WorldWideScience

Sample records for regulate membrane trafficking

  1. Trafficking of plant plasma membrane aquaporins: multiple regulation levels and complex sorting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Adrien S; Chaumont, François

    2015-05-01

    Aquaporins are small channel proteins which facilitate the diffusion of water and small neutral molecules across biological membranes. Compared with animals, plant genomes encode numerous aquaporins, which display a large variety of subcellular localization patterns. More specifically, plant aquaporins of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily were first described as plasma membrane (PM)-resident proteins, but recent research has demonstrated that the trafficking and subcellular localization of these proteins are complex and highly regulated. In the past few years, PIPs emerged as new model proteins to study subcellular sorting and membrane dynamics in plant cells. At least two distinct sorting motifs (one cytosolic, the other buried in the membrane) are required to direct PIPs to the PM. Hetero-oligomerization and interaction with SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein attachment protein receptors) also influence the subcellular trafficking of PIPs. In addition to these constitutive processes, both the progression of PIPs through the secretory pathway and their dynamics at the PM are responsive to changing environmental conditions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. HIV-1 matrix dependent membrane targeting is regulated by Gag mRNA trafficking.

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    Jing Jin

    Full Text Available Retroviral Gag polyproteins are necessary and sufficient for virus budding. Productive HIV-1 Gag assembly takes place at the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which thousands of Gag molecules are targeted to the plasma membrane. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC assay, we recently reported that the cellular sites and efficiency of HIV-1 Gag assembly depend on the precise pathway of Gag mRNA export from the nucleus, known to be mediated by Rev. Here we describe an assembly deficiency in human cells for HIV Gag whose expression depends on hepatitis B virus (HBV post-transcriptional regulatory element (PRE mediated-mRNA nuclear export. PRE-dependent HIV Gag expressed well in human cells, but assembled with slower kinetics, accumulated intracellularly, and failed to associate with a lipid raft compartment where the wild-type Rev-dependent HIV-1 Gag efficiently assembles. Surprisingly, assembly and budding of PRE-dependent HIV Gag in human cells could be rescued in trans by co-expression of Rev-dependent Gag that provides correct membrane targeting signals, or in cis by replacing HIV matrix (MA with other membrane targeting domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate deficient membrane targeting of PRE-dependent HIV-1 Gag and suggest that HIV MA function is regulated by the trafficking pathway of the encoding mRNA.

  3. PIST regulates the intracellular trafficking and plasma membrane expression of Cadherin 23

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    Oshima Kazuo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The atypical cadherin protein cadherin 23 (CDH23 is crucial for proper function of retinal photoreceptors and inner ear hair cells. As we obtain more and more information about the specific roles of cadherin 23 in photoreceptors and hair cells, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the transport of this protein to the plasma membrane are largely unknown. Results PIST, a Golgi-associated, PDZ domain-containing protein, interacted with cadherin 23 via the PDZ domain of PIST and the C-terminal PDZ domain-binding interface (PBI of cadherin 23. By binding to cadherin 23, PIST retained cadherin 23 in the trans-Golgi network of cultured cells. The retention was released when either of the two known cadherin 23-binding proteins MAGI-1 and harmonin was co-expressed. Similar to MAGI-1 and harmonin, PIST was detected in mouse inner ear sensory hair cells. Conclusions PIST binds cadherin 23 via its PDZ domain and retains cadherin 23 in trans-Golgi network. MAGI-1 and harmonin can compete with PIST for binding cadherin 23 and release cadherin 23 from PIST's retention. Our finding suggests that PIST, MAGI-1 and harmonin collaborate in intracellular trafficking of cadherin 23 and regulate the plasma membrane expression of cadherin 23.

  4. VANGL2 regulates membrane trafficking of MMP14 to control cell polarity and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B Blairanne; Cantrell, V Ashley; Mundell, Nathan A; Bennett, Andrea C; Quick, Rachel E; Jessen, Jason R

    2012-05-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) describes the polarized orientation of cells within the plane of a tissue. Unlike epithelial PCP, the mechanisms underlying PCP signaling in migrating cells remain undefined. Here, the establishment of PCP must be coordinated with dynamic changes in cell adhesion and extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. During gastrulation, the membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP or MMP14) is required for PCP and convergence and extension cell movements. We report that the PCP protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) regulates the endocytosis and cell-surface availability of MMP14 in manner that is dependent on focal adhesion kinase. We demonstrate that zebrafish trilobite/vangl2 mutant embryos exhibit increased Mmp14 activity and decreased ECM. Furthermore, in vivo knockdown of Mmp14 partially rescues the Vangl2 loss-of-function convergence and extension phenotype. This study identifies a mechanism linking VANGL2 with MMP14 trafficking and suggests that establishment of PCP in migrating gastrula cells requires regulated proteolytic degradation or remodeling of the ECM. Our findings implicate matrix metalloproteinases as downstream effectors of PCP and suggest a broadly applicable mechanism whereby VANGL2 affects diverse morphogenetic processes.

  5. The formation of endosymbiotic membrane compartments: membrane identity markers and the regulation of vesicle trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanov, S.

    2012-01-01

    In symbiosis of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as well as in rhizobium-legume symbiosis the microbes are hosted intracellularly, inside specialized membrane compartments of the host. These membrane compartments are morphologically different but similar in function, since they control

  6. P2X7 receptors regulate multiple types of membrane trafficking responses and non-classical secretion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan; Dubyak, George R

    2009-06-01

    Activation of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) triggers a remarkably diverse array of membrane trafficking responses in leukocytes and epithelial cells. These responses result in altered profiles of cell surface lipid and protein composition that can modulate the direct interactions of P2X7R-expressing cells with other cell types in the circulation, in blood vessels, at epithelial barriers, or within sites of immune and inflammatory activation. Additionally, these responses can result in the release of bioactive proteins, lipids, and large membrane complexes into extracellular compartments for remote communication between P2X7R-expressing cells and other cells that amplify or modulate inflammation, immunity, and responses to tissue damages. This review will discuss P2X7R-mediated effects on membrane composition and trafficking in the plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular organelles, as well as actions of P2X7R in controlling various modes of non-classical secretion. It will review P2X7R regulation of: (1) phosphatidylserine distribution in the PM outer leaflet; (2) shedding of PM surface proteins; (3) release of PM-derived microvesicles or microparticles; (4) PM blebbing; (5) cell-cell fusion resulting in formation of multinucleate cells; (6) phagosome maturation and fusion with lysosomes; (7) permeability of endosomes with internalized pathogen-associated molecular patterns; (8) permeability/integrity of mitochondria; (9) exocytosis of secretory lysosomes; and (10) release of exosomes from multivesicular bodies.

  7. Membrane Trafficking Modulation during Entamoeba Encystation.

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    Herman, Emily; Siegesmund, Maria A; Bottery, Michael J; van Aerle, Ronny; Shather, Maulood Mohammed; Caler, Elisabet; Dacks, Joel B; van der Giezen, Mark

    2017-10-09

    Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal parasite that infects 50-100 million people and causes up to 55,000 deaths annually. The transmissive form of E. histolytica is the cyst, with a single infected individual passing up to 45 million cysts per day, making cyst production an attractive target for infection control. Lectins and chitin are secreted to form the cyst wall, although little is known about the underlying membrane trafficking processes supporting encystation. As E. histolytica does not readily form cysts in vitro, we assessed membrane trafficking gene expression during encystation in the closely related model Entamoeba invadens. Genes involved in secretion are up-regulated during cyst formation, as are some trans-Golgi network-to-endosome trafficking genes. Furthermore, endocytic and general trafficking genes are up-regulated in the mature cyst, potentially preserved as mRNA in preparation for excystation. Two divergent dynamin-related proteins found in Entamoeba are predominantly expressed during cyst formation. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that they are paralogous to, but quite distinct from, classical dynamins found in human, suggesting that they may be potential drug targets to block encystation. The membrane-trafficking machinery is clearly regulated during encystation, providing an additional facet to understanding this crucial parasitic process.

  8. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion: Post-Palade Era Researchers Win the Nobel Prize. Riddhi Atul Jani Subba Rao Gangi Setty. General Article Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 421-445 ...

  9. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Regulates Activity-Dependent Membrane Trafficking and Trans-Synaptic Signaling Mediating Synaptic Remodeling

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    Sears, James C.; Broadie, Kendal

    2018-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading monogenic cause of autism and intellectual disability. The disease arises through loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which normally exhibits peak expression levels in early-use critical periods, and is required for activity-dependent synaptic remodeling during this transient developmental window. FMRP canonically binds mRNA to repress protein translation, with targets that regulate cytoskeleton dynamics, membrane trafficking, and trans-synaptic signaling. We focus here on recent advances emerging in these three areas from the Drosophila disease model. In the well-characterized central brain mushroom body (MB) olfactory learning/memory circuit, FMRP is required for activity-dependent synaptic remodeling of projection neurons innervating the MB calyx, with function tightly restricted to an early-use critical period. FMRP loss is phenocopied by conditional removal of FMRP only during this critical period, and rescued by FMRP conditional expression only during this critical period. Consistent with FXS hyperexcitation, FMRP loss defects are phenocopied by heightened sensory experience and targeted optogenetic hyperexcitation during this critical period. FMRP binds mRNA encoding Drosophila ESCRTIII core component Shrub (human CHMP4 homolog) to restrict Shrub translation in an activity-dependent mechanism only during this same critical period. Shrub mediates endosomal membrane trafficking, and perturbing Shrub expression is known to interfere with neuronal process pruning. Consistently, FMRP loss and Shrub overexpression targeted to projection neurons similarly causes endosomal membrane trafficking defects within synaptic boutons, and genetic reduction of Shrub strikingly rescues Drosophila FXS model defects. In parallel work on the well-characterized giant fiber (GF) circuit, FMRP limits iontophoretic dye loading into central interneurons, demonstrating an FMRP role controlling core neuronal properties through the

  10. A Proteomics Approach to Membrane Trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, A.J.; Vries, de S.C.; Lilley, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    Membrane trafficking, including that of integral membrane proteins as well as peripherally associated proteins, appears to be a vital process common to all eukaryotes. An important element of membrane trafficking is to determine the protein composition of the various endomembrane compartments. A

  11. Munc13-4 Is a Rab11-binding Protein That Regulates Rab11-positive Vesicle Trafficking and Docking at the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Kiosses, William B; Zhang, Jinzhong; Catz, Sergio D

    2016-02-12

    The small GTPase Rab11 and its effectors control trafficking of recycling endosomes, receptor replenishment and the up-regulation of adhesion and adaptor molecules at the plasma membrane. Despite recent advances in the understanding of Rab11-regulated mechanisms, the final steps mediating docking and fusion of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane are not fully understood. Munc13-4 is a docking factor proposed to regulate fusion through interactions with SNAREs. In hematopoietic cells, including neutrophils, Munc13-4 regulates exocytosis in a Rab27a-dependent manner, but its possible regulation of other GTPases has not been explored in detail. Here, we show that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11 and regulates the trafficking of Rab11-containing vesicles. Using a novel Time-resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (TR-FRET) assay, we demonstrate that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11a but not to dominant negative Rab11a. Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the specificity of the interaction between Munc13-4 and Rab11, and super-resolution microscopy studies support the interaction of endogenous Munc13-4 with Rab11 at the single molecule level in neutrophils. Vesicular dynamic analysis shows the common spatio-temporal distribution of Munc13-4 and Rab11, while expression of a calcium binding-deficient mutant of Munc13-4 significantly affected Rab11 trafficking. Munc13-4-deficient neutrophils showed normal endocytosis, but the trafficking, up-regulation, and retention of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane was significantly impaired. This correlated with deficient NADPH oxidase activation at the plasma membrane in response to Rab11 interference. Our data demonstrate that Munc13-4 is a Rab11-binding partner that regulates the final steps of Rab11-positive vesicle docking at the plasma membrane. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Insights into plant plasma membrane aquaporin trafficking.

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    Hachez, Charles; Besserer, Arnaud; Chevalier, Adrien S; Chaumont, François

    2013-06-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are plant aquaporins that facilitate the diffusion of water and small uncharged solutes through the cell membrane. Deciphering the network of interacting proteins that modulate PIP trafficking to and activity in the plasma membrane is essential to improve our knowledge about PIP regulation and function. This review highlights the most recent advances related to PIP subcellular routing and dynamic redistribution, identifies some key molecular interacting proteins, and indicates exciting directions for future research in this field. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which plants optimize water movement might help in identifying new molecular players of agronomical relevance involved in the control of cellular water uptake and drought tolerance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multifaceted Roles of ALG-2 in Ca2+-Regulated Membrane Trafficking

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    Masatoshi Maki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ALG-2 (gene name: PDCD6 is a penta-EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein and interacts with a variety of proteins in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. ALG-2 recognizes different types of identified motifs in Pro-rich regions by using different hydrophobic pockets, but other unknown modes of binding are also used for non-Pro-rich proteins. Most ALG-2-interacting proteins associate directly or indirectly with the plasma membrane or organelle membranes involving the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT system, coat protein complex II (COPII-dependent ER-to-Golgi vesicular transport, and signal transduction from membrane receptors to downstream players. Binding of ALG-2 to targets may induce conformational change of the proteins. The ALG-2 dimer may also function as a Ca2+-dependent adaptor to bridge different partners and connect the subnetwork of interacting proteins.

  14. Protein trafficking and maturation regulate intramembrane proteolysis.

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    Morohashi, Yuichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2013-12-01

    Intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs) are membrane embedded proteolytic enzymes. All substrates identified so far are also membrane proteins, involving a number of critical cellular signaling as well as human diseases. After synthesis and assembly at the endoplasmic reticulum, membrane proteins are exported to the Golgi apparatus and transported to their sites of action. A number of studies have revealed the importance of the intracellular membrane trafficking in i-CLiP-mediated intramembrane proteolysis, not only for limiting the unnecessary encounter between i-CLiPs and their substrate but also for their cleavage site preference. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of how each i-CLiP proteolysis is regulated by intracellular vesicle trafficking. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial pathogen manipulation of host membrane trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrat, Seblewongel; de Jesús, Dennise A; Hempstead, Andrew D; Ramabhadran, Vinay; Isberg, Ralph R

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens use a vast number of strategies to alter host membrane dynamics. Targeting the host membrane machinery is important for the survival and pathogenesis of several extracellular, vacuolar, and cytosolic bacteria. Membrane manipulation promotes bacterial replication while suppressing host responses, allowing the bacterium to thrive in a hostile environment. This review provides a comprehensive summary of various strategies used by both extracellular and intracellular bacteria to hijack host membrane trafficking machinery. We start with mechanisms used by bacteria to alter the plasma membrane, delve into the hijacking of various vesicle trafficking pathways, and conclude by summarizing bacterial adaptation to host immune responses. Understanding bacterial manipulation of host membrane trafficking provides insights into bacterial pathogenesis and uncovers the molecular mechanisms behind various processes within a eukaryotic cell.

  16. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

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    Kazuo eEbine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall.

  17. Sphingomyelin synthases regulate protein trafficking and secretion.

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    Marimuthu Subathra

    Full Text Available Sphingomyelin synthases (SMS1 and 2 represent a class of enzymes that transfer a phosphocholine moiety from phosphatidylcholine onto ceramide thus producing sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol (DAG. SMS1 localizes at the Golgi while SMS2 localizes both at the Golgi and the plasma membrane. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that modulation of SMS1 and, to a lesser extent, of SMS2 affected the formation of DAG at the Golgi apparatus. As a consequence, down-regulation of SMS1 and SMS2 reduced the localization of the DAG-binding protein, protein kinase D (PKD, to the Golgi. Since PKD recruitment to the Golgi has been implicated in cellular secretion through the trans golgi network (TGN, the effect of down-regulation of SMSs on TGN-to-plasma membrane trafficking was studied. Down regulation of either SMS1 or SMS2 significantly retarded trafficking of the reporter protein vesicular stomatitis virus G protein tagged with GFP (VSVG-GFP from the TGN to the cell surface. Inhibition of SMSs also induced tubular protrusions from the trans Golgi network reminiscent of inhibited TGN membrane fission. Since a recent study demonstrated the requirement of PKD activity for insulin secretion in beta cells, we tested the function of SMS in this model. Inhibition of SMS significantly reduced insulin secretion in rat INS-1 cells. Taken together these results provide the first direct evidence that both enzymes (SMS1 and 2 are capable of regulating TGN-mediated protein trafficking and secretion, functions that are compatible with PKD being a down-stream target for SMSs in the Golgi.

  18. New insights into how trafficking regulates T cell receptor signaling

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    Jieqiong Lou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThere is emerging evidence that exocytosis plays an important role in regulating T cell receptor (TCR signaling. The trafficking molecules involved in lytic granule (LG secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL have been well studied due to the immune disorder known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohisiocytosis (FHLH. However, the knowledge of trafficking machineries regulating the exocytosis of receptors and signaling molecules remains quite limited. In this review, we summarize the reported trafficking molecules involved in the transport of the TCR and downstream signaling molecules to the cell surface. By combining this information with the known knowledge of LG exocytosis and general exocytic trafficking machinery, we attempt to draw a more complete picture of how the TCR signaling network and exocytic trafficking matrix are interconnected to facilitate T cell activation. This also highlights how membrane compartmentalization facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses that are essential for immune functions.

  19. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    protein and the data can be cor- related with cellular .... these mutant cells under the electron microscope and found a large number of ... trans-Golgi network and early ..... Arrows represent the flow of membrane traffic: black arrows – antero-.

  20. Membrane trafficking pathways and their roles in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Noriko; Ueda, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Membrane trafficking functions in the delivery of proteins that are newly synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to their final destinations, such as the plasma membrane (PM) and the vacuole, and in the internalization of extracellular components or PM-associated proteins for recycling or degradative regulation. These trafficking pathways play pivotal roles in the rapid responses to environmental stimuli such as challenges by microorganisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of plant membrane trafficking and its roles in plant-microbe interactions. Although there is little information regarding the mechanism of pathogenic modulation of plant membrane trafficking thus far, recent research has identified many membrane trafficking factors as possible targets of microbial modulation.

  1. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  2. Neurobeachin regulates neurotransmitter receptor trafficking to synapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, R.; Lauks, J.; Jung, S; Cooke, N.E.; de Wit, H.; Brose, N.; Kilimann, M.W.; Verhage, M.; Rhee, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface density of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses is a key determinant of synaptic efficacy. Synaptic receptor accumulation is regulated by the transport, postsynaptic anchoring, and turnover of receptors, involving multiple trafficking, sorting, motor, and scaffold proteins. We found

  3. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, I-Ju [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  4. Methods of analysis of the membrane trafficking pathway from recycling endosomes to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takahide; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    The transferrin receptor (TfR) is responsible for iron uptake through its trafficking between the plasma membrane and recycling endosomes, and as a result it has become a well-known marker for recycling endosomes. Although the molecular basis of the TfR recycling pathway has been thoroughly investigated, the TfR degradation mechanism has been poorly understood. Exposure of cultured cells to two drugs, the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1, recently showed that TfR is not only recycled back to the plasma membrane after endocytosis but is constitutively transported to lysosomes for degradation. The results of genome-wide screening of mouse Rab small GTPases (common regulators of membrane trafficking in all eukaryotes) have indicated that Rab12 regulates TfR trafficking to lysosomes independently of the known membrane trafficking pathways, for example, the conventional endocytic pathway and recycling pathway. This chapter summarizes the methods that the authors used to analyze the membrane trafficking pathway from recycling endosomes to lysosomes that is specifically regulated by Rab12. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Redefining the essential trafficking pathway for outer membrane lipoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowicz, Marcin; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, most lipoproteins synthesized in the inner membrane (IM) are trafficked to the outer membrane (OM). The Lol pathway is the trafficking paradigm: LolCDE releases lipoproteins from the IM; LolA shuttles them between membranes to LolB in the OM. Several OM lipoproteins are essential for viability. In apparent concordance, the Lol proteins are each essential in wild-type cells. However, we show that Escherichia coli grows well without LolA and LolB in the absence of one...

  6. Membrane Trafficking of Death Receptors: Implications on Signalling

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    Wulf Schneider-Brachert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Death receptors were initially recognised as potent inducers of apoptotic cell death and soon ambitious attempts were made to exploit selective ignition of controlled cellular suicide as therapeutic strategy in malignant diseases. However, the complexity of death receptor signalling has increased substantially during recent years. Beyond activation of the apoptotic cascade, involvement in a variety of cellular processes including inflammation, proliferation and immune response was recognised. Mechanistically, these findings raised the question how multipurpose receptors can ensure selective activation of a particular pathway. A growing body of evidence points to an elegant spatiotemporal regulation of composition and assembly of the receptor-associated signalling complex. Upon ligand binding, receptor recruitment in specialized membrane compartments, formation of receptor-ligand clusters and internalisation processes constitute key regulatory elements. In this review, we will summarise the current concepts of death receptor trafficking and its implications on receptor-associated signalling events.

  7. Drosophila VAMP7 regulates Wingless intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; He, Fang; Lin, Xinhua; Wu, Yihui

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila Wingless (Wg) is a morphogen that determines cell fate during development. Previous studies have shown that endocytic pathways regulate Wg trafficking and signaling. Here, we showed that loss of vamp7, a gene required for vesicle fusion, dramatically increased Wg levels and decreased Wg signaling. Interestingly, we found that levels of Dally-like (Dlp), a glypican that can interact with Wg to suppress Wg signaling at the dorsoventral boundary of the Drosophila wing, were also increased in vamp7 mutant cells. Moreover, Wg puncta in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes were Dlp positive. We hypothesize that VAMP7 is required for Wg intracellular trafficking and the accumulation of Wg in Rab4-dependent recycling endosomes might affect Wg signaling.

  8. Exocyst and autophagy-related membrane trafficking in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenková, Tamara; Markovic, Vedrana; Sabol, Peter; Kulich, Ivan; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-12-18

    Endomembrane traffic in eukaryotic cells functions partially as a means of communication; delivery of membrane in one direction has to be balanced with a reduction at the other end. This effect is typically the case during the defence against pathogens. To combat pathogens, cellular growth and differentiation are suppressed, while endomembrane traffic is poised towards limiting the pathogen attack. The octameric exocyst vesicle-tethering complex was originally discovered as a factor facilitating vesicle-targeting and vesicle-plasma membrane (PM) fusion during exocytosis prior to and possibly during SNARE complex formation. Interestingly, it was recently implicated both in animals and plants in autophagy membrane traffic. In animal cells, the exocyst is integrated into the mTOR-regulated energy metabolism stress/starvation pathway, participating in the formation and especially initiation of an autophagosome. In plants, the first functional link was to autophagy-related anthocyanin import to the vacuole and to starvation. In this concise review, we summarize the current knowledge of exocyst functions in autophagy and defence in plants that might involve unconventional secretion and compare it with animal conditions. Formation of different exocyst complexes during undisturbed cell growth, as opposed to periods of cellular stress reactions involving autophagy, might contribute to the coordination of endomembrane trafficking pathways. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Regulation of AMPA Receptor Trafficking by Protein Ubiquitination

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    Jocelyn Widagdo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying plastic changes in the strength and connectivity of excitatory synapses have been studied extensively for the past few decades and remain the most attractive cellular models of learning and memory. One of the major mechanisms that regulate synaptic plasticity is the dynamic adjustment of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA-type glutamate receptor content on the neuronal plasma membrane. The expression of surface AMPA receptors (AMPARs is controlled by the delicate balance between the biosynthesis, dendritic transport, exocytosis, endocytosis, recycling and degradation of the receptors. These processes are dynamically regulated by AMPAR interacting proteins as well as by various post-translational modifications that occur on their cytoplasmic domains. In the last few years, protein ubiquitination has emerged as a major regulator of AMPAR intracellular trafficking. Dysregulation of AMPAR ubiquitination has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we review recent advances in the field and provide insights into the role of protein ubiquitination in regulating AMPAR membrane trafficking and function. We also discuss how aberrant ubiquitination of AMPARs contributes to the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, chronic stress and epilepsy.

  10. Phosphorylation-dependent trafficking of plasma membrane proteins in animal and plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, Remko; Huang, Fang

    2013-09-01

    In both unicellular and multicellular organisms, transmembrane (TM) proteins are sorted to and retained at specific membrane domains by endomembrane trafficking mechanisms that recognize sorting signals in the these proteins. The trafficking and distribution of plasma membrane (PM)-localized TM proteins (PM proteins), especially of those PM proteins that show an asymmetric distribution over the PM, has received much attention, as their proper PM localization is crucial for elementary signaling and transport processes, and defects in their localization often lead to severe disease symptoms or developmental defects. The subcellular localization of PM proteins is dynamically regulated by post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These modificaitons mostly occur on sorting signals that are located in the larger cytosolic domains of the cargo proteins. Here we review the effects of phosphorylation of PM proteins on their trafficking, and present the key examples from the animal field that have been subject to studies for already several decades, such as that of aquaporin 2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Our knowledge on cargo trafficking in plants is largely based on studies of the family of PIN FORMED (PIN) carriers that mediate the efflux of the plant hormone auxin. We will review what is known on the subcellular distribution and trafficking of PIN proteins, with a focus on how this is modulated by phosphorylation, and identify and discuss analogies and differences in trafficking with the well-studied animal examples. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  12. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  13. Membrane domains and polarized trafficking of sphingolipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, O; Slimane, TA; Hoekstra, D

    The plasma membrane of polarized cells consists of distinct domains, the apical and basolateral membrane that are characterized by a distinct lipid and protein content. Apical protein transport is largely mediated by (glyco)sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched membrane microdomains, so called rafts. In

  14. Neuron membrane trafficking and protein kinases involved in autism and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagishi, Yasuko; Minami, Akari; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Ogura, Yasunori; Matsuda, Satoru

    2015-01-30

    A brain-enriched multi-domain scaffolding protein, neurobeachin has been identified as a candidate gene for autism patients. Mutations in the synaptic adhesion protein cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) are also associated with autism spectrum disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder of uncertain molecular origin. Potential roles of neurobeachin and CADM1 have been suggested to a function of vesicle transport in endosomal trafficking. It seems that protein kinase B (AKT) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) have key roles in the neuron membrane trafficking involved in the pathogenesis of autism. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is documented to dopaminergic insufficiencies, which is attributed to synaptic dysfunction of dopamine transporter (DAT). AKT is also essential for the DAT cell-surface redistribution. In the present paper, we summarize and discuss the importance of several protein kinases that regulate the membrane trafficking involved in autism and ADHD, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Neuron Membrane Trafficking and Protein Kinases Involved in Autism and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Kitagishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A brain-enriched multi-domain scaffolding protein, neurobeachin has been identified as a candidate gene for autism patients. Mutations in the synaptic adhesion protein cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1 are also associated with autism spectrum disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder of uncertain molecular origin. Potential roles of neurobeachin and CADM1 have been suggested to a function of vesicle transport in endosomal trafficking. It seems that protein kinase B (AKT and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA have key roles in the neuron membrane trafficking involved in the pathogenesis of autism. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is documented to dopaminergic insufficiencies, which is attributed to synaptic dysfunction of dopamine transporter (DAT. AKT is also essential for the DAT cell-surface redistribution. In the present paper, we summarize and discuss the importance of several protein kinases that regulate the membrane trafficking involved in autism and ADHD, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Functional links between mucolipin-1 and Ca2+-dependent membrane trafficking in mucolipidosis IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaPlante, Janice M.; Ye, C.P.; Quinn, Stephen J.; Goldin, Ehud; Brown, Edward M.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Vassilev, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    Most of the membrane trafficking phenomena including those involving the interactions between endosomes and lysosomes are regulated by changes in intracellular Ca 2+ (Ca i ). These processes are disturbed in some types of mucolipidoses and other lysosomal storage disorders, such as mucolipidosis IV (MLIV), a neurological disorder that usually presents during the first year of life with blindness, cognitive impairment, and psychomotor delays. It is caused by mutations in MCOLN1, the gene encoding mucolipin-1 (MLN1), which we have recently established to represent a Ca 2+ -permeable cation channel that is transiently modulated by changes in Ca i . The cells of MLIV patients contain enlarged lysosomes that are likely associated with abnormal sorting and trafficking of these and related organelles. We studied fibroblasts from MLIV patients and found disturbed Ca 2+ signaling and large acidic organelles such as late endosomes and lysosomes (LEL) with altered cellular localization in these cells. The fusion between LEL vesicles in these cells was defective. This is a Ca 2+ -dependent process related to signaling pathways involved in regulation of Ca 2+ homeostasis and trafficking. The MLN1 channels could play a key role in Ca 2+ release from LEL vesicles, which triggers the fusion and trafficking of these organelles. The characterization of this MLN1-mediated Ca 2+ -dependent process should provide new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the development of MLIV and other mucolipidoses associated with similar disturbances in membrane trafficking

  17. Disturbed vesicular trafficking of membrane proteins in prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Keiji; Miyata, Hironori; Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of prion diseases remains unknown. We recently reported that prion infection disturbs post-Golgi trafficking of certain types of membrane proteins to the cell surface, resulting in reduced surface expression of membrane proteins and abrogating the signal from the proteins. The surface expression of the membrane proteins was reduced in the brains of mice inoculated with prions, well before abnormal symptoms became evident. Prions or pathogenic prion proteins were mainly detected in endosomal compartments, being particularly abundant in recycling endosomes. Some newly synthesized membrane proteins are delivered to the surface from the Golgi apparatus through recycling endosomes, and some endocytosed membrane proteins are delivered back to the surface through recycling endosomes. These results suggest that prions might cause neuronal dysfunctions and cell loss by disturbing post-Golgi trafficking of membrane proteins via accumulation in recycling endosomes. Interestingly, it was recently shown that delivery of a calcium channel protein to the cell surface was impaired and its function was abrogated in a mouse model of hereditary prion disease. Taken together, these results suggest that impaired delivery of membrane proteins to the cell surface is a common pathogenic event in acquired and hereditary prion diseases.

  18. Redefining the essential trafficking pathway for outer membrane lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowicz, Marcin; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a permeability barrier and an intrinsic antibiotic resistance factor. Lipoproteins are OM components that function in cell wall synthesis, diverse secretion systems, and antibiotic efflux pumps. Moreover, each of the essential OM machines that assemble the barrier requires one or more lipoproteins. This dependence is thought to explain the essentiality of the periplasmic chaperone LolA and its OM receptor LolB that traffic lipoproteins to the OM. However, we show that in strains lacking substrates that are toxic when mislocalized, both LolA and LolB can be completely bypassed by activating an envelope stress response without compromising trafficking of essential lipoproteins. We identify the Cpx stress response as a monitor of lipoprotein trafficking tasked with protecting the cell from mislocalized lipoproteins. Moreover, our findings reveal that an alternate trafficking pathway exists that can, under certain conditions, bypass the functions of LolA and LolB, implying that these proteins do not perform any truly essential mechanistic steps in lipoprotein trafficking. Instead, these proteins’ key function is to prevent lethal accumulation of mislocalized lipoproteins. PMID:28416660

  19. Redefining the essential trafficking pathway for outer membrane lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowicz, Marcin; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2017-05-02

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a permeability barrier and an intrinsic antibiotic resistance factor. Lipoproteins are OM components that function in cell wall synthesis, diverse secretion systems, and antibiotic efflux pumps. Moreover, each of the essential OM machines that assemble the barrier requires one or more lipoproteins. This dependence is thought to explain the essentiality of the periplasmic chaperone LolA and its OM receptor LolB that traffic lipoproteins to the OM. However, we show that in strains lacking substrates that are toxic when mislocalized, both LolA and LolB can be completely bypassed by activating an envelope stress response without compromising trafficking of essential lipoproteins. We identify the Cpx stress response as a monitor of lipoprotein trafficking tasked with protecting the cell from mislocalized lipoproteins. Moreover, our findings reveal that an alternate trafficking pathway exists that can, under certain conditions, bypass the functions of LolA and LolB, implying that these proteins do not perform any truly essential mechanistic steps in lipoprotein trafficking. Instead, these proteins' key function is to prevent lethal accumulation of mislocalized lipoproteins.

  20. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant-microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eLeborgne-Castel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e. the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we will describe the fine-tune regulation of such alterations, and their consequence in PM protein activity. We will consider the formation of intracellular perimicrobial compartments, the PM protein trafficking machinery of the host, and the delivery or retrieval of signaling and transport proteins such as pattern-recognition receptors, producers of reactive oxygen species, and sugar transporters.

  1. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system.

  2. Regulation of vesicular trafficking by Parkinson's disease-associated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Inoshita

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms that control intracellular vesicular trafficking play important roles in cellular function and viability. Neurons have specific vesicular trafficking systems for synaptic vesicle formation, release and recycling. Synaptic vesicular trafficking impairments induce neuronal dysfunction and physiological and behavioral disorders. Parkinson's disease (PD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dopamine depletion and loss of dopamine neurons in the midbrain. The molecular mechanism responsible for the neurodegeneration that occurs during PD is still not understood; however, recent functional analyses of familial PD causative genes suggest that a number of PD causative genes regulate intracellular vesicular trafficking, including synaptic vesicular dynamics. This review focuses on recent insights regarding the functions of PD causative genes, their relationship with vesicular trafficking and how mutations associated with PD affect vesicular dynamics and neuronal survival.

  3. Regulation of Trafficking, Membrane Retention and Turnover of the Na+, HCO3- Co-Transporter NBCn1 in Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Christina Wilkens

    normal conditions. Furthermore, we found that the small scaffolding protein RACK1 co-localizes with NBCn1 in membrane protrusions and is important for NBCn1 membrane stability. Collectively, the work in this thesis has contributed with new understanding of the mechanisms involved in cisplatin...

  4. The molecular mechanisms of plant plasma membrane intrinsic proteins trafficking and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Ji-long; Feng, Xiu-xiu; Li, Hong-jie; Zhang, Gen-fa

    2017-04-20

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are plant channel proteins located on the plasma membrane. PIPs transfer water, CO 2 and small uncharged solutes through the plasma membrane. PIPs have high selectivity to substrates, suggestive of a central role in maintaining cellular water balance. The expression, activity and localization of PIPs are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and also affected by environmental factors. Numerous studies indicate that the expression patterns and localizations of PIPs can change in response to abiotic stresses. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of PIP trafficking, transcriptional and post-translational regulations, and abiotic stress responses. Moreover, we also discuss the current research trends and future directions on PIPs.

  5. From the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane: mechanisms of CFTR folding and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos M; Canato, Sara

    2017-01-01

    CFTR biogenesis starts with its co-translational insertion into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum and folding of the cytosolic domains, towards the acquisition of a fully folded compact native structure. Efficiency of this process is assessed by the ER quality control system that allows the exit of folded proteins but targets unfolded/misfolded CFTR to degradation. If allowed to leave the ER, CFTR is modified at the Golgi and reaches the post-Golgi compartments to be delivered to the plasma membrane where it functions as a cAMP- and phosphorylation-regulated chloride/bicarbonate channel. CFTR residence at the membrane is a balance of membrane delivery, endocytosis, and recycling. Several adaptors, motor, and scaffold proteins contribute to the regulation of CFTR stability and are involved in continuously assessing its structure through peripheral quality control systems. Regulation of CFTR biogenesis and traffic (and its dysregulation by mutations, such as the most common F508del) determine its overall activity and thus contribute to the fine modulation of chloride secretion and hydration of epithelial surfaces. This review covers old and recent knowledge on CFTR folding and trafficking from its synthesis to the regulation of its stability at the plasma membrane and highlights how several of these steps can be modulated to promote the rescue of mutant CFTR.

  6. COPI-mediated retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER regulates EGFR nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ying-Nai; Wang, Hongmei; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → ARF1 activation is involved in the EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. → Assembly of γ-COP coatomer mediates EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. → Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking regulates nuclear transport of EGFR. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that cell surface receptors, such as the entire epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, have been shown to localize in the nucleus. A retrograde route from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is postulated to be involved in the EGFR trafficking to the nucleus; however, the molecular mechanism in this proposed model remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-embedded vesicular trafficking is involved in the nuclear transport of EGFR. Confocal immunofluorescence reveals that in response to EGF, a portion of EGFR redistributes to the Golgi and the ER, where its NH 2 -terminus resides within the lumen of Golgi/ER and COOH-terminus is exposed to the cytoplasm. Blockage of the Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking by brefeldin A or dominant mutants of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor, which both resulted in the disassembly of the coat protein complex I (COPI) coat to the Golgi, inhibit EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. We further find that EGF-dependent nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER involving an association of EGFR with γ-COP, one of the subunits of the COPI coatomer. Our findings experimentally provide a comprehensive pathway that nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by COPI-mediated vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the ER, and may serve as a general mechanism in regulating the nuclear transport of other cell surface receptors.

  7. Investigation of SNARE-Mediated Membrane Trafficking in Prostate Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xin

    2003-01-01

    In order to better understand how polarized membrane trafficking pathways change during the loss of epithelial cell polarity during cancer progression we have studied syntaxins 3 and 4 in prostate cancer...

  8. Phosphoinositides, Major Actors in Membrane Trafficking and Lipid Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan-Owen De Craene

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositides are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins and lipids between the different compartments of eukaryotic cells. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and thus are involved in regulating various cellular functions, such as vesicular budding, membrane fusion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although detected in small concentrations in membranes, their role is essential to cell function, since imbalance in their concentrations is a hallmark of many cancers. Their synthesis involves phosphorylating/dephosphorylating positions D3, D4 and/or D5 of their inositol ring by specific lipid kinases and phosphatases. This process is tightly regulated and specific to the different intracellular membranes. Most enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis are conserved between yeast and human, and their loss of function leads to severe diseases (cancer, myopathy, neuropathy and ciliopathy.

  9. Regulation of Neuronal Protein Trafficking and Translocation by SUMOylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy M. Henley

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of proteins are essential for cell function. Covalent modification by SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier plays a role in multiple cell processes, including transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair, protein localization and trafficking. Factors affecting protein localization and trafficking are particularly crucial in neurons because of their polarization, morphological complexity and functional specialization. SUMOylation has emerged as a major mediator of intranuclear and nucleo-cytoplasmic translocations of proteins involved in critical pathways such as circadian rhythm, apoptosis and protein degradation. In addition, SUMO-regulated re-localization of extranuclear proteins is required to sustain neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. Thus, SUMOylation is a key arbiter of neuronal viability and function. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of regulation of neuronal protein localization and translocation by SUMO and highlight exciting areas of ongoing research.

  10. Role of LRRK2 in the regulation of dopamine receptor trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Rassu

    Full Text Available Mutations in LRRK2 play a critical role in both familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD. Up to date, the role of LRRK2 in PD onset and progression remains largely unknown. However, experimental evidence highlights a critical role of LRRK2 in the control of vesicle trafficking that in turn may regulate different aspects of neuronal physiology. We have analyzed the role of LRRK2 in regulating dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1 and D2 (DRD2 trafficking. DRD1 and DRD2 are the most abundant dopamine receptors in the brain. They differ in structural, pharmacological and biochemical properties, as well as in localization and internalization mechanisms. Our results indicate that disease-associated mutant G2019S LRRK2 impairs DRD1 internalization, leading to an alteration in signal transduction. Moreover, the mutant forms of LRRK2 affect receptor turnover by decreasing the rate of DRD2 trafficking from the Golgi complex to the cell membrane. Collectively, our findings are consistent with the conclusion that LRRK2 influences the motility of neuronal vesicles and the neuronal receptor trafficking. These findings have important implications for the complex role that LRRK2 plays in neuronal physiology and the possible pathological mechanisms that may lead to neuronal death in PD.

  11. Optineurin: A Coordinator of Membrane-Associated Cargo Trafficking and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Ryan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Optineurin is a multifunctional adaptor protein intimately involved in various vesicular trafficking pathways. Through interactions with an array of proteins, such as myosin VI, huntingtin, Rab8, and Tank-binding kinase 1, as well as via its oligomerisation, optineurin has the ability to act as an adaptor, scaffold, or signal regulator to coordinate many cellular processes associated with the trafficking of membrane-delivered cargo. Due to its diverse interactions and its distinct functions, optineurin is an essential component in a number of homeostatic pathways, such as protein trafficking and organelle maintenance. Through the binding of polyubiquitinated cargoes via its ubiquitin-binding domain, optineurin also serves as a selective autophagic receptor for the removal of a wide range of substrates. Alternatively, it can act in an ubiquitin-independent manner to mediate the clearance of protein aggregates. Regarding its disease associations, mutations in the optineurin gene are associated with glaucoma and have more recently been found to correlate with Paget’s disease of bone and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Indeed, ALS-associated mutations in optineurin result in defects in neuronal vesicular localisation, autophagosome–lysosome fusion, and secretory pathway function. More recent molecular and functional analysis has shown that it also plays a role in mitophagy, thus linking it to a number of other neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson’s. Here, we review the role of optineurin in intracellular membrane trafficking, with a focus on autophagy, and describe how upstream signalling cascades are critical to its regulation. Current data and contradicting reports would suggest that optineurin is an important and selective autophagy receptor under specific conditions, whereby interplay, synergy, and functional redundancy with other receptors occurs. We will also discuss how dysfunction in optineurin-mediated pathways may lead

  12. PIN-G – A novel reporter for imaging and defining the effects of trafficking signals in membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Weiwen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of protein trafficking signals, and their interacting mechanisms, is a fundamental objective of modern biology. Unfortunately, the analysis of trafficking signals is complicated by their topography, hierarchical nature and regulation. Powerful strategies to test candidate motifs include their ability to direct simpler reporter proteins, to which they are fused, to the appropriate cellular compartment. However, present reporters are limited by their endogenous expression, paucity of cloning sites, and difficult detection in live cells. Results Consequently, we have engineered a mammalian expression vector encoding a novel trafficking reporter – pIN-G – consisting of a simple, type I integral protein bearing permissive intra/extracellular cloning sites, green fluorescent protein (GFP, cMyc and HA epitope tags. Fluorescence imaging, flow cytometry and biochemical assays of transfected HEK293 cells, confirm the size, topology and surface expression of PIN-G. Moreover, a pIN-G fusion construct, containing a Trans-Golgi Network (TGN targeting determinant, internalises rapidly from the cell surface and localises to the TGN. Additionally, another PIN-G fusion protein and its mutants reveal trafficking determinants in the cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of Kv1.4 voltage-gated potassium channels. Conclusion Together, these data indicate that pIN-G is a versatile, powerful, new reporter for analysing signals controlling membrane protein trafficking, surface expression and dynamics.

  13. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lan

    2015-09-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons.

  14. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane.—Patel, C., Douard, V., Yu, S., Gao, N., Ferraris, R. P. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption. PMID:26071406

  15. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 mediates trafficking of α5β1 integrin to the plasma membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Nazarul; Hu, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are major receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). As transmembrane proteins, the levels of integrins at the plasma membrane or the cell surface are ultimately determined by the balance between two vesicle trafficking events: endocytosis of integrins at the plasma membrane and exocytosis of the vesicles that transport integrins. Here, we report that vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), a SNARE protein that mediates vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane, is involved in the trafficking of α5β1 integrin. VAMP2 was present on vesicles containing endocytosed β1 integrin. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of VAMP2 markedly reduced cell surface α5β1 and inhibited cell adhesion and chemotactic migration to fibronectin, the ECM ligand of α5β1, without altering cell surface expression of α2β1 integrin or α3β1 integrin. By contrast, silencing of VAMP8, another SNARE protein, had no effect on cell surface expression of the integrins or cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, VAMP2-mediated trafficking is involved in cell adhesion to collagen but not to laminin. Consistent with disruption of integrin functions in cell proliferation and survival, VAMP2 silencing diminished proliferation and triggered apoptosis. Collectively, these data indicate that VAMP2 mediates the trafficking of α5β1 integrin to the plasma membrane and VAMP2-dependent integrin trafficking is critical in cell adhesion, migration and survival.

  16. Regulation of VEGF signaling by membrane traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Arie; Seerapu, Himabindu Reddy

    2012-09-01

    Recent findings have drawn attention to the role of membrane traffic in the signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The significance of this development stems from the pivotal function of VEGF in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. The outline of the regulation of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) signaling by membrane traffic is similar to that of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a prototype of the intertwining between membrane traffic and signaling. There are, however, unique features in VEGFR signaling that are conferred in part by the involvement of the co-receptor neuropilin (Nrp). Nrp1 and VEGFR2 are integrated into membrane traffic through the adaptor protein synectin, which recruits myosin VI, a molecular motor that drives inward trafficking [17,21,64]. The recent detection of only mild vascular defects in a knockin mouse model that expresses Nrp1 lacking a cytoplasmic domain [104], questions the co-receptor's role in VEGF signaling and membrane traffic. The regulation of endocytosis by ephrin-B2 is another feature unique to VEGR2/3 [18,19], but it awaits a mechanistic explanation. Current models do not fully explain how membrane traffic bridges between VEGFR and the downstream effectors that produce its functional outcome, such as cell migration. VEGF-A appears to accomplish this task in part by recruiting endocytic vesicles carrying RhoA to internalized active VEGFR2 [58]. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. REGULATED VESICULAR TRAFFICKING OF SPECIFIC PCDH15 AND VLGR1 VARIANTS IN AUDITORY HAIR CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Delimont, Duane; Meehan, Daniel T.; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by hearing and balance dysfunction and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. Mouse models carrying mutations for the nine Usher-associated genes have splayed stereocilia and some show delayed maturation of ribbon synapses suggesting these proteins may play different roles in terminal differentiation of auditory hair cells. The presence of the Usher proteins at the basal and apical aspects of the neurosensory epithelia suggests the existence of regulated trafficking through specific transport proteins and routes. Immature mouse cochleae and UB/OC-1 cells were used in this work to address whether specific variants of PCDH15 and VLGR1 are being selectively transported to opposite poles of the hair cells. Confocal co-localization studies between apical and basal vesicular markers and the different PCDH15 and VLGR1 variants along with sucrose density gradients and the use of vesicle trafficking inhibitors show the existence of Usher protein complexes in at least two vesicular sub-pools. The apically trafficked pool co-localized with the early endosomal vesicle marker, rab5, while the basally trafficked pool associates with membrane microdomains and SNAP25. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments between SNAP25 and VLGR1 show a physical interaction of these two proteins in organ of Corti and brain. Collectively, these findings establish the existence of a differential vesicular trafficking mechanism for specific Usher protein variants in mouse cochlear hair cells, with the apical variants playing a potential role in endosomal recycling and stereocilia development/maintenance and the basolateral variants involved in vesicle docking and/or fusion through SNAP25-mediated interactions. PMID:23035094

  18. Andrographolide regulates epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin receptor trafficking in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y; Chiow, KH; Huang, D; Wong, SH

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Andrographolide is the active component of Andrographis paniculata, a plant used in both Indian and Chinese traditional medicine, and it has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. However, not much is known about how it may affect the key receptors implicated in cancer. Knowledge of how andrographolide affects receptor trafficking will allow us to better understand new mechanisms by which andrographolide may cause death in cancer cells. Experimental approach: We utilized the well-characterized epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfR) expressed in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells as a model to study the effect of andrographolide on receptor trafficking. Receptor distribution, the total number of receptors and surface receptors were analysed by immunofluorescence, Western blot as well as flow-cytometry respectively. Key results: Andrographolide treatment inhibited cell growth, down-regulated EGFRs on the cell surface and affected the degradation of EGFRs and TfRs. The EGFR was internalized into the cell at an increased rate, and accumulated in a compartment that co-localizes with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein in the late endosomes. Conclusion and implications: This study sheds light on how andrographolide may affect receptor trafficking by inhibiting receptor movement from the late endosomes to lysosomes. The down-regulation of EGFR from the cell surface also indicates a new mechanism by which andrographolide may induce cancer cell death. PMID:20233216

  19. The golgin GMAP-210 is required for efficient membrane trafficking in the early secretory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roboti, Peristera; Sato, Keisuke; Lowe, Martin

    2015-04-15

    Golgins are coiled-coil proteins that participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi complex. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular trafficking and Golgi organization. However, the degree to which individual golgins contribute to these processes is poorly defined, and it has been proposed that golgins act in a largely redundant manner. Previous studies on the golgin GMAP-210 (also known as TRIP11), which is mutated in the rare skeletal disorder achondrogenesis type 1A, have yielded conflicting results regarding its involvement in trafficking. Here, we re-investigated the trafficking role of GMAP-210, and found that it is indeed required for efficient trafficking in the secretory pathway. GMAP-210 acts at both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and Golgi complex during anterograde trafficking, and is also required for retrograde trafficking to the ER. Using co-depletion experiments, we also found that GMAP-210 acts in a partially redundant manner with the golgin GM130 to ensure efficient anterograde cargo delivery to the cis-Golgi. In summary, our results indicate a role for GMAP-210 in several trafficking steps at the ER-Golgi interface, some of which are partially redundant with another golgin, namely GM130 (also known as GOLGA2). © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Mitochondrial cardiolipin/phospholipid trafficking: the role of membrane contact site complexes and lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattner, Uwe; Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Rousseau, Denis; Boissan, Mathieu; Mannella, Carmen; Epand, Richard; Lacombe, Marie-Lise

    2014-04-01

    Historically, cellular trafficking of lipids has received much less attention than protein trafficking, mostly because its biological importance was underestimated, involved sorting and translocation mechanisms were not known, and analytical tools were limiting. This has changed during the last decade, and we discuss here some progress made in respect to mitochondria and the trafficking of phospholipids, in particular cardiolipin. Different membrane contact site or junction complexes and putative lipid transfer proteins for intra- and intermembrane lipid translocation have been described, involving mitochondrial inner and outer membrane, and the adjacent membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. An image emerges how cardiolipin precursors, remodeling intermediates, mature cardiolipin and its oxidation products could migrate between membranes, and how this trafficking is involved in cardiolipin biosynthesis and cell signaling events. Particular emphasis in this review is given to mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase D and mitochondrial creatine kinases, which emerge to have roles in both, membrane junction formation and lipid transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ist2 in the yeast cortical endoplasmic reticulum promotes trafficking of the amino acid transporter Bap2 to the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendelin Wolf

    Full Text Available The equipment of the plasma membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with specific nutrient transporters is highly regulated by transcription, translation and protein trafficking allowing growth in changing environments. The activity of these transporters depends on a H(+ gradient across the plasma membrane generated by the H(+-ATPase Pma1. We found that the polytopic membrane protein Ist2 in the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER is required for efficient leucine uptake during the transition from fermentation to respiration. Experiments employing tandem fluorescence timer protein tag showed that Ist2 was necessary for efficient trafficking of newly synthesized leucine transporter Bap2 from the ER to the plasma membrane. This finding explains the growth defect of ist2Δ mutants during nutritional challenges and illustrates the important role of physical coupling between cortical ER and plasma membrane.

  2. Rab7: roles in membrane trafficking and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Chen, Li; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Tuanlao

    2009-06-01

    The endocytosis pathway controls multiple cellular and physiological events. The lysosome is the destination of newly synthesized lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes. Internalized molecules or particles are delivered to the lysosome for degradation through sequential transport along the endocytic pathway. The endocytic pathway is also emerging as a signalling platform, in addition to the well-known role of the plasma membrane for signalling. Rab7 is a late endosome-/lysosome-associated small GTPase, perhaps the only lysosomal Rab protein identified to date. Rab7 plays critical roles in the endocytic processes. Through interaction with its partners (including upstream regulators and downstream effectors), Rab7 participates in multiple regulation mechanisms in endosomal sorting, biogenesis of lysosome [or LRO (lysosome-related organelle)] and phagocytosis. These processes are closely related to substrates degradation, antigen presentation, cell signalling, cell survival and microbial pathogen infection. Consistently, mutations or dysfunctions of Rab7 result in traffic disorders, which cause various diseases, such as neuropathy, cancer and lipid metabolism disease. Rab7 also plays important roles in microbial pathogen infection and survival, as well as in participating in the life cycle of viruses. Here, we give a brief review on the central role of Rab7 in endosomal traffic and summarize the studies focusing on the participation of Rab7 in disease pathogenesis. The underlying mechanism governed by Rab7 and its partners will also be discussed.

  3. BPIFB6 Regulates Secretory Pathway Trafficking and Enterovirus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosky, Stefanie; Lennemann, Nicholas J; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-05-15

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 3 (BPIFB3) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized host factor that negatively regulates coxsackievirus B (CVB) replication through its control of the autophagic pathway. Here, we show that another member of the BPIFB family, BPIFB6, functions as a positive regulator of CVB, and other enterovirus, replication by controlling secretory pathway trafficking and Golgi complex morphology. We show that similar to BPIFB3, BPIFB6 localizes exclusively to the ER, where it associates with other members of the BPIFB family. However, in contrast to our findings that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of BPIFB3 greatly enhances CVB replication, we show that silencing of BPIFB6 expression dramatically suppresses enterovirus replication in a pan-viral manner. Mechanistically, we show that loss of BPIFB6 expression induces pronounced alterations in retrograde and anterograde trafficking, which correlate with dramatic fragmentation of the Golgi complex. Taken together, these data implicate BPIFB6 as a key regulator of secretory pathway trafficking and viral replication and suggest that members of the BPIFB family participate in diverse host cell functions to regulate virus infections. Enterovirus infections are associated with a number of severe pathologies, such as aseptic meningitis, dilated cardiomyopathy, type I diabetes, paralysis, and even death. These viruses, which include coxsackievirus B (CVB), poliovirus (PV), and enterovirus 71 (EV71), co-opt the host cell secretory pathway, which controls the transport of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, to facilitate their replication. Here we report on the identification of a novel regulator of the secretory pathway, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 6 (BPIFB6), whose expression is required for enterovirus replication. We show that loss of BPIFB6 expression

  4. BPIFB6 Regulates Secretory Pathway Trafficking and Enterovirus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosky, Stefanie; Lennemann, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 3 (BPIFB3) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized host factor that negatively regulates coxsackievirus B (CVB) replication through its control of the autophagic pathway. Here, we show that another member of the BPIFB family, BPIFB6, functions as a positive regulator of CVB, and other enterovirus, replication by controlling secretory pathway trafficking and Golgi complex morphology. We show that similar to BPIFB3, BPIFB6 localizes exclusively to the ER, where it associates with other members of the BPIFB family. However, in contrast to our findings that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of BPIFB3 greatly enhances CVB replication, we show that silencing of BPIFB6 expression dramatically suppresses enterovirus replication in a pan-viral manner. Mechanistically, we show that loss of BPIFB6 expression induces pronounced alterations in retrograde and anterograde trafficking, which correlate with dramatic fragmentation of the Golgi complex. Taken together, these data implicate BPIFB6 as a key regulator of secretory pathway trafficking and viral replication and suggest that members of the BPIFB family participate in diverse host cell functions to regulate virus infections. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus infections are associated with a number of severe pathologies, such as aseptic meningitis, dilated cardiomyopathy, type I diabetes, paralysis, and even death. These viruses, which include coxsackievirus B (CVB), poliovirus (PV), and enterovirus 71 (EV71), co-opt the host cell secretory pathway, which controls the transport of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, to facilitate their replication. Here we report on the identification of a novel regulator of the secretory pathway, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 6 (BPIFB6), whose expression is required for enterovirus replication. We show that loss of

  5. Physiological Roles of Plant Post-Golgi Transport Pathways in Membrane Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Tomohiro

    2016-10-01

    Membrane trafficking is the fundamental system through which proteins are sorted to their correct destinations in eukaryotic cells. Key regulators of this system include RAB GTPases and soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). Interestingly, the numbers of RAB GTPases and SNAREs involved in post-Golgi transport pathways in plant cells are larger than those in animal and yeast cells, suggesting that plants have evolved unique and complex post-Golgi transport pathways. The trans-Golgi network (TGN) is an important organelle that acts as a sorting station in the post-Golgi transport pathways of plant cells. The TGN also functions as the early endosome, which is the first compartment to receive endocytosed proteins. Several endocytosed proteins on the plasma membrane (PM) are initially targeted to the TGN/EE, then recycled back to the PM or transported to the vacuole for degradation. The recycling and degradation of the PM localized proteins is essential for the development and environmental responses in plant. The present review describes the post-Golgi transport pathways that show unique physiological functions in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant–microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Leborgne-Castel,; Bouhidel, Karim

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM) proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic ...

  7. A FRET-Based Approach for Quantitative Evaluation of Forskolin-Induced Pendrin Trafficking at the Plasma Membrane in Bronchial NCI H292 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Tamma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human pendrin (SLC26A4, PDS is an integral membrane protein acting as an electroneutral anion exchanger. Loss of function mutations in pendrin protein cause Pendred syndrome, a disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and a partial iodide organification defect that may lead to thyroid goiter. Additionally, pendrin up-regulation could play a role in the pathogenesis of several diseases including bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Therefore, monitoring the plasma membrane abundance and trafficking of pendrin in the context of a living cell is crucially important. Methods: Trafficking of pendrin to the plasma membrane was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, a physical phenomenon occurring between two fluorophores (the FRET donor and acceptor located in close spatial proximity. Because the efficiency of the energy transfer is inversely proportional to the sixth power of the distance between donor and acceptor, FRET is extremely sensitive to small changes in distance between the donor and acceptor and is therefore a powerful tool to determine protein-protein interactions. Results: FRET studies revealed that forskolin-induced cAMP production is associated with a significant increase of pendrin expression at plasma membrane, which is paralleled by a decrease in intracellular pH. Pendrin transposition to the membrane is accompanied with a partial depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton via Rho-GTPase inhibition. Conclusion: Trafficking to the plasma membrane is critical in the regulation of pendrin activity. Therefore, reliable tools for monitoring and quantifying this phenomenon are highly desirable.

  8. A FRET-based approach for quantitative evaluation of forskolin-induced pendrin trafficking at the plasma membrane in bronchial NCI H292 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Grazia; Ranieri, Marianna; Dossena, Silvia; Di Mise, Annarita; Nofziger, Charity; Svelto, Maria; Paulmichl, Markus; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Human pendrin (SLC26A4, PDS) is an integral membrane protein acting as an electroneutral anion exchanger. Loss of function mutations in pendrin protein cause Pendred syndrome, a disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness and a partial iodide organification defect that may lead to thyroid goiter. Additionally, pendrin up-regulation could play a role in the pathogenesis of several diseases including bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, monitoring the plasma membrane abundance and trafficking of pendrin in the context of a living cell is crucially important. Trafficking of pendrin to the plasma membrane was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), a physical phenomenon occurring between two fluorophores (the FRET donor and acceptor) located in close spatial proximity. Because the efficiency of the energy transfer is inversely proportional to the sixth power of the distance between donor and acceptor, FRET is extremely sensitive to small changes in distance between the donor and acceptor and is therefore a powerful tool to determine protein-protein interactions. FRET studies revealed that forskolin-induced cAMP production is associated with a significant increase of pendrin expression at plasma membrane, which is paralleled by a decrease in intracellular pH. Pendrin transposition to the membrane is accompanied with a partial depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton via Rho-GTPase inhibition. Trafficking to the plasma membrane is critical in the regulation of pendrin activity. Therefore, reliable tools for monitoring and quantifying this phenomenon are highly desirable. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Post-transcriptional trafficking and regulation of neuronal gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Belinda J; Cairns, Murray J

    2012-02-01

    Intracellular messenger RNA (mRNA) traffic and translation must be highly regulated, both temporally and spatially, within eukaryotic cells to support the complex functional partitioning. This capacity is essential in neurons because it provides a mechanism for rapid input-restricted activity-dependent protein synthesis in individual dendritic spines. While this feature is thought to be important for synaptic plasticity, the structures and mechanisms that support this capability are largely unknown. Certainly specialized RNA binding proteins and binding elements in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of translationally regulated mRNA are important, but the subtlety and complexity of this system suggests that an intermediate "specificity" component is also involved. Small non-coding microRNA (miRNA) are essential for CNS development and may fulfill this role by acting as the guide strand for mediating complex patterns of post-transcriptional regulation. In this review we examine post-synaptic gene regulation, mRNA trafficking and the emerging role of post-transcriptional gene silencing in synaptic plasticity.

  10. Imp2, the PSTPIP homolog in fission yeast, affects sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506 and membrane trafficking in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Ayako; Higa, Mari; Doi, Akira; Satoh, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process that divides one cell into two cells, which is functionally linked to the dynamic remodeling of the plasma membrane coordinately with various events such as membrane trafficking. Calcineurin is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein phosphatase, which regulates multiple biological functions, such as membrane trafficking and cytokinesis. Here, we isolated imp2-c3, a mutant allele of the imp2 + gene, encoding a homolog of the mouse PSTPIP1 (proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1), using a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion in fission yeast. The imp2-c3 mutants showed a defect in cytokinesis with multi-septated phenotypes, which was further enhanced upon treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Notably, electron micrographs revealed that the imp2-c3 mutant cells accumulated aberrant multi-lamella Golgi structures and putative post-Golgi secretory vesicles, and exhibited fragmented vacuoles in addition to thickened septa. Consistently, imp2-c3 mutants showed a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase and defects in vacuole fusion. The imp2-c3 mutant cells exhibited a weakened cell wall, similar to the membrane trafficking mutants identified in the same genetic screen such as ypt3-i5. These findings implicate the PSTPIP1 homolog Imp2 in Golgi/vacuole function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including cytokinesis and cell integrity. - Highlights: • We isolated imp2-c3, in a synthetic lethal screen with calcineurin in fission yeast. • The imp2 + gene encodes a component of the actin contractile ring similar to Cdc15. • The imp2-c3 mutants showed defects in cytokinesis, which were exacerbated by FK506. • The imp2-c3 mutants were defective in membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. • Our study revealed a novel role for Imp2 in the Golgi/vacuolar membrane trafficking

  11. Imp2, the PSTPIP homolog in fission yeast, affects sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506 and membrane trafficking in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Ayako; Higa, Mari [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Doi, Akira [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko, E-mail: sugiurar@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2015-02-13

    Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process that divides one cell into two cells, which is functionally linked to the dynamic remodeling of the plasma membrane coordinately with various events such as membrane trafficking. Calcineurin is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein phosphatase, which regulates multiple biological functions, such as membrane trafficking and cytokinesis. Here, we isolated imp2-c3, a mutant allele of the imp2{sup +} gene, encoding a homolog of the mouse PSTPIP1 (proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1), using a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion in fission yeast. The imp2-c3 mutants showed a defect in cytokinesis with multi-septated phenotypes, which was further enhanced upon treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Notably, electron micrographs revealed that the imp2-c3 mutant cells accumulated aberrant multi-lamella Golgi structures and putative post-Golgi secretory vesicles, and exhibited fragmented vacuoles in addition to thickened septa. Consistently, imp2-c3 mutants showed a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase and defects in vacuole fusion. The imp2-c3 mutant cells exhibited a weakened cell wall, similar to the membrane trafficking mutants identified in the same genetic screen such as ypt3-i5. These findings implicate the PSTPIP1 homolog Imp2 in Golgi/vacuole function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including cytokinesis and cell integrity. - Highlights: • We isolated imp2-c3, in a synthetic lethal screen with calcineurin in fission yeast. • The imp2{sup +} gene encodes a component of the actin contractile ring similar to Cdc15. • The imp2-c3 mutants showed defects in cytokinesis, which were exacerbated by FK506. • The imp2-c3 mutants were defective in membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. • Our study revealed a novel role for Imp2 in the Golgi/vacuolar membrane trafficking.

  12. Classifying the molecular functions of Rab GTPases in membrane trafficking using deep convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Ho, Quang-Thai; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2018-06-13

    Deep learning has been increasingly used to solve a number of problems with state-of-the-art performance in a wide variety of fields. In biology, deep learning can be applied to reduce feature extraction time and achieve high levels of performance. In our present work, we apply deep learning via two-dimensional convolutional neural networks and position-specific scoring matrices to classify Rab protein molecules, which are main regulators in membrane trafficking for transferring proteins and other macromolecules throughout the cell. The functional loss of specific Rab molecular functions has been implicated in a variety of human diseases, e.g., choroideremia, intellectual disabilities, cancer. Therefore, creating a precise model for classifying Rabs is crucial in helping biologists understand the molecular functions of Rabs and design drug targets according to such specific human disease information. We constructed a robust deep neural network for classifying Rabs that achieved an accuracy of 99%, 99.5%, 96.3%, and 97.6% for each of four specific molecular functions. Our approach demonstrates superior performance to traditional artificial neural networks. Therefore, from our proposed study, we provide both an effective tool for classifying Rab proteins and a basis for further research that can improve the performance of biological modeling using deep neural networks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The golgin GMAP-210 is required for efficient membrane trafficking in the early secretory pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Roboti, Peristera; Sato, Keisuke; Lowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Golgins are coiled-coil proteins that participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi complex. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular trafficking and Golgi organization. However, the degree to which individual golgins contribute to these processes is poorly defined, and it has been proposed that golgins act in a largely redundant manner. Previous studies on the golgin GMAP-210 (also known as TRIP11), which is mutated in the rare skeletal disorder achondrogene...

  14. Rab GTPases Regulate Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Trafficking of Factor VIIa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ramesh C.; Keshava, Shiva; Esmon, Charles T.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have established that factor VIIa (FVIIa) binds to the endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR). FVIIa binding to EPCR may promote the endocytosis of this receptor/ligand complex. Rab GTPases are known to play a crucial role in the endocytic and exocytic pathways of receptors or receptor/ligand complexes. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of Rab GTPases in the intracellular trafficking of EPCR and FVIIa. CHO-EPCR cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were transduced with recombinant adenoviral vectors to express wild-type, constitutively active, or dominant negative mutant of various Rab GTPases. Cells were exposed to FVIIa conjugated with AF488 fluorescent probe (AF488-FVIIa), and intracellular trafficking of FVIIa, EPCR, and Rab proteins was evaluated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. In cells expressing wild-type or constitutively active Rab4A, internalized AF488-FVIIa accumulated in early/sorting endosomes and its entry into the recycling endosomal compartment (REC) was inhibited. Expression of constitutively active Rab5A induced large endosomal structures beneath the plasma membrane where EPCR and FVIIa accumulated. Dominant negative Rab5A inhibited the endocytosis of EPCR-FVIIa. Expression of constitutively active Rab11 resulted in retention of accumulated AF488-FVIIa in the REC, whereas expression of a dominant negative form of Rab11 led to accumulation of internalized FVIIa in the cytoplasm and prevented entry of internalized FVIIa into the REC. Expression of dominant negative Rab11 also inhibited the transport of FVIIa across the endothelium. Overall our data show that Rab GTPases regulate the internalization and intracellular trafficking of EPCR-FVIIa. PMID:23555015

  15. VPS35 regulates developing mouse hippocampal neuronal morphogenesis by promoting retrograde trafficking of BACE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lei Wang

    2012-10-01

    VPS35, a major component of the retromer, plays an important role in the selective endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Dysfunction of retromer is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, but its function in developing mouse brain remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence for VPS35 promoting dendritic growth and maturation, and axonal protein transport in developing mouse hippocampal neurons. Embryonic hippocampal CA1 neurons suppressing Vps35 expression by in utero electroporation of its micro RNAs displayed shortened apical dendrites, reduced dendritic spines, and swollen commissural axons in the neonatal stage, those deficits reflecting a defective protein transport/trafficking in developing mouse neurons. Further mechanistic studies showed that Vps35 depletion in neurons resulted in an impaired retrograde trafficking of BACE1 (β1-secretase and altered BACE1 distribution. Suppression of BACE1 expression in CA1 neurons partially rescued both dendritic and axonal deficits induced by Vps35-deficiency. These results thus demonstrate that BACE1 acts as a critical cargo of retromer in vitro and in vivo, and suggest that VPS35 plays an essential role in regulating apical dendritic maturation and in preventing axonal spheroid formation in developing hippocampal neurons.

  16. Synaptic activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through different recycling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ning; Jeyifous, Okunola; Munro, Charlotte; Montgomery, Johanna M; Green, William N

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glutamatergic synaptic strength in brain are dependent on AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) recycling, which is assumed to occur through a single local pathway. In this study, we present evidence that AMPAR recycling occurs through different pathways regulated by synaptic activity. Without synaptic stimulation, most AMPARs recycled in dynamin-independent endosomes containing the GTPase, Arf6. Few AMPARs recycled in dynamin-dependent endosomes labeled by transferrin receptors (TfRs). AMPAR recycling was blocked by alterations in the GTPase, TC10, which co-localized with Arf6 endosomes. TC10 mutants that reduced AMPAR recycling had no effect on increased AMPAR levels with long-term potentiation (LTP) and little effect on decreased AMPAR levels with long-term depression. However, internalized AMPAR levels in TfR-containing recycling endosomes increased after LTP, indicating increased AMPAR recycling through the dynamin-dependent pathway with synaptic plasticity. LTP-induced AMPAR endocytosis is inconsistent with local recycling as a source of increased surface receptors, suggesting AMPARs are trafficked from other sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06878.001 PMID:25970033

  17. KCNE regulation of K+ channel trafficking – a Sisyphean task?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Anmol Kanda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels shape the action potentials of excitable cells and regulate membrane potential and ion homeostasis in excitable and nonexcitable cells. With forty known members in the human genome and a variety of homomeric and heteromeric pore-forming alpha subunit interactions, post-translational modifications, cellular locations and expression patterns, the functional repertoire of the Kv alpha subunit family is monumental. This versatility is amplified by a host of interacting proteins, including the single membrane-spanning KCNE ancillary subunits. Here, examining both the secretory and the endocytic pathways, we review recent findings illustrating the surprising virtuosity of the KCNE proteins in orchestrating not just the function, but also the composition, diaspora and retrieval of channels formed by their Kv alpha subunit partners.

  18. PICK1 regulates the trafficking of ASIC1a and acidotoxicity in a BAR domain lipid binding-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wenying

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a is the major ASIC subunit determining acid-activated currents in brain neurons. Recent studies show that ASIC1a play critical roles in acid-induced cell toxicity. While these studies raise the importance of ASIC1a in diseases, mechanisms for ASIC1a trafficking are not well understood. Interestingly, ASIC1a interacts with PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1, an intracellular protein that regulates trafficking of several membrane proteins. However, whether PICK1 regulates ASIC1a surface expression remains unknown. Results Here, we show that PICK1 overexpression increases ASIC1a surface level. A BAR domain mutant of PICK1, which impairs its lipid binding capability, blocks this increase. Lipid binding of PICK1 is also required for PICK1-induced clustering of ASIC1a. Consistent with the effect on ASIC1a surface levels, PICK1 increases ASIC1a-mediated acidotoxicity and this effect requires both the PDZ and BAR domains of PICK1. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that PICK1 regulates trafficking and function of ASIC1a in a lipid binding-dependent manner.

  19. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis.

  20. Regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking by intracellular amphetamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlig, Kristopher M; Lute, Brandon J; Wei, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    -induced cell surface DAT redistribution may result in long-lasting changes in DA homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which AMPH induces trafficking is not clear. Because AMPH is a substrate, we do not know whether extracellular AMPH stimulates trafficking through its interaction with DAT and subsequent...... alteration in DAT function, thereby triggering intracellular signaling or whether AMPH must be transported and then act intracellularly. In agreement with our previous studies, extracellular AMPH caused cytosolic redistribution of the wild-type human DAT (WT-hDAT). However, AMPH did not induce cytosolic...... redistribution in an uptake-impaired hDAT (Y335A-hDAT) that still binds AMPH. The divalent cation zinc (Zn(2+)) inhibits WT-hDAT activity, but it restores Y335A-hDAT uptake. Coadministration of Zn(2+) and AMPH consistently reduced WT-hDAT trafficking but stimulated cytosolic redistribution of Y335A...

  1. Cholesterol depletion of enterocytes. Effect on the Golgi complex and apical membrane trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Niels-Christiansen, L L; Thorsen, Evy

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal brush border enzymes, including aminopeptidase N and sucrase-isomaltase, are associated with "rafts" (membrane microdomains rich in cholesterol and sphingoglycolipids). To assess the functional role of rafts in the present work, we studied the effect of cholesterol depletion on apical......, the rates of the Golgi-associated complex glycosylation and association with rafts of newly synthesized aminopeptidase N were reduced, and less of the enzyme had reached the brush border membrane after 2 h of labeling. In contrast, the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was neither missorted nor raft......-associated. Our results implicate the Golgi complex/trans-Golgi network in raft formation and suggest a close relationship between this event and apical membrane trafficking....

  2. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Daniel

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact.We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus.Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall.

  3. Mechanism and Regulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking of Smad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaochu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smad proteins are the intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β signaling. Smads function as transcription factors and their activities require carboxyl-terminal phosphorylation by TGF-β receptor kinases which are embedded in the cell membrane. Therefore, the translocation of activated Smads from the cytoplasm into the nucleus is a rate-limiting step in TGF-β signal transduction into the nucleus. On the other hand, the export of Smads out of the nucleus turns off TGF-β effect. Such spatial control of Smad ensures a tight regulation of TGF-β target genes. Several cross-talk pathways have been shown to affect TGF-β signaling by impairing nuclear translocation of Smad, exemplifying the biological importance of the nuclear transport process. Many laboratories have investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of Smad nucleocytoplasmic translocation, combining genetics, biochemistry and sophisticated live cell imaging approaches. The last few years have witnessed the elucidation of several key players in Smad nuclear transport, most importantly the karyopherins that carry Smads across the nuclear envelope and nuclear pore proteins that facilitate the trans-nuclear envelope movement. The foundation is now set to further elucidate how the nuclear transport process is regulated and exploit such knowledge to manipulate TGF-β signaling. In this review we will discuss the current understanding of the molecular machinery responsible for nuclear import and export of Smads.

  4. PDZ Protein Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Trafficking and Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Henry A; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contribute to the regulation of every aspect of human physiology and are therapeutic targets for the treatment of numerous diseases. As a consequence, understanding the myriad of mechanisms controlling GPCR signaling and trafficking is essential for the development of new pharmacological strategies for the treatment of human pathologies. Of the many GPCR-interacting proteins, postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons, disc large, zona occludens-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins appear most abundant and have similarly been implicated in disease mechanisms. PDZ proteins play an important role in regulating receptor and channel protein localization within synapses and tight junctions and function to scaffold intracellular signaling protein complexes. In the current study, we review the known functional interactions between PDZ domain-containing proteins and GPCRs and provide insight into the potential mechanisms of action. These PDZ domain-containing proteins include the membrane-associated guanylate-like kinases [postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 97 kilodaltons; postsynaptic density protein of 93 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 102 kilodaltons; discs, large homolog 5; caspase activation and recruitment domain and membrane-associated guanylate-like kinase domain-containing protein 3; membrane protein, palmitoylated 3; calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase; membrane-associated guanylate kinase protein (MAGI)-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3], Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor proteins (NHERFs) (NHERF1, NHERF2, PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 1, and PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 2), Golgi-associated PDZ proteins (Gα-binding protein interacting protein, C-terminus and CFTR-associated ligand), PDZ domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) 1 and 2, regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-homology-RhoGEFs (PDZ domain-containing RhoGEF and

  5. Wherever I may roam: protein and membrane trafficking in P. falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deponte, Marcel; Hoppe, Heinrich C; Lee, Marcus C S; Maier, Alexander G; Richard, Dave; Rug, Melanie; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude M

    2012-12-01

    Quite aside from its immense importance as a human pathogen, studies in recent years have brought to light the fact that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is an interesting eukaryotic model system to study protein trafficking. Studying parasite cell biology often reveals an overrepresentation of atypical cell biological features, possibly driven by the parasites' need to survive in an unusual biological niche. Malaria parasites possess uncommon cellular compartments to which protein traffic must be directed, including secretory organelles such as rhoptries and micronemes, a lysosome-like compartment referred to as the digestive vacuole and a complex (four membrane-bound) plastid, the apicoplast. In addition, the parasite must provide proteins to extracellular compartments and structures including the parasitophorous vacuole, the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane, the Maurer's clefts and both cytosol and plasma membrane of the host cell, the mature human red blood cell. Although some of these unusual destinations are possessed by other cell types, only Plasmodium parasites contain them all within one cell. Here we review what is known about protein and membrane transport in the P. falciparum-infected cell, highlighting novel features of these processes. A growing body of evidence suggests that this parasite is a real "box of tricks" with regards to protein traffic. Possibly, these tricks may be turned against the parasite by exploiting them as novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. EMBO workshop al fin del mundo: a meeting on membrane trafficking and its implication for polarity and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolo, María-Paz; Faundez, Victor; Galli, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    The EMBO worskhop at the "end of the world'" (al fin del mundo), a meeting on membrane trafficking and its implication for polarity and diseases, took place in the Chilean Patagonia surrounded by the landscapes once witnessed by Charles Darwin. The meeting showcased some of the best membrane trafficking science with an emphasis in neuroscience and disease models. Speakers from Europe, USA, South America and the graduate students behind it; embarked on an enthusiastic and eclectic dialog where a wide range of cell types, model genetic systems, and diseases where discussed. This meeting demonstrated the power of trafficking concepts to integrate diverse biology and to formulate mechanisms of normal and disease cells. © 2015 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Key factors regulating the mass delivery of macromolecules to model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Richard A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Jagalski, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow...... of the aggregates to activate endocytosis pathways on specific cell types is discussed in the context of targeted drug delivery applications....

  8. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator intracellular processing, trafficking, and opportunities for mutation-specific treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogan, Mark P

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in basic science have greatly expanded our understanding of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the chloride and bicarbonate channel that is encoded by the gene, which is mutated in patients with CF. We review the structure, function, biosynthetic processing, and intracellular trafficking of CFTR and discuss the five classes of mutations and their impact on the CF phenotype. The therapeutic discussion is focused on the significant progress toward CFTR mutation-specific therapies. We review the results of encouraging clinical trials examining orally administered therapeutics, including agents that promote read-through of class I mutations (premature termination codons); correctors, which overcome the CFTR misfolding that characterizes the common class II mutation F508del; and potentiators, which enhance the function of class III or IV mutated CFTR at the plasma membrane. Long-term outcomes from successful mutation-specific treatments could finally answer the question that has been lingering since and even before the CFTR gene discovery: Will therapies that specifically restore CFTR-mediated chloride secretion slow or arrest the deleterious cascade of events leading to chronic infection, bronchiectasis, and end-stage lung disease?

  9. LRRK2 affects vesicle trafficking, neurotransmitter extracellular level and membrane receptor localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Migheli

    Full Text Available The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD. LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2(G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2(G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells.

  10. A new vesicle trafficking regulator CTL1 plays a crucial role in ion homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi-Qun; Chen, Jiu-Geng; Chen, Zi-Ru; An, Dong; Lv, Qiao-Yan; Han, Mei-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ling; Salt, David E; Chao, Dai-Yin

    2017-12-01

    Ion homeostasis is essential for plant growth and environmental adaptation, and maintaining ion homeostasis requires the precise regulation of various ion transporters, as well as correct root patterning. However, the mechanisms underlying these processes remain largely elusive. Here, we reported that a choline transporter gene, CTL1, controls ionome homeostasis by regulating the secretory trafficking of proteins required for plasmodesmata (PD) development, as well as the transport of some ion transporters. Map-based cloning studies revealed that CTL1 mutations alter the ion profile of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the phenotypes associated with these mutations are caused by a combination of PD defects and ion transporter misregulation. We also established that CTL1 is involved in regulating vesicle trafficking and is thus required for the trafficking of proteins essential for ion transport and PD development. Characterizing choline transporter-like 1 (CTL1) as a new regulator of protein sorting may enable researchers to understand not only ion homeostasis in plants but also vesicle trafficking in general.

  11. VEGFR2 Trafficking, Signaling and Proteolysis is Regulated by the Ubiquitin Isopeptidase USP8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) regulates many aspects of vascular function. VEGF-A binding to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates endothelial signal transduction and regulates multiple cellular responses. Activated VEGFR2 undergoes ubiquitination but the enzymes that regulate this post-translational modification are unclear. In this study, the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP8, is shown to regulate VEGFR2 trafficking, de-ubiquitination, proteolysis and signal transduction. USP8-depleted endothelial cells displayed altered VEGFR2 ubiquitination and production of a unique VEGFR2 extracellular domain proteolytic fragment caused by VEGFR2 accumulation in the endosome-lysosome system. In addition, perturbed VEGFR2 trafficking impaired VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction in USP8-depleted cells. Thus, regulation of VEGFR2 ubiquitination and de-ubiquitination has important consequences for the endothelial cell response and vascular physiology. © 2015 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Alterations in membrane trafficking and pathophysiological implications in lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuech, Eva-Maria; Brogden, Graham; Naim, Hassan Y

    2016-11-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders are a heterogeneous group of more than 50 distinct inborn metabolic diseases affecting about 1 in 5000 to 7000 live births. The diseases often result from mutations followed by functional deficiencies of enzymes or transporters within the acidic environment of the lysosome, which mediate the degradation of a wide subset of substrates, including glycosphingolipids, glycosaminoglycans, cholesterol, glycogen, oligosaccharides, peptides and glycoproteins, or the export of the respective degradation products from the lysosomes. The progressive accumulation of uncleaved substrates occurs in multiple organs and finally causes a broad spectrum of different pathologies including visceral, neurological, skeletal and hematologic manifestations. Besides deficient lysosomal enzymes and transporters other defects may lead to lysosomal storage disorders, including activator defects, membrane defects or defects in modifier proteins. In this review we concentrate on four different lysosomal storage disorders: Niemann-Pick type C, Fabry disease, Gaucher disease and Pompe disease. While the last three are caused by defective lysosomal hydrolases, Niemann-Pick type C is caused by the inability to export LDL-derived cholesterol out of the lysosome. We want to emphasise potential implications of membrane trafficking defects on the pathology of these diseases, as many mutations interfere with correct lysosomal protein trafficking and alter cellular lipid homeostasis. Current therapeutic strategies are summarised, including substrate reduction therapy as well as pharmacological chaperone therapy which directly aim to improve folding and lysosomal transport of misfolded mutant proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Arabidopsis SNAREs SYP61 and SYP121 coordinate the trafficking of plasma membrane aquaporin PIP2;7 to modulate the cell membrane water permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachez, Charles; Laloux, Timothée; Reinhardt, Hagen; Cavez, Damien; Degand, Hervé; Grefen, Christopher; De Rycke, Riet; Inzé, Dirk; Blatt, Michael R; Russinova, Eugenia; Chaumont, François

    2014-07-01

    Plant plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are aquaporins that facilitate the passive movement of water and small neutral solutes through biological membranes. Here, we report that post-Golgi trafficking of PIP2;7 in Arabidopsis thaliana involves specific interactions with two syntaxin proteins, namely, the Qc-SNARE SYP61 and the Qa-SNARE SYP121, that the proper delivery of PIP2;7 to the plasma membrane depends on the activity of the two SNAREs, and that the SNAREs colocalize and physically interact. These findings are indicative of an important role for SYP61 and SYP121, possibly forming a SNARE complex. Our data support a model in which direct interactions between specific SNARE proteins and PIP aquaporins modulate their post-Golgi trafficking and thus contribute to the fine-tuning of the water permeability of the plasma membrane. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Small interference RNA profiling reveals the essential role of human membrane trafficking genes in mediating the infectious entry of dengue virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Justin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus (DENV is the causative agent of Dengue fever and the life-threatening Dengue Haemorrhagic fever or Dengue shock syndrome. In the absence of anti-viral agents or vaccine, there is an urgent need to develop an effective anti-viral strategy against this medically important viral pathogen. The initial interplay between DENV and the host cells may represent one of the potential anti-viral targeting sites. Currently the involvements of human membrane trafficking host genes or factors that mediate the infectious cellular entry of dengue virus are not well defined. Results In this study, we have used a targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA library to identify and profile key cellular genes involved in processes of endocytosis, cytoskeletal dynamics and endosome trafficking that are important and essential for DENV infection. The infectious entry of DENV into Huh7 cells was shown to be potently inhibited by siRNAs targeting genes associated with clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The important role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis was confirmed by the expression of well-characterized dominant-negative mutants of genes in this pathway and by using the clathrin endocytosis inhibitor chlorpromazine. Furthermore, DENV infection was shown to be sensitive to the disruption of human genes in regulating the early to late endosomal trafficking as well as the endosomal acidic pH. The importance and involvement of both actin and microtubule dynamics in mediating the infectious entry of DENV was also revealed in this study. Conclusions Together, the findings from this study have provided a detail profiling of the human membrane trafficking cellular genes and the mechanistic insight into the interplay of these host genes with DENV to initiate an infection, hence broadening our understanding on the entry pathway of this medically important viral pathogen. These data may also provide a new potential avenue for development of anti

  15. Cystic Fibrosis, Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and Drugs: Insights from Cellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Robert J; Bradbury, Neil A

    2018-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell is organized into membrane-delineated compartments that are characterized by specific cadres of proteins sustaining biochemically distinct cellular processes. The appropriate subcellular localization of proteins is key to proper organelle function and provides a physiological context for cellular processes. Disruption of normal trafficking pathways for proteins is seen in several genetic diseases, where a protein's absence for a specific subcellular compartment leads to organelle disruption, and in the context of an individual, a disruption of normal physiology. Importantly, several drug therapies can also alter protein trafficking, causing unwanted side effects. Thus, a deeper understanding of trafficking pathways needs to be appreciated as novel therapeutic modalities are proposed. Despite the promising efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, the intracellular bioavailability of these compounds has proved to be a potential barrier, leading to failures in treatments for various diseases and disorders. While endocytosis of drug moieties provides an efficient means of getting material into cells, the subsequent release and endosomal escape of materials into the cytosol where they need to act has been a barrier. An understanding of cellular protein/lipid trafficking pathways has opened up strategies for increasing drug bioavailability. Approaches to enhance endosomal exit have greatly increased the cytosolic bioavailability of drugs and will provide a means of investigating previous drugs that may have been shelved due to their low cytosolic concentration.

  16. PINK1 regulates mitochondrial trafficking in dendrites of cortical neurons through mitochondrial PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Banerjee, Tania; Dagda, Raul Y; Dagda, Marisela; Chu, Charleen T; Rice, Monica; Vazquez-Mayorga, Emmanuel; Dagda, Ruben K

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondrial Protein Kinase A (PKA) and PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1), which is linked to Parkinson's disease, are two neuroprotective serine/threonine kinases that regulate dendrite remodeling and mitochondrial function. We have previously shown that PINK1 regulates dendrite morphology by enhancing PKA activity. Here, we show the molecular mechanisms by which PINK1 and PKA in the mitochondrion interact to regulate dendrite remodeling, mitochondrial morphology, content, and trafficking in dendrites. PINK1-deficient cortical neurons exhibit impaired mitochondrial trafficking, reduced mitochondrial content, fragmented mitochondria, and a reduction in dendrite outgrowth compared to wild-type neurons. Transient expression of wild-type, but not a PKA-binding-deficient mutant of the PKA-mitochondrial scaffold dual-specificity A Kinase Anchoring Protein 1 (D-AKAP1), restores mitochondrial trafficking, morphology, and content in dendrites of PINK1-deficient cortical neurons suggesting that recruiting PKA to the mitochondrion reverses mitochondrial pathology in dendrites induced by loss of PINK1. Mechanistically, full-length and cleaved forms of PINK1 increase the binding of the regulatory subunit β of PKA (PKA/RIIβ) to D-AKAP1 to enhance the autocatalytic-mediated phosphorylation of PKA/RIIβ and PKA activity. D-AKAP1/PKA governs mitochondrial trafficking in dendrites via the Miro-2/TRAK2 complex and by increasing the phosphorylation of Miro-2. Our study identifies a new role of D-AKAP1 in regulating mitochondrial trafficking through Miro-2, and supports a model in which PINK1 and mitochondrial PKA participate in a similar neuroprotective signaling pathway to maintain dendrite connectivity. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Glucocorticoid-regulated and constitutive trafficking of proteolytically processed cell surface-associated glycoproteins in wild type and variant rat hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacher, S.L.; Goodman, L.J.; Bravo, D.A.; Wong, K.Y.; Goldfine, I.D.; Hawley, D.M.; Firestone, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate the trafficking of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) glycoproteins to the cell surface in the rat hepatoma cell line M1.54, but not in the immunoselected sorting variant CR4. To compare the localization of MMTV glycoproteins to another proteolytically processed glycoprotein, both wild type M1.54 cells and variant CR4 cells were transfected with a human insulin receptor (hIR) expression vector, pRSVhIR. The production of cell surface hIR was monitored in dexamethasone-treated and -untreated wild type M1.54 and variant CR4 cells by indirect immunofluorescence, direct plasma membrane immunoprecipitation, and by [125I] insulin binding. In both wild type and variant rat hepatoma cells, hIR were localized at the cell surface in the presence or in the absence of 1 microM dexamethasone. In contrast, the glucocorticoid-regulated trafficking of cell surface MMTV glycoproteins occurred only in wild type M1.54 cells. We conclude that the hIR, which undergoes posttranslational processing reactions similar to MMTV glycoproteins, does not require glucocorticoids to be transported to the plasma membrane and is representative of a subset of cell surface glycoproteins whose trafficking is constitutive in rat hepatoma cells. Thus, MMTV glycoproteins and hIR provide specific cell surface markers to characterize the glucocorticoid-regulated and constitutive sorting pathways

  18. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma membrane, ER, and ERC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbarino, J.; Pan, M. H.; Chin, H. F.

    2012-01-01

    small hairpin RNA knockdown technology to reduce STARD4 expression in HepG2 cells. In a cholesterol-poor environment, we found that a reduction in STARD4 expression leads to retention of cholesterol at the plasma membrane, reduction of endoplasmic reticulum-associated cholesterol, and decreased ACAT...... synthesized cholesteryl esters. Furthermore, D4 KD cells exhibited a reduced rate of sterol transport to the endocytic recycling compartment after cholesterol repletion. Although these cells displayed normal endocytic trafficking in cholesterol-poor and replete conditions, cell surface low density lipoprotein...... membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment to the endoplasmic reticulum and perhaps other intracellular compartments as well. -Garbarino, J., M. Pan, H.F. Chin, F.W. Lund, F.R. Maxfield, and J.L. Breslow. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma...

  19. Kinetic imaging of NPC1L1 and sterol trafficking between plasma membrane and recycling endosomes in hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig Petersen, Nicole; Færgeman, Nils J; Yu, Liqing

    2008-01-01

    fluorescent protein (NPC1L1-EGFP) and cholesterol analogues in hepatoma cells. At steady state about 42% of NPC1L1 resided in the transferrin (Tf) positive, sterol enriched endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), while time-lapse microscopy demonstrated NPC1L1 traffic between plasma membrane and ERC...... the ERC to the plasma membrane. NPC1L1-EGFP facilitated transport of fluorescent sterols from the plasma membrane to the ERC. Insulin induced translocation of vesicles containing NPC1L1 and fluorescent sterol from the ERC to the cell membrane. Upon polarization of hepatoma cells NPC1L1 resided almost...... exclusively in the canalicular membrane, where the protein is highly mobile. Our study demonstrates dynamic trafficking of NPC1L1 between cell surface and intracellular compartments and suggests that this transport is involved in NPC1L1 mediated cellular sterol uptake....

  20. ROBO4-Mediated Vascular Integrity Regulates the Directionality of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Smith-Berdan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in clinical therapy for over half a century, the mechanisms that regulate HSC trafficking, engraftment, and life-long persistence after transplantation are unclear. Here, we show that the vascular endothelium regulates HSC trafficking into and out of bone marrow (BM niches. Surprisingly, we found that instead of acting as barriers to cellular entry, vascular endothelial cells, via the guidance molecule ROBO4, actively promote HSC translocation across vessel walls into the BM space. In contrast, we found that the vasculature inhibits the reverse process, as induced vascular permeability led to a rapid increase in HSCs in the blood stream. Thus, the vascular endothelium reinforces HSC localization to BM niches both by promoting HSC extravasation from blood-to-BM and by forming vascular barriers that prevent BM-to-blood escape. Our results uncouple the mechanisms that regulate the directionality of HSC trafficking and show that the vasculature can be targeted to improve hematopoietic transplantation therapies.

  1. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14 P75L mutant. The ttd14 P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14 P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  2. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C Cerny

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP and TRP-like (TRPL and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1 and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14, which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14P75L mutant. The ttd14P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane.

  3. Loss-of-function of the ciliopathy protein Cc2d2a disorganizes the vesicle fusion machinery at the periciliary membrane and indirectly affects Rab8-trafficking in zebrafish photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda Naharros, Irene; Gesemann, Matthias; Mateos, José M; Barmettler, Gery; Forbes, Austin; Ziegler, Urs; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Bachmann-Gagescu, Ruxandra

    2017-12-01

    Ciliopathies are human disorders caused by dysfunction of primary cilia, ubiquitous organelles involved in transduction of environmental signals such as light sensation in photoreceptors. Concentration of signal detection proteins such as opsins in the ciliary membrane is achieved by RabGTPase-regulated polarized vesicle trafficking and by a selective barrier at the ciliary base, the transition zone (TZ). Dysfunction of the TZ protein CC2D2A causes Joubert/Meckel syndromes in humans and loss of ciliary protein localization in animal models, including opsins in retinal photoreceptors. The link between the TZ and upstream vesicle trafficking has been little explored to date. Moreover, the role of the small GTPase Rab8 in opsin-carrier vesicle (OCV) trafficking has been recently questioned in a mouse model. Using correlative light and electron microscopy and live imaging in zebrafish photoreceptors, we provide the first live characterization of Rab8-mediated trafficking in photoreceptors in vivo. Our results support a possibly redundant role for both Rab8a/b paralogs in OCV trafficking, based on co-localization of Rab8 and opsins in vesicular structures, and joint movement of Rab8-tagged particles with opsin. We further investigate the role of the TZ protein Cc2d2a in Rab8-mediated trafficking using cc2d2a zebrafish mutants and identify a requirement for Cc2d2a in the latest step of OCV trafficking, namely vesicle fusion. Progressive accumulation of opsin-containing vesicles in the apical portion of photoreceptors lacking Cc2d2a is caused by disorganization of the vesicle fusion machinery at the periciliary membrane with mislocalization and loss of the t-SNAREs SNAP25 and Syntaxin3 and of the exocyst component Exoc4. We further observe secondary defects on upstream Rab8-trafficking with cytoplasmic accumulation of Rab8. Taken together, our results support participation of Rab8 in OCV trafficking and identify a novel role for the TZ protein Cc2d2a in fusion of incoming

  4. Quantification of the Force of Nanoparticle-Cell Membrane Interactions and Its Influence on Intracellular Trafficking of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasir, Jaspreet K.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with the cell membrane and their trafficking through cells is imperative to fully explore the use of NPs for efficient intracellular delivery of therapeutics. Here, we report a novel method of measuring the force of NP-cell membrane interactions using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Poly(dl-lactide co-glycolide, PLGA) NPs functionalized with poly-l-lysine were used as a model system, to demonstrate that this force determines the adhesive interaction of NPs with the cell membrane and in turn the extent of cellular uptake of NPs, and hence that of the encapsulated therapeutic. Cellular uptake of NPs was monitored using AFM imaging, and the dynamics of their intracellular distribution was quantified using confocal microscopy. Results demonstrated that the functionalized NPs have a five-fold greater force of adhesion with the cell membrane and the time-lapse AFM images show their rapid internalization than unmodified NPs. The intracellular trafficking study showed that the functionalized NPs escape more rapidly and efficiently from late endosomes than unmodified NPs and result in 10-fold higher intracellular delivery of the encapsulated model protein. The findings described herein enhance our basic understanding of the NP-cell membrane interaction on the basis of physical phenomena that could have wider applications in developing efficient nanocarrier systems for intracellular delivery of therapeutics. PMID:18692238

  5. Ubiquitin-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix protein is important for viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao E Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Paramyxoviruses are known to replicate in the cytoplasm and bud from the plasma membrane. Matrix is the major structural protein in paramyxoviruses that mediates viral assembly and budding. Curiously, the matrix proteins of a few paramyxoviruses have been found in the nucleus, although the biological function associated with this nuclear localization remains obscure. We report here that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix (NiV-M protein and associated post-translational modification play a critical role in matrix-mediated virus budding. Nipah virus (NiV is a highly pathogenic emerging paramyxovirus that causes fatal encephalitis in humans, and is classified as a Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4 pathogen. During live NiV infection, NiV-M was first detected in the nucleus at early stages of infection before subsequent localization to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. Mutations in the putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS and the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES found in NiV-M impaired its nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking and also abolished NiV-M budding. A highly conserved lysine residue in the NLS served dual functions: its positive charge was important for mediating nuclear import, and it was also a potential site for monoubiquitination which regulates nuclear export of the protein. Concordantly, overexpression of ubiquitin enhanced NiV-M budding whereas depletion of free ubiquitin in the cell (via proteasome inhibitors resulted in nuclear retention of NiV-M and blocked viral budding. Live Nipah virus budding was exquisitely sensitive to proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib, an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor for treating multiple myeloma, reduced viral titers with an IC(50 of 2.7 nM, which is 100-fold less than the peak plasma concentration that can be achieved in humans. This opens up the possibility of using an "off-the-shelf" therapeutic against acute NiV infection.

  6. Trafficking and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a complex network of posttranslational modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Michelle L.; Barnes, Stephen; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications add diversity to protein function. Throughout its life cycle, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) undergoes numerous covalent posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including glycosylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, phosphorylation, and palmitoylation. These modifications regulate key steps during protein biogenesis, such as protein folding, trafficking, stability, function, and association with protein partners and therefore may serve as targets for therapeutic manipulation. More generally, an improved understanding of molecular mechanisms that underlie CFTR PTMs may suggest novel treatment strategies for CF and perhaps other protein conformational diseases. This review provides a comprehensive summary of co- and posttranslational CFTR modifications and their significance with regard to protein biogenesis. PMID:27474090

  7. Novel role for proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) in membrane trafficking of proteinase-activated receptor 4 (PAR4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret R; McIntosh, Kathryn A; Pediani, John D; Robben, Joris; Cooke, Alexandra E; Nilsson, Mary; Gould, Gwyn W; Mundell, Stuart; Milligan, Graeme; Plevin, Robin

    2012-05-11

    Proteinase-activated receptors 4 (PAR(4)) is a class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) recognized through the ability of serine proteases such as thrombin and trypsin to mediate receptor activation. Due to the irreversible nature of activation, a fresh supply of receptor is required to be mobilized to the cell surface for responsiveness to agonist to be sustained. Unlike other PAR subtypes, the mechanisms regulating receptor trafficking of PAR(4) remain unknown. Here, we report novel features of the intracellular trafficking of PAR(4) to the plasma membrane. PAR(4) was poorly expressed at the plasma membrane and largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a complex with the COPI protein subunit β-COP1. Analysis of the PAR(4) protein sequence identified an arginine-based (RXR) ER retention sequence located within intracellular loop-2 (R(183)AR → A(183)AA), mutation of which allowed efficient membrane delivery of PAR(4). Interestingly, co-expression with PAR(2) facilitated plasma membrane delivery of PAR(4), an effect produced through disruption of β-COP1 binding and facilitation of interaction with the chaperone protein 14-3-3ζ. Intermolecular FRET studies confirmed heterodimerization between PAR(2) and PAR(4). PAR(2) also enhanced glycosylation of PAR(4) and activation of PAR(4) signaling. Our results identify a novel regulatory role for PAR(2) in the anterograde traffic of PAR(4). PAR(2) was shown to both facilitate and abrogate protein interactions with PAR(4), impacting upon receptor localization and cell signal transduction. This work is likely to impact markedly upon the understanding of the receptor pharmacology of PAR(4) in normal physiology and disease.

  8. Heme in pathophysiology: a matter of scavenging, metabolism and trafficking across cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Vinchi, Francesca; Fiorito, Veronica; Mercurio, Sonia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Heme (iron-protoporphyrin IX) is an essential co-factor involved in multiple biological processes: oxygen transport and storage, electron transfer, drug and steroid metabolism, signal transduction, and micro RNA processing. However, excess free-heme is highly toxic due to its ability to promote oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, thus leading to membrane injury and, ultimately, apoptosis. Thus, heme metabolism needs to be finely regulated. Intracellular heme amount is controlled at multi...

  9. Regulation of dynein-mediated autophagosomes trafficking by ASM in CASMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Zhang, Qiufang; Li, Pin-Lan; Nguyen, Thaison; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM; gene symbol Smpd1) has been shown to play a crucial role in autophagy maturation by controlling lysosomal fusion with autophagosomes in coronary arterial smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which ASM controls autophagolysosomal fusion remains unknown. In primary cultured CASMCs, lysosomal Ca2+ induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket, an atherogenic stimulus and autophagy inducer) was markedly attenuated by ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing suggesting that ASM signaling is required for TRPML1 channel activity and subsequent lysosomal Ca(2+) release. In these CASMCs, ASM deficiency or TRPML1 gene silencing markedly inhibited 7-Ket-induced dynein activation. In addition, 7-Ket-induced autophagosome trafficking, an event associated with lysosomal Ca(2+) release and dynein activity, was significantly inhibited in ASM-deficient (Smpd1(-/-)) CASMCs compared to that in Smpd1(+/+) CASMCs. Finally, overexpression of TRPML1 proteins restored 7-Ket-induced lysosomal Ca(2+) release and autophagosome trafficking in Smpd1-/- CASMCs. Collectively, these results suggest that ASM plays a critical role in regulating lysosomal TRPML1-Ca(2+) signaling and subsequent dynein-mediated autophagosome trafficking, which leads its role in controlling autophagy maturation in CASMCs under atherogenic stimulation.

  10. Stargazin regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through adaptor protein complexes during long-term depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Kakegawa, Wataru; Budisantoso, Timotheus; Nomura, Toshihiro; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2013-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) underlies learning and memory in various brain regions. Although postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking mediates LTD, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here we show that stargazin, a transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein, forms a ternary complex with adaptor proteins AP-2 and AP-3A in hippocampal neurons, depending on its phosphorylation state. Inhibiting the stargazin-AP-2 interaction disrupts NMDA-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis, and inhibiting that of stargazin-AP-3A abrogates the late endosomal/lysosomal trafficking of AMPA receptors, thereby upregulating receptor recycling to the cell surface. Similarly, stargazin’s interaction with AP-2 or AP-3A is necessary for low-frequency stimulus-evoked LTD in CA1 hippocampal neurons. Thus, stargazin has a crucial role in NMDA-dependent LTD by regulating two trafficking pathways of AMPA receptors—transport from the cell surface to early endosomes and from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes—through its sequential binding to AP-2 and AP-3A.

  11. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Ryan T; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M; Higgins, Christina A; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding. HIV-1 infects more than 34 million people worldwide causing >1 million deaths per year. Infectious virion production is activated by the essential viral Rev protein that mediates nuclear export of intron-bearing late-stage viral mRNAs. Rev's shuttling into and out of the nucleus is regulated by the antagonistic activities of both a peptide-encoded N-terminal nuclear localization signal and C-terminal nuclear export signal (NES). How Rev and related viral proteins balance strong import and export activities in order to achieve optimal levels of viral gene expression is incompletely understood. We provide evidence that multimerization provides a mechanism by which Rev transiently masks its NES peptide

  12. Size-Dependent Regulation of Intracellular Trafficking of Polystyrene Nanoparticle-Based Drug-Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Lu; Li, Xiaoming; Hu, Xingjie; Han, Yuping; Luo, Yao; Wang, Zejun; Li, Qian; Aldalbahi, Ali; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yun; Wang, Maolin; Chen, Nan

    2017-06-07

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have shown great promise as intracellular imaging probes or nanocarriers and are increasingly being used in biomedical applications. A detailed understanding of how NPs get "in and out" of cells is important for developing new nanomaterials with improved selectivity and less cytotoxicity. Both physical and chemical characteristics have been proven to regulate the cellular uptake of NPs. However, the exocytosis process and its regulation are less explored. Herein, we investigated the size-regulated endocytosis and exocytosis of carboxylated polystyrene (PS) NPs. PS NPs with a smaller size were endocytosed mainly through the clathrin-dependent pathway, whereas PS NPs with a larger size preferred caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, our results revealed exocytosis of larger PS NPs and tracked the dynamic process at the single-particle level. These results indicate that particle size is a key factor for the regulation of intracellular trafficking of NPs and provide new insight into the development of more effective cellular nanocarriers.

  13. DKWSLLL, a versatile DXXXLL-type signal with distinct roles in the Cu(+)-regulated trafficking of ATP7B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalioti, Vasiliki; Hernandez-Tiedra, Sonia; Sandoval, Ignacio V

    2014-08-01

    In the liver, the P-type ATPase and membrane pump ATP7B plays a crucial role in Cu(+) donation to cuproenzymes and in the elimination of excess Cu(+). ATP7B is endowed with a COOH-cytoplasmic (DE)XXXLL-type traffic signal. We find that accessory (Lys -3, Trp -2, Ser -1 and Leu +2) and canonical (D -4, Leu 0 and Leu +1) residues confer the DKWSLLL signal with the versatility required for the Cu(+)-regulated cycling of ATP7B between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the plasma membrane (PM). The separate mutation of these residues caused a disruption of the signal, resulting in different ATP7B distribution phenotypes. These phenotypes indicate the key roles of specific residues at separate steps of ATP7B trafficking, including sorting at the TGN, transport from the TGN to the PM and its endocytosis, and recycling to the TGN and PM. The distinct roles of ATP7B in the TGN and PM and the variety of phenotypes caused by the mutation of the canonical and accessory residues of the DKWSLLL signal can explain the separate or joined presentation of Wilson's cuprotoxicosis and the dysfunction of the cuproenzymes that accept Cu(+) at the TGN. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. BACE1 protein endocytosis and trafficking are differentially regulated by ubiquitination at lysine 501 and the Di-leucine motif in the carboxyl terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eugene L; Biscaro, Barbara; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-12-14

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a membrane-tethered member of the aspartyl proteases that has been identified as β-secretase. BACE1 is targeted through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane and then is internalized to endosomes. Sorting of membrane proteins to the endosomes and lysosomes is regulated by the interaction of signals present in their carboxyl-terminal fragment with specific trafficking molecules. The BACE1 carboxyl-terminal fragment contains a di-leucine sorting signal ((495)DDISLL(500)) and a ubiquitination site at Lys-501. Here, we report that lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 (BACE1K501R) does not affect the rate of endocytosis but produces BACE1 stabilization and accumulation of BACE1 in early and late endosomes/lysosomes as well as at the cell membrane. In contrast, the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA) greatly impairs BACE1 endocytosis and produces a delayed retrograde transport of BACE1 to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and a delayed delivery of BACE1 to the lysosomes, thus decreasing its degradation. Moreover, the combination of the lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA/KR) produces additive effects on BACE1 stabilization and defective internalization. Finally, BACE1LLAA/KR accumulates in the TGN, while its levels are decreased in EEA1-positive compartments indicating that both ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the di-leucine motif are necessary for the trafficking of BACE1 from the TGN to early endosomes. Our studies have elucidated a differential role for the di-leucine motif and ubiquitination at Lys-501 in BACE1 endocytosis, trafficking, and degradation and suggest the involvement of multiple adaptor molecules.

  15. BACE1 Protein Endocytosis and Trafficking Are Differentially Regulated by Ubiquitination at Lysine 501 and the Di-leucine Motif in the Carboxyl Terminus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eugene L.; Biscaro, Barbara; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a membrane-tethered member of the aspartyl proteases that has been identified as β-secretase. BACE1 is targeted through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane and then is internalized to endosomes. Sorting of membrane proteins to the endosomes and lysosomes is regulated by the interaction of signals present in their carboxyl-terminal fragment with specific trafficking molecules. The BACE1 carboxyl-terminal fragment contains a di-leucine sorting signal (495DDISLL500) and a ubiquitination site at Lys-501. Here, we report that lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 (BACE1K501R) does not affect the rate of endocytosis but produces BACE1 stabilization and accumulation of BACE1 in early and late endosomes/lysosomes as well as at the cell membrane. In contrast, the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA) greatly impairs BACE1 endocytosis and produces a delayed retrograde transport of BACE1 to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and a delayed delivery of BACE1 to the lysosomes, thus decreasing its degradation. Moreover, the combination of the lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA/KR) produces additive effects on BACE1 stabilization and defective internalization. Finally, BACE1LLAA/KR accumulates in the TGN, while its levels are decreased in EEA1-positive compartments indicating that both ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the di-leucine motif are necessary for the trafficking of BACE1 from the TGN to early endosomes. Our studies have elucidated a differential role for the di-leucine motif and ubiquitination at Lys-501 in BACE1 endocytosis, trafficking, and degradation and suggest the involvement of multiple adaptor molecules. PMID:23109336

  16. The ESCRT regulator Did2 maintains the balance between long-distance endosomal transport and endocytic trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Haag

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In highly polarised cells, like fungal hyphae, early endosomes function in both endocytosis as well as long-distance transport of various cargo including mRNA and protein complexes. However, knowledge on the crosstalk between these seemingly different trafficking processes is scarce. Here, we demonstrate that the ESCRT regulator Did2 coordinates endosomal transport in fungal hyphae of Ustilago maydis. Loss of Did2 results in defective vacuolar targeting, less processive long-distance transport and abnormal shuttling of early endosomes. Importantly, the late endosomal protein Rab7 and vacuolar protease Prc1 exhibit increased shuttling on these aberrant endosomes suggesting defects in endosomal maturation and identity. Consistently, molecular motors fail to attach efficiently explaining the disturbed processive movement. Furthermore, the endosomal mRNP linker protein Upa1 is hardly present on endosomes resulting in defects in long-distance mRNA transport. In conclusion, the ESCRT regulator Did2 coordinates precise maturation of endosomes and thus provides the correct membrane identity for efficient endosomal long-distance transport.

  17. Genome comparison implies the role of Wsm2 in membrane trafficking and protein degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorong Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Wsm2 may combat WSMV disease through a molecular mechanism involving protein degradation and/or membrane trafficking. The 93 putative Wsm2 ancestor loci discovered in this study could serve as good candidates for future genetic isolation of the true Wsm2 locus.

  18. A VESICLE TRAFFICKING PROTEIN αSNAP REGULATES PANETH CELL DIFFERENTIATION IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Naydenov, Nayden G.; Feygin, Alex; Jimenez, Antonio J.; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2017-01-01

    A soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein alpha (αSNAP) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking and signaling. In cultured intestinal epithelial cells, αSNAP has been shown to be essential for cell survival, motility, and adhesion; however, its physiologic functions in the intestinal mucosa remain unknown. In the present study, we used a mouse with a spontaneous hydrocephalus with hop gait (hyh) mutation of αSNAP to examine the roles of this trafficking protein in regulating intestinal epithelial homeostasis in vivo. Homozygous hyh mice demonstrated decreased expression of αSNAP protein in the intestinal epithelium, but did not display gross abnormalities of epithelial architecture in the colon and ileum. Such αSNAP depletion attenuated differentiation of small intestinal epithelial enteroids ex vivo. Furthermore, αSNAP-deficient mutant animals displayed reduced formation of lysozyme granules in small intestinal crypts and decreased expression of lysozyme and defensins in the intestinal mucosa, which is indicative of defects in Paneth cell differentiation. By contrast, development of Goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells, and assembly of enterocyte apical junctions was not altered in hyh mutant mice. Our data revealed a novel role of αSNAP in the intestinal Paneth cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:28359759

  19. A vesicle trafficking protein αSNAP regulates Paneth cell differentiation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Naydenov, Nayden G; Feygin, Alex; Jimenez, Antonio J; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2017-05-13

    A soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein alpha (αSNAP) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking and signaling. In cultured intestinal epithelial cells, αSNAP has been shown to be essential for cell survival, motility, and adhesion; however, its physiologic functions in the intestinal mucosa remain unknown. In the present study, we used a mouse with a spontaneous hydrocephalus with hop gait (hyh) mutation of αSNAP to examine the roles of this trafficking protein in regulating intestinal epithelial homeostasis in vivo. Homozygous hyh mice demonstrated decreased expression of αSNAP protein in the intestinal epithelium, but did not display gross abnormalities of epithelial architecture in the colon and ileum. Such αSNAP depletion attenuated differentiation of small intestinal epithelial enteroids ex vivo. Furthermore, αSNAP-deficient mutant animals displayed reduced formation of lysozyme granules in small intestinal crypts and decreased expression of lysozyme and defensins in the intestinal mucosa, which is indicative of defects in Paneth cell differentiation. By contrast, development of Goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells, and assembly of enterocyte apical junctions was not altered in hyh mutant mice. Our data revealed a novel role of αSNAP in the intestinal Paneth cell differentiation in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Akt Substrate of 160 kD Regulates Na+,K+-ATPase Trafficking in Response to Energy Depletion and Renal Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daiane S.; Thulin, Gunilla; Loffing, Johannes; Kashgarian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Renal ischemia and reperfusion injury causes loss of renal epithelial cell polarity and perturbations in tubular solute and fluid transport. Na+,K+-ATPase, which is normally found at the basolateral plasma membrane of renal epithelial cells, is internalized and accumulates in intracellular compartments after renal ischemic injury. We previously reported that the subcellular distribution of Na+,K+-ATPase is modulated by direct binding to Akt substrate of 160 kD (AS160), a Rab GTPase-activating protein that regulates the trafficking of glucose transporter 4 in response to insulin and muscle contraction. Here, we investigated the effect of AS160 on Na+,K+-ATPase trafficking in response to energy depletion. We found that AS160 is required for the intracellular accumulation of Na+,K+-ATPase that occurs in response to energy depletion in cultured epithelial cells. Energy depletion led to dephosphorylation of AS160 at S588, which was required for the energy depletion–induced accumulation of Na,K-ATPase in intracellular compartments. In AS160-knockout mice, the effects of renal ischemia on the distribution of Na+,K+-ATPase were substantially reduced in the epithelial cells of distal segments of the renal tubules. These data demonstrate that AS160 has a direct role in linking the trafficking of Na+,K+-ATPase to the energy state of renal epithelial cells. PMID:25788531

  1. Akt Substrate of 160 kD Regulates Na+,K+-ATPase Trafficking in Response to Energy Depletion and Renal Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daiane S; Thulin, Gunilla; Loffing, Johannes; Kashgarian, Michael; Caplan, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Renal ischemia and reperfusion injury causes loss of renal epithelial cell polarity and perturbations in tubular solute and fluid transport. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, which is normally found at the basolateral plasma membrane of renal epithelial cells, is internalized and accumulates in intracellular compartments after renal ischemic injury. We previously reported that the subcellular distribution of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is modulated by direct binding to Akt substrate of 160 kD (AS160), a Rab GTPase-activating protein that regulates the trafficking of glucose transporter 4 in response to insulin and muscle contraction. Here, we investigated the effect of AS160 on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase trafficking in response to energy depletion. We found that AS160 is required for the intracellular accumulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase that occurs in response to energy depletion in cultured epithelial cells. Energy depletion led to dephosphorylation of AS160 at S588, which was required for the energy depletion-induced accumulation of Na,K-ATPase in intracellular compartments. In AS160-knockout mice, the effects of renal ischemia on the distribution of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were substantially reduced in the epithelial cells of distal segments of the renal tubules. These data demonstrate that AS160 has a direct role in linking the trafficking of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase to the energy state of renal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. [Membrane-bound cytokine and feedforward regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-Fu; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Tong; Song, Yu-Hua

    2013-10-01

    Feedback and feedforward widely exist in life system, both of them are the basic processes of control system. While the concept of feedback has been widely used in life science, feedforward regulation was systematically studied in neurophysiology, awaiting further evidence and mechanism in molecular biology and cell biology. The authors put forward a hypothesis about the feedforward regulation of membrane bound macrophage colony stimulation factor (mM-CSF) on the basis of their previous work. This hypothesis might provide a new direction for the study on the biological effects of mM-CSF on leukemia and solid tumors, and contribute to the study on other membrane bound cytokines.

  3. C-terminus of progranulin interacts with the beta-propeller region of sortilin to regulate progranulin trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Zheng

    Full Text Available Progranulin haplo-insufficiency is a main cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD with TDP-43 aggregates. Previous studies have shown that sortilin regulates progranulin trafficking and is a main determinant of progranulin level in the brain. In this study, we mapped the binding site between progranulin and sortilin. Progranulin binds to the beta-propeller region of sortilin through its C-terminal tail. The C-terminal progranulin fragment is fully sufficient for sortilin binding and progranulin C-terminal peptide displaces progranulin binding to sortilin. Deletion of the last 3 residues of progranulin (QLL abolishes its binding to sortilin and also sortilin dependent regulation of progranulin trafficking. Since progranulin haplo-insufficiency results in FTLD, these results may provide important insights into future studies of progranulin trafficking and signaling and progranulin based therapy for FTLD.

  4. C-Terminus of Progranulin Interacts with the Beta-Propeller Region of Sortilin to Regulate Progranulin Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Peter S.; Mao, Yuxin; Hu, Fenghua

    2011-01-01

    Progranulin haplo-insufficiency is a main cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 aggregates. Previous studies have shown that sortilin regulates progranulin trafficking and is a main determinant of progranulin level in the brain. In this study, we mapped the binding site between progranulin and sortilin. Progranulin binds to the beta-propeller region of sortilin through its C-terminal tail. The C-terminal progranulin fragment is fully sufficient for sortilin binding and progranulin C-terminal peptide displaces progranulin binding to sortilin. Deletion of the last 3 residues of progranulin (QLL) abolishes its binding to sortilin and also sortilin dependent regulation of progranulin trafficking. Since progranulin haplo-insufficiency results in FTLD, these results may provide important insights into future studies of progranulin trafficking and signaling and progranulin based therapy for FTLD. PMID:21698296

  5. PICK1 interacts with ABP/GRIP to regulate AMPA receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Ziff, Edward B

    2005-08-04

    PICK1 and ABP/GRIP bind to the AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluR2 subunit C terminus. Transfer of the receptor from ABP/GRIP to PICK1, facilitated by GluR2 S880 phosphorylation, may initiate receptor trafficking. Here we report protein interactions that regulate these steps. The PICK1 BAR domain interacts intermolecularly with the ABP/GRIP linker II region and intramolecularly with the PICK1 PDZ domain. Binding of PKCalpha or GluR2 to the PICK1 PDZ domain disrupts the intramolecular interaction and facilitates the PICK1 BAR domain association with ABP/GRIP. Interference with the PICK1-ABP/GRIP interaction impairs S880 phosphorylation of GluR2 by PKC and decreases the constitutive surface expression of GluR2, the NMDA-induced endocytosis of GluR2, and recycling of internalized GluR2. We suggest that the PICK1 interaction with ABP/GRIP is a critical step in controlling GluR2 trafficking.

  6. Plasma Membrane Targeting of Protocadherin 15 Is Regulated by the Golgi-Associated Chaperone Protein PIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyun Nie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocadherin 15 (PCDH15 is a core component of hair cell tip-links and crucial for proper function of inner ear hair cells. Mutations of PCDH15 gene cause syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing loss. At present, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transportation of PCDH15 largely remain unknown. Here we show that PIST, a Golgi-associated, PDZ domain-containing protein, interacts with PCDH15. The interaction is mediated by the PDZ domain of PIST and the C-terminal PDZ domain-binding interface (PBI of PCDH15. Through this interaction, PIST retains PCDH15 in the trans-Golgi network (TGN and reduces the membrane expression of PCDH15. We have previously showed that PIST regulates the membrane expression of another tip-link component, cadherin 23 (CDH23. Taken together, our finding suggests that PIST regulates the intracellular trafficking and membrane targeting of the tip-link proteins CDH23 and PCDH15.

  7. Endocytosis and Endosomal Trafficking in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez Valencia, Julio; Goodman, Kaija; Otegui, Marisa S

    2016-04-29

    Endocytosis and endosomal trafficking are essential processes in cells that control the dynamics and turnover of plasma membrane proteins, such as receptors, transporters, and cell wall biosynthetic enzymes. Plasma membrane proteins (cargo) are internalized by endocytosis through clathrin-dependent or clathrin-independent mechanism and delivered to early endosomes. From the endosomes, cargo proteins are recycled back to the plasma membrane via different pathways, which rely on small GTPases and the retromer complex. Proteins that are targeted for degradation through ubiquitination are sorted into endosomal vesicles by the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery for degradation in the vacuole. Endocytic and endosomal trafficking regulates many cellular, developmental, and physiological processes, including cellular polarization, hormone transport, metal ion homeostasis, cytokinesis, pathogen responses, and development. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that mediate the recognition and sorting of endocytic and endosomal cargos, the vesiculation processes that mediate their trafficking, and their connection to cellular and physiological responses in plants.

  8. Spatio-temporal Remodeling of Functional Membrane Microdomains Organizes the Signaling Networks of a Bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Johannes; Klein, Teresa; Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Koch, Gudrun; Franke, Christian; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Ákos T; Sauer, Markus; Lopez, Daniel

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains specialized in the regulation of numerous cellular processes related to membrane organization, as diverse as signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane trafficking or pathogen invasion. It has been proposed that this functional diversity would require a

  9. Role of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in regulating EHD2 plasma membrane localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Simone

    Full Text Available The four mammalian C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHD1-EHD4 play pivotal roles in endocytic membrane trafficking. While EHD1, EHD3 and EHD4 associate with intracellular tubular/vesicular membranes, EHD2 localizes to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Currently, little is known about the regulation of EHD2. Thus, we sought to define the factors responsible for EHD2's association with the plasma membrane. The subcellular localization of endogenous EHD2 was examined in HeLa cells using confocal microscopy. Although EHD partner proteins typically mediate EHD membrane recruitment, EHD2 was targeted to the plasma membrane independent of two well-characterized binding proteins, syndapin2 and EHBP1. Additionally, the EH domain of EHD2, which facilitates canonical EHD protein interactions, was not required to direct overexpressed EHD2 to the cell surface. On the other hand, several lines of evidence indicate that the plasma membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 plays a crucial role in regulating EHD2 subcellular localization. Pharmacologic perturbation of PIP2 metabolism altered PIP2 plasma membrane distribution (as assessed by confocal microscopy, and caused EHD2 to redistribute away from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpressed EHD2 localized to PIP2-enriched vacuoles generated by active Arf6. Finally, we show that although cytochalasin D caused actin microfilaments to collapse, EHD2 was nevertheless maintained at the plasma membrane. Intriguingly, cytochalasin D induced relocalization of both PIP2 and EHD2 to actin aggregates, supporting a role of PIP2 in controlling EHD2 subcellular localization. Altogether, these studies emphasize the significance of membrane lipid composition for EHD2 subcellular distribution and offer new insights into the regulation of this important endocytic protein.

  10. Cell Surface Trafficking of TLR1 Is Differentially Regulated by the Chaperones PRAT4A and PRAT4B*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bryan E.; Tapping, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    The subcellular localization of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is critical to their ability to function as innate immune sensors of microbial infection. We previously reported that an I602S polymorphism of human TLR1 is associated with aberrant trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface, loss of responses to TLR1 agonists, and differential susceptibility to diseases caused by pathogenic mycobacteria. Through an extensive analysis of receptor deletion and point mutants we have discovered that position 602 resides within a short 6 amino acid cytoplasmic region that is required for TLR1 surface expression. This short trafficking motif, in conjunction with the adjacent transmembrane domain, is sufficient to direct TLR1 to the cell surface. A serine at position 602 interrupts this trafficking motif and prevents cell surface expression of TLR1. Additionally, we have found that ER-resident TLR chaperones, PRAT4A and PRAT4B, act as positive and negative regulators of TLR1 surface trafficking, respectively. Importantly, either over-expression of PRAT4A or knock-down of PRAT4B rescues cell surface expression of the TLR1 602S variant. We also report that IFN-γ treatment of primary human monocytes derived from homozygous 602S individuals rescues TLR1 cell surface trafficking and cellular responses to soluble agonists. This event appears to be mediated by PRAT4A whose expression is strongly induced in human monocytes by IFN-γ. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism for the differential trafficking of TLR1 I602S variants, and highlight the distinct roles for PRAT4A and PRAT4B in the regulation of TLR1 surface expression. PMID:22447933

  11. STARD4 knockdown in HepG2 cells disrupts cholesterol trafficking associated with the plasma membrane, ER, and ERC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, Jeanne; Pan, Meihui; Chin, Harvey F; Lund, Frederik W; Maxfield, Frederick R; Breslow, Jan L

    2012-12-01

    STARD4, a member of the evolutionarily conserved START gene family, has been implicated in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of cholesterol. However, the direction of transport and the membranes with which this protein interacts are not clear. We present studies of STARD4 function using small hairpin RNA knockdown technology to reduce STARD4 expression in HepG2 cells. In a cholesterol-poor environment, we found that a reduction in STARD4 expression leads to retention of cholesterol at the plasma membrane, reduction of endoplasmic reticulum-associated cholesterol, and decreased ACAT synthesized cholesteryl esters. Furthermore, D4 KD cells exhibited a reduced rate of sterol transport to the endocytic recycling compartment after cholesterol repletion. Although these cells displayed normal endocytic trafficking in cholesterol-poor and replete conditions, cell surface low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) levels were increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed a decrease in NPC1 protein expression, suggesting the induction of compensatory pathways to maintain cholesterol balance. These data indicate a role for STARD4 in nonvesicular transport of cholesterol from the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment to the endoplasmic reticulum and perhaps other intracellular compartments as well.

  12. Siderophore-mediated iron trafficking in humans is regulated by iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuoming; Lanford, Robert; Mueller, Sebastian; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Luscieti, Sara; Sanchez, Mayka; Devireddy, L.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophores are best known as small iron binding molecules that facilitate microbial iron transport. In our previous study we identified a siderophore-like molecule in mammalian cells and found that its biogenesis is evolutionarily conserved. A member of the short chain dehydrogenase family of reductases, 3-OH butyrate dehydrogenase (BDH2) catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the mammalian siderophore. We have shown that depletion of the mammalian siderophore by inhibiting expression of bdh2 results in abnormal accumulation of cellular iron and mitochondrial iron deficiency. These observations suggest that the mammalian siderophore is a critical regulator of cellular iron homeostasis and facilitates mitochondrial iron import. By utilizing bioinformatics, we identified an iron-responsive element (IRE; a stem-loop structure that regulates genes expression post-transcriptionally upon binding to iron regulatory proteins or IRPs) in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of the human BDH2 (hBDH2) gene. In cultured cells as well as in patient samples we now demonstrate that the IRE confers iron-dependent regulation on hBDH2 and binds IRPs in RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, we show that the hBDH2 IRE associates with IRPs in cells and that abrogation of IRPs by RNAi eliminates the iron-dependent regulation of hBDH2 mRNA. The key physiologic implication is that iron-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of hBDH2 controls mitochondrial iron homeostasis in human cells. These observations provide a new and an unanticipated mechanism by which iron regulates its intracellular trafficking. PMID:22527885

  13. KSHV Entry and Trafficking in Target Cells—Hijacking of Cell Signal Pathways, Actin and Membrane Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV is etiologically associated with human endothelial cell hyperplastic Kaposi’s sarcoma and B-cell primary effusion lymphoma. KSHV infection of adherent endothelial and fibroblast cells are used as in vitro models for infection and KSHV enters these cells by host membrane bleb and actin mediated macropinocytosis or clathrin endocytosis pathways, respectively. Infection in endothelial and fibroblast cells is initiated by the interactions between multiple viral envelope glycoproteins and cell surface associated heparan sulfate (HS, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3 and αVβ5, and EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase (EphA2R. This review summarizes the accumulated studies demonstrating that KSHV manipulates the host signal pathways to enter and traffic in the cytoplasm of the target cells, to deliver the viral genome into the nucleus, and initiate viral gene expression. KSHV interactions with the cell surface receptors is the key platform for the manipulations of host signal pathways which results in the simultaneous induction of FAK, Src, PI3-K, Rho-GTPase, ROS, Dia-2, PKC ζ, c-Cbl, CIB1, Crk, p130Cas and GEF-C3G signal and adaptor molecules that play critical roles in the modulation of membrane and actin dynamics, and in the various steps of the early stages of infection such as entry and trafficking towards the nucleus. The Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT proteins are also recruited to assist in viral entry and trafficking. In addition, KSHV interactions with the cell surface receptors also induces the host transcription factors NF-κB, ERK1/2, and Nrf2 early during infection to initiate and modulate viral and host gene expression. Nuclear delivery of the viral dsDNA genome is immediately followed by the host innate responses such as the DNA damage response (DDR, inflammasome and interferon responses. Overall, these studies form the initial framework for further studies of

  14. Phospho-Caveolin-1 Mediates Integrin-Regulated Membrane Domain Internalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo, Miguel A.; Alderson, Nazilla B.; Grande-García, Araceli; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Schwartz, Martin A.; Kiosses, William B.; Anderson, Richard G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Growth of normal cells is anchorage-dependent because signalling through multiple pathways including Erk, PI 3-kinase and Rac requires integrin-mediated cell adhesion 1. Components of these pathways localize to low density, cholesterol-rich domains in the plasma membrane named “lipid rafts” 2,3 or “cholesterol enriched membrane microdomains” (CEMM) 4. We previously reported that integrin-mediated adhesion regulates CEMM trafficking such that cell detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM) triggers CEMM internalisation and clearance from the plasma membrane 5. We now report that this internalisation is mediated by dynamin-2 and caveolin-1. Internalisation requires phosphorylation of caveolin-1 on tyrosine 14. A shift in localisation of phospho-caveolin-1 from focal adhesions to caveolae induces CEMM internalisation upon cell detachment, which mediates inhibition of Erk, PI 3-kinase and Rac. These data define a novel molecular mechanism for growth and tumour suppression by caveolin-1. PMID:16113676

  15. Huntingtin-associated protein-1 (HAP1) regulates endocytosis and interacts with multiple trafficking-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Kimberly D; Lim, Yoon; Duffield, Michael D; Chataway, Timothy; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Keating, Damien J

    2017-07-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) was initially identified as a binding partner of huntingtin, mutations in which underlie Huntington's disease. Subcellular localization and protein interaction data indicate that HAP1 may be important in vesicle trafficking, cell signalling and receptor internalization. In this study, a proteomics approach was used for the identification of novel HAP1-interacting partners to attempt to shed light on the physiological function of HAP1. Using affinity chromatography with HAP1-GST protein fragments bound to Sepharose columns, this study identified a number of trafficking-related proteins that bind to HAP1. Interestingly, many of the proteins that were identified by mass spectrometry have trafficking-related functions and include the clathrin light chain B and Sec23A, an ER to Golgi trafficking vesicle coat component. Using co-immunoprecipitation and GST-binding assays the association between HAP1 and clathrin light chain B has been validated in vitro. This study also finds that HAP1 co-localizes with clathrin light chain B. In line with a physiological function of the HAP1-clathrin interaction this study detected a dramatic reduction in vesicle retrieval and endocytosis in adrenal chromaffin cells. Furthermore, through examination of transferrin endocytosis in HAP1 -/- cortical neurons, this study has determined that HAP1 regulates neuronal endocytosis. In this study, the interaction between HAP1 and Sec23A was also validated through endogenous co-immunoprecipitation in rat brain homogenate. Through the identification of novel HAP1 binding partners, many of which have putative trafficking roles, this study provides us with new insights into the mechanisms underlying the important physiological function of HAP1 as an intracellular trafficking protein through its protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. β-arrestin regulates estradiol membrane-initiated signaling in hypothalamic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Wong

    Full Text Available Estradiol (E2 action in the nervous system is the result of both direct nuclear and membrane-initiated signaling (EMS. E2 regulates membrane estrogen receptor-α (ERα levels through opposing mechanisms of EMS-mediated trafficking and internalization. While ß-arrestin-mediated mERα internalization has been described in the cortex, a role of ß-arrestin in EMS, which underlies multiple physiological processes, remains undefined. In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH, membrane-initiated E2 signaling modulates lordosis behavior, a measure of female sexually receptivity. To better understand EMS and regulation of ERα membrane levels, we examined the role of ß-arrestin, a molecule associated with internalization following agonist stimulation. In the present study, we used an immortalized neuronal cell line derived from embryonic hypothalamic neurons, the N-38 line, to examine whether ß-arrestins mediate internalization of mERα. β-arrestin-1 (Arrb1 was found in the ARH and in N-38 neurons. In vitro, E2 increased trafficking and internalization of full-length ERα and ERαΔ4, an alternatively spliced isoform of ERα, which predominates in the membrane. Treatment with E2 also increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 in N-38 neurons. Arrb1 siRNA knockdown prevented E2-induced ERαΔ4 internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In vivo, microinfusions of Arrb1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN into female rat ARH knocked down Arrb1 and prevented estradiol benzoate-induced lordosis behavior compared with nonsense scrambled ODN (lordosis quotient: 3 ± 2.1 vs. 85.0 ± 6.0; p < 0.0001. These results indicate a role for Arrb1 in both EMS and internalization of mERα, which are required for the E2-induction of female sexual receptivity.

  17. Cell-autonomous defense, re-organization and trafficking of membranes in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörmann, Peter; Kim, Hyeran; Ott, Thomas; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Trujillo, Marco; Wewer, Vera; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Plant cells dynamically change their architecture and molecular composition following encounters with beneficial or parasitic microbes, a process referred to as host cell reprogramming. Cell-autonomous defense reactions are typically polarized to the plant cell periphery underneath microbial contact sites, including de novo cell wall biosynthesis. Alternatively, host cell reprogramming converges in the biogenesis of membrane-enveloped compartments for accommodation of beneficial bacteria or invasive infection structures of filamentous microbes. Recent advances have revealed that, in response to microbial encounters, plasma membrane symmetry is broken, membrane tethering and SNARE complexes are recruited, lipid composition changes and plasma membrane-to-cytoskeleton signaling is activated, either for pre-invasive defense or for microbial entry. We provide a critical appraisal on recent studies with a focus on how plant cells re-structure membranes and the associated cytoskeleton in interactions with microbial pathogens, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and mycorrhiza fungi. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus gH stability and trafficking are regulated by ER-associated degradation and transmembrane architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas J; Hernandez, Rosmel E; Noriega, Vanessa M; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-03-30

    The prototypic betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. While benign in healthy individuals, CMV poses a significant threat to the immune compromised, including transplant recipients and neonates. The CMV glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO mediates infection of fibroblasts, and together with the gH/gL/UL128/130/131 a pentameric complex permits infection of epithelial, endothethial, and myeloid cells. Given the central role of the gH/gL complex during infection, we were interested in studying cellular trafficking of the gH/gL complex through generation of human cells that stably express gH and gL. When expressed alone, CMV gH and gL were degraded through the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. However, co-expression of these proteins stabilized the polypeptides and enhanced their cell-surface expression. To further define regulatory factors involved in gH/gL trafficking, a CMV gH chimera in which the gH transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail were replaced with that of human CD4 protein permitted cell surface gH expression in absence of gL. We thus demonstrate the ability of distinct cellular processes to regulate the trafficking of viral glycoproteins. Collectively, the data provide insight into the processing and trafficking requirements of CMV envelope protein complexes and provide an example of the co-opting of cellular processes by CMV.

  19. Desipramine induces disorder in cholesterol-rich membranes: implications for viral trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Salonen, Emppu; Mäkelä, Anna R.; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Vuento, Matti

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the effect of desipramine (DMI) on phospholipid bilayers and parvoviral entry was elucidated. In atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, DMI was found to introduce disorder in cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers. This was manifested by a decrease in the deuterium order parameter SCD as well as an increase in the membrane area. Disordering of the membrane suggested DMI to destabilize cholesterol-rich membrane domains (rafts) in cellular conditions. To relate the raft disrupting ability of DMI with novel biological relevance, we studied the intracellular effect of DMI using canine parvovirus (CPV), a virus known to interact with endosomal membranes and sphingomyelin, as an intracellular probe. DMI was found to cause retention of the virus in intracellular vesicular structures leading to the inhibition of viral proliferation. This implies that DMI has a deleterious effect on the viral traffic. As recycling endosomes and the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies are known to contain raft components, the effect of desipramine beyond the plasma membrane step could be caused by raft disruption leading to impaired endosomal function and possibly have direct influence on the penetration of the virus through an endosomal membrane.

  20. Desipramine induces disorder in cholesterol-rich membranes: implications for viral trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Mäkelä, Anna R; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vuento, Matti; Salonen, Emppu; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the effect of desipramine (DMI) on phospholipid bilayers and parvoviral entry was elucidated. In atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, DMI was found to introduce disorder in cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers. This was manifested by a decrease in the deuterium order parameter S CD as well as an increase in the membrane area. Disordering of the membrane suggested DMI to destabilize cholesterol-rich membrane domains (rafts) in cellular conditions. To relate the raft disrupting ability of DMI with novel biological relevance, we studied the intracellular effect of DMI using canine parvovirus (CPV), a virus known to interact with endosomal membranes and sphingomyelin, as an intracellular probe. DMI was found to cause retention of the virus in intracellular vesicular structures leading to the inhibition of viral proliferation. This implies that DMI has a deleterious effect on the viral traffic. As recycling endosomes and the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies are known to contain raft components, the effect of desipramine beyond the plasma membrane step could be caused by raft disruption leading to impaired endosomal function and possibly have direct influence on the penetration of the virus through an endosomal membrane

  1. C-Terminus of Progranulin Interacts with the Beta-Propeller Region of Sortilin to Regulate Progranulin Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yanqiu; Brady, Owen A.; Meng, Peter S.; Mao, Yuxin; Hu, Fenghua

    2011-01-01

    Progranulin haplo-insufficiency is a main cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 aggregates. Previous studies have shown that sortilin regulates progranulin trafficking and is a main determinant of progranulin level in the brain. In this study, we mapped the binding site between progranulin and sortilin. Progranulin binds to the beta-propeller region of sortilin through its C-terminal tail. The C-terminal progranulin fragment is fully sufficient for sortilin binding and...

  2. Hypothesis review: are clathrin-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-dependent membrane and protein trafficking core pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the best-characterized mechanism governing cellular membrane and protein trafficking. In this hypothesis review, we integrate recent evidence implicating CME and related cellular trafficking mechanisms in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The evidence includes proteomic and genomic findings implicating proteins and genes of the clathrin interactome. Additionally, several important candidate genes for schizophrenia, such as dysbindin, are involved in processes closely linked to CME and membrane trafficking. We discuss that key aspects of psychosis neuropathology such as synaptic dysfunction, white matter changes and aberrant neurodevelopment are all influenced by clathrin-dependent processes, and that other cellular trafficking mechanisms previously linked to psychoses interact with the clathrin interactome in important ways. Furthermore, many antipsychotic drugs have been shown to affect clathrin-interacting proteins. We propose that the targeted pharmacological manipulation of the clathrin interactome may offer fruitful opportunities for novel treatments of schizophrenia.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 October 2011; doi:10.1038\\/mp.2011.123.

  3. 78 FR 59325 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Further Implementation of Trafficking in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... whistleblowing). The revised clause would retain the $5 million threshold and the exclusion for commercial items... subpart 3.9, from retribution for whistleblowing on trafficking in persons violations. (End of provision...

  4. Investigating Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of GPCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Simon R; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    for signal transduction. One of the major mechanisms for GPCR regulation involves their endocytic trafficking, which serves to internalize the receptors from the plasma membrane and thereby attenuate G protein-dependent signaling. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that GPCRs can signal...... independently of G proteins, as well as from intracellular compartments including endosomes. It is in this context that receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking have attracted renewed interest within the GPCR field. In this chapter, we will review the current understanding and methodologies...

  5. The cysteines of the extracellular loop are crucial for trafficking of human organic cation transporter 2 to the plasma membrane and are involved in oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brast, Sabine; Grabner, Alexander; Sucic, Sonja; Sitte, Harald H; Hermann, Edwin; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schlatter, Eberhard; Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2012-03-01

    Human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2) is involved in transport of many endogenous and exogenous organic cations, mainly in kidney and brain cells. Because the quaternary structure of transmembrane proteins plays an essential role for their cellular trafficking and function, we investigated whether hOCT2 forms oligomeric complexes, and if so, which part of the transporter is involved in the oligomerization. A yeast 2-hybrid mating-based split-ubiquitin system (mbSUS), fluorescence resonance energy transfer, Western blot analysis, cross-linking experiments, immunofluorescence, and uptake measurements of the fluorescent organic cation 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium were applied to human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transfected with hOCT2 and partly also to freshly isolated human proximal tubules. The role of cysteines for oligomerization and trafficking of the transporter to the plasma membranes was investigated in cysteine mutants of hOCT2. hOCT2 formed oligomers both in the HEK293 expression system and in native human kidneys. The cysteines of the large extracellular loop are important to enable correct folding, oligomeric assembly, and plasma membrane insertion of hOCT2. Mutation of the first and the last cysteines of the loop at positions 51 and 143 abolished oligomer formation. Thus, the cysteines of the extracellular loop are important for correct trafficking of the transporter to the plasma membrane and for its oligomerization.

  6. Targeting HSP90 and monoclonal protein trafficking modulates the unfolded protein response, chaperone regulation and apoptosis in myeloma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, E J; Hartman, S V; Holstein, S A

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the production of substantial quantities of monoclonal protein. We have previously demonstrated that select inhibitors of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) induce apoptosis of myeloma cells via inhibition of Rab geranylgeranylation, leading to disruption of monoclonal protein trafficking and induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors disrupt protein folding and are currently under clinical investigation in myeloma. The effects of combining IBP and HSP90 inhibitors on cell death, monoclonal protein trafficking, the UPR and chaperone regulation were investigated in monoclonal protein-producing cells. An enhanced induction of cell death was observed following treatment with IBP and HSP90 inhibitors, which occurred through both ER stress and non-ER stress pathways. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the effects of the IBP inhibitors on intracellular monoclonal protein levels and localization as well as induction of the UPR in myeloma cells. Disparate effects on chaperone expression were observed in myeloma vs amyloid light chain cells. Here we demonstrate that the novel strategy of targeting MP trafficking in concert with HSP90 enhances myeloma cell death via a complex modulation of ER stress, UPR, and cell death pathways

  7. Membrane curvature enables N-Ras lipid anchor sorting to liquid-ordered membrane phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik Bruun; Jensen, Martin Borch; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking and sorting of membrane-anchored Ras GTPases are regulated by partitioning between distinct membrane domains. Here, in vitro experiments and microscopic molecular theory reveal membrane curvature as a new modulator of N-Ras lipid anchor and palmitoyl chain partitioning. Membrane...

  8. Cholesterol trafficking and raft-like membrane domain composition mediate scavenger receptor class B type 1-dependent lipid sensing in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Etienne; Ghezzal, Sara; Lucchi, Géraldine; Truntzer, Caroline; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Demignot, Sylvie; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Leturque, Armelle; Rousset, Monique; Carrière, Véronique

    2018-02-01

    Scavenger receptor Class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a lipid transporter and sensor. In intestinal epithelial cells, SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing is associated with SR-B1 recruitment in raft-like/ detergent-resistant membrane domains and interaction of its C-terminal transmembrane domain with plasma membrane cholesterol. To clarify the initiating events occurring during lipid sensing by SR-B1, we analyzed cholesterol trafficking and raft-like domain composition in intestinal epithelial cells expressing wild-type SR-B1 or the mutated form SR-B1-Q445A, defective in membrane cholesterol binding and signal initiation. These features of SR-B1 were found to influence both apical cholesterol efflux and intracellular cholesterol trafficking from plasma membrane to lipid droplets, and the lipid composition of raft-like domains. Lipidomic analysis revealed likely participation of d18:0/16:0 sphingomyelin and 16:0/0:0 lysophosphatidylethanolamine in lipid sensing by SR-B1. Proteomic analysis identified proteins, whose abundance changed in raft-like domains during lipid sensing, and these included molecules linked to lipid raft dynamics and signal transduction. These findings provide new insights into the role of SR-B1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and suggest molecular links between SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing and cell cholesterol and lipid droplet dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen-rich saline controls remifentanil-induced hypernociception and NMDA receptor NR1 subunit membrane trafficking through GSK-3β in the DRG in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Shu, Ruichen; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Haiyun; Li, Nan; Wang, Guolin

    2014-07-01

    Although NMDAR trafficking mediated by GSK-3β involvement in transmission of pronociceptive messages in the spinal cord has been confirmed by our previous studies, whether NMDAR trafficking is implicated in peripheral sensitization remains equivocal. It is demonstrated that inflammation is associated with spinal NMDAR-containing nociceptive neurons activation and the maintenance of opioid induced pain hypersensitivity. However, whether and how hydrogen-rich saline, as an effective anti-inflammatory drug, could prevent hyperalgesia through affecting peripheral sensitization caused by NMDAR activation remains to be explored. To test these effects, hydrogen-rich saline (2.5, 5 or 10 ml/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally after remifentanil infusion, NMDAR antagonist MK-801 or GSK-3β inhibitor TDZD-8 was administrated intravenously before remifentanil infusion in rats. We examined time course of hydrogen concentration in blood after hydrogen-rich saline administration. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated by measuring PWT and PWL for 48 post-infusion hours, respectively. Western blotting and real-time qPCR assay were applied to analyze the NR1 membrane trafficking, GSK-3β expression and activity in DRG. Inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) expressions in DRG were also analyzed. We found that NR1 membrane trafficking in DRG increased, possibly due to GSK-3β activation after remifentanil infusion. We also discovered that hydrogen-rich saline not 2.5 ml/kg but 5 and 10 ml/kg could dose-dependently attenuate mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia without affecting baseline nociceptive threshold, reduce expressions of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and decrease NR1 trafficking mediated by GSK-3β, and minimal effective concentration was observed to be higher than 10 μmol/L, namely peak concentration in arterial blood after administration of HRS 2.5 ml/kg without any influence on hyperalgesia. Our results indicated that

  10. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin α, karyopherin β, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  11. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Institute on Aging, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Chul, E-mail: scpark@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Institute on Aging, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin {alpha}, karyopherin {beta}, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  12. A Novel Nuclear Trafficking Module Regulates the Nucleocytoplasmic Localization of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist, P Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksayan, Sibil; Wiltzer, Linda; Rowe, Caitlin L.; Blondel, Danielle; Jans, David A.; Moseley, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins is central to cellular function and dysfunction during processes such as viral infection. Active protein trafficking into and out of the nucleus is dependent on the presence within cargo proteins of intrinsic specific modular signals for nuclear import (nuclear localization signals, NLSs) and export (nuclear export signals, NESs). Rabies virus (RabV) phospho (P) protein, which is largely responsible for antagonising the host anti-viral response, is expressed as five isoforms (P1–P5). The subcellular trafficking of these isoforms is thought to depend on a balance between the activities of a dominant N-terminal NES (N-NES) and a distinct C-terminal NLS (C-NLS). Specifically, the N-NES-containing isoforms P1 and P2 are cytoplasmic, whereas the shorter P3–P5 isoforms, which lack the N-NES, are believed to be nuclear through the activity of the C-NLS. Here, we show for the first time that RabV P contains an additional strong NLS in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), which, intriguingly, overlaps with the N-NES. This arrangement represents a novel nuclear trafficking module where the N-NLS is inactive in P1 but becomes activated in P3, concomitant with truncation of the N-NES, to become the principal targeting signal conferring nuclear accumulation. Understanding this unique switch arrangement of overlapping, co-regulated NES/NLS sequences is vital to delineating the critical role of RabV P protein in viral infection. PMID:22700958

  13. The SNARE VAMP7 Regulates Exocytic Trafficking of Interleukin-12 in Dendritic Cells

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    Giulia Chiaruttini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12, produced by dendritic cells in response to activation, is central to pathogen eradication and tumor rejection. The trafficking pathways controlling spatial distribution and intracellular transport of IL-12 vesicles to the cell surface are still unknown. Here, we show that intracellular IL-12 localizes in late endocytic vesicles marked by the SNARE VAMP7. Dendritic cells (DCs from VAMP7-deficient mice are partially impaired in the multidirectional release of IL-12. Upon encounter with antigen-specific T cells, IL-12-containing vesicles rapidly redistribute at the immune synapse and release IL-12 in a process entirely dependent on VAMP7 expression. Consistently, acquisition of effector functions is reduced in T cells stimulated by VAMP7-null DCs. These results provide insights into IL-12 intracellular trafficking pathways and show that VAMP7-mediated release of IL-12 at the immune synapse is a mechanism to transmit innate signals to T cells.

  14. Defects in the COG complex and COG-related trafficking regulators affect neuronal Golgi function.

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    Leslie K Climer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG complex is an evolutionarily conserved hetero-octameric protein complex that has been proposed to organize vesicle tethering at the Golgi apparatus. Defects in seven of the eight COG subunits are linked to Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG-type II, a family of rare diseases involving misregulation of protein glycosylation, alterations in Golgi structure, variations in retrograde trafficking through the Golgi and system-wide clinical pathologies. A troublesome aspect of these diseases are the neurological pathologies such as low IQ, microcephaly and cerebellar atrophy. The essential function of the COG complex is dependent upon interactions with other components of trafficking machinery, such as Rab-GTPases and SNAREs. COG-interacting Rabs and SNAREs have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Defects in Golgi maintenance disrupts trafficking and processing of essential proteins, frequently associated with and contributing to compromised neuron function and human disease. Despite the recent advances in molecular neuroscience, the subcellular bases for most neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. This article gives an overview of the potential contributions of the COG complex and its Rab and SNARE partners in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex.

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    Diana P Wehrendt

    Full Text Available It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4 had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF, an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface.

  16. Membrane Curvature and Lipid Composition Synergize To Regulate N-Ras Anchor Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik B.; Kennard, Celeste; Pedersen, Søren L.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins anchored to membranes through covalently linked fatty acids and/or isoprenoid groups play crucial roles in all forms of life. Sorting and trafficking of lipidated proteins has traditionally been discussed in the context of partitioning to membrane domains of different lipid composition. We...

  17. Barcoding of GPCR trafficking and signaling through the various trafficking roadmaps by compartmentalized signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Suleiman W; Nooh, Mohammed M

    2017-08-01

    Proper signaling by G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is dependent on the specific repertoire of transducing, enzymatic and regulatory kinases and phosphatases that shape its signaling output. Activation and signaling of the GPCR through its cognate G protein is impacted by G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-imprinted "barcodes" that recruit β-arrestins to regulate subsequent desensitization, biased signaling and endocytosis of the GPCR. The outcome of agonist-internalized GPCR in endosomes is also regulated by sequence motifs or "barcodes" within the GPCR that mediate its recycling to the plasma membrane or retention and eventual degradation as well as its subsequent signaling in endosomes. Given the vast number of diverse sequences in GPCR, several trafficking mechanisms for endosomal GPCR have been described. The majority of recycling GPCR, are sorted out of endosomes in a "sequence-dependent pathway" anchored around a type-1 PDZ-binding module found in their C-tails. For a subset of these GPCR, a second "barcode" imprinted onto specific GPCR serine/threonine residues by compartmentalized kinase networks was required for their efficient recycling through the "sequence-dependent pathway". Mutating the serine/threonine residues involved, produced dramatic effects on GPCR trafficking, indicating that they played a major role in setting the trafficking itinerary of these GPCR. While endosomal SNX27, retromer/WASH complexes and actin were required for efficient sorting and budding of all these GPCR, additional proteins were required for GPCR sorting via the second "barcode". Here we will review recent developments in GPCR trafficking in general and the human β 1 -adrenergic receptor in particular across the various trafficking roadmaps. In addition, we will discuss the role of GPCR trafficking in regulating endosomal GPCR signaling, which promote biochemical and physiological effects that are distinct from those generated by the GPCR signal transduction

  18. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

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    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  19. AQP4 plasma membrane trafficking or channel gating is not significantly modulated by phosphorylation at C-terminal serine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assentoft, Mette; Larsen, Brian R; Olesen, Emma T B

    2014-01-01

    heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes (along with serine-to-aspartate mutants of the same residues to mimic a phosphorylation). None of the mutant AQP4 constructs displayed alterations in the unit water permeability. Thus phosphorylation of six different serine residues in the COOH terminus of AQP4....... Phosphorylation of aquaporins can regulate plasma membrane localization and, possibly, the unit water permeability via gating of the AQP channel itself. In vivo phosphorylation of six serine residues in the COOH terminus of AQP4 has been detected by mass spectrometry: Ser(276), Ser(285), Ser(315), Ser(316), Ser...

  20. Membrane tension regulates clathrin-coated pit dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular organization depends on close communication between the extracellular environment and a network of cytoskeleton filaments. The interactions between cytoskeletal filaments and the plasma membrane lead to changes in membrane tension that in turns help regulate biological processes. Endocytosis is thought to be stimulated by low membrane tension and the removal of membrane increases membrane tension. While it is appreciated that the opposing effects of exocytosis and endocytosis have on keeping plasma membrane tension to a set point, it is not clear how membrane tension affects the dynamics of clathrin-coated pits (CCPs), the individual functional units of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, although it was recently shown that actin dynamics counteracts membrane tension during CCP formation, it is not clear what roles plasma membrane tension plays during CCP initiation. Based on the notion that plasma membrane tension is increased when the membrane area increases during cell spreading, we designed micro-patterned surfaces of different sizes to control the cell spreading sizes. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of living cells and high content image analysis were used to quantify the dynamics of CCPs. We found that there is an increased proportion of CCPs with short (<20s) lifetime for cells on larger patterns. Interestingly, cells on larger patterns have higher CCP initiation density, an effect unexpected based on the conventional view of decreasing endocytosis with increasing membrane tension. Furthermore, by analyzing the intensity profiles of CCPs that were longer-lived, we found CCP intensity decreases with increasing cell size, indicating that the CCPs are smaller with increasing membrane tension. Finally, disruption of actin dynamics significantly increased the number of short-lived CCPs, but also decreased CCP initiation rate. Together, our study reveals new mechanistic insights into how plasma membrane tension regulates

  1. Regulation of HTLV-1 Tax Stability, Cellular Trafficking and NF-κB Activation by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%–5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis. PMID:25341660

  2. αPIX Is a Trafficking Regulator that Balances Recycling and Degradation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Kortüm

    Full Text Available Endosomal sorting is an essential control mechanism for signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. We report here that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX, which modulates the activity of Rho-GTPases, is a potent bimodal regulator of EGFR trafficking. αPIX interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl, an enzyme that attaches ubiquitin to EGFR, thereby labelling this tyrosine kinase receptor for lysosomal degradation. We show that EGF stimulation induces αPIX::c-Cbl complex formation. Simultaneously, αPIX and c-Cbl protein levels decrease, which depends on both αPIX binding to c-Cbl and c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase activity. Through interaction αPIX sequesters c-Cbl from EGFR and this results in reduced EGFR ubiquitination and decreased EGFR degradation upon EGF treatment. However, quantitatively more decisive for cellular EGFR distribution than impaired EGFR degradation is a strong stimulating effect of αPIX on EGFR recycling to the cell surface. This function depends on the GIT binding domain of αPIX but not on interaction with c-Cbl or αPIX exchange activity. In summary, our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated function of αPIX as a strong promoter of EGFR recycling. We suggest that the novel recycling regulator αPIX and the degradation factor c-Cbl closely cooperate in the regulation of EGFR trafficking: uncomplexed αPIX and c-Cbl mediate a positive and a negative feedback on EGFR signaling, respectively; αPIX::c-Cbl complex formation, however, results in mutual inhibition, which may reflect a stable condition in the homeostasis of EGF-induced signal flow.

  3. Estradiol-induced estrogen receptor-α trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Galyna; Kuo, John; Hamid, Naheed; Micevych, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Estradiol has rapid actions in the central nervous system, which are mediated by membrane estrogen receptors (ERs) and activate cell signaling pathways through interaction with metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Membrane-initiated estradiol signaling increases the free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) that stimulates the synthesis of neuroprogesterone in astrocytes. We used surface biotinylation to demonstrate that ERα has an extracellular portion. In addition to the full length ERα (apparent M.W. 66 kDa), surface biotinylation labeled an ERα-immunoreactive protein (M.W. ~ 52 kDa) identified by both COOH- and NH2-directed antibodies. Estradiol treatment regulated membrane levels of both proteins in parallel: within 5 min, estradiol significantly increased membrane levels of the 66 kDa and 52 kDa ERα. Internalization, a measure of membrane receptor activation, was also increased by estradiol with a similar time course. Continuous treatment with estradiol for 24–48 hr reduced ERα levels, suggesting receptor down-regulation. Estradiol also increased mGluR1a trafficking and internalization, consistent with the proposed ERα-mGluR1a interaction. Blocking ER with ICI 182,780 or mGluR1a with LY 367385 prevented ERα trafficking to and from the membrane. Estradiol-induced [Ca2+]i flux was also significantly increased at the time of peak ERα activation/internalization. These results demonstrate that ERα is present in the membrane and has an extracellular portion. Furthermore, membrane levels and internalization of ERα are regulated by estradiol and mGluR1a ligands. The pattern of trafficking into and out of the membrane suggests that the changing concentration of estradiol during the estrous cycle regulates ERα to augment and then terminate membrane-initiated signaling. PMID:19955385

  4. Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells by altering CD1d trafficking through the endocytic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; Carey, Gregory B; Webb, Tonya J

    2014-09-01

    NKT cells are a unique subset of T cells that recognize glycolipid Ags presented in the context of CD1d molecules. NKT cells mount strong antitumor responses and are a major focus in developing effective cancer immunotherapy. It is known that CD1d molecules are constantly internalized from the cell surface, recycled through the endocytic compartments, and re-expressed on the cell surface. However, little is known about the regulation of CD1d-mediated Ag processing and presentation in B cell lymphoma. Prosurvival factors of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-xL, are often upregulated in B cell lymphomas and are intimately linked to sphingolipid metabolism, as well as the endocytic compartments. We hypothesized that Bcl-xL can regulate CD1d-mediated Ag presentation to NKT cells. We found that overexpression or induction of Bcl-xL led to increased Ag presentation to NKT cells. Conversely, the inhibition or knockdown of Bcl-xL led to decreased NKT cell activation. Furthermore, knockdown of Bcl-xL resulted in the loss of CD1d trafficking to lysosome-associated membrane protein 1(+) compartments. Rab7, a late endosomal protein, was upregulated and CD1d molecules accumulated in the Rab7(+) late endosomal compartment. These results demonstrate that Bcl-xL regulates CD1d-mediated Ag processing and presentation to NKT cells by altering the late endosomal compartment and changing the intracellular localization of CD1d. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. DISC1 Protein Regulates γ-Aminobutyric Acid, Type A (GABAA) Receptor Trafficking and Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing; Graziane, Nicholas M; Gu, Zhenglin; Yan, Zhen

    2015-11-13

    Association studies have suggested that Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) confers a genetic risk at the level of endophenotypes that underlies many major mental disorders. Despite the progress in understanding the significance of DISC1 at neural development, the mechanisms underlying DISC1 regulation of synaptic functions remain elusive. Because alterations in the cortical GABA system have been strongly linked to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, one potential target of DISC1 that is critically involved in the regulation of cognition and emotion is the GABAA receptor (GABAAR). We found that cellular knockdown of DISC1 significantly reduced GABAAR-mediated synaptic and whole-cell current, whereas overexpression of wild-type DISC1, but not the C-terminal-truncated DISC1 (a schizophrenia-related mutant), significantly increased GABAAR currents in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex. These effects were accompanied by DISC1-induced changes in surface GABAAR expression. Moreover, the regulation of GABAARs by DISC1 knockdown or overexpression depends on the microtubule motor protein kinesin 1 (KIF5). Our results suggest that DISC1 exerts an important effect on GABAergic inhibitory transmission by regulating KIF5/microtubule-based GABAAR trafficking in the cortex. The knowledge gained from this study would shed light on how DISC1 and the GABA system are linked mechanistically and how their interactions are critical for maintaining a normal mental state. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. The coiled-coil domain of MURC/cavin-4 is involved in membrane trafficking of caveolin-3 in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Daisuke; Ogata, Takehiro; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Taniguchi, Takuya; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2015-12-15

    Muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein (MURC), also referred to as cavin-4, is a member of the cavin family that works cooperatively with caveolins in caveola formation and function. Cavins are cytoplasmic proteins with coiled-coil domains and form heteromeric complexes, which are recruited to caveolae in cells expressing caveolins. Among caveolins, caveolin-3 (Cav3) is exclusively expressed in muscle cells, similar to MURC/cavin-4. In the heart, Cav3 overexpression contributes to cardiac protection, and its deficiency leads to progressive cardiomyopathy. Mutations in the MURC/cavin-4 gene have been identified in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. In the present study, we show the role of MURC/cavin-4 as a caveolar component in the heart. In H9c2 cells, MURC/cavin-4 was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas a MURC/cavin-4 mutant lacking the coiled-coil domain (ΔCC) was primarily localized to the cytoplasm. ΔCC bound to Cav3 and impaired membrane localization of Cav3 in cardiomyocytes. Additionally, although ΔCC did not alter Cav3 mRNA expression, ΔCC decreased the Cav3 protein level. MURC/cavin-4 and ΔCC similarly induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy; however, ΔCC showed higher hypertrophy-related fetal gene expression than MURC/cavin-4. ΔCC induced ERK activation in cardiomyocytes. Transgenic mice expressing ΔCC in the heart (ΔCC-Tg mice) showed impaired cardiac function accompanied by cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and marked interstitial fibrosis. Hearts from ΔCC-Tg mice showed a reduction of the Cav3 protein level and activation of ERK. These results suggest that MURC/cavin-4 requires its coiled-coil domain to target the plasma membrane and to stabilize Cav3 at the plasma membrane of cardiomyocytes and that MURC/cavin-4 functions as a crucial caveolar component to regulate cardiac function. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. F-BAR family proteins, emerging regulators for cell membrane dynamic changes-from structure to human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suxuan; Xiong, Xinyu; Zhao, Xianxian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-09

    Eukaryotic cell membrane dynamics change in curvature during physiological and pathological processes. In the past ten years, a novel protein family, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) domain proteins, has been identified to be the most important coordinators in membrane curvature regulation. The F-BAR domain family is a member of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain superfamily that is associated with dynamic changes in cell membrane. However, the molecular basis in membrane structure regulation and the biological functions of F-BAR protein are unclear. The pathophysiological role of F-BAR protein is unknown. This review summarizes the current understanding of structure and function in the BAR domain superfamily, classifies F-BAR family proteins into nine subfamilies based on domain structure, and characterizes F-BAR protein structure, domain interaction, and functional relevance. In general, F-BAR protein binds to cell membrane via F-BAR domain association with membrane phospholipids and initiates membrane curvature and scission via Src homology-3 (SH3) domain interaction with its partner proteins. This process causes membrane dynamic changes and leads to seven important cellular biological functions, which include endocytosis, phagocytosis, filopodium, lamellipodium, cytokinesis, adhesion, and podosome formation, via distinct signaling pathways determined by specific domain-binding partners. These cellular functions play important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. We further summarize F-BAR protein expression and mutation changes observed in various diseases and developmental disorders. Considering the structure feature and functional implication of F-BAR proteins, we anticipate that F-BAR proteins modulate physiological and pathophysiological processes via transferring extracellular materials, regulating cell trafficking and mobility, presenting antigens, mediating extracellular matrix degradation, and transmitting

  8. Estradiol-induced estrogen receptor-alpha trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Galyna; Kuo, John; Hamid, Naheed; Micevych, Paul

    2009-12-02

    Estradiol has rapid actions in the CNS that are mediated by membrane estrogen receptors (ERs) and activate cell signaling pathways through interaction with metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Membrane-initiated estradiol signaling increases the free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) that stimulates the synthesis of neuroprogesterone in astrocytes. We used surface biotinylation to demonstrate that ERalpha has an extracellular portion. In addition to the full-length ERalpha [apparent molecular weight (MW), 66 kDa], surface biotinylation labeled an ERalpha-immunoreactive protein (MW, approximately 52 kDa) identified by both COOH- and NH(2)-directed antibodies. Estradiol treatment regulated membrane levels of both proteins in parallel: within 5 min, estradiol significantly increased membrane levels of the 66 and 52 kDa ERalpha. Internalization, a measure of membrane receptor activation, was also increased by estradiol with a similar time course. Continuous treatment with estradiol for 24-48 h reduced ERalpha levels, suggesting receptor downregulation. Estradiol also increased mGluR1a trafficking and internalization, consistent with the proposed ERalpha-mGluR1a interaction. Blocking ER with ICI 182,780 or mGluR1a with LY 367385 prevented ERalpha trafficking to and from the membrane. Estradiol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) flux was also significantly increased at the time of peak ERalpha activation/internalization. These results demonstrate that ERalpha is present in the membrane and has an extracellular portion. Furthermore, membrane levels and internalization of ERalpha are regulated by estradiol and mGluR1a ligands. The pattern of trafficking into and out of the membrane suggests that the changing concentration of estradiol during the estrous cycle regulates ERalpha to augment and then terminate membrane-initiated signaling.

  9. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshita, W.M.; Gushiken, V.O.; Ferreira-Duarte, A.P.; Pinheiro-Torres, A.S.; Roncalho-Buck, I.A. [Department of Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai (FMJ), Jundiai, SP (Brazil); Squebola-Cola, D.M.; Mello, G.C.; Anhê, G.F.; Antunes, E. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil); DeSouza, I.A., E-mail: ivanidesouza@uol.com.br [Department of Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai (FMJ), Jundiai, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and

  10. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, W.M.; Gushiken, V.O.; Ferreira-Duarte, A.P.; Pinheiro-Torres, A.S.; Roncalho-Buck, I.A.; Squebola-Cola, D.M.; Mello, G.C.; Anhê, G.F.; Antunes, E.; DeSouza, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and

  11. Post-translational regulation and trafficking of the granulin-containing protease RD21 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gu

    Full Text Available RD21-like proteases are ubiquitous, plant-specific papain-like proteases typified by carrying a C-terminal granulin domain. RD21-like proteases are involved in immunity and associated with senescence and various types of biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we interrogated Arabidopsis RD21 regulation and trafficking by site-directed mutagenesis, agroinfiltration, western blotting, protease activity profiling and protein degradation. Using an introduced N-glycan sensor, deglycosylation experiments and glyco-engineered N. benthamiana plants, we show that RD21 passes through the Golgi where it becomes fucosylated. Our studies demonstrate that RD21 is regulated at three post-translational levels. Prodomain removal is not blocked in the catalytic Cys mutant, indicating that RD21 is activated by a proteolytic cascade. However, RD21 activation in Arabidopsis does not require vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs or aleurain-like protease AALP. In contrast, granulin domain removal requires the catalytic Cys and His residues and is therefore autocatalytic. Furthermore, SDS can (re-activate latent RD21 in Arabidopsis leaf extracts, indicating the existence of a third layer of post-translational regulation, possibly mediated by endogenous inhibitors. RD21 causes a dominant protease activity in Arabidopsis leaf extracts, responsible for SDS-induced proteome degradation.

  12. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Mechanoactivation Involves RGS5 (Regulator of G Protein Signaling 5) in Skeletal Muscle Arteries: Impaired Trafficking of RGS5 in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kwangseok; Li, Min; Nourian, Zahra; Meininger, Gerald A; Hill, Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Studies suggest that arteriolar pressure-induced vasoconstriction can be initiated by GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors), including the AT 1 R (angiotensin II type 1 receptor). This raises the question, are such mechanisms regulated by negative feedback? The present studies examined whether RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells are colocalized with the AT 1 R when activated by mechanical stress or angiotensin II and whether this modulates AT 1 R-mediated vasoconstriction. To determine whether activation of the AT 1 R recruits RGS5, an in situ proximity ligation assay was performed in primary cultures of cremaster muscle arteriolar vascular smooth muscle cells treated with angiotensin II or hypotonic solution in the absence or presence of candesartan (an AT 1 R blocker). Proximity ligation assay results revealed a concentration-dependent increase in trafficking/translocation of RGS5 toward the activated AT 1 R, which was attenuated by candesartan. In intact arterioles, knockdown of RGS5 enhanced constriction to angiotensin II and augmented myogenic responses to increased intraluminal pressure. Myogenic constriction was attenuated to a higher degree by candesartan in RGS5 siRNA-transfected arterioles, consistent with RGS5 contributing to downregulation of AT 1 R-mediated signaling. Further, translocation of RGS5 was impaired in vascular smooth muscle cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats. This is consistent with dysregulated (RGS5-mediated) AT 1 R signaling that could contribute to excessive vasoconstriction in hypertension. In intact vessels, candesartan reduced myogenic vasoconstriction to a greater extent in spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with controls. Collectively, these findings suggest that AT 1 R activation results in translocation of RGS5 toward the plasma membrane, limiting AT 1 R-mediated vasoconstriction through its role in G q/11 protein-dependent signaling. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Regulation of B cell differentiation by intracellular membrane associated proteins and microRNAs: role in the antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eLou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available B cells are central to adaptive immunity and their functions in antibody responses are exquisitely regulated. As suggested by recent findings, B cell differentiation is mediated by intracellular membrane structures (including endosomes, lysosomes and autophagosomes and protein factors specifically associated with these membranes, including Rab7, Atg5 and Atg7. These factors participate in vesicle formation/trafficking, signal transduction and induction of gene expression to promote antigen presentation, CSR/SHM, and generation/maintenance of plasma cells and memory B cells. Their expression is induced in B cells activated to differentiate and further fine-tuned by immune-modulating microRNAs, which coordinates CSR/SHM, plasma cell differentiation and memory B cell differentiation. These short non-coding RNAs would individually target multiple factors associated with the same intracellular membrane compartments and collaboratively target a single factor in addition to regulate AID and Blimp-1. These, together with regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activities by endosomes and autophagosomes, show that intracellular membranes and microRNAs, two broadly relevant cell constituents, play important roles in balancing gene expression to specify B cell differentiation processes for optimal antibody responses.

  14. Human Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  15. Palmitoylation of Sindbis Virus TF Protein Regulates Its Plasma Membrane Localization and Subsequent Incorporation into Virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jolene; Renzi, Emily C; Arnold, Randy J; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana

    2017-02-01

    Palmitoylation is a reversible, posttranslational modification that helps target proteins to cellular membranes. The alphavirus small membrane proteins 6K and TF have been reported to be palmitoylated and to positively regulate budding. 6K and TF are isoforms that are identical in their N termini but unique in their C termini due to a -1 ribosomal frameshift during translation. In this study, we used cysteine (Cys) mutants to test differential palmitoylation of the Sindbis virus 6K and TF proteins. We modularly mutated the five Cys residues in the identical N termini of 6K and TF, the four additional Cys residues in TF's unique C terminus, or all nine Cys residues in TF. Using these mutants, we determined that TF palmitoylation occurs primarily in the N terminus. In contrast, 6K is not palmitoylated, even on these shared residues. In the C-terminal Cys mutant, TF protein levels increase both in the cell and in the released virion compared to the wild type. In viruses with the N-terminal Cys residues mutated, TF is much less efficiently localized to the plasma membrane, and it is not incorporated into the virion. The three Cys mutants have minor defects in cell culture growth but a high incidence of abnormal particle morphologies compared to the wild-type virus as determined by transmission electron microscopy. We propose a model where the C terminus of TF modulates the palmitoylation of TF at the N terminus, and palmitoylated TF is preferentially trafficked to the plasma membrane for virus budding. Alphaviruses are a reemerging viral cause of arthritogenic disease. Recently, the small 6K and TF proteins of alphaviruses were shown to contribute to virulence in vivo Nevertheless, a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which either protein acts to promote virus infection is missing. The TF protein is a component of budded virions, and optimal levels of TF correlate positively with wild-type-like particle morphology. In this study, we show that the

  16. Intracellular Calreticulin Regulates Multiple Steps in Fibrillar Collagen Expression, Trafficking, and Processing into the Extracellular Matrix*

    OpenAIRE

    Van Duyn Graham, Lauren; Sweetwyne, Mariya T.; Pallero, Manuel A.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2009-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), a chaperone and Ca2+ regulator, enhances wound healing, and its expression correlates with fibrosis in animal models, suggesting that CRT regulates production of the extracellular matrix. However, direct regulation of collagen matrix by CRT has not been previously demonstrated. We investigated the role of CRT in the regulation of fibrillar collagen expression, secretion, processing, and deposition in the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts defi...

  17. Novel cross-talk between IGF-IR and DDR1 regulates IGF-IR trafficking, signaling and biological responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Antonella; Morcavallo, Alaide; Vella, Veronica; Voci, Concetta; Spatuzza, Michela; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Iozzo, Renato V.; Vigneri, Riccardo; Morrione, Andrea; Belfiore, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), plays a key role in regulating mammalian development and growth, and is frequently deregulated in cancer contributing to tumor initiation and progression. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen receptor tyrosine-kinase, is as well frequently overexpressed in cancer and implicated in cancer progression. Thus, we investigated whether a functional cross-talk between the IGF-IR and DDR1 exists and plays any role in cancer progression. Using human breast cancer cells we found that DDR1 constitutively associated with the IGF-IR. However, this interaction was enhanced by IGF-I stimulation, which promoted rapid DDR1 tyrosine-phosphorylation and co-internalization with the IGF-IR. Significantly, DDR1 was critical for IGF-IR endocytosis and trafficking into early endosomes, IGF-IR protein expression and IGF-I intracellular signaling and biological effects, including cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. These biological responses were inhibited by DDR1 silencing and enhanced by DDR1 overexpression. Experiments in mouse fibroblasts co-transfected with the human IGF-IR and DDR1 gave similar results and indicated that, in the absence of IGF-IR, collagen-dependent phosphorylation of DDR1 is impaired. These results demonstrate a critical role of DDR1 in the regulation of IGF-IR action, and identify DDR1 as a novel important target for breast cancers that overexpress IGF-IR. PMID:25840417

  18. Host cell interactions of outer membrane vesicle-associated virulence factors of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: Intracellular delivery, trafficking and mechanisms of cell injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greune, Lilo; Jarosch, Kevin-André; Steil, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlan; He, Xiaohua; Lloubes, Roland; Fruth, Angelika; Kim, Kwang Sik; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander; Karch, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are important tools in bacterial virulence but their role in the pathogenesis of infections caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157, the leading cause of life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome, is poorly understood. Using proteomics, electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoblotting, and bioassays, we investigated OMVs secreted by EHEC O157 clinical isolates for virulence factors cargoes, interactions with pathogenetically relevant human cells, and mechanisms of cell injury. We demonstrate that O157 OMVs carry a cocktail of key virulence factors of EHEC O157 including Shiga toxin 2a (Stx2a), cytolethal distending toxin V (CdtV), EHEC hemolysin, and flagellin. The toxins are internalized by cells via dynamin-dependent endocytosis of OMVs and differentially separate from vesicles during intracellular trafficking. Stx2a and CdtV-B, the DNase-like CdtV subunit, separate from OMVs in early endosomes. Stx2a is trafficked, in association with its receptor globotriaosylceramide within detergent-resistant membranes, to the Golgi complex and the endoplasmic reticulum from where the catalytic Stx2a A1 fragment is translocated to the cytosol. CdtV-B is, after its retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum, translocated to the nucleus to reach DNA. CdtV-A and CdtV-C subunits remain OMV-associated and are sorted with OMVs to lysosomes. EHEC hemolysin separates from OMVs in lysosomes and targets mitochondria. The OMV-delivered CdtV-B causes cellular DNA damage, which activates DNA damage responses leading to G2 cell cycle arrest. The arrested cells ultimately die of apoptosis induced by Stx2a and CdtV via caspase-9 activation. By demonstrating that naturally secreted EHEC O157 OMVs carry and deliver into cells a cocktail of biologically active virulence factors, thereby causing cell death, and by performing first comprehensive analysis of intracellular trafficking of OMVs and OMV-delivered virulence factors

  19. Homeoviscous adaptation and the regulation of membrane lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Robert; Ejsing, Christer S; Antonny, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex and dynamic assemblies of lipids and proteins. Poikilothermic organisms including bacteria, fungi, reptiles, and fish do not control their body temperature and must adapt their membrane lipid composition in order to maintain membrane fluidity in the cold. This ada......Biological membranes are complex and dynamic assemblies of lipids and proteins. Poikilothermic organisms including bacteria, fungi, reptiles, and fish do not control their body temperature and must adapt their membrane lipid composition in order to maintain membrane fluidity in the cold....... This adaptive response was termed homeoviscous adaptation and has been frequently studied with a specific focus on the acyl chain composition of membrane lipids. Massspectrometry-based lipidomics can nowadays provide more comprehensive insights into the complexity of lipid remodeling during adaptive responses...... such as neurons maintain unique lipid compositions with specific physicochemical properties. To date little is known about the sensory mechanisms regulating the acyl chain profile in such specialized cells or during adaptive responses. Here we summarize our current understanding of lipid metabolic networks...

  20. Association with β-COP Regulates the Trafficking of the Newly Synthesized Na,K-ATPase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Michael J.; Farr, Glen A.; Hull, Michael; Capendeguy, Oihana; Horisberger, Jean-Daniel; Caplan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane expression of the Na,K-ATPase requires assembly of its α- and β-subunits. Using a novel labeling technique to identify Na,K-ATPase partner proteins, we detected an interaction between the Na,K-ATPase α-subunit and the coat protein, β-COP, a component of the COP-I complex. When expressed in the absence of the Na,K-ATPase β-subunit, the Na,K-ATPase α-subunit interacts with β-COP, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is targeted for degradation. In the presence of the Na,K-ATPase β-subunit, the α-subunit does not interact with β-COP and traffics to the plasma membrane. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that in cells expressing both the Na,K-ATPase α- and β-subunits, newly synthesized α-subunit associates with β-COP immediately after its synthesis but that this interaction does not constitute an obligate intermediate in the assembly of the α- and β-subunits to form the pump holoenzyme. The interaction with β-COP was reduced by mutating a dibasic motif at Lys54 in the Na,K-ATPase α-subunit. This mutant α-subunit is not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and reaches the plasma membrane, even in the absence of Na,K-ATPase β-subunit expression. Although the Lys54 α-subunit reaches the cell surface without need for β-subunit assembly, it is only functional as an ion-transporting ATPase in the presence of the β-subunit. PMID:20801885

  1. Combating illicit trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.L.; Grama, E.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) is the national authority, which is contact point for illicit trafficking and coordinates all measures and activities to combat and prevent illicit trafficking with nuclear material and radioactive sources. Legal framework regarding illicit trafficking has been improved due to new Physical Protection Regulations, Regulations on using the DBT, Regulations on requirements for qualification of guards and physical protection personnel, Design Basis Threat for each nuclear facility to avoid the unauthorized removal or theft of nuclear material or radioactive sources. New amendments of the Law for the safe deployment of nuclear activities, Law no. 111/1996, republished, in respect of illicit trafficking with nuclear material and radioactive sources are in the process to be approved by the Parliament. CNCAN is member of the Romanian Non-proliferation Group that is an interdepartmental mechanism of cooperation entered into force in August 1999. During the sessions of this group there are discussions focused on the preventing and combating illicit trafficking with nuclear material and radioactive sources. CNCAN is member of the Interministerial Council that controls import and export with strategic products including nuclear material, non nuclear material and equipment pertinent for proliferation of nuclear weapons. An Emergency Mobile Unit has been created in 2001 that contains instruments (gamma dose rate instruments portable and personal, contaminometers, mini MCA with CdZnTe detector, a CANBERRA Inspector with Nal, CdZnTe and HPGe detectors and 2 FiedSPEC, a mobile laboratory, 2 cars and individual equipment). CNCAN is cooperating with the Police through a National Plan to verify the authorization holders in order to prevent and combat illicit trafficking, and to find the orphan sources. CNCAN is the beneficiary of the PECO Project initiated by the European Commission in cooperation with the IAEA and

  2. Rebooting Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas de Villiers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While popular psychology and appeals to emotion have unfortunately dominated discussions of ‘sex trafficking’, this article suggests that feminist psychoanalytic film theory and theories of affect are still useful for making sense of the appeal of sensational exposés like Lifetime Television’s Human Trafficking (2005. The dynamic of identification with (and impersonation of a human trafficking ‘victim’ by the rescuing Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent (Mira Sorvino is particularly worthy of scrutiny. Film theory about the ‘rebooting’ of film franchises (iconic brands like Batman also helps explain the preponderance of similar programming—Sex Slaves (2005, Selling the Girl Next Door (2011, Trafficked (2016—and the way contemporary discourses of human trafficking have effectively rebranded the myth of ‘white slavery’.

  3. Dynamic trafficking and delivery of connexons to the plasma membrane and accretion to gap junctions in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauf, Undine; Giepmans, Ben N G; Lopez, Patricia; Braconnot, Sebastien; Chen, Shu-Chih; Falk, Matthias M

    2002-01-01

    Certain membrane channels including acetylcholine receptors, gap junction (GJ) channels, and aquaporins arrange into large clusters in the plasma membrane (PM). However, how these channels are recruited to the clusters is unknown. To address this question, we have investigated delivery of GJ channel

  4. Distribution dynamics and functional importance of NHERF1 in regulation of Mrp-2 trafficking in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvar, Serhan; Suda, Jo; Zhu, Lixin; Rockey, Don C

    2014-10-15

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that interacts with receptors and ion transporters in its PDZ domains and with the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of proteins in its COOH terminus. The role of NHERF1 in hepatocyte function remains largely unknown. We examine the distribution and physiological significance of NHERF1 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp-2) in hepatocytes. A WT radixin binding site mutant (F355R) and NHERF1 PDZ1 and PDZ2 domain adenoviral mutant constructs were tagged with yellow fluorescent protein and expressed in polarized hepatocytes to study localization and function of NHERF1. Cellular distribution of NHERF1 and radixin was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. A 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) assay was used to characterize Mrp-2 function. Similar to Mrp-2, WT NHERF1 and the NHERF1 PDZ2 deletion mutant were localized to the canalicular membrane. In contrast, the radixin binding site mutant (F355R) and the NHERF1 PDZ1 deletion mutant, which interacts poorly with Mrp-2, were rarely associated with the canalicular membrane. Knockdown of NHERF1 led to dramatically impaired CMFDA secretory response. Use of CMFDA showed that the NHERF1 PDZ1 and F355R mutants were devoid of a secretory response, while WT NHERF1-infected cells exhibited increased secretion of glutathione-methylfluorescein. The data indicate that NHERF1 interacts with Mrp-2 via the PDZ1 domain of NHERF1 and, furthermore, that NHERF1 is essential for maintaining the localization and function of Mrp-2. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The breast cancer antigen 5T4 interacts with Rab11, and is a target and regulator of Rab11 mediated trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Janelle L; Dave, Keyur; Gorman, Jeffrey; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2018-06-01

    5T4 is a transmembrane glycoprotein with limited expression in normal adult tissues and expression in some solid tumours. It is unclear whether 5T4 is preferentially expressed by stem or differentiated cell types. Modes of 5T4 regulation are unknown despite its ongoing development as a cancer immunotherapy target. Our aims were to clarify the differentiation status of 5T4 expressing cells in breast cancer and to understand the mechanism underlying 5T4 membrane presentation. We analysed 5T4 expression in breast cancer cell populations by flow cytometery and found that 5T4 is highly expressed on differentiated cells, where it localizes to focal adhesions. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified interactions between 5T4 and the membrane trafficking proteins Rab11, Rab18 and ARF6. Mechanistically we found that Rab11 and Rab18 have oppositional roles in controlling expression and surface presentation of 5T4. 5T4 depletion stabilizes Rab11 protein expression with a consequent stimulation transferrin surface labelling, indicating that 5T4 represses endocytic activity. Successful immunotherapeutic targeting of 5T4 requires surface presentation and different immunotherapy strategies require surface presentation versus endocytosis. While breast cancer cells with high 5T4 surface expression and rapid cell surface turnover would be susceptible to antibody-drug conjugates that rely on intracellular release, 5T4 positive cells with lower expression or lower turnover may still be responsive to T-cell mediated approaches. We find that endocytosis of 5T4 is strongly Rab11 dependent and as such Rab11 activity could affect the success or failure of 5T4-targetted immunotherapy, particularly for antibody-drug conjugate approaches. In fact, 5T4 itself represses Rab11 expression. This newly uncovered relationship between Rab11 and 5T4 suggests that breast tumours with high 5T4 expression may not have efficient endocytic uptake of 5T4-targetted immunotherapeutics

  6. An Unusual Prohibitin Regulates Malaria Parasite Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Michael Matz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Proteins of the stomatin/prohibitin/flotillin/HfIK/C (SPFH family are membrane-anchored and perform diverse cellular functions in different organelles. Here, we investigate the SPFH proteins of the murine malaria model parasite Plasmodium berghei, the conserved prohibitin 1, prohibitin 2, and stomatin-like protein and an unusual prohibitin-like protein (PHBL. The SPFH proteins localize to the parasite mitochondrion. While the conserved family members could not be deleted from the Plasmodium genome, PHBL was successfully ablated, resulting in impaired parasite fitness and attenuated virulence in the mammalian host. Strikingly, PHBL-deficient parasites fail to colonize the Anopheles vector because of complete arrest during ookinete development in vivo. We show that this arrest correlates with depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨmt. Our results underline the importance of SPFH proteins in the regulation of core mitochondrial functions and suggest that fine-tuning of ΔΨmt in malarial parasites is critical for colonization of the definitive host. : Matz et al. present an experimental genetics study of an unusual prohibitin-like protein in the malaria parasite and find that it regulates mitochondrial membrane polarity. Ablation of this protein causes almost complete mitochondrial depolarization in the mosquito vector, which, in turn, leads to a block in malaria parasite transmission. Keywords: Plasmodium berghei, malaria, SPFH, prohibitin, stomatin-like protein, mitochondrion, membrane potential, ookinete, transmission

  7. Interpretation of the FGF8 morphogen gradient is regulated by endocytic trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Matthias; Machate, Anja; Yu, Shuizi Rachel; Gupta, Mansi; Brand, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Forty years ago, it was proposed that during embryonic development and organogenesis, morphogen gradients provide positional information to the individual cells within a tissue leading to specific fate decisions. Recently, much insight has been gained into how such morphogen gradients are formed and maintained; however, which cellular mechanisms govern their interpretation within target tissues remains debated. Here we used in vivo fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and automated image analysis to assess the role of endocytic sorting dynamics on fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) morphogen gradient interpretation. By interfering with the function of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl, we found an expanded range of Fgf target gene expression and a delay of Fgf8 lysosomal transport. However, the extracellular Fgf8 morphogen gradient remained unchanged, indicating that the observed signalling changes are due to altered gradient interpretation. We propose that regulation of morphogen signalling activity through endocytic sorting allows fast feedback-induced changes in gradient interpretation during the establishment of complex patterns.

  8. Multisite tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-terminus of Mint1/X11α by Src kinase regulates the trafficking of amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Christopher J R; Black, Hannah L; Andrews, Katie L; Davenport, Elizabeth C; Conboy, Michael; Chawla, Sangeeta; Dowle, Adam A; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry R; Evans, Gareth J O

    2016-05-01

    Mint/X11 is one of the four neuronal trafficking adaptors that interact with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and are linked with its cleavage to generate β-amyloid peptide, a key player in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. How APP switches between adaptors at different stages of the secretory pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 regulates the destination of APP. A canonical SH2-binding motif ((202) YEEI) was identified in the N-terminus of Mint1 that is phosphorylated on tyrosine by C-Src and recruits the active kinase for sequential phosphorylation of further tyrosines (Y191 and Y187). A single Y202F mutation in the Mint1 N-terminus inhibits C-Src binding and tyrosine phosphorylation. Previous studies observed that co-expression of wild-type Mint1 and APP causes accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi. Unphosphorylatable Mint1 (Y202F) or pharmacological inhibition of Src reduced the accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi of heterologous cells. A similar result was observed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons where Mint1(Y202F) permitted the trafficking of APP to more distal neurites than the wild-type protein. These data underline the importance of the tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 as a critical switch for determining the destination of APP. The regulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking is poorly understood. We have discovered that the APP adapter, Mint1, is phosphorylated by C-Src kinase. Mint1 causes APP accumulation in the trans-Golgi network, whereas inhibition of Src or mutation of Mint1-Y202 permits APP recycling. The phosphorylation status of Mint1 could impact on the pathological trafficking of APP in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Homeostatic regulation of T cell trafficking by a B cell derived peptide is impaired in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apta, Bonita; Kuravi, Sahithi J.; Yates, Clara M.; Kennedy, Amy; Odedra, Arjun; Alassiri, Mohammed; Harrison, Matthew; Martin, Ashley; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Cunningham, Adam F.; Raza, Karim; Filer, Andrew; Copland, David A.; Dick, Andrew D.; Robinson, Joseph; Kalia, Neena; Walker, Lucy S. K.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Nash, Gerard B.; Narendran, Parth; Rainger, G. Ed.

    2015-01-01

    During an inflammatory response, lymphocyte recruitment into tissue must be tightly controlled because dysregulated trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic disease. Here we show that during inflammation and in response to adiponectin, B cells tonically inhibit T cell trafficking by secreting a peptide (PEPITEM) proteolytically derived from 14.3.3.ζδ protein. PEPITEM binds cadherin-15 on endothelial cells, promoting synthesis and release of sphingosine-1 phosphate, which inhibits trafficking of T cells without affecting recruitment of other leukocytes. Expression of adiponectin receptors on B cells and adiponectin induced PEPITEM secretion wanes with age, implying immune senescence of the pathway. Additionally, these changes are evident in individuals with type-1-diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, and circulating PEPITEM in patient serum is reduced compared to healthy age matched donors. In both diseases, tonic inhibition of T cell trafficking across inflamed endothelium is lost. Importantly, control of patient T cell trafficking is re-established by exogenous PEPITEM. Moreover, in animal models of peritonitis, hepatic I/R injury, Salmonella infection, Uveitis and Sjögren’s Syndrome, PEPITEM could reduce T cell recruitment into inflamed tissues. PMID:25894827

  10. Arabidopsis cortical microtubules position cellulose synthase delivery to the plasma membrane and interact with cellulose synthase trafficking compartments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, R.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Paredez, A.R.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ehrhardt, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis relies on the organization and function of two polymer arrays separated by the plasma membrane: the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton and cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Studies using in vivo markers confirmed that one function of the cortical microtubule array is

  11. Synaptic Control of Secretory Trafficking in Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hanus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized signaling in neuronal dendrites requires tight spatial control of membrane composition. Upon initial synthesis, nascent secretory cargo in dendrites exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER from local zones of ER complexity that are spatially coupled to post-ER compartments. Although newly synthesized membrane proteins can be processed locally, the mechanisms that control the spatial range of secretory cargo transport in dendritic segments are unknown. Here, we monitored the dynamics of nascent membrane proteins in dendritic post-ER compartments under regimes of low or increased neuronal activity. In response to activity blockade, post-ER carriers are highly mobile and are transported over long distances. Conversely, increasing synaptic activity dramatically restricts the spatial scale of post-ER trafficking along dendrites. This activity-induced confinement of secretory cargo requires site-specific phosphorylation of the kinesin motor KIF17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK. Thus, the length scales of early secretory trafficking in dendrites are tuned by activity-dependent regulation of microtubule-dependent transport.

  12. The kinesin-3 family motor KLP-4 regulates anterograde trafficking of GLR-1 glutamate receptors in the ventral nerve cord of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Michael I; Ahlawat, Shikha; Kowalski, Jennifer R; Malkin, Emily; Koushika, Sandhya P; Juo, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The transport of glutamate receptors from the cell body to synapses is essential during neuronal development and may contribute to the regulation of synaptic strength in the mature nervous system. We previously showed that cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK-5) positively regulates the abundance of GLR-1 glutamate receptors at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we identify a kinesin-3 family motor klp-4/KIF13 in a cdk-5 suppressor screen for genes that regulate GLR-1 trafficking. klp-4 mutants have decreased abundance of GLR-1 in the VNC. Genetic analysis of klp-4 and the clathrin adaptin unc-11/AP180 suggests that klp-4 functions before endocytosis in the ventral cord. Time-lapse microscopy indicates that klp-4 mutants exhibit decreased anterograde flux of GLR-1. Genetic analysis of cdk-5 and klp-4 suggests that they function in the same pathway to regulate GLR-1 in the VNC. Interestingly, GLR-1 accumulates in cell bodies of cdk-5 but not klp-4 mutants. However, GLR-1 does accumulate in klp-4-mutant cell bodies if receptor degradation in the multivesicular body/lysosome pathway is blocked. This study identifies kinesin KLP-4 as a novel regulator of anterograde glutamate receptor trafficking and reveals a cellular control mechanism by which receptor cargo is targeted for degradation in the absence of its motor.

  13. The Plasma Membrane Sialidase NEU3 Regulates the Malignancy of Renal Carcinoma Cells by Controlling β1 Integrin Internalization and Recycling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringali, Cristina; Lupo, Barbara; Silvestri, Ilaria; Papini, Nadia; Anastasia, Luigi; Tettamanti, Guido; Venerando, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The human plasma membrane sialidase NEU3 is a key enzyme in the catabolism of membrane gangliosides, is crucial in the regulation of cell surface processes, and has been demonstrated to be significantly up-regulated in renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). In this report, we show that NEU3 regulates β1 integrin trafficking in RCC cells by controlling β1 integrin recycling to the plasma membrane and controlling activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. NEU3 silencing in RCC cells increased the membrane ganglioside content, in particular the GD1a content, and changed the expression of key regulators of the integrin recycling pathway. In addition, NEU3 silencing up-regulated the Ras-related protein RAB25, which directs internalized integrins to lysosomes, and down-regulated the chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3), which induces the recycling of internalized integrins to the plasma membrane. In this manner, NEU3 silencing enhanced the caveolar endocytosis of β1 integrin, blocked its recycling and reduced its levels at the plasma membrane, and, consequently, inhibited EGFR and FAK/AKT. These events had the following effects on the behavior of RCC cells: they (a) decreased drug resistance mediated by the block of autophagy and the induction of apoptosis; (b) decreased metastatic potential mediated by down-regulation of the metalloproteinases MMP1 and MMP7; and (c) decreased adhesion to collagen and fibronectin. Therefore, our data identify NEU3 as a key regulator of the β1 integrin-recycling pathway and FAK/AKT signaling and demonstrate its crucial role in RCC malignancy. PMID:23139422

  14. Regulation of the basement membrane by epithelia generated forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2012-12-01

    Tumor metastasis involves a progressive loss of tissue architecture and dissolution of structural boundaries between the epithelium and connective tissue. The basement membrane (BM), a specialized network of extracellular matrix proteins forms a barrier that physically restricts pre-invasive lesions such that they remain as local insults. The BM is not a static structure, but one that is constantly regenerated and remodeled in the adult organism. Matrix organization also regulates cell function. Thus alterations in the balance of synthesis, remodeling and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins may contribute to a loss of structural integrity. However, the de novo assembly and maintenance of the complex structural properties of in vivo basement membranes remain elusive. Here, this paper highlights the current understanding on the structural properties and the establishment of the BM, and discusses the potential role of self-generated forces in adult tissue remodeling and the maintenance of the BM as a malignancy suppressor.

  15. Regulation of the basement membrane by epithelia generated forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2012-01-01

    Tumor metastasis involves a progressive loss of tissue architecture and dissolution of structural boundaries between the epithelium and connective tissue. The basement membrane (BM), a specialized network of extracellular matrix proteins forms a barrier that physically restricts pre-invasive lesions such that they remain as local insults. The BM is not a static structure, but one that is constantly regenerated and remodeled in the adult organism. Matrix organization also regulates cell function. Thus alterations in the balance of synthesis, remodeling and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins may contribute to a loss of structural integrity. However, the de novo assembly and maintenance of the complex structural properties of in vivo basement membranes remain elusive. Here, this paper highlights the current understanding on the structural properties and the establishment of the BM, and discusses the potential role of self-generated forces in adult tissue remodeling and the maintenance of the BM as a malignancy suppressor. (paper)

  16. Autoinhibitory Regulation of Plasma Membrane H+-ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Torbøl

    Electrochemical gradients across cell membranes are essential for nutrient uptake. In plant and fungal cells the electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane (PM) can build much higher than in mammalian cells. The protein responsible for this gradient is the essential PM H+-ATPase that uses...... resolution 3D structure the mechanism behind is only poorly understood. This thesis aimed at illuminating the autoinhibitory mechanism in plant and yeast PM H+-ATPases and below some of our main findings will be highlighted. The two terminal domains of the PM H+-ATPases have several amino acid residues...... that can be phosphorylated, and it has been demonstrated that these phosphorylation sites in both plant and yeast are highly involved in the regulation of terminal autoinhibition. In this study we used a phylogenetic analysis to investigate the evolutionary development of these phosphorylation sites...

  17. Insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid binding protein trafficking at the plasma membrane in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Serup, Annette Karen; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate lipid-induced regulation of lipid binding proteins in human skeletal muscle and the impact hereof on insulin sensitivity. Eleven healthy male subjects underwent a 3-day hyper-caloric and high-fat diet regime. Muscle biopsies were taken before......-regulated by increased fatty acid availability. This suggests a time dependency in the up-regulation of FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein during high availability of plasma fatty acids. Furthermore, we did not detect FATP1 and FATP4 protein in giant sarcolemmal vesicles obtained from human skeletal muscle. In conclusion......, this study shows that a short-term lipid-load increases mRNA content of key lipid handling proteins in human muscle. However, decreased insulin sensitivity after high-fat diet is not accompanied with relocation of FAT/CD36 or FABPpm protein to the sarcolemma. Finally, FATP1 and FATP4 protein could...

  18. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Attaches Tumor Suppressor PTEN to the Membrane and Promotes Anti Pseudomonas aeruginosa Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Wolfe, Andrew L; DiMango, Emily; Kitur, Kipyegon; Parsons, Ramon; Prince, Alice

    2017-12-19

    The tumor suppressor PTEN controls cell proliferation by regulating phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activity, but the participation of PTEN in host defense against bacterial infection is less well understood. Anti-inflammatory PI3K-Akt signaling is suppressed in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease characterized by hyper-inflammatory responses to airway infection. We found that Ptenl -/- mice, which lack the NH 2 -amino terminal splice variant of PTEN, were unable to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the airways and could not generate sufficient anti-inflammatory PI3K activity, similar to what is observed in CF. PTEN and the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) interacted directly and this interaction was necessary to position PTEN at the membrane. CF patients under corrector-potentiator therapy, which enhances CFTR transport to the membrane, have increased PTEN amounts. These findings suggest that improved CFTR trafficking could enhance P. aeruginosa clearance from the CF airway by activating PTEN-mediated anti-bacterial responses and might represent a therapeutic strategy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A-RAF kinase functions in ARF6 regulated endocytic membrane traffic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nekhoroshkova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RAF kinases direct ERK MAPK signaling to distinct subcellular compartments in response to growth factor stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the three mammalian isoforms A-RAF is special in that one of its two lipid binding domains mediates a unique pattern of membrane localization. Specific membrane binding is retained by an N-terminal fragment (AR149 that corresponds to a naturally occurring splice variant termed DA-RAF2. AR149 colocalizes with ARF6 on tubular endosomes and has a dominant negative effect on endocytic trafficking. Moreover actin polymerization of yeast and mammalian cells is abolished. AR149/DA-RAF2 does not affect the internalization step of endocytosis, but trafficking to the recycling compartment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A-RAF induced ERK activation is required for this step by activating ARF6, as A-RAF depletion or inhibition of the A-RAF controlled MEK-ERK cascade blocks recycling. These data led to a new model for A-RAF function in endocytic trafficking.

  20. Membrane-Initiated Estradiol Signaling Regulating Sexual Receptivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micevych, Paul E.; Dewing, Phoebe

    2011-01-01

    Estradiol has profound actions on the structure and function of the nervous system. In addition to nuclear actions that directly modulate gene expression, the idea that estradiol can rapidly activate cell signaling by binding to membrane estrogen receptors (mERs) has emerged. Even the regulation of sexual receptivity, an action previously thought to be completely regulated by nuclear ERs, has been shown to have a membrane-initiated estradiol signaling (MIES) component. This highlighted the question of the nature of mERs. Several candidates have been proposed, ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 (G protein coupled estrogen receptor), and a receptor activated by a diphenylacrylamide compound, STX. Although each of these receptors has been shown to be active in specific assays, we present evidence for and against their participation in sexual receptivity by acting in the lordosis-regulating circuit. The initial MIES that activates the circuit is in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH). Using both activation of μ-opioid receptors (MOR) in the medial preoptic nucleus and lordosis behavior, we document that both ERα and the STX-receptor participate in the required MIES. ERα and the STX-receptor activation of cell signaling are dependent on the transactivation of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1a) that augment progesterone synthesis in astrocytes and protein kinase C (PKC) in ARH neurons. While estradiol-induced sexual receptivity does not depend on neuroprogesterone, proceptive behaviors do. Moreover, the ERα and the STX-receptor activation of medial preoptic MORs and augmentation of lordosis were sensitive to mGluR1a blockade. These observations suggest a common mechanism through which mERs are coupled to intracellular signaling cascades, not just in regulating reproduction, but in actions throughout the neuraxis including the cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and dorsal root ganglias. PMID:22649369

  1. Thioredoxin h regulates calcium dependent protein kinases in plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueoka-Nakanishi, Hanayo; Sazuka, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Mori, Hitoshi; Hisabori, Toru

    2013-07-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a key player in redox homeostasis in various cells, modulating the functions of target proteins by catalyzing a thiol-disulfide exchange reaction. Target proteins of cytosolic Trx-h of higher plants were studied, particularly in the plasma membrane, because plant plasma membranes include various functionally important protein molecules such as transporters and signal receptors. Plasma membrane proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures were screened using a resin Trx-h1 mutant-immobilized, and a total of 48 candidate proteins obtained. These included two calcium-sensing proteins: a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase 2 (AtPLC2) and a calcium-dependent protein kinase 21 (AtCPK21). A redox-dependent change in AtCPK21 kinase activity was demonstrated in vitro. Oxidation of AtCPK21 resulted in a decrease in kinase activity to 19% of that of untreated AtCPK21, but Trx-h1 effectively restored the activity to 90%. An intramolecular disulfide bond (Cys97-Cys108) that is responsible for this redox modulation was then identified. In addition, endogenous AtCPK21 was shown to be oxidized in vivo when the culture cells were treated with H2 O2 . These results suggest that redox regulation of AtCPK21 by Trx-h in response to external stimuli is important for appropriate cellular responses. The relationship between the redox regulation system and Ca(2+) signaling pathways is discussed. © 2013 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  2. Organized crime-trafficking with human being

    OpenAIRE

    Jelenová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Organized crime - Trafficking in human beings This thesis deals with the criminal offence of trafficking in human beings under Sec. 168 of the Czech Criminal Code. A trafficking in human being is not a frequent criminal offence but with its consequences belongs to the most dangerous crimes. After the Velvet revolution the relevance of this crime has raised subsequently and therefore the regulation of this crime requires particular attention. It is important to find new ways and improve curren...

  3. Human organ trafficking in the cyber space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuletić Dejan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated growth of the information-communication technology use brought about cyber crime as a new form of crime connected with the misuse of computer network. Human trafficking and human organ trafficking are changing in line with the state-of-art technological achievements i.e. becoming more and more characteristic of cyber space. Passing appropriate regulations at both national and international levels presents an important step in solving the problem of human organ trafficking through Internet.

  4. Regulation of transport processes across the tonoplast membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eTrentmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the vacuole builds up the cellular turgor and represents an important component in cellular responses to diverse stress stimuli. Rapid volume changes of cells, particularly of motor cells, like guard cells, are caused by variation of osmolytes and consequently of the water contents in the vacuole. Moreover, directed solute uptake into or release out of the large central vacuole allows adaptation of cytosolic metabolite levels according to the current physiological requirements and specific cellular demands. Therefore, solute passage across the vacuolar membrane, the tonoplast, has to be tightly regulated. Important principles in vacuolar transport regulation are changes of tonoplast transport protein abundances by differential expression of genes or changes of their activities, e.g. due to post-translational modification or by interacting proteins. Because vacuolar transport is in most cases driven by an electro-chemical gradient altered activities of tonoplast proton pumps significantly influence vacuolar transport capacities. Intense studies on individual tonoplast proteins but also unbiased system biological approaches have provided important insights into the regulation of vacuolar transport. This short review refers to selected examples of tonoplast proteins and their regulation, with special focus on protein phosphorylation.

  5. Trafficking of human ADAM 12-L: retention in the trans-Golgi network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Loechel, F; Xu, X

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the trafficking of the membrane-anchored form of human ADAM 12 (ADAM 12-L) fused to a green fluorescence protein tag. Subcellular localization of the protein in transiently transfected cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy and trypsin sensitivity. Full-length ADAM 12...... the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains, but not the Src homology 3 domain (SH3) binding sites. These results raise the possibility that a trafficking checkpoint in the trans-Golgi network is one of the cellular mechanisms for regulation of ADAM 12-L function, by allowing a rapid release of ADAM 12-L...

  6. Akt2-Dependent Phosphorylation of Radixin in Regulation of Mrp-2 Trafficking in WIF-B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Jo; Rockey, Don C; Karvar, Serhan

    2016-02-01

    The dominant ezrin/radixin/moesin protein in hepatocytes is radixin, which plays an important role in mediating the binding of F-actin to the plasma membrane after a conformational activation by phosphorylation at Thr564. Here we have investigated the importance of Akt-mediated radixin Thr564 phosphorylation on Mrp-2 distribution and function in WIF-B cells. Mrp-2 is an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter that plays an important role in detoxification and chemoprotection by transporting a wide range of compounds, especially conjugates of lipophilic substances with glutathione, organic anions, and drug metabolites such as glucuronides. Akt1 and Akt2 expression were manipulated using dominant active and negative constructs as well as Akt1 and Akt2 siRNA. Cellular distribution of radixin and Mrp-2 was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. A 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate, which is a substrate of the Mrp-2 and is actively transported in canalicular lumina, was used to measure Mrp-2 function. Radixin phosphorylation was significantly increased in wild-type and dominant active Akt2 transfected cells. Furthermore, radixin and Mrp-2 were localized at the canalicular membrane, similar to control cells. In contrast, overexpression of dominant negative Akt2, siRNA knockdown of Akt2 and a specific Akt inhibitor prevented radixin phosphorylation and led to alteration of normal radixin and Mrp-2 localization; inhibition of Akt2, but not Akt1 function led to radixin localization to the cytoplasmic space. In addition, dominant negative and Akt2 knockdown led to a dramatically impaired hepatocyte secretory response, while wild-type and dominant active Akt2 transfected cells exhibited increased 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate excretion. In contrast to Akt2, Akt1 was not associated with radixin phosphorylation. These studies, therefore, identify Akt2 as a critical kinase that regulates radixin phosphorylation and leads to Mrp-2 translocation and

  7. Ctr9, a Protein in the Transcription Complex Paf1, Regulates Dopamine Transporter Activity at the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gois, Stéphanie; Slama, Patrick; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Erdozain, Amaia M; Louis, Franck; Bouvrais-Veret, Caroline; Daviet, Laurent; Giros, Bruno

    2015-07-17

    Dopamine (DA) is a major regulator of sensorimotor and cognitive functions. The DA transporter (DAT) is the key protein that regulates the spatial and temporal activity of DA release into the synaptic cleft via the rapid reuptake of DA into presynaptic termini. Several lines of evidence have suggested that transporter-interacting proteins may play a role in DAT function and regulation. Here, we identified the tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein Ctr9 as a novel DAT binding partner using a yeast two-hybrid system. We showed that Ctr9 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and forms a stable complex with DAT in vivo via GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays. In mammalian cells co-expressing both proteins, Ctr9 partially colocalizes with DAT at the plasma membrane. This interaction between DAT and Ctr9 results in a dramatic enhancement of DAT-mediated DA uptake due to an increased number of DAT transporters at the plasma membrane. We determined that the binding of Ctr9 to DAT requires residues YKF in the first half of the DAT C terminus. In addition, we characterized Ctr9, providing new insight into this protein. Using three-dimensional modeling, we identified three novel tetratricopeptide repeat domains in the Ctr9 sequence, and based on deletion mutation experiments, we demonstrated the role of the SH2 domain of Ctr9 in nuclear localization. Our results demonstrate that Ctr9 localization is not restricted to the nucleus, as previously described for the transcription complex Paf1. Taken together, our data provide evidence that Ctr9 modulates DAT function by regulating its trafficking. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Economics of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  9. Human regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) is required for the nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking of pre-U2 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Michael; Jouravleva, Karina; Perderiset, Mylene; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Le Guen, Tangui; Bardoni, Barbara; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Revy, Patrick; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2015-02-18

    Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) is a severe form of Dyskeratosis congenita characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and immunodeficiency and has been associated with telomere dysfunction. Recently, mutations in Regulator of Telomere ELongation helicase 1 (RTEL1), a helicase first identified in Mus musculus as being responsible for the maintenance of long telomeres, have been identified in several HHS patients. Here we show that RTEL1 is required for the export and the correct cytoplasmic trafficking of the small nuclear (sn) RNA pre-U2, a component of the major spliceosome complex. RTEL1-HHS cells show abnormal subcellular partitioning of pre-U2, defects in the recycling of ribonucleotide proteins (RNP) in the cytoplasm and splicing defects. While most of these phenotypes can be suppressed by re-expressing the wild-type protein in RTEL1-HHS cells, expression of RTEL1 mutated variants in immortalized cells provokes cytoplasmic mislocalizations of pre-U2 and other RNP components, as well as splicing defects, thus phenocopying RTEL1-HHS cellular defects. Strikingly, expression of a cytoplasmic form of RTEL1 is sufficient to correct RNP mislocalizations both in RTEL1-HHS cells and in cells expressing nuclear mutated forms of RTEL1. This work unravels completely unanticipated roles for RTEL1 in RNP trafficking and strongly suggests that defects in RNP biogenesis pathways contribute to the pathology of HHS. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. The calcium-binding protein ALG-2 regulates protein secretion and trafficking via interactions with MISSL and MAP1B proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Terunao; Inoue, Kuniko; Arai, Yumika; Kuwata, Keiko; Shibata, Hideki; Maki, Masatoshi

    2017-10-13

    Mobilization of intracellular calcium is essential for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, apoptosis, and vesicular trafficking. Several lines of evidence have suggested that apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2, also known as PDCD6 ), a calcium-binding protein, acts as a calcium sensor linking calcium levels with efficient vesicular trafficking, especially at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport step. However, how ALG-2 regulates these processes remains largely unclear. Here, we report that M APK1- i nteracting and s pindle- s tabilizing (MISS)- l ike (MISSL), a previously uncharacterized protein, interacts with ALG-2 in a calcium-dependent manner. Live-cell imaging revealed that upon a rise in intracellular calcium levels, GFP-tagged MISSL (GFP-MISSL) dynamically relocalizes in a punctate pattern and colocalizes with ALG-2. MISSL knockdown caused disorganization of the components of the ER exit site, the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, and Golgi. Importantly, knockdown of either MISSL or ALG-2 attenuated the secretion of se creted a lkaline p hosphatase (SEAP), a model secreted cargo protein, with similar reductions in secretion by single- and double-protein knockdowns, suggesting that MISSL and ALG-2 act in the same pathway to regulate the secretion process. Furthermore, ALG-2 or MISSL knockdown delayed ER-to-Golgi transport of procollagen type I. We also found that ALG-2 and MISSL interact with microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) and that MAP1B knockdown reverts the reduced secretion of SEAP caused by MISSL or ALG-2 depletion. These results suggest that a change in the intracellular calcium level plays a role in regulation of the secretory pathway via interaction of ALG-2 with MISSL and MAP1B. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. A fluorescent glycolipid-binding peptide probe traces cholesterol dependent microdomain-derived trafficking pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Steinert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uptake and intracellular trafficking of sphingolipids, which self-associate into plasma membrane microdomains, is associated with many pathological conditions, including viral and toxin infection, lipid storage disease, and neurodegenerative disease. However, the means available to label the trafficking pathways of sphingolipids in live cells are extremely limited. In order to address this problem, we have developed an exogenous, non-toxic probe consisting of a 25-amino acid sphingolipid binding domain, the SBD, derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, and conjugated by a neutral linker with an organic fluorophore. The current work presents the characterization of the sphingolipid binding and live cell trafficking of this novel probe, the SBD peptide. SBD was the name given to a motif originally recognized by Fantini et al in a number of glycolipid-associated proteins, and was proposed to interact with sphingolipids in membrane microdomains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In accordance with Fantini's model, optimal SBD binding to membranes depends on the presence of sphingolipids and cholesterol. In synthetic membrane binding assays, SBD interacts preferentially with raft-like lipid mixtures containing sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and complex gangliosides in a pH-dependent manner, but is less glycolipid-specific than Cholera toxin B (CtxB. Using quantitative time-course colocalization in live cells, we show that the uptake and intracellular trafficking route of SBD is unlike that of either the non-raft marker Transferrin or the raft markers CtxB and Flotillin2-GFP. However, SBD traverses an endolysosomal route that partially intersects with raft-associated pathways, with a major portion being diverted at a late time point to rab11-positive recycling endosomes. Trafficking of SBD to acidified compartments is strongly disrupted by cholesterol perturbations, consistent with the regulation of sphingolipid trafficking by cholesterol

  12. Membrane-bound transcription factors: regulated release by RIP or RUP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, T; Rape, M; Jentsch, S

    2001-06-01

    Regulated nuclear transport of transcription factors from cytoplasmic pools is a major route by which eukaryotes control gene expression. Exquisite examples are transcription factors that are kept in a dormant state in the cytosol by membrane anchors; such proteins are released from membranes by proteolytic cleavage, which enables these transcription factors to enter the nucleus. Cleavage can be mediated either by regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) catalysed by specific membrane-bound proteases or by regulated ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent processing (RUP). In both cases processing can be controlled by cues that originate at or in the vicinity of the membrane.

  13. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  14. Casein Kinase 2 Is a Novel Regulator of the Human Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ting; Cheung, Florence Shin Gee; Zheng, Jian; Lu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Ling; Grewal, Thomas; Murray, Michael; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-01-04

    Human organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) mediate the influx of many important drugs into cells. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a critical protein kinase that phosphorylates >300 protein substrates and is dysregulated in a number of disease states. Among the CK2 substrates are several transporters, although whether this includes human OATPs has not been evaluated. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the regulation of human OATP1A2 by CK2. HEK-239T cells in which OATP1A2 was overexpressed were treated with CK2 specific inhibitors or transfected with CK2 specific siRNA, and the activity, expression, and subcellular trafficking of OATP1A2 was evaluated. CK2 inhibition decreased the uptake of the prototypic OATP1A2 substrate estrone-3-sulfate (E3S). Kinetic studies revealed that this was due to a decrease in the maximum velocity (Vmax) of E3S uptake, while the Michaelis constant was unchanged. The cell surface expression, but not the total cellular expression of OATP1A2, was impaired by CK2 inhibition and knockdown of the catalytic α-subunits of CK2. CK2 inhibition decreased the internalization of OATP1A2 via a clathrin-dependent pathway, decreased OATP1A2 recycling, and likely impaired OATP1A2 targeting to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, CK2 inhibition also disrupted the colocalization of OATP1A2 and Rab GTPase (Rab)4-, Rab8-, and Rab9-positive endosomal and secretory vesicles. Taken together, CK2 has emerged as a novel regulator of the subcellular trafficking and stability of OATP1A2. Because OATP1A2 transports many molecules of physiological and pharmacological importance, the present data may inform drug selection in patients with diseases in which CK2 and OATP1A2 are dysregulated.

  15. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kang, Jong-Sun; Hahn, Myong-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. ► Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. ► Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances GABA transport by modulating the trafficking of GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) from the plasma membrane of rat cortical astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, Sandra H; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Cristóvão-Ferreira, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    /MAPK pathway and requires active adenosine A(2A) receptors. Transport through GAT-3 is not affected by BDNF. To elucidate if BDNF affects trafficking of GAT-1 in astrocytes, we generated and infected astrocytes with a functional mutant of the rat GAT-1 (rGAT-1) in which the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope...

  17. Endosome-based protein trafficking and Ca2+ homeostasis in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry eCurran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to dynamically regulate, traffic, retain, and recycle proteins within the cell membrane is fundamental to life and central to the normal function of the heart and cardiovascular system. In the heart, these systems are essential for the regulation of cardiac calcium, both at the level of the plasma membrane, but also at local domains of the endoplasmic reticulum, sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, nucleus, and nuclear envelope. One intracellular pathway often overlooked in relation to cardiovascular calcium regulation and signaling is the endosome-based trafficking pathway. Highlighting its importance, this system and its molecular components are evolutionarily conserved across all metazoans. However, remarkably little is known of how endosome-based protein trafficking and recycling functions within mammalian cells systems, especially in the heart. The vast majority of what is known has been derived from heterologous cell systems. However, recently, more appropriate cell and animal models been developed that have allowed researchers to begin to understand how this system functions within the intact physiological environment. All excitable cells, including cardiomyocytes, depend on the proper expression and organization of multiple ion channels, pumps, exchangers, and transporters within the plasma membrane. As the endosomal system acts to regulate the expression and localization of membrane proteins, understanding the in vivo function of this system in the heart is important. This review will focus on endosome-based protein trafficking in the heart in both health and disease. Special emphasis will be given to the role played by the family of endocytic regulatory proteins, C-terminal Eps15 homology domain -containing proteins (EHDs, as recent data demonstrates that this family of proteins is essential for the proper trafficking and localization and of key proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling.

  18. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L Rowe

    Full Text Available Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5 which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS, the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES. However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2, and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  19. Biglycan and decorin differentially regulate signaling in the fetal membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiping; Horgan, Casie E.; Carr, Olivia; Owens, Rick T.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Lechner, Beatrice E.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of newborn mortality in the United States and about one third of cases are caused by preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes, a complication that is frequently observed in patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Notably, a subtype of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is caused by expression of abnormal biglycan and decorin proteoglycans. As compound deficiency of these two small leucine-rich proteoglycans is a model of preterm birth, we investigated the fetal membranes of Bgn−/−;Dcn−/− double-null and single-null mice. Our results showed that biglycan signaling supported fetal membrane remodeling during early gestation in the absence of concomitant changes in TGFβ levels. In late gestation, biglycan signaling acted in a TGFβ–dependent manner to aid in membrane stabilization. In contrast, decorin signaling supported fetal membrane remodeling at early stages of gestation in a TGFβ–dependent manner, and fetal membrane stabilization at later stages of gestation without changes in TGFβ levels. Furthermore, exogenous soluble decorin was capable of rescuing the TGFβ signaling pathway in fetal membrane mesenchymal cells. Collectively, these findings provide novel targets for manipulation of fetal membrane extracellular matrix stability and could represent novel targets for research on preventive strategies for preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes. PMID:24373743

  20. Plectin regulates the signaling and trafficking of the HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 and plays a role in HIV-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yun; Zhang Li; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Wang Ziqing; Liu Bingdong; Zhang Jingwu; Fan Guohuang

    2008-01-01

    The CXC chemokine CXCL12 and its cognate receptor CXCR4 play an important role in inflammation, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and cancer metastasis. The signal transduction and intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 are involved in these functions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that the CXCR4 formed a complex with the cytolinker protein plectin in a ligand-dependent manner in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. The glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-CXCR4 C-terminal fusion proteins co-precipitated with the full-length and the N-terminal fragments of plectin isoform 1 but not with the N-terminal deletion mutants of plectin isoform 1, thereby suggesting an interaction between the N-terminus of plectin and the C-terminus of CXCR4. This interaction was confirmed by confocal microscopic reconstructions showing co-distribution of these two proteins in the internal vesicles after ligand-induced internalization of CXCR4 in HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4. Knockdown of plectin with RNA interference (RNAi) significantly inhibited ligand-dependent CXCR4 internalization and attenuated CXCR4-mediated intracellular calcium mobilization and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of HEK293 cells stably expressing CXCR4 and of Jurkat T cells was inhibited by the plectin RNAi. Moreover, CXCR4 tropic HIV-1 infection in MAGI (HeLa-CD4-LTR-Gal) cells was inhibited by the RNAi of plectin. Thus, plectin appears to interact with CXCR4 and plays an important role in CXCR4 signaling and trafficking and HIV-1 infection

  1. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels, and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2 phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively. Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are

  3. Regulation of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falhof, Janus

    The plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase is responsible for generating the electrochemical gradientthat drives the secondary transport of nutrients across the cellular membrane. It belongs to a familyof cation and lipid transporters that are vital to many organisms. PM H+-ATPases are Type P3AATPases...

  4. The Ciliopathy Protein CC2D2A Associates with NINL and Functions in RAB8-MICAL3-Regulated Vesicle Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Bachmann-Gagescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ciliopathies are a group of human disorders caused by dysfunction of primary cilia, ubiquitous microtubule-based organelles involved in transduction of extra-cellular signals to the cell. This function requires the concentration of receptors and channels in the ciliary membrane, which is achieved by complex trafficking mechanisms, in part controlled by the small GTPase RAB8, and by sorting at the transition zone located at the entrance of the ciliary compartment. Mutations in the transition zone gene CC2D2A cause the related Joubert and Meckel syndromes, two typical ciliopathies characterized by central nervous system malformations, and result in loss of ciliary localization of multiple proteins in various models. The precise mechanisms by which CC2D2A and other transition zone proteins control protein entrance into the cilium and how they are linked to vesicular trafficking of incoming cargo remain largely unknown. In this work, we identify the centrosomal protein NINL as a physical interaction partner of CC2D2A. NINL partially co-localizes with CC2D2A at the base of cilia and ninl knockdown in zebrafish leads to photoreceptor outer segment loss, mislocalization of opsins and vesicle accumulation, similar to cc2d2a-/- phenotypes. Moreover, partial ninl knockdown in cc2d2a-/- embryos enhances the retinal phenotype of the mutants, indicating a genetic interaction in vivo, for which an illustration is found in patients from a Joubert Syndrome cohort. Similar to zebrafish cc2d2a mutants, ninl morphants display altered Rab8a localization. Further exploration of the NINL-associated interactome identifies MICAL3, a protein known to interact with Rab8 and to play an important role in vesicle docking and fusion. Together, these data support a model where CC2D2A associates with NINL to provide a docking point for cilia-directed cargo vesicles, suggesting a mechanism by which transition zone proteins can control the protein content of the ciliary

  5. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking and Impact in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Arenas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a critical component of membrane bilayers where it plays key structural and functional roles by regulating the activity of diverse signaling platforms and pathways. Particularly enriched in brain, cholesterol homeostasis in this organ is singular with respect to other tissues and exhibits a heterogeneous regulation in distinct brain cell populations. Due to the key role of cholesterol in brain physiology and function, alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and levels have been linked to brain diseases and neurodegeneration. In the case of Alzheimer disease (AD, however, this association remains unclear with evidence indicating that either increased or decreased total brain cholesterol levels contribute to this major neurodegenerative disease. Here, rather than analyzing the role of total cholesterol levels in neurodegeneration, we focus on the contribution of intracellular cholesterol pools, particularly in endolysosomes and mitochondria through its trafficking via specialized membrane domains delineated by the contacts between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, in the onset of prevalent neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, Parkinson disease, and Huntington disease as well as in lysosomal disorders like Niemann-Pick type C disease. We dissect molecular events associated with intracellular cholesterol accumulation, especially in mitochondria, an event that results in impaired mitochondrial antioxidant defense and function. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the distribution of cholesterol in intracellular compartments may shed light on the role of cholesterol homeostasis disruption in neurodegeneration and may pave the way for specific intervention opportunities.

  7. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  8. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    OpenAIRE

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of li...

  9. Regulation of cellular pH: From molecules to membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, Michael David

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a universal class of proton pumps responsible for creating and maintaining acidic milieus in both intracellular and extracellular spaces. In the first chapter, I develop a mechanochemical model of this enzyme based upon the counter-rotation of adjacent subunits. The mathematical approach details a general integrated method for describing the mechanical and chemical reactions that occur in motor systems. A novel escapement is proposed for how the protons cross the protein-bilayer interface, and it is shown how this movement couples to ATP hydrolysis. This model reproduces a variety of experimental data while providing a framework for understanding the function of the enzyme's subunits. Specifically, it explains how ATP hydrolysis can uncouple from proton movement, which has important consequences for cellular energetics and pH regulation. Until now only an equilibrium theory of organelle acidification has been proposed; however, recent experiments show that large proton leaks prevent many cellular compartments from reaching thermodynamic equilibrium. The characterization of the V-ATPase is used in the second chapter in order to develop a unified model of organelle acidification based on the interplay of ion pumps and channels and the physical characteristics of the organelle. This model successfully describes the time dependent acidification of many different organelle systems. It accurately predicts both the electrical and concentration dependent terms of the chemical potential. In conjunction with fluorescence experiments, I determined the first measurements of the proton permeability of organelles along the secretory pathway. These measurements allowed me to make the first estimates of the number of V-ATPases in each compartment by analyzing the resting pH's of the respective organelles. I found a decrease in permeability from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (51 x 10-4 cm/s) to the Golgi (21 x 10-4 cm/s) to the mature secretory

  10. cAMP-induced activation of protein kinase A and p190B RhoGAP mediates down-regulation of TC10 activity at the plasma membrane and neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koinuma, Shingo; Takeuchi, Kohei; Wada, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    Cyclic AMP plays a pivotal role in neurite growth. During outgrowth, a trafficking system supplies membrane at growth cones. However, the cAMP-induced signaling leading to the regulation of membrane trafficking remains unknown. TC10 is a Rho family GTPase that is essential for specific types of vesicular trafficking. Recent studies have shown a role of TC10 in neurite growth in NGF-treated PC12 cells. Here, we investigated a mechanical linkage between cAMP and TC10 in neuritogenesis. Plasmalemmal TC10 activity decreased abruptly after cAMP addition in neuronal cells. TC10 was locally inactivated at extending neurite tips in cAMP-treated PC12 cells. TC10 depletion led to a decrease in cAMP-induced neurite outgrowth. Constitutively active TC10 could not rescue this growth reduction, supporting our model for a role of GTP hydrolysis of TC10 in neuritogenesis by accelerating vesicle fusion. The cAMP-induced TC10 inactivation was mediated by PKA. Considering cAMP-induced RhoA inactivation, we found that p190B, but not p190A, mediated inactivation of TC10 and RhoA. Upon cAMP treatment, p190B was recruited to the plasma membrane. STEF depletion and Rac1-N17 expression reduced cAMP-induced TC10 inactivation. Together, the PKA-STEF-Rac1-p190B pathway leading to inactivation of TC10 and RhoA at the plasma membrane plays an important role in cAMP-induced neurite outgrowth. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization methods in solids and solutions to explore membrane proteins and membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins regulate vital cellular processes, including signaling, ion transport, and vesicular trafficking. Obtaining experimental access to their structures, conformational fluctuations, orientations, locations, and hydration in membrane environments, as well as the lipid membrane properties, is critical to understanding their functions. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of frozen solids can dramatically boost the sensitivity of current solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance tools to enhance access to membrane protein structures in native membrane environments. Overhauser DNP in the solution state can map out the local and site-specific hydration dynamics landscape of membrane proteins and lipid membranes, critically complementing the structural and dynamics information obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Here, we provide an overview of how DNP methods in solids and solutions can significantly increase our understanding of membrane protein structures, dynamics, functions, and hydration in complex biological membrane environments.

  12. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton-plasma membrane interplay by phosphoinositides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikangas, Juha; Zhao, Hongxia; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane and the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton undergo continuous dynamic interplay that is responsible for many essential aspects of cell physiology. Polymerization of actin filaments against cellular membranes provides the force for a number of cellular processes such as migration, morphogenesis, and endocytosis. Plasma membrane phosphoinositides (especially phosphatidylinositol bis- and trisphosphates) play a central role in regulating the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton by acting as platforms for protein recruitment, by triggering signaling cascades, and by directly regulating the activities of actin-binding proteins. Furthermore, a number of actin-associated proteins, such as BAR domain proteins, are capable of directly deforming phosphoinositide-rich membranes to induce plasma membrane protrusions or invaginations. Recent studies have also provided evidence that the actin cytoskeleton-plasma membrane interactions are misregulated in a number of pathological conditions such as cancer and during pathogen invasion. Here, we summarize the wealth of knowledge on how the cortical actin cytoskeleton is regulated by phosphoinositides during various cell biological processes. We also discuss the mechanisms by which interplay between actin dynamics and certain membrane deforming proteins regulate the morphology of the plasma membrane.

  13. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Trafficking and function of the tetraspanin CD63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pols, Maaike S. [Cell Microscopy Center, Department of Cell Biology and Institute of Biomembranes, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Klumperman, Judith, E-mail: j.klumperman@umcutrecht.nl [Cell Microscopy Center, Department of Cell Biology and Institute of Biomembranes, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    Tetraspanins comprise a large superfamily of cell surface-associated membrane proteins characterized by four transmembrane domains. They participate in a variety of cellular processes, like cell activation, adhesion, differentiation and tumour invasion. At the cell surface, tetraspanins form networks with a wide diversity of proteins called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs). CD63 was the first characterized tetraspanin. In addition to its presence in TEMs, CD63 is also abundantly present in late endosomes and lysosomes. CD63 at the cell surface is endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway, although recent studies suggest the involvement of other pathways as well and we here present evidence for a role of caveolae in CD63 endocytosis. In late endosomes, CD63 is enriched on the intraluminal vesicles, which by specialized cells are secreted as exosomes through fusion of endosomes with the plasma membrane. The complex localization pattern of CD63 suggests that its intracellular trafficking and distribution must be tightly regulated. In this review we discuss the latest insights in CD63 trafficking and its emerging function as a transport regulator of its interaction partners. Finally, the involvement of CD63 in cancer will be discussed.

  15. Trafficking and function of the tetraspanin CD63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pols, Maaike S.; Klumperman, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Tetraspanins comprise a large superfamily of cell surface-associated membrane proteins characterized by four transmembrane domains. They participate in a variety of cellular processes, like cell activation, adhesion, differentiation and tumour invasion. At the cell surface, tetraspanins form networks with a wide diversity of proteins called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs). CD63 was the first characterized tetraspanin. In addition to its presence in TEMs, CD63 is also abundantly present in late endosomes and lysosomes. CD63 at the cell surface is endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway, although recent studies suggest the involvement of other pathways as well and we here present evidence for a role of caveolae in CD63 endocytosis. In late endosomes, CD63 is enriched on the intraluminal vesicles, which by specialized cells are secreted as exosomes through fusion of endosomes with the plasma membrane. The complex localization pattern of CD63 suggests that its intracellular trafficking and distribution must be tightly regulated. In this review we discuss the latest insights in CD63 trafficking and its emerging function as a transport regulator of its interaction partners. Finally, the involvement of CD63 in cancer will be discussed.

  16. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  17. Membrane mechanisms and intracellular signalling in cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Dunham, Philip B.

    1995-01-01

    Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation.......Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation....

  18. Membrane dynamics and the regulation of epithelial cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, JM; Maier, O; van IJzendoorn, SCD; Hoekstra, D

    2003-01-01

    Plasma membranes of epithelial cells consist of two domains, an apical and a basolateral domain, the surfaces of which differ in composition. The separation of these domains by a tight junction and the fact that specific transport pathways exist for intracellular communication between these domains

  19. Cell polarity and patterning by PIN trafficking through early endosomal compartments in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Tanaka

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PIN-FORMED (PIN proteins localize asymmetrically at the plasma membrane and mediate intercellular polar transport of the plant hormone auxin that is crucial for a multitude of developmental processes in plants. PIN localization is under extensive control by environmental or developmental cues, but mechanisms regulating PIN localization are not fully understood. Here we show that early endosomal components ARF GEF BEN1 and newly identified Sec1/Munc18 family protein BEN2 are involved in distinct steps of early endosomal trafficking. BEN1 and BEN2 are collectively required for polar PIN localization, for their dynamic repolarization, and consequently for auxin activity gradient formation and auxin-related developmental processes including embryonic patterning, organogenesis, and vasculature venation patterning. These results show that early endosomal trafficking is crucial for cell polarity and auxin-dependent regulation of plant architecture.

  20. Mass spectrometry approaches to study plant endomembrane trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsons, Harriet Tempé; Lilley, Kathryn S.

    2018-01-01

    . Trafficking of membrane proteins to their correct endomembrane location is especially important to enable them to carry out their function. Although a considerable amount of knowledge about membrane protein trafficking in plants has been delivered by years of dedicated research, there are still significant...... gaps in our understanding of this process. Further knowledge of endomembrane trafficking is dependent on thorough characterization of the subcellular components that constitute the endomembrane system. Such studies are challenging for a number of reasons including the complexity of the plant...

  1. Diphtheria toxin translocation across cellular membranes is regulated by sphingolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spilsberg, Bjorn; Hanada, Kentaro; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is translocated across cellular membranes when receptor-bound toxin is exposed to low pH. To study the role of sphingolipids for toxin translocation, both a mutant cell line lacking the first enzyme in de novo sphingolipid synthesis, serine palmitoyltransferase, and a specific inhibitor of the same enzyme, myriocin, were used. The serine palmitoyltransferase-deficient cell line (LY-B) was found to be 10-15 times more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than the genetically complemented cell line (LY-B/cLCB1) and the wild-type cell line (CHO-K1), both when toxin translocation directly across the plasma membrane was induced by exposing cells with surface-bound toxin to low pH, and when the toxin followed its normal route via acidified endosomes into the cytosol. Toxin binding was similar in these three cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase activity by addition of myriocin sensitized the two control cell lines (LY-B/cLCB1 and CHO-K1) to diphtheria toxin, whereas, as expected, no effect was observed in cells lacking serine palmitoyltransferase (LY-B). In conclusion, diphtheria toxin translocation is facilitated by depletion of membrane sphingolipids

  2. Plasma Membrane H(+)-ATPase Regulation in the Center of Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falhof, Janus; Pedersen, Jesper Torbøl; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-03-07

    The plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase is an important ion pump in the plant cell membrane. By extruding protons from the cell and generating a membrane potential, this pump energizes the PM, which is a prerequisite for growth. Modification of the autoinhibitory terminal domains activates PM H(+)-ATPase activity, and on this basis it has been hypothesized that these regulatory termini are targets for physiological factors that activate or inhibit proton pumping. In this review, we focus on the posttranslational regulation of the PM H(+)-ATPase and place regulation of the pump in an evolutionary and physiological context. The emerging picture is that multiple signals regulating plant growth interfere with the posttranslational regulation of the PM H(+)-ATPase. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. FIG4 regulates lysosome membrane homeostasis independent of phosphatase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Cunningham, Kathleen M; Zhang, Ke; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2016-02-15

    FIG4 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that is mutated in several diseases including Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease 4J (CMT4J) and Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS). To investigate the mechanism of disease pathogenesis, we generated Drosophila models of FIG4-related diseases. Fig4 null mutant animals are viable but exhibit marked enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in muscle cells and neurons, accompanied by an age-related decline in flight ability. Transgenic animals expressing Drosophila Fig4 missense mutations corresponding to human pathogenic mutations can partially rescue lysosomal expansion phenotypes, consistent with these mutations causing decreased FIG4 function. Interestingly, Fig4 mutations predicted to inactivate FIG4 phosphatase activity rescue lysosome expansion phenotypes, and mutations in the phosphoinositide (3) phosphate kinase Fab1 that performs the reverse enzymatic reaction also causes a lysosome expansion phenotype. Since FIG4 and FAB1 are present together in the same biochemical complex, these data are consistent with a model in which FIG4 serves a phosphatase-independent biosynthetic function that is essential for lysosomal membrane homeostasis. Lysosomal phenotypes are suppressed by genetic inhibition of Rab7 or the HOPS complex, demonstrating that FIG4 functions after endosome-to-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, disruption of the retromer complex, implicated in recycling from the lysosome to Golgi, does not lead to similar phenotypes as Fig4, suggesting that the lysosomal defects are not due to compromised retromer-mediated recycling of endolysosomal membranes. These data show that FIG4 plays a critical noncatalytic function in maintaining lysosomal membrane homeostasis, and that this function is disrupted by mutations that cause CMT4J and YVS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grossmann, G.; Malínský, Jan; Stahlschmidt, W.; Loibl, M.; Weig-Meckl, I.; Frommer, W.B.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, W.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 6 (2008), s. 1075-1088 ISSN 0021-9525 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/0009; GA ČR GA204/07/0133; GA ČR GC204/08/J024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Lithium acetate * Membrane compartment of Can1 * Monomeric red fluorescent protein Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 9.120, year: 2008

  5. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoling; Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao; Zhao, Yunhui; Fan, Yubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9 days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ. - Highlights: • A series of peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes were prepared. • Hemocompatibility of the membranes was greatly improved by the modification. • QK-modified PELCL membrane promoted VECs proliferation more significantly. • REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VEC adhesion.

  6. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Jia, Xiaoling [Key Laboratory for Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of Ministry of Education, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, Yang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao [Key Laboratory for Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of Ministry of Education, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Yunhui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fan, Yubo, E-mail: yubofan@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of Ministry of Education, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083 (China); National Research Center for Rehabilitation Technical Aids, Beijing 100176 (China); Yuan, Xiaoyan, E-mail: yuanxy@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9 days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ. - Highlights: • A series of peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes were prepared. • Hemocompatibility of the membranes was greatly improved by the modification. • QK-modified PELCL membrane promoted VECs proliferation more significantly. • REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VEC adhesion.

  7. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivyna Pau Ni Bong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the functions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05. NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05. Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01. Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM.

  8. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Ivyna Pau Ni; Ng, Ching Ching; Fakiruddin, Shaik Kamal; Lim, Moon Nian; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM) phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the fprotein expression in unctions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05). NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05). Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM. PMID:27754828

  9. Homeostatic regulation of T cell trafficking by a B cell-derived peptide is impaired in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimen, Myriam; McGettrick, Helen M; Apta, Bonita; Kuravi, Sahithi J; Yates, Clara M; Kennedy, Amy; Odedra, Arjun; Alassiri, Mohammed; Harrison, Matthew; Martin, Ashley; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Hitchcock, Jessica R; Cunningham, Adam F; Raza, Karim; Filer, Andrew; Copland, David A; Dick, Andrew D; Robinson, Joseph; Kalia, Neena; Walker, Lucy S K; Buckley, Christopher D; Nash, Gerard B; Narendran, Parth; Rainger, G Ed

    2015-05-01

    During an inflammatory response, lymphocyte recruitment into tissue must be tightly controlled because dysregulated trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic disease. Here we show that during inflammation and in response to adiponectin, B cells tonically inhibit T cell trafficking by secreting a peptide (PEPITEM) proteolytically derived from 14.3.3 zeta delta (14.3.3.ζδ) protein. PEPITEM binds cadherin-15 on endothelial cells, promoting synthesis and release of sphingosine-1 phosphate, which inhibits trafficking of T cells without affecting recruitment of other leukocytes. Expression of adiponectin receptors on B cells and adiponectin-induced PEPITEM secretion wanes with age, implying immune senescence of the pathway. Additionally, these changes are evident in individuals with type 1 diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, and circulating PEPITEM in patient serum is reduced compared to that of healthy age-matched donors. In both diseases, tonic inhibition of T cell trafficking across inflamed endothelium is lost. Control of patient T cell trafficking is re-established by treatment with exogenous PEPITEM. Moreover, in animal models of peritonitis, hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury, Salmonella infection, uveitis and Sjögren's syndrome, PEPITEM reduced T cell recruitment into inflamed tissues.

  10. Regulation of glycolytic oscillations by mitochondrial and plasma membrane H+-ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Folke; Andersen, Ann Zahle; Lunding, Anita

    2009-01-01

    ,3'-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide. The responses of glycolytic and membrane potential oscillations to a number of inhibitors of glycolysis, mitochondrial electron flow, and mitochondrial and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase were investigated. Furthermore, the glycolytic flux was determined as the rate of production of ethanol....../ATP antiporter and the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)-ATPase. The results further suggest that ATP hydrolysis, through the action of the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)-ATPase and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, are important in regulating these oscillations. We conclude that it is glycolysis that drives the oscillations...

  11. Androgen receptor regulates nuclear trafficking and nuclear domain residency of corepressor HDAC7 in a ligand-dependent fashion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvonen, Ulla; Jaenne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to chromosomal proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) target transcription factors in transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the class II HDAC family member HDAC7 is an efficient corepressor of the androgen receptor (AR). HDAC7 resided in the cytoplasm in the absence of AR or a cognate ligand, but hormone-occupancy of AR induced nuclear transfer of HDAC7. Nuclear colocalization pattern of AR and HDAC7 was dependent on the nature of the ligand. In the presence of testosterone, a portion of HDAC7 localized to pearl-like nuclear domains, whereas AR occupied with antagonistic ligands cyproterone acetate- or casodex (bicalutamide) recruited HDAC7 from these domains to colocalize with the receptor in speckles and nucleoplasm in a more complete fashion. Ectopic expression of PML-3 relieved the repressive effect of HDAC7 on AR function by sequestering HDAC7 to PML-3 domains. AR acetylation at Lys630/632/633 was not the target of HDAC7 repression, since repression of AR function was independent of these acetylation sites. Moreover, the deacetylase activity of HDAC7 was in part dispensable in the repression of AR function. In sum, our results identify HDAC7 as a novel AR corepressor whose subcellular and subnuclear compartmentalization can be regulated in an androgen-selective manner

  12. A palmitoylation switch mechanism regulates Rac1 function and membrane organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Perales, Sara; Calvo, María; Rentero, Carles; Zheng, Yi; Enrich, Carlos; Del Pozo, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 plays important roles in many processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, cell-cycle progression and gene expression. The initiation of Rac1 signalling requires at least two mechanisms: GTP loading via the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)/guanosine diphosphate (GDP) cycle, and targeting to cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms governing this specific compartmentalization. We show that Rac1 can incorporate palmitate at cysteine 178 and that this post-translational modification targets Rac1 for stabilization at actin cytoskeleton-linked ordered membrane regions. Palmitoylation of Rac1 requires its prior prenylation and the intact C-terminal polybasic region and is regulated by the triproline-rich motif. Non-palmitoylated Rac1 shows decreased GTP loading and lower association with detergent-resistant (liquid-ordered) membranes (DRMs). Cells expressing no Rac1 or a palmitoylation-deficient mutant have an increased content of disordered membrane domains, and markers of ordered membranes isolated from Rac1-deficient cells do not correctly partition in DRMs. Importantly, cells lacking Rac1 palmitoylation show spreading and migration defects. These data identify palmitoylation as a mechanism for Rac1 function in actin cytoskeleton remodelling by controlling its membrane partitioning, which in turn regulates membrane organization. PMID:22157745

  13. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Timothy A; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E; Prinz, William A

    2009-12-14

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Using Osh4p/Kes1p as a representative ORP, we show that ORPs have at least two membrane-binding surfaces; one near the mouth of the sterol-binding pocket and a distal site that can bind a second membrane. The distal site is required for the protein to function in cells and, remarkably, regulates the rate at which Osh4p extracts and delivers sterols in a phosphoinositide-dependent manner. Together, these findings suggest a new model of how ORPs could sense and regulate the lipid composition of adjacent membranes.

  14. Smuggled or trafficked?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Bhabha

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime (TNC and its two Protocols on Trafficking and Smuggling, adopted in 2000, seek to distinguish between trafficking and smuggling. In reality these distinctions are often blurred. A more nuanced approach is needed to ensure protection for all those at risk.

  15. Crystalline polymorphism induced by charge regulation in ionic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Palmer, Liam C; Kewalramani, Sumit; Qiao, Baofu; Stupp, Samuel I; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2013-10-08

    The crystallization of molecules with polar and hydrophobic groups, such as ionic amphiphiles and proteins, is of paramount importance in biology and biotechnology. By coassembling dilysine (+2) and carboxylate (-1) amphiphiles of various tail lengths into bilayer membranes at different pH values, we show that the 2D crystallization process in amphiphile membranes can be controlled by modifying the competition of long-range and short-range interactions among the polar and the hydrophobic groups. The pH and the hydrophobic tail length modify the intermolecular packing and the symmetry of their crystalline phase. For hydrophobic tail lengths of 14 carbons (C14), we observe the coassembly into crystalline bilayers with hexagonal molecular ordering via in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. As the tail length increases, the hexagonal lattice spacing decreases due to an increase in van der Waals interactions, as demonstrated by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. For C16 and C18 we observe a reentrant crystalline phase transition sequence, hexagonal-rectangular-C-rectangular-P-rectangular-C-hexagonal, as the solution pH is increased from 3 to 10.5. The stability of the rectangular phases, which maximize tail packing, increases with increasing tail length. As a result, for very long tails (C22), the possibility of observing packing symmetries other than rectangular-C phases diminishes. Our work demonstrates that it is possible to systematically exchange chemical and mechanical energy by changing the solution pH value within a range of physiological conditions at room temperature in bilayers of molecules with ionizable groups.

  16. The Role of Rab Proteins in Neuronal Cells and in the Trafficking of Neurotrophin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Bucci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that are important for neuronal development, neuronal survival and neuronal functions. Neurotrophins exert their role by binding to their receptors, the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC and p75NTR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily. Binding of neurotrophins to receptors triggers a complex series of signal transduction events, which are able to induce neuronal differentiation but are also responsible for neuronal maintenance and neuronal functions. Rab proteins are small GTPases localized to the cytosolic surface of specific intracellular compartments and are involved in controlling vesicular transport. Rab proteins, acting as master regulators of the membrane trafficking network, play a central role in both trafficking and signaling pathways of neurotrophin receptors. Axonal transport represents the Achilles' heel of neurons, due to the long-range distance that molecules, organelles and, in particular, neurotrophin-receptor complexes have to cover. Indeed, alterations of axonal transport and, specifically, of axonal trafficking of neurotrophin receptors are responsible for several human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this review, we will discuss the link between Rab proteins and neurotrophin receptor trafficking and their influence on downstream signaling pathways.

  17. The Role of Rab Proteins in Neuronal Cells and in the Trafficking of Neurotrophin Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Cogli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that are important for neuronal development, neuronal survival and neuronal functions. Neurotrophins exert their role by binding to their receptors, the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC) and p75NTR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily. Binding of neurotrophins to receptors triggers a complex series of signal transduction events, which are able to induce neuronal differentiation but are also responsible for neuronal maintenance and neuronal functions. Rab proteins are small GTPases localized to the cytosolic surface of specific intracellular compartments and are involved in controlling vesicular transport. Rab proteins, acting as master regulators of the membrane trafficking network, play a central role in both trafficking and signaling pathways of neurotrophin receptors. Axonal transport represents the Achilles' heel of neurons, due to the long-range distance that molecules, organelles and, in particular, neurotrophin-receptor complexes have to cover. Indeed, alterations of axonal transport and, specifically, of axonal trafficking of neurotrophin receptors are responsible for several human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this review, we will discuss the link between Rab proteins and neurotrophin receptor trafficking and their influence on downstream signaling pathways. PMID:25295627

  18. Nuclear functions and subcellular trafficking mechanisms of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that various diseases, including many types of cancer, result from alteration of subcellular protein localization and compartmentalization. Therefore, it is worthwhile to expand our knowledge in subcellular trafficking of proteins, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB-2 of the receptor tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed and activated in human malignancies and frequently correlated with poor prognosis. The well-characterized trafficking of cell surface EGFR is routed, via endocytosis and endosomal sorting, to either the lysosomes for degradation or back to the plasma membrane for recycling. A novel nuclear mode of EGFR signaling pathway has been gradually deciphered in which EGFR is shuttled from the cell surface to the nucleus after endocytosis, and there, it acts as a transcriptional regulator, transmits signals, and is involved in multiple biological functions, including cell proliferation, tumor progression, DNA repair and replication, and chemo- and radio-resistance. Internalized EGFR can also be transported from the cell surface to several intracellular compartments, such as the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the mitochondria, in addition to the nucleus. In this review, we will summarize the functions of nuclear EGFR family and the potential pathways by which EGFR is trafficked from the cell surface to a variety of cellular organelles. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of EGFR trafficking will shed light on both the receptor biology and potential therapeutic targets of anti-EGFR therapies for clinical application. PMID:22520625

  19. Extracellular membrane vesicles and immune regulation in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano ePluchino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain is characterized by a complex and integrated network of interacting cells in which cell-to-cell communication is critical for proper development and function. Initially considered as an immune privileged site, the brain is now regarded as an immune specialized system. Accumulating evidence reveals the presence of immune components in the brain, as well as extensive bidirectional communication that takes place between the nervous and the immune system both under homeostatic and pathological conditions. In recent years the secretion of extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs has been described as a new and evolutionary well-conserved mechanism of cell-to-cell communication, with EMVs influencing the microenvironment through the traffic of bioactive molecules that include proteins and nucleic acids, such as DNA, protein coding and non coding RNAs. Increasing evidence suggests that EMVs are a promising candidate to study cross-boundary cell-to-cell communication pathways. Herein we review the role of EMVs secreted by neural cells in modulating the immune response(s within the brain under physiological and pathological circumstances.

  20. Niemann-Pick C2 protein regulates sterol transport between plasma membrane and late endosomes in human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berzina, Zane; Solanko, Lukasz M; Mehadi, Ahmed S

    2018-01-01

    /LYSs is currently unknown. We show that the close cholesterol analog dehydroergosterol (DHE), when delivered to the plasma membrane (PM) accumulates in LE/LYSs of human fibroblasts lacking functional NPC2. We measured two different time scales of sterol diffusion; while DHE rich LE/LYSs moved by slow anomalous...... but not of DHE is reduced 10-fold in disease fibroblasts compared to control cells. Internalized NPC2 rescued the sterol storage phenotype and strongly expanded the dynamic sterol pool seen in FRAP experiments. Together, our study shows that cholesterol esterification and trafficking of sterols between the PM...

  1. Regulating Human Trafficking by Prostitution Policy? : An Assessment of the Dutch and Swedish Prostitution Legislation and its Effects on Women's Self-determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, Nicolle; Althoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Is the Nordic model of combating the trafficking of women for sexual purposes to be followed by all member states of the eu? At the moment, the member states still differ considerably in their legislative approaches towards prostitution and the extent to which this is linked to the combat against

  2. The conserved dileucine- and tyrosine-based motifs in MLV and MPMV envelope glycoproteins are both important to regulate a common Env intracellular trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Vergès Sandra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrovirus particles emerge from the assembly of two structural protein components, Gag that is translated as a soluble protein in the cytoplasm of the host cells, and Env, a type I transmembrane protein. Because both components are translated in different intracellular compartments, elucidating the mechanisms of retrovirus assembly thus requires the study of their intracellular trafficking. Results We used a CD25 (Tac chimera-based approach to study the trafficking of Moloney murine leukemia virus and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus Env proteins. We found that the cytoplasmic tails (CTs of both Env conserved two major signals that control a complex intracellular trafficking. A dileucine-based motif controls the sorting of the chimeras from the trans-Golgi network (TGN toward endosomal compartments. Env proteins then follow a retrograde transport to the TGN due to the action of a tyrosine-based motif. Mutation of either motif induces the mis-localization of the chimeric proteins and both motifs are found to mediate interactions of the viral CTs with clathrin adaptors. Conclusion This data reveals the unexpected complexity of the intracellular trafficking of retrovirus Env proteins that cycle between the TGN and endosomes. Given that Gag proteins hijack endosomal host proteins, our work suggests that the endosomal pathway may be used by retroviruses to ensure proper encountering of viral structural Gag and Env proteins in cells, an essential step of virus assembly.

  3. The N-terminal region of the dopamine D2 receptor, a rhodopsin-like GPCR, regulates correct integration into the plasma membrane and endocytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, DI; Min, C; Jung, KS; Cheong, SY; Zheng, M; Cheong, SJ; Oak, MH; Cheong, JH; Lee, BK; Kim, KM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Functional roles of the N-terminal region of rhodopsin-like GPCR family remain unclear. Using dopamine D2 and D3 receptors as a model system, we probed the roles of the N-terminal region in the signalling, intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins, and explored the critical factors that determine the functionality of the N-terminal region. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor was gradually shortened or switched with that of the D3 receptor or a non-specific sequence (FLAG), or potential N-terminal glycosylation sites were mutated. Effects of these manipulations on surface expression, internalization, post-endocytic behaviours and signalling were determined. KEY RESULTS Shortening the N-terminal region of the D2 receptor enhanced receptor internalization and impaired surface expression and signalling; ligand binding, desensitization and down-regulation were not affected but their association with a particular microdomain, caveolae, was disrupted. Replacement of critical residues within the N-terminal region with the FLAG epitope failed to restore surface expression but partially restored the altered internalization and signalling. When the N-terminal regions were switched between D2 and D3 receptors, cell surface expression pattern of each receptor was switched. Mutations of potential N-terminal glycosylation sites inhibited surface expression but enhanced internalization of D2 receptors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Shortening of N-terminus or mutation of glycosylation sites located within the N-terminus enhanced receptor internalization but impaired the surface expression of D2 receptors. The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor, in a sequence-specific manner, controls the receptor's conformation and integration into the plasma membrane, which determine its subcellular localization, intracellular trafficking and signalling properties. PMID:22117524

  4. Regulation of developmental and environmental signaling by interaction between microtubules and membranes in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cell division and expansion require the ordered arrangement of microtubules, which are subject to spatial and temporal modifications by developmental and environmental factors. Understanding how signals translate to changes in cortical microtubule organization is of fundamental importance. A defining feature of the cortical microtubule array is its association with the plasma membrane; modules of the plasma membrane are thought to play important roles in the mediation of microtubule organization. In this review, we highlight advances in research on the regulation of cortical microtubule organization by membrane-associated and membrane-tethered proteins and lipids in response to phytohormones and stress. The transmembrane kinase receptor Rho-like guanosine triphosphatase, phospholipase D, phosphatidic acid, and phosphoinositides are discussed with a focus on their roles in microtubule organization.

  5. Polarized trafficking: the palmitoylation cycle distributes cytoplasmic proteins to distinct neuronal compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortosa, Elena; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2018-02-01

    In neurons, polarized cargo distribution occurs mainly between the soma and axonal and dendritic compartments, and requires coordinated regulation of cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane trafficking. The Golgi complex plays a critical role during neuronal polarization and secretory trafficking has been shown to differentially transport proteins to both axons and dendrites. Besides the Golgi protein sorting, recent data revealed that palmitoylation cycles are an efficient mechanism to localize cytoplasmic, non-transmembrane proteins to particular neuronal compartments, such as the newly formed axon. Palmitoylation allows substrate proteins to bind to and ride with Golgi-derived secretory vesicles to all neuronal compartments. By allowing cytoplasmic proteins to 'hitchhike' on transport carriers in a non-polarized fashion, compartmentalized depalmitoylation may act as a selective retention mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Substrate Specificity, Membrane Topology, and Activity Regulation of Human Alkaline Ceramidase 2 (ACER2)*

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wei; Jin, Junfei; Xu, Ruijuan; Hu, Wei; Szulc, Zdzislaw M.; Bielawski, Jacek; Obeid, Lina M.; Mao, Cungui

    2010-01-01

    Human alkaline ceramidase 2 (ACER2) plays an important role in cellular responses by regulating the hydrolysis of ceramides in cells. Here we report its biochemical characterization, membrane topology, and activity regulation. Recombinant ACER2 was expressed in yeast mutant cells (Δypc1Δydc1) that lack endogenous ceramidase activity, and microsomes from ACER2-expressiong yeast cells were used to biochemically characterize ACER2. ACER2 catalyzed the hydrolysis of various ceramides and followed...

  7. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A; Fraser, Mark E; Scott, Jordan L; Soni, Smita P; Jones, Keaton R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-09-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. Copyright © 2015, American

  8. The structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Or; Steiner, Ariel; Szekely, Pablo; Amit, Einav; Asor, Roi; Tamburu, Carmen; Raviv, Uri

    2011-06-21

    In pure water, zwitterionic lipids form lamellar phases with an equilibrium water gap on the order of 2 to 3 nm as a result of the dominating van der Waals attraction between dipolar bilayers. Monovalent ions can swell those neutral lamellae by a small amount. Divalent ions can adsorb onto dipolar membranes and charge them. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied how the structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes. We found that unlike monovalent ions that weakly interact with all of the examined dipolar membranes, divalent and trivalent ions adsorb onto membranes containing lipids with saturated tails, with an association constant on the order of ∼10 M(-1). One double bond in the lipid tail is sufficient to prevent divalent ion adsorption. We suggest that this behavior is due to the relatively loose packing of lipids with unsaturated tails that increases the area per lipid headgroup, enabling their free rotation. Divalent ion adsorption links two lipids and limits their free rotation. The ion-dipole interaction gained by the adsorption of the ions onto unsaturated membranes is insufficient to compensate for the loss of headgroup free-rotational entropy. The ion-dipole interaction is stronger for cations with a higher valence. Nevertheless, polyamines behave as monovalent ions near dipolar interfaces in the sense that they interact weakly with the membrane surface, whereas in the bulk their behavior is similar to that of multivalent cations. Advanced data analysis and comparison with theory provide insight into the structure and interactions between ion-induced regulated charged interfaces. This study models biologically relevant interactions between cell membranes and various ions and the manner in which the lipid structure governs those interactions. The ability to monitor these interactions creates a tool for probing systems that are more complex and forms the basis for controlling the interactions between dipolar

  9. HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trafficking through the Endosomal Recycling Compartment Is Required for Particle Incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Junghwa; Qi, Mingli; Ding, Lingmei; Hammonds, Jason; Dienger-Stambaugh, Krista; Wang, Jaang-Jiun; Lapierre, Lynne A; Goldenring, James R; Spearman, Paul

    2018-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) encodes specific trafficking signals within its long cytoplasmic tail (CT) that regulate incorporation into HIV-1 particles. Rab11-family interacting protein 1C (FIP1C) and Rab14 are host trafficking factors required for Env particle incorporation, suggesting that Env undergoes sorting from the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC) to the site of particle assembly on the plasma membrane. We disrupted outward sorting from the ERC by expressing a C-terminal fragment of FIP1C (FIP1C 560-649 ) and examined the consequences on Env trafficking and incorporation into particles. FIP1C 560-649 reduced cell surface levels of Env and prevented its incorporation into HIV-1 particles. Remarkably, Env was trapped in an exaggerated perinuclear ERC in a CT-dependent manner. Mutation of either the Yxxϕ endocytic motif or the YW 795 motif in the CT prevented Env trapping in the ERC and restored incorporation into particles. In contrast, simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 Env was not retained in the ERC, while substitution of the HIV-1 CT for the SIV CT resulted in SIV Env retention in this compartment. These results provide the first direct evidence that Env traffics through the ERC and support a model whereby HIV-1 Env is specifically targeted to the ERC prior to FIP1C- and CT-dependent outward sorting to the particle assembly site on the plasma membrane. IMPORTANCE The HIV envelope protein is an essential component of the viral particle. While many aspects of envelope protein structure and function have been established, the pathway it follows in the cell prior to reaching the site of particle assembly is not well understood. The envelope protein has a very long cytoplasmic tail that interacts with the host cell trafficking machinery. Here, we utilized a truncated form of the trafficking adaptor FIP1C protein to arrest the intracellular transport of the envelope protein, demonstrating that it becomes

  10. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  11. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  12. hERG trafficking inhibition in drug-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Hisashi; Kawai, Tomoyuki

    2014-10-15

    Acquired long QT syndrome induced by non-cardiovascular drugs can cause lethal cardiac arrhythmia called torsades de points and is a significant problem in drug development. The prolongation of QT interval and cardiac action potential duration are mainly due to reduced physiological function of the rapidly activating voltage-dependent potassium channels encoded by human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). Structurally diverse groups of drugs are known to directly inhibit hERG channel conductance. Therefore, the ability of acute hERG inhibition is routinely assessed at the preclinical stages in pharmaceutical testing. Recent findings indicated that chronic treatment with various drugs not only inhibits hERG channels but also decreases hERG channel expression in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocytes, which has become another concern in safety pharmacology. The mechanisms involve the disruption of hERG trafficking to the surface membrane or the acceleration of hERG protein degradation. From this perspective, we present a brief overview of mechanisms of drug-induced trafficking inhibition and pathological regulation. Understanding of drug-induced hERG trafficking inhibition may provide new strategies for predicting drug-induced QT prolongation and lethal cardiac arrhythmia in pharmaceutical drug development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex for Sale: Globalization and Human Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Aiello, Annmarie

    2009-01-01

    The practice of trafficking has many different facets; drug trafficking, arms trafficking and human trafficking complete the top three illegal trafficking practices today. Human trafficking may be the third highest illegal trafficking practice, however there is inadequate mainstream information on the affects of the trade and horrifying issues that incorporate trafficking in human beings. This paper will discuss how the globalized world has been enabling trafficking in human beings with a con...

  14. Concise Review: Plasma and Nuclear Membranes Convey Mechanical Information to Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzer, Gunes; Fuchs, Robyn K; Rubin, Janet; Thompson, William R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous factors including chemical, hormonal, spatial, and physical cues determine stem cell fate. While the regulation of stem cell differentiation by soluble factors is well-characterized, the role of mechanical force in the determination of lineage fate is just beginning to be understood. Investigation of the role of force on cell function has largely focused on "outside-in" signaling, initiated at the plasma membrane. When interfaced with the extracellular matrix, the cell uses integral membrane proteins, such as those found in focal adhesion complexes to translate force into biochemical signals. Akin to these outside-in connections, the internal cytoskeleton is physically linked to the nucleus, via proteins that span the nuclear membrane. Although structurally and biochemically distinct, these two forms of mechanical coupling influence stem cell lineage fate and, when disrupted, often lead to disease. Here we provide an overview of how mechanical coupling occurs at the plasma and nuclear membranes. We also discuss the role of force on stem cell differentiation, with focus on the biochemical signals generated at the cell membrane and the nucleus, and how those signals influence various diseases. While the interaction of stem cells with their physical environment and how they respond to force is complex, an understanding of the mechanical regulation of these cells is critical in the design of novel therapeutics to combat diseases associated with aging, cancer, and osteoporosis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1455-1463. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  15. UK victims of trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Burgoyne

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of court cases shows how hard it is forvictims of trafficking to win the right to remain in the UK. Case law is inconsistent and more research and data collection are urgently needed.

  16. Trafficking in Persons Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    people Burmese Lu kon ku de Trade in people French La traite des personnes The trade of people Japanese Jinshin bai bai The buying and selling of...commercial sex among young men. In 2008, the government partially funded an NGO to conduct an anti-trafficking awareness campaign in cinemas and in...A significant number of Japanese women and girls have also been reported as sex trafficking victims. During the last year, a number of Paraguayan

  17. Human Trafficking and Commercialization of Surrogacy in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyali Chatterjee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Supreme Court of India, In Baby Manji Yamada versus Union of India & Anr. [2008] INSC 1656, popularly known as Manji Case, declared that Commercial Surrogacy is legal in India. As we know that, India is a developing country and here, most of the peoples are very poor and illiterate. Recently, human trafficking was increase with an uncontrollable rate in the entire world. In addition, making Commercialization of Surrogacy legal had already give birth to a new form of trafficking. Where, illiterate women from poor section is trafficked to run the reproductive industry of the Surrogacy. As we know that the traffickers, they used to trafficked girls/women for prostitution but now after the legalization of Commercial Surrogacy, they will trafficked girl/women for the reproductive industry as a raw material. The Immoral Trafficking Prevention Act (ITPA, 1956 and Sections 366(A and 372 of the Indian Penal Code, 1860 are the existing laws of India, which deals with human trafficking. However, none of these provisions contains any solution, to deal with this new serious issue of trafficking of women/girls for the purpose of Commercial Surrogacy in reproductive industries. These existing laws as well as the pending draft bill of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART Regulation Bill, 2010 needs an amendment to check this crime against women once again to protect the rights and health of the women.

  18. ANTROPOLOGIS TENTANG TRAFFICKING TKW DI MALAYSIA: ANTARA ADA DAN TIADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Marhaeni Pudji Astuti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking has existed since the period of kingdoms in Java, going on to the colonialism period, andto the present time. Its meaning is broadening beyond human trading into the matters related to violence,blackmailing, and forcing. Trafficking happens not only within one specific area, but has crossed theborder of countries, indicating the existence of an international net. The mushrooming of trafficking isdue to weak law and political commitment of the concerning countries. Moreover, the bilateral talk tobanish trafficking has not been maximally conducted. The actors of trafficking vary from man-powerbrokers, agents, taxi drivers, and even officers (of transmigration and police offices. Trafficking happens invarious places ranging from luxurious spots or starred-hotels to plantations and areas which accommodatea lot of migrants. The victims are usually in so unfavorable bargaining positions that they are muchdependent on those traffickers. This dependency is the impact of imbalanced gender relation. Based onsome existing cases, it is indicated that the women’s lack of power, strength, information, and educationare often misused by the traffickers to take them as their preys. That is why empowering migrant womenis very crucial. One of the ways is empowering them through their realization that this need comes fromtheir own selves, not from any force outside. Besides, there should be strong commitment from the stateto seriously implement the law against any traffickers. Cooperation between the concerning countriesare also needed, for instance by issuing common regulations to banish trafficking.Keywords: Trafficking, migrant women, receiving country, sending country, trafficker

  19. Regulation of plant plasma membrane H+- and Ca2+-ATPases by terminal domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years, major progress has been made to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of P-type plasma membrane H(+)-and Ca(2+)-ATPases. Even though a number of regulatory proteins have been identified, many pieces are still lacking in order to understand the complete regulatory...... mechanisms of these pumps. In plant plasma membrane H(+)- and Ca(2+)-ATPases, autoinhibitory domains are situated in the C- and N-terminal domains, respectively. A model for a common mechanism of autoinhibition is discussed....

  20. The PDZ protein GIPC regulates trafficking of the LPA1 receptor from APPL signaling endosomes and attenuates the cell's response to LPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Varsano

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA mediates diverse cellular responses through the activation of at least six LPA receptors--LPA(1-6, but the interacting proteins and signaling pathways that mediate the specificity of these receptors are largely unknown. We noticed that LPA(1 contains a PDZ binding motif (SVV identical to that present in two other proteins that interact with the PDZ protein GIPC. GIPC is involved in endocytic trafficking of several receptors including TrkA, VEGFR2, lutropin and dopamine D2 receptors. Here we show that GIPC binds directly to the PDZ binding motif of LPA(1 but not that of other LPA receptors. LPA(1 colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with GIPC and its binding partner APPL, an activator of Akt signaling found on APPL signaling endosomes. GIPC depletion by siRNA disturbed trafficking of LPA(1 to EEA1 early endosomes and promoted LPA(1 mediated Akt signaling, cell proliferation, and cell motility. We propose that GIPC binds LPA(1 and promotes its trafficking from APPL-containing signaling endosomes to EEA1 early endosomes and thus attenuates LPA-mediated Akt signaling from APPL endosomes.

  1. Complex lipid trafficking in Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanier, Marie T

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is an atypical lysosomal storage disease resulting from mutations in one of two genes, either NPC1 or NPC2. Although a neurovisceral disorder, it is above all a neurodegenerative disease in the vast majority of patients. Not an enzyme deficiency, it is currently conceived as a lipid trafficking disorder. Impaired egress of cholesterol from the late endosomal/lysosomal (LE/L) compartment is a specific and key element of the pathogenesis, but other lipids, more specially sphingolipids, are also involved, and there are indications for further abnormalities. The full function of the NPC1 and NPC2 proteins is still unclear. This review provides a reappraisal of lipid storage and lysosomal enzymes activities in tissues/cells from NPC patients and animal models. It summarizes the current knowledge on the NPC1 and NPC2 proteins and their function in transport of cholesterol within the late endosomal-lysosomal compartment, with emphasis on differences between systemic organs and the brain; it also discusses regulation by membrane lipids of the NPC2-mediated cholesterol trafficking, interplay between cholesterol and sphingomyelin, the metabolic origin of glycosphingolipids stored in brain, and the putative role of free sphingoid bases in pathogenesis. Brief mention is finally made of diseases affecting other genes that were very recently shown to impact the "NPC pathway".

  2. Membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase ATL15 functions in sugar-responsive growth regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shoki; Terada, Saki; Sanagi, Miho; Hasegawa, Yoko; Lu, Yu; Morita, Yoshie; Chiba, Yukako; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2017-09-09

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in regulating various cellular processes by modulating the protein function of specific ubiquitination targets. The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family is a group of plant-specific RING-type ubiquitin ligases that localize to membranes via their N-terminal transmembrane-like domains. To date, 91 ATL isoforms have been identified in the Arabidopsis genome, with several ATLs reported to be involved in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses. However, the functions of most ATLs remain unknown. This study, involving transcriptome database analysis, identifies ATL15 as a sugar responsive ATL gene in Arabidopsis. ATL15 expression was rapidly down-regulated in the presence of sugar. The ATL15 protein showed ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and localized to plasma membrane and endomembrane compartments. Further genetic analyses demonstrated that the atl15 knockout mutants are insensitive to high glucose concentrations, whereas ATL15 overexpression depresses plant growth. In addition, endogenous glucose and starch amounts were reciprocally affected in the atl15 knockout mutants and the ATL15 overexpressors. These results suggest that ATL15 protein plays a significant role as a membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase that regulates sugar-responsive plant growth in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Passive Flow-rate Regulator Using Pressure-dependent Autonomous Deflection of Parallel Membrane Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il, Doh; Cho, Young-Ho

    2009-01-01

    We present a passive flow-rate regulator, capable to compensate inlet pressure variation and to maintain a constant flow-rate for precise liquid control. Deflection of the parallel membrane valves in the passive flowrate regulator adjusts fluidic resistance according to inlet fluid pressure without any external energy. Compared to previous passive flow-rate regulators, the present device achieves precision flow regulation functions at the lower threshold compensation pressure of 20kPa with the simpler structure. In the experimental study, the fabricated device achieves the constant flow-rate of 6.09±0.32 μl/s over the inlet pressure range of 20∼50 kPa. The present flow-rate regulator having simple structure and lower compensation pressure level demonstrates potentials for use in integrated micropump systems

  4. SNARE-mediated trafficking of α5β1 integrin is required for spreading in CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalski, Michael; Coppolino, Marc G.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the role of SNARE-mediated membrane traffic in regulating integrin localization was examined and the requirement for SNARE function in cellular spreading was quantitatively assessed. Membrane traffic was inhibited with the VAMP-specific catalytic light chain from tetanus toxin (TeTx-LC), a dominant-negative form (E329Q) of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF), and brefeldin A (BfA). Inhibition of membrane traffic with either E329Q-NSF or TeTx-LC, but not BfA, significantly inhibited spreading of CHO cells on fibronectin. Spreading was rescued in TeTx-LC-expressing cells by co-transfection with a TeTx-resistant cellubrevin/VAMP3. E329Q-NSF, a general inhibitor of SNARE function, was a more potent inhibitor of cell spreading than TeTx-LC, suggesting that tetanus toxin-insensitive SNAREs contribute to adhesion. It was found that E329Q-NSF prevented trafficking of α 5 β 1 integrins from a central Rab11-containing compartment to sites of protrusion during cell adhesion, while TeTx-LC delayed this trafficking. These results are consistent with a model of cellular adhesion that implicates SNARE function as an important component of integrin trafficking during the process of cell spreading

  5. Membrane-lipid therapy: A historical perspective of membrane-targeted therapies - From lipid bilayer structure to the pathophysiological regulation of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    Our current understanding of membrane lipid composition, structure and functions has led to the investigation of their role in cell signaling, both in healthy and pathological cells. As a consequence, therapies based on the regulation of membrane lipid composition and structure have been recently developed. This novel field, known as Membrane Lipid Therapy, is growing and evolving rapidly, providing treatments that are now in use or that are being studied for their application to oncological disorders, Alzheimer's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and neuropathic pain. This field has arisen from relevant discoveries on the behavior of membranes in recent decades, and it paves the way to adopt new approaches in modern pharmacology and nutrition. This innovative area will promote further investigation into membranes and the development of new therapies with molecules that target the cell membrane. Due to the prominent roles of membranes in the cells' physiology and the paucity of therapeutic approaches based on the regulation of the lipids they contain, it is expected that membrane lipid therapy will provide new treatments for numerous pathologies. The first on-purpose rationally designed molecule in this field, minerval, is currently being tested in clinical trials and it is expected to enter the market around 2020. However, it seems feasible that during the next few decades other membrane regulators will also be marketed for the treatment of human pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D; Garner, Ethan C; Walker, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is crucial for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors. When precursors are depleted, MreB filaments disassemble into the cytoplasm, and peptidoglycan synthesis becomes disorganized. In cells that lack wall teichoic acids but continue to make peptidoglycan, dynamic MreB filaments are observed, although their presence is not sufficient to establish a rod shape. We propose that the cell regulates MreB filament association with the membrane, allowing rapid and reversible inactivation of cell wall enzyme complexes in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis.

  7. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Myat Khine K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4 and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293 cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1 levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells.

  8. Regulation of multispanning membrane protein topology via post-translational annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lehn, Reid C; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-09-26

    The canonical mechanism for multispanning membrane protein topogenesis suggests that protein topology is established during cotranslational membrane integration. However, this mechanism is inconsistent with the behavior of EmrE, a dual-topology protein for which the mutation of positively charged loop residues, even close to the C-terminus, leads to dramatic shifts in its topology. We use coarse-grained simulations to investigate the Sec-facilitated membrane integration of EmrE and its mutants on realistic biological timescales. This work reveals a mechanism for regulating membrane-protein topogenesis, in which initially misintegrated configurations of the proteins undergo post-translational annealing to reach fully integrated multispanning topologies. The energetic barriers associated with this post-translational annealing process enforce kinetic pathways that dictate the topology of the fully integrated proteins. The proposed mechanism agrees well with the experimentally observed features of EmrE topogenesis and provides a range of experimentally testable predictions regarding the effect of translocon mutations on membrane protein topogenesis.

  9. MUC1 intra-cellular trafficking is clathrin, dynamin, and rab5 dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaolong; Yuan Zhenglong; Chung, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a transmembrane glycoprotein, is abnormally over-expressed in most human adenocarcinomas. MUC1 association with cytoplasmic cell signal regulators and nuclear accumulation are important for its tumor related activities. Little is known about how MUC1 translocates from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. In this study, live cell imaging was used to study MUC1 intracellular trafficking. The interaction between EGFR and MUC1 was mapped by FRET analysis and EGF stimulated MUC1 endocytosis was observed directly through live cell imaging. MUC1-CT endocytosis was clathrin and dynamin dependent. Rab5 over-expression resulted in decreased cell membrane localization of MUC1, with accumulation of MUC1 endocytic vesicles in the peri-nuclear region. Conversely, over-expression of a Rab5 dominant negative mutant (S34N) resulted in redistribution of MUC1 from the peri-nuclear region to the cytoplasm. Collectively, these results indicated that MUC1 intra-cellular trafficking occurs through a regulated process that was stimulated by direct EGFR and MUC1 interaction, mediated by clathrin coated pits that were dynamin dependent and regulated by Rab5

  10. The type II cGMP dependent protein kinase regulates GluA1 levels at the plasma membrane of developing cerebellar granule cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incontro, Salvatore; Ciruela, Francisco; Ziff, Edward; Hofmann, Franz; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is regulated by specific interactions with other proteins and by post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation. We have found that the type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) phosphorylates GluA1 (formerly GluR1) at S845, augmenting the surface expression of AMPARs at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites. Activation of cGKII by 8-Br-cGMP enhances the surface expression of GluA1, whereas its inhibition or suppression effectively diminished the expression of this protein at the cell surface. In granule cells, NMDA receptor activation (NMDAR) stimulates nitric oxide and cGMP production, which in turn activates cGKII and induces the phosphorylation of GluA1, promoting its accumulation in the plasma membrane. GluA1 is mainly incorporated into calcium permeable AMPARs as exposure to 8-Br-cGMP or NMDA activation enhanced AMPA-elicited calcium responses that are sensitive to NASPM inhibition. We summarize evidence for an increase of calcium permeable AMPA receptors downstream of NMDA receptor activation that might be relevant for granule cell development and plasticity. PMID:23545413

  11. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    with collective physical properties (e.g. thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature or elastic moduli). Studies in physico-chemical model systems have demonstrated that changes in bilayer physical properties can regulate membrane protein function by altering the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation associated...... with a protein conformational change. This type of regulation is well characterized, and its mechanistic elucidation is an interdisciplinary field bordering on physics, chemistry and biology. Changes in lipid composition that alter bilayer physical properties (including cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids...... channels as molecular force probes for studying this mechanism, with a unique ability to discriminate between consequences of changes in monolayer curvature and bilayer elastic moduli....

  12. Conversion of Stationary to Invasive Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs): Role of Hypoxia in Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zucker, Stanley; Pulkoski-Gross, Ashleigh; Kuscu, Cem; Karaayvaz, Mihriban; Ju, Jingfang; Yao, Herui; Song, Erwei; Cao, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence has implicated the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in the process of cancer metastasis. The mechanism underlying the conversion of TICs from stationary to invasive remains to be characterized. In this report, we employed less invasive breast cancer TICs, SK-3rd, that displays CD44high/CD24low with high mammosphere-forming and tumorigenic capacities, to investigate the mechanism by which stationary TICs are converted to invasive TICs. Invasive ability of SK-3rd TICs was markedly enhanced when the cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions. Given the role of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in cancer invasion/metastasis, we explored a possible involvement of MT1-MMP in hypoxia-induced TIC invasion. Silencing of MT1-MMP by a shRNA approach resulted in diminution of hypoxia-induced cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Under hypoxic conditions, MT1-MMP redistributed from cytoplasmic storage pools to the cell surface of TICs, which coincides with the increased cell invasion. In addition, CD44, a cancer stem-like cell marker, inversely correlated with increased cell surface MT1-MMP. Interestingly, cell surface MT1-MMP gradually disappeared when the hypoxia-treated cells were switched to normoxia, suggesting the plasticity of TICs in response to oxygen content. Furthermore, we dissected the pathways leading to upregulated MT1-MMP in cytoplasmic storage pools under normoxic conditions, by demonstrating a cascade involving Twist1-miR10b-HoxD10 leading to enhanced MT1-MMP expression in SK-3rd TICs. These observations suggest that MT1-MMP is a key molecule capable of executing conversion of stationary TICs to invasive TICs under hypoxic conditions and thereby controlling metastasis. PMID:22679501

  13. Fission Yeast SCYL1/2 Homologue Ppk32: A Novel Regulator of TOR Signalling That Governs Survival during Brefeldin A Induced Stress to Protein Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Katarzyna M; Petersen, Janni

    2016-05-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling allows eukaryotic cells to adjust cell growth in response to changes in their nutritional and environmental context. The two distinct TOR complexes (TORC1/2) localise to the cell's internal membrane compartments; the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus and lysosomes/vacuoles. Here, we show that Ppk32, a SCYL family pseudo-kinase, is a novel regulator of TOR signalling. The absence of ppk32 expression confers resistance to TOR inhibition. Ppk32 inhibition of TORC1 is critical for cell survival following Brefeldin A (BFA) induced stress. Treatment of wild type cells with either the TORC1 specific inhibitor rapamycin or the general TOR inhibitor Torin1 confirmed that a reduction in TORC1 activity promoted recovery from BFA induced stress. Phosphorylation of Ppk32 on two residues that are conserved within the SCYL pseudo-kinase family are required for this TOR inhibition. Phosphorylation on these sites controls Ppk32 protein levels and sensitivity to BFA. BFA induced ER stress does not account for the response to BFA that we report here, however BFA is also known to induce Golgi stress and impair traffic to lysosomes. In summary, Ppk32 reduce TOR signalling in response to BFA induced stress to support cell survival.

  14. Muscle intermediate filaments and their links to membranes and membranous organelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capetanaki, Yassemi; Bloch, Robert J.; Kouloumenta, Asimina; Mavroidis, Manolis; Psarras, Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) play a key role in the integration of structure and function of striated muscle, primarily by mediating mechanochemical links between the contractile apparatus and mitochondria, myonuclei, the sarcolemma and potentially the vesicle trafficking apparatus. Linkage of all these membranous structures to the contractile apparatus, mainly through the Z-disks, supports the integration and coordination of growth and energy demands of the working myocyte, not only with force transmission, but also with de novo gene expression, energy production and efficient protein and lipid trafficking and targeting. Desmin, the most abundant and intensively studied muscle intermediate filament protein, is linked to proper costamere organization, myoblast and stem cell fusion and differentiation, nuclear shape and positioning, as well as mitochondrial shape, structure, positioning and function. Similar links have been established for lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles, consistent with the presence of widespread links between IFs and membranous structures and the regulation of their fusion, morphology and stabilization necessary for cell survival

  15. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Hameed

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  16. Developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 is required for stabilization of Rac1-positive membrane tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Muralidharan; Lee, Unn Hwa; Yoon, Nal Ae; Yoon, Eun Hye; Lee, Byung Ju; Cho, Wha Ja; Park, Jeong Woo

    2017-11-04

    Previously we have reported that developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 (DRG2) localizes on Rab5 endosomes and plays an important role in transferrin (Tfn) recycling. We here identified DRG2 as a key regulator of membrane tubule stability. At 30 min after Tfn treatment, DRG2 localized to membrane tubules which were enriched with phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate [PI(4)P] and did not contain Rab5. DRG2 interacted with Rac1 more strongly with GTP-bound Rac1 and tubular localization of DRG2 depended on Rac1 activity. DRG2 depletion led to destabilization of membrane tubules, while ectopic expression of DRG2 rescued the stability of the membrane tubules in DRG2-depleted cells. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for regulation of membrane tubule stability mediated by DRG2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Sirtuin 2 Localization, Transient Interactions, and Impact on the Proteome Point to Its Role in Intracellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budayeva, Hanna G; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-10-01

    Human sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD + -dependent deacetylase that primarily functions in the cytoplasm, where it can regulate α-tubulin acetylation levels. SIRT2 is linked to cancer progression, neurodegeneration, and infection with bacteria or viruses. However, the current knowledge about its interactions and the means through which it exerts its functions has remained limited. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of its cellular functions by characterizing SIRT2 subcellular localization, the identity and relative stability of its protein interactions, and its impact on the proteome of primary human fibroblasts. To assess the relative stability of SIRT2 interactions, we used immunoaffinity purification in conjunction with both label-free and metabolic labeling quantitative mass spectrometry. In addition to the expected associations with cytoskeleton proteins, including its known substrate TUBA1A, our results reveal that SIRT2 specifically interacts with proteins functioning in membrane trafficking, secretory processes, and transcriptional regulation. By quantifying their relative stability, we found most interactions to be transient, indicating a dynamic SIRT2 environment. We discover that SIRT2 localizes to the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), and that this recruitment requires an intact ER-Golgi trafficking pathway. Further expanding these findings, we used microscopy and interaction assays to establish the interaction and coregulation of SIRT2 with liprin-β1 scaffolding protein (PPFiBP1), a protein with roles in focal adhesions disassembly. As SIRT2 functions may be accomplished via interactions, enzymatic activity, and transcriptional regulation, we next assessed the impact of SIRT2 levels on the cellular proteome. SIRT2 knockdown led to changes in the levels of proteins functioning in membrane trafficking, including some of its interaction partners. Altogether, our study expands the knowledge of SIRT2 cytoplasmic functions to define a

  18. Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Koon; Sandén, Camilla; Selegård, Robert; Liedberg, Bo; Aili, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo.

  19. Spatio-temporal dependence of the signaling response in immune-receptor trafficking networks regulated by cell density: a theoretical model.

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    Pilar García-Peñarrubia

    Full Text Available Cell signaling processes involve receptor trafficking through highly connected networks of interacting components. The binding of surface receptors to their specific ligands is a key factor for the control and triggering of signaling pathways. In most experimental systems, ligand concentration and cell density vary within a wide range of values. Dependence of the signal response on cell density is related with the extracellular volume available per cell. This dependence has previously been studied using non-spatial models which assume that signaling components are well mixed and uniformly distributed in a single compartment. In this paper, a mathematical model that shows the influence exerted by cell density on the spatio-temporal evolution of ligands, cell surface receptors, and intracellular signaling molecules is developed. To this end, partial differential equations were used to model ligand and receptor trafficking dynamics through the different domains of the whole system. This enabled us to analyze several interesting features involved with these systems, namely: a how the perturbation caused by the signaling response propagates through the system; b receptor internalization dynamics and how cell density affects the robustness of dose-response curves upon variation of the binding affinity; and c that enhanced correlations between ligand input and system response are obtained under conditions that result in larger perturbations of the equilibrium ligand + surface receptor [Please see text] ligand - receptor complex. Finally, the results are compared with those obtained by considering that the above components are well mixed in a single compartment.

  20. Expression and Trafficking of the γ Subunit of Na,K-ATPase in Hypertonically Challenged IMCD3 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihakaski-Maunsbach, Kaarina; Nonaka, Shoichi; Maunsbach, Arvid B.

    2008-01-01

    The γ subunit (FXYD2) of Na,K-ATPase is an important regulator of the sodium pump. In this investigation we have analysed the trafficking of γ to the plasma membrane in cultures of inner medullary collecting duct cells (IMCD3) following acute hypertonic challenge and brefeldin A (BFA) treatment. Following hypertonic challenging for 24 hr immunofluorescence labeling revealed initial co-localization of the γ subunit and 58K Golgi protein in the cytoplasm, but no co-localization of α1 and Golgi protein. Exposure of the challenged cells to BFA prevented the subsequent incorporation of γ into the basolateral plasma membrane. The γ subunit instead remained in cytoplasmic vesicles while cell proliferation and cell viability decreased simultaneously. Following removal of BFA from the hypertonic medium the IMCD3 cells recovered with distinct expression of γ in the basolateral membrane. The α1 subunit was only marginally influenced by BFA. The results demonstrate that the γ subunit trafficks to the plasma membrane via the Golgi apparatus, despite the absence of a signal sequence. The results also suggest that the γ and α subunits do not traffic together to the plasma membrane, and that the γ and α subunit have different turnover rates during these experimental conditions

  1. Independent regulation of reovirus membrane penetration and apoptosis by the mu1 phi domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danthi, Pranav; Coffey, Caroline M; Parker, John S L; Abel, Ty W; Dermody, Terence S

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis. Reovirus outer-capsid protein mu1, which functions to penetrate host cell membranes during viral entry, is the primary regulator of apoptosis following reovirus infection. Ectopic expression of full-length and truncated forms of mu1 indicates that the mu1 phi domain is sufficient to elicit a cell death response. To evaluate the contribution of the mu1 phi domain to the induction of apoptosis following reovirus infection, phi mutant viruses were generated by reverse genetics and analyzed for the capacity to penetrate cell membranes and elicit apoptosis. We found that mutations in phi diminish reovirus membrane penetration efficiency by preventing conformational changes that lead to generation of key reovirus entry intermediates. Independent of effects on membrane penetration, amino acid substitutions in phi affect the apoptotic potential of reovirus, suggesting that phi initiates apoptosis subsequent to cytosolic delivery. In comparison to wild-type virus, apoptosis-defective phi mutant viruses display diminished neurovirulence following intracranial inoculation of newborn mice. These results indicate that the phi domain of mu1 plays an important regulatory role in reovirus-induced apoptosis and disease.

  2. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  3. Independent regulation of reovirus membrane penetration and apoptosis by the mu1 phi domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Danthi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis. Reovirus outer-capsid protein mu1, which functions to penetrate host cell membranes during viral entry, is the primary regulator of apoptosis following reovirus infection. Ectopic expression of full-length and truncated forms of mu1 indicates that the mu1 phi domain is sufficient to elicit a cell death response. To evaluate the contribution of the mu1 phi domain to the induction of apoptosis following reovirus infection, phi mutant viruses were generated by reverse genetics and analyzed for the capacity to penetrate cell membranes and elicit apoptosis. We found that mutations in phi diminish reovirus membrane penetration efficiency by preventing conformational changes that lead to generation of key reovirus entry intermediates. Independent of effects on membrane penetration, amino acid substitutions in phi affect the apoptotic potential of reovirus, suggesting that phi initiates apoptosis subsequent to cytosolic delivery. In comparison to wild-type virus, apoptosis-defective phi mutant viruses display diminished neurovirulence following intracranial inoculation of newborn mice. These results indicate that the phi domain of mu1 plays an important regulatory role in reovirus-induced apoptosis and disease.

  4. Mitochondria-Associated Membranes As Networking Platforms and Regulators of Cancer Cell Fate

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    Maria Livia Sassano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The tight cross talk between two essential organelles of the cell, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria, is spatially and functionally regulated by specific microdomains known as the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs. MAMs are hot spots of Ca2+ transfer between the ER and mitochondria, and emerging data indicate their vital role in the regulation of fundamental physiological processes, chief among them mitochondria bioenergetics, proteostasis, cell death, and autophagy. Moreover, and perhaps not surprisingly, it has become clear that signaling events regulated at the ER–mitochondria intersection regulate key processes in oncogenesis and in the response of cancer cells to therapeutics. ER–mitochondria appositions have been shown to dynamically recruit oncogenes and tumor suppressors, modulating their activity and protein complex formation, adapt the bioenergetic demand of cancer cells and to regulate cell death pathways and redox signaling in cancer cells. In this review, we discuss some emerging players of the ER–mitochondria contact sites in mammalian cells, the key processes they regulate and recent evidence highlighting the role of MAMs in shaping cell-autonomous and non-autonomous signals that regulate cancer growth.

  5. Syndecan-4 Regulates Muscle Differentiation and Is Internalized from the Plasma Membrane during Myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønning, Sissel B; Carlson, Cathrine R; Stang, Espen; Kolset, Svein O; Hollung, Kristin; Pedersen, Mona E

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-4 has been reported to be crucial for muscle differentiation, but the molecular mechanisms still remain to be fully understood. During in vitro differentiation of bovine muscle cells immunocytochemical analyses showed strong labelling of syndecan-4 intracellularly, in close proximity with Golgi structures, in membranes of intracellular vesicles and finally, in the nuclear area including the nuclear envelope. Chase experiments showed that syndecan-4 was internalized from the plasma membrane during this process. Furthermore, when syndecan-4 was knocked down by siRNA more myotubes were formed, and the expression of myogenic transcription factors, β1-integrin and actin was influenced. However, when bovine muscle cells were treated with a cell-penetrating peptide containing the cytoplasmic region of syndecan-4, myoblast fusion and thus myotube formation was blocked, both in normal cells and in syndecan-4 knock down cells. Altogether this suggests that the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is important in regulation of myogenesis. The internalization of syndecan-4 from the plasma membrane during muscle differentiation and the nuclear localization of syndecan-4 in differentiated muscle cells may be part of this regulation, and is a novel aspect of syndecan biology which merits further studies.

  6. Syndecan-4 Regulates Muscle Differentiation and Is Internalized from the Plasma Membrane during Myogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissel B Rønning

    Full Text Available The cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-4 has been reported to be crucial for muscle differentiation, but the molecular mechanisms still remain to be fully understood. During in vitro differentiation of bovine muscle cells immunocytochemical analyses showed strong labelling of syndecan-4 intracellularly, in close proximity with Golgi structures, in membranes of intracellular vesicles and finally, in the nuclear area including the nuclear envelope. Chase experiments showed that syndecan-4 was internalized from the plasma membrane during this process. Furthermore, when syndecan-4 was knocked down by siRNA more myotubes were formed, and the expression of myogenic transcription factors, β1-integrin and actin was influenced. However, when bovine muscle cells were treated with a cell-penetrating peptide containing the cytoplasmic region of syndecan-4, myoblast fusion and thus myotube formation was blocked, both in normal cells and in syndecan-4 knock down cells. Altogether this suggests that the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is important in regulation of myogenesis. The internalization of syndecan-4 from the plasma membrane during muscle differentiation and the nuclear localization of syndecan-4 in differentiated muscle cells may be part of this regulation, and is a novel aspect of syndecan biology which merits further studies.

  7. Extended synaptotagmins are Ca2+-dependent lipid transfer proteins at membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijia; Liu, Yinghui; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Paine, Alex; Rathore, Shailendra S; Shen, Jingshi

    2016-04-19

    Organelles are in constant communication with each other through exchange of proteins (mediated by trafficking vesicles) and lipids [mediated by both trafficking vesicles and lipid transfer proteins (LTPs)]. It has long been known that vesicle trafficking can be tightly regulated by the second messenger Ca(2+), allowing membrane protein transport to be adjusted according to physiological demands. However, it remains unclear whether LTP-mediated lipid transport can also be regulated by Ca(2+) In this work, we show that extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), poorly understood membrane proteins at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, are Ca(2+)-dependent LTPs. Using both recombinant and endogenous mammalian proteins, we discovered that E-Syts transfer glycerophospholipids between membrane bilayers in the presence of Ca(2+) E-Syts use their lipid-accommodating synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid binding protein (SMP) domains to transfer lipids. However, the SMP domains themselves cannot transport lipids unless the two membranes are tightly tethered by Ca(2+)-bound C2 domains. Strikingly, the Ca(2+)-regulated lipid transfer activity of E-Syts was fully recapitulated when the SMP domain was fused to the cytosolic domain of synaptotagmin-1, the Ca(2+)sensor in synaptic vesicle fusion, indicating that a common mechanism of membrane tethering governs the Ca(2+)regulation of lipid transfer and vesicle fusion. Finally, we showed that microsomal vesicles isolated from mammalian cells contained robust Ca(2+)-dependent lipid transfer activities, which were mediated by E-Syts. These findings established E-Syts as a novel class of LTPs and showed that LTP-mediated lipid trafficking, like vesicular transport, can be subject to tight Ca(2+)regulation.

  8. Intracellular trafficking of the β-secretase and processing of amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Pei; Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Chia, Cheryl; Gleeson, Paul A

    2011-09-01

    The main component of the amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a polymerized form of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and is considered to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Aβ is derived from the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Beta site APP-cleaving enzyme, BACE1 (also known as β-secretase) is a membrane-bound aspartyl protease responsible for the initial step in the generation of Aβ peptide and is thus a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Substantive evidence now indicates that the processing of APP by BACE1 is regulated by the intracellular sorting of the enzyme and, moreover, perturbations in these intracellular trafficking pathways have been linked to late-onset AD. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in the understanding of the regulation of the intracellular sorting of BACE1 and APP and illustrate why the trafficking of these cargos represent a key issue for understanding the membrane-mediated events associated with the generation of the neurotoxic Aβ products in AD. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oninla, Vincent O; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747-1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Cholesterol regulates the endoplasmic reticulum exit of the major membrane protein P0 required for peripheral myelin compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Quintes, Susanne; Möbius, Wiebke; Wehr, Michael C; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Brügger, Britta; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2009-05-13

    Rapid impulse conduction requires electrical insulation of axons by myelin, a cholesterol-rich extension of the glial cell membrane with a characteristic composition of proteins and lipids. Mutations in several myelin protein genes cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention and disease, presumably attributable to failure of misfolded proteins to pass the ER quality control. Because many myelin proteins partition into cholesterol-rich membrane rafts, their interaction with cholesterol could potentially be part of the ER quality control system. Here, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that the major peripheral myelin protein P0 requires cholesterol for exiting the ER and reaching the myelin compartment. Cholesterol dependency of P0 trafficking in heterologous cells is mediated by a cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif. Mutant mice lacking cholesterol biosynthesis in Schwann cells suffer from severe hypomyelination with numerous uncompacted myelin stretches. This demonstrates that high-level cholesterol coordinates P0 export with myelin membrane synthesis, which is required for the correct stoichiometry of myelin components and for myelin compaction.

  11. RABA Members Act in Distinct Steps of Subcellular Trafficking of the FLAGELLIN SENSING2 Receptor[W

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    Choi, Seung-won; Tamaki, Takayuki; Ebine, Kazuo; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface proteins play critical roles in the perception of environmental stimuli at the plasma membrane (PM) and ensuing signal transduction. Intracellular localization of such proteins must be strictly regulated, which requires elaborate integration of exocytic and endocytic trafficking pathways. Subcellular localization of Arabidopsis thaliana FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2), a receptor that recognizes bacterial flagellin, also depends on membrane trafficking. However, our understanding about the mechanisms involved is still limited. In this study, we visualized ligand-induced endocytosis of FLS2 using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged FLS2 expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Upon treatment with the flg22 peptide, internalized FLS2-GFP from the PM was transported to a compartment with properties intermediate between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the multivesicular endosome. This compartment gradually discarded the TGN characteristics as it continued along the trafficking pathway. We further found that FLS2 endocytosis involves distinct RABA/RAB11 subgroups at different steps. Moreover, we demonstrated that transport of de novo–synthesized FLS2 to the PM also involves a distinct RABA/RAB11 subgroup. Our results demonstrate the complex regulatory system for properly localizing FLS2 and functional differentiation in RABA members in endo- and exocytosis. PMID:23532067

  12. Do phosphoinositides regulate membrane water permeability of tobacco protoplasts by enhancing the aquaporin pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaohong; Shatil-Cohen, Arava; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Wigoda, Noa; Perera, Imara Y; Im, Yang Ju; Diminshtein, Sofia; Yu, Ling; Boss, Wendy F; Moshelion, Menachem; Moran, Nava

    2015-03-01

    Enhancing the membrane content of PtdInsP 2 , the already-recognized protein-regulating lipid, increased the osmotic water permeability of tobacco protoplasts, apparently by increasing the abundance of active aquaporins in their membranes. While phosphoinositides are implicated in cell volume changes and are known to regulate some ion channels, their modulation of aquaporins activity has not yet been reported for any organism. To examine this, we compared the osmotic water permeability (P f) of protoplasts isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultured cells (NT1) with different (genetically lowered or elevated relative to controls) levels of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) and phosphatidyl inositol [4,5] bisphosphate (PtdInsP2). To achieve this, the cells were transformed with, respectively, the human InsP3 5-phosphatase ('Ptase cells') or human phosphatidylinositol (4) phosphate 5-kinase ('PIPK cells'). The mean P f of the PIPK cells was several-fold higher relative to that of controls and Ptase cells. Three results favor aquaporins over the membrane matrix as underlying this excessive P f: (1) transient expression of the maize aquaporin ZmPIP2;4 in the PIPK cells increased P f by 12-30 μm s(-1), while in the controls only by 3-4 μm s(-1). (2) Cytosol acidification-known to inhibit aquaporins-lowered the P f in the PIPK cells down to control levels. (3) The transcript of at least one aquaporin was elevated in the PIPK cells. Together, the three results demonstrate the differences between the PIPK cells and their controls, and suggest a hitherto unobserved regulation of aquaporins by phosphoinositides, which could occur through direct interaction or indirect phosphoinositides-dependent cellular effects.

  13. Trafficked Women in Denmark—Falling through the cracks

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    Kira West

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The policy framework for combating human trafficking and protecting victims in Denmark does not match the reality faced by the majority of the migrant women arriving in the country. Especially in relation to women from African countries, the national legislation and regulations can be a source of frustration for agencies such as Reden International, which helps foreign women working in prostitution in Denmark, particularly victims of trafficking.

  14. An Essential Role of Hrs/Vps27 in Endosomal Cholesterol Trafficking

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    Ximing Du

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT plays a crucial role in the degradation of ubiquitinated endosomal membrane proteins. Here, we report that Hrs, a key protein of the ESCRT-0 complex, is required for the transport of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum. This function of Hrs in cholesterol transport is distinct from its previously defined role in lysosomal sorting and downregulation of membrane receptors via the ESCRT pathway. In line with this, knocking down other ESCRT proteins does not cause prominent endosomal cholesterol accumulation. Importantly, the localization and biochemical properties of key cholesterol-sorting proteins, NPC1 and NPC2, appear to be unchanged upon Hrs knockdown. Our data identify Hrs as a regulator of endosomal cholesterol trafficking and provide additional insights into the budding of intralumenal vesicles.

  15. Neuronal sphingolipidoses: Membrane lipids and sphingolipid activator proteins regulate lysosomal sphingolipid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhoff, Konrad

    2016-11-01

    Glycosphingolipids and sphingolipids of cellular plasma membranes (PMs) reach luminal intra-lysosomal vesicles (LVs) for degradation mainly by pathways of endocytosis. After a sorting and maturation process (e.g. degradation of sphingomyelin (SM) and secretion of cholesterol), sphingolipids of the LVs are digested by soluble enzymes with the help of activator (lipid binding and transfer) proteins. Inherited defects of lipid-cleaving enzymes and lipid binding and transfer proteins cause manifold and fatal, often neurodegenerative diseases. The review summarizes recent findings on the regulation of sphingolipid catabolism and cholesterol secretion from the endosomal compartment by lipid modifiers, an essential stimulation by anionic membrane lipids and an inhibition of crucial steps by cholesterol and SM. Reconstitution experiments in the presence of all proteins needed, hydrolase and activator proteins, reveal an up to 10-fold increase of ganglioside catabolism just by the incorporation of anionic lipids into the ganglioside carrying membranes, whereas an additional incorporation of cholesterol inhibits GM2 catabolism substantially. It is suggested that lipid and other low molecular modifiers affect the genotype-phenotype relationship observed in patients with lysosomal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

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    Goel Vikas

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses four new outer membrane proteins,with molecular weight ranging from 77 kDa to 88 kDa, that are called Iron Regulated Outer Membrane Proteins (IROMPs. We studied the functional and immunological properties of IROMPs expressed by A.baumanii ATCC 19606.The bands corresponding to IROMPs were eluted from SDS-PAGE and were used to immunize BALB/c mice for the production of monoclonal antibodies. Hybridomas secreting specific antibodies against these IROMPs were selected after screening by ELISA and their reactivity was confirmed by Western Blot. The antibodies then generated belonged to IgM isotype and showed bactericidical and opsonising activities against A.baumanii in vitro.These antibodies also blocked siderophore mediated iron uptake via IROMPs in bacteria. Conclusion This proves that iron uptake via IROMPs,which is mediated through siderophores,may have an important role in the survival of A.baumanii inside the host,and helps establishing the infection.

  17. LDL receptor-related protein 1 regulates the abundance of diverse cell-signaling proteins in the plasma membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaultier, Alban; Simon, Gabriel; Niessen, Sherry; Dix, Melissa; Takimoto, Shinako; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Gonias, Steven L

    2010-12-03

    LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor, reported to regulate the abundance of other receptors in the plasma membrane, including uPAR and tissue factor. The goal of this study was to identify novel plasma membrane proteins, involved in cell-signaling, that are regulated by LRP1. Membrane protein ectodomains were prepared from RAW 264.7 cells in which LRP1 was silenced and control cells using protease K. Peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS. By analysis of spectral counts, 31 transmembrane and secreted proteins were regulated in abundance at least 2-fold when LRP1 was silenced. Validation studies confirmed that semaphorin4D (Sema4D), plexin domain-containing protein-1 (Plxdc1), and neuropilin-1 were more abundant in the membranes of LRP1 gene-silenced cells. Regulation of Plxdc1 by LRP1 was confirmed in CHO cells, as a second model system. Plxdc1 coimmunoprecipitated with LRP1 from extracts of RAW 264.7 cells and mouse liver. Although Sema4D did not coimmunoprecipitate with LRP1, the cell-surface level of Sema4D was increased by RAP, which binds to LRP1 and inhibits binding of other ligands. These studies identify Plxdc1, Sema4D, and neuropilin-1 as novel LRP1-regulated cell-signaling proteins. Overall, LRP1 emerges as a generalized regulator of the plasma membrane proteome.

  18. Membrane trafficking: ER export encounters dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlowe, Charles

    2015-02-16

    Cytoplasmic coat protein complexes perform central roles in sorting protein constituents within the endomembrane system. A new study reveals that the COPII coat operates through dual recognition of signals in a sorting receptor and its bound cargo to promote efficient export from the endoplasmic reticulum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Normative framework for combating trafficking in human organs

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    Banović Božidar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking in human organs is a specific and complex criminal phenomenon that takes place in several phases, with the participation of a large number of actors, often covering several jurisdictions. To effectively countering are necessary conceptual and terminological demarcation of organ trafficking from other similar phenomena, fundamental scientifically research of its shape and dynamics, and the construction of an adequate legislative framework, both at the national and international level. This paper first analyses the conceptual - terminological framework in which research of organ trafficking is range, and then presents a review and analysis of the development of ethical and normative international standards aimed at prevention and suppression this phenomenon. In the end, we analysed the current solutions in the domestic legislation. Nowadays, there are two parallel legislative regime that regulate the matter of organ trafficking. The first legislative regime that organ trafficking treated exclusively as a modality of transnational crime of human trafficking, and a second, recent, that organ trafficking treats as forbidden (incriminating activity that violates a regulatory system of organ (tissue cells transplantation.

  20. Oligomerization of Bacillus subtilis DesR is required for fine tuning regulation of membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najle, Sebastián R; Inda, María E; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E

    2009-10-01

    The DesK-DesR two-component system regulates the order of membrane lipids in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis by controlling the expression of the des gene coding for the delta 5-acyl-lipid desaturase. To activate des transcription, the membrane-bound histidine kinase DesK phosphorylates the response regulator DesR. This covalent modification of the regulatory domain of dimeric DesR promotes, in a cooperative fashion, the hierarchical occupation of two adjacent, non-identical, DesR-P binding sites, so that there is a shift in the equilibrium toward the tetrameric active form of the response regulator. However, the mechanism of regulation of DesR activity by phosphorylation and oligomerization is not well understood. We employed deletion analysis and reporter fusions to study the role of the N-terminal domain on DesR activity. In addition, electromobility shift assays were used to analyze the binding capacity of the transcription factor to deletion mutants of the des promoter. We show that DesR lacking the N-terminal domain is still able to bind to the des promoter. We also demonstrate that if the RA site is moved closer to the -35 region of Pdes, the adjacent site RB is dispensable for activation. Our results indicate that the unphosphorylated regulatory domain of DesR obstructs the access of the recognition helix of DesR to its DNA target. In addition, we present evidence showing that RB is physiologically relevant to control the activation of the des gene when the levels of DesR-P reach a critical threshold.

  1. Environmental and Genetic Factors Regulating Localization of the Plant Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Tan, Li Xuan; Bushey, Daniel B; Swanson, Sarah J; Sussman, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    A P-type H + -ATPase is the primary transporter that converts ATP to electrochemical energy at the plasma membrane of higher plants. Its product, the proton-motive force, is composed of an electrical potential and a pH gradient. Many studies have demonstrated that this proton-motive force not only drives the secondary transporters required for nutrient uptake, but also plays a direct role in regulating cell expansion. Here, we have generated a transgenic Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) plant expressing H + -ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2) that is translationally fused with a fluorescent protein and examined its cellular localization by live-cell microscopy. Using a 3D imaging approach with seedlings grown for various times under a variety of light intensities, we demonstrate that AHA2 localization at the plasma membrane of root cells requires light. In dim light conditions, AHA2 is found in intracellular compartments, in addition to the plasma membrane. This localization profile was age-dependent and specific to cell types found in the transition zone located between the meristem and elongation zones. The accumulation of AHA2 in intracellular compartments is consistent with reduced H + secretion near the transition zone and the suppression of root growth. By examining AHA2 localization in a knockout mutant of a receptor protein kinase, FERONIA, we found that the intracellular accumulation of AHA2 in the transition zone is dependent on a functional FERONIA-dependent inhibitory response in root elongation. Overall, this study provides a molecular underpinning for understanding the genetic, environmental, and developmental factors influencing root growth via localization of the plasma membrane H + -ATPase. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Environmental and Genetic Factors Regulating Localization of the Plant Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li Xuan; Bushey, Daniel B.; Swanson, Sarah J.

    2018-01-01

    A P-type H+-ATPase is the primary transporter that converts ATP to electrochemical energy at the plasma membrane of higher plants. Its product, the proton-motive force, is composed of an electrical potential and a pH gradient. Many studies have demonstrated that this proton-motive force not only drives the secondary transporters required for nutrient uptake, but also plays a direct role in regulating cell expansion. Here, we have generated a transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plant expressing H+-ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2) that is translationally fused with a fluorescent protein and examined its cellular localization by live-cell microscopy. Using a 3D imaging approach with seedlings grown for various times under a variety of light intensities, we demonstrate that AHA2 localization at the plasma membrane of root cells requires light. In dim light conditions, AHA2 is found in intracellular compartments, in addition to the plasma membrane. This localization profile was age-dependent and specific to cell types found in the transition zone located between the meristem and elongation zones. The accumulation of AHA2 in intracellular compartments is consistent with reduced H+ secretion near the transition zone and the suppression of root growth. By examining AHA2 localization in a knockout mutant of a receptor protein kinase, FERONIA, we found that the intracellular accumulation of AHA2 in the transition zone is dependent on a functional FERONIA-dependent inhibitory response in root elongation. Overall, this study provides a molecular underpinning for understanding the genetic, environmental, and developmental factors influencing root growth via localization of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. PMID:29042459

  3. Hemorrhagic shock impairs myocardial cell volume regulation and membrane integrity in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    An in vitro myocardial slice technique was used to quantitate alterations in cell volume regulation and membrane integrity after 2 h or hemorrhagic shock. After in vitro incubation in Krebs-Ringer-phosphate medium containing trace [ 14 C]inulin, values (ml H 2 O/g dry wt) for control nonshocked myocardial slices were 4.03 /plus minus/ 0.11 (SE) for total water, 2.16 /plus minus/ 0.07 for inulin impermeable space, and 1.76 /plus minus/ 0.15 for inulin diffusible space. Shocked myocardial slices showed impaired response to cold incubation. After 2 h of in vivo shock, total tissue water, inulin diffusible space, and inulin impermeable space increased significantly for subendocardium, whereas changes in subepicardium parameters were minimal. Shock-induced cellular swelling was accompanied by an increased total tissue sodium, but no change in tissue potassium. Calcium entry blockade in vivo significantly reduced subendocardial total tissue water as compared with shock-untreated dogs. In addition, calcium entry blockade reduced shock-induced increases in inulin diffusible space. In vitro myocardial slice studies confirm alterations in subendocardial membrane integrity after 2 h of in vivo hemorrhagic shock. Shock-induced abnormalities in myocardial cell volume regulation are reduced by calcium entry blockade in vivo

  4. Epithelial trafficking of Sonic hedgehog by megalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Carlos R; Zeng, Jibin; El Alfy, Mohamed; Barth, Jeremy L; Chintalapudi, Mastan Rao; McCarthy, Robert A; Incardona, John P; Argraves, W Scott

    2006-10-01

    We present here evidence of in vivo epithelial endocytosis and trafficking of non-lipid-modified Sonic hedgehog (ShhN) when infused into rat efferent ducts via microinjection. Initially, exogenous ShhN is detected in endocytic vesicles and early endosomes located near the apical plasma membrane of non-ciliated cells. Within 30-60 min following infusion, ShhN can be detected in lysosomes and at basolateral regions of non-ciliated cells. Basolaterally, ShhN was observed along the extracellular surfaces of interdigitated plasma membranes of adjacent cells and in the extracellular compartment underlying the efferent duct epithelium. Uptake and subcellular trafficking of infused ShhN by non-ciliated cells could be blocked by either anti-megalin IgG or the megalin antagonist, RAP. Ciliated cells, which do not express megalin, displayed little if any apical internalization of ShhN even though they were found to express Patched-1. However, ShhN was found in coated pits of lateral plasma membranes of ciliated cells as well as in underlying endocytic vesicles. We conclude that megalin-mediated endocytosis of ShhN can occur in megalin-expressing epithelia in vivo, and that the internalized ShhN can be targeted to the lysosome or transcytosed in the plane of the epithelium or across the epithelium. These findings highlight the multiple mechanisms by which megalin may influence Shh morphogen gradients in vivo.

  5. Exo- and endocytotic trafficking of SCAMP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyooka, Kiminori; Matsuoka, Ken

    2009-12-01

    Exo- and endocytotic membrane trafficking is an essential process for transport of secretory proteins, extracellular glycans, transporters and lipids in plant cells. Using secretory carrier membrane protein 2 (SCAMP2) as a marker for secretory vesicles and tobacco BY-2 cells as a model system, we recently demonstrated that SCAMP2 positive structures containing secretory materials are transported from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane (PM) and/or cell plate. This structure is consisted with clustered vesicles and was thus named the secretory vesicle cluster (SVC). Here, we have utilized the reversible photoswitching fluorescent protein Dronpa1 to trace the movement of SCAMP2 on the PM and cell plate. Activated SCAMP2-Dronpa fluorescence on the PM and cell plate moved into the BY-2 cells within several minutes, but did not spread around PM. This is consistent with recycling of SCAMP2 among endomembrane compartments such as the TGN, PM and cell plate. The relationship between SVC-mediated trafficking and exo- and endocytosis of plant cells is discussed taking into account this new data and knowledge provided by recent reports.

  6. Two barcodes encoded by the type-1 PDZ and by phospho-Ser312 regulate retromer/WASH-mediated sorting of the ß1-adrenergic receptor from endosomes to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooh, Mohammed M; Bahouth, Suleiman W

    2017-01-01

    Recycling of the majority of agonist-internalized GPCR is dependent on a type I-PDZ "barcode" in their C-tail. The recycling of wild-type (WT) ß 1 -AR is also dependent on its default "type-1 PDZ barcode", but trafficking of the ß 1 -AR is inhibited when PKA or its substrate serine at position 312 (Ser 312 ) are inactivated. We tested the hypothesis that phospho-Ser 312 provided a second barcode for ß 1 -AR sorting from endosomes to the plasma membrane by determining the role of retromer/WASH complexes in ß 1 -AR trafficking. Recycling of WT ß 1 -AR or WT ß 2 -AR was dependent on targeting the retromer to endosomal membranes via SNX3 and rab7a, and on complexing the retromer to the WASH pentamer via the C-tail of FAM21 (FAM21 C ). These maneuvers however, did not inhibit the recycling of a phospho-Ser 312 ß 1 -AR mimic ((S312D) ß 1 -AR). Knockdown of the trans-acting PDZ protein sorting nexin27 (SNX27) inhibited the recycling of WT ß 1 -AR and WT ß 2 -AR, but had no effect on (S312D) ß 1 -AR∆PDZ or on phosphorylation of WT ß 1 -AR by PKA at Ser 312 . However, depletion of FKBP15, a FAM21 C -binding endosomal protein, selectively inhibited WT ß 1 -AR but not ß 2 -AR recycling, suggesting divergence might exist in GPCR trafficking roadmaps. These results indicate that two barcodes are involved in sorting WT ß 1 -AR out of early endosomes. The first and antecedent "barcode" was the "type-1 PDZ", followed by a second reversible "phospho-Ser 312 " verification "barcode". This organization allows tight regulation of ß 1 -AR density to signaling intensity in conditions associated with aberrant ß 1 -AR signaling such as in hypertension and heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Women trafficking: causes, concerns, care!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Shaneela Sadaruddin; Tharani, Ambreen Jawed; Agha, Ajmal; Karamaliani, Rozina Sherali

    2012-08-01

    Pakistan is both a country of origin and destination as far as women trafficking is concerned. Poverty, gender discrimination, lack of education, and ignorance about legal rights are some of the underlying causes. Available data suggest several areas of concern, like, for instance: direct health effects, maladaptive coping leading to the use of illicit drugs, and inaccessibility to healthcare facilities. Therefore, numerous interventions would be required at three levels: the prevention of trafficking, the protection of victims and the prosecution of the traffickers.

  8. Health implications of human trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tiffany A

    2014-01-01

    Freedom is arguably the most cherished right in the United States. But each year, approximately 14,500 to 17,500 women, men and children are trafficked into the United States for the purposes of forced labor or sexual exploitation. Human trafficking has significant effects on both physical and mental health. This article describes the features of human trafficking, its physical and mental health effects and the vital role nurses can play in providing care to this vulnerable population. © 2014 AWHONN.

  9. Analysis of occludin trafficking, demonstrating continuous endocytosis, degradation, recycling and biosynthetic secretory trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Fletcher

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs link adjacent cells and are critical for maintenance of apical-basolateral polarity in epithelial monolayers. The TJ protein occludin functions in disparate processes, including wound healing and Hepatitis C Virus infection. Little is known about steady-state occludin trafficking into and out of the plasma membrane. Therefore, we determined the mechanisms responsible for occludin turnover in confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial monolayers. Using various biotin-based trafficking assays we observed continuous and rapid endocytosis of plasma membrane localised occludin (the majority internalised within 30 minutes. By 120 minutes a significant reduction in internalised occludin was observed. Inhibition of lysosomal function attenuated the reduction in occludin signal post-endocytosis and promoted co-localisation with the late endocytic system. Using a similar method we demonstrated that ∼20% of internalised occludin was transported back to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, significant co-localisation between internalised occludin and recycling endosomal compartments was observed. We then quantified the extent to which occludin synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane contributes to plasma membrane occludin homeostasis, identifying inhibition of protein synthesis led to decreased plasma membrane localised occludin. Significant co-localisation between occludin and the biosynthetic secretory pathway was demonstrated. Thus, under steady-state conditions occludin undergoes turnover via a continuous cycle of endocytosis, recycling and degradation, with degradation compensated for by biosynthetic exocytic trafficking. We developed a mathematical model to describe the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of occludin, utilising experimental data to provide quantitative estimates for the rates of these processes.

  10. Human Trafficking and National Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. DI PIETRO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes that national morality is an important variable for explaining national anti-trafficking policy. It uses cross country regression analysis to see whether or not empirically national morality is a determinant of anti-trafficking policy. The findings of the paper are consistent with the notion that improved levels of national morality lead to better national anti-trafficking policy. National morality is found to be statistically relevant for national anti-trafficking policy when controlling for the extent of democracy, the share of the private sector in the economy, and the degree of globalization.

  11. In silico investigation of ADAM12 effect on TGF-β receptors trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeMeur Nolwenn

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transforming growth factor beta is known to have pleiotropic effects, including differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. However the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The regulation and effect of TGF-β signaling is complex and highly depends on specific protein context. In liver, we have recently showed that the disintegrin and metalloproteinase ADAM12 interacts with TGF-β receptors and modulates their trafficking among membranes, a crucial point in TGF-β signaling and development of fibrosis. The present study aims to better understand how ADAM12 impacts on TGF-β receptors trafficking and TGF-β signaling. Findings We extracted qualitative biological observations from experimental data and defined a family of models producing a behavior compatible with the presence of ADAM12. We computationally explored the properties of this family of models which allowed us to make novel predictions. We predict that ADAM12 increases TGF-β receptors internalization rate between the cell surface and the endosomal membrane. It also appears that ADAM12 modifies TGF-β signaling shape favoring a permanent response by removing the transient component observed under physiological conditions. Conclusion In this work, confronting differential models with qualitative biological observations, we obtained predictions giving new insights into the role of ADAM12 in TGF-β signaling and hepatic fibrosis process.

  12. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  13. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-05-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A-VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Subcellular trafficking of FGF controls tracheal invasion of Drosophila flight muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Soren J; Krasnow, Mark A

    2015-01-15

    To meet the extreme oxygen demand of insect flight muscle, tracheal (respiratory) tubes ramify not only on its surface, as in other tissues, but also within T-tubules and ultimately surrounding every mitochondrion. Although this remarkable physiological specialization has long been recognized, its cellular and molecular basis is unknown. Here, we show that Drosophila tracheoles invade flight muscle T-tubules through transient surface openings. Like other tracheal branching events, invasion requires the Branchless FGF pathway. However, localization of the FGF chemoattractant changes from all muscle membranes to T-tubules as invasion begins. Core regulators of epithelial basolateral membrane identity localize to T-tubules, and knockdown of AP-1γ, required for basolateral trafficking, redirects FGF from T-tubules to surface, increasing tracheal surface ramification and preventing invasion. We propose that tracheal invasion is controlled by an AP-1-dependent switch in FGF trafficking. Thus, subcellular targeting of a chemoattractant can direct outgrowth to specific domains, including inside the cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Membrane fusion by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chuan; Hardee, Deborah; Minnear, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Pairing of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins on vesicles (v-SNAREs) and SNARE proteins on target membranes (t-SNAREs) mediates intracellular membrane fusion. VAMP3/cellubrevin is a v-SNARE that resides in recycling endosomes and endosome-derived transport vesicles. VAMP3 has been implicated in recycling of transferrin receptors, secretion of α-granules in platelets, and membrane trafficking during cell migration. Using a cell fusion assay, we examined membrane fusion capacity of the ternary complexes formed by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs syntaxin1, syntaxin4, SNAP-23 and SNAP-25. VAMP3 forms fusogenic pairing with t-SNARE complexes syntaxin1/SNAP-25, syntaxin1/SNAP-23 and syntaxin4/SNAP-25, but not with syntaxin4/SNAP-23. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of syntaxin4 enhanced membrane fusion more than two fold, indicating that the N-terminal domain negatively regulates membrane fusion. Differential membrane fusion capacities of the ternary v-/t-SNARE complexes suggest that transport vesicles containing VAMP3 have distinct membrane fusion kinetics with domains of the plasma membrane that present different t-SNARE proteins

  16. Modulation of epithelial sodium channel trafficking and function by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate in human nasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prulière-Escabasse, Virginie; Planès, Carole; Escudier, Estelle; Fanen, Pascale; Coste, André; Clerici, Christine

    2007-11-23

    Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) has been shown to correct the cellular trafficking of several mutant or nonmutant plasma membrane proteins such as cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator through the expression of 70-kDa heat shock proteins. The objective of the study was to determine whether 4-PBA may influence the functional expression of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC). Using primary cultures of HNEC, we demonstrate that 4-PBA (5 mm for 6 h) markedly stimulated amiloride-sensitive sodium channel activity and that this was related to an increased abundance of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC subunits in the apical membrane. The increase in ENaC cell surface expression (i) was due to insertion of newly ENaC subunits as determined by brefeldin A experiments and (ii) was not associated with cell surface retention of ENaC subunits because endocytosis of ENaC subunits was unchanged. In addition, we find that ENaC co-immunoprecipitated with the heat shock protein constitutively expressed Hsc70, that has been reported to modulate ENaC trafficking, and that 4-PBA decreased Hsc70 protein level. Finally, we report that in cystic fibrosis HNEC obtained from two cystic fibrosis patients, 4-PBA increased functional expression of ENaC as demonstrated by the increase in amiloride-sensitive sodium transport and in alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC subunit expression in the apical membrane. Our results suggest that in HNEC, 4-PBA increases the functional expression of ENaC through the insertion of new alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC subunits into the apical membrane and also suggest that 4-PBA could modify ENaC trafficking by reducing Hsc70 protein expression.

  17. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways by the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Darborg, Barbara Vasek; Rentsch, Maria Louise

    2006-01-01

    activity is regulated by a three-tiered phosphorelay system, which is in turn regulated by a complex network of signaling events and scaffolding proteins. The ubiquitous plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 is activated by, and implicated in, the physiological/pathophysiological responses to many...... of the same stimuli that modulate MAPK activity. While under some conditions, NHE1 is regulated by MAPKs, a number of studies have, conversely, implicated NHE1 in the regulation of MAPK activity. Here, we discuss the current evidence indicating the involvement of NHE1 in MAPK regulation, the mechanisms...

  18. Combating Human Trafficking with Deep Multimodal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Edmund; Zadeh, Amir; Jones, Cara; Morency, Louis-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Human trafficking is a global epidemic affecting millions of people across the planet. Sex trafficking, the dominant form of human trafficking, has seen a significant rise mostly due to the abundance of escort websites, where human traffickers can openly advertise among at-will escort advertisements. In this paper, we take a major step in the automatic detection of advertisements suspected to pertain to human trafficking. We present a novel dataset called Trafficking-10k, with more than 10,00...

  19. Vimentin is involved in regulation of mitochondrial motility and membrane potential by Rac1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Matveeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that binding of mitochondria to vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF is regulated by GTPase Rac1. The activation of Rac1 leads to a redoubling of mitochondrial motility in murine fibroblasts. Using double-mutants Rac1(G12V, F37L and Rac1(G12V, Y40H that are capable to activate different effectors of Rac1, we show that mitochondrial movements are regulated through PAK1 kinase. The involvement of PAK1 kinase is also confirmed by the fact that expression of its auto inhibitory domain (PID blocks the effect of activated Rac1 on mitochondrial motility. The observed effect of Rac1 and PAK1 kinase on mitochondria depends on phosphorylation of the Ser-55 of vimentin. Besides the effect on motility Rac1 activation also decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP which is detected by ∼20% drop of the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the potential sensitive dye TMRM. One of important consequences of the discovered regulation of MMP by Rac1 and PAK1 is a spatial differentiation of mitochondria in polarized fibroblasts: at the front of the cell they are less energized (by ∼25% than at the rear part.

  20. Stress regulated members of the plant organic cation transporter family are localized to the vacuolar membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis six genes group into the gene family of the organic cation transporters (OCTs. In animals the members of the OCT-family are mostly characterized as polyspecific transporters involved in the homeostasis of solutes, the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters and the transport of choline and carnitine. In plants little is known about function, localisation and regulation of this gene family. Only one protein has been characterized as a carnitine transporter at the plasma membrane so far. Findings We localized the five uncharacterized members of the Arabidopsis OCT family, designated OCT2-OCT6, via GFP fusions and protoplast transformation to the tonoplast. Expression analysis with RNA Gel Blots showed a distinct, organ-specific expression pattern of the individual genes. With reporter gene fusion of four members we analyzed the tissue specific distribution of OCT2, 3, 4, and 6. In experiments with salt, drought and cold stress, we could show that AtOCT4, 5 and 6 are up-regulated during drought stress, AtOCT3 and 5 during cold stress and AtOCT 5 and 6 during salt stress treatments. Conclusion Localisation of the proteins at the tonoplast and regulation of the gene expression under stress conditions suggests a specific role for the transporters in plant adaptation to environmental stress.

  1. Endocytosis regulates membrane localization and function of the fusogen EFF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smurova, Ksenia; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2017-07-03

    Cell fusion is essential for sexual reproduction and formation of muscles, bones, and placenta. Two families of cell fusion proteins (Syncytins and FFs) have been identified in eukaryotes. Syncytins have been shown to form the giant syncytial trophoblasts in the placenta. The FFs are essential to fuse cells in the skin, reproductive, excretory, digestive and nervous systems in nematodes. EFF-1 (Epithelial Fusion Failure 1), a member of the FF family, is a type I membrane glycoprotein that is essential for most cell fusions in C. elegans. The crystal structure of EFF-1 ectodomain reveals striking structural similarity to class II fusion glycoproteins from enveloped viruses (e.g. dengue and rubella) that mediate virus to cell fusion. We found EFF-1 to be present on the plasma membrane and in RAB-5-positive early endosomes, with EFF-1 recycling between these 2 cell compartments. Only when EFF-1 proteins transiently arrive to the surfaces of 2 adjacent cells do they dynamically interact in trans and mediate membrane fusion. EFF-1 is continuously internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis via the activity of 2 small GTPases: RAB-5 and Dynamin. Here we propose a model that explains how EFF-1 endocytosis together with interactions in trans can control cell-cell fusion. Kontani et al. showed that vacuolar ATPase (vATPase) mutations result in EFF-1-dependent hyperfusion. 1 We propose that vATPase is required for normal degradation of EFF-1. Failure to degrade EFF-1 results in delayed hyperfusion and mislocalization to organelles that appear to be recycling endosomes. EFF-1 is also required to fuse neurons as part of the repair mechanism following injury and to prune dendrites. We speculate that EFF-1 may regulate neuronal tree like structures via endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis of cell-cell fusion proteins functions to prevent merging of cells and to sculpt organs and neurons.

  2. The secret life of tethers: the role of tethering factors in SNARE complex regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Dubuke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking in eukaryotic cells is a tightly regulated process to ensure correct cargo delivery to the proper destination organelle or plasma membrane. In this review, we focus on how the vesicle fusion machinery, the SNARE complex, is regulated by the interplay of the multisubunit tethering complexes (MTC with the SNAREs and Sec1/Munc18 (SM proteins. Although these factors are used in different stages of membrane trafficking, e.g. Golgi to plasma membrane transport vs vacuolar fusion, and in a variety of diverse eukaryotic cell types, many commonalities between their functions are being revealed. We explore the various protein-protein interactions and findings from functional reconstitution studies in order to highlight both their common features and the differences in their modes of regulation. These studies serve as a starting point for mechanistic explorations in other systems.

  3. Illicit Nuclear Trafficking Scams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Trafficking Scams are situations where the scam artist(s) offer something (material or information) that is not what he/she/they represent it to be. Example of a scam is when attempt is made to sell fake nuclear material. The offered material may not be nuclear material or may be of a lower grade. The offered material may not actually exist . Radioactive material may be offered as nuclear material. A small sample of actual nuclear material may be offered, but the bulk material may be something else.

  4. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowton, E; Saunders, C; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R D; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A

    2014-10-14

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA efflux phenotype. Here, we report the novel identification of hDAT A559V in two unrelated ASD subjects and provide the first mechanistic description of its impaired trafficking phenotype. DAT surface expression is dynamically regulated by DAT substrates including the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH), which causes hDAT trafficking away from the plasma membrane. The integrity of DAT trafficking directly impacts DA transport capacity and therefore dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here, we show that hDAT A559V is resistant to AMPH-induced cell surface redistribution. This unique trafficking phenotype is conferred by altered protein kinase C β (PKCβ) activity. Cells expressing hDAT A559V exhibit constitutively elevated PKCβ activity, inhibition of which restores the AMPH-induced hDAT A559V membrane redistribution. Mechanistically, we link the inability of hDAT A559V to traffic in response to AMPH to the phosphorylation of the five most distal DAT N-terminal Ser. Mutation of these N-terminal Ser to Ala restores AMPH-induced trafficking. Furthermore, hDAT A559V has a diminished ability to transport AMPH, and therefore lacks AMPH-induced DA efflux. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ or Ser to Ala substitution in the hDAT A559V background restores AMPH-induced DA efflux while promoting intracellular AMPH accumulation. Although hDAT A559V is a rare variant, it has been found in multiple probands with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with imbalances in DA neurotransmission

  5. RIN4 functions with plasma membrane H+-ATPases to regulate stomatal apertures during pathogen attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jun; Elmore, James M.; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Pathogen perception by the plant innate immune system is of central importance to plant survival and productivity. The Arabidopsis protein RIN4 is a negative regulator of plant immunity. In order to identify additional proteins involved in RIN4- mediated immune signal transduction, we...... purified components of the RIN4 protein complex. We identified six novel proteins that had not previously been implicated in RIN4 signaling, including the plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPases AHA1 and/or AHA2. RIN4 interacts with AHA1 and AHA2 both in vitro and in vivo. RIN4 overexpression and knockout lines...... exhibit differential PM H+-ATPase activity. PM H+-ATPase activation induces stomatal opening, enabling bacteria to gain entry into the plant leaf; inactivation induces stomatal closure thus restricting bacterial invasion. The rin4 knockout line exhibited reduced PM H+-ATPase activity and, importantly, its...

  6. Assessing the nature of lipid raft membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Ollila, Samuli; Hyvönen, Marja T

    2007-01-01

    of highly ordered lateral domains rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol (CHOL). These domains, called functional lipid rafts, have been suggested to take part in a variety of dynamic cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the activity of membrane proteins......-scale simulations to elucidate the properties of ternary raft mixtures with CHOL, palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM), and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. We simulate two bilayers of 1,024 lipids for 100 ns in the liquid-ordered phase and one system of the same size in the liquid-disordered phase. The studies provide...... heterogeneity more difficult. The findings reveal aspects of the role of favored (specific) lipid-lipid interactions within rafts and clarify the prominent role of CHOL in altering the properties of the membrane locally in its neighborhood. Also, we show that the presence of PSM and CHOL in rafts leads...

  7. Sphingolipid trafficking - Sorted out?

    OpenAIRE

    van Meer, G.; Burger, K.N.J.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of intracellular membrane traffic have traditionally focused on the protein components of membranes, but what about lipids? Recent findings have drawn attention to the transport of one type of lipid, the sphingolipids. Their unique physical properties may allow them to aggregate into microdomains in membranes that concentrate sphingolipids into specific transport pathways. Gerrit van Meer and Koert Burger consider here the routes of sphingolipid biosynthesis and transport, and the rol...

  8. Membrane cholesterol regulates lysosome-plasma membrane fusion events and modulates Trypanosoma cruzi invasion of host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Hissa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages and non-professional (epithelial phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of

  9. HUMAN TRAFFICKING DRUG TRAFFICKING, AND THE DEATH PENALTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Gerry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both Australia and Indonesia have made commitments to combatting human trafficking.  Through the experience of Mary Jane Veloso it can be seen that it is most often the vulnerable ‘mule’ that is apprehended by law enforcement and not the powerful leaders of crime syndicates. It is unacceptable that those vulnerable individuals may face execution for acts committed under threat of force, coercion, fraud, deception or abuse of power. For this reason it is vital that a system of victim identification is developed, including better training for law enforcement, legal representatives and members of the judiciary. This paper builds on submissions by authors for Australian Parliamentary Inquiry into Human Trafficking, and focusses on issues arising in the complex cross section of human trafficking, drug trafficking, and the death penalty with particular attention on identifying victims and effective reporting mechanisms in both Australia and Indonesia. It concludes that, in the context of human trafficking both countries could make three main improvements to law and policy, among others, 1 enactment of laws that create clear mandatory protection for human trafficking victims; 2 enactment of criminal laws that provides complete defence for victim of human trafficking; 3 enactment of corporate reporting mechanisms. Systemic protection and support is not sufficiently available without clear legislative protection as this paper suggests together with standardised referral mechanisms and effective financial reporting mechanisms. The implementation can be achieved through collaborative responses and inter-agency coordination with data collection and properly trained specialists.

  10. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-08-18

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR-VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome-lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR-VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. © 2015 Authors.

  11. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future

  12. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuin, Tanmay [Cell and Developmental Biology Unit, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag 713104 (India); Roy, Jagat Kumar, E-mail: jkroy@bhu.ac.in [Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  13. ER-plasma membrane contact sites contribute to autophagosome biogenesis by regulation of local PI3P synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Giordano, Francesca; Dupont, Nicolas; Grasso, Daniel; Vaccaro, Maria I; Codogno, Patrice; Morel, Etienne

    2017-07-14

    The double-membrane-bound autophagosome is formed by the closure of a structure called the phagophore, origin of which is still unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is clearly implicated in autophagosome biogenesis due to the presence of the omegasome subdomain positive for DFCP1, a phosphatidyl-inositol-3-phosphate (PI3P) binding protein. Contribution of other membrane sources, like the plasma membrane (PM), is still difficult to integrate in a global picture. Here we show that ER-plasma membrane contact sites are mobilized for autophagosome biogenesis, by direct implication of the tethering extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) proteins. Imaging data revealed that early autophagic markers are recruited to E-Syt-containing domains during autophagy and that inhibition of E-Syts expression leads to a reduction in autophagosome biogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that E-Syts are essential for autophagy-associated PI3P synthesis at the cortical ER membrane via the recruitment of VMP1, the stabilizing ER partner of the PI3KC3 complex. These results highlight the contribution of ER-plasma membrane tethers to autophagosome biogenesis regulation and support the importance of membrane contact sites in autophagy. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. 76 FR 35787 - Updated Trafficking Definition and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-FDPIR Dual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ...-Rulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov . Preferred method; follow the online instructions for... included in the record and will be made available to the public. Please be advised that the substance of... definition of trafficking in SNAP benefits is as follows: ``Trafficking means the buying or selling of...

  15. Sphingolipid trafficking - Sorted out?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, G.; Burger, K.N.J.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of intracellular membrane traffic have traditionally focused on the protein components of membranes, but what about lipids? Recent findings have drawn attention to the transport of one type of lipid, the sphingolipids. Their unique physical properties may allow them to aggregate into

  16. Regulation of Membrane-Type 4 Matrix Metalloproteinase by SLUG Contributes to Hypoxia-Mediated Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hung Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxic tumor environment has been shown to be critical to cancer metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and acquisition of invasive potential. However, the impact of hypoxia on the expression profile of the proteolytic enzymes involved in invasiveness is relatively unknown. Membrane-type 4 matrix metalloproteinase (MT4-MMP is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol-anchored protease that has been shown to be overexpressed in human cancers. However, detailed mechanisms regarding the regulation and function of MT4-MMP expression in tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α induced MT4-MMP expression in human cancer cells. Activation of SLUG, a transcriptional factor regulating the EMT process of human cancers, by HIF-1α was critical for the induction of MT4-MMP under hypoxia. SLUG regulated the transcription of MT4-MMP through direct binding to the E-box located in its proximal promoter. Short-interference RNA-mediated knockdown of MT4-MMP attenuated in vitro invasiveness and in vivo pulmonary colonization of tumor cells without affecting cell migratory ability. MT4-MMP promoted invasiveness and pulmonary colonization through modulation of the expression profile of MMPs and angiogenic factors. Finally, coexpression of HIF-1α and MT4-MMP in human head and neck cancer was predictive of a worse clinical outcome. These findings establish a novel signaling pathway for hypoxia-mediated metastasis and elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanism and functional significance of MT4-MMP in cancer metastasis.

  17. MicroRNA 26a (miR-26a/KLF4 and CREB-C/EBPβ regulate innate immune signaling, the polarization of macrophages and the trafficking of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to lysosomes during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaya Kumar Sahu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For efficient clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, macrophages tilt towards M1 polarization leading to the activation of transcription factors associated with the production of antibacterial effector molecules such as nitric oxide (NO and proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1 β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α. At the same time, resolution of inflammation is associated with M2 polarization with increased production of arginase and cytokines such as IL-10. The transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that govern the balance between M1 and M2 polarization, and bacteria-containing processes such as autophagy and trafficking of Mtb to lysosomes, are incompletely understood. Here we report for the first time, that the transcription factor KLF4 is targeted by microRNA-26a (miR-26a. During Mtb infection, downregulation of miR-26a (observed both ex vivo and in vivo facilitates upregulation of KLF4 which in turn favors increased arginase and decreased iNOS activity. We further demonstrate that KLF4 prevents trafficking of Mtb to lysosomes. The CREB-C/EBPβ signaling axis also favors M2 polarization. Downregulation of miR-26a and upregulation of C/ebpbeta were observed both in infected macrophages as well as in infected mice. Knockdown of C/ebpbeta repressed the expression of selected M2 markers such as Il10 and Irf4 in infected macrophages. The importance of these pathways is substantiated by observations that expression of miR-26a mimic or knockdown of Klf4 or Creb or C/ebpbeta, attenuated the survival of Mtb in macrophages. Taken together, our results attribute crucial roles for the miR-26a/KLF4 and CREB-C/EBPβsignaling pathways in regulating the survival of Mtb in macrophages. These studies expand our understanding of how Mtb hijacks host signaling pathways to survive in macrophages, and open up new exploratory avenues for host-targeted interventions.

  18. MicroRNA 26a (miR-26a)/KLF4 and CREB-C/EBPβ regulate innate immune signaling, the polarization of macrophages and the trafficking of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to lysosomes during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sanjaya Kumar; Kumar, Manish; Chakraborty, Sohini; Banerjee, Srijon Kaushik; Kumar, Ranjeet; Gupta, Pushpa; Jana, Kuladip; Gupta, Umesh D; Ghosh, Zhumur; Kundu, Manikuntala; Basu, Joyoti

    2017-05-01

    For efficient clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), macrophages tilt towards M1 polarization leading to the activation of transcription factors associated with the production of antibacterial effector molecules such as nitric oxide (NO) and proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). At the same time, resolution of inflammation is associated with M2 polarization with increased production of arginase and cytokines such as IL-10. The transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that govern the balance between M1 and M2 polarization, and bacteria-containing processes such as autophagy and trafficking of Mtb to lysosomes, are incompletely understood. Here we report for the first time, that the transcription factor KLF4 is targeted by microRNA-26a (miR-26a). During Mtb infection, downregulation of miR-26a (observed both ex vivo and in vivo) facilitates upregulation of KLF4 which in turn favors increased arginase and decreased iNOS activity. We further demonstrate that KLF4 prevents trafficking of Mtb to lysosomes. The CREB-C/EBPβ signaling axis also favors M2 polarization. Downregulation of miR-26a and upregulation of C/ebpbeta were observed both in infected macrophages as well as in infected mice. Knockdown of C/ebpbeta repressed the expression of selected M2 markers such as Il10 and Irf4 in infected macrophages. The importance of these pathways is substantiated by observations that expression of miR-26a mimic or knockdown of Klf4 or Creb or C/ebpbeta, attenuated the survival of Mtb in macrophages. Taken together, our results attribute crucial roles for the miR-26a/KLF4 and CREB-C/EBPβsignaling pathways in regulating the survival of Mtb in macrophages. These studies expand our understanding of how Mtb hijacks host signaling pathways to survive in macrophages, and open up new exploratory avenues for host-targeted interventions.

  19. Non-bilayer structures in mitochondrial membranes regulate ATP synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, Sardar E; Kim, Aleksandr A; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S; Dagda, Ruben K

    2018-02-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid at the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) that facilitates the formation of transient non-bilayer (non-lamellar) structures to maintain mitochondrial integrity. CL modulates mitochondrial functions including ATP synthesis. However, the biophysical mechanisms by which CL generates non-lamellar structures and the extent to which these structures contribute to ATP synthesis remain unknown. We hypothesized that CL and ATP synthase facilitate the formation of non-bilayer structures at the IMM to stimulate ATP synthesis. By using 1 H NMR and 31 P NMR techniques, we observed that increasing the temperature (8°C to 37°C), lowering the pH (3.0), or incubating intact mitochondria with CTII - an IMM-targeted toxin that increases the formation of immobilized non-bilayer structures - elevated the formation of non-bilayer structures to stimulate ATP synthesis. The F 0 sector of the ATP synthase complex can facilitate the formation of non-bilayer structures as incubating model membranes enriched with IMM-specific phospholipids with exogenous DCCD-binding protein of the F 0 sector (DCCD-BPF) elevated the formation of immobilized non-bilayer structures to a similar manner as CTII. Native PAGE assays revealed that CL, but not other anionic phospholipids, specifically binds to DCCD-BPF to promote the formation of stable lipid-protein complexes. Mechanistically, molecular docking studies identified two lipid binding sites for CL in DCCD-BPF. We propose a new model of ATP synthase regulation in which CL mediates the formation of non-bilayer structures that serve to cluster protons and ATP synthase complexes as a mechanism to enhance proton translocation to the F 0 sector, and thereby increase ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interplay between membrane elasticity and active cytoskeleton forces regulates the aggregation dynamics of the immunological synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    Adhesion between a T cell and an antigen presenting cell is achieved by TCR-pMHC and LFA1-ICAM1 protein complexes. These segregate to form a special pattern, known as the immunological synapse (IS), consisting of a central quasi-circular domain of TCR-pMHC bonds surrounded by a peripheral domain of LFA1-ICAM1 complexes. Insights gained from imaging studies had led to the conclusion that the formation of the central adhesion domain in the IS is driven by active (ATP-driven) mechanisms. Recent studies, however, suggested that passive (thermodynamic) mechanisms may also play an important role in this process. Here, we present a simple physical model, taking into account the membrane-mediated thermodynamic attraction between the TCR-pMHC bonds and the effective forces that they experience due to ATP-driven actin retrograde flow and transport by dynein motor proteins. Monte Carlo simulations of the model exhibit a good spatio-temporal agreement with the experimentally observed pattern evolution of the TCR-pMHC microclusters. The agreement is lost when one of the aggregation mechanisms is "muted", which helps to identify the respective roles in the process. We conclude that actin retrograde flow drives the centripetal motion of TCR-pMHC bonds, while the membrane-mediated interactions facilitate microcluster formation and growth. In the absence of dynein motors, the system evolves into a ring-shaped pattern, which highlights the role of dynein motors in the formation of the final concentric pattern. The interplay between the passive and active mechanisms regulates the rate of the accumulation process, which in the absence of one them proceeds either too quickly or slowly.

  1. Role of myristoylation in membrane attachment and function of G alpha i-3 on Golgi membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, S H; Holtzman, E J; Scher, D A; Ausiello, D A; Stow, J L

    1996-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G protein alpha-subunits localized on the cytoplasmic face of Golgi membranes are involved in regulating vesicle trafficking and protein secretion. We investigated the role of myristoylation in attachment of the G alpha i-3 subunit to Golgi membranes. G alpha i-3 was epitope-tagged by insertion of a FLAG sequence at an NH2-terminal site predicted to interfere with myristoylation, and the resulting NT-alpha i-3 construct was stably transfected and expressed in polarized epithelial LLC-PK1 cells. Metabolic labeling confirmed that the translation product of NT-alpha i-3 was not myristoylated. In contrast to endogenous G alpha 1-3, which is tightly bound to Golgi membranes, the unmyristoylated FLAG-tagged NT-alpha i-3 did not attach to membranes; it was localized by immunofluorescence in the cytoplasm of LLC-PK1 cells and was detected only in the cytosol fraction of cell homogenates. Pertussis toxin-dependent ADP-ribosylation was used to test the ability of NT-alpha i-3 to interact with membrane-bound beta gamma-subunits. In both in vitro and in vivo assays, cytosolic NT-alpha i-3 alone was not ADP-ribosylated, although in the presence of membranes it could interact with G beta gamma-subunits to form heterotrimers. The expression of NT-alpha i-3 in LLC-PK1 cells altered the rate of basolateral secretion of sulfated proteoglycans, consistent with the demonstrated function of endogenous G alpha i-3. These data are consistent with a model in which G alpha i-3 utilizes NH2-terminal myristoylation to bind to Golgi membranes and to maximize its interaction with G beta gamma-subunits. Furthermore, our results show that stable attachment of G alpha i-3 to Golgi membranes is not required for it to participate as a regulatory element in vesicle trafficking in the secretory pathway.

  2. New approaches for solving old problems in neuronal protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Ashley M; Bowen, Aaron B; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2018-04-10

    Fundamental cellular properties are determined by the repertoire and abundance of proteins displayed on the cell surface. As such, the trafficking mechanisms for establishing and maintaining the surface proteome must be tightly regulated for cells to respond appropriately to extracellular cues, yet plastic enough to adapt to ever-changing environments. Not only are the identity and abundance of surface proteins critical, but in many cases, their regulated spatial positioning within surface nanodomains can greatly impact their function. In the context of neuronal cell biology, surface levels and positioning of ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors play essential roles in establishing important properties, including cellular excitability and synaptic strength. Here we review our current understanding of the trafficking pathways that control the abundance and localization of proteins important for synaptic function and plasticity, as well as recent technological advances that are allowing the field to investigate protein trafficking with increasing spatiotemporal precision. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) is required for the nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking of pre-U2 RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Schertzer , Michael; Jouravleva , Karina; Perderiset , Mylène; Dingli , Florent; Loew , Damarys; Le Guen , Tangui; Bardoni , Barbara; De Villartay , Jean-Pierre; Revy , Patrick; Londono-Vallejo , Arturo

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) is a severe form of Dyskeratosis congenita characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and im-munodeficiency and has been associated with telom-ere dysfunction. Recently, mutations in Regulator of Telomere ELongation helicase 1 (RTEL1), a helicase first identified in Mus musculus as being responsible for the maintenance of long telomeres, have been identified in several HHS patients. Here we show that RTEL1 is require...

  4. FlnA binding to PACSIN2 F-BAR domain regulates membrane tubulation in megakaryocytes and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Pluthero, Fred G; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Giannini, Silvia; Christensen, Hilary; Leung, Richard; Lo, Richard W; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lehman, William; Plomann, Markus; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Kahr, Walter H A; Hartwig, John H; Falet, Hervé

    2015-07-02

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) and Fes-CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) proteins generate tubular membrane invaginations reminiscent of the megakaryocyte (MK) demarcation membrane system (DMS), which provides membranes necessary for future platelets. The F-BAR protein PACSIN2 is one of the most abundant BAR/F-BAR proteins in platelets and the only one reported to interact with the cytoskeletal and scaffold protein filamin A (FlnA), an essential regulator of platelet formation and function. The FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction was therefore investigated in MKs and platelets. PACSIN2 associated with FlnA in human platelets. The interaction required FlnA immunoglobulin-like repeat 20 and the tip of PACSIN2 F-BAR domain and enhanced PACSIN2 F-BAR domain membrane tubulation in vitro. Most human and wild-type mouse platelets had 1 to 2 distinct PACSIN2 foci associated with cell membrane GPIbα, whereas Flna-null platelets had 0 to 4 or more foci. Endogenous PACSIN2 and transfected enhanced green fluorescent protein-PACSIN2 were concentrated in midstage wild-type mouse MKs in a well-defined invagination of the plasma membrane reminiscent of the initiating DMS and dispersed in the absence of FlnA binding. The DMS appeared less well defined, and platelet territories were not readily visualized in Flna-null MKs. We conclude that the FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction regulates membrane tubulation in MKs and platelets and likely contributes to DMS formation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Response to Illicit Trafficking of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Two response paths are discussed in the presentation. Reactive response follows when an alarm of a border monitor goes off or a notification is received about an incident involving or suspected to involve radioactive materials. The response can also be the result of the finding of a discrepancy between a customs declaration form and the corresponding actual shipment. Proactive response is undertaken upon receipt of intelligence information suggesting the illicit trafficking of radioactive materials, notification about the discovery of non-compliance with transport regulations or if discrepancies are found in an inventory of radioactive materials.

  6. Electrophoresis of cell membrane heparan sulfate regulates galvanotaxis in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Schiapparelli, Paula; Kozielski, Kristen; Green, Jordan; Lavell, Emily; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Searson, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Endogenous electric fields modulate many physiological processes by promoting directional migration, a process known as galvanotaxis. Despite the importance of galvanotaxis in development and disease, the mechanism by which cells sense and migrate directionally in an electric field remains unknown. Here, we show that electrophoresis of cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) critically regulates this process. HS was found to be localized at the anode-facing side in fetal neural progenitor cells (fNPCs), fNPC-derived astrocytes and brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs), regardless of their direction of galvanotaxis. Enzymatic removal of HS and other sulfated glycosaminoglycans significantly abolished or reversed the cathodic response seen in fNPCs and BTICs. Furthermore, Slit2, a chemorepulsive ligand, was identified to be colocalized with HS in forming a ligand gradient across cellular membranes. Using both imaging and genetic modification, we propose a novel mechanism for galvanotaxis in which electrophoretic localization of HS establishes cell polarity by functioning as a co-receptor and provides repulsive guidance through Slit-Robo signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Insulin regulates Glut4 confinement in plasma membrane clusters in adipose cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizunov, Vladimir A; Stenkula, Karin; Troy, Aaron; Cushman, Samuel W; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM) is the hallmark of glucose metabolism. In this study we examined insulin's effects on GLUT4 organization in PM of adipose cells by direct microscopic observation of single monomers tagged with photoswitchable fluorescent protein. In the basal state, after exocytotic delivery only a fraction of GLUT4 is dispersed into the PM as monomers, while most of the GLUT4 stays at the site of fusion and forms elongated clusters (60-240 nm). GLUT4 monomers outside clusters diffuse freely and do not aggregate with other monomers. In contrast, GLUT4 molecule collision with an existing cluster can lead to immediate confinement and association with that cluster. Insulin has three effects: it shifts the fraction of dispersed GLUT4 upon delivery, it augments the dissociation of GLUT4 monomers from clusters ∼3-fold and it decreases the rate of endocytic uptake. All together these three effects of insulin shift most of the PM GLUT4 from clustered to dispersed states. GLUT4 confinement in clusters represents a novel kinetic mechanism for insulin regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  8. Insulin regulates Glut4 confinement in plasma membrane clusters in adipose cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Lizunov

    Full Text Available Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 to the plasma membrane (PM is the hallmark of glucose metabolism. In this study we examined insulin's effects on GLUT4 organization in PM of adipose cells by direct microscopic observation of single monomers tagged with photoswitchable fluorescent protein. In the basal state, after exocytotic delivery only a fraction of GLUT4 is dispersed into the PM as monomers, while most of the GLUT4 stays at the site of fusion and forms elongated clusters (60-240 nm. GLUT4 monomers outside clusters diffuse freely and do not aggregate with other monomers. In contrast, GLUT4 molecule collision with an existing cluster can lead to immediate confinement and association with that cluster. Insulin has three effects: it shifts the fraction of dispersed GLUT4 upon delivery, it augments the dissociation of GLUT4 monomers from clusters ∼3-fold and it decreases the rate of endocytic uptake. All together these three effects of insulin shift most of the PM GLUT4 from clustered to dispersed states. GLUT4 confinement in clusters represents a novel kinetic mechanism for insulin regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  9. Calcium regulates cell death in cancer: Roles of the mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Alberto; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Previati, Maurizio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Until 1972, the term 'apoptosis' was used to differentiate the programmed cell death that naturally occurs in organismal development from the acute tissue death referred to as necrosis. Many studies on cell death and programmed cell death have been published and most are, at least to some degree, related to cancer. Some key proteins and molecular pathways implicated in cell death have been analyzed, whereas others are still being actively researched; therefore, an increasing number of cellular compartments and organelles are being implicated in cell death and cancer. Here, we discuss the mitochondria and subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria, the mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which have been identified as critical hubs in the regulation of cell death and tumor growth. MAMs-dependent calcium (Ca 2+ ) release from the ER allows selective Ca 2+ uptake by the mitochondria. The perturbation of Ca 2+ homeostasis in cancer cells is correlated with sustained cell proliferation and the inhibition of cell death through the modulation of Ca 2+ signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Mitochondria in Cancer, edited by Giuseppe Gasparre, Rodrigue Rossignol and Pierre Sonveaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Steinhaeusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-01-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium ( 20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces

  11. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  12. INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    OpenAIRE

    Ionita COCHINTU; Laura TUTUNARU; Narcisa Mihaela STOICU; Daniela Cristina VALEA

    2011-01-01

    Trafficking in human beings, a phenomenon with global dimensions constitutes a serious violation of human rights, dignity and freedom, a social phenomenon with negative consequences for the entire society. Countries have been concerned over the time to find the most effective policy measures to combat and prevent human trafficking, and in this regard the United Nations, the European Union and the Council of Europe have developed a series of international documents which established an interna...

  13. To discuss illicit nuclear trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Severe, William R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallace, Richard K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Illicit nuclear trafficking panel was conducted at the 4th Annual INMM workshop on Reducing the Risk from Radioactive and Nuclear Materials on February 2-3, 2010 in Washington DC. While the workshop occurred prior to the Nuclear Security Summit, April 12-13 2010 in Washington DC, some of the summit issues were raised during the workshop. The Communique of the Washington Nuclear Security Summit stated that 'Nuclear terrorism is one of the most challenging threats to international security, and strong nuclear security measures are the most effective means to prevent terrorists, criminals, or other unauthorized actors from acquiring nuclear materials.' The Illicit Trafficking panel is one means to strengthen nuclear security and cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels. Such a panel promotes nuclear security culture through technology development, human resources development, education and training. It is a tool which stresses the importance of international cooperation and coordination of assistance to improve efforts to prevent and respond to incidents of illicit nuclear trafficking. Illicit trafficking panel included representatives from US government, an international organization (IAEA), private industry and a non-governmental organization to discuss illicit nuclear trafficking issues. The focus of discussions was on best practices and challenges for addressing illicit nuclear trafficking. Terrorism connection. Workshop discussions pointed out the identification of terrorist connections with several trafficking incidents. Several trafficking cases involved real buyers (as opposed to undercover law enforcement agents) and there have been reports identifying individuals associated with terrorist organizations as prospective plutonium buyers. Some specific groups have been identified that consistently search for materials to buy on the black market, but no criminal groups were identified that specialize in nuclear materials or isotope

  14. Membrane junctions in xenopus eggs: their distribution suggests a role in calcium regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, DM; Grey, RD

    1983-01-01

    We have observed the presence of membrane junctions formed between the plasma membrane and cortical endoplasmic reticulum of mature, unactivated eggs of xenopus laevis. The parallel, paired membranes of the junction are separated by a 10-mn gap within which electron-dense material is present. This material occurs in patches with an average center-to-center distance of approximately 30 nm. These junctions are rare in immature (but fully grown) oocytes (approximately 2 percent of the plasma mem...

  15. CXC-chemokine regulation and neutrophil trafficking in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in P-selectin/ICAM-1 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crockett Elahé T

    2007-05-01

    -selectin does not appear to be critical for neutrophil infiltration and I/R injury in the liver, they may regulate CXC-chemokine production. Blockage of these adhesion molecules may improve survival and remote organ injury that often accompanies liver I/R injury, through chemokine regulation.

  16. Single-molecule tracking of small GTPase Rac1 uncovers spatial regulation of membrane translocation and mechanism for polarized signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sulagna; Yin, Taofei; Yang, Qingfen; Zhang, Jingqiao; Wu, Yi I.; Yu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Polarized Rac1 signaling is a hallmark of many cellular functions, including cell adhesion, motility, and cell division. The two steps of Rac1 activation are its translocation to the plasma membrane and the exchange of nucleotide from GDP to GTP. It is, however, unclear whether these two processes are regulated independent of each other and what their respective roles are in polarization of Rac1 signaling. We designed a single-particle tracking (SPT) method to quantitatively analyze the kinetics of Rac1 membrane translocation in living cells. We found that the rate of Rac1 translocation was significantly elevated in protrusions during cell spreading on collagen. Furthermore, combining FRET sensor imaging with SPT measurements in the same cell, the recruitment of Rac1 was found to be polarized to an extent similar to that of the nucleotide exchange process. Statistical analysis of single-molecule trajectories and optogenetic manipulation of membrane lipids revealed that Rac1 membrane translocation precedes nucleotide exchange, and is governed primarily by interactions with phospholipids, particularly PI(3,4,5)P3, instead of protein factors. Overall, the study highlights the significance of membrane translocation in spatial Rac1 signaling, which is in addition to the traditional view focusing primarily on GEF distribution and exchange reaction. PMID:25561548

  17. Physician Encounters with Human Trafficking: Legal Consequences and Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todres, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    There is growing recognition and evidence that health care professionals regularly encounter-though they may not identify-victims of human trafficking in a variety of health care settings. Identifying and responding appropriately to trafficking victims or survivors requires not only training in trauma-informed care but also consideration of the legal and ethical issues that arise when serving this vulnerable population. This essay examines three areas of law that are relevant to this case scenario: criminal law, with a focus on conspiracy; service provider regulations, with a focus on mandatory reporting laws; and human rights law. In addition to imposing a legal mandate, the law can inform ethical considerations about how health care professionals should respond to human trafficking. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  18. MAL Is a Regulator of the Recruitment of Myelin Protein PLP to Membrane Microdomains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlard, Marjolein; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Klunder, Bert; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2016-01-01

    In oligodendrocytes (OLGs), an indirect, transcytotic pathway is mediating transport of de novo synthesized PLP, a major myelin specific protein, from the apical-like plasma membrane to the specialized basolateral-like myelin membrane to prevent its premature compaction. MAL is a well-known

  19. Membrane junctions in Xenopus eggs: their distribution suggests a role in calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, D M; Grey, R D

    1983-04-01

    We have observed the presence of membrane junctions formed between the plasma membrane and cortical endoplasmic reticulum of mature, unactivated eggs of xenopus laevis. The parallel, paired membranes of the junction are separated by a 10-mn gap within which electron-dense material is present. This material occurs in patches with an average center-to-center distance of approximately 30 nm. These junctions are rare in immature (but fully grown) oocytes (approximately 2 percent of the plasma membrane is associated with junctions) and increase dramatically during progesterone-induced maturation. Junctions in the mature, unactivated egg are two to three times more abundant in the animal hemisphere (25-30 percent of the plasma membrane associated with junction) as compared with the vegetal hemisphere (10-15 percent). Junction density decreases rapidly to values characteristic of immature oocytes in response to egg activation. The plasma membrane-ER junctions of xenopus eggs are strikingly similar in structure to membrane junctions in muscle cells thought to be essential in the triggering of intracellular calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition, the junctions' distinctive, animal-vegetal polarity of distribution, their dramatic appearance during maturation, and their disapperance during activation are correlated with previously documented patterns of calcium-mediated events in anuran eggs. We discuss several lines of evidence supporting the hypothesis that these junctions in xenopus eggs are sites that transduce extracellular events into intracellular calcium release during fertilization and activation of development.

  20. The role of cell membranes in the regulation of lignification in pine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The identity of pine cell membranes bearing PAL enzyme activity, the isolation of a plasma membrane preparation from pine cells for testing as a regulatory barrier in lignification, and the measurement of the geopotential effect in pine stems are presented. A model to describe and predict the interaction of gravity and lignification of higher plants was developed.

  1. The Down regulated in Adenoma (dra) gene encodes an intestine-specific membrane sulfate transport protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberg, D G; Wang, W; Moseley, R H; Traber, P G

    1995-05-19

    A gene has been described, Down Regulated in Adenoma (dra), which is expressed in normal colon but is absent in the majority of colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas. However, the function of this protein is unknown. Because of sequence similarity to a recently cloned membrane sulfate transporter in rat liver, the transport function of Dra was examined. We established that dra encodes for a Na(+)-independent transporter for both sulfate and oxalate using microinjected Xenopus oocytes as an assay system. Sulfate transport was sensitive to the anion exchange inhibitor DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2' disulfonic acid stilbene). Using an RNase protection assay, we found that dra mRNA expression is limited to the small intestine and colon in mouse, therefore identifying Dra as an intestine-specific sulfate transporter. dra also had a unique pattern of expression during intestinal development. Northern blot analysis revealed a low level of expression in colon at birth with a marked increase in the first 2 postnatal weeks. In contrast, there was a lower, constant level of expression in small intestine in the postnatal period. Caco-2 cells, a colon carcinoma cell line that differentiates over time in culture, demonstrated a marked induction of dra mRNA as cells progressed from the preconfluent (undifferentiated) to the postconfluent (differentiated) state. These results show that Dra is an intestine-specific Na(+)-independent sulfate transporter that has differential expression during colonic development. This functional characterization provides the foundation for investigation of the role of Dra in intestinal sulfate transport and in the malignant phenotype.

  2. Role of plasma membrane-associated AKAPs for the regulation of cardiac IK1 current by protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Claudia; Scherer, Daniel; Köpple, Christoph; Kulzer, Martin; Korkmaz, Sevil; Xynogalos, Panagiotis; Thomas, Dierk; Kaya, Ziya; Scholz, Eberhard; Backs, Johannes; Karle, Christoph; Katus, Hugo A; Zitron, Edgar

    2017-05-01

    The cardiac I K1 current stabilizes the resting membrane potential of cardiomyocytes. Protein kinase A (PKA) induces an inhibition of I K1 current which strongly promotes focal arrhythmogenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation have only partially been elucidated yet. Furthermore, the role of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) in this regulation has not been examined to date. The objective of this project was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of I K1 by PKA and to identify novel molecular targets for antiarrhythmic therapy downstream β-adrenoreceptors. Patch clamp and voltage clamp experiments were used to record currents and co-immunoprecipitation, and co-localization experiments were performed to show spatial and functional coupling. Activation of PKA inhibited I K1 current in rat cardiomyocytes. This regulation was markedly attenuated by disrupting PKA-binding to AKAPs with the peptide inhibitor AKAP-IS. We observed functional and spatial coupling of the plasma membrane-associated AKAP15 and AKAP79 to Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 channel subunits, but not to Kir2.3 channels. In contrast, AKAPyotiao had no functional effect on the PKA regulation of Kir channels. AKAP15 and AKAP79 co-immunoprecipitated with and co-localized to Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 channel subunits in ventricular cardiomyocytes. In this study, we provide evidence for coupling of cardiac Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 subunits with the plasma membrane-bound AKAPs 15 and 79. Cardiac membrane-associated AKAPs are a functionally essential part of the regulatory cascade determining I K1 current function and may be novel molecular targets for antiarrhythmic therapy downstream from β-adrenoreceptors.

  3. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  4. Characterization of four plasma membrane aquaporins in tulip petals: a putative homolog is regulated by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Katsuhara, Maki; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    We suggested previously that temperature-dependent tulip (Tulipa gesneriana) petal movement that is concomitant with water transport is regulated by reversible phosphorylation of an unidentified plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP). In this study, four full-length cDNAs of PIPs from tulip petals were identified and cloned. Two PIPs, namely TgPIP1;1 and TgPIP1;2, are members of the PIP1 subfamily, and the remaining two PIPs, namely TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2, belong to the PIP2 subfamily of aquaporins and were named according to the nomenclature of PIP genes in plants. Of these four homologs, only TgPIP2;2 displayed significant water channel activity in the heterologous expression assay using Xenopus laevis oocytes. The water channel activity of this functional isoform was abolished by mercury and was affected by inhibitors of protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Using a site-directed mutagenesis approach to substitute several serine residues with alanine, and assessing water channel activity using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris expression assay, we showed that Ser35, Ser116 and Ser274 are the putative phosphorylation sites of TgPIP2;2. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the transcript levels of TgPIP1;1 and TgPIP1;2 in tulip petals, stems, leaves, bulbs and roots are very low when compared with those of TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2. The transcript level of TgPIP2;1 is negligible in roots, and TgPIP2;2 is ubiquitously expressed in all organs with significant transcript levels. From the data reported herein, we suggest that TgPIP2;2 might be modulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for regulating water channel activity, and may play a role in transcellular water transport in all tulip organs.

  5. Dysfunction of bovine endogenous retrovirus K2 envelope glycoprotein is related to unsuccessful intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yuki; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2014-06-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are the remnants of retroviral infection of ancestral germ cells. Mutations introduced into ERVs halt the production of infectious agents, but their effects on the function of retroviral proteins are not fully understood. Retroviral envelope glycoproteins (Envs) are utilized in membrane fusion during viral entry, and we recently identified intact coding sequences for bovine endogenous retrovirus K1 (BERV-K1) and BERV-K2 Envs. Amino acid sequences of BERV-K1 Env (also called Fematrin-1) and BERV-K2 Env are similar, and both viruses are classified in the genus Betaretrovirus. While Fematrin-1 plays an important role in cell-to-cell fusion in bovine placenta, the BERV-K2 envelope gene is marginally expressed in vivo, and its recombinant Env protein is defective in membrane fusion due to inefficient cleavage of surface (SU) and transmembrane subunits. Here, we conducted chimeric analyses of Fematrin-1 and BERV-K2 Envs and revealed that defective maturation of BERV-K2 Env contributed to failed intracellular trafficking. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis suggested that in contrast to Fematrin-1 Env, BERV-K2 Env could not be transported from the endoplasmic reticulum to the trans-Golgi network, where cellular proteases required for processing retroviral Envs are localized. We also identified that one of the responsive regions of this phenomenon resided within a 65-amino-acid region of BERV-K2 SU. This is the first report to identify that retroviral Env SU is involved in the regulation of intracellular trafficking, and it may help to elucidate the maturation process of Fematrin-1 and other related Envs. Retroviruses utilize envelope glycoproteins (Envs) to enter host target cells. Mature retroviral Env is a heterodimer, which consists of surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits that are generated by the cleavage of an Env precursor protein in the trans-Golgi network. SU and TM mediate the recognition of the entry

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the iron-regulated outer membrane lipoprotein FrpD from Neisseria meningitidis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sviridova, E.; Bumba, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Procházková, Kateřina; Kavan, Daniel; Bezouška, Karel; Kutý, Michal; Šebo, Peter; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 66, - (2010), s. 1119-1123 ISSN 1744-3091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA ČR GP310/06/P150 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Fe-regulated protein D * iron-regulated proteins * outer membrane lipoproteins Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.563, year: 2010

  7. Hyaluronan, CD44, and Emmprin Regulate Lactate Efflux and Membrane Localization of Monocarboxylate Transporters in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, Mark G.; Grass, G. Daniel; Robertson, Angela D.; Yang, Xiao Y.; Maria, Bernard L.; Beeson, Craig; Toole, Bryan P.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions of hyaluronan with CD44 in tumor cells play important cooperative roles in various aspects of malignancy and drug resistance. Emmprin (CD147; basigin)is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is highly up-regulated in malignant cancer cells and stimulates hyaluronan production, as well as several downstream signaling pathways. Emmprin also interacts with various monocarboxylate transporters (MCT). Malignant cancer cells use the glycolytic pathway and require MCTs to efflux lactate that results from glycolysis. Glycolysis and lactate secretion contribute to malignant cell behaviors and drug resistance in tumor cells. In the present study, we find that perturbation of endogenous hyaluronan, using small hyaluronan oligosaccharides, rapidly inhibits lactate efflux from breast carcinoma cells; down-regulation of emmprin, using emmprin small interfering RNA, also results in decreased efflux. In addition, we find that CD44 coimmunoprecipitates with MCT1, MCT4, and emmprin and colocalizes with these proteins at the plasma membrane. Moreover, after treatment of the cells with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, CD44, MCT1, and MCT4 become localized intracellularly whereas emmprin remains at the cell membrane. Together, these data indicate that constitutive interactions among hyaluronan, CD44, and emmprin contribute to regulation of MCT localization and function in the plasma membrane of breast carcinoma cells. PMID:19176383

  8. The CFTR-Associated Ligand Arrests the Trafficking of the Mutant ΔF508 CFTR Channel in the ER Contributing to Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Bergbower

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The CFTR-Associated Ligand (CAL, a PDZ domain containing protein with two coiled-coil domains, reduces cell surface WT CFTR through degradation in the lysosome by a well-characterized mechanism. However, CAL’s regulatory effect on ΔF508 CFTR has remained almost entirely uninvestigated. Methods: In this study, we describe a previously unknown pathway for CAL by which it regulates the membrane expression of ΔF508 CFTR through arrest of ΔF508 CFTR trafficking in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER using a combination of cell biology, biochemistry and electrophysiology. Results: We demonstrate that CAL is an ER localized protein that binds to ΔF508 CFTR and is degraded in the 26S proteasome. When CAL is inhibited, ΔF508 CFTR retention in the ER decreases and cell surface expression of mature functional ΔF508 CFTR is observed alongside of enhanced expression of plasma membrane scaffolding protein NHERF1. Chaperone proteins regulate this novel process, and ΔF508 CFTR binding to HSP40, HSP90, HSP70, VCP, and Aha1 changes to improve ΔF508 CFTR cell surface trafficking. Conclusion: Our results reveal a pathway in which CAL regulates the cell surface availability and intracellular retention of ΔF508 CFTR.

  9. Ricin Trafficking in Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Spooner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterodimeric plant toxin ricin binds exposed galactosyls at the cell surface of target mammalian cells, and, following endocytosis, is transported in vesicular carriers to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Subsequently, the cell-binding B chain (RTB and the catalytic A chain (RTA are separated reductively, RTA embeds in the ER membrane and then retrotranslocates (or dislocates across this membrane. The protein conducting channels used by RTA are usually regarded as part of the ER-associated protein degradation system (ERAD that removes misfolded proteins from the ER for destruction by the cytosolic proteasomes. However, unlike ERAD substrates, cytosolic RTA avoids destruction and folds into a catalytic conformation that inactivates its target ribosomes. Protein synthesis ceases, and subsequently the cells die apoptotically. This raises questions about how this protein avoids the pathways that are normally sanctioned for ER-dislocating substrates. In this review we focus on the molecular events that occur with non-tagged ricin and its isolated subunits at the ER–cytosol interface. This focus reveals that intra-membrane interactions of RTA may control its fate, an area that warrants further investigation.

  10. Quantitative Microscopic Analysis of Plasma Membrane Receptor Dynamics in Living Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Russinova, Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Plasma membrane-localized receptors are essential for cellular communication and signal transduction. In Arabidopsis thaliana, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) is one of the receptors that is activated by binding to its ligand, the brassinosteroid (BR) hormone, at the cell surface to regulate diverse plant developmental processes. The availability of BRI1 in the plasma membrane is related to its signaling output and is known to be controlled by the dynamic endomembrane trafficking. Advances in fluorescence labeling and confocal microscopy techniques enabled us to gain a better understanding of plasma membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. Here we describe different quantitative microscopy methods to monitor the relative steady-state levels of the BRI1 protein in the plasma membrane of root epidermal cells and its relative exocytosis and recycling rates. The methods can be applied also to analyze similar dynamics of other plasma membrane-localized receptors.

  11. Understanding human trafficking in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, T K; Walker, Robert; Hunt, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    The topic of modern-day slavery or human trafficking has received increased media and national attention. However, to date there has been limited research on the nature and scope of human trafficking in the United States. This article describes and synthesizes nine reports that assess the U.S. service organizations' legal representative knowledge of, and experience with, human trafficking cases, as well as information from actual cases and media reports. This article has five main goals: (a) to define what human trafficking is, and is not; (b) to describe factors identified as contributing to vulnerability to being trafficked and keeping a person entrapped in the situation; (c) to examine how the crime of human trafficking differs from other kinds of crimes in the United States; (d) to explore how human trafficking victims are identified; and, (e) to provide recommendations to better address human trafficking in the United States.

  12. Profilin as a regulator of the membrane-actin cytoskeleton interface in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian eSun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Membrane structures and cytoskeleton dynamics are intimately inter-connected in the eukaryotic cell. Recently, the molecular mechanisms operating at this interface have been progressively addressed. Many experiments have revealed that the actin cytoskeleton can interact with membranes through various discrete membrane domains. The actin-binding protein, profilin has been proven to inhibit actin polymerization and to promote F-actin elongation. This is dependent on many factors, such as the profilin/G-actin ratio and the ionic environment of the cell. Additionally, profilin has specific domains that interact with phosphoinositides and poly-L-proline rich proteins; theoretically, this gives profilin the opportunity to interact with membranes, and a large number of experiments have confirmed this possibility. In this article, we summarize recent findings in plant cells, and discuss the evidence of the connections among actin cytoskeleton, profilin and biomembranes through direct or indirect relationships.

  13. Does Legalized Prostitution Increase Human Trafficking?

    OpenAIRE

    Seo-Young Cho; Axel Dreher; Eric Neumayer

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of legalized prostitution on human trafficking inflows. According to economic theory, there are two opposing effects of unknown magnitude. The scale effect of legalized prostitution leads to an expansion of the prostitution market, increasing human trafficking, while the substitution effect reduces demand for trafficked women as legal prostitutes are favored over trafficked ones. Our empirical analysis for a cross-section of up to 150 countries shows that th...

  14. Barriers to combating human trafficking in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcox, Daniel Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Despite international and domestic policies and programs intended to combat human trafficking, Colombia remains one of the countries with the highest instances of human trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. Factors contributing to human trafficking in Colombia, such as internal violence and displacement, drug trafficking, a weak central government, and widespread corruption, have overpowered what energies the government marshaled agai...

  15. Ion channel regulation of the dynamical instability of the resting membrane potential in saccular hair cells of the green frog (Rana esculenta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, F; Kroese, ABA

    2005-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the ion channel regulation of the resting membrane potential of hair cells with the aim to determine if the resting membrane potential is poised close to instability and thereby a potential cause of the spontaneous afferent spike activity. Methods: The ionic mechanism and the

  16. The Escherichia coli Cpx envelope stress response regulates genes of diverse function that impact antibiotic resistance and membrane integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raivio, Tracy L; Leblanc, Shannon K D; Price, Nancy L

    2013-06-01

    The Cpx envelope stress response mediates adaptation to stresses that cause envelope protein misfolding. Adaptation is partly conferred through increased expression of protein folding and degradation factors. The Cpx response also plays a conserved role in the regulation of virulence determinant expression and impacts antibiotic resistance. We sought to identify adaptive mechanisms that may be involved in these important functions by characterizing changes in the transcriptome of two different Escherichia coli strains when the Cpx response is induced. We show that, while there is considerable strain- and condition-specific variability in the Cpx response, the regulon is enriched for proteins and functions that are inner membrane associated under all conditions. Genes that were changed by Cpx pathway induction under all conditions were involved in a number of cellular functions and included several intergenic regions, suggesting that posttranscriptional regulation is important during Cpx-mediated adaptation. Some Cpx-regulated genes are centrally involved in energetics and play a role in antibiotic resistance. We show that a number of small, uncharacterized envelope proteins are Cpx regulated and at least two of these affect phenotypes associated with membrane integrity. Altogether, our work suggests new mechanisms of Cpx-mediated envelope stress adaptation and antibiotic resistance.

  17. Security Implications of Human-Trafficking Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-15

    to those security concerns. Background How is Human Trafficking Carried Out? While trafficking victims are often found in sweatshops , domestic...labor. This type of trafficking is often found in agricultural labor, the production of goods (typically called sweatshops ) and construction labor

  18. Ubiquitination of the bacterial inositol phosphatase, SopB, regulates its biological activity at the plasma membrane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Knodler, Leigh A

    2009-11-01

    The Salmonella type III effector, SopB, is an inositol polyphosphate phosphatase that modulates host cell phospholipids at the plasma membrane and the nascent Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). Translocated SopB persists for many hours after infection and is ubiquitinated but the significance of this covalent modification has not been investigated. Here we identify by mass spectrometry six lysine residues of SopB that are mono-ubiquitinated. Substitution of these six lysine residues with arginine, SopB-K(6)R, almost completely eliminated SopB ubiquitination. We found that ubiquitination does not affect SopB stability or membrane association, or SopB-dependent events in SCV biogenesis. However, two spatially and temporally distinct events are dependent on ubiquitination, downregulation of SopB activity at the plasma membrane and prolonged retention of SopB on the SCV. Activation of the mammalian pro-survival kinase Akt\\/PKB, a downstream target of SopB, was intensified and prolonged after infection with the SopB-K(6)R mutant. At later times, fewer SCV were decorated with SopB-K(6)R compared with SopB. Instead SopB-K(6)R was present as discrete vesicles spread diffusely throughout the cell. Altogether, our data show that ubiquitination of SopB is not related to its intracellular stability but rather regulates its enzymatic activity at the plasma membrane and intracellular localization.

  19. Super-resolution microscopy reveals the insulin-resistance-regulated reorganization of GLUT4 on plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Xiong, Wenyong

    2017-01-15

    GLUT4 (also known as SLC2A4) is essential for glucose uptake in skeletal muscles and adipocytes, which play central roles in whole-body glucose metabolism. Here, using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to investigate the characteristics of plasma-membrane-fused GLUT4 at the single-molecule level, we have demonstrated that insulin and insulin resistance regulate the spatial organization of GLUT4 in adipocytes. Stimulation with insulin shifted the balance of GLUT4 on the plasma membrane toward a more dispersed configuration. In contrast, insulin resistance induced a more clustered distribution of GLUT4 and increased the mean number of molecules per cluster. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that the F 5 QQI motif and lipid rafts mediate the maintenance of GLUT4 clusters on the plasma membrane. Mutation of F 5 QQI (F 5 QQA-GLUT4) induced a more clustered distribution of GLUT4; moreover, destruction of lipid rafts in adipocytes expressing F 5 QQA-GLUT4 dramatically decreased the percentage of large clusters and the mean number of molecules per cluster. In conclusion, our data clarify the effects of insulin stimulation or insulin resistance on GLUT4 reorganization on the plasma membrane and reveal new pathogenic mechanisms of insulin resistance. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Bagus Boedi Iswanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD, which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC, which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs. In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft–processed PDC.

  1. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswanto, Arya Bagus Boedi; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2017-04-03

    A bstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD), which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs) is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC), which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS) and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs). In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft-processed PDC.

  2. Vps35-deficiency impairs SLC4A11 trafficking and promotes corneal dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Vps35 (vacuolar protein sorting 35 is a major component of retromer that selectively promotes endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of transmembrane proteins. Dysfunction of retromer is a risk factor for the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD and Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, Vps35/retromer's function in the eye or the contribution of Vps35-deficiency to eye degenerative disorders remains to be explored. Here we provide evidence for a critical role of Vps35 in mouse corneal dystrophy. Vps35 is expressed in mouse and human cornea. Mouse cornea from Vps35 heterozygotes (Vps35+/- show features of dystrophy, such as loss of both endothelial and epithelial cell densities, disorganizations of endothelial, stroma, and epithelial cells, excrescences in the Descemet membrane, and corneal edema. Additionally, corneal epithelial cell proliferation was reduced in Vps35-deficient mice. Intriguingly, cell surface targeting of SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein (OH- /H+ /NH3 /H2O of corneal endothelium, whose mutations have been identified in patients with corneal dystrophy, was impaired in Vps35-deficient cells and cornea. Taken together, these results suggest that SLC4A11 appears to be a Vps35/retromer cargo, and Vps35-regulation of SLC4A11 trafficking may underlie Vps35/retromer regulation of corneal dystrophy.

  3. Mg(2+,ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. ІІ. Regulation of activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. О. Veklich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane Ca2+-pump is one of key proteins, which takes part in Ca2+ exchange in smooth muscle cells. It has a lot of diverse functions from control of basal cytoplasmal Ca2+ concentration to regulation of proteins involved in Ca2+-dependent signal pathway. Ca2+ pump function is often depen­dent on the isoform or even form of alternative splicing. Allowing for a variety of Ca2+-pump functions and properties, which were reviewed in detail in the first part of our review article cycle (Ukr. Biochem. J., 2015; 87(1, the precise control of the mentioned pump activity is very important for cell functioning­. The other part of this article is dedicated to different regulation factors of smooth muscle plasma membrane Ca2+-pump activity: endogenous and exo­genous, biotic and abiotic factors. Special attention is given to literature data and own results about design and the search of selective plasma membrane Ca2+-pump inhibitor which would allow examining its functioning in smooth muscle cells more meticulously.

  4. Plasma membrane factor XIIIA transglutaminase activity regulates osteoblast matrix secretion and deposition by affecting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadil F Al-Jallad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminase activity, arising potentially from transglutaminase 2 (TG2 and Factor XIIIA (FXIIIA, has been linked to osteoblast differentiation where it is required for type I collagen and fibronectin matrix deposition. In this study we have used an irreversible TG-inhibitor to 'block -and-track' enzyme(s targeted during osteoblast differentiation. We show that the irreversible TG-inhibitor is highly potent in inhibiting osteoblast differentiation and mineralization and reduces secretion of both fibronectin and type I collagen and their release from the cell surface. Tracking of the dansyl probe by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the inhibitor targets plasma membrane-associated FXIIIA. TG2 appears not to contribute to crosslinking activity on the osteoblast surface. Inhibition of FXIIIA with NC9 resulted in defective secretory vesicle delivery to the plasma membrane which was attributable to a disorganized microtubule network and decreased microtubule association with the plasma membrane. NC9 inhibition of FXIIIA resulted in destabilization of microtubules as assessed by cellular Glu-tubulin levels. Furthermore, NC9 blocked modification of Glu-tubulin into 150 kDa high-molecular weight Glu-tubulin form which was specifically localized to the plasma membrane. FXIIIA enzyme and its crosslinking activity were colocalized with plasma membrane-associated tubulin, and thus, it appears that FXIIIA crosslinking activity is directed towards stabilizing the interaction of microtubules with the plasma membrane. Our work provides the first mechanistic cues as to how transglutaminase activity could affect protein secretion and matrix deposition in osteoblasts and suggests a novel function for plasma membrane FXIIIA in microtubule dynamics.

  5. Tissue Factor Coagulant Activity is Regulated by the Plasma Membrane Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanjie; Böing, Anita N; Hau, Chi M; Hajji, Najat; Ruf, Wolfram; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2018-06-01

     Tissue factor (TF) can be present in a non-coagulant and coagulant form. Whether the coagulant activity is affected by the plasma membrane microenvironment is unexplored.  This article studies the presence and coagulant activity of human TF in plasma membrane micro-domains.  Plasma membranes were isolated from human MIA PaCa2 cells, MDA-MB-231 cells and human vascular smooth muscle cells by Percoll gradient ultracentrifugation after cell disruption. Plasma membranes were fractionated by OptiPrep gradient ultracentrifugation, and the presence of TF, flotillin, caveolin, clathrin, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), TF pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and phosphatidylserine (PS) were determined.  Plasma membranes contain two detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) compartments differing in density and biochemical composition. High-density DRMs (DRM-H) have a density ( ρ ) of 1.15 to 1.20 g/mL and contain clathrin, whereas low-density DRMs (DRM-L) have a density between 1.09 and 1.13 g/mL and do not contain clathrin. Both DRMs contain TF, flotillin and caveolin. PDI is detectable in DRM-H, TFPI is not detectable in either DMR-H or DRM-L and PS is detectable in DRM-L. The DRM-H-associated TF (> 95% of the TF antigen) lacks detectable coagulant activity, whereas the DRM-L-associated TF triggers coagulation. This coagulant activity is inhibited by lactadherin and thus PS-dependent, but seemed insensitive to 16F16, an inhibitor of PDI.  Non-coagulant and coagulant TF are present within different types of DRMs in the plasma membrane, and the composition of these DRMs may affect the TF coagulant activity. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  6. Bcl-xL regulates mitochondrial energetics by stabilizing the inner membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Aon, Miguel A; Hsu, Yi-Te; Soane, Lucian; Teng, Xinchen; McCaffery, J Michael; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Qi, Bing; Li, Hongmei; Alavian, Kambiz N; Dayhoff-Brannigan, Margaret; Zou, Shifa; Pineda, Fernando J; O'Rourke, Brian; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Jonas, Elizabeth A; Hardwick, J Marie

    2011-10-17

    Mammalian Bcl-x(L) protein localizes to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it inhibits apoptosis by binding Bax and inhibiting Bax-induced outer membrane permeabilization. Contrary to expectation, we found by electron microscopy and biochemical approaches that endogenous Bcl-x(L) also localized to inner mitochondrial cristae. Two-photon microscopy of cultured neurons revealed large fluctuations in inner mitochondrial membrane potential when Bcl-x(L) was genetically deleted or pharmacologically inhibited, indicating increased total ion flux into and out of mitochondria. Computational, biochemical, and genetic evidence indicated that Bcl-x(L) reduces futile ion flux across the inner mitochondrial membrane to prevent a wasteful drain on cellular resources, thereby preventing an energetic crisis during stress. Given that F(1)F(O)-ATP synthase directly affects mitochondrial membrane potential and having identified the mitochondrial ATP synthase β subunit in a screen for Bcl-x(L)-binding partners, we tested and found that Bcl-x(L) failed to protect β subunit-deficient yeast. Thus, by bolstering mitochondrial energetic capacity, Bcl-x(L) may contribute importantly to cell survival independently of other Bcl-2 family proteins.

  7. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñ ez, Natalia Maria; Shabala, Lana; Gehring, Christoph A; Shabala, Sergey Nikolayevich

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  8. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  9. The traffic in voices: Contrasting experiences of migrant women in prostitution with the paradigm of "human trafficking"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpes, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on empirical research with West African migrant women working in prostitution in Paris. Given current migration regulations in Western Europe, as well as state policies on prostitution, the traffickers and people considered to be trafficking victims de facto form part of the

  10. Routledge handbook of human trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, Conny; Piotrowicz, Ryszard; Uhl, Baerbe Heide

    2017-01-01

    Trafficking in human beings (THB) has been described as modern slavery. It is a serious criminal activity that has significant ramifications for the human rights of the victims. It poses major challenges to the state, society and individual victims. THB is not a static given but a constantly

  11. Anti-Human Trafficking Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, a significant number of programs and policies have been developed and implemented to prevent and combat human trafficking. At the international, regional and national levels, government, and international, and nongovernment organizations have established plans of action, conducted training, developed policy tools, and…

  12. Membrane Microdomains and Cytoskeleton Organization Shape and Regulate the IL-7 Receptor Signalosome in Human CD4 T-cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarit, Blanche; Bugault, Florence; Pillet, Anne-Hélène; Lavergne, Vincent; Bochet, Pascal; Garin, Nathalie; Schwarz, Ulf; Thèze, Jacques; Rose, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-7 is the main homeostatic regulator of CD4 T-lymphocytes (helper) at both central and peripheral levels. Upon activation by IL-7, several signaling pathways, mainly JAK/STAT, PI3K/Akt and MAPK, induce the expression of genes involved in T-cell differentiation, activation, and proliferation. We have analyzed the early events of CD4 T-cell activation by IL-7. We have shown that IL-7 in the first few min induces the formation of cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains that compartmentalize its activated receptor and initiate its anchoring to the cytoskeleton, supporting the formation of the signaling complex, the signalosome, on the IL-7 receptor cytoplasmic domains. Here we describe by stimulated emission depletion microscopy the key roles played by membrane microdomains and cytoskeleton transient organization in the IL-7-regulated JAK/STAT signaling pathway. We image phospho-STAT5 and cytoskeleton components along IL-7 activation kinetics using appropriate inhibitors. We show that lipid raft inhibitors delay and reduce IL-7-induced JAK1 and JAK3 phosphorylation. Drug-induced disassembly of the cytoskeleton inhibits phospho-STAT5 formation, transport, and translocation into the nucleus that controls the transcription of genes involved in T-cell activation and proliferation. We fit together the results of these quantitative analyses and propose the following mechanism. Activated IL-7 receptors embedded in membrane microdomains induce actin-microfilament meshwork formation, anchoring microtubules that grow radially from rafted receptors to the nuclear membrane. STAT5 phosphorylated by signalosomes are loaded on kinesins and glide along the microtubules across the cytoplasm to reach the nucleus 2 min after IL-7 stimulation. Radial microtubules disappear 15 min later, while transversal microtubules, independent of phospho-STAT5 transport, begin to bud from the microtubule organization center. PMID:23329834

  13. Insulin and adenosine regulate the phosphatidylcholine concentration in isolated rat adipocyte plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechle, F L; Sykes, E; Artiss, J D

    1995-01-01

    Blockade of adenosine receptors by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine or degradation of endogenous adenosine with adenosine deaminase increased the phosphatidylcholine concentration in isolated rat adipocyte plasma membranes, an effect which was suppressed by the phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase inhibitor, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, and reversed by the adenosine analogue, N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine. For example, the addition of N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine to adenosine deaminase pretreated plasma membranes rapidly lowered the concentration of phosphatidylcholine by 171 nmol/mg at 30 seconds compared to control. Insulin-induced stimulation of phospholipid methylation in membranes treated with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine or adenosine deaminase was achieved only after the addition of N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine. These results suggest that adenosine receptor occupancy inhibits phospholipid methylation, is required for insulin stimulation of phospholipid methylation, and may perhaps activate a phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C or phospholipase D.

  14. Assaying the proton transport and regulation of UCP1 using solid supported membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesneac, Iulia; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Machillot, Paul; Zoonens, Manuela; Masscheylen, Sandrine; Miroux, Bruno; Vivaudou, Michel; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva

    2012-08-01

    The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is a mitochondrial protein that carries protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. It has an important role in non-shivering thermogenesis, and recent evidence suggests its role in human adult metabolism. Using rapid solution exchange on solid supported membranes, we succeeded in measuring electrical currents generated by the transport activity of UCP1. The protein was purified from mouse brown adipose tissue, reconstituted in liposomes and absorbed on solid supported membranes. A fast pH jump activated the ion transport, and electrical signals could be recorded. The currents were characterized by a fast rise and a slow decay, were stable over time, inhibited by purine nucleotides and activated by fatty acids. This new assay permits direct observation of UCP1 activity in controlled cell-free conditions, and opens up new possibilities for UCP1 functional characterization and drug screening because of its robustness and its potential for automation.

  15. Concerted regulation of retinal pigment epithelium basement membrane and barrier function by angiocrine factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedicto, Ignacio; Lehmann, Guillermo L; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J; Bareja, Rohan; Elemento, Olivier; Salfati, Zelda; Alam, Nazia M; Prusky, Glen T; Llanos, Pierre; Rabbany, Sina Y; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Miller, Sheldon S; Rafii, Shahin; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2017-05-19

    The outer blood-retina barrier is established through the coordinated terminal maturation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), fenestrated choroid endothelial cells (ECs) and Bruch's membrane, a highly organized basement membrane that lies between both cell types. Here we study the contribution of choroid ECs to this process by comparing their gene expression profile before (P5) and after (P30) the critical postnatal period when mice acquire mature visual function. Transcriptome analyses show that expression of extracellular matrix-related genes changes dramatically over this period. Co-culture experiments support the existence of a novel regulatory pathway: ECs secrete factors that remodel RPE basement membrane, and integrin receptors sense these changes triggering Rho GTPase signals that modulate RPE tight junctions and enhance RPE barrier function. We anticipate our results will spawn a search for additional roles of choroid ECs in RPE physiology and disease.

  16. Podoplanin, novel 43-kd membrane protein of glomerular epithelial cells, is down-regulated in puromycin nephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiteneder-Geleff, S.; Matsui, K.; Soleiman, A.; Meraner, P.; Poczewski, H.; Kalt, R.; Schaffner, G.; Kerjaschki, D.

    1997-01-01

    Puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN), a rat model of human minimal change nephropathy, is characterized by extensive flattening of glomerular epithelial cell (podocyte) foot processes and by severe proteinuria. For comparison of expression of glomerular membrane proteins of normal and PAN rats, a membrane protein fraction of isolated rat glomeruli was prepared and monoclonal antibodies were raised against it. An IgG-secreting clone designated LF3 was selected that specifically immunolabeled podocytes of normal but not of PAN rats. The antigen of LF3 IgG was identified as a 43-kd glycoprotein. Molecular cloning of its cDNA was performed in a delta gt11 expression library prepared from mRNA of isolated rat glomeruli. The predicted amino acid sequence indicated a 166-amino-acid integral membrane protein with a single membrane-spanning domain, two potential phosphorylation sites in its short cytoplasmic tail, and six potential O-glycosylation sites in the large ectodomain. High amino acid sequence identities were found to membrane glycoproteins of rat lung and bone and mouse thymus epithelial cells as well as to a phorbol-ester-induced protein in a mouse osteoblast cell line and to a canine influenza C virus receptor. In PAN, expression of this 43-kd protein was selectively reduced to < 30%, as determined by quantitative immunogold electron microscopy, immunoblotting, and Northern blotting. These data provide evidence that transcription of the 43-kd transmembrane podocyte glycoprotein is specifically down-regulated in PAN. To indicate that this protein could be associated with transformation of arborized foot processes to flat feet (Latin, pes planus) we have called it podoplanin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:9327748

  17. Membrane Restructuring by Phospholipase A2 Is Regulated by the Presence of Lipid Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Ocampo, Jackson; Duelund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids. This enzyme is sensitive to membrane structure, and its activity has been shown to increase in the presence of liquid-crystalline/gel (Lα/Lβ) lipid domains. In this work, we explore whether lipid domains can also...... without necessarily destroying the membrane. We confirm by high-performance liquid chromatography the preferential hydrolysis of DMPC within the phase coexistence region of the DMPC/DSPC phase diagram, showing that this preferential hydrolysis is accentuated close to the solidus phase boundary...

  18. Trafficking in human beings as a specific form of women's migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrvić-Petrović Nataša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The author is analyzing trafficking in human beings as a specific form of women's (illegal migration. The author is presenting detailed analysis of the international standards and recent activities of different international organizations (UN, Council of Europe, European Community, OSCE, concerning prevention of trafficking in human beings, regulation of foreign migrants' status and protection of victims of trafficking. Starting from the analysis of international documents and national legislations dealing with migration and prostitution, the author is proposing changes of existing domestic laws concerning movement and residence of foreigners. The aim of such changes is to harmonize our legislation with international standards and obligations accepted by signing the Palermo Convention.

  19. The Fight against the Least Visible Form of Human Trafficking: Trafficking for Child Labour Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Puente Aba

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Child trafficking for the purpose of labour exploitation is a difficult phenomenon to detect. It is also not readily definable considering that this specific form of trafficking is closely linked with the phenomenon of forced child labour, and even with the broader occurrence of child labour. A lack of globally reliable data and the convergence of different concepts related to child trafficking for labour exploitation pose significant challenges when trying to regulate the circumstances concerning child work and the criminalisation of trafficking for labour exploitation. This article offers a clear overview of the available data related to all the phenomena, and aims to clarify all the situations involved, defining child work, child labour, forced child labour and child trafficking for the purposes of labour exploitation. Furthermore, this article discusses the possible loopholes and critical issues that could hinder global approaches to resolving these issues. La trata infantil con fines de explotación laboral es un fenómeno difícil de detectar, y tampoco es sencillo definirlo si se tiene en cuenta que esta forma específica de trata está estrechamente relacionada con el fenómeno del trabajo forzado infantil e, incluso, con el fenómeno más general de trabajo infantil. Todo ello supone un desafío a la hora de regular las circunstancias que definen el trabajo realizado por niños y la criminalización de la trata para la explotación laboral. Este artículo ofrece un repaso de los datos disponibles en esta materia y procura aclarar las situaciones que se pueden plantear, así como definir trabajo realizado por niños, trabajo infantil, trabajo infantil forzado y trata infantil con fines de explotación laboral. Por último, profundiza en las posibles deficiencias y en los aspectos críticos que podrían obstaculizar un acercamiento global a esta problemática. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=3088010

  20. Human trafficking and the healthcare professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Jeffrey; Finger, Reginald

    2008-05-01

    Despite the legislation passed in the 19th century outlawing human slavery, it is more widespread today than at the conclusion of the civil war. Modern human slavery, termed human trafficking, comes in several forms. The most common type of human trafficking is sex trafficking, the sale of women and children into prostitution. Labor trafficking is the sale of men, women, and children into hard labor for which they receive little or no compensation. Other forms of trafficking include child soldiering, war brides, and organ removal. Healthcare professionals play a critical role in both finding victims of human trafficking while they are still in captivity, as well as caring for their mental and physical needs upon release. Those working in the healthcare profession need to be educated regarding how a trafficking victim may present, as well as their unique healthcare needs.

  1. Child trafficking and the European migration crisis: The role of forensic practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertová, Zuzana; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Trafficking in children is one of the worst forms of human rights violation and is categorised as a serious crime. Children at high risk of becoming victims of trafficking are runaways, children with a history of abuse, and migrant children. Internationally, cases of child trafficking are increasing the most in Europe, which is likely the result of the current migration crisis. In crises, preventing and combating human trafficking needs to be prioritized, considering that the aims of humanitarian action include saving lives, easing suffering and preserving human dignity. The involvement of forensic practitioners in investigations of cases of child trafficking mainly concerning the identification of victims may save lives and certainly alleviate suffering of the child victims and their families searching for them. Moreover, by aiding the prosecution process through thorough documentation and expert reporting forensic practitioners may contribute to the protection, rehabilitation and possibly compensation of the child victims, and thus to the restoration of their rights and dignity. So far, forensic practitioners were rarely specifically mentioned as actors in the counter-trafficking efforts in the multitude of policies, regulations, guidelines and recommendations concerning different aspects of child trafficking. This seems surprising considering that the expertise and experience of practitioners from forensic sciences including cyber forensics, document analysis, forensic biology, anthropology, and medicine can be utilised for gathering intelligence in cases of suspected human trafficking, for identifying the victims as well as perpetrators, and for securing evidence for legal proceedings as this paper shows. While this article mainly discusses the role of forensic pathologists and anthropologists, with a specific focus on the identification of child victims of trafficking in the context of the European migration crisis, the notions regarding the contribution of

  2. Regulation of alpha1 Na/K-ATPase expression by cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiliang; Li, Xin; Ye, Qiqi; Tian, Jiang; Jing, Runming; Xie, Zijian

    2011-04-29

    We have reported that α1 Na/K-ATPase regulates the trafficking of caveolin-1 and consequently alters cholesterol distribution in the plasma membrane. Here, we report the reciprocal regulation of α1 Na/K-ATPase by cholesterol. Acute exposure of LLC-PK1 cells to methyl β-cyclodextrin led to parallel decreases in cellular cholesterol and the expression of α1 Na/K-ATPase. Cholesterol repletion fully reversed the effect of methyl β-cyclodextrin. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane by compound U18666A had the same effect on α1 Na/K-ATPase. Similarly, the expression of α1, but not α2 and α3, Na/K-ATPase was significantly reduced in the target organs of Niemann-Pick type C mice where the intracellular cholesterol trafficking is blocked. Mechanistically, decreases in the plasma membrane cholesterol activated Src kinase and stimulated the endocytosis and degradation of α1 Na/K-ATPase through Src- and ubiquitination-dependent pathways. Thus, the new findings, taken together with what we have already reported, revealed a previously unrecognized feed-forward mechanism by which cells can utilize the Src-dependent interplay among Na/K-ATPase, caveolin-1, and cholesterol to effectively alter the structure and function of the plasma membrane.

  3. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Helix Nielsen, Claus; Wojewodzka, Urszula

    2008-01-01

    of the plasma membrane were predominantly labelled with L-d markers 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-dilinoleyl-3.3.3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate and weakly stained by L-o marker fluorescein...

  4. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, D.; Nielsen, C.H.; Wojewodzka, U.

    2008-01-01

    of the plasma membrane were predominantly labelled with L(d) markers 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-dilinoleyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate and weakly stained by L(o) marker...

  5. Calcium-dependent regulation of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion by calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Iborra, Cécile; Maulet, Yves; Lévêque, Christian; El Far, Oussama; Seagar, Michael

    2010-07-30

    Neuroexocytosis requires SNARE proteins, which assemble into trans complexes at the synaptic vesicle/plasma membrane interface and mediate bilayer fusion. Ca(2+) sensitivity is thought to be conferred by synaptotagmin, although the ubiquitous Ca(2+)-effector calmodulin has also been implicated in SNARE-dependent membrane fusion. To examine the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the direct action of calmodulin and synaptotagmin in vitro, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to assay lipid mixing between target- and vesicle-SNARE liposomes. Ca(2+)/calmodulin inhibited SNARE assembly and membrane fusion by binding to two distinct motifs located in the membrane-proximal regions of VAMP2 (K(D) = 500 nm) and syntaxin 1 (K(D) = 2 microm). In contrast, fusion was increased by full-length synaptotagmin 1 anchored in vesicle-SNARE liposomes. When synaptotagmin and calmodulin were combined, synaptotagmin overcame the inhibitory effects of calmodulin. Furthermore, synaptotagmin displaced calmodulin binding to target-SNAREs. These findings suggest that two distinct Ca(2+) sensors act antagonistically in SNARE-mediated fusion.

  6. Dipolar Relaxation Dynamics at the Active Site of an ATPase Regulated by Membrane Lateral Pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischermeier, E.; Pospíšil, Petr; Sayed, A.; Hof, Martin; Solioz, M.; Fahmy, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2017), s. 1269-1272 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fluorescence * ion pump * membrane proteins * nanodiscs * time-resolved emission Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  7. Eisosomes promote the ability of Sur7 to regulate plasma membrane organization in Candida albicans.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, H.X.; Douglas, L.M.; Veselá, Petra; Rachel, R.; Malínský, Jan; Konopka, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2016), s. 1663-1675 ISSN 1059-1524 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10641S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : plasma membrane * eisosome * PIL1 * SUR7 Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.685, year: 2016

  8. Network and neuronal membrane properties in hybrid networks reciprocally regulate selectivity to rapid thalamocortical inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Michael J; Pinto, David J

    2012-11-01

    Rapidly changing environments require rapid processing from sensory inputs. Varying deflection velocities of a rodent's primary facial vibrissa cause varying temporal neuronal activity profiles within the ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus. Local neuron populations in a single somatosensory layer 4 barrel transform sparsely coded input into a spike count based on the input's temporal profile. We investigate this transformation by creating a barrel-like hybrid network with whole cell recordings of in vitro neurons from a cortical slice preparation, embedding the biological neuron in the simulated network by presenting virtual synaptic conductances via a conductance clamp. Utilizing the hybrid network, we examine the reciprocal network properties (local excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence) and neuronal membrane properties (input resistance) by altering the barrel population response to diverse thalamic input. In the presence of local network input, neurons are more selective to thalamic input timing; this arises from strong feedforward inhibition. Strongly inhibitory (damping) network regimes are more selective to timing and less selective to the magnitude of input but require stronger initial input. Input selectivity relies heavily on the different membrane properties of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. When inhibitory and excitatory neurons had identical membrane properties, the sensitivity of in vitro neurons to temporal vs. magnitude features of input was substantially reduced. Increasing the mean leak conductance of the inhibitory cells decreased the network's temporal sensitivity, whereas increasing excitatory leak conductance enhanced magnitude sensitivity. Local network synapses are essential in shaping thalamic input, and differing membrane properties of functional classes reciprocally modulate this effect.

  9. Regulation of Ca2+ channels by SNAP-25 via recruitment of syntaxin-1 from plasma membrane clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Bertelsen, Trine Lisberg; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Houy, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    expression recruits syntaxin-1 from clusters on the plasma membrane, thereby increasing the immunoavailability of syntaxin-1 and leading indirectly to Ca(2+) current inhibition. Expression of Munc18-1, which recruits syntaxin-1 within the exocytotic pathway, does not modulate Ca(2+) channels, whereas...... overexpression of the syntaxin-binding protein Doc2B or ubMunc13-2 increases syntaxin-1 immunoavailability and concomitantly down-regulates Ca(2+) currents. Similar findings were obtained upon chemical cholesterol depletion, leading directly to syntaxin-1 cluster dispersal and Ca(2+) current inhibition. We...

  10. Mg(2+),ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. ІІ. Regulation of activity

    OpenAIRE

    T. О. Veklich; Iu. Iu. Mazur; S. О. Kosterin

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-pump is one of key proteins, which takes part in Ca2+ exchange in smooth muscle cells. It has a lot of diverse functions from control of basal cytoplasmal Ca2+ concentration to regulation of proteins involved in Ca2+-dependent signal pathway. Ca2+ pump function is often depen­dent on the isoform or even form of alternative splicing. Allowing for a variety of Ca2+-pump functions and properties, which were reviewed in detail in the first part of our review article cycle (U...

  11. Nucleolar protein trafficking in response to HIV-1 Tat: rewiring the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboui, Mohamed Ali; Bidoia, Carlo; Woods, Elena; Roe, Barbara; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2012-01-01

    The trans-activator Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein essential for HIV-1 replication. Tat trafficks to the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus. The nucleolus, a highly dynamic and structured membrane-less sub-nuclear compartment, is the site of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis and is involved in numerous cellular functions including transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control and viral infection. Importantly, transient nucleolar trafficking of both Tat and HIV-1 viral transcripts are critical in HIV-1 replication, however, the role(s) of the nucleolus in HIV-1 replication remains unclear. To better understand how the interaction of Tat with the nucleolar machinery contributes to HIV-1 pathogenesis, we investigated the quantitative changes in the composition of the nucleolar proteome of Jurkat T-cells stably expressing HIV-1 Tat fused to a TAP tag. Using an organellar proteomic approach based on mass spectrometry, coupled with Stable Isotope Labelling in Cell culture (SILAC), we quantified 520 proteins, including 49 proteins showing significant changes in abundance in Jurkat T-cell nucleolus upon Tat expression. Numerous proteins exhibiting a fold change were well characterised Tat interactors and/or known to be critical for HIV-1 replication. This suggests that the spatial control and subcellular compartimentaliation of these cellular cofactors by Tat provide an additional layer of control for regulating cellular machinery involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Pathway analysis and network reconstruction revealed that Tat expression specifically resulted in the nucleolar enrichment of proteins collectively participating in ribosomal biogenesis, protein homeostasis, metabolic pathways including glycolytic, pentose phosphate, nucleotides and amino acids biosynthetic pathways, stress response, T-cell signaling pathways and genome integrity. We present here the first differential profiling of the nucleolar proteome of T-cells expressing HIV-1 Tat. We discuss how these

  12. Trafficking of Kv2.1 Channels to the Axon Initial Segment by a Novel Nonconventional Secretory Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Stampe; Watanabe, Shoji; Stas, Jeroen Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    the localization of Kv2.1 in these two different membrane compartments in cultured rat hippocampal neurons of mixed sex. Our data uncover a unique ability of Kv2.1 channels to use two molecularly distinct trafficking pathways to accomplish this. Somatodendritic Kv2.1 channels are targeted by the conventional...... secretory pathway, whereas axonal Kv2.1 channels are targeted by a nonconventional trafficking pathway independent of the Golgi apparatus. We further identified a new AIS trafficking motif in the C-terminus of Kv2.1, and show that putative phosphorylation sites in this region are critical for the restricted.......SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study uncovered a novel mechanism that targets the Kv2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel to two distinct trafficking pathways and two distinct subcellular destinations: the somatodendritic plasma membrane and that of the axon initial segment. We also identified a distinct motif, including...

  13. Spatio-temporal remodeling of functional membrane microdomains organizes the signaling networks of a bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schneider

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains specialized in the regulation of numerous cellular processes related to membrane organization, as diverse as signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane trafficking or pathogen invasion. It has been proposed that this functional diversity would require a heterogeneous population of raft domains with varying compositions. However, a mechanism for such diversification is not known. We recently discovered that bacterial membranes organize their signal transduction pathways in functional membrane microdomains (FMMs that are structurally and functionally similar to the eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this report, we took advantage of the tractability of the prokaryotic model Bacillus subtilis to provide evidence for the coexistence of two distinct families of FMMs in bacterial membranes, displaying a distinctive distribution of proteins specialized in different biological processes. One family of microdomains harbors the scaffolding flotillin protein FloA that selectively tethers proteins specialized in regulating cell envelope turnover and primary metabolism. A second population of microdomains containing the two scaffolding flotillins, FloA and FloT, arises exclusively at later stages of cell growth and specializes in adaptation of cells to stationary phase. Importantly, the diversification of membrane microdomains does not occur arbitrarily. We discovered that bacterial cells control the spatio-temporal remodeling of microdomains by restricting the activation of FloT expression to stationary phase. This regulation ensures a sequential assembly of functionally specialized membrane microdomains to strategically organize signaling networks at the right time during the lifespan of a bacterium.

  14. Dimerization Efficiency of Canine Distemper Virus Matrix Protein Regulates Membrane-Budding Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringolf, Fanny; Herren, Michael; Wyss, Marianne; Vidondo, Beatriz; Langedijk, Johannes P; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2017-08-15

    Paramyxoviruses rely on the matrix (M) protein to orchestrate viral assembly and budding at the plasma membrane. Although the mechanistic details remain largely unknown, structural data suggested that M dimers and/or higher-order oligomers may facilitate membrane budding. To gain functional insights, we employed a structure-guided mutagenesis approach to investigate the role of canine distemper virus (CDV) M protein self-assembly in membrane-budding activity. Three six-alanine-block (6A-block) mutants with mutations located at strategic oligomeric positions were initially designed. While the first one includes residues potentially residing at the protomer-protomer interface, the other two display amino acids located within two distal surface-exposed α-helices proposed to be involved in dimer-dimer contacts. We further focused on the core of the dimeric interface by mutating asparagine 138 (N138) to several nonconservative amino acids. Cellular localization combined with dimerization and coimmunopurification assays, performed under various denaturing conditions, revealed that all 6A-block mutants were impaired in self-assembly and cell periphery accumulation. These phenotypes correlated with deficiencies in relocating CDV nucleocapsid proteins to the cell periphery and in virus-like particle (VLP) production. Conversely, all M-N138 mutants remained capable of self-assembly, though to various extents, which correlated with proper accumulation and redistribution of nucleocapsid proteins at the plasma membrane. However, membrane deformation and VLP assays indicated that the M-N138 variants exhibiting the most reduced dimerization propensity were also defective in triggering membrane remodeling and budding, despite proper plasma membrane accumulation. Overall, our data provide mechanistic evidence that the efficiency of CDV M dimerization/oligomerization governs both cell periphery localization and membrane-budding activity. IMPORTANCE Despite the availability of

  15. Nuclear and Membrane Actions of Estrogen Receptor Alpha: Contribution to the Regulation of Energy and Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Maeva; Montagner, Alexandra; Fontaine, Coralie; Lenfant, Françoise; Arnal, Jean-François; Gourdy, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been demonstrated to play a key role in reproduction but also to exert numerous functions in nonreproductive tissues. Accordingly, ERα is now recognized as a key regulator of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism and mediates the protective effects of estrogens against obesity and type 2 diabetes. This chapter attempts to summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms of ERα activation and their involvement in the modulation of energy balance and glucose metabolism. We first focus on the experimental studies that constitute the basis of the understanding of ERα as a nuclear receptor and more specifically on the key roles played by its two activation functions (AFs). We depict the consequences of the selective inactivation of these AFs in mouse models, which further underline the prominent role of nuclear ERα in the prevention of obesity and diabetes, as on the reproductive tract and the vascular system. Besides these nuclear actions, a fraction of ERα is associated with the plasma membrane and activates nonnuclear signaling from this site. Such rapid effects, called membrane-initiated steroid signals (MISS), have been characterized in a variety of cell lines and in particular in endothelial cells. The development of selective pharmacological tools that specifically activate MISS as well as the generation of mice expressing an ERα protein impeded for membrane localization has just begun to unravel the physiological role of MISS in vivo and their contribution to ERα-mediated metabolic protection. Finally, we discuss novel perspectives for the design of tissue-selective ER modulators.

  16. The leukodystrophy protein FAM126A (hyccin) regulates PtdIns(4)P synthesis at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Jeremy M; Wu, Xudong; Christiano, Romain; Oh, Michael S; Schauder, Curtis M; Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Messa, Mirko; Baldassari, Simona; Assereto, Stefania; Biancheri, Roberta; Zara, Federico; Minetti, Carlo; Raimondi, Andrea; Simons, Mikael; Walther, Tobias C; Reinisch, Karin M; De Camilli, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Genetic defects in myelin formation and maintenance cause leukodystrophies, a group of white matter diseases whose mechanistic underpinnings are poorly understood. Hypomyelination and congenital cataract (HCC), one of these disorders, is caused by mutations in FAM126A, a gene of unknown function. We show that FAM126A, also known as hyccin, regulates the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P), a determinant of plasma membrane identity. HCC patient fibroblasts exhibit reduced PtdIns(4)P levels. FAM126A is an intrinsic component of the plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase complex that comprises PI4KIIIα and its adaptors TTC7 and EFR3 (refs 5,7). A FAM126A-TTC7 co-crystal structure reveals an all-α-helical heterodimer with a large protein-protein interface and a conserved surface that may mediate binding to PI4KIIIα. Absence of FAM126A, the predominant FAM126 isoform in oligodendrocytes, destabilizes the PI4KIIIα complex in mouse brain and patient fibroblasts. We propose that HCC pathogenesis involves defects in PtdIns(4)P production in oligodendrocytes, whose specialized function requires massive plasma membrane expansion and thus generation of PtdIns(4)P and downstream phosphoinositides. Our results point to a role for FAM126A in supporting myelination, an important process in development and also following acute exacerbations in multiple sclerosis.

  17. MapA, an iron-regulated, cytoplasmic membrane protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R; Troyan, T; Sherman, D; Sherman, L A

    1994-08-01

    Growth of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in iron-deficient media leads to the accumulation of an approximately 34-kDa protein. The gene encoding this protein, mapA (membrane-associated protein A), has been cloned and sequenced (GenBank accession number, L01621). The mapA transcript is not detectable in normally grown cultures but is stably accumulated by cells grown in iron-deficient media. However, the promoter sequence for this gene does not resemble other bacterial iron-regulated promoters described to date. The carboxyl-terminal region of the derived amino acid sequence of MapA resembles bacterial proteins involved in iron acquisition, whereas the amino-terminal end of MapA has a high degree of amino acid identity with the abundant, chloroplast envelope protein E37. An approach employing improved cellular fractionation techniques as well as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry was essential in localizing MapA protein to the cytoplasmic membrane of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. When these cells were grown under iron-deficient conditions, a significant fraction of MapA could also be localized to the thylakoid membranes.

  18. Radiation protection aspects of the trafficking radionuclides contaminated metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prouza, Z.

    1999-01-01

    This paper covers the legal base of the release in the environment of radionuclides containing materials and the radiation protection aspects of trafficking in radionuclides contaminated materials. Materials, substance and objects containing radionuclides or contaminated by them may be released into the environment, if they do not exceed values authorized by SONS (State Office of Nuclear Safety). Legislative measures should be taken against illicit trafficking of the nuclear material in all the areas. The creation of a sophisticated system for the control and regulation of all important radionuclides released into the environment should be based on the radiation protection limits, constraints, reference and exemption levels which are introduced in the legislative documents; the strong supervision of producers and users of the sealed sources by SONS side, in addition to the requirements of the licensing process of their sources; a complete data-base and information exchange system related to illicit trafficking in contaminated material; in this system all the authorities with jurisdiction should be involved. The responsibilities of the persons involved in metal scrap trafficking should include arrangement of appropriate monitoring, rules for transport of the metal scrap, an adequate measuring system to monitor metal scrap including monitoring to prevent processing or smelting of the radioactive material, control measures, etc. All of the above items of legislation are an important challenge for the Czech Republic. (author)

  19. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  20. The human Na+/H+ exchanger 1 is a membrane scaffold protein for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendus-Altenburger, Ruth; Pedraz Cuesta, Elena; Olesen, Christina Wilkens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is an S/T kinase with more than 200 known substrates, and with critical roles in regulation of cell growth and differentiation and currently no membrane proteins have been linked to ERK2 scaffolding. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we identify...

  1. Biopolitical management, economic calculation and "trafficked women".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Narratives surrounding human trafficking, especially trafficking in women for sex work, employ gendered and racialized tropes that have among their effects, a shrouding of women's economic decision-making and state collusion in benefiting from their labour. This paper explores the operation of these narratives in order to understand the ways in which they mask the economics of trafficking by sensationalizing the sexual and criminal aspects of it, which in turn allows the state to pursue political projects under the guise of a benevolent concern for trafficked women and/or protection of its own citizens. This paper will explore one national example: Article 18 of Italian Law 40 (1998). I argue that its passage has led to an increase in cooperation with criminal prosecution of traffickers largely because it approaches trafficked women as capable of making decisions about how and what they themselves want to do. This paper will also consider a more global approach to trafficking embedded in the concept of "migration management", an International Organization for Migration (IOM) framework that is now shaping EU, US and other national immigration laws and policies that impact trafficking. It will also examine the inherent limitations of both the national and global approach as an occasion to unpack how Article 18 and Migration Management function as forms of biopolitical management that participate in the production of "trafficking victims" into a massified population to be managed, rather than engender a more engaged discussion of what constitutes trafficking and how to redress it.

  2. Thermo-elasticity and adhesion as regulators of cell membrane architecture and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Elastic forces and structural phase transitions control the architecture and function of bio-membranes from the molecular to the microscopic scale of organization. The multi-component lipid bilayer matrix behaves as a pseudo-ternary system. Together with elastically and electrostatically mediated specific lipid-protein interaction mechanisms, fluid-fluid phase separation can occur at physiological temperatures. This can drive the transient generation of micro-domains of distinct composition within multi-component lipid-protein alloys, enabling cells to optimize the efficiency of biochemical reactions by facilitating or inhibiting the access of enzymes by distinct substrates or regulatory proteins. Together with global shape changes governed by the principle of minimum bending energy and induced curvature by macromolecular adsorption, phase separation processes can also play a key role for the sorting of lipids and proteins between intracellular compartments during the vesicle mediated intracellular material transport. Cell adhesion is another example of mechanical force controlled membrane processes. By interplay of attractive lock and key forces, long range disjoining pressures mediated by repeller molecules or membrane undulations and elastic interfacial forces, adhesion induced domain formation can play a dual role for the immunological stimulation of lymphocytes and for the rapid control of the adhesion strength. The present picture of the thermo-elastic control of membrane processes based on concepts of local thermal equilibrium is still rudimentary and has to be extended in the future to account for the intrinsic non-equilibrium situation associated with the constant restructuring of the cellular compartments on a timescale of minutes. (topical review)

  3. Adenylate cyclase regulation in the spermatogenic cell plasma membrane: Modulating effects of TPA and TCDD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    This research was designed to compare the effects of TPA, a phorbol ester, and TCDD in a spermatogenic cell population, a target of TCDD toxicity. Membrane-bound adenylate cyclase activity was used an index of membrane function, and was quantified by the amount of 32 P-cAMP formed from 32 P-ATP following chromatographic separation. Exposure to male germ cells in-vitro to TPA and TCDD followed by direct measurement of enzyme activity was used to investigate the potential of each agent to perturb membrane function. TPA and TCDD consistently inhibited adenylate cyclase activity at the levels of G s -catalytic unit coupling and hormone-receptor activation, as measured by the stimulation of enzyme activity by concomitant addition of forskolin and GTP and FSH and GTP, respectively. The effect on coupling required at least 60 minutes of exposure to TPA or TCDD. Concentration-response curves demonstrated a progressive desensitization with increasing TPA concentration, while TCDD exhibited consistent inhibition over the same concentration range

  4. ER-to-plasma membrane tethering proteins regulate cell signaling and ER morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manford, Andrew G; Stefan, Christopher J; Yuan, Helen L; Macgurn, Jason A; Emr, Scott D

    2012-12-11

    Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) junctions are conserved structures defined as regions of the ER that tightly associate with the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the mechanisms that tether these organelles together and why such connections are maintained. Using a quantitative proteomic approach, we identified three families of ER-PM tethering proteins in yeast: Ist2 (related to mammalian TMEM16 ion channels), the tricalbins (Tcb1/2/3, orthologs of the extended synaptotagmins), and Scs2 and Scs22 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated proteins). Loss of all six tethering proteins results in the separation of the ER from the PM and the accumulation of cytoplasmic ER. Importantly, we find that phosphoinositide signaling is misregulated at the PM, and the unfolded protein response is constitutively activated in the ER in cells lacking ER-PM tether proteins. These results reveal critical roles for ER-PM contacts in cell signaling, organelle morphology, and ER function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic regulation by amino acids of specific membrane protein biosynthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiles, T.C.; Handlogten, M.E.; Kilberg, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rat Hepatocytes in primary culture were incubated in amino acid-free (AAF) medium or amino acid-supplemented (AAS) medium for 2-6 hr. The effect of amino acid starvation on the synthesis of specific membrane proteins was monitored by including 3 H-leucine during the incubation. A crude plasma membrane fraction was prepared and then analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography. Amino acid deprivation caused an induction of the synthesis of 5 of the 30 proteins studied. The ratio (AAF/-AAS) of cpm incorporated into the remaining 25 proteins was 0.8 +/- 0.2, whereas the ratio for the 5 proteins that showed amino acid-dependent synthesis ranged from 1.5 to 2.5. The presence of 4 μM actinomycin in the AAF medium completely blocked the starvation-induced synthesis of the 5 proteins tested, but did not alter significantly the ratio of cpm incorporated into the other 25 proteins. Binding studies involving ConA suggested a plasma membrane location for the 5 proteins. The molecular weight values of the starvation-induced proteins are 70, 66, 66, 67, and 45kD. Surface-labelling of intact cells and preparation of antibodies against the 5 proteins will be used to establish the subcellular location and to describe the amino acid-dependent synthesis of each in more detail

  6. Regulation of adhesion behavior of murine macrophage using supported lipid membranes displaying tunable mannose domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaindl, T; Oelke, J; Kaufmann, S; Tanaka, M; Pasc, A; Konovalov, O V; Funari, S S; Engel, U; Wixforth, A

    2010-01-01

    Highly uniform, strongly correlated domains of synthetically designed lipids can be incorporated into supported lipid membranes. The systematic characterization of membranes displaying a variety of domains revealed that the equilibrium size of domains significantly depends on the length of fluorocarbon chains, which can be quantitatively interpreted within the framework of an equivalent dipole model. A mono-dispersive, narrow size distribution of the domains enables us to treat the inter-domain correlations as two-dimensional colloidal crystallization and calculate the potentials of mean force. The obtained results demonstrated that both size and inter-domain correlation can precisely be controlled by the molecular structures. By coupling α-D-mannose to lipid head groups, we studied the adhesion behavior of the murine macrophage (J774A.1) on supported membranes. Specific adhesion and spreading of macrophages showed a clear dependence on the density of functional lipids. The obtained results suggest that such synthetic lipid domains can be used as a defined platform to study how cells sense the size and distribution of functional molecules during adhesion and spreading.

  7. Phosphorylation of plasma membrane aquaporin regulates temperature-dependent opening of tulip petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    The opening and closing of tulip petals was reproduced in the dark by changing the temperature from 5 degrees C to 20 degrees C for opening and 20 degrees C to 5 degrees C for closing. The opening process was accompanied by (3)H(2)O transport through the stem from the incubation medium to the petals. A Ca(2+)-channel blocker and a Ca(2+)-chelator inhibited petal opening and (3)H(2)O transport. Several proteins in the isolated plasma membrane fraction were phosphorylated in the presence of 25 micro M Ca(2+) at 20 degrees C. The 31-kDa protein that was phosphorylated, was suggested immunologically as the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP). This phosphorylated PM-AQP clearly reacted with the anti-phospho-Ser. In-gel assay revealed the presence of a 45-kDa Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase in the isolated plasma membrane. Phosphorylation of the putative PM-AQP was thought to activate the water channel composed of PM-AQP. Dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated PM-AQP was also observed during petal closing at 5 degrees C, suggesting the inactivation of the water channel.

  8. IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB) was established in 1995 as a unique network of points of contact connecting 100 states and several international organizations. Information collected from official sources supplemented by open-source reports. The 1994 - GC 38, resolution intensifies the activities through which the Agency is currently supporting Member States in this field. Member states were notified of completed database in 1995 and invited to participate. The purpose of the I TDB is to facilitate exchange of authoritative information among States on incidents of illicit trafficking and other related unauthorized activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials; to collect, maintain and analyse information on such incidents with a view to identifying common threats, trends, and patterns; use this information for internal planning and prioritisation and provide this information to member states and to provide a reliable source of basic information on such incidents to the media, when appropriate

  9. Visualizing Mutation-Specific Differences in the Trafficking-Deficient Phenotype of Kv11.1 Proteins Linked to Long QT Syndrome Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison R; Anderson, Corey L; Smith, Jennifer L; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Elayi, Claude S; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2018-01-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 α-subunit that underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K + current in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channel protein to the cell surface membrane. Several trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutations (e.g., G601S) generate Kv11.1 proteins that are sequestered in a microtubule-dependent quality control (QC) compartment in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that the QC mechanisms that regulate LQT2-linked Kv11.1 protein trafficking are mutation-specific. Confocal imaging analyses of HEK293 cells stably expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutation F805C showed that, unlike G601S-Kv11.1 protein, F805C-Kv11.1 protein was concentrated in several transitional ER subcompartments. The microtubule depolymerizing drug nocodazole differentially affected G601S- and F805C-Kv11.1 protein immunostaining. Nocodazole caused G601S-Kv11.1 protein to distribute into peripheral reticular structures, and it increased the diffuse immunostaining of F805C-Kv11.1 protein around the transitional ER subcompartments. Proteasome inhibition also affected the immunostaining of G601S- and F805C-Kv11.1 protein differently. Incubating cells in MG132 minimally impacted G601S-Kv11.1 immunostaining, but it dramatically increased the diffuse immunostaining of F805C-Kv11.1 protein in the transitional ER. Similar results were seen after incubating cells in the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Differences in the cellular distribution of G601S-Kv11.1 and F805C-Kv11.1 protein persisted in transfected human inducible pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. These are the first data to visually demonstrate mutation-specific differences in the trafficking-deficient LQT2 phenotype, and this study has identified a novel way to categorize trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutations based on differences in intracellular

  10. Activity-dependent trafficking of lysosomes in dendrites and dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Marisa S; Sancho, Laura; Slepak, Natalia; Boassa, Daniela; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Bloodgood, Brenda L; Patrick, Gentry N

    2017-08-07

    In neurons, lysosomes, which degrade membrane and cytoplasmic components, are thought to primarily reside in somatic and axonal compartments, but there is little understanding of their distribution and function in dendrites. Here, we used conventional and two-photon imaging and electron microscopy to show that lysosomes traffic bidirectionally in dendrites and are present in dendritic spines. We find that lysosome inhibition alters their mobility and also decreases dendritic spine number. Furthermore, perturbing microtubule and actin cytoskeletal dynamics has an inverse relationship on the distribution and motility of lysosomes in dendrites. We also find trafficking of lysosomes is correlated with synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptors. Strikingly, lysosomes traffic to dendritic spines in an activity-dependent manner and can be recruited to individual spines in response to local activation. These data indicate the position of lysosomes is regulated by synaptic activity and thus plays an instructive role in the turnover of synaptic membrane proteins. © 2017 Goo et al.

  11. The C-terminal HRET sequence of Kv1.3 regulates gating rather than targeting of Kv1.3 to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voros, Orsolya; Szilagyi, Orsolya; Balajthy, András; Somodi, Sándor; Panyi, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Péter

    2018-04-12

    Kv1.3 channels are expressed in several cell types including immune cells, such as T lymphocytes. The targeting of Kv1.3 to the plasma membrane is essential for T cell clonal expansion and assumed to be guided by the C-terminus of the channel. Using two point mutants of Kv1.3 with remarkably different features compared to the wild-type Kv1.3 (A413V and H399K having fast inactivation kinetics and tetraethylammonium-insensitivity, respectively) we showed that both Kv1.3 channel variants target to the membrane when the C-terminus was truncated right after the conserved HRET sequence and produce currents identical to those with a full-length C-terminus. The truncation before the HRET sequence (NOHRET channels) resulted in reduced membrane-targeting but non-functional phenotypes. NOHRET channels did not display gating currents, and coexpression with wild-type Kv1.3 did not rescue the NOHRET-A413V phenotype, no heteromeric current was observed. Interestingly, mutants of wild-type Kv1.3 lacking HRET(E) (deletion) or substituted with five alanines for the HRET(E) motif expressed current indistinguishable from the wild-type. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of Kv1.3 immediately proximal to the S6 helix is required for the activation gating and conduction, whereas the presence of the distal region of the C-terminus is not exclusively required for trafficking of Kv1.3 to the plasma membrane.

  12. Membrane association of the Arabidopsis ARF exchange factor GNOM involves interaction of conserved domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anders, Nadine; Nielsen, Michael M.; Keicher, Jutta

    2008-01-01

    vesicle formation by activating ARF GTPases on specific membranes in animals, plants, and fungi. However, apart from the catalytic exchange activity of the SEC7 domain, the functional significance of other conserved domains is virtually unknown. Here, we show that a distinct N-terminal domain of GNOM......The GNOM protein plays a fundamental role in Arabidopsis thaliana development by regulating endosome-to-plasma membrane trafficking required for polar localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1. GNOM is a family member of large ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs), which regulate...... mediates dimerization and in addition interacts heterotypically with two other conserved domains in vivo. In contrast with N-terminal dimerization, the heterotypic interaction is essential for GNOM function, as mutations abolishing this interaction inactivate the GNOM protein and compromise its membrane...

  13. Endocytic trafficking from the small intestinal brush border probed with FM dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte

    2009-01-01

    -linking galectins/intelectin, but little is known about the dynamic properties of this highly specialized membrane. Here, we probed the endocytic membrane trafficking from the brush border of organ cultured pig intestinal mucosal explants by use of a fixable, lipophilic FM dye. The fluorescent dye readily......, contributes to the overall permeability barrier of the gut. Key words: FM dye, small intestine, brush border, endocytosis....

  14. An apolipoprotein-enriched biomolecular corona switches the cellular uptake mechanism and trafficking pathway of lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiacomo, L; Cardarelli, F; Pozzi, D; Palchetti, S; Digman, M A; Gratton, E; Capriotti, A L; Mahmoudi, M; Caracciolo, G

    2017-11-16

    Following exposure to biological milieus (e.g. after systemic administration), nanoparticles (NPs) get covered by an outer biomolecular corona (BC) that defines many of their biological outcomes, such as the elicited immune response, biodistribution, and targeting abilities. In spite of this, the role of BC in regulating the cellular uptake and the subcellular trafficking properties of NPs has remained elusive. Here, we tackle this issue by employing multicomponent (MC) lipid NPs, human plasma (HP) and HeLa cells as models for nanoformulations, biological fluids, and target cells, respectively. By conducting confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments and image correlation analyses, we quantitatively demonstrate that the BC promotes a neat switch of the cell entry mechanism and subsequent intracellular trafficking, from macropinocytosis to clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry identifies apolipoproteins as the most abundant components of the BC tested here. Interestingly, this class of proteins target the LDL receptors, which are overexpressed in clathrin-enriched membrane domains. Our results highlight the crucial role of BC as an intrinsic trigger of specific NP-cell interactions and biological responses and set the basis for a rational exploitation of the BC for targeted delivery.

  15. Ubiquilin 1 modulates amyloid precursor protein trafficking and Abeta secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Mikko; Lu, Alice; Thomas, Anne V; Romano, Donna M; Kim, Minji; Jones, Phill B; Xie, Zhongcong; Kounnas, Maria Z; Wagner, Steven L; Berezovska, Oksana; Hyman, Bradley T; Tesco, Giuseppina; Bertram, Lars; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2006-10-27

    Ubiquilin 1 (UBQLN1) is a ubiquitin-like protein, which has been shown to play a central role in regulating the proteasomal degradation of various proteins, including the presenilins. We recently reported that DNA variants in UBQLN1 increase the risk for Alzheimer disease, by influencing expression of this gene in brain. Here we present the first assessment of the effects of UBQLN1 on the metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate UBQLN1 in a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. We demonstrate that down-regulation of UBQLN1 accelerates the maturation and intracellular trafficking of APP, while not interfering with alpha-, beta-, or gamma-secretase levels or activity. UBQLN1 knockdown increased the ratio of APP mature/immature, increased levels of full-length APP on the cell surface, and enhanced the secretion of sAPP (alpha- and beta-forms). Moreover, UBQLN1 knockdown increased levels of secreted Abeta40 and Abeta42. Finally, employing a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay, we show that UBQLN1 and APP come into close proximity in intact cells, independently of the presence of the presenilins. Collectively, our findings suggest that UBQLN1 may normally serve as a cytoplasmic "gatekeeper" that may control APP trafficking from intracellular compartments to the cell surface. These findings suggest that changes in UBQLN1 steady-state levels affect APP trafficking and processing, thereby influencing the generation of Abeta.

  16. The pyrimidine nucleotide carrier PNC1 and mitochondrial trafficking of thymidine phosphates in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzolin, Elisa; Miazzi, Cristina; Frangini, Miriam; Palumbo, Elisa; Rampazzo, Chiara [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58B, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bianchi, Vera, E-mail: vbianchi@bio.unipd.it [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Via Ugo Bassi 58B, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    In cycling cells cytosolic de novo synthesis of deoxynucleotides is the main source of precursors for mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis. The transfer of deoxynucleotides across the inner mt membrane requires protein carriers. PNC1, a SLC25 family member, exchanges pyrimidine nucleoside triphosphates in liposomes and its downregulation decreases mtUTP concentration in cultured cells. By an isotope-flow protocol we confirmed transport of uridine nucleotides by PNC1 in intact cultured cells and investigated PNC1 involvement in the mt trafficking of thymidine phosphates. Key features of our approach were the manipulation of PNC1 expression by RNA interference or inducible overexpression, the employment of cells proficient or deficient for cytosolic thymidine kinase (TK1) to distinguish the direction of flow of thymidine nucleotides across the mt membrane during short pulses with [{sup 3}H]-thymidine, the determination of mtdTTP specific radioactivity to quantitate the rate of mtdTTP export to the cytoplasm. Downregulation of PNC1 in TK1{sup -} cells increased labeled dTTP in mitochondria due to a reduced rate of export. Overexpression of PNC1 in TK1{sup +} cells increased mtdTTP pool size and radioactivity, suggesting an involvement in the import of thymidine phosphates. Thus PNC1 is a component of the network regulating the mtdTTP pool in human cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thymidine phosphates exchange between mitochondria and cytosol in mammalian cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNA-downregulation of PNC1 delays mitochondrial dTTP export in TK1{sup -} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PNC1 overexpression accumulates dTTP in mitochondria of TK1{sup +} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PNC1 exchanges thymidine nucleotides across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PNC1 participates in the regulation of the mtdTTP pool supporting mtDNA synthesis.

  17. The pyrimidine nucleotide carrier PNC1 and mitochondrial trafficking of thymidine phosphates in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzolin, Elisa; Miazzi, Cristina; Frangini, Miriam; Palumbo, Elisa; Rampazzo, Chiara; Bianchi, Vera

    2012-01-01

    In cycling cells cytosolic de novo synthesis of deoxynucleotides is the main source of precursors for mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis. The transfer of deoxynucleotides across the inner mt membrane requires protein carriers. PNC1, a SLC25 family member, exchanges pyrimidine nucleoside triphosphates in liposomes and its downregulation decreases mtUTP concentration in cultured cells. By an isotope-flow protocol we confirmed transport of uridine nucleotides by PNC1 in intact cultured cells and investigated PNC1 involvement in the mt trafficking of thymidine phosphates. Key features of our approach were the manipulation of PNC1 expression by RNA interference or inducible overexpression, the employment of cells proficient or deficient for cytosolic thymidine kinase (TK1) to distinguish the direction of flow of thymidine nucleotides across the mt membrane during short pulses with [ 3 H]-thymidine, the determination of mtdTTP specific radioactivity to quantitate the rate of mtdTTP export to the cytoplasm. Downregulation of PNC1 in TK1 − cells increased labeled dTTP in mitochondria due to a reduced rate of export. Overexpression of PNC1 in TK1 + cells increased mtdTTP pool size and radioactivity, suggesting an involvement in the import of thymidine phosphates. Thus PNC1 is a component of the network regulating the mtdTTP pool in human cells. -- Highlights: ► Thymidine phosphates exchange between mitochondria and cytosol in mammalian cells. ► siRNA-downregulation of PNC1 delays mitochondrial dTTP export in TK1 − cells. ► PNC1 overexpression accumulates dTTP in mitochondria of TK1 + cells. ► PNC1 exchanges thymidine nucleotides across the mitochondrial inner membrane. ► PNC1 participates in the regulation of the mtdTTP pool supporting mtDNA synthesis.

  18. Regulation of membrane fusion and secretory events in the sea urchin embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Membrane fusion and secretory events play a key role in fertilization and early development in the sea urchin embryo. To investigate the mechanism of membrane fusion, the effect of inhibitors of metalloendoprotease activity was studied on two model systems of cell fusion; fertilization and spiculogenesis by primary mesenchyme cells in the embryo. Both the zinc chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, and peptide metalloprotease substrates were found to inhibit both fertilization and gamete fusion, while peptides that are not substrates of metalloproteases did not affect either process. Primary mesenchyme cells form the larval skeleton in the embryo by deposition of mineral and an organic matrix into a syncytial cavity formed by fusion of filopodia of these cells. Metalloprotease inhibitors were found to inhibit spiculogenesis both in vivo and in cultures of isolated primary mesenchyme cells, and the activity of a metalloprotease of the appropriate specificity was found in the primary mesenchyme cells. These two studies implicate the activity of a metalloprotease in a necessary step in membrane fusion. Following fertilization, exocytosis of the cortical granules results in the formation of the fertilization envelope and the hyaline layer, that surround the developing embryo. The hatching enzyme is secreted by the blastula stage sea urchin embryo, which proteolyzes the fertilization envelope surrounding the embryo, allowing the embryo to hatch. Using an assay that measures 125 I-fertilization envelope degradation, the hatching enzyme was identified as a 33 kDa metalloprotease, and was purified by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography from the hatching media of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos. The hatching enzyme showed a substrate preference for only a minor subset of fertilization envelope proteins

  19. Compounds that correct F508del-CFTR trafficking can also correct other protein trafficking diseases: an in vitro study using cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampson Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many genetic diseases are due to defects in protein trafficking where the mutant protein is recognized by the quality control systems, retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and degraded by the proteasome. In many cases, the mutant protein retains function if it can be trafficked to its proper cellular location. We have identified structurally diverse correctors that restore the trafficking and function of the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis, F508del-CFTR. Most of these correctors do not act directly as ligands of CFTR, but indirectly on other pathways to promote folding and correction. We hypothesize that these proteostasis regulators may also correct other protein trafficking diseases. Methods To test our hypothesis, we used stable cell lines or transient transfection to express 2 well-studied trafficking disease mutations in each of 3 different proteins: the arginine-vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2, also known as V2R, the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (KCNH2, also known as hERG, and finally the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (ABCC8, also known as SUR1. We treated cells expressing these mutant proteins with 9 structurally diverse F508del-CFTR correctors that function through different cellular mechanisms and assessed whether correction occurred via immunoblotting and functional assays. Results were deemed significantly different from controls by a one-way ANOVA (p  Results Here we show that F508del-CFTR correctors RDR1, KM60 and KM57 also correct some mutant alleles of other protein trafficking diseases. We also show that one corrector, the cardiac glycoside ouabain, was found to alter the glycosylation of all mutant alleles tested. Conclusions Correctors of F508del-CFTR trafficking might have broader applications to other protein trafficking diseases.

  20. The political aspects of human trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Lukach

    2014-01-01

    The negative international results of human trafficking are researched by the author. Namely, problems of governance organization that are created by powerful criminal groups of human traffickers and smugglers, mass stay of a significant number of non­citizens in the country; formation of the negative international image of the origin, destination or transit country as the state which is unable to counter effectively illegal migration and human trafficking.

  1. Gun Trafficking and the Southwest Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-29

    felons, drug traffickers, and juvenile gang members from acquiring firearms from gun traffickers. These criminals often acquire firearms from persons...renounced their U.S. citizenship; (8) persons restrained under a court-order from harassing, stalking , or threatening an intimate partner or child of... gang members from acquiring firearms from gun traffickers. These criminals often acquire firearms from a person who otherwise is not prohibited to

  2. Human Trafficking in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ronak B; Ahn, Roy; Burke, Thomas F

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking continues to persist, affecting up to 200 million people worldwide. As clinicians in emergency departments commonly encounter victims of intimate partner violence, some of these encounters will be with trafficking victims. These encounters provide a rare opportunity for healthcare providers to intervene and help. This case report of a human trafficking patient from a teaching hospital illustrates the complexity in identifying these victims. Clinicians can better identify pot...

  3. A family of membrane-shaping proteins at ER subdomains regulates pre-peroxisomal vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit S; Huang, Xiaofang; Choudhary, Vineet; Levine, Tim P; Hu, Junjie; Prinz, William A

    2016-11-21

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three conserved reticulon and reticulon-like proteins that help maintain ER structure by stabilizing high membrane curvature in ER tubules and the edges of ER sheets. A mutant lacking all three proteins has dramatically altered ER morphology. We found that ER shape is restored in this mutant when Pex30p or its homologue Pex31p is overexpressed. Pex30p can tubulate membranes both in cells and when reconstituted into proteoliposomes, indicating that Pex30p is a novel ER-shaping protein. In contrast to the reticulons, Pex30p is low abundance, and we found that it localizes to subdomains in the ER. We show that these ER subdomains are the sites where most preperoxisomal vesicles (PPVs) are generated. In addition, overproduction or deletion of Pex30p or Pex31p alters the size, shape, and number of PPVs. Our findings suggest that Pex30p and Pex31p help shape and generate regions of the ER where PPV biogenesis occurs.

  4. GLUT4 trafficking in a test tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Georg; James, David E

    2005-09-01

    Insulin regulates glucose transport in muscle and fat cells by stimulating the translocation of GLUT4 from intracellular vesicles to the plasma membrane. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Holman and colleagues reconstitute this process in vitro, providing a system that promises new breakthroughs in our understanding of this important metabolic process.

  5. Local Ca²+ entry via Orai1 regulates plasma membrane recruitment of TRPC1 and controls cytosolic Ca²+ signals required for specific cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwong Tai Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Store-operated Ca²+ entry (SOCE has been associated with two types of channels: CRAC channels that require Orai1 and STIM1 and SOC channels that involve TRPC1, Orai1, and STIM1. While TRPC1 significantly contributes to SOCE and SOC channel activity, abrogation of Orai1 function eliminates SOCE and activation of TRPC1. The critical role of Orai1 in activation of TRPC1-SOC channels following Ca²+ store depletion has not yet been established. Herein we report that TRPC1 and Orai1 are components of distinct channels. We show that TRPC1/Orai1/STIM1-dependent I(SOC, activated in response to Ca²+ store depletion, is composed of TRPC1/STIM1-mediated non-selective cation current and Orai1/STIM1-mediated I(CRAC; the latter is detected when TRPC1 function is suppressed by expression of shTRPC1 or a STIM1 mutant that lacks TRPC1 gating, STIM1(⁶⁸⁴EE⁶⁸⁵. In addition to gating TRPC1 and Orai1, STIM1 mediates the recruitment and association of the channels within ER/PM junctional domains, a critical step in TRPC1 activation. Importantly, we show that Ca²+ entry via Orai1 triggers plasma membrane insertion of TRPC1, which is prevented by blocking SOCE with 1 µM Gd³+, removal of extracellular Ca²+, knockdown of Orai1, or expression of dominant negative mutant Orai1 lacking a functional pore, Orai1-E106Q. In cells expressing another pore mutant of Orai1, Orai1-E106D, TRPC1 trafficking is supported in Ca²+-containing, but not Ca²+-free, medium. Consistent with this, I(CRAC is activated in cells pretreated with thapsigargin in Ca²+-free medium while I(SOC is activated in cells pretreated in Ca²+-containing medium. Significantly, TRPC1 function is required for sustained K(Ca activity and contributes to NFκB activation while Orai1 is sufficient for NFAT activation. Together, these findings reveal an as-yet unidentified function for Orai1 that explains the critical requirement of the channel in the activation of TRPC1 following Ca²+ store

  6. Basolateral cholesterol depletion alters Aquaporin-2 post-translational modifications and disrupts apical plasma membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Hanne B; Fuglsang, Cecilia Hvitfeldt; Pedersen, Cecilie Nøhr; Fenton, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    Apical plasma membrane accumulation of the water channel Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in kidney collecting duct principal cells is critical for body water homeostasis. Posttranslational modification (PTM) of AQP2 is important for regulating AQP2 trafficking. The aim of this study was to determine the role of cholesterol in regulation of AQP2 PTM and in apical plasma membrane targeting of AQP2. Cholesterol depletion from the basolateral plasma membrane of a collecting duct cell line (mpkCCD14) using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) increased AQP2 ubiquitylation. Forskolin, cAMP or dDAVP-mediated AQP2 phosphorylation at Ser269 (pS269-AQP2) was prevented by cholesterol depletion from the basolateral membrane. None of these effects on pS269-AQP2 were observed when cholesterol was depleted from the apical side of cells, or when MBCD was applied subsequent to dDAVP stimulation. Basolateral, but not apical, MBCD application prevented cAMP-induced apical plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2. These studies indicate that manipulation of the cholesterol content of the basolateral plasma membrane interferes with AQP2 PTM and subsequently regulated apical plasma membrane targeting of AQP2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A role for protein kinase C in the regulation of membrane fluidity and Ca²(+) flux at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes of HEK293 and Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Meng, Qingli; Jing, Xian; Xu, Pingxiang; Luo, Dali

    2011-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a prominent role in the regulation of a variety of cellular functions, including Ca²(+) signalling. In HEK293 and Jurkat cells, the Ca²(+) release and Ca²(+) uptake stimulated by several different activators were attenuated by activation of PKC with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) and potentiated by PKC inhibition with Gö6983 or knockdown of PKCα or PKCβ using shRNA. Immunostaining and Western blotting analyses revealed that PKCα and PKCβII accumulated at the plasma membrane (PM) and that these isoforms, along with PKCβI, also translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) upon activation with PMA. Measurements of membrane fluidity showed that, like the cell membrane stabilizers bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ursodeoxycholate (UDCA), PMA and OAG significantly reduced the fluidity of both the PM and ER membranes; these effects were blocked in PKC-knockdown cells. Interestingly, both BSA and UDCA inhibited the Ca²(+) responses to agonists to the same extent as PMA, whereas Tween 20, which increases membrane fluidity, raised the internal Ca²(+) concentration. Thus, activation of PKC induces both translocation of PKC to the PM and ER membranes and downregulation of membrane fluidity, thereby negatively modulating Ca²(+) flux. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Decidual-secreted factors alter invasive trophoblast membrane and secreted proteins implying a role for decidual cell regulation of placentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Melaleuca Menkhorst

    Full Text Available Inadequate or inappropriate implantation and placentation during the establishment of human pregnancy is thought to lead to first trimester miscarriage, placental insufficiency and other obstetric complications. To create the placental blood supply, specialized cells, the 'extravillous trophoblast' (EVT invade through the differentiated uterine endometrium (the decidua to engraft and remodel uterine spiral arteries. We hypothesized that decidual factors would regulate EVT function by altering the production of EVT membrane and secreted factors. We used a proteomics approach to identify EVT membrane and secreted proteins regulated by decidual cell factors. Human endometrial stromal cells were decidualized in vitro by treatment with estradiol (10(-8 M, medroxyprogesterone acetate (10(-7 M and cAMP (0.5 mM for 14 days. Conditioned media (CM was collected on day 2 (non-decidualized CM and 14 (decidualized CM of treatment. Isolated primary EVT cultured on Matrigel™ were treated with media control, non-decidualized or decidualized CM for 16 h. EVT CM was fractionated for proteins <30 kDa using size-exclusion affinity nanoparticles (SEAN before trypsin digestion and HPLC-MS/MS. 43 proteins produced by EVT were identified; 14 not previously known to be expressed in the placenta and 12 which had previously been associated with diseases of pregnancy including preeclampsia. Profilin 1, lysosome associated membrane glycoprotein 1 (LAMP1, dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1/cathepsin C and annexin A2 expression by interstitial EVT in vivo was validated by immunhistochemistry. Decidual CM regulation in vitro was validated by western blotting: decidualized CM upregulated profilin 1 in EVT CM and non-decidualized CM upregulated annexin A2 in EVT CM and pro-DPP1 in EVT cell lysate. Here, non-decidualized factors induced protease expression by EVT suggesting that non-decidualized factors may induce a pro-inflammatory cascade. Preeclampsia is a pro

  9. Characterisation of detergent-insoluble membranes in pollen tubes of Nicotiana tabacum (L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Moscatelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pollen tubes are the vehicle for sperm cell delivery to the embryo sac during fertilisation of Angiosperms. They provide an intriguing model for unravelling mechanisms of growing to extremes. The asymmetric distribution of lipids and proteins in the pollen tube plasma membrane modulates ion fluxes and actin dynamics and is maintained by a delicate equilibrium between exocytosis and endocytosis. The structural constraints regulating polarised secretion and asymmetric protein distribution on the plasma membrane are mostly unknown. To address this problem, we investigated whether ordered membrane microdomains, namely membrane rafts, might contribute to sperm cell delivery. Detergent insoluble membranes, rich in sterols and sphingolipids, were isolated from tobacco pollen tubes. MALDI TOF/MS analysis revealed that actin, prohibitins and proteins involved in methylation reactions and in phosphoinositide pattern regulation are specifically present in pollen tube detergent insoluble membranes. Tubulins, voltage-dependent anion channels and proteins involved in membrane trafficking and signalling were also present. This paper reports the first evidence of membrane rafts in Angiosperm pollen tubes, opening new perspectives on the coordination of signal transduction, cytoskeleton dynamics and polarised secretion.

  10. Effects of state-level firearm seller accountability policies on firearm trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Daniel W; Vernick, Jon S; Bulzacchelli, Maria T

    2009-07-01

    Criminals illegally obtaining firearms represent a great risk to many urban residents. This cross-sectional study of 54 US cities uses data on state laws governing gun sales, a survey of law enforcement agencies' practices to promote compliance with gun sales laws, and crime gun trace data to examine associations between these policies and practices with gun trafficking indicators. Higher levels of local gun ownership were linked with greater intrastate gun trafficking. Regression models estimate that comprehensive regulation and oversight of gun dealers and state regulation of private sales of handguns were each associated with significantly lower levels of intrastate gun trafficking. Discretionary permit-to-purchase licensing laws' negative association with intrastate trafficking disappeared when local gun ownership is controlled. The effects of these relatively restrictive gun purchase laws on trafficking may be mediated by the laws' lowering of gun ownership. Relatively low prevalence of gun ownership may also be a prerequisite for passage of discretionary purchase. We observed no effect on intrastate trafficking of laws limiting handgun sales to a maximum of one per person per month.

  11. Human trafficking and exploitation: A global health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Cathy; Kiss, Ligia

    2017-11-01

    In this collection review, Cathy Zimmerman and colleague introduce the PLOS Medicine Collection on Human Trafficking, Exploitation and Health, laying out the magnitude of the global trafficking problem and offering a public health policy framework to guide responses to trafficking.

  12. Multivesicular Bodies in Neurons: Distribution, Protein Content, and Trafficking Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    VON BARTHELD, CHRISTOPHER S.; ALTICK, AMY L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are intracellular endosomal organelles characterized by multiple internal vesicles that are enclosed within a single outer membrane. MVBs were initially regarded as purely prelysosomal structures along the degradative endosomal pathway of internalized proteins. MVBs are now known to be involved in numerous endocytic and trafficking functions, including protein sorting, recycling, transport, storage, and release. This review of neuronal MVBs summarizes their research history, morphology, distribution, accumulation of cargo and constitutive proteins, transport, and theories of functions of MVBs in neurons and glia. Due to their complex morphologies, neurons have expanded trafficking and signaling needs, beyond those of “geometrically simpler” cells, but it is not known whether neuronal MVBs perform additional transport and signaling functions. This review examines the concept of compartment-specific MVB functions in endosomal protein trafficking and signaling within synapses, axons, dendrites and cell bodies. We critically evaluate reports of the accumulation of neuronal MVBs based on evidence of stress-induced MVB formation. Furthermore, we discuss potential functions of neuronal and glial MVBs in development, in dystrophic neuritic syndromes, injury, disease, and aging. MVBs may play a role in Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, and Niemann-Pick diseases, some types of frontotemporal dementia, prion and virus trafficking, as well as in adaptive responses of neurons to trauma and toxin or drug exposure. Functions of MVBs in neurons have been much neglected, and major gaps in knowledge currently exist. Developing truly MVB-specific markers would help to elucidate the roles of neuronal MVBs in intra- and intercellular signaling of normal and diseased neurons. PMID:21216273

  13. Lysosomal trafficking of β-catenin induced by the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza; Carter, Orianna; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed; Li, Qingjie; Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2005-01-01

    β-Catenin is a cadherin-binding protein involved in cell-cell adhesion, which also functions as a transcriptional activator when complexed in the nucleus with members of the T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) family of proteins. There is considerable interest in mechanisms that down-regulate β-catenin, since this provides an avenue for the prevention of colorectal and other cancers in which β-catenin is frequently over-expressed. We show here that physiologically relevant concentrations of the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibited β-catenin/TCF-dependent reporter activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with wild type or mutant β-catenins, and there was a corresponding decrease in β-catenin protein levels in the nuclear, cytosolic and membrane-associated fractions. However, β-catenin accumulated as punctate aggregates in response to EGCG treatment, including in human colon cancer cells over-expressing β-catenin endogenously. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that the aggregated β-catenin in HEK293 cells was extra-nuclear and co-localized with lysosomes, suggesting that EGCG activated a pathway involving lysosomal trafficking of β-catenin. Lysosomal inhibitors leupeptin and transepoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanido)butane produced an increase in β-catenin protein in total cell lysates, without a concomitant increase in β-catenin transcriptional activity. These data provide the first evidence that EGCG facilitates the trafficking of β-catenin into lysosomes, presumably as a mechanism for sequestering β-catenin and circumventing further nuclear transport and activation of β-catenin/TCF/LEF signaling

  14. Lysosomal trafficking of {beta}-catenin induced by the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Carter, Orianna [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Al-Fageeh, Mohamed [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Li, Qingjie [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Dashwood, Roderick H. [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States)]. E-mail: Rod.Dashwood@oregonstate.edu

    2005-12-11

    {beta}-Catenin is a cadherin-binding protein involved in cell-cell adhesion, which also functions as a transcriptional activator when complexed in the nucleus with members of the T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) family of proteins. There is considerable interest in mechanisms that down-regulate {beta}-catenin, since this provides an avenue for the prevention of colorectal and other cancers in which {beta}-catenin is frequently over-expressed. We show here that physiologically relevant concentrations of the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibited {beta}-catenin/TCF-dependent reporter activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with wild type or mutant {beta}-catenins, and there was a corresponding decrease in {beta}-catenin protein levels in the nuclear, cytosolic and membrane-associated fractions. However, {beta}-catenin accumulated as punctate aggregates in response to EGCG treatment, including in human colon cancer cells over-expressing {beta}-catenin endogenously. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that the aggregated {beta}-catenin in HEK293 cells was extra-nuclear and co-localized with lysosomes, suggesting that EGCG activated a pathway involving lysosomal trafficking of {beta}-catenin. Lysosomal inhibitors leupeptin and transepoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanido)butane produced an increase in {beta}-catenin protein in total cell lysates, without a concomitant increase in {beta}-catenin transcriptional activity. These data provide the first evidence that EGCG facilitates the trafficking of {beta}-catenin into lysosomes, presumably as a mechanism for sequestering {beta}-catenin and circumventing further nuclear transport and activation of {beta}-catenin/TCF/LEF signaling.

  15. Regulation of G-protein coupled receptor traffic by an evolutionary conserved hydrophobic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelotti, Tim; Daunt, David; Shcherbakova, Olga G; Kobilka, Brian; Hurt, Carl M

    2010-04-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) expression of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is required for activation by extracellular ligands; however, mechanisms that regulate PM expression of GPCRs are poorly understood. For some GPCRs, such as alpha2c-adrenergic receptors (alpha(2c)-ARs), heterologous expression in non-native cells results in limited PM expression and extensive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention. Recently, ER export/retentions signals have been proposed to regulate cellular trafficking of several GPCRs. By utilizing a chimeric alpha(2a)/alpha(2c)-AR strategy, we identified an evolutionary conserved hydrophobic sequence (ALAAALAAAAA) in the extracellular amino terminal region that is responsible in part for alpha(2c)-AR subtype-specific trafficking. To our knowledge, this is the first luminal ER retention signal reported for a GPCR. Removal or disruption of the ER retention signal dramatically increased PM expression and decreased ER retention. Conversely, transplantation of this hydrophobic sequence into alpha(2a)-ARs reduced their PM expression and increased ER retention. This evolutionary conserved hydrophobic trafficking signal within alpha(2c)-ARs serves as a regulator of GPCR trafficking.

  16. Actin filaments regulate the adhesion between the plasma membrane and the cell wall of tobacco guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Ren, Jing-Jing; Kong, Lan-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Ling

    2018-01-01

    During the opening and closing of stomata, guard cells undergo rapid and reversible changes in their volume and shape, which affects the adhesion of the plasma membrane (PM) to the cell wall (CW). The dynamics of actin filaments in guard cells are involved in stomatal movement by regulating structural changes and intracellular signaling. However, it is unclear whether actin dynamics regulate the adhesion of the PM to the CW. In this study, we investigated the relationship between actin dynamics and PM-CW adhesion by the hyperosmotic-induced plasmolysis of tobacco guard cells. We found that actin filaments in guard cells were depolymerized during mannitol-induced plasmolysis. The inhibition of actin dynamics by treatment with latrunculin B or jasplakinolide and the disruption of the adhesion between the PM and the CW by treatment with RGDS peptide (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) enhanced guard cell plasmolysis. However, treatment with latrunculin B alleviated the RGDS peptide-induced plasmolysis and endocytosis. Our results reveal that the actin depolymerization is involved in the regulation of the PW-CW adhesion during hyperosmotic-induced plasmolysis in tobacco guard cells.