL “hotspots,” each of which regulates the expression of a large number of genes. Interestingly, genes regulated by a trans-eQTL hotspot tend to be enriched for a specific function or act in the same genetic pathway. Also, genomic structural variation appeared to contribute to cis-regulation of gene expression. Besides genes showing Mendelian inheritance in the RIL population, we also found genes whose expression level and variation in the progeny could not be predicted based on parental difference, indicating that non-Mendelian factors also contribute to expression variation. Specifically, we found 145 genes that show patterns of expression reminiscent of paramutation such that all the progeny had expression levels similar to one of the two parents. Furthermore, we identified another 210 genes that exhibited unexpected patterns of transcript presence/absence. Many of these genes are likely to be gene fragments resulting from transposition, and the presence/absence of their transcripts could influence expression levels of their ancestral syntenic genes. Overall, our results contribute to the identification of novel expression patterns and broaden the understanding of transcriptional variation in plants. PMID

  15. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, Masayuki; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Aizawa, Ryo; Miyazono, Agasa; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Morimura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2011-07-15

    POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-α-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-α in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-α-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-α inhibits POEM expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-α. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Static compression regulates OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells via the CAMK II pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Jianru

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This study aimed to investigate the potential role of CAMK II pathway in the compression-regulated OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs. Material and Methods The PDL tissue model was developed by 3-D culturing human PDLCs in a thin sheet of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA scaffolds, which was subjected to static compression of 25 g/cm2 for 3, 6 and 12 h, with or without treatment of KN-93. After that, the expression of OPG, RANKL and NFATC2 was investigated through real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Results After static compression, the NFATC2 and RANKL expression was significantly up-regulated, while partially suppressed by KN-93 for 6 and 12 h respectively. The OPG expression was significantly down-regulated by compression in 3 h, started to elevate in 6 h, and significantly up-regulated in 12 h. The up-regulation after 12 h was significantly suppressed by KN-93. Conclusions Long-term static compression increases OPG expression in PDLCs, at least partially, via the CAMK II pathway.

  17. Static compression regulates OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells via the CAMK II pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianru, Y I; MeiLe, L I; Yang, Yan; Zheng, Wei; Yu, L I; Zhao, Zhihe

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential role of CAMK II pathway in the compression-regulated OPG expression in periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). MATERIAL AND METHOds: The PDL tissue model was developed by 3-D culturing human PDLCs in a thin sheet of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds, which was subjected to static compression of 25 g/cm2 for 3, 6 and 12 h, with or without treatment of KN-93. After that, the expression of OPG, RANKL and NFATC2 was investigated through real-time PCR and western blot analysis. After static compression, the NFATC2 and RANKL expression was significantly up-regulated, while partially suppressed by KN-93 for 6 and 12 h respectively. The OPG expression was significantly down-regulated by compression in 3 h, started to elevate in 6 h, and significantly up-regulated in 12 h. The up-regulation after 12 h was significantly suppressed by KN-93. Long-term static compression increases OPG expression in PDLCs, at least partially, via the CAMK II pathway.

  18. Hfq regulates the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masayuki; Takahashi, Akira; Su, Zehong; Harada, Nagakatsu; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2008-09-21

    The hfq gene is conserved in a wide variety of bacteria and Hfq is involved in many cellular functions such as stress responses and the regulation of gene expression. It has also been reported that Hfq is involved in bacterial pathogenicity. However, it is not clear whether Hfq regulates virulence in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. To evaluate this, we investigated the effect of Hfq on the expression of virulence-associated genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), which is considered to be an important virulence factor in V. parahaemolyticus, using an hfq deletion mutant. The production of TDH in the hfq deletion mutant was much higher than in the parental strain. Quantification of tdh promoter activity and mRNA demonstrated that transcription of the tdh gene was up-regulated in the mutant strain. The hfq-complemented strain had a normal (parental) amount of tdh expression. The transcriptional activity of tdhA was particularly increased in the mutant strain. These results indicate that Hfq is closely associated with the expression level of the tdh gene. Interestingly, other genes involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus, such as VP1680, vopC, and vopT, were also up-regulated in the mutant strain. Hfq regulates the expression of virulence-associated factors such as TDH and may be involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  19. Hfq regulates the expression of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawatari Kazuaki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hfq gene is conserved in a wide variety of bacteria and Hfq is involved in many cellular functions such as stress responses and the regulation of gene expression. It has also been reported that Hfq is involved in bacterial pathogenicity. However, it is not clear whether Hfq regulates virulence in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. To evaluate this, we investigated the effect of Hfq on the expression of virulence-associated genes including thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH, which is considered to be an important virulence factor in V. parahaemolyticus, using an hfq deletion mutant. Results The production of TDH in the hfq deletion mutant was much higher than in the parental strain. Quantification of tdh promoter activity and mRNA demonstrated that transcription of the tdh gene was up-regulated in the mutant strain. The hfq-complemented strain had a normal (parental amount of tdh expression. The transcriptional activity of tdhA was particularly increased in the mutant strain. These results indicate that Hfq is closely associated with the expression level of the tdh gene. Interestingly, other genes involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus, such as VP1680, vopC, and vopT, were also up-regulated in the mutant strain. Conclusion Hfq regulates the expression of virulence-associated factors such as TDH and may be involved in the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  20. Androgens Regulate Ovarian Gene Expression Through Modulation of Ezh2 Expression and Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoting; Hayes, Emily; Biswas, Anindita; Seger, Christina; Prizant, Hen; Hammes, Stephen R; Sen, Aritro

    2017-09-01

    A substantial amount of evidence suggests that androgen signaling through classical androgen receptors is critical for both normal and pathologic ovarian physiology. Specifically, we and others have shown that, in mouse granulosa cells, androgen actions through both extranuclear and nuclear androgen receptor signaling are critical for normal follicle development and ovulation. Here, we show that androgens through the PI3K/Akt pathway rapidly (within minutes) phosphorylate and inhibit activity of the Polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2). Over the course of 24 to 48 hours, androgens then induce expression of the microRNA miR-101, which targets Ezh2 messenger RNA (mRNA), leading to a nearly complete loss of Ezh2 protein expression. This long-term androgen-induced loss of Ezh2 actions ultimately results in sustained reduction of the H3K27me3-repressive mark in the promoter region of the Runt-related transcription factor-1 (Runx1) gene, a luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced transcription factor essential for ovulation, leading to increased Runx1 mRNA expression. Accordingly, blocking androgen-induced inhibition of Ezh2 in vivo adversely affects LH-induced Runx1 mRNA expression and subsequent ovulation. Importantly, although estrogen treatment of granulosa cells similarly causes rapid activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and short-term phosphorylation of Ezh2, it does not induce miR-101 expression and thereby does not reduce overall Ezh2 expression, demonstrating the androgen specificity of long-term Ezh2 suppression. Thus, this study provides insight regarding how androgen-induced extranuclear kinase signaling and intranuclear transcription through Ezh2 modifications may influence the expression pattern of genes, ultimately affecting various downstream physiological processes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of the expression of genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis and action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Steroid hormones participate in organ development, reproduction, body homeostasis, and stress responses. The steroid machinery is expressed in a development- and tissue-specific manner, with the expression of these factors being tightly regulated by an array of transcription factors (TFs). Epigenetics provides an additional layer of gene regulation through DNA methylation and histone tail modifications. Evidence of epigenetic regulation of key steroidogenic enzymes is increasing, though this does not seem to be a predominant regulatory pathway. Steroid hormones exert their action in target tissues through steroid nuclear receptors belonging to the NR3A and NR3C families. Nuclear receptor expression levels and post-translational modifications regulate their function and dictate their sensitivity to steroid ligands. Nuclear receptors and TFs are more likely to be epigenetically regulated than proteins involved in steroidogenesis and have secondary impact on the expression of these steroidogenic enzymes. Here we review evidence for epigenetic regulation of enzymes, transcription factors, and nuclear receptors related to steroid biogenesis and action. PMID:20156469

  2. Tradeoff between reproduction and resistance evolution to Bt-toxin in Helicoverpa armigera: regulated by vitellogenin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W N; Xiao, H J; Liang, G M; Guo, Y Y; Wu, K M

    2014-08-01

    Evolution of resistance to insecticides usually has fitness tradeoffs associated with adaptation to the stress. The basic regulation mechanism of tradeoff between reproduction and resistance evolution to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Ha), based on the vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression was analyzed here. The full-length cDNA of the Vg gene HaVg (JX504706) was cloned and identified. HaVg has 5704 base pairs (bp) with an open reading frame (ORF) of 5265 bp, which encoded 1756 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 197.28 kDa and a proposed isoelectric point of 8.74. Sequence alignment analysis indicated that the amino acid sequence of HaVg contained all of the conserved domains detected in the Vgs of the other insects and had a high similarity with the Vgs of the Lepidoptera insects, especially Noctuidae. The resistance level to Cry1Ac Bt toxin and relative HaVg mRNA expression levels among the following four groups: Cry1Ac-susceptible strain (96S), Cry1Ac-resistant strain fed on artificial diet with Bt toxin for 135 generations (BtR stands for the Cry1Ac Bt resistance), progeny of the Cry1Ac-resistant strain with a non-Bt-toxin artificial diet for 38 generations (CK1) and the direct descendants of the 135th-generation resistant larvae which were fed on an artificial diet without the Cry1Ac protein (CK2) were analyzed. Compared with the 96S strain, the resistance ratios of the BtR strain, the CK1 strain and the CK2 strain were 2917.15-, 2.15- and 2037.67-fold, respectively. The maximum relative HaVg mRNA expression levels of the BtR strain were approximately 50% less than that of the 96S strain, and the coming of maximum expression was delayed for approximately 4 days. The overall trend of the HaVg mRNA expression levels in the CK1 strain was similar to that in the 96S strain, and the overall trend of the HaVg mRNA expression levels in the CK2 strain was similar to that in the BtR strain. Our results

  3. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17?-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulat...

  4. Alternative polyadenylation and miR-34 family members regulate tau expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickson, John R; Kruse, Carla; Montagna, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    Tau pathologically aggregates in Alzheimer's disease, and evidence suggests that reducing tau expression may be safe and beneficial for the prevention or treatment of this disease. We sought to examine the role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of human tau mRNA in regulating tau expression....... Tau expresses two 3'-UTR isoforms, long and short, as a result of alternative polyadenylation. Using luciferase reporter constructs, we found that expression from these isoforms is differentially controlled in human neuroblastoma cell lines M17D and SH-SY5Y. Several microRNAs were computationally...

  5. RNAi silenced Dd-grp94 (Dictyostelium discoideum glucose-regulated protein 94 kDa) cell lines in Dictyostelium exhibit marked reduction in growth rate and delay in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baviskar, Sandhya N; Shields, Malcolm S

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-regulated 94 kDa protein (Grp94) is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of multicellular eukaryotes. It is a constitutively expressed protein that is overexpressed in certain abnormal conditions of the cell such as depletion of glucose and calcium, and low oxygen and pH. The protein is also implicated in diseased conditions like cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, the consequences of downregulation of Grp94 were investigated at both unicellular and multicellular stages of Dictyostelium discoideum. Previous studies have shown the expression of Dd-Grp94 (Dictyostelium discoideum glucose-regulated 94 kDa protein) in wild-type cells varies during development, and overexpression of Dd-Grp94 leads to abnormal cell shape and inhibition of development (i.e., formation of fruiting bodies). Grp94 is a known calcium binding protein and an efficient calcium buffer. Therefore, in the present study we hypothesized that downregulation of Dd-Grp94 protein would affect Dictyostelium cell structure, growth, and development. We found that Dd-grp94 RNAi recombinants exhibited reduced growth rate, cell size, and a subtle change in cell motility compared to the parental cells. The recombinants also exhibited a delay in development and small fruiting bodies. These results establish that Dd-grp94 plays a crucial role in determining normal cell structure, growth and differentiation.

  6. Self-Regulation of Learning and Academic Delay of Gratification: Gender and Ethnic Differences among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2007-01-01

    Self-regulated learners engage in self-generated thoughts, actions, and feelings while pursuing academic goals. The most successful learners use appropriate learning strategies and maintain high levels of motivation. Few studies on the self-regulation of learning have examined individual differences such as gender and ethnicity among college…

  7. Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression and association with HIF binding reveals the complexity of microRNA expression regulation under hypoxia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camps, Carme; Saini, Harpreet K; Mole, David R; Choudhry, Hani; Reczko, Martin; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Tian, Ya-Min; Buffa, Francesca M; Harris, Adrian L; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G; Enright, Anton J; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2014-01-01

    .... Our aim is to investigate in depth the regulation of microRNA expression by hypoxia in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, establish the relationship between microRNA expression and HIF binding sites...

  8. Gene expression profiling of hormonal regulation related to the residual feed intake of Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Y M; Yang, Z; Wu, F; Han, Z Y; Wang, G L

    2015-09-11

    An accumulation of over a decade of research in cattle has shown that genetic selection for decreased residual feed intake (RFI), defined as the difference between an animal's actual feed intake and its expected feed intake, is a viable option for improving feed efficiency and reducing the feed requirements of herds, thereby improving the profitability of cattle producers. Hormonal regulation is one of the most important factors in feed intake. To determine the relationship between hormones and feed efficiency, we performed gene expression profiling of jugular vein serum on hormonal regulation of Chinese Holstein cattle with low and high RFI coefficients. 857 differential expression genes (from 24683 genes) were found. Among these, 415 genes were up-regulated and 442 genes were down-regulated in the low RFI group. The gene ontology (GO) search revealed 6 significant terms and 64 genes associated with hormonal regulation, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) selected the adipocytokine signaling pathway, insulin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the study indicated that the molecular expression of genes associated with hormonal regulation differs in dairy cows, depending on their RFI coefficients, and that these differences may be related to the molecular regulation of the leptin-NPY and insulin signaling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Child and Adolescent Emotion Regulation: The Role of Parental Emotion Regulation and Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariola, Emily; Gullone, Eleonora; Hughes, Elizabeth K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews current literature relating to parent and child emotional functioning, specifically their emotion regulatory skills and emotional expression. Included are considerations regarding theoretical, methodological, and sampling strengths and weaknesses of existing literature. On the basis of the review, several directions for future…

  10. Energy Balance Regulating Neuropeptides Are Expressed through Pregnancy and Regulated by Interleukin-6 Deficiency in Mouse Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta produces a number of signaling molecules including metabolic and reproductive hormones as well as several inflammatory mediators. Among them, Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-known immune and metabolic regulator, acts peripherally modulating metabolic function and centrally increasing energy expenditure and reducing body fat. IL-6 interacts with key hypothalamic neuropeptidergic systems controlling energy homeostasis such as those producing the orexigenic/anabolic: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorectic/catabolic neuropeptides: proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Human and rat placenta have been identified as source of these neuropeptides, but their expression and regulation in murine placental tissues remain unknown. Therefore, placental mRNA levels of IL-6, NPY, AgRP, POMC, and CART at different pregnancy stages (gestational days 13, 15, and 18) were analyzed by real time PCR, as were the effect of IL-6 deficiency (IL-6 knockout mice) on their placental expression. Our results showed that placenta-derived neuropeptides were regulated by gestational age and IL-6 throughout the second half of mouse pregnancy. These data suggest that IL-6 may participate in the fine tune control of energy balance during pregnancy by extending its action as a metabolic signal to the main organ at the fetomaternal interface: the placenta. PMID:24744782

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein-7 expression is down-regulated in human clear cell renal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic-Jukic, Nikolina; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Radic-Antolic, Margareta; Coric, Marijana; Zadro, Renata; Kastelan, Zeljko; Pasini, Josip; Bandic-Pavlovic, Daniela; Kes, Petar

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the expression pattern of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is altered in different tumors. We determined expression of BMP-7 in human clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC). Samples from cancer and corresponding healthy tissue were obtained from 20 patients who underwent nephrectomy for CCRC. Expression of BMP-7 mRNA was determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR showed strong down-regulation of BMP-7 mRNA in cancer tissue. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of BMP-7 in normal renal tissue, with almost complete loss of BMP-7 expression in malignant cells of 6 patients (30%). After 3 years of follow-up, 5 out of 6 patients with high BMP-7 mRNA expression were alive and disease-free, compared with 9 out of 14 patients with low BMP-7 mRNA expression. BMP-7 mRNA and protein expression were down-regulated in CCRC. Further prospective studies are needed to characterize the role of BMP-7 in human CCRC.

  12. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations.

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    Hsueh-Tzu Shih

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations.

  13. Cold exposure inhibits hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression, serum leptin concentration, and delays reproductive development in male Brandt's vole ( Lasiopodomys brandtii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Cold commonly affects growth and reproductive development in small mammals. Here, we test the hypothesis that low ambient temperature will affect growth and puberty onset, associated with altered hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression and serum leptin concentration in wild rodents. Male Brandt's voles ( Lasiopodomys brandtii) were exposed to cold (4 ± 1 °C) and warm (23 ± 1 °C) conditions from the birth and sacrificed on different developmental stages (day 26, day 40, day 60, and day 90, respectively). Brandt's voles increased the thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue, mobilized body fat, decreased serum leptin levels, and delayed the reproductive development especially on day 40 in the cold condition. They increased food intake to compensate for the high energy demands in the cold. The hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression on day 26 was decreased, associated with lower wet testis mass and testis testosterone concentration on day 40, in the cold-exposed voles compared to that in the warm. Serum leptin was positively correlated with body fat, testis mass, and testosterone concentration. These data suggested that cold exposure inhibited hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression during the early stage of development, decreased serum leptin concentration, and delayed reproductive development in male Brandt's voles.

  14. STAT3 regulates ABCA3 expression and influences lamellar body formation in alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Yohei; Besnard, Valérie; Clark, Jean C; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2008-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lamellar body associated lipid transport protein required for normal synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. In this study, we demonstrate that STAT3, activated by IL-6, regulates ABCA3 expression in vivo and in vitro. ABCA3 mRNA and immunostaining were decreased in adult mouse lungs in which STAT3 was deleted from the respiratory epithelium (Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice). Consistent with the role of STAT3, intratracheal IL-6 induced ABCA3 expression in vivo. Decreased ABCA3 and abnormalities in the formation of lamellar bodies, the intracellular site of surfactant lipid storage, were observed in Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. Expression of SREBP1a and 1c, SCAP, ABCA3, and AKT mRNAs was inhibited by deletion of Stat3 in type II cells isolated from Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. The activities of PI3K and AKT were required for normal Abca3 gene expression in vitro. AKT activation induced SREBP expression and increased the activity of the Abca3 promoter in vitro, consistent with the role of STAT3 signaling, at least in part via SREBP, in the regulation of ABCA3. ABCA3 expression is regulated by IL-6 in a pathway that includes STAT3, PI3K, AKT, SCAP, and SREBP. Activation of STAT3 after exposure to IL-6 enhances ABCA3 expression, which, in turn, influences pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

  15. Orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ is a key regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lu, Yan; Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-min; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Jina; Dewidar, Bedair; Jeong, Won-IL; Lee, In-Kyu; Cho, Sung Jin; Dooley, Steven; Lee, Chul-Ho; Li, Xiaoying

    2017-01-01

    Fibrinogen, 1 of 13 coagulation factors responsible for normal blood clotting, is synthesized by hepatocytes. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating fibrinogen gene expression have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we identified estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) as a novel transcriptional regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression. Overexpression of ERRγ specially increased fibrinogen expression in human hepatoma cell line. Cannabinoid receptor types 1(CB1R) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) up-regulated transcription of fibrinogen via induction of ERRγ, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated fibrinogen expression. Deletion analyses of the fibrinogen γ (FGG) gene promoter and ChIP assays revealed binding sites of ERRγ on human fibrinogen γ gene promoter. Moreover, overexpression of ERRγ was sufficient to increase fibrinogen gene expression, whereas treatment with GSK5182, a selective inverse agonist of ERRγ led to its attenuation in cell culture. Finally, fibrinogen and ERRγ gene expression were elevated in liver tissue of obese patients suggesting a conservation of this mechanism. Overall, this study elucidates a molecular mechanism linking CB1R signaling, ERRγ expression and fibrinogen gene transcription. GSK5182 may have therapeutic potential to treat hyperfibrinogenemia. PMID:28750085

  16. Distraction and Expressive Suppression Strategies in Regulation of High- and Low-Intensity Negative Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Fan, Cong; Zhu, Chuanlin; Li, Shuaixia; Zhang, Zhao; Qi, Zhengyang; Luo, Wenbo

    2017-10-12

    The current study compared the effectiveness of distraction, an antecedent-focused strategy that involves diverting an individual's attention away from affective terms, and expressive suppression, a response-focused strategy that involves inhibiting conscious emotion-expressive behavior during an emotionally aroused state, in the regulation of high- and low-intensity unpleasant stimuli, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Sixteen participants completed an emotion regulation experiment in which they passively viewed high- or low-intensity unpleasant images (view), solved a mathematical equation presented on high- or low-intensity negative images (distraction), or suppressed their emotional expression in response to high- or low-intensity unpleasant images (suppression). Their negative experiences after implementation of these strategies were rated by participants on a 1-9 scale. We mainly found that compared with expressive suppression, distraction yielded greater attenuation of the early phase of centro-parietal LPP when the participants responded to high-intensity stimuli. In the low-intensity condition, distraction, but not expressive suppression, effectively decreased the early phase of LPP. The findings suggest that expressive suppression works as early as distraction in the high-intensity condition; more importantly, distraction is superior to expressive suppression in regulating negative emotion, which is influenced by emotional intensity.

  17. Somatic, germline and sex hierarchy regulated gene expression during Drosophila metamorphosis

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    Arbeitman Michelle N

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila melanogaster undergoes a complete metamorphosis, during which time the larval male and female forms transition into sexually dimorphic, reproductive adult forms. To understand this complex morphogenetic process at a molecular-genetic level, whole genome microarray analyses were performed. Results The temporal gene expression patterns during metamorphosis were determined for all predicted genes, in both somatic and germline tissues of males and females separately. Temporal changes in transcript abundance for genes of known functions were found to correlate with known developmental processes that occur during metamorphosis. We find that large numbers of genes are sex-differentially expressed in both male and female germline tissues, and relatively few are sex-differentially expressed in somatic tissues. The majority of genes with somatic, sex-differential expression were found to be expressed in a stage-specific manner, suggesting that they mediate discrete developmental events. The Sex-lethal paralog, CG3056, displays somatic, male-biased expression at several time points in metamorphosis. Gene expression downstream of the somatic, sex determination genes transformer and doublesex (dsx was examined in two-day old pupae, which allowed for the identification of genes regulated as a consequence of the sex determination hierarchy. These include the homeotic gene abdominal A, which is more highly expressed in females as compared to males, as a consequence of dsx. For most genes regulated downstream of dsx during pupal development, the mode of regulation is distinct from that observed for the well-studied direct targets of DSX, Yolk protein 1 and 2. Conclusion The data and analyses presented here provide a comprehensive assessment of gene expression during metamorphosis in each sex, in both somatic and germline tissues. Many of the genes that underlie critical developmental processes during metamorphosis, including sex

  18. Somatic, germline and sex hierarchy regulated gene expression during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Matthew S; Sanders, Laura E; Sun, Fengzhu; Arbeitman, Michelle N

    2009-02-13

    Drosophila melanogaster undergoes a complete metamorphosis, during which time the larval male and female forms transition into sexually dimorphic, reproductive adult forms. To understand this complex morphogenetic process at a molecular-genetic level, whole genome microarray analyses were performed. The temporal gene expression patterns during metamorphosis were determined for all predicted genes, in both somatic and germline tissues of males and females separately. Temporal changes in transcript abundance for genes of known functions were found to correlate with known developmental processes that occur during metamorphosis. We find that large numbers of genes are sex-differentially expressed in both male and female germline tissues, and relatively few are sex-differentially expressed in somatic tissues. The majority of genes with somatic, sex-differential expression were found to be expressed in a stage-specific manner, suggesting that they mediate discrete developmental events. The Sex-lethal paralog, CG3056, displays somatic, male-biased expression at several time points in metamorphosis. Gene expression downstream of the somatic, sex determination genes transformer and doublesex (dsx) was examined in two-day old pupae, which allowed for the identification of genes regulated as a consequence of the sex determination hierarchy. These include the homeotic gene abdominal A, which is more highly expressed in females as compared to males, as a consequence of dsx. For most genes regulated downstream of dsx during pupal development, the mode of regulation is distinct from that observed for the well-studied direct targets of DSX, Yolk protein 1 and 2. The data and analyses presented here provide a comprehensive assessment of gene expression during metamorphosis in each sex, in both somatic and germline tissues. Many of the genes that underlie critical developmental processes during metamorphosis, including sex-specific processes, have been identified. These results

  19. Negative regulation of hepatic fat mass and obesity associated (Fto) gene expression by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tooru M; Lew, Pei San; Luo, Yanming; Leckstrom, Arnold

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the role of glucose and insulin in the regulation of hepatic fat mass and obesity associated (Fto) gene expression and the role of hepatic Fto in the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression. To determine the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic Fto expression, levels of Fto mRNA in liver were compared between normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic, hypereglycemic/hyperinsulinemic, and hyperglycemic/hypoinsulinemic mice. To determine the direct effect of insulin on Fto expression, levels of Fto, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pase), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck) mRNA levels were compared between control and insulin-treated mouse liver tissues cultured ex vivo and immortalized mouse hepatocytes AML12. To determine the role of Fto in the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression, we examined the effect of enhanced Fto expression on G6pase and Pepck mRNA levels in AML12 cells. Fto mRNA levels were significantly reduced in hyperglycemic/hyperinsulinemic mice compared to normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic mice, while they were indistinguishable between hyperglycemic/hypoinsulinemic mice and normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic mice. Insulin treatment reduced Fto, G6pase, and Pepck mRNA levels compared to control vehicle treatment in both ex vivo cultured mouse liver tissues and AML12 cells. Enhanced Fto expression significantly increased G6pase and Pepck mRNA level in AML12 cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that hepatic Fto participates in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis possibly by mediating the inhibitory effect of glucose and insulin on gluconeogenic gene expression in liver. It is further suggested that impairments in nutritional and hormonal regulation of hepatic Fto expression may lead to impairments in glycemic control in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of Chlamydia Gene Expression by Tandem Promoters with Different Temporal Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Christopher J; Tan, Ming

    2015-11-02

    Chlamydia is a genus of pathogenic bacteria with an unusual intracellular developmental cycle marked by temporal waves of gene expression. The three main temporal groups of chlamydial genes are proposed to be controlled by separate mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. However, we have noted genes with discrepancies, such as the early gene dnaK and the midcycle genes bioY and pgk, which have promoters controlled by the late transcriptional regulators EUO and σ(28). To resolve this issue, we analyzed the promoters of these three genes in vitro and in Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria grown in cell culture. Transcripts from the σ(28)-dependent promoter of each gene were detected only at late times in the intracellular infection, bolstering the role of σ(28) RNA polymerase in late gene expression. In each case, however, expression prior to late times was due to a second promoter that was transcribed by σ(66) RNA polymerase, which is the major form of chlamydial polymerase. These results demonstrate that chlamydial genes can be transcribed from tandem promoters with different temporal profiles, leading to a composite expression pattern that differs from the expression profile of a single promoter. In addition, tandem promoters allow a gene to be regulated by multiple mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, such as DNA supercoiling or late regulation by EUO and σ(28). We discuss how tandem promoters broaden the repertoire of temporal gene expression patterns in the chlamydial developmental cycle and can be used to fine-tune the expression of specific genes. Chlamydia is a pathogenic bacterium that is responsible for the majority of infectious disease cases reported to the CDC each year. It causes an intracellular infection that is characterized by coordinated expression of chlamydial genes in temporal waves. Chlamydial transcription has been shown to be regulated by DNA supercoiling, alternative forms of RNA polymerase, and transcription factors, but the number

  1. Independent regulation of gene expression level and noise by histone modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohuan Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The inherent stochasticity generates substantial gene expression variation among isogenic cells under identical conditions, which is frequently referred to as gene expression noise or cell-to-cell expression variability. Similar to (average expression level, expression noise is also subject to natural selection. Yet it has been observed that noise is negatively correlated with expression level, which manifests as a potential constraint for simultaneous optimization of both. Here, we studied expression noise in human embryonic cells with computational analysis on single-cell RNA-seq data and in yeast with flow cytometry experiments. We showed that this coupling is overcome, to a certain degree, by a histone modification strategy in multiple embryonic developmental stages in human, as well as in yeast. Importantly, this epigenetic strategy could fit into a burst-like gene expression model: promoter-localized histone modifications (such as H3K4 methylation are associated with both burst size and burst frequency, which together influence expression level, while gene-body-localized ones (such as H3K79 methylation are more associated with burst frequency, which influences both expression level and noise. We further knocked out the only "writer" of H3K79 methylation in yeast, and observed that expression noise is indeed increased. Consistently, dosage sensitive genes, such as genes in the Wnt signaling pathway, tend to be marked with gene-body-localized histone modifications, while stress responding genes, such as genes regulating autophagy, tend to be marked with promoter-localized ones. Our findings elucidate that the "division of labor" among histone modifications facilitates the independent regulation of expression level and noise, extend the "histone code" hypothesis to include expression noise, and shed light on the optimization of transcriptome in evolution.

  2. Independent regulation of gene expression level and noise by histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohuan; Li, Ke; Li, Yingshu; Zhao, Tong; Li, Ting; Yang, Yu-Fei; Qian, Wenfeng

    2017-06-01

    The inherent stochasticity generates substantial gene expression variation among isogenic cells under identical conditions, which is frequently referred to as gene expression noise or cell-to-cell expression variability. Similar to (average) expression level, expression noise is also subject to natural selection. Yet it has been observed that noise is negatively correlated with expression level, which manifests as a potential constraint for simultaneous optimization of both. Here, we studied expression noise in human embryonic cells with computational analysis on single-cell RNA-seq data and in yeast with flow cytometry experiments. We showed that this coupling is overcome, to a certain degree, by a histone modification strategy in multiple embryonic developmental stages in human, as well as in yeast. Importantly, this epigenetic strategy could fit into a burst-like gene expression model: promoter-localized histone modifications (such as H3K4 methylation) are associated with both burst size and burst frequency, which together influence expression level, while gene-body-localized ones (such as H3K79 methylation) are more associated with burst frequency, which influences both expression level and noise. We further knocked out the only "writer" of H3K79 methylation in yeast, and observed that expression noise is indeed increased. Consistently, dosage sensitive genes, such as genes in the Wnt signaling pathway, tend to be marked with gene-body-localized histone modifications, while stress responding genes, such as genes regulating autophagy, tend to be marked with promoter-localized ones. Our findings elucidate that the "division of labor" among histone modifications facilitates the independent regulation of expression level and noise, extend the "histone code" hypothesis to include expression noise, and shed light on the optimization of transcriptome in evolution.

  3. miRNA-130a regulates C/EBP-ε expression during granulopoiesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maria T; Häger, Mattias; Glenthøj, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-ε (C/EBP-ε) is considered a master transcription factor regulating terminal neutrophil maturation. It is essential for expression of secondary granule proteins, but it also regulates proliferation, cell cycle, and maturation during granulopoiesis. Cebpe(-/-) mice have...... incomplete granulocytic differentiation and increased sensitivity toward bacterial infections. The amount of C/EBP-ε messenger RNA (mRNA) increases with maturation from myeloblasts with peak level in myelocytes (MC)/metamyelocytes (MM), when the cells stop proliferating followed by a decline in more mature...... cells. In contrast, C/EBP-ε protein is virtually detectable only in the MC/MM population, indicating that expression in more immature cells could be inhibited by microRNAs (miRNAs). We found that miRNA-130a (miR-130a) regulates C/EBP-ε protein expression in both murine and human granulocytic precursors...

  4. Light-induced c-Fos expression in the SCN and behavioural phase shifts of Djungarian hamsters with a delayed activity onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttner, Konrad; Vuillez, Patrick; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Weinert, Dietmar

    2015-06-01

    C-Fos expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and phase shifts of the activity rhythm following photic stimulation were investigated in Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) of two different circadian phenotypes. Wild-type (WT) hamsters display robust daily patterns of locomotor activity according to the light/dark conditions. Hamsters of the DAO (delayed activity onset) phenotype, however, progressively delay the activity onset, whereas activity offset remains coupled to "light-on". Although the exact reason for the delayed activity onset is not yet clarified, it is connected with a disturbed interaction between the light/dark cycle and the circadian clock. The aim was to test the link between photoreception and the behavioral output of the circadian system in hamsters of both phenotypes, to get further insight in the underlying mechanism of the DAO phenomenon. Animals were exposed to short light pulses at different times during the dark period to analyze phase shifts of the activity rhythm and expression of Fos protein in the SCN. The results indicate that the photosensitive phase in DAO hamsters is shifted like the activity onset. Also, phase shifts were significantly smaller in DAO hamsters. At the same time, levels of Fos expression did not differ between phenotypes regarding the circadian phase. The results provide evidence that the shifted photosensitivity of the circadian system in DAO hamsters does not differ from that of WT animals, and lead us to conclude that processes within the SCN that enable light information to reset the circadian pacemaker might offer an explanation for the DAO phenomenon.

  5. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Gee

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+ and neural plate border zone (pax3(+, while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland, as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the

  6. Hypoxia regulates microRNA expression in the human carotid body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchian, Souren, E-mail: souren.mkrtchian@ki.se [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Lee, Kian Leong, E-mail: csilkl@nus.edu.sg [Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore (Singapore); Kåhlin, Jessica [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Function Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Ebberyd, Anette [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Poellinger, Lorenz [Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I. [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Function Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    The carotid body (CB) is the key sensing organ for physiological oxygen levels in the body. Under conditions of low oxygen (hypoxia), the CB plays crucial roles in signaling to the cardiorespiratory center in the medulla oblongata for the restoration of oxygen homeostasis. How hypoxia regulates gene expression in the human CB remains poorly understood. While limited information on transcriptional regulation in animal CBs is available, the identity and impact of important post-transcriptional regulators such as non-coding RNAs, and in particular miRNAs are not known. Here we show using ex vivo experiments that indeed a number of miRNAs are differentially regulated in surgically removed human CB slices when acute hypoxic conditions were applied. Analysis of the hypoxia-regulated miRNAs shows that they target biological pathways with upregulation of functions related to cell proliferation and immune response and downregulation of cell differentiation and cell death functions. Comparative analysis of the human CB miRNAome with the global miRNA expression patterns of a large number of different human tissues showed that the CB miRNAome had a unique profile which reflects its highly specialized functional status. Nevertheless, the human CB miRNAome is most closely related to the miRNA expression pattern of brain tissues indicating that they may have the most similar developmental origins. - Highlights: • Hypoxia triggers differential expression of many miRNAs in the human carotid body. • This can lead to the upregulation of proliferation and immune response functions. • CB expression profile in the carotid body resembles the miRNA expression pattern in the brain. • miRNAs are involved in the regulation of carotid body functions including oxygen sensing.

  7. Attentional deployment is not necessary for successful emotion regulation via cognitive reappraisal or expressive suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, Genna M; Franconeri, Steven L; Ochsner, Kevin N; Chiao, Joan Y

    2014-06-01

    According to appraisal theories of emotion, cognitive reappraisal is a successful emotion regulation strategy because it involves cognitively changing our thoughts, which, in turn, change our emotions. However, recent evidence has challenged the importance of cognitive change and, instead, has suggested that attentional deployment may at least partly explain the emotion regulation success of cognitive reappraisal. The purpose of the current study was to examine the causal relationship between attentional deployment and emotion regulation success. We examined 2 commonly used emotion regulation strategies--cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression-because both depend on attention but have divergent behavioral, experiential, and physiological outcomes. Participants were either instructed to regulate emotions during free-viewing (unrestricted image viewing) or gaze-controlled (restricted image viewing) conditions and to self-report negative emotional experience. For both emotion regulation strategies, emotion regulation success was not altered by changes in participant control over the (a) direction of attention (free-viewing vs. gaze-controlled) during image viewing and (b) valence (negative vs. neutral) of visual stimuli viewed when gaze was controlled. Taken together, these findings provide convergent evidence that attentional deployment does not alter subjective negative emotional experience during either cognitive reappraisal or expressive suppression, suggesting that strategy-specific processes, such as cognitive appraisal and response modulation, respectively, may have a greater impact on emotional regulation success than processes common to both strategies, such as attention.

  8. MiR-184 expression is regulated by AMPK in pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Aida; Nguyen-Tu, Marie-Sophie; Cebola, Ines; Yavari, Arash; Marchetti, Piero; Piemonti, Lorenzo; de Koning, Eelco; Shapiro, A M James; Johnson, Paul; Sakamoto, Kei; Smith, David M; Leclerc, Isabelle; Ashrafian, Houman; Ferrer, Jorge; Rutter, Guy A

    2018-01-08

    AMPK is a critical energy sensor and target for widely used antidiabetic drugs. In β-cells, elevated glucose concentrations lower AMPK activity, and the ablation of both catalytic subunits (βAMPKdKO mice) impairs insulin secretion in vivo and β-cell identity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that silence gene expression that are essential for pancreatic β-cell function and identity and altered in diabetes. Here, we have explored the miRNAs acting downstream of AMPK in mouse and human β-cells. We identified 14 down-regulated and 9 up-regulated miRNAs in βAMPKdKO vs. control islets. Gene ontology analysis of targeted transcripts revealed enrichment in pathways important for β-cell function and identity. The most down-regulated miRNA was miR-184 (miR-184-3p), an important regulator of β-cell function and compensatory expansion that is controlled by glucose and reduced in diabetes. We demonstrate that AMPK is a potent regulator and an important mediator of the negative effects of glucose on miR-184 expression. Additionally, we reveal sexual dimorphism in miR-184 expression in mouse and human islets. Collectively, these data demonstrate that glucose-mediated changes in AMPK activity are central for the regulation of miR-184 and other miRNAs in islets and provide a link between energy status and gene expression in β-cells.-Martinez-Sanchez, A., Nguyen-Tu, M.-S., Cebola, I., Yavari, A., Marchetti, P., Piemonti, L., de Koning, E., Shapiro, A. M. J., Johnson, P., Sakamoto, K., Smith, D. M., Leclerc, I., Ashrafian, H., Ferrer, J., Rutter, G. A. MiR-184 expression is regulated by AMPK in pancreatic islets.

  9. Light induces Fos expression via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 in melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldrup, Marie-Louise Bülow; Georg, Birgitte; Falktoft, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    and the cells respond to light by a membrane depolarization and induction of the immediate early response gene Fos. Previous studies showed that the light activated melanopsin-induced signaling, the phototransduction, leading to depolarization of the membrane resembles the invertebrate opsins, which involves......-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) was found as pharmacological blockage of this kinase suppressed the light-induced Fos expression. Illumination increased the inositol phosphate turnover and induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 but not the c-Jun N-terminal kinase. The Galpha(q/11) protein inhibitor YM......254890 attenuated these intracellular light responses. Our data strongly indicate that Galpha(q/11)-mediated ERK1/2 activation is essential for expression of Fos upon illumination of melanopsin-expressing PC12 cells....

  10. Three nuclear and two membrane estrogen receptors in basal teleosts, Anguilla sp.: Identification, evolutionary history and differential expression regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafont, Anne Gaëlle; Rousseau, Karine; Tomkiewicz, Jonna

    2016-01-01

    expressed in the eel, but with differential patterns of tissue expression and regulation. ESR1 only is consistently up-regulated in vivo in female eel BPG-liver axis during induced sexual maturation, and also up-regulated in vitro by estradiol in eel hepatocyte primary cultures. This first comparative study...

  11. OsCOL16, encoding a CONSTANS-like protein, represses flowering by up-regulating Ghd7 expression in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weixun; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Daibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Ma, Weiwei; Zhang, Huan; Sun, Lianping; Yang, Zhengfu; Zhao, Chunde; Zhan, Xiaodeng; Shen, Xihong; Yu, Ping; Fu, Yaping; Zhu, Shanshan; Cao, Liyong; Cheng, Shihua

    2017-07-01

    Flowering time is an important agronomic trait that coordinates the plant life cycle with regional adaptability and thereby impacts yield potentials for cereal crops. The CONSTANS (CO)-like gene family plays vital roles in the regulation of flowering time. CO-like proteins are typically divided into four phylogenetic groups in rice. Several genes from groups I, III, and IV have been functionally characterized, though little is known about the genes of group II in rice. We report the functional characterization in rice of a constitutive floral inhibitor, OsCOL16, encoding a group-II CO-like protein that delays flowering time and increases plant height and grain yield. Overexpression of OsCOL16 resulted in late heading under both long-day and short-day conditions. OsCOL16 expression exhibits a diurnal oscillation and serves as a transcription factor with transcriptional activation activity. We determined that OsCOL16 up-regulates the expression of the floral repressor Ghd7, leading to down-regulation of the expression of Ehd1, Hd3a, and RFT1. Moreover, genetic diversity and evolutionary analyses suggest that remarkable differences in flowering times correlate with two major alleles of OsCOL16. Our combined molecular biology and phylogeographic analyses revealed that OsCOL16 plays an important role in regulating rice photoperiodic flowering, allowing for environmental adaptation of rice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Signaling pathways regulating the expression of Prx1 and Prx2 in the Chick Mandibular Mesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-El; Mina, Mina

    2009-01-01

    Prx1 and Prx2 are members of the aristaless-related homeobox genes shown to play redundant but essential roles in morphogenesis of the mandibular processes. To gain insight into the signaling pathways that regulate expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme, we used the chick as a model system. We examined the patterns of gene expression in the face and the roles of signals derived from the epithelium on the expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme. Our results demonstrated stage-dependent roles of mandibular epithelium on the expression of Prx in the mandibular mesenchyme and provide evidence for positive roles of members of the fibroblast and hedgehog families derived from mandibular epithelium on the expression of Prx genes in the mandibular mesenchyme. Our studies suggest that endothelin-1 signaling derived from the mesenchyme is involved in restricting the expression of Prx2 to the medial mandibular mesenchyme. PMID:18942149

  13. Negative regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression by steroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Okinaga, Hiroko [Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Chikamori, Minoru; Iizuka, Masayoshi [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Okazaki, Tomoki, E-mail: okbgeni@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Teikyo University School of Medicine, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Steroid hormones repress expression of PTHrP in the cell lines where the corresponding nuclear receptors are expressed. {yields} Nuclear receptors are required for suppression of PTHrP expression by steroid hormones, except for androgen receptor. {yields} Androgen-induced suppression of PTHrP expression appears to be mediated by estrogen receptor. -- Abstract: Elevated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is responsible for humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), which is of clinical significance in treatment of terminal patients with malignancies. Steroid hormones were known to cause suppression of PTHrP expression. However, detailed studies linking multiple steroid hormones to PTHrP expression are lacking. Here we studied PTHrP expression in response to steroid hormones in four cell lines with excessive PTHrP production. Our study established that steroid hormones negatively regulate PTHrP expression. Vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor {alpha}, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, were required for repression of PTHrP expression by the cognate ligands. A notable exception was the androgen receptor, which was dispensable for suppression of PTHrP expression in androgen-treated cells. We propose a pathway(s) involving nuclear receptors to suppress PTHrP expression.

  14. Gene expression regulation in photomorphogenesis from the perspective of the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the environment a young seedling encounters, the developmental program following seed germination could be skotomorphogenesis in the dark or photomorphogenesis in the light. Light signals are interpreted by a repertoire of photoreceptors followed by sophisticated gene expression networks, eventually resulting in developmental changes. The expression and functions of photoreceptors and key signaling molecules are highly coordinated and regulated at multiple levels of the central dogma in molecular biology. Light activates gene expression through the actions of positive transcriptional regulators and the relaxation of chromatin by histone acetylation. Small regulatory RNAs help attenuate the expression of light-responsive genes. Alternative splicing, protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the formation of diverse transcriptional complexes, and selective protein degradation all contribute to proteome diversity and change the functions of individual proteins.

  15. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated homocysteine levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared to control subjects. We further observed that administration of homocysteine or acetylcysteine significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared...

  16. Transcriptional programs that control expression of the autoimmune regulator gene Aire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Yonatan; Nevo, Shir; Bornstein, Chamutal; Brezis, Miriam R; Ben-Hur, Sharon; Shkedy, Aya; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Levi, Ben; Delacher, Michael; Goldfarb, Yael; David, Eyal; Weinberger, Leehee; Viukov, Sergey; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Giraud, Matthieu; Hanna, Jacob H; Breiling, Achim; Lyko, Frank; Amit, Ido; Feuerer, Markus; Abramson, Jakub

    2017-02-01

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces promiscuous expression of thousands of genes encoding tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the target genes of Aire are well characterized, the transcriptional programs that regulate its own expression have remained elusive. Here we comprehensively analyzed both cis-acting and trans-acting regulatory mechanisms and found that the Aire locus was insulated by the global chromatin organizer CTCF and was hypermethylated in cells and tissues that did not express Aire. In mTECs, however, Aire expression was facilitated by concurrent eviction of CTCF, specific demethylation of exon 2 and the proximal promoter, and the coordinated action of several transcription activators, including Irf4, Irf8, Tbx21, Tcf7 and Ctcfl, which acted on mTEC-specific accessible regions in the Aire locus.

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A isotypes regulate cell surface expression of the T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Menné, C; Kastrup, J

    2001-01-01

    show that inhibition of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A family had a biphasic effect on TCR expression. Thus, low concentrations of PP2A inhibitors induced TCR down-regulation, whereas higher concentrations of PP2A inhibitors induced TCR up-regulation. The effect of PP2A inhibition...... regulatory role for PP2A in both exocytosis and endocytosis....

  18. E2Fs regulate the expression of genes involved in differentiation, development, proliferation, and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, H; Bracken, A P; Vernell, R

    2001-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and its two relatives, p107 and p130, regulate development and cell proliferation in part by inhibiting the activity of E2F-regulated promoters. We have used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to identify genes in which expression changed in response to activation...... to the variety of phenotypes observed as a consequence of a deregulated pRB/E2F pathway....

  19. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  20. Inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis without affecting expression of p53-regulated genes

    OpenAIRE

    Lotem, Joseph; Gal, Hilah; Kama, Rachel; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo; Givol, David

    2003-01-01

    Using DNA microarray and clustering of expressed genes we have analyzed the mechanism of inhibition of wild-type p53-induced apoptosis by the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the calcium mobilizer thapsigargin (TG). Clustering analysis of 1,786 genes, the expression level of which changed after activation of wild-type p53 in the absence or presence of IL-6 or TG, showed that these compounds did not cause a general inhibition of the ability of p53 to up-regulate or down-regulate gene ex...

  1. Detection of oestrogenic chemicals by assaying the expression level of oestrogen regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M; Hummel, R; Bévort, M

    1998-01-01

    or the yeast E-screen, with methods that are based on mammalian cells or whole animals. An alternative is to assay gene expression directly by methods such as differential display, where the expression of both genes known to be regulated directly by the receptor and genes regulated by other pathways can...... by dimerisation and binding of their corresponding response elements. By interacting with the transcriptional apparatus they then either activate or repress the transcription of target genes. However, this is a highly simplified view, since the activated oestrogen receptor interacts with other signal transduction...

  2. Expression of metastasin S100A4 is essential for bone resorption and regulates osteoclast function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlandsson, Malin C; Svensson, M; Jonsson, Ing-Marie

    2013-01-01

    S100A4 is a Ca-binding protein that regulates cell growth, survival, and motility. The abundant expression of S100A4 in rheumatiod arthritis contributes to the invasive growth of joint tissue and to bone damage. In the present study, we analysed the role of S100A4 in bone homeostasis.......S100A4 is a Ca-binding protein that regulates cell growth, survival, and motility. The abundant expression of S100A4 in rheumatiod arthritis contributes to the invasive growth of joint tissue and to bone damage. In the present study, we analysed the role of S100A4 in bone homeostasis....

  3. Genome-Wide Expression of MicroRNAs Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in Hepatocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies, including ours, have examined the regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs by DNA methylation, but whether this regulation occurs at a genome-wide level in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unclear. Subjects/Methods. Using a two-phase study design, we conducted genome-wide screening for DNA methylation and miRNA expression to explore the potential role of methylation alterations in miRNAs regulation. Results. We found that expressions of 25 miRNAs were statistically significantly different between tumor and nontumor tissues and perfectly differentiated HCC tumor from nontumor. Six miRNAs were overexpressed, and 19 were repressed in tumors. Among 133 miRNAs with inverse correlations between methylation and expression, 8 miRNAs (6% showed statistically significant differences in expression between tumor and nontumor tissues. Six miRNAs were validated in 56 additional paired HCC tissues, and significant inverse correlations were observed for miR-125b and miR-199a, which is consistent with the inactive chromatin pattern found in HepG2 cells. Conclusion. These data suggest that the expressions of miR-125b and miR-199a are dramatically regulated by DNA hypermethylation that plays a key role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  4. MDP Up-Regulates the Gene Expression of Type I Interferons in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumei Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Muramyldipeptide (MDP, the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2. Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  5. Characterization of human FHL2 transcript variants and gene expression regulation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chor-Fung; Zhou, Wayne Jun-Wei; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Li, Man-Shan; Ng, Yuen-Keng; Lai, Paul Bo-San; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2011-07-15

    The four-and-a-half LIM protein 2 (FHL2) was originally identified to be expressed abundantly in the heart, as well as in a wide range of tissues demonstrated in various studies. The human FHL2 gene expresses different transcripts which are known to differ only in the 5'UTR region. However, little is known about the functional role of the different variants and the mechanism of gene regulation. In the present study, we characterized the different alternative spliced transcripts of FHL2 by in silico analysis and RT-PCR analysis. A novel transcript variant was identified. The FHL2 gene produces transcripts by different 5' exons, which may be responsible for tissue-specific regulation. To study the mechanism of FHL2 gene regulation, the potential promoter region was investigated. We have identified a functional promoter region upstream of the transcription start site. Deletion mutation analysis of 5' flanking region showed that the fragment from -138 to +292 bp have positive regulatory effect. We identified the binding sites of Pax-5/ZF5 in this region and found that Pax-5 and ZF5 expression in HCC samples had a significant positive correlation with FHL2 expression, suggesting a possible role for these transcription factors in the regulation of FHL2 expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of human lincRNA gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadin, Konstantin; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2013-12-05

    Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are still poorly functionally characterized. We analyzed the genetic and epigenetic regulation of human lincRNA expression in the GenCord collection by using three cell types from 195 unrelated European individuals. We detected a considerable number of cis expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs) and demonstrated that the genetic regulation of lincRNA expression is independent of the regulation of neighboring protein-coding genes. lincRNAs have relatively more cis-eQTLs than do equally expressed protein-coding genes with the same exon number. lincRNA cis-eQTLs are located closer to transcription start sites (TSSs) and their effect sizes are higher than cis-eQTLs found for protein-coding genes, suggesting that lincRNA expression levels are less constrained than that of protein-coding genes. Additionally, lincRNA cis-eQTLs can influence the expression level of nearby protein-coding genes and thus could be considered as QTLs for enhancer activity. Enrichment of expressed lincRNA promoters in enhancer marks provides an additional argument for the involvement of lincRNAs in the regulation of transcription in cis. By investigating the epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs, we observed both positive and negative correlations between DNA methylation and gene expression (expression quantitative trait methylation [eQTMs]), as expected, and found that the landscapes of passive and active roles of DNA methylation in gene regulation are similar to protein-coding genes. However, lincRNA eQTMs are located closer to TSSs than are protein-coding gene eQTMs. These similarities and differences in genetic and epigenetic regulation between lincRNAs and protein-coding genes contribute to the elucidation of potential functions of lincRNAs. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cathepsin B Regulates Collagen Expression by Fibroblasts via Prolonging TLR2/NF-?B Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Li; Zhou Wu; Junjun Ni; Yicong Liu; Jie Meng; Weixian Yu; Hiroshi Nakanishi; Yanmin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are essential for tissue repair due to producing collagens, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B (CatB) is involved in promoting chronic inflammation. We herein report that CatB regulates the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts in response to a TLR2 agonist, lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS). In cultured human BJ fibroblasts, mRNA expression of CatB was significantly increased, while that of collagens III and IV was significantly decreased a...

  8. P70S6K 1 regulation of angiogenesis through VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Chuan-Xiu; Shi, Zhumei [Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Meng, Qiao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Ling-Zhi [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: binghjiang@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} P70S6K1 regulates VEGF expression; {yields} P70S6K1 induces transcriptional activation through HIF-1{alpha} binding site; {yields} P70S6K1 regulates HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression; {yields} P70S6K1 mediates tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression. -- Abstract: The 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1), a downstream target of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), is an important regulator of cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Recent studies indicated an important role of p70S6K1 in PTEN-negative and AKT-overexpressing tumors. However, the mechanism of p70S6K1 in tumor angiogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we specifically inhibited p70S6K1 activity in ovarian cancer cells using vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p70S6K1. We found that knockdown of p70S6K1 significantly decreased VEGF protein expression and VEGF transcriptional activation through the HIF-1{alpha} binding site at its enhancer region. The expression of p70S6K1 siRNA specifically inhibited HIF-1{alpha}, but not HIF-1{beta} protein expression. We also found that p70S6K1 down-regulation inhibited ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis, and decreased cell proliferation and levels of VEGF and HIF-1{alpha} expression in tumor tissues. Our results suggest that p70S6K1 is required for tumor growth and angiogenesis through HIF-1{alpha} and VEGF expression, providing a molecular mechanism of human ovarian cancer mediated by p70S6K1 signaling.

  9. FOXM1 regulates glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma by transactivating glucose transporter 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Runze; Pu, Meng; Li, Yu; Wang, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    The Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) transcription factor plays crucial roles in the initiation and progression of various malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism by which FOXM1 regulates cancer metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) approaches were used to investigate the role of FOXM1 in the regulation of glycolysis in vitro. Luciferase reporter assays were used to explore the transcriptional regulation of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) promoter by FOXM1. Then, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine the expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 in 100 paired HCC and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the association between FOXM1 and GLUT1 expression with clinicopathological characteristics. Our data showed that FOXM1 promoted glycolysis in the HCC cells. FOXM1 knockdown significantly reduced the expression of GLUT1 among key glycolysis-related molecules in the different HCC cell lines. Glucose uptake and lactate production assay showed that FOXM1 positively regulated glycolysis based on GLUT1 expression. Moreover, FOXM1 overexpression increased and knockdown decreased GLUT1 expression. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the -206 to -199 bp region of the GLUT1 promoter is important for FOXM1 to enhance GLUT1 promoter activity. The results of the IHC analysis showed that the protein expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 was closely related to the tumor histological grade and TNM stage. In addition, GLUT1 expression was also related to microvascular invasion. In conclusion, overexpression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 may play critical roles in HCC. FOXM1 promotes HCC glycolysis by transactivating GLUT1 expression.

  10. Measuring emotion regulation and emotional expression in breast cancer patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Tânia; Tavares, Rita; Schulz, Marc S; Matos, Paula Mena

    2016-02-01

    The important role of emotion regulation and expression in adaptation to breast cancer is now widely recognized. Studies have shown that optimal emotion regulation strategies, including less constrained emotional expression, are associated with better adaptation. Our objective was to systematically review measures used to assess the way women with breast cancer regulate their emotions. This systematic review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Nine different databases were searched. Data were independently extracted and assessed by two researchers. English-language articles that used at least one instrument to measure strategies to regulate emotions in women with breast cancer were included. Of 679 abstracts identified 59 studies were deemed eligible for inclusion. Studies were coded regarding their objectives, methods, and results. We identified 16 instruments used to measure strategies of emotion regulation and expression. The most frequently employed instrument was the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale. Few psychometric proprieties other than internal consistency were reported for most instruments. Many studies did not include important information regarding descriptive characteristics and psychometric properties of the instruments used. The instruments used tap different aspects of emotion regulation. Specific instruments should be explored further with regard to content, validity, and reliability in the context of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  12. Pax6 regulates gene expression in the vertebrate lens through miR-204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaham, Ohad; Gueta, Karen; Mor, Eyal; Oren-Giladi, Pazit; Grinberg, Dina; Xie, Qing; Cvekl, Ales; Shomron, Noam; Davis, Noa; Keydar-Prizant, Maya; Raviv, Shaul; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Bell, Rachel E; Levy, Carmit; Avellino, Raffaella; Banfi, Sandro; Conte, Ivan; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    During development, tissue-specific transcription factors regulate both protein-coding and non-coding genes to control differentiation. Recent studies have established a dual role for the transcription factor Pax6 as both an activator and repressor of gene expression in the eye, central nervous system, and pancreas. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Pax6 is not fully understood. Here, we reveal that Trpm3 and the intronic microRNA gene miR-204 are co-regulated by Pax6 during eye development. miR-204 is probably the best known microRNA to function as a negative modulator of gene expression during eye development in vertebrates. Analysis of genes altered in mouse Pax6 mutants during lens development revealed significant over-representation of miR-204 targets among the genes up-regulated in the Pax6 mutant lens. A number of new targets of miR-204 were revealed, among them Sox11, a member of the SoxC family of pro-neuronal transcription factors, and an important regulator of eye development. Expression of Trpm/miR-204 and a few of its targets are also Pax6-dependent in medaka fish eyes. Collectively, this study identifies a novel evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which Pax6 controls the down-regulation of multiple genes through direct up-regulation of miR-204.

  13. Pax6 regulates gene expression in the vertebrate lens through miR-204.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohad Shaham

    Full Text Available During development, tissue-specific transcription factors regulate both protein-coding and non-coding genes to control differentiation. Recent studies have established a dual role for the transcription factor Pax6 as both an activator and repressor of gene expression in the eye, central nervous system, and pancreas. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Pax6 is not fully understood. Here, we reveal that Trpm3 and the intronic microRNA gene miR-204 are co-regulated by Pax6 during eye development. miR-204 is probably the best known microRNA to function as a negative modulator of gene expression during eye development in vertebrates. Analysis of genes altered in mouse Pax6 mutants during lens development revealed significant over-representation of miR-204 targets among the genes up-regulated in the Pax6 mutant lens. A number of new targets of miR-204 were revealed, among them Sox11, a member of the SoxC family of pro-neuronal transcription factors, and an important regulator of eye development. Expression of Trpm/miR-204 and a few of its targets are also Pax6-dependent in medaka fish eyes. Collectively, this study identifies a novel evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which Pax6 controls the down-regulation of multiple genes through direct up-regulation of miR-204.

  14. Expression Analysis of Sound Vibration-Regulated Genes by Touch Treatment inArabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ritesh; Gururani, Mayank A; Ponpandian, Lakshmi N; Mishra, Ratnesh C; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-01-01

    Sound vibration (SV) is considered to be a mechanical stimulus which gives rise to various physiological and molecular changes in plants. Previously, we identified 17 SV-regulated genes (SRGs) which were up-regulated by SV treatments in Arabidopsis . Here, we analyzed the expression pattern of similar genes after an exposure of 500 Hertz at 80 decibels, for various time periods. Simultaneously, we confirmed the SV-mediated expression of these genes under lighted condition as many of them were reported to be dark-induced. For this, we designed an improved SV treatment chamber. Additionally, we checked the electrolyte leakage (EL), photosynthetic performance and expression of mechanosensitive (MS) ion channel genes after 5 days of SV treatment in the illuminated chamber. EL was higher, and the photosynthetic performance index was lower in the SV-treated plants compared to control. Seven out of the 13 MS ion channel genes were differentially expressed after the SV treatment. Simultaneously, we checked the touch-mediated expression pattern of 17 SRGs and 13 MS ion channel genes. The distinct expression pattern of 6 SRGs and 1 MS ion channel gene generate an idea that SV as a stimulus is different from touch. Developmental stage-specific expression profiling suggested that the majority of the SRGs were expressed spatiotemporally in different developmental stages of Arabidopsis , especially in imbibed seed, seedlings and leaves.

  15. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 regulates decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yue; Hu, Yali; Zhao, Jing; Zhen, Xin [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yan, Guijun, E-mail: yanguijun33@gmail.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Sun, Haixiang, E-mail: stevensunz@163.com [Reproductive Medicine Center, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Decidually produced PRL plays a key role during pregnancy. {yields} Overexpression of Nur77 increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter activity. {yields} Knockdown of Nur77 decreased decidual PRL secretion induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. {yields} Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression. -- Abstract: Prolactin (PRL) is synthesized and released by several extrapituitary tissues, including decidualized stromal cells. Despite the important role of decidual PRL during pregnancy, little is understood about the factors involved in the proper regulation of decidual PRL expression. Here we present evidence that the transcription factor Nur77 plays an active role in decidual prolactin expression in human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs). Nur77 mRNA expression in hESCs was significantly increased after decidualization stimulated by 8-Br-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Nur77 in hESCs markedly increased PRL mRNA expression and enhanced decidual PRL promoter (dPRL/-332Luc) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, knockdown of Nur77 in hESCs significantly decreased decidual PRL promoter activation and substantially attenuated PRL mRNA expression and PRL secretion (P < 0.01) induced by 8-Br-cAMP and MPA. These results demonstrate that Nur77 is a novel transcription factor that contributes significantly to the regulation of prolactin gene expression in human endometrial stromal cells.

  16. T3 differentially regulates TRH expression in developing hypothalamic neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Charli, Jean-Louis; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2009-12-11

    Triiodothyronine (T3) plays an important role during development of the central nervous system. T3 effects on gene expression are determined in part by the type of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) expressed in a given cell type. Previous studies have demonstrated that thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) transcription in the adult hypothalamus is subjected to negative regulation by thyroid hormones. However, the role of T3 on the development of TRH expression is unknown. In this study we used primary cultures derived from 17-day-old fetal rat hypothalamus to analyze the effects of T3 on TRH gene expression during development. T3 increased TRH mRNA expression in immature cultures, but decreased it in mature cultures. In addition, T3 up-regulated TRalpha1 and TRbeta2 mRNA expression. TRalpha1 expression coincided chronologically with that of TRH in the rat hypothalamus in vivo. Maturation of TRH expression in the hypothalamus may involve T3 acting through TRalpha1.

  17. Efg1 Directly Regulates ACE2 Expression To Mediate Cross Talk between the cAMP/PKA and RAM Pathways during Candida albicans Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputo, Sarah; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) and regulation of Ace2 and morphogenesis (RAM) pathways are important regulators of the yeast-to-hypha transition in Candida albicans that interact genetically during this process. To further understand this interaction, we have characterized the expression of ACE2 during morphogenesis. In normoxic, planktonic conditions, ACE2 expression is very low in stationary-phase cells at both the mRNA and protein levels. Upon shifting to Spider medium, ACE2/Ace2p levels increase. Although Ace2 is not absolutely required for hypha formation, ace2Δ/Δ mutants show delayed hypha formation in Spider medium (but not others) and morphological changes to the hyphal tip and lateral yeast. We also show that Efg1 directly binds the promoter of Ace2 in stationary phase, and ACE2 levels are increased in strains lacking Efg1 and the protein kinase A proteins Tpk1 and Tpk2, indicating that the PKA pathway directly regulates ACE2 expression. ACE2 expression is positively regulated by Tec1 and Brg1, which bind the promoters of ACE2 in hyphal cells but not in the yeast phase. Under embedded conditions, Efg1 is dispensable for filamentation and Ace2 is required. We have found that ACE2 expression is much higher in embedded cells than in planktonic cells, providing a potential rationale for this observation. Taken together, our observations indicate that the PKA pathway directly regulates the RAM pathway under specific conditions and are consistent with a model where the two pathways carry out similar functions that depend on the specific environmental context. PMID:25001410

  18. A previously functional tetracycline-regulated transactivator fails to target gene expression to the bone

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    Schmidt Eva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tetracycline-controlled transactivator system is a powerful tool to control gene expression in vitro and to generate consistent and conditional transgenic in vivo model organisms. It has been widely used to study gene function and to explore pathological mechanisms involved in human diseases. The system permits the regulation of the expression of a target gene, both temporally and quantitatively, by the application of tetracycline or its derivative, doxycycline. In addition, it offers the possibility to restrict gene expression in a spatial fashion by utilizing tissue-specific promoters to drive the transactivator. Findings In this study, we report our problems using a reverse tetracycline-regulated transactivator (rtTA in a transgenic mouse model system for the bone-specific expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation. Even though prior studies have been successful utilizing the same rtTA, expression analysis of the transactivator revealed insufficient activity for regulating the transgene expression in our system. The absence of transactivator could not be ascribed to differences in genetic background because mice in a mixed genetic background and in congenic mouse lines showed similar results. Conclusions The purpose of this study is to report our negative experience with previously functional transactivator mice, to raise caution in the use of tet-based transgenic mouse lines and to reinforce the need for controls to ensure the stable functionality of generated tetracycline-controlled transactivators over time.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates in vivo intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1.

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    Mulligan, M S; Vaporciyan, A A; Miyasaka, M; Tamatani, T; Ward, P A

    1993-06-01

    Lung injury following deposition of IgG immune complexes is neutrophil-dependent and requires both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and CD18. In the current studies, we have evaluated the relationship between TNF alpha and expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in vitro and in vivo. In both rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, TNF alpha induced an early (within 60 minutes) increase in ICAM-1 expression, followed by a peak at 6 to 8 hours, with relatively stable expression at 24 hours. Expression of E-selectin did not show the early phase (within 60 minutes) of up-regulation, peaked at 4 hours, and then declined thereafter. Using a radioimmunochemical assay in vivo, it was demonstrated that intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes caused a progressive increase in ICAM-1 expression in lung over an 8-hour period. In animals pretreated with antibody to TNF alpha, the intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1 was significantly reduced. These results were confirmed by immunoperoxidase analysis of lung tissue. It was also shown that airway instillation of TNF alpha caused up-regulation of ICAM-1 in lung. These data support the concept that deposition of IgG immune complexes in lung induces intrapulmonary up-regulation of ICAM-1 in a manner that is TNF alpha-dependent.

  20. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein expression in the retina is regulated by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Souza, E M; Perche, O; Morgans, C W; Duvoisin, R M; Calaza, K C

    2016-05-01

    Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is a RNA-binding protein that modulates protein synthesis at the synapse and its function is regulated by glutamate. The retina is the first structure that participates in vision, and uses glutamate to transduce electromagnetic signals from light to electrochemical signals to neurons. FMRP has been previously detected in the retina, but its localization has not been studied yet. In this work, our objectives were to describe the localization of FMRP in the retina, to determine whether different exposure to dark or light stimulus alters FMRP expression in the retina, and to compare the pattern in two different species, the mouse and chick. We found that both FMRP mRNA and protein are expressed in the retina. By immunohistochemistry analysis we found that both mouse and chick present similar FMRP expression localized mainly in both plexiform layers and the inner retina. It was also observed that FMRP is down-regulated by 24 h dark adaptation compared to its expression in the retina of animals that were exposed to light for 1 h after 24 h in the dark. We conclude that FMRP is likely to participate in retinal physiology, since its expression changes with light exposure. In addition, the expression pattern and regulation by light of FMRP seems well conserved since it was similar in both mouse and chick. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ectopic expression of BraYAB1-702, a member of YABBY gene family in Chinese cabbage, causes leaf curling, inhibition of development of shoot apical meristem and flowering stage delaying in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Ling; Yang, Ze-Ping; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Lu-Gang

    2013-07-16

    YABBY gene family plays an important role in the polarity development of lateral organs. We isolated the BraYAB1-702 gene, a member of the YABBY gene family, from young leaves of Chinese cabbage line 06J45. The full-length gene has a 937 bp CDNA sequence and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 702 bp. The subcellular localization analysis showed that the expression product of the gene was localized in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of BraYAB1-702 in Arabidopsis thaliana caused leaf curling from the adaxial epidermises to abaxial epidermises; the partial abaxialization of the adaxial epidermises of leaves; leaf trichomes and stomata numbers being significantly increased; the plants being severely stunted; the flowering stage being remarkably delayed and inhibiting the development of shoot apical meristem (SAM) with the down-regulation of the expression of SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), Brevipedicellus (BP) and KNAT2 which were related to the development of shoot apical meristem. These results from the present research help to reveal the molecular mechanism of BraYAB1-702 gene in the establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity of the lateral organs in Chinese cabbage.

  2. Chicken pleiotrophin: regulation of tissue specific expression by estrogen in the oviduct and distinct expression pattern in the ovarian carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Pleiotrophin (PTN is a developmentally-regulated growth factor which is widely distributed in various tissues and also detected in many kinds of carcinomas. However, little is known about the PTN gene in chickens. In the present study, we found chicken PTN to be highly conserved with respect to mammalian PTN genes (91-92.6% and its mRNA was most abundant in brain, heart and oviduct. This study focused on the PTN gene in the oviduct where it was detected in the glandular (GE and luminal (LE epithelial cells. Treatment of young chicks with diethylstilbesterol induced PTN mRNA and protein in GE and LE, but not in other cell types of the oviduct. Further, several microRNAs, specifically miR-499 and miR-1709 were discovered to influence PTN expression via its 3'-UTR which suggests that post-transcriptional regulation influences PTN expression in chickens. We also compared expression patterns and CpG methylation status of the PTN gene in normal and cancerous ovaries from chickens. Our results indicated that PTN is most abundant in the GE of adenocarcinoma of cancerous, but not normal ovaries of hens. Bisulfite sequencing revealed that 30- and 40% of -1311 and -1339 CpG sites are demethylated in ovarian cancer cells, respectively. Collectively, these results indicate that chicken PTN is a novel estrogen-induced gene expressed mainly in the oviductal epithelia implicating PTN regulation of oviduct development and egg formation, and also suggest that PTN is a biomarker for epithelial ovarian carcinoma that could be used for diagnosis and monitoring effects of therapies for the disease.

  3. Slip regulation for anti-lock braking systems using multiple surface sliding controller combined with inertial delay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rahul; Ginoya, Divyesh; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a multiple surface sliding controller is designed for an anti-lock braking system to maintain the slip ratio at a desired level. Various types of uncertainties coming from unknown road surface conditions, the variations in normal force and the mass of the vehicle are estimated using an uncertainty estimation technique called the inertial delay control and then the estimate is used in the design of the multiple surface sliding controller. The proposed scheme does not require the bounds of uncertainties. The ultimate boundedness of the overall system is proved. The proposed scheme is validated by simulation under various scenarios of road friction, road gradient and vehicle loading followed by experimentation on a laboratory anti-lock braking set-up for different friction conditions.

  4. Regulation and expression of human Fabs under the control of the Escherichia coli arabinose promoter, PBAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M A; Hammond, F R; Papaioannou, A; Hawkins, N J; Ward, R L

    1997-10-01

    The L-arabinose operon from E. coli contains an inducible promoter PBAD which has been extensively studied for the control of gene expression. PBAD has a number of potential advantages over Plac, and has been used successfully to promote high level expression of recombinant proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate PBAD as an alternative system to Plac for the bacterial expression of recombinant Fabs. The promoter PBAD from the E. coli arabinose operon araBAD and the gene encoding the regulator of this promoter, were cloned into the phagemid expression vector MCO1. Expression of human recombinant tetanus toxoid (TT) and c-erbB2 Fabs under the control of PBAD was compared at two induction temperatures with the same Fabs produced under the control of Plac. Expression of TT and c-erbB2 Fabs under the control of PBAD was comparable to Fab expression from Plac. However, highly expressed TT Fab under the control of PBAD was localised to the soluble periplasmic fraction whereas under the control of Plac, there was greater leakage of Fab into the culture supernatant. In addition, Fab expression from PBAD could be more tightly repressed than from Plac. PBAD is a useful and cheaply inducible alternative to the more commonly used Plac for the rapid expression of soluble recombinant human antibody fragments.

  5. Array2BIO: from microarray expression data to functional annotation of co-regulated genes

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    Rasley Amy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several isolated tools for partial analysis of microarray expression data. To provide an integrative, easy-to-use and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data we have developed Array2BIO, an application that couples several analytical methods into a single web based utility. Results Array2BIO converts raw intensities into probe expression values, automatically maps those to genes, and subsequently identifies groups of co-expressed genes using two complementary approaches: (1 comparative analysis of signal versus control and (2 clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on Gene Ontology classification and KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods for quantifying expression levels, including Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. An automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis for the identified gene loci while the interconnection with Crème allows prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie observed expression patterns. Conclusion We have developed Array2BIO – a web based tool for rapid comprehensive analysis of Affymetrix microarray expression data, which also allows users to link expression data to Dcode.org comparative genomics tools and integrates a system for translating co-expression data into mechanisms of gene co-regulation. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  6. The trafficking protein, EHD2, positively regulates cardiac sarcolemmal KATP channel surface expression: role in cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua Qian; Jana, Kundan; Rindler, Michael J; Coetzee, William A

    2017-11-13

    ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels uniquely link cellular energy metabolism to membrane excitability and are expressed in diverse cell types that range from the endocrine pancreas to neurons and smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle. A decrease in the surface expression of KATP channels has been linked to various disorders, including dysregulated insulin secretion, abnormal blood pressure, and impaired resistance to cardiac injury. In contrast, up-regulation of KATP channel surface expression may be protective, for example, by mediating the beneficial effect of ischemic preconditioning. Molecular mechanisms that regulate KATP channel trafficking are poorly understood. Here, we used cellular assays with immunofluorescence, surface biotinylation, and patch clamping to demonstrate that Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 2 (EHD2) is a novel positive regulator of KATP channel trafficking to increase surface KATP channel density. EHD2 had no effect on cardiac Na+ channels (Nav1.5). The effect is specific to EHD2 as other members of the EHD family-EHD1, EHD3, and EHD4-had no effect on KATP channel surface expression. EHD2 did not directly affect KATP channel properties as unitary conductance and ATP sensitivity were unchanged. Instead, we observed that the mechanism by which EHD2 increases surface expression is by stabilizing KATP channel-containing caveolar structures, which results in a reduced rate of endocytosis. EHD2 also regulated KATP channel trafficking in isolated cardiomyocytes, which validated the physiologic relevance of these observations. Pathophysiologically, EHD2 may be cardioprotective as a dominant-negative EHD2 mutant sensitized cardiomyocytes to ischemic damage. Our findings highlight EHD2 as a potential pharmacologic target in the treatment of diseases with KATP channel trafficking defects.-Yang, H. Q., Jana, K., Rindler, M. J., Coetzee, W. A. The trafficking protein, EHD2, positively regulates cardiac sarcolemmal KATP channel surface expression

  7. MicroRNA expression and regulation in human, chimpanzee, and macaque brains.

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    Hai Yang Hu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Among other factors, changes in gene expression on the human evolutionary lineage have been suggested to play an important role in the establishment of human-specific phenotypes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these expression changes are largely unknown. Here, we have explored the role of microRNA (miRNA in the regulation of gene expression divergence among adult humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques, in two brain regions: prefrontal cortex and cerebellum. Using a combination of high-throughput sequencing, miRNA microarrays, and Q-PCR, we have shown that up to 11% of the 325 expressed miRNA diverged significantly between humans and chimpanzees and up to 31% between humans and macaques. Measuring mRNA and protein expression in human and chimpanzee brains, we found a significant inverse relationship between the miRNA and the target genes expression divergence, explaining 2%-4% of mRNA and 4%-6% of protein expression differences. Notably, miRNA showing human-specific expression localize in neurons and target genes that are involved in neural functions. Enrichment in neural functions, as well as miRNA-driven regulation on the human evolutionary lineage, was further confirmed by experimental validation of predicted miRNA targets in two neuroblastoma cell lines. Finally, we identified a signature of positive selection in the upstream region of one of the five miRNA with human-specific expression, miR-34c-5p. This suggests that miR-34c-5p expression change took place after the split of the human and the Neanderthal lineages and had adaptive significance. Taken together these results indicate that changes in miRNA expression might have contributed to evolution of human cognitive functions.

  8. A single enhancer regulating the differential expression of duplicated red-sensitive opsin genes in zebrafish.

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    Taro Tsujimura

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental step in the evolution of the visual system is the gene duplication of visual opsins and differentiation between the duplicates in absorption spectra and expression pattern in the retina. However, our understanding of the mechanism of expression differentiation is far behind that of spectral tuning of opsins. Zebrafish (Danio rerio have two red-sensitive cone opsin genes, LWS-1 and LWS-2. These genes are arrayed in a tail-to-head manner, in this order, and are both expressed in the long member of double cones (LDCs in the retina. Expression of the longer-wave sensitive LWS-1 occurs later in development and is thus confined to the peripheral, especially ventral-nasal region of the adult retina, whereas expression of LWS-2 occurs earlier and is confined to the central region of the adult retina, shifted slightly to the dorsal-temporal region. In this study, we employed a transgenic reporter assay using fluorescent proteins and P1-artificial chromosome (PAC clones encompassing the two genes and identified a 0.6-kb "LWS-activating region" (LAR upstream of LWS-1, which regulates expression of both genes. Under the 2.6-kb flanking upstream region containing the LAR, the expression pattern of LWS-1 was recapitulated by the fluorescent reporter. On the other hand, when LAR was directly conjugated to the LWS-2 upstream region, the reporter was expressed in the LDCs but also across the entire outer nuclear layer. Deletion of LAR from the PAC clones drastically lowered the reporter expression of the two genes. These results suggest that LAR regulates both LWS-1 and LWS-2 by enhancing their expression and that interaction of LAR with the promoters is competitive between the two genes in a developmentally restricted manner. Sharing a regulatory region between duplicated genes could be a general way to facilitate the expression differentiation in duplicated visual opsins.

  9. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J.; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function. PMID:26033914

  10. Intermittent fasting up-regulates Fsp27/Cidec gene expression in white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowska, Joanna; Kochan, Zdzislaw

    2012-03-01

    Fat-specific protein of 27 kDa (FSP27) is a novel lipid droplet protein that promotes triacylglycerol storage in white adipose tissue (WAT). The regulation of the Fsp27 gene expression in WAT is largely unknown. We investigated the nutritional regulation of FSP27 in WAT. The effects of intermittent fasting (48 d, eight cycles of 3-d fasting and 3-d refeeding), caloric restriction (48 d), fasting-refeeding (3-d fasting and 3-d refeeding), and fasting (3 d) on mRNA expression of FSP27, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ2), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), and M isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (a positive control for PPARγ activation) in epididymal WAT and on serum triacylglycerol, insulin, and leptin levels were determined in Wistar rats. We also determined the effects of PPARγ activation by rosiglitazone or pioglitazone on FSP27 mRNA levels in primary rat adipocytes. Long-term intermittent fasting, in contrast to other dietary manipulations, significantly up-regulated Fsp27 gene expression in WAT. Moreover, in rats subjected to intermittent fasting, serum insulin levels were elevated; PPARγ2 and C/EBPα mRNA expression in WAT was increased, and there was a positive correlation of Fsp27 gene expression with PPARγ2 and C/EBPα mRNA levels. FSP27 mRNA expression was also increased in adipocytes treated with PPARγ agonists. Our study demonstrates that the transcription of the Fsp27 gene in adipose tissue may be induced in response to nutritional stimuli. Furthermore, PPARγ2, C/EBPα, and insulin may be involved in the nutritional regulation of FSP27. Thus intermittent fasting, despite lower caloric intake, may promote triacylglycerol deposition in WAT by increasing the expression of genes involved in lipid storage, such as Fsp27. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Resveratrol inhibits Cdk5 activity through regulation of p35 expression

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    Kulkarni Ashok B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 participates in the regulation of nociceptive signaling. Through activation of the ERK1/2 pathway, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α induces expression of Egr-1. This results in the sustained and robust expression of p35, a coactivator of Cdk5, in PC12 cells, thereby increasing Cdk5 kinase activity. The aim of our present study was to test whether resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound with known analgesic activity, can regulate Cdk5/p35 activity. Results Here we used a cell-based assay in which a p35 promoter-luciferase construct was stably transfected in PC12 cells. Our studies demonstrate that resveratrol inhibits p35 promoter activity and also blocks the TNF-α mediated increase in Cdk5 activity in PC12 cells. Resveratrol also inhibits p35 expression and blocks the TNF-α mediated increase in Cdk5 activity in DRG neurons. In the presence of resveratrol, the MEK inhibitor decreased p35 promoter activity, whereas the inhibitors of p38 MAPK, JNK and NF-κB increased p35 promoter activity, indicating that these pathways regulate p35 expression differently. The TNF-α-mediated increase in Egr-1 expression was decreased by resveratrol treatment with a concomitant reduction in p35 expression and protein levels, resulting in reduced Cdk5 kinase activity. Conclusions We demonstrate here that resveratrol regulates p35 promoter activity in PC12 cells and DRG neurons. Most importantly, resveratrol blocks the TNF-α-mediated increase in p35 promoter activity, thereby reducing p35 expression and subsequent Cdk5 kinase activity. This new molecular mechanism adds to the known analgesic effects of resveratrol and confirms the need for identifying new analgesics based on their ability to inhibit Cdk5 activity for effective treatment of pain.

  12. JAZF1 can regulate the expression of lipid metabolic genes and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Guang-feng [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Department of Critical Care Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Xiao, Di; Gong, Wei-jing [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Hui-xia; Liu, Jun [Department of Geriatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, Hunan (China); Zhou, Hong-hao [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China); Liu, Zhao-qian, E-mail: liuzhaoqian63@126.com [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan (China)

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • JAZF1 overexpression inhibited the expression of SREBP1, ACC, and FAS. • JAZF1 overexpression upregulated the expression of HSL and ATGL. • SREBP1 and JAZF1 could regulate each other in adipocytes. - Abstract: JAZF1 is a newly identified gene with unknown functions. A recent genome-wide association study showed that JAZF1 is associated with type 2 diabetes and is highly expressed in liver and adipose tissue. Studies have demonstrated that JAZF1 is the co-repressor for nuclear orphan receptor TAK1, whereas most nuclear orphan receptor family members are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Therefore, JAZF1 could be closely related to glycolipid metabolism. In this study, JAZF1 was significantly upregulated during the induced differentiation process of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The overexpression of JAZF1 inhibited lipid accumulation in differentiated mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes and significantly inhibited the expression of SREBPl, ACC, and FAS, which were important in lipid synthesis, while upregulating the expression of key enzyme hormone-sensitive lipase in lipoclasis. Moreover, SREBPl exhibited an inhibitory function on the expression of JAZF1. SREBP1 reversed the inhibitory action on lipid accumulation of JAZF1. SREBP1 and JAZF1 were observed to regulate each other in adipocytes. Therefore, JAZF1 could regulate the expression of particular genes related to lipid metabolism and inhibit lipid accumulation in adipocytes. This result suggests that JAZF1 may be a potential target for the treatment of diseases, such as obesity and lipid metabolism disorders.

  13. DNA methylation-dependent regulation of pef expression in Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, B; Low, D

    2000-02-01

    Plasmid-encoded fimbriae (Pef) expressed by Salmonella typhimurium mediate adhesion to mouse intestinal epithelium. The pef operon shares features with the Escherichia coli pyelonephritis-associated pilus (pap) operon, which is under methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation. These features include conserved DNA GATC box sites in the upstream regulatory region as well as homologues of the PapI and PapB regulatory proteins. Unlike Pap fimbriae, which are expressed in a variety of laboratory media, Pef fimbriae were expressed only in acidic, rich broth under standing culture conditions. Analysis of S. typhimurium grown under these conditions indicated that Pef production was regulated by a phase variation mechanism, in which the bacterial population was skewed between fimbrial expression (phase ON) and non-expression (phase OFF) states. Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) and DNA adenine methylase (Dam) were required for pef transcription. In contrast, the histone-like protein (H-NS) and the stationary-phase sigma factor (RpoS) repressed pef transcription. Methylation of the pef GATC II site appeared to be required for pef fimbrial expression based on analysis of a GCTC II mutant that did not express Pef fimbriae. Analysis of the DNA methylation states of pef GATC sites indicated that, under acidic growth conditions, which induced Pef production, most GATC I sites were non-methylated, whereas GATC II and GATC X were predominantly methylated. The methylation protection at GATC I and GATC II was dependent upon Lrp and was modulated by PefI. Together, these results indicate that Pef production is regulated by DNA methylation, which is the first example of methylation-dependent gene regulation outside of E. coli.

  14. The Relationship between Emotion Regulation and Emotion Expression Styles with Bullying Behaviors in Adolescent Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Basharpoor

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Students bullying, especially in the adolescence period, is a prevalent problem in the schools, that emotional dysregulation is posed as a one cause of it. Considering this issue, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between emotion regulation and emotion expression styles with bullying behaviors in adolescent students.   Methods: The method of this study was correlation. Whole male students of secondary and high schools in Ardabil at 90-91 educational year comprised statistical population of this research. Two hundred thirty students, were selected by multistage cluster sampling method, responded to the questionnaires of bullying/victimization, emotion regulation and emotion expression. Gathered data were analyzed by Pearson correlation and multiple regression tests.   Results: The results showed that victimization by bullying has positive relationship with cognitive reappraisal (r= 0.15, p<0.02, emotion suppression (r= 0.47, p<0.001, and positive expression (r= 0.25, p<0.02, but has negative relationship with impulse severity (r= -0.35, p<0.001, and negative emotion expression (r= -0.43, p<0.001. Furthermore bullying has a positive relationship with cognitive reappraisal (r= 0.14, p<0.03, impulse severity (r= 0.31, p<0.003, and negative expression (r= 0.29, p<0.001, but has negative relationship with emotion suppression (r= 0.28, p<0.001, and positive expression (r= 0.24, p<0.001. In sum emotion regulation and emotion expression styles explained 36 percent of the variance of the victimization by bullying and 19 percent of the variance of the bullying.   Conclusion: This research demonstrated that emotion dysregulation at the adolescent period plays important role in bullying and victimization, thus the training of emotion regulation abilities is suggested as the one of interventions methods for this behavioral problems.

  15. MicroRNA-30b-Mediated Regulation of Catalase Expression in Human ARPE-19 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rashidul; Chun, Eugene; Howell, Jennifer C.; Sengupta, Trisha; Chen, Dan; Kim, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxidative injury to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retinal photoreceptors has been linked to a number of retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated gene expression has been extensively studied at transcriptional levels. Also, the post-transcriptional control of gene expression at the level of translational regulation has been recently reported. However, the microRNA (miRNA/miR)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in human RPE cells has not been thoroughly looked at. Increasing evidence points to a potential role of miRNAs in diverse physiological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated for the first time in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) that the post-transcriptional control of gene expression via miRNA modulation regulates human catalase, an important and potent component of cell's antioxidant defensive network, which detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) radicals. Exposure to several stress-inducing agents including H2O2 has been reported to alter miRNA expression profile. Here, we demonstrated that a sublethal dose of H2O2 (200 µM) up-regulated the expression of miR-30b, a member of the miR-30 family, which inhibited the expression of endogenous catalase both at the transcript and protein levels. However, antisense (antagomirs) of miR-30b was not only found to suppress the miR-30b mimics-mediated inhibitions, but also to dramatically increase the expression of catalase even under an oxidant environment. Conclusions/Significance We propose that a microRNA antisense approach could enhance cytoprotective mechanisms against oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant defense system. PMID:22880027

  16. Regulation of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Expression in Human Myometrial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Melissa J.; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Garfield, Robert E.; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme catalyzes the methylation of the catechol estrogens, 2- or 4-hydroxyestrogen, to 2- or 4-methoxyestrogen. Both the hydroxy estrogens and methoxy estrogens were shown to modulate the effects of estrogen. Because catechol-O-methyltransferase activity controls levels of these metabolites, it may help regulate the cellular estrogenic milieu. In this study, we examined the regulation of catechol-O-methyltransferase expression in human myometrial cells. METHODS Catechol-O-methyltransferase expression was assessed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase assays in human myometrial cells after treatment with estrogen or progesterone. Catechol-O-methyltransferase expression was measured in cells after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) alone or with lactacystin, a protea-some inhibitor. Luciferase assays were also conducted using human myometrial cells containing an estrogen response element–luciferase reporter gene to measure levels of estrogen-mediated transactivation after treatment with estrogen and increasing concentrations of 2-hydroxestrogen. RESULTS Catechol-O-methyltransferase expression was down-regulated by progesterone or estrogen. Tumor necrosis factor alpha upregulated catechol-O-methyltransferase expression, whereas cotreatment with lactacystin attenuated this response, suggesting that TNFα activated nuclear factor kappa B to induce catechol-O-methyltransferase expression. Increased concentrations of 2-hydroxyestrogen attenuated estrogen-mediated transcription in the myometrial cells. CONCLUSION Catechol-O-methyltransferase expression may be regulated in the myometrium to control the local action of estrogen. Low levels of catechol-O-methyltransferase in the myometrium would result in an accumulation of 2-hydroxyestrogen and may antagonize the local effect of estrogen. High levels of catechol-O-methyltransferase in the myometrium would result in

  17. CFTR-associated ligand is a negative regulator of Mrp2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Soroka, Carol J; Harry, Kathy; Boyer, James L

    2017-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that transports a wide variety of organic anions across the apical membrane of epithelial cells. The expression of Mrp2 on the plasma membrane is regulated by protein-protein interactions. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-associated ligand (CAL) interacts with transmembrane proteins via its PDZ domain and reduces their cell surface expression by increasing lysosomal degradation and intracellular retention. Our results showed that CAL is localized at the trans-Golgi network of rat hepatocytes. The expression of CAL is increased, and Mrp2 expression is decreased, in the liver of mice deficient in sodium/hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor-1. To determine whether CAL interacts with Mrp2 and is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of Mrp2, we used glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with or without the COOH-terminal PDZ binding motif of Mrp2 as the bait in GST pull-down assays. We demonstrated that Mrp2 binds to CAL via its COOH-terminal PDZ-binding motif in GST pull-down assays, an interaction verified by coimmunoprecipitation of these two proteins in cotransfected COS-7 cells. In COS-7 and LLC-PK1 cells transfected with Mrp2 alone, only a mature, high-molecular-mass band of Mrp2 was detected. However, when cells were cotransfected with Mrp2 and CAL, Mrp2 was expressed as both mature and immature forms. Biotinylation and streptavidin pull-down assays confirmed that CAL dramatically reduces the expression level of total and cell surface Mrp2 in Huh-7 cells. Our findings suggest that CAL interacts with Mrp2 and is a negative regulator of Mrp2 expression. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Dynamic regulation of gene expression using sucrose responsive promoters and RNA interference in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas C; Espinosa, Monica I; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2015-04-01

    Engineering dynamic, environmentally- and temporally-responsive control of gene expression is one of the principle objectives in the field of synthetic biology. Dynamic regulation is desirable because many engineered functions conflict with endogenous processes which have evolved to facilitate growth and survival, and minimising conflict between growth and production phases can improve product titres in microbial cell factories. There are a limited number of mechanisms that enable dynamic regulation in yeast, and fewer still that are appropriate for application in an industrial setting. To address this problem we have identified promoters that are repressed during growth on glucose, and activated during growth on sucrose. Catabolite repression and preferential glucose utilisation allows active growth on glucose before switching to production on sucrose. Using sucrose as an activator of gene expression circumvents the need for expensive inducer compounds and enables gene expression to be triggered during growth on a fermentable, high energy-yield carbon source. The ability to fine-tune the timing and population density at which gene expression is activated from the SUC2 promoter was demonstrated by varying the ratio of glucose to sucrose in the growth medium. Finally, we demonstrated that the system could also be used to repress gene expression (a process also required for many engineering projects). We used the glucose/sucrose system to control a heterologous RNA interference module and dynamically repress the expression of a constitutively regulated GFP gene. The low noise levels and high dynamic range of the SUC2 promoter make it a promising option for implementing dynamic regulation in yeast. The capacity to repress gene expression using RNA interference makes the system highly versatile, with great potential for metabolic engineering applications.

  19. Enhancement of delay eyelid conditioning by microcurrent electrical stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex is triggered by the expression of Fos protein in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ya-Juan; Dong, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Chao; Zhao, Mei-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Eyelid conditioning, including delay eyelid conditioning and trace eyelid conditioning, has been used extensively to study neural structures and mechanisms of learning and memory as a form of associative learning. In the present study, microcurrent electrical stimulation was used to stimulate the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to induce delay eyelid conditioning in guinea pigs. The acquisition rate and relative latency of the conditioned eyelid response (CR) and the startle eyelid response (SR) were analyzed. The mPFC sites in the guinea pigs were examined under a light microscope following Nissl staining. In addition, the expression of Fos protein in neurons was detected using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results indicated that the acquisition rates of CR and SR were increased significantly (Pguinea pigs (Pguinea pigs was triggered by the expression of Fos protein. The observations of the present study further expand the understanding of conditioned reflexes and may aid future investigations into the formation of eyelid conditioning and the mechanisms underlying the circuit in various conditions.

  20. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Kieber, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture. PMID:28419168

  1. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V Yamburenko

    Full Text Available Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture.

  2. TET1-mediated DNA hypomethylation regulates the expression of MUC4 in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Seiya; Higashi, Michiyo; Tsutsumida, Hideaki; Wakimoto, Jouji; Hamada, Tomofumi; Wiest, Edwin; Matsuo, Kei; Kitazono, Ikumi; Goto, Yuko; Guo, Xin; Hamada, Taiji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Hiraki, Tsubasa; Yonezawa, Suguru; Batra, Surinder K.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Tanimoto, Akihide

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a disease of high mortality, despite advanced diagnostic techniques. Mucins (MUC) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis and tumor invasion in lung neoplasms. Our immunohistochemistry (IHC) studies have shown that high MUC4 expression correlates with a poor outcome. We have also shown that the expression of several mucin genes in cancer cell lines is regulated by DNA methylation. We evaluated the expression level of MUC4, mRNA and several DNA hypomethylation factors in lung tissue samples from 33 patients with various lung lesions. The results indicated that the DNA methylation status of MUC4 matched the expression level of mRNA. In addition, the TET1 (Ten-Eleven Translocation) mRNA showed a significant correlation with the status of DNA methylation of MUC4. Furthermore, the treatment of a lung cancer cell line with TET1 siRNA caused a reduction in MUC4 mRNA expression. Thus, we suggest that TET1 mediated DNA hypomethylation plays a key role in the expression of MUC4. This is the first report that TET1 mediated DNA hypomethylation regulates the expression of MUC4 in lung cancer. The analysis of these epigenetic changes may be useful for diagnosing carcinogenic risk. PMID:28680536

  3. Long-range regulation of alpha globin gene expression during erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Douglas R; Wood, William G

    2008-05-01

    The analysis of globin gene expression during erythropoiesis has established many principles underlying normal mammalian gene expression. New aspects of gene regulation have been revealed by natural mutations that downregulate globin gene expression and cause thalassemia. Deletions involving sequences upstream of the alpha and beta clusters suggested that the globin genes might be controlled by remote regulatory elements. This was demonstrated experimentally and suggested that many mammalian genes may be controlled in a similar manner. Completion of the Human Genome Project and the associated encyclopaedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project confirmed that human gene expression is commonly controlled by long-range, cis-acting elements. The development of chromatin immunoprecipitation has allowed us to identify binding of transcription factors and chromatin modifications at the key cis-acting sequences in vivo. In addition, chromosome conformation capture has enabled us to address the topological models proposed to mediate long-range interactions. Together, these methods have given us some insight into how long-range elements may influence gene expression and how this process may be subverted in thalassemia. The review asks how remote elements regulate alpha globin expression and how natural mutations interfere with this mechanism to cause alpha thalassemia. We also speculate as to why long-range control of gene expression may have evolved in higher organisms.

  4. Dynamic patterns of expression for genes regulating cytokinin metabolism and signaling during rice inflorescence development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2017-01-01

    Inflorescence development in cereals, including such important crops as rice, maize, and wheat, directly affects grain number and size and is a key determinant of yield. Cytokinin regulates meristem size and activity and, as a result, has profound effects on inflorescence development and architecture. To clarify the role of cytokinin action in inflorescence development, we used the NanoString nCounter system to analyze gene expression in the early stages of rice panicle development, focusing on 67 genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, degradation, and signaling. Results point toward key members of these gene families involved in panicle development and indicate that the expression of many genes involved in cytokinin action differs between the panicle and vegetative tissues. Dynamic patterns of gene expression suggest that subnetworks mediate cytokinin action during different stages of panicle development. The variation of expression during panicle development is greater among genes encoding proteins involved in cytokinin metabolism and negative regulators of the pathway than for the genes in the primary response pathway. These results provide insight into the expression patterns of genes involved in cytokinin action during inflorescence development in a crop of agricultural importance, with relevance to similar processes in other monocots. The identification of subnetworks of genes expressed at different stages of early panicle development suggests that manipulation of their expression could have substantial effects on inflorescence architecture.

  5. Psoriasis is characterized by deficient negative immune regulation compared to transient delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Gulati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diphencyprone (DPCP is a hapten that causes delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH reactions in human skin, and is used as a topical therapeutic for alopecia areata, warts, and cutaneous melanoma metastases.  We examined peak DTH reactions induced by DPCP (3 days post-challenge by comprehensive gene expression and histological analysis.  To better understand how these DTH reactions naturally resolve, we compared our DPCP biopsies to those from patients with psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic inflammatory disease that does not resolve.  By both microarray and qRT-PCR, we found that psoriasis lesional skin has significantly lower expression of many negative immune regulators compared to peak DPCP reactions.  These regulators include: interleukin-10, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated 4 (CTLA4, programmed cell death 1 (PD1, programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1, programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (PDL2, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1.  Their decreased expression was confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry.  To more completely determine the balance of positive vs. negative immune regulators in both DPCP reactions and psoriasis, we developed one comprehensive gene list for positive regulatory (inflammatory genes, and another for negative regulatory (immunosuppressive genes, through Gene Ontology terms and literature review.  With this approach, we found that DPCP reactions have a higher ratio of negative to positive regulatory genes (both in terms of quantity and expression levels than psoriasis lesional skin.  These data suggest that the disease chronicity that distinguishes psoriasis from transient DTH reactions may be related to absence of negative immune regulatory pathways, and induction of these is therefore of therapeutic interest.  Further study of these negative regulatory mechanisms that are present in DPCP reactions, but not in psoriasis, could reveal novel players in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation.  The DPCP

  6. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF A DELAY-DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the menstrual cycle, pituitary hormones stimulate the growth and development of ovarian follicles and the release of an ovum to be fertilized. The ovarian follicles secrete hormones during the cycle that regulate the production of the pituitary hormones creating positi...

  7. Matrix gla protein: An extracellular matrix protein regulates myostatin expression in the muscle developmental program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sarafraz; Jan, Arif Tasleem; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Lee, Eun Ju; Choi, Inho

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle development involves interactions between intracellular and extracellular factors that act in concert to regulate the myogenic process. Matrix gla protein (MGP), a well-known inhibitor of calcification in soft tissues, has been reported to be highly up-regulated during myogenesis. Our interest in the regulation of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) by extracellular matrix (ECM) led us to investigate the effects of MGP during the progression of myogenesis. Participation of MGP in the myogenic process was investigated in vitro using C2C12 cells, and knockdown of its gene was performed to determine its effects on the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and other ECM genes. In addition, interactions between MGP, Fibromodulin (FMOD), and Myostatin (MSTN) were investigated by conducting co-immunoprecipitation and in silico studies. Matrix gla protein knockdown (MGPkd) shows pronounced effects during myogenesis as evidenced by the down regulation of myogenic marker (MYOG and MYOD), and ECM (COL1α1 and FMOD) genes. Down-regulation of MSTN expression in MGPkd cells suggests its role in coordinating the regulation of MSTN expression. Having strong affinity for ACVRIIB receptor, in silico data confirms MGP interference in the interaction of MSTN with ACVRIIB. These findings show MGP inhibits MSTN functionally by disrupting its binding to receptor. The present study provides insights of an ECM protein that participates in the regulation of the myogenic program by inhibiting the activity of the myogenic negative regulator MSTN, which suggests that MGP might be used for designing novel inhibitors that can promote muscle regeneration or treat muscle atrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Emotional Experience, Expression, and Regulation of High-Quality Japanese Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosotani, Rika; Imai-Matsumura, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the emotional experience, expression, and regulation processes of high-quality Japanese elementary school teachers while they interact with children, in terms of teachers' emotional competence. Qualitative analysis of interview data demonstrated that teachers had various emotional experiences including self-elicited…

  9. Staphylococcus aureus accessory regulators: expression within biofilms and effect on adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratten, J; Foster, S J; Chan, P F; Wilson, M; Nair, S P

    2001-07-01

    Many of the genes encoding the virulence factors for Staphylococcus aureus are controlled by the accessory gene regulator (agr) and staphylococcal accessory regulator (sar). This regulation may be affected by the environment in which the organisms are grown. In the majority of ecosystems, bacteria grow attached to surfaces and form biofilms. We used S. aureus strains containing mutations inactivating agr and sar to determine whether the presence of these genes influences the attachment of the bacterium to a surface. We also used strains harbouring reporter constructs of the agr and sar operons to determine their expression in biofilms. The attachment study results showed that the sarA mutant strain adhered better to glass than did the agrA mutant or the wild type. There was an increased adherence to fibronectin-coated glass for all three strains compared to glass. Thus, these adhesion studies demonstrate that agr and sar have pleiotrophic effects on the surface expression of molecules responsible for binding to different substrata. In the biofilms higher numbers of bacteria and the greatest expression were observed at the base, but there were no observable differences between the reporter constructs. Expression of the agr and sar reporter fusions was significantly higher in the deepest layers of the biofilms where the greatest numbers of bacteria were also observed, perhaps as one might expect for genes that are regulated in a cell density dependent fashion.

  10. Regulation of lactase and sucrase-isomaltase gene expression in the duodenum during childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beers, E. H.; Rings, E. H.; Taminiau, J. A.; Heymans, H. S.; Einerhand, A. W.; Dekker, J.; Büller, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    In children, lactase and sucrase-isomaltase are essential intestinal glycohydrolases, and insufficiency of either enzyme causes diarrhea and malnutrition. Little is known about the regulation of lactase and sucrase-isomaltase expression in the duodenum during childhood. In this study, the mechanisms

  11. Isolation of nuclear proteins from flax (Linum usitatissimum L. seed coats for gene expression regulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renouard Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While seed biology is well characterized and numerous studies have focused on this subject over the past years, the regulation of seed coat development and metabolism is for the most part still non-elucidated. It is well known that the seed coat has an essential role in seed development and its features are associated with important agronomical traits. It also constitutes a rich source of valuable compounds such as pharmaceuticals. Most of the cell genetic material is contained in the nucleus; therefore nuclear proteins constitute a major actor for gene expression regulation. Isolation of nuclear proteins responsible for specific seed coat expression is an important prerequisite for understanding seed coat metabolism and development. The extraction of nuclear proteins may be problematic due to the presence of specific components that can interfere with the extraction process. The seed coat is a rich source of mucilage and phenolics, which are good examples of these hindering compounds. Findings In the present study, we propose an optimized nuclear protein extraction protocol able to provide nuclear proteins from flax seed coat without contaminants and sufficient yield and quality for their use in transcriptional gene expression regulation by gel shift experiments. Conclusions Routinely, around 250 μg of nuclear proteins per gram of fresh weight were extracted from immature flax seed coats. The isolation protocol described hereafter may serve as an effective tool for gene expression regulation and seed coat-focused proteomics studies.

  12. The cumate gene-switch: a system for regulated expression in mammalian cells

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    Lamoureux Linda

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of expression systems have been developed where transgene expression can be regulated. They all have specific characteristics making them more suitable for certain applications than for others. Since some applications require the regulation of several genes, there is a need for a variety of independent yet compatible systems. Results We have used the regulatory mechanisms of bacterial operons (cmt and cym to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells using three different strategies. In the repressor configuration, regulation is mediated by the binding of the repressor (CymR to the operator site (CuO, placed downstream of a strong constitutive promoter. Addition of cumate, a small molecule, relieves the repression. In the transactivator configuration, a chimaeric transactivator (cTA protein, formed by the fusion of CymR with the activation domain of VP16, is able to activate transcription when bound to multiple copies of CuO, placed upstream of the CMV minimal promoter. Cumate addition abrogates DNA binding and therefore transactivation by cTA. Finally, an adenoviral library of cTA mutants was screened to identify a reverse cumate activator (rcTA, which activates transcription in the presence rather than the absence of cumate. Conclusion We report the generation of a new versatile inducible expression system.

  13. Caregiver Emotional Expressiveness, Child Emotion Regulation, and Child Behavior Problems among Head Start Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Dana Charles; Raver, C. Cybele

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships between caregivers' self-reported positive and negative emotional expressiveness, observer assessments of children's emotion regulation, and teachers' reports of children's internalizing and externalizing behaviors in a sample of 97 primarily African American and Hispanic Head Start families. Results…

  14. Parent Emotional Expressiveness and Children's Self-Regulation: Associations with Abused Children's School Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskett, Mary E.; Stelter, Rebecca; Proffit, Katie; Nice, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Identifying factors associated with school functioning of abused children is important in prevention of long-term negative outcomes associated with school failure. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which parent emotional expressiveness and children's self-regulation predicted early school behavior of abused…

  15. Microarray analysis reveals expression regulation of Wnt antagonists in differentiating osteoblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaes, B.L.T.; Dechering, K.J.; Someren, van P.; Hendriks, J.M.A.; Ven, van de C.J.J.M.; Feijen, A.; Mummery, C.L.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Olijve, W.; Zoelen, van E.J.J.; Steegenga, W.T.

    2005-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in regulating bone formation by controlling osteoblast proliferation and function. Although stabilization of ß-catenin by Wnt has been shown to increase alkaline phosphatase expression and osteoblast differentiation, the precise role of Wnt signaling during the

  16. Regulation of Gene Expression in Diverse Cyanobacterial Species by Using Theophylline-Responsive Riboswitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Amy T.; Schmidt, Calvin M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria that are currently being developed as biological production platforms. They derive energy from light and carbon from atmospheric carbon dioxide, and some species can fix atmospheric nitrogen. One advantage of developing cyanobacteria for renewable production of biofuels and other biological products is that they are amenable to genetic manipulation, facilitating bioengineering and synthetic biology. To expand the currently available genetic toolkit, we have demonstrated the utility of synthetic theophylline-responsive riboswitches for effective regulation of gene expression in four diverse species of cyanobacteria, including two recent isolates. We evaluated a set of six riboswitches driving the expression of a yellow fluorescent protein reporter in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, Leptolyngbya sp. strain BL0902, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, and Synechocystis sp. strain WHSyn. We demonstrated that riboswitches can offer regulation of gene expression superior to that of the commonly used isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside induction of a lacIq-Ptrc promoter system. We also showed that expression of the toxic protein SacB can be effectively regulated, demonstrating utility for riboswitch regulation of proteins that are detrimental to biomass accumulation. Taken together, the results of this work demonstrate the utility and ease of use of riboswitches in the context of genetic engineering and synthetic biology in diverse cyanobacteria, which will facilitate the development of algal biotechnology. PMID:25149516

  17. p21WAF1/CIP1 Expression is Differentially Regulated by Metformin and Rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Molnar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway plays an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy and other age-related diseases. One of the features of DN is the elevated expression of p21WAF1/CIP1. However, the importance of the mTOR signalling pathway in p21 regulation is poorly understood. Here we investigated the effect of metformin and rapamycin on mTOR-related phenotypes in cell lines of epithelial origin. This study reports that metformin inhibits high glucose-induced p21 expression. High glucose opposed metformin in regulating cell size, proliferation, and protein synthesis. These effects were associated with reduced AMPK activation, affecting downstream mTOR signalling. However, the inhibition of the mTOR pathway by rapamycin did not have a negative effect on p21 expression, suggesting that metformin regulates p21 upstream of mTOR. These findings provide support for the hypothesis that AMPK activation may regulate p21 expression, which may have implications for diabetic nephropathy and other age-related pathologies.

  18. Gut microbiota regulates NKG2D ligand expression on intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Holm, Thomas L.; Krych, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are one of a few cell types in the body with constitutive surface expression of natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands, although the magnitude of ligand expression by IECs varies. Here, we investigated whether the gut microbiota regulates the NKG2D ligand...... expression is kept in check by an intestinal regulatory immune milieu induced by members of the gut microbiota, for example A. muciniphila....... expression on small IECs. Germ-free and ampicillin-treated mice were shown to have a significant increase in NKG2D ligand expression. Interestingly, vancomycin treatment, which propagated the bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and reduced the level of IFN-¿ and IL-15 in the intestine, decreased the NKG2D...

  19. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  20. Regulation of delayed type hypersensitivity : cellular and genetic requirements, with emphases on the response to histocompatibility antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T.J. Bianchi (Andre Thomas Johan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe failure of successful exchange of tissues and organs between individuals of the same species is mainly due to the expression of histocompatibility (H) antigens on the cell surface of the transplanted tissues. Every individual has a unique set of genetically determined

  1. Genes regulated by the Escherichia coli SOS repressor LexA exhibit heterogenous expression

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    Gillor Osnat

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic heterogeneity may ensure that a small fraction of a population survives environmental perturbations or may result in lysis in a subpopulation, to increase the survival of siblings. Genes involved in DNA repair and population dynamics play key roles in rapid responses to environmental conditions. In Escherichia coli the transcriptional repressor LexA controls a coordinated cellular response to DNA damage designated the SOS response. Expression of LexA regulated genes, e.g. colicin encoding genes, recA, lexA and umuDC, was examined utilizing transcription fusions with the promoterless gfp at the single cell level. Results The investigated LexA regulated genes exhibited heterogeneity, as only in a small fraction of the population more intense fluorescence was observed. Unlike recA and lexA, the pore forming and nuclease colicin activity genes as well as umuDC, exhibited no basal level activity. However, in a lexA defective strain high level expression of the gene fusions was observed in the large majority of the cells. All of the investigated genes were expressed in a recA defective strain, albeit at lower levels, revealing expression in the absence of a spontaneous SOS response. In addition, the simultaneous expression of cka, encoding the pore forming colicin K, and lexA, investigated at the single cell level revealed high level expression of only cka in rare individual cells. Conclusion LexA regulated genes exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity as high level expression is observed in only a small subpopulation of cells. Heterogenous expression is established primarily by stochastic factors and the binding affinity of LexA to SOS boxes.

  2. Reduced expression of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 in human thyroid cancer

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    Ma Jianjun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NDRG2 (N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 was initially cloned in our laboratory. Previous results have shown that NDRG2 expressed differentially in normal and cancer tissues. Specifically, NDRG2 mRNA was down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers, and over-expression of NDRG2 inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. NDRG2 also exerts important functions in cell differentiation and tumor suppression. However, it remains unclear whether NDRG2 participates in carcinogenesis of the thyroid. Methods In this study, we investigated the expression profile of human NDRG2 in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas, by examining tissues from individuals with thyroid adenomas (n = 40 and carcinomas (n = 35, along with corresponding normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot methods were utilized to determine both the protein and mRNA expression status of Ndrg2 and c-Myc. Results The immunostaining analysis revealed a decrease of Ndrg2 expression in thyroid carcinomas. When comparing adenomas or carcinomas with adjacent normal tissue from the same individual, the mRNA expression level of NDRG2 was significantly decreased in thyroid carcinoma tissues, while there was little difference in adenoma tissues. This differential expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blotting. However, there were no significant correlations of NDRG2 expression with gender, age, different histotypes of thyroid cancers or distant metastases. Conclusion Our data indicates that NDRG2 may participate in thyroid carcinogenesis. This finding provides novel insight into the important role of NDRG2 in the development of thyroid carcinomas. Future studies are needed to address whether the down-regulation of NDRG2 is a cause or a consequence of the progression from a normal thyroid to a carcinoma.

  3. Ethylene synthesis and regulated expression of recombinant protein in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

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    Fernando Guerrero

    Full Text Available The ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE from Pseudomonas syringae catalyzes the synthesis of ethylene which can be easily detected in the headspace of closed cultures. A synthetic codon-optimized gene encoding N-terminal His-tagged EFE (EFEh was expressed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis and Escherichia coli (E. coli under the control of diverse promoters in a self-replicating broad host-range plasmid. Ethylene synthesis was stably maintained in both organisms in contrast to earlier work in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. The rate of ethylene accumulation was used as a reporter for protein expression in order to assess promoter strength and inducibility with the different expression systems. Several metal-inducible cyanobacterial promoters did not function in E. coli but were well-regulated in cyanobacteria, albeit at a low level of expression. The E. coli promoter P(trc resulted in constitutive expression in cyanobacteria regardless of whether IPTG was added or not. In contrast, a Lac promoter variant, P(A1lacO-1, induced EFE-expression in Synechocystis at a level of expression as high as the Trc promoter and allowed a fine level of IPTG-dependent regulation of protein-expression. The regulation was tight at low cell density and became more relaxed in more dense cultures. A synthetic quorum-sensing promoter system was also constructed and shown to function well in E. coli, however, only a very low level of EFE-activity was observed in Synechocystis, independent of cell density.

  4. Regucalcin expression in bovine tissues and its regulation by sex steroid hormones in accessory sex glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Starvaggi Cucuzza

    Full Text Available Regucalcin (RGN is a mammalian Ca2+-binding protein that plays an important role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Recently, RGN has been identified as a target gene for sex steroid hormones in the prostate glands and testis of rats and humans, but no studies have focused on RGN expression in bovine tissues. Thus, in the present study, we examined RGN mRNA and protein expression in the different tissues and organs of veal calves and beef cattle. Moreover, we investigated whether RGN expression is controlled through sex steroid hormones in bovine target tissues, namely the bulbo-urethral and prostate glands and the testis. Sex steroid hormones are still illegally used in bovine husbandry to increase muscle mass. The screening of the regulation and function of anabolic sex steroids via modified gene expression levels in various tissues represents a new approach for the detection of illicit drug treatments. Herein, we used quantitative PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses to demonstrate RGN mRNA and protein expression in bovine tissues. In addition, estrogen administration down-regulated RGN gene expression in the accessory sex glands of veal calves and beef cattle, while androgen treatment reduced RGN gene expression only in the testis. The confirmation of the regulation of RGN gene expression through sex steroid hormones might facilitate the potential detection of hormone abuse in bovine husbandry. Particularly, the specific response in the testis suggests that this tissue is ideal for the detection of illicit androgen administration in veal calves and beef cattle.

  5. Stromal Expression of Hypoxia Regulated Proteins Is an Adverse Prognostic Factor in Colorectal Carcinomas

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    Arjen H. G. Cleven

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia modifies the phenotype of tumors in a way that promotes tumor aggressiveness and resistance towards chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the expression and influence of hypoxia-regulated proteins on tumor biology are not well characterized in colorectal tumors. We studied the role of protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 in patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 133 colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of hypoxia markers was correlated with clinicopathological variables and overall patient survival. Results: Expression of these hypoxia markers was detected in the epithelial compartment of the tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated stromal cells. Although tumor cells frequently showed expression of one or more of the investigated hypoxia markers, no correlation among these markers or with clinical response was found. However, within the tumor stroma, positive correlations between the hypoxia markers HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 were observed. Furthermore expression of HIF-2α and CA9 in tumor-associated stroma were both associated with a significantly reduced overall survival. In the Cox proportional hazard model, stromal HIF-2α expression was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusion: These observations show, that expression of hypoxia regulated proteins in tumor-associated stromal cells, as opposed to their expression in epithelial tumor cells, is associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer. This study suggests that tumor hypoxia may influence tumor-associated stromal cells in a way that ultimately contributes to patient prognosis.

  6. Smoking-mediated up-regulation of GAD67 expression in the human airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Wang, Rui; Ferris, Barbara; Salit, Jacqueline; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2010-10-29

    The production of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is dependent on glutamate decarboxylases (GAD65 and GAD67), the enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate to GABA. Based on studies suggesting a role of the airway epithelial GABAergic system in asthma-related mucus overproduction, we hypothesized that cigarette smoking, another disorder associated with increased mucus production, may modulate GABAergic system-related gene expression levels in the airway epithelium. We assessed expression of the GABAergic system in human airway epithelium obtained using bronchoscopy to sample the epithelium and microarrays to evaluate gene expression. RT-PCR was used to confirm gene expression of GABAergic system gene in large and small airway epithelium from heathy nonsmokers and healthy smokers. The differences in the GABAergic system gene was further confirmed by TaqMan, immunohistochemistry and Western analysis. The data demonstrate there is a complete GABAergic system expressed in the large and small human airway epithelium, including glutamate decarboxylase, GABA receptors, transporters and catabolism enzymes. Interestingly, of the entire GABAergic system, smoking modified only the expression of GAD67, with marked up-regulation of GAD67 gene expression in both large (4.1-fold increase, p smoking. In the context that GAD67 is the rate limiting enzyme in GABA synthesis, the correlation of GAD67 gene expression with MUC5AC expressions suggests that the up-regulation of airway epithelium expression of GAD67 may contribute to the increase in mucus production observed in association with cigarette smoking. NCT00224198; NCT00224185.

  7. Development of an analogue multiplexed regulation for periodic 1. order delayed processes; Etude et realisation d'une regulation analogique multiplexee pour processus aperiodiques du 1. ordre avec retard pur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amblard, J.C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-15

    The present note deals with the study regulations of the sampled type, for 1. order process with simple delay. In order to obtain a good stability in such regulations, together with acceptable performances, it is interesting to use polynomial type correctors acting directly on the sampled error signals. The active elements of these correctors can be shared by all the channels to be controlled. Furthermore, the determination of the correction parameters results from an optimal study of the system. In the second part is described the construction of a multiplexed regulation for diffusion ovens. (author) [French] La presente note concerne l'etude des regulations de type echantillonne, pour processus du 1. ordre avec retard pur. Pour obtenir une bonne stabilite de telles regulations, ainsi que des performances correcte il est interessant d'utiliser des correcteurs de type polynomial, agissant directement sur les signaux d'erreur echantillonnes. Les elements actifs de ces correcteurs peuvent etre pris communs a toutes les voies a controler. D'autre part, la determination des parametres de correction decoula d'une etude optimale du systeme. Dans une seconde partie on decrit la realisation d'une regulation multiplexee de fours a diffusion. (auteur)

  8. Retinoic Acid Inhibits Adipogenesis Modulating C/EBPβ Phosphorylation and Down Regulating Srebf1a Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Vélez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Beltrán-Langarica, Alicia; Hernández-Mosqueira, Claudia; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2016-03-01

    Adipogenesis comprises a complex network of signaling pathways and transcriptional cascades; the GSK3β-C/EBPβ-srebf1a axis is a critical signaling pathway at early stages leading to the expression of PPARγ2, the master regulator of adipose differentiation. Previous work has demonstrated that retinoic acid inhibits adipogenesis affecting different signaling pathways. Here, we evaluated the anti-adipogenic effect of retinoic acid on the adipogenic transcriptional cascade, and the expression of adipogenic genes cebpb, srebf1a, srebf1c, pparg2, and cebpa. Our results demonstrate that retinoic acid blocks adipose differentiation during commitment, returning cells to an apparent non-committed state, since they have to be newly induced to adipose conversion after the retinoid is removed from the culture medium. Retinoic acid down regulates the expression of the adipogenic genes, srebf1a, srebf1c, pparg2, and cebpa; however, it did not down regulate the expression of cebpb, but it inhibited C/EBPβ phosphorylation at Thr188, a critical step for the progression of the adipogenic program. We also found that RA inhibition of adipogenesis did not increase the expression of dlk1, the gene encoding for Pref1, a well-known anti-adipogenic factor. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Regulating Hypothalamus Gene Expression in Food Intake: Dietary Composition or Calorie Density?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Jang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe proportion of saturated fatty acids/unsaturated fatty acids in the diet seems to act as a physiological regulation on obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Differently composed fatty acid diets may induce satiety of the hypothalamus in different ways. However, the direct effect of the different fatty acid diets on satiety in the hypothalamus is not clear.MethodsThree experiments in mice were conducted to determine whether: different compositions of fatty acids affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus over time; different types of fatty acids administered into the stomach directly affect gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus; and fat composition changes in the diet affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus.ResultsThe type of fat in cases of purified fatty acid administration directly into the stomach may cause changes of gene expressions in the hypothalamus. Gene expression by dietary fat may be regulated by calorie amount ingested rather than weight amount or type of fat.ConclusionTherefore, the calorie density factor of the diet in regulating hypothalamic gene in food intake may be detrimental, although the possibility of type of fat cannot be ruled out.

  10. RKIP regulates CCL5 expression to inhibit breast cancer invasion and metastasis by controlling macrophage infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Ila; Qiu, Xiaoliang; Ma, Hong Zhi; Yeung, Miranda; Aras, Shweta; de la Serna, Ivana; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Thiery, Jean Paul; Trumbly, Robert; Fan, Xuan; Cui, Hongjuan; Yeung, Kam C

    2015-11-17

    Accumulating evidence suggests that presence of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment add to the invasive and tumor-promoting hallmarks of cancer cells by secreting angiogenic and growth factors. RKIP is a known metastasis suppressor and interferes with several steps of metastasis. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of its function as a broad metastasis suppressor remain poorly understood. Here, we establish a novel pathway for RKIP regulation of metastasis inhibition through the negative regulation of RANTES/CCL5 thereby limiting tumor macrophage infiltration and inhibition of angiogenesis. Using a combination of loss- and gain-of- function approaches, we show that RKIP hinders breast cancer cell invasion by inhibiting expression of the CC chemokine CCL5 in vitro. We also show that the expression levels of RKIP and CCL5 are inversely correlated among clinical human breast cancer samples. Using a mouse allograft breast cancer transplantation model, we highlight that ectopic expression of RKIP significantly decreases tumor vasculature, macrophage infiltration and lung metastases. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that the inhibition of the CCL5 expression is the cause of the observed effects resulting from RKIP expression. Taken together, our results underscore the significance of RKIP as important negative regulator of tumor microenvironment.

  11. PERP regulates enamel formation via effects on cell–cell adhesion and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheon, Andrew H.; Mostowfi, Pasha; Snead, Malcolm L.; Ihrie, Rebecca A.; Sone, Eli; Pramparo, Tiziano; Attardi, Laura D.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of cell–cell adhesion in the development of mineralized tissues. Here we report that PERP, a tetraspan membrane protein essential for epithelial integrity, regulates enamel formation. PERP is necessary for proper cell attachment and gene expression during tooth development, and its expression is controlled by P63, a master regulator of stratified epithelial development. During enamel formation, PERP is localized to the interface between the enamel-producing ameloblasts and the stratum intermedium (SI), a layer of cells subjacent to the ameloblasts. Perp-null mice display dramatic enamel defects, which are caused, in part, by the detachment of ameloblasts from the SI. Microarray analysis comparing gene expression in teeth of wild-type and Perp-null mice identified several differentially expressed genes during enamel formation. Analysis of these genes in ameloblast-derived LS8 cells upon knockdown of PERP confirmed the role for PERP in the regulation of gene expression. Together, our data show that PERP is necessary for the integrity of the ameloblast–SI interface and that a lack of Perp causes downregulation of genes that are required for proper enamel formation. PMID:21285247

  12. Regulating Hypothalamus Gene Expression in Food Intake: Dietary Composition or Calorie Density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi; Park, So Young; Kim, Yong Woon; Jung, Seung Pil; Kim, Jong Yeon

    2017-04-01

    The proportion of saturated fatty acids/unsaturated fatty acids in the diet seems to act as a physiological regulation on obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Differently composed fatty acid diets may induce satiety of the hypothalamus in different ways. However, the direct effect of the different fatty acid diets on satiety in the hypothalamus is not clear. Three experiments in mice were conducted to determine whether: different compositions of fatty acids affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus over time; different types of fatty acids administered into the stomach directly affect gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus; and fat composition changes in the diet affects gene mRNA expression of the hypothalamus. The type of fat in cases of purified fatty acid administration directly into the stomach may cause changes of gene expressions in the hypothalamus. Gene expression by dietary fat may be regulated by calorie amount ingested rather than weight amount or type of fat. Therefore, the calorie density factor of the diet in regulating hypothalamic gene in food intake may be detrimental, although the possibility of type of fat cannot be ruled out.

  13. Acute sleep deprivation enhances avoidance learning and spatial memory and induces delayed alterations in neurochemical expression of GR, TH, DRD1, pCREB and Ki67 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azogu, Idu; de la Tremblaye, Patricia Barra; Dunbar, Megan; Lebreton, Marianne; LeMarec, Nathalie; Plamondon, Hélène

    2015-02-15

    The current study investigated the effects of acute versus repeated periods of sleep deprivation on avoidance learning and spatial memory and on the expression of discrete biochemical brain signals involved in stress regulation, motivation and brain plasticity. Male Long-Evans rats were sleep deprived using the platform-over-water method for a single 4 h period (ASD) or for daily 4h RSD period on five consecutive days (CSD). The Y maze passive avoidance task (YM-PAT) and the Morris water maze (MWM) were used to determine learning and memory 1h following the last SD period. Region-specific changes in glucocorticoid receptors (GR), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine 1 receptors (DRD1), phospho-CREB (pCREB) and Ki-67 expression were assessed in the hippocampal formation, hypothalamus and mesolimbic regions 72 h following RSD. Behaviorally, our findings revealed increased latency to re-enter the aversive arm in the YM-PAT and reduced distance traveled and latency to reach the platform in the MWM in ASD rats compared to all other groups, indicative of improved avoidance learning and spatial memory, respectively. Acute SD enhanced TH expression in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and A11 neurons of the hypothalamus and DRD1 expression in the lateral hypothalamus. Cell proliferation in the subventricular zone and pCREB expression in the dentate gyrus and CA3 regions was also enhanced following acute SD. In contrast, repeated SD significantly elevated GR-ir at the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and CA1 and CA3 layers of the hippocampus compared to all other groups. Our study supports that a brief 4h sleep deprivation period is sufficient to induce delayed neurochemical changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of NDRG2 is down-regulated in high-risk adenomas and colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anders; Vogel, Lotte K.; Lewinsky, Rikke H

    2007-01-01

    to examine NDRG2 mRNA expression in colon cancer. By examining affected and normal tissue from individuals with colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, as well as in healthy individuals, we aim to determine whether and at which stages NDRG2 down-regulation occurs during colonic carcinogenesis. METHODS: Using......BACKGROUND: It has recently been shown that NDRG2 mRNA is down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers and cancer cell-lines. Although the function of NDRG2 is unknown, high NDRG2 expression correlates with improved prognosis in high-grade gliomas. The aim of this study has been......-regulation is a cause or consequence of the progression of colorectal adenomas to carcinoma....

  15. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Godbole, Madan M., E-mail: madangodbole@yahoo.co.in [Department of Endocrinology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  16. Regulation of chromatin organization and inducible gene expression by a Drosophila insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ashley M.; Van Bortle, Kevin; Ramos, Edward; Takenaka, Naomi; Rohrbaugh, Margaret; Jones, Brian C.; Jones, Keith C.; Corces, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Insulators are multi-protein-DNA complexes thought to affect gene expression by mediating inter- and intra-chromosomal interactions. Drosophila insulators contain specific DNA binding proteins plus common components, such as CP190, that facilitate these interactions. Here we examine changes in the distribution of Drosophila insulator proteins during the heat-shock and ecdysone responses. We find that CP190 recruitment to insulator sites is the main regulatable step in controlling insulator function during heat shock. In contrast, both CP190 and DNA binding protein recruitment are regulated during the ecdysone response. CP190 is necessary to stabilize specific chromatin loops and for proper activation of transcription of genes regulated by this hormone. These findings suggest that cells may regulate recruitment of insulator proteins to the DNA in order to activate insulator activity at specific sites and create distinct patterns of nuclear organization that are necessary to achieve proper gene expression in response to different stimuli. PMID:21981916

  17. USP22 is a positive regulator of NFATc2 on promoting IL2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yayi; Lin, Fang; Xu, Peng; Nie, Jia; Chen, Zuojia; Su, Jinsong; Tang, Jiayou; Wu, Qingsi; Li, Yangyang; Guo, Zhixiang; Gao, Zhimei; Li, Dan; Shen, Jijia; Ge, Shenglin; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2014-03-18

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is an important regulator of T cell activation. However, the molecular mechanism whereby NFATc2 regulates IL2 transcription is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22), known as a cancer stem cell marker, specifically interacted with and deubiquitinated NFATc2. USP22 stabilized NFATc2 protein levels, which required its deubiquitinase activity. Consistent with these observations, depletion of USP22 in T cells reduced the expression of IL2, which is a cytokine that signifies T effector cell activation. Our findings thus unveil a previously uncharacterized positive regulator of NFATc2, suggesting that targeting the deubiquitinase activity of USP22 could have therapeutic benefit to control IL2 expression and T cell function. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. IL1B promoter polymorphism regulates the expression of gastric acid stimulating hormone gastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Meenakshi; Datta De, Dipanjana; Choudhury, Abhijit; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2009-07-01

    It is important to dissect the effect of the alternative alleles of a functional SNP on the entire biochemical pathway for the complete understanding of the mechanism of the manifestation of complex diseases. IL1B-511C>T and -31C>T promoter polymorphisms have been suggested as potential susceptibility loci for Helicobacter pylori associated gastroduodenal diseases. We report that altered expression of IL1B due to a specific polymorphism in its promoter modulates the expression of gastrin, an acid regulating hormone. Treatment of gastric carcinoma cells, AGS, with IL1B resulted in a 20-fold reduction in gastrin expression. Gastrin promoter assay showed that IL1B inhibits gastrin expression at the transcriptional level and part of this inhibitory process is mediated via activation of NFkappaB and involvement of HDACs. An almost 3-fold increase in IL1B expression was observed when AGS cells were transfected with -31TIL1B expression plasmid in comparison to -31CIL1B. The -31TIL1B induced a 2-fold greater repression of the gastrin luciferase activity compared to -31CIL1B. This signaling of the -31TIL1B variant allele driven IL1B revealed an almost 1.5-fold greater expression of NFkappaB. Thus, this study showed that a single base substitution at the -31 position of the IL1B promoter brought about differential expression of IL1B which differentially altered both NFkappaB activation and gastrin expression.

  19. LPS counter regulates RNA expression of extracellular proteases and their inhibitors in murine macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Rønø, Birgitte; Lund, Leif R

    2012-01-01

    Besides their evident importance in host defense, macrophages have been shown to play a detrimental role in different pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Regardless of the exact situation, macrophage activation and migration are intimately connected...... in extracellular matrix metabolism in the mouse derived-macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 following stimulation with LPS. Our results revealed that LPS induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinases while at the same time decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. The opposite scenario...... expression regulation implicated in macrophage-dependent matrix degradation and furthermore emphasize the value of qPCR array techniques for the investigation of the complex regulation of the matrix degradome....

  20. Expression of cell cycle regulator p16 is not affected by diabetes during oral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairaktaris, Eleftherios; Goutzanis, Lambros; Nkenke, Emeka; Spyridonidou, Sofia; Vassiliou, Stavros; Derka, Spyridoula; Vylliotis, Antonis; Yapijakis, Christos; Lazaris, Andreas; Patsouris, Efstratios

    2007-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p16 plays a vital role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The expression of p16 was investigated in an experimental model of chemically induced carcinogenesis in normal and diabetic (type I) Sprague-Dawley rats. Tissue sections ranging from normal oral mucosa to moderately differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) were studied immunohistochemically. In normal rats p16 expression increased gradually during oral oncogenesis, but a significant increase was observed only in moderately differentiated OSCC (p=0.038). On the contrary, in diabetic rats the detected gradual increase was significant in hyperplasia, dysplasia, early invasion and well-differentiated OSCC (panimals. It seems that the expression of cell cycle regulator p16 is not affected by diabetes in the studied animal model of oral oncogenesis.

  1. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 expression is regulated by insulin and glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Jose Barrera Roa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trefoil factors are effector molecules in gastrointestinal tract physiology. They are classified into three groups: the gastric peptides (TFF1, spasmolytic peptide (TFF2 and intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3. Previous studies have shown that trefoil factors are located and expressed in human endocrine pancreas suggesting that TFF3 play a role in: a pancreatic cells migration, b β-cell mitosis, and c pancreatic cells regeneration. We speculated that the presence of TFF3 in pancreas, could be associated to a possible regulation mechanism by insulin and glucose. To date, there are not reports whether the unbalance in carbohydrate metabolism observed in diabetes could affect the production or expression of TFF3.Methods: We determined the TFF3 levels and expression by immunoassay (ELISA and semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique respectively, of intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29 treated with glucose and insulin. Also,Real Time-PCR (RTq-PCR was done.Results: Increasing concentrations of glucose improved TFF3 expression and these levels were further elevated after insulin treatment. Insulin treatment also led to the up-regulation of human sodium/glucose transporter 1 (hSGLT1, which further increases intracellular glucose levels. Finally, we investigated theTFF3 levels in serum of diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM and healthy patients. Here we shown that serum TFF3 levels were down-regulated in T1DM and this levels were up-regulated after insulin treatment. Also, the TFF3 levels of healthy donors were up-regulated 2 h after breakfast.Conclusion: Our fi ndings suggest for the fi rst time that insulin signaling is important for TFF3 optimal expression in serum and intestinal epithelial cells.

  2. H-ferritin-regulated microRNAs modulate gene expression in K562 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Biamonte

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that the silencing of the heavy subunit (FHC offerritin, the central iron storage molecule in the cell, is accompanied by a modification in global gene expression. In this work, we explored whether different FHC amounts might modulate miRNA expression levels in K562 cells and studied the impact of miRNAs in gene expression profile modifications. To this aim, we performed a miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in K562 silenced for FHC (K562shFHC comparing it with K562 transduced with scrambled RNA (K562shRNA. Four miRNAs, namely hsa-let-7g, hsa-let-7f, hsa-let-7i and hsa-miR-125b, were significantly up-regulated in silenced cells. The remarkable down-regulation of these miRNAs, following FHC expression rescue, supports a specific relation between FHC silencing and miRNA-modulation. The integration of target predictions with miRNA and gene expression profiles led to the identification of a regulatory network which includes the miRNAs up-regulated by FHC silencing, as well as91 down-regulated putative target genes. These genes were further classified in 9 networks; the highest scoring network, "Cell Death and Survival, Hematological System Development and Function, Hematopoiesis", is composed by 18 focus molecules including RAF1 and ERK1/2. We confirmed that, following FHC silencing, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is severely impaired and that RAF1 mRNA is significantly down-regulated. Taken all together, our data indicate that, in our experimental model, FHC silencing may affect RAF1/pERK1/2 levels through the modulation of a specific set of miRNAs and add new insights in to the relationship among iron homeostasis and miRNAs.

  3. Expression profiles of Fsh-regulated ovarian genes during oogenesis in coho salmon.

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    Guzmán, José M; Luckenbach, J Adam; Yamamoto, Yoji; Swanson, Penny

    2014-01-01

    The function of follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) during oogenesis in fishes is poorly understood. Using coho salmon as a fish model, we recently identified a suite of genes regulated by Fsh in vitro and involved in ovarian processes mostly unexplored in fishes, like cell proliferation, differentiation, survival or extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To better understand the role of these Fsh-regulated genes during oocyte growth in fishes, we characterized their mRNA levels at discrete stages of the ovarian development in coho salmon. While most of the transcripts were expressed at low levels during primary growth (perinucleolus stage), high expression of genes associated with cell proliferation (pim1, pcna, and mcm4) and survival (ddit4l) was found in follicles at this stage. The transition to secondary oocyte growth (cortical alveolus and lipid droplet stage ovarian follicles) was characterized by a marked increase in the expression of genes related to cell survival (clu1, clu2 and ivns1abpa). Expression of genes associated with cell differentiation and growth (wt2l and adh8l), growth factor signaling (inha), steroidogenesis (cyp19a1a) and the ECM (col1a1, col1a2 and dcn) peaked in vitellogenic follicles, showing a strong and positive correlation with transcripts for fshr. Other genes regulated by Fsh and associated with ECM function (ctgf, wapl and fn1) and growth factor signaling (bmp16 and smad5l) peaked in maturing follicles, along with increases in steroidogenesis-related gene transcripts. In conclusion, ovarian genes regulated by Fsh showed marked differences in their expression patterns during oogenesis in coho salmon. Our results suggest that Fsh regulates different ovarian processes at specific stages of development, likely through interaction with other intra- or extra-ovarian factors.

  4. Expression Profiles of Fsh-Regulated Ovarian Genes during Oogenesis in Coho Salmon

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    Guzmán, José M.; Luckenbach, J. Adam; Yamamoto, Yoji; Swanson, Penny

    2014-01-01

    The function of follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) during oogenesis in fishes is poorly understood. Using coho salmon as a fish model, we recently identified a suite of genes regulated by Fsh in vitro and involved in ovarian processes mostly unexplored in fishes, like cell proliferation, differentiation, survival or extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To better understand the role of these Fsh-regulated genes during oocyte growth in fishes, we characterized their mRNA levels at discrete stages of the ovarian development in coho salmon. While most of the transcripts were expressed at low levels during primary growth (perinucleolus stage), high expression of genes associated with cell proliferation (pim1, pcna, and mcm4) and survival (ddit4l) was found in follicles at this stage. The transition to secondary oocyte growth (cortical alveolus and lipid droplet stage ovarian follicles) was characterized by a marked increase in the expression of genes related to cell survival (clu1, clu2 and ivns1abpa). Expression of genes associated with cell differentiation and growth (wt2l and adh8l), growth factor signaling (inha), steroidogenesis (cyp19a1a) and the ECM (col1a1, col1a2 and dcn) peaked in vitellogenic follicles, showing a strong and positive correlation with transcripts for fshr. Other genes regulated by Fsh and associated with ECM function (ctgf, wapl and fn1) and growth factor signaling (bmp16 and smad5l) peaked in maturing follicles, along with increases in steroidogenesis-related gene transcripts. In conclusion, ovarian genes regulated by Fsh showed marked differences in their expression patterns during oogenesis in coho salmon. Our results suggest that Fsh regulates different ovarian processes at specific stages of development, likely through interaction with other intra- or extra-ovarian factors. PMID:25485989

  5. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of Ubc9 expression in cancer cells.

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    Wu, Fangting; Zhu, Shuomin; Ding, Yanna; Beck, William T; Mo, Yin-Yuan

    2009-03-01

    As an E2-conjugating enzyme for sumoylation, Ubc9 plays a critical role in sumoylation-mediated cellular pathways, ultimately impacting cell growth and cancer development. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of Ubc9 in cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to determine Ubc9 expression in paraffin-embedded tumor tissue and frozen specimens of the matched tumors from the same patient, respectively. To establish the causal relationship between miR-30e and Ubc9 expression, we overexpressed miR-30e and then determined the resultant effects on Ubc9 expression. To determine whether miR-30e directly targets Ubc9, we did luciferase assays using luciferase reporters carrying the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the Ubc9 gene. We found that Ubc9 is up-regulated in breast, head and neck, and lung cancer specimens. In addition, an examination of eight pairs of matched breast tumor specimens by Western blot analysis revealed that, on average, the level of Ubc9 is 5.7-fold higher in tumor than in the matched normal breast tissue. Of interest, we present evidence that Ubc9 is subjected to posttranscriptional regulation by microRNA, and the miR-30 family, such as miR-30e, negatively regulates Ubc9 expression. In contrast to Ubc9, miR-30e is underexpressed in tumors. Moreover, ectopic expression of miR-30e suppresses cell growth, which can be partially reversed by Ubc9. Finally, using luciferase-Ubc9-3'-UTR reporters, we show that Ubc9 is a direct target for miR-30e by interactions with the putative miR-30e binding sites. These results provide new insight into regulation of Ubc9 in cancer cells.

  6. N-Myc Differentially Regulates Expression of MXI1 Isoforms in Neuroblastoma

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    Michael B. Armstrong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amplification of the MYCN proto-oncogene is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with metastatic neuroblastoma (NB. MYCN encodes the N-Myc protein, a transcriptional regulator that dimerizes with the Max transcription factor, binds to E-box DNA sequences, and regulates genes involved in cell growth and apoptosis. Overexpression of N-Myc leads to transcriptional activation and an increase in NB cell proliferation. Mxi1, a member of the Myc family of transcriptional regulators, also binds to Max. However, Mxi1 is a transcriptional repressor and inhibits proliferation of NB cells, suggesting that Mxi1 functions as an N-Myc antagonist. Our laboratory previously identified Mxi1-0, an alternatively transcribed Mxi1 isoform. Mxi1-0 has properties distinct from those of Mxi1; in contrast to Mxi1, Mxi1-0 is unable to suppress c-Myc-dependent transcription. We now show that Mxi1-0 expression increases in response to MYCN overexpression in NB cells, with a positive correlation between MYCN and MXI1-0 RNA levels. We also show that N-Myc expression differentially regulates the MXI1 and MXI1-0 promoters: Increased MYCN expression suppresses MXI1 promoter activity while enhancing transcription through the MXI1-0 promoter. Finally, induction of Mxi1-0 leads to increased proliferation, whereas expression of Mxi1 inhibits cell growth, indicating differential roles for these two proteins. These data suggest that N-Myc differentially regulates the expression of MXI1 and MXI1-0 and can alter the balance between the two transcription factors. Furthermore, MXI1-0 appears to be a downstream target of MYCN-dependent signaling pathways and may contribute to N-Myc-dependent cell growth and proliferation.

  7. The MEK-ERK pathway negatively regulates bim expression through the 3' UTR in sympathetic neurons

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    Kristiansen Mark

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a critical role during neuronal development and disease. Developing sympathetic neurons depend on nerve growth factor (NGF for survival during the late embryonic and early postnatal period and die by apoptosis in its absence. The proapoptotic BH3-only protein Bim increases in level after NGF withdrawal and is required for NGF withdrawal-induced death. The regulation of Bim expression in neurons is complex and this study describes a new mechanism by which an NGF-activated signalling pathway regulates bim gene expression in sympathetic neurons. Results We report that U0126, an inhibitor of the prosurvival MEK-ERK pathway, increases bim mRNA levels in sympathetic neurons in the presence of NGF. We find that this effect is independent of PI3-K-Akt and JNK-c-Jun signalling and is not mediated by the promoter, first exon or first intron of the bim gene. By performing 3' RACE and microinjection experiments with a new bim-LUC+3'UTR reporter construct, we show that U0126 increases bim expression via the bim 3' UTR. We demonstrate that this effect does not involve a change in bim mRNA stability and by using PD184352, a specific MEK1/2-ERK1/2 inhibitor, we show that this mechanism involves the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of MEK/ERK signalling independently reduces cell survival in NGF-treated sympathetic neurons. Conclusions These results suggest that in sympathetic neurons, MEK-ERK signalling negatively regulates bim expression via the 3' UTR and that this regulation is likely to be at the level of transcription. This data provides further insight into the different mechanisms by which survival signalling pathways regulate bim expression in neurons.

  8. Stat3 inhibition attenuates mechanical allodynia through transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in spinal astrocytes.

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    Xiaodong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 is known to induce cell proliferation and inflammation by regulating gene transcription. Recent studies showed that Stat3 modulates nociceptive transmission by reducing spinal astrocyte proliferation. However, it is unclear whether Stat3 also contributes to the modulation of nociceptive transmission by regulating inflammatory response in spinal astrocytes. This study aimed at investigating the role of Stat3 on neuroinflammation during development of pain in rats after intrathecal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. METHODS: Stat3 specific siRNA oligo and synthetic selective inhibitor (Stattic were applied to block the activity of Stat3 in primary astrocytes or rat spinal cord, respectively. LPS was used to induce the expression of proinflammatory genes in all studies. Immunofluorescence staining of cells and slices of spinal cord was performed to monitor Stat3 activation. The impact of Stat3 inhibition on proinflammatory genes expression was determined by cytokine antibody array, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mechanical allodynia, as determined by the threshold pressure that could induce hind paw withdrawal after application of standardized von Frey filaments, was used to detect the effects of Stat3 inhibition after pain development with intrathecal LPS injection. RESULTS: Intrathecal injection of LPS activated Stat3 in reactive spinal astrocytes. Blockade of Stat3 activity attenuated mechanical allodynia significantly and was correlated with a lower number of reactive astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. In vitro study demonstrated that Stat3 modulated inflammatory response in primary astrocytes by transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression including Cx3cl1, Cxcl5, Cxcl10 and Ccl20. Similarly, inhibition of Stat3 reversed the expression of these chemokines in the spinal dorsal horn. CONCLUSIONS: Stat3 acted as a

  9. N-Myc Differentially Regulates Expression of MXI1 Isoforms in Neuroblastoma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael B; Mody, Rajen J; Ellis, D Christian; Hill, Adam B; Erichsen, David A; Wechsler, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the MYCN proto-oncogene is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with metastatic neuroblastoma (NB). MYCN encodes the N-Myc protein, a transcriptional regulator that dimerizes with the Max transcription factor, binds to E-box DNA sequences, and regulates genes involved in cell growth and apoptosis. Overexpression of N-Myc leads to transcriptional activation and an increase in NB cell proliferation. Mxi1, a member of the Myc family of transcriptional regulators, also binds to Max. However, Mxi1 is a transcriptional repressor and inhibits proliferation of NB cells, suggesting that Mxi1 functions as an N-Myc antagonist. Our laboratory previously identified Mxi1-0, an alternatively transcribed Mxi1 isoform. Mxi1-0 has properties distinct from those of Mxi1; in contrast to Mxi1, Mxi1-0 is unable to suppress c-Myc-dependent transcription. We now show that Mxi1-0 expression increases in response to MYCN overexpression in NB cells, with a positive correlation between MYCN and MXI1-0 RNA levels. We also show that N-Myc expression differentially regulates the MXI1 and MXI1-0 promoters: Increased MYCN expression suppresses MXI1 promoter activity while enhancing transcription through the MXI1-0 promoter. Finally, induction of Mxi1-0 leads to increased proliferation, whereas expression of Mxi1 inhibits cell growth, indicating differential roles for these two proteins. These data suggest that N-Myc differentially regulates the expression of MXI1 and MXI1-0 and can alter the balance between the two transcription factors. Furthermore, MXI1-0 appears to be a downstream target of MYCN-dependent signaling pathways and may contribute to N-Myc-dependent cell growth and proliferation. PMID:24403858

  10. Regulation of serum response factor-dependent gene expression by proteasome inhibitors.

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    Sandbo, Nathan; Qin, Yimin; Taurin, Sebastien; Hogarth, D Kyle; Kreutz, Barry; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2005-03-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is activated by contractile and hypertrophic agonists, such as endothelin-1 (ET1) to stimulate expression of cytoskeletal proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). While studying the regulation of smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMA) expression at the level of protein stability, we discovered that inhibition of proteasome-dependent protein degradation by N-benzoyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG132) or lactacystin (LC) did not enhance the levels of SMA, but, unexpectedly, attenuated SMA expression in response to ET1, without affecting the viability of VSMCs. Down-regulation of SMA protein by MG132 or LC occurred at the level of SMA transcription and via the inhibition of SRF activity. By contrast, MG132 and LC potentiated the activity of activator protein-1 transcription factor. Regulation of SRF by MG132 was not related to inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB, an established target of proteasome inhibitors, and was not mediated by protein kinase A, a powerful regulator of SRF activity. Signaling studies indicate that inhibition of ET1-induced SRF activity by MG132 occurs at the level downstream of heterotrimeric G proteins Gq/11 and G13, of small GTPase RhoA, and of actin dynamics but at the level of SRF-DNA binding. MG132 treatment did not result in ubiquitination or accumulation of SRF. By contrast, the levels of c-Jun were rapidly increased upon incubation of cells with MG132, and ectopic overexpression of c-Jun mimicked the effect of MG132 on SRF activity. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of proteasome results in down-regulation of SMA expression via up-regulation of c-Jun and repression of SRF activity at the level of DNA binding.

  11. p38 MAPK Down-regulates Fibulin 3 Expression through Methylation of Gene Regulatory Sequences

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    Arechederra, María; Priego, Neibla; Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Sequera, Celia; Gutiérrez-Uzquiza, Álvaro; Cerezo-Guisado, María Isabel; Ortiz-Rivero, Sara; Roncero, Cesáreo; Cuenda, Ana; Guerrero, Carmen; Porras, Almudena

    2015-01-01

    p38 MAPKs regulate migration and invasion. However, the mechanisms involved are only partially known. We had previously identified fibulin 3, which plays a role in migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis, as a gene regulated by p38α. We have characterized in detail how p38 MAPK regulates fibulin 3 expression and its role. We describe here for the first time that p38α, p38γ, and p38δ down-regulate fibulin 3 expression. p38α has a stronger effect, and it does so through hypermethylation of CpG sites in the regulatory sequences of the gene. This would be mediated by the DNA methylase, DNMT3A, which is down-regulated in cells lacking p38α, but once re-introduced represses Fibulin 3 expression. p38α through HuR stabilizes dnmt3a mRNA leading to an increase in DNMT3A protein levels. Moreover, by knocking-down fibulin 3, we have found that Fibulin 3 inhibits migration and invasion in MEFs by mechanisms involving p38α/β inhibition. Hence, p38α pro-migratory/invasive effect might be, at least in part, mediated by fibulin 3 down-regulation in MEFs. In contrast, in HCT116 cells, Fibulin 3 promotes migration and invasion through a mechanism dependent on p38α and/or p38β activation. Furthermore, Fibulin 3 promotes in vitro and in vivo tumor growth of HCT116 cells through a mechanism dependent on p38α, which surprisingly acts as a potent inducer of tumor growth. At the same time, p38α limits fibulin 3 expression, which might represent a negative feed-back loop. PMID:25548290

  12. HSF-1 is a regulator of miRNA expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Brunquell, Jessica; Snyder, Alana; Cheng, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The ability of an organism to sense and adapt to environmental stressors is essential for proteome maintenance and survival. The highly conserved heat shock response is a survival mechanism employed by all organisms, including the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, upon exposure to environmental extremes. Transcriptional control of the metazoan heat shock response is mediated by the heat shock transcription factor HSF-1. In addition to regulating global stress-responsive genes to promote stress-resistance and survival, HSF-1 has recently been shown to regulate stress-independent functions in controlling development, metabolism, and longevity. However, the indirect role of HSF-1 in coordinating stress-dependent and -independent processes through post-transcriptional regulation is largely unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a class of post-transcriptional regulators that control gene expression through translational repression or mRNA degradation. To determine the role of HSF-1 in regulating miRNA expression, we have performed high-throughput small RNA-sequencing in C. elegans grown in the presence and absence of hsf-1 RNAi followed by treatment with or without heat shock. This has allowed us to uncover the miRNAs regulated by HSF-1 via heat-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Integrated miRNA/mRNA target-prediction analyses suggest HSF-1 as a post-transcriptional regulator of development, metabolism, and longevity through regulating miRNA expression. This provides new insight into the possible mechanism by which HSF-1 controls these processes. We have also uncovered oxidative stress response factors and insulin-like signaling factors as a common link between processes affected by HSF-1-regulated miRNAs in stress-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. This may provide a role for miRNAs in regulating cross-talk between various stress responses. Our work therefore uncovers an interesting potential role for HSF-1 in post

  13. Mechanisms of Hypoxic Up-Regulation of Versican Gene Expression in Macrophages.

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    Fattah Sotoodehnejadnematalahi

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a hallmark of many pathological tissues. Macrophages accumulate in hypoxic sites and up-regulate a range of hypoxia-inducible genes. The matrix proteoglycan versican has been identified as one such gene, but the mechanisms responsible for hypoxic induction are not fully characterised. Here we investigate the up-regulation of versican by hypoxia in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM, and, intriguingly, show that versican mRNA is up-regulated much more highly (>600 fold by long term hypoxia (5 days than by 1 day of hypoxia (48 fold. We report that versican mRNA decay rates are not affected by hypoxia, demonstrating that hypoxic induction of versican mRNA is mediated by increased transcription. Deletion analysis of the promoter identified two regions required for high level promoter activity of luciferase reporter constructs in human macrophages. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1 has previously been implicated as a key potential regulator of versican expression in hypoxia, however our data suggest that HIF-1 up-regulation is unlikely to be principally responsible for the high levels of induction observed in HMDM. Treatment of HMDM with two distinct specific inhibitors of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, LY290042 and wortmannin, significantly reduced induction of versican mRNA by hypoxia and provides evidence of a role for PI3K in hypoxic up-regulation of versican expression.

  14. An Effective Tri-Clustering Algorithm Combining Expression Data with Gene Regulation Information

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    Ao Li

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Bi-clustering algorithms aim to identify sets of genes sharing similar expression patterns across a subset of conditions. However direct interpretation or prediction of gene regulatory mechanisms may be difficult as only gene expression data is used. Information about gene regulators may also be available, most commonly about which transcription factors may bind to the promoter region and thus control the expression level of a gene. Thus a method to integrate gene expression and gene regulation information is desirable for clustering and analyzing. Methods: By incorporating gene regulatory information with gene expression data, we define regulated expression values (REV as indicators of how a gene is regulated by a specific factor. Existing bi-clustering methods are extended to a three dimensional data space by developing a heuristic TRI-Clustering algorithm. An additional approach named Automatic Boundary Searching algorithm (ABS is introduced to automatically determine the boundary threshold. Results: Results based on incorporating ChIP-chip data representing transcription factor-gene interactions show that the algorithms are efficient and robust for detecting tri-clusters. Detailed analysis of the tri-cluster extracted from yeast sporulation REV data shows genes in this cluster exhibited significant differences during the middle and late stages. The implicated regulatory network was then reconstructed for further study of defined regulatory mechanisms. Topological and statistical analysis of this network demonstrated evidence of significant changes of TF activities during the different stages of yeast sporulation, and suggests this approach might be a general way to study regulatory networks undergoing transformations.

  15. The physiological regulation of toll-like receptor expression and function in humans

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    Lancaster, Graeme I; Khan, Qamar; Drysdale, Pam; Wallace, Fiona; Jeukendrup, Asker E; Drayson, Mark T; Gleeson, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Eleven mammalian toll-like receptors (TLRs 1–11) have been identified to date and are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses; however, the factors that regulate TLR expression and function in vivo are poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the physiological regulation of TLR expression and function in humans. To examine the influence of diurnal rhythmicity on TLR expression and function, peripheral venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers (n = 8) at time points coinciding with the peak and nadir in the endogenous circulating cortisol concentration. While no diurnal rhythmicity in the expression of TLRs 1, 2, 4 or 9 was observed, the upregulation of costimulatory (CD80 and CD86) and antigen-presenting (MHC class II) molecules on CD14+ monocytes following activation with specific TLR ligands was greater (P < 0.05) in samples obtained in the evening compared with the morning. To examine the influence of physical stress on TLR expression and function, peripheral venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers (n = 11) at rest and following 1.5 h of strenuous exercise in the heat (34°C). Strenuous exercise resulted in a decrease (P < 0.005) in the expression of TLRs 1, 2 and 4 on CD14+ monocytes. Furthermore, the upregulation of CD80, CD86, MHC class II and interleukin-6 by CD14+ monocytes following activation with specific TLR ligands was decreased (P < 0.05) in samples obtained following exercise compared with at rest. These results demonstrate that TLR function is subject to modulation under physiological conditions in vivo and provide evidence for the role of immunomodulatory hormones in the regulation of TLR function. PMID:15661814

  16. Genome-wide tissue-specific gene expression, co-expression and regulation of co-expressed genes in adult nematode Ascaris suum.

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    Rosa, Bruce A; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2014-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has traditionally been used as a model for studying nematode biology, but its small size limits the ability for researchers to perform some experiments such as high-throughput tissue-specific gene expression studies. However, the dissection of individual tissues is possible in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum due to its relatively large size. Here, we take advantage of the recent genome sequencing of Ascaris suum and the ability to physically dissect its separate tissues to produce a wide-scale tissue-specific nematode RNA-seq datasets, including data on three non-reproductive tissues (head, pharynx, and intestine) in both male and female worms, as well as four reproductive tissues (testis, seminal vesicle, ovary, and uterus). We obtained fundamental information about the biology of diverse cell types and potential interactions among tissues within this multicellular organism. Overexpression and functional enrichment analyses identified many putative biological functions enriched in each tissue studied, including functions which have not been previously studied in detail in nematodes. Putative tissue-specific transcriptional factors and corresponding binding motifs that regulate expression in each tissue were identified, including the intestine-enriched ELT-2 motif/transcription factor previously described in nematode intestines. Constitutively expressed and novel genes were also characterized, with the largest number of novel genes found to be overexpressed in the testis. Finally, a putative acetylcholine-mediated transcriptional network connecting biological activity in the head to the male reproductive system is described using co-expression networks, along with a similar ecdysone-mediated system in the female. The expression profiles, co-expression networks and co-expression regulation of the 10 tissues studied and the tissue-specific analysis presented here are a valuable resource for studying tissue-specific biological functions in

  17. Genome-wide tissue-specific gene expression, co-expression and regulation of co-expressed genes in adult nematode Ascaris suum.

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    Bruce A Rosa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans has traditionally been used as a model for studying nematode biology, but its small size limits the ability for researchers to perform some experiments such as high-throughput tissue-specific gene expression studies. However, the dissection of individual tissues is possible in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum due to its relatively large size. Here, we take advantage of the recent genome sequencing of Ascaris suum and the ability to physically dissect its separate tissues to produce a wide-scale tissue-specific nematode RNA-seq datasets, including data on three non-reproductive tissues (head, pharynx, and intestine in both male and female worms, as well as four reproductive tissues (testis, seminal vesicle, ovary, and uterus. We obtained fundamental information about the biology of diverse cell types and potential interactions among tissues within this multicellular organism.Overexpression and functional enrichment analyses identified many putative biological functions enriched in each tissue studied, including functions which have not been previously studied in detail in nematodes. Putative tissue-specific transcriptional factors and corresponding binding motifs that regulate expression in each tissue were identified, including the intestine-enriched ELT-2 motif/transcription factor previously described in nematode intestines. Constitutively expressed and novel genes were also characterized, with the largest number of novel genes found to be overexpressed in the testis. Finally, a putative acetylcholine-mediated transcriptional network connecting biological activity in the head to the male reproductive system is described using co-expression networks, along with a similar ecdysone-mediated system in the female.The expression profiles, co-expression networks and co-expression regulation of the 10 tissues studied and the tissue-specific analysis presented here are a valuable resource for studying tissue

  18. Differential effects of chronic hypoxia and feed restriction on the expression of leptin and its receptor, food intake regulation and the endocrine stress response in common carp.

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    Bernier, Nicholas J; Gorissen, Marnix; Flik, Gert

    2012-07-01

    Appetite suppression is a common response to hypoxia in fish that confers significant energy savings. Yet little is known about the endocrine signals involved in the regulation of food intake during chronic hypoxia. Thus, we assessed the impact of chronic hypoxia on food intake, the expression of the potent anorexigenic signal leptin and its receptor (lepr), the mRNA levels of key hypothalamic appetite-regulating genes, and the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis in common carp, Cyprinus carpio. Fish exposed to 10% O(2) saturation for 8 days wer