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Sample records for registries improve diabetes

  1. Improving Diabetes Outcomes Using a Web-Based Registry and Interactive Education: A Multisite Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Robert W.; Fletcher, Jason; Kelly, Kim F.; Shea, Laura A.; Spence, Maureen M.; Sullivan, Janet N.; Cerniglia, Joan R.; Yang, YoonJung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To support the adoption of guideline concordant care by primary care practices, the New York Diabetes Coalition (NYDC) promoted use of an electronic diabetes registry and developed an interactive educational module on using the registry and improving patient communication. The NYDC hypothesized that use of a registry with immediate…

  2. Improved results in paediatric diabetes care using a quality registry in an improvement collaborative: a case study in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Peterson

    Full Text Available Several studies show that good metabolic control is important for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In Sweden, there are large differences in mean haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c in different hospitals and difficulties implementing national guidelines in everyday practice. This study shows how the participation in an improvement collaborative could facilitate improvements in the quality of care by paediatric diabetes teams. The Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry, SWEDIABKIDS was used as a tool and resource for feedback and outcome measures.Twelve teams at paediatric diabetes centres, caring for 30% (2302/7660 of patients in Sweden, participated in an 18-month quality improvement program. Each team defined treatment targets, areas needing improvement, and action plans. The main outcome was the centre patients' mean HbA1c levels, but other clinical variables and change concepts were also studied. Data from the previous six months were compared with the first six months after starting the program, and the long-term follow up after another eleven months.All centres reduced mean HbA1c during the second and third periods compared with the first. The mean reduction for all was 3·7 mmol/mol (p<0.001, compared with non-participating centres who improved their mean HbA1c with 1·7 mmol/mol during the same period. Many of the participating centres reduced the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia and/or ketoacidosis, and five centres reached their goal of ensuring that all patients had some sort of physical activity at least once weekly. Change concepts were, for example, improved guidelines, appointment planning, informing the patients, improving teamwork and active use of the registry, and health promotion activities.By involving paediatric diabetes teams in a quality improvement collaborative together with access to a quality register, the quality of paediatric diabetes care can improve, thereby contributing to a reduced risk of late

  3. The Danish adult diabetes registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Kristensen, Jette K.; Husted, Gitte Reventlov

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database: The aim of the Danish Adult Diabetes Registry (DADR) is to provide data from both the primary health care sector (general practice [GP]) and the secondary sector (specialized outpatient clinics) to assess the quality of treatment given to patients with diabetes. The indicators...... represent process and outcome indicators selected from the literature. Study population: The total diabetes population in Denmark is estimated to be ∼300,000 adult diabetes patients. Approximately 10% have type 1 diabetes, which is managed mainly in the secondary sector, and 90% have type 2 diabetes......, glucose-, blood pressure-, and lipid-lowering treatment (yes/no), insulin pump treatment (yes/ no), and date of last eye and foot examination. Descriptive data: In 2014, the annual report included data regarding over 38,000 patients from outpatient clinics, which is assumed to have included almost all...

  4. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

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    Svensson J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jannet Svensson,1 Charlotte Cerqueira,2 Per Kjærsgaard,3 Lene Lyngsøe,4 Niels Thomas Hertel,5 Mette Madsen,6 Henrik B Mortensen,1 Jesper Johannesen1 1Pediatric and Adolescent Department, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev and Gentofte, Herlev, 2Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 3Pediatric Department, County Hospital Herning, Herning, 4Pediatric and Adolescent Department, Nordsjællands Hospital, Hillerød, 5HC Andersen Childrens Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 6Pediatric Department, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Aim: The aims of the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes (DanDiabKids are to monitor and improve the quality of care for children and adolescents with diabetes in Denmark and to follow the incidence and prevalence of diabetes. Study population: The study population consists of all children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (<18 years of age will be included. Main variables: The variables in the registry are the quality indicators, demographic variables, associated conditions, diabetes classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy, neuropathy, number of severe hypoglycemic events, and hospitalization with ketoacidosis. Descriptive data: The number of children diagnosed with diabetes is increasing with ~3% per year mainly for type 1 diabetes (ie, 296 new patients <15 years of age were diagnosed in 2014. The disease management has changed dramatically with more children treated intensively with multiple daily injections, insulin pumps

  5. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase’s latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  6. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    . Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...... with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase's latest annual report (2014-2015) indicates...

  7. Utilizing a diabetic registry to manage diabetes in a low-income Asian American population.

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    Seto, Winnie; Turner, Barbara S; Champagne, Mary T; Liu, Lynn

    2012-08-01

    Racial and income disparities persist in diabetes management in America. One third of African and Hispanic Americans with diabetes receive the recommended diabetes services (hemoglobin A1c [A1c] testing, retinal and foot examinations) shown to reduce diabetes complications and mortality, compared to half of whites with diabetes. National data for Asian Americans are limited, but studies suggest that those with language and cultural barriers have difficulty accessing health services. A diabetic registry has been shown to improve process and clinical outcomes in a population with diabetes. This study examined whether a community center that serves primarily low-income Asian American immigrants in Santa Clara County, California, could improve diabetes care and outcomes by implementing a diabetic registry. The registry was built using the Access 2007 software program. A total of 580 patients with diabetes were identified by reviewing charts, the appointment database, and reimbursement records from Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurance companies. Utilizing the registry, medical assistants contacted patients for follow-up appointments, and medical providers checked and tracked the patients' A1c results. Among the 431 patients who returned for treatment, the mean A1c was reduced from 7.27% to 6.97% over 8 months (P<0.001). Although 10.8% of the patients changed from controlled to uncontrolled diabetes post intervention, 32.6% of patients with uncontrolled diabetes converted to controlled diabetes (P<0.001). The diabetes control rate improved from 47% to 59% at the end of the study. This study demonstrated that a diabetic registry is an effective tool to manage an underserved population with diabetes, thereby reducing disparities in diabetes management.

  8. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Jannet; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Per

    2016-01-01

    children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (years of age) will be included. MAIN VARIABLES: The variables in the registry are the quality indicators, demographic variables, associated conditions, diabetes......, neuropathy, number of severe hypoglycemic events, and hospitalization with ketoacidosis. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The number of children diagnosed with diabetes is increasing with ∼3% per year mainly for type 1 diabetes (ie, 296 new patients years of age were diagnosed in 2014). The disease management has...... classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy...

  9. Primary healthcare-based diabetes registry in Puducherry: Design and methods

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    Subitha Lakshminarayanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes registries monitor the population prevalence and incidence of diabetes, monitor diabetes control program, provide information of quality of care to health service providers, and provide a sampling frame for interventional studies. This study documents the process of establishing a prospective diabetes registry in a primary health-care setting in Puducherry. Methods: This is a facility-based prospective registry conducted in six randomly selected urban health centers in Puducherry, with enrollment of all known patients with diabetes attending chronic disease clinics. Administrative approvals were obtained from Government Health Services. Manuals for training of medical officers, health-care workers, and case report forms were developed. Diabetes registry was prepared using Epi Info software. Results: In the first phase, demographic characteristics, risk factors, complications, coexisting chronic conditions, lifestyle and medical management, and clinical outcomes were recorded. Around 2177 patients with diabetes have been registered in six Primary Health Centres out of a total of 2948 participants seeking care from chronic disease clinic. Registration coverage ranges from 61% to 105% in these centers. Conclusion: This study has documented methodological details, and learning experiences gained while developing a diabetes registry at the primary health care level and the scope for upscaling to a Management Information System for Diabetes and a State-wide Registry. Improvement in patient care through needs assessment and quality assurance in service delivery is an important theme envisioned by this registry.

  10. Managing type 1 diabetes: trends and outcomes over 20 years in the Wisconsin Diabetes Registry cohort.

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    Palta, Mari; LeCaire, Tamara

    2009-08-01

    The Wisconsin Diabetes Registry Study is a Wisconsin cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes, who were diagnosed in 1987-1992 and actively followed. The study provides patients and health care professionals with better prognostic information and helps identify aspects of diabetes management that need improvement. To describe diabetes management and acute and chronic complications from the time of diagnosis. All incident cases diagnosed at age <30 in 28 counties were eligible and 590 enrolled. A baseline interview, blood sample kits, biannual/annual questionnaires and study examinations at 4, 7, 9, 14, and 20 years duration were administered. Diabetes management indicators, general health, and acute and chronic complications. Glycemic control was poor in adolescence, but improved with age. A high percentage of individuals do not meet treatment standards for blood pressure and lipid profile. Self-reported health deteriorated with age, and body mass index was similar to that of the general US population. Chronic complications were present at 15-20 years, but tended to be relatively mild. There is room for improvement in diabetes management, especially in meeting goals for blood pressure and lipid profile. Nonetheless, individuals with type 1 diabetes can be offered a more optimistic prognosis than in the past.

  11. Compliance with guidelines for disease management in diabetes: results from the SwissDiab Registry.

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    Schimke, Katrin E; Renström, Frida; Meier, Sandro; Stettler, Christoph; Brändle, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Tight glycemic control and aggressive treatment of additional cardiovascular risk factors can substantially reduce risk of diabetes-related complications. In 2013, the Swiss Society of Endocrinology and Diabetology (SSED) established national criteria on good disease management in diabetes, but little is known about compliance in clinical care. Here we assessed to what extent patients from two tertiary care centers in the German-speaking part of Switzerland enrolled in the Swiss Diabetes (SwissDiab) Registry adhere to the SSED criteria. SwissDiab is a prospective observational cohort study of patients regularly treated at Swiss tertiary diabetes centers. Data were collected through standardized annual health examinations. Baseline participant descriptive statistics, stratified by diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2), were compared with SSED targets for glycemic control, blood pressure, blood lipids, weight maintenance, and ophthalmic examination. By the end of 2016, 604 participants with DM1 (40%) and DM2 (60%) had data available for analyses, 36% and 29% women, respectively. At baseline, all the SSED targets were met with two exceptions: a glycated hemoglobin A1c value management in diabetes were achieved in the majority of participants at the time of enrollment, but results also highlight areas where disease management can be improved, particularly the role of nutrition counseling.

  12. Determinants of uncontrolled hypertension in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus: an analysis of the Malaysian diabetes registry 2009

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    Chew Boon How

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP is a significant contributor of morbidity and even mortality in type 2 diabetes (T2D patients. This study was done to determine the significant determinants of uncontrolled blood pressure in T2D patients in Malaysia. Methods Between 1st January 2009 to 31st December 2009, data from 70 889 patients with Type 2 diabetes was obtained from the Adult Diabetes Control and Management Registry for analysis; 303 centers participated in the study. Their demographic characteristics, the nature of their diabetes, their state of hypertension, treatment modalities, risk factors, and complications are described. Based on their most recent BP values, subjects were divided into controlled BP and uncontrolled BP and their clinical determinants compared. Independent determinants were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Results The mean age of patients at diagnosis of diabetes was 52.3 ± 11.1 years old. Most were women (59.0 % and of Malay ethnicity (61.9 %. The mean duration of diabetes was 5.9 ± 5.6 years. A total of 57.4 % were hypertensive. Of the 56 503 blood pressure (BP measured, 13 280 (23.5 % patients had BP two anti-hypertensive agents. Health clinics without doctor, older age (≥ 50 years old, shorter duration of diabetes ( Conclusions Major independent determinants of uncontrolled BP in our group of T2D patients were Malay ethnicity, older age, recent diagnosis of diabetes, overweight and follow-up at health clinics without a doctor and possibly the improper use of anti hypertensive agent. More effort, education and resources, especially in the primary health care centres are needed to improve hypertensive care among our patients with diabetes.

  13. Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes among Children and Adolescents in Italy between 2009 and 2013: The Role of a Regional Childhood Diabetes Registry

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    F. Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Surveillance represents a key strategy to control type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. In Italy, national data are missing. This study aimed at evaluating the incidence of T1DM in subjects <18 year olds in Apulia (a large southeastern region, about 4,000,000 inhabitants and assessing the sensitivity of the regional Registry of Childhood-Onset Diabetes (RCOD in the 2009–2013 period. Methods. We performed a retrospective study matching records from regional Hospital Discharge Registry (HDR, User Fee Exempt Registry (UFER, and Drugs Prescription Registry (DPR and calculated T1DM incidence; completeness of each data source was also estimated. In order to assess the RCOD sensitivity we compared cases from the registry to those extracted from HDR-UFER-DPR matching. Results. During 2009–2013, a total of 917 cases (about 184/year in at least one of the three sources and an annual incidence of 25.2 per 100,000 were recorded, lower in infant, increasing with age and peaked in 5- to 9-year-olds. The completeness of DPR was 78.7%, higher than that of UFER (64.3% and of HDR (59.6%. The RCOD’s sensitivity was 39.05% (360/922; 95% CI: 34.01%–44.09%. Conclusions. Apulia appeared as a high-incidence region. A full, active involvement of physicians working in paediatric diabetes clinics would be desirable to improve the RCOD performance.

  14. Design, development and deployment of a Diabetes Research Registry to facilitate recruitment in clinical research.

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    Tan, Meng H; Bernstein, Steven J; Gendler, Stephen; Hanauer, David; Herman, William H

    2016-03-01

    A major challenge in conducting clinical trials/studies is the timely recruitment of eligible subjects. Our aim is to develop a Diabetes Research Registry (DRR) to facilitate recruitment by matching potential subjects interested in research with approved clinical studies using study entry criteria abstracted from their electronic health records (EHR). A committee with expertise in diabetes, quality improvement, information technology, and informatics designed and developed the DRR. Using a hybrid approach, we identified and consented patients interested in research, abstracted their EHRs to assess common eligibility criteria, and contacted them about their interest in participating in specific studies. Investigators submit their requests with study entry criteria to the DRR which then provides a list of potential subjects who may be directly contacted for their study. The DRR meets all local, regional and federal regulatory requirements. After 5 years, the DRR has over 5000 registrants. About 30% have type 1 diabetes and 70% have type 2 diabetes. There are almost equal proportions of men and women. During this period, 31 unique clinical studies from 19 unique investigators requested lists of potential subjects for their studies. Eleven grant applications from 10 unique investigators used aggregated counts of potentially eligible subjects in their applications. The DRR matches potential subjects interested in research with approved clinical studies using study entry criteria abstracted from their EHR. By providing large lists of potentially eligible study subjects quickly, the DRR facilitated recruitment in 31 clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes of Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Diabetes: Insights From the OPEN CTO Registry.

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    Salisbury, Adam C; Sapontis, James; Grantham, J Aaron; Qintar, Mohammed; Gosch, Kensey L; Lombardi, William; Karmpaliotis, Dimitri; Moses, Jeffrey; Cohen, David J; Spertus, John A; Kosiborod, Mikhail

    2017-11-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship of diabetes with technical success and periprocedural complications, and no studies have compared patient-reported health status after chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with and without diabetes. CTOs are more common in patients with diabetes, yet CTO PCI is less often attempted in patients with diabetes than in patients without. The association between diabetes and health status after CTO PCI is unknown. In the 12-center OPEN-CTO PCI registry (Outcomes, Patient Health Status, and Efficiency in Chronic Total Occlusion Registry), patients with and without diabetes were assessed for technical success, periprocedural complications, and health status over 1 year following CTO PCI using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire and the Rose Dyspnea Scale. Hierarchical modified Poisson regression was used to examine the independent association between diabetes and technical success, and hierarchical multivariable linear regression was used to assess the association between diabetes and follow-up health status. Diabetes was common (41.2%) and associated with a lower crude rate of technical success (83.5% vs. 88.1%; p = 0.04). After adjustment, there was no significant difference between diabetic and nondiabetic patients (relative risk: 0.96, 95% confidence interval: 0.91 to 1.01). There were no significant differences in complication rates between patients with and without diabetes. Angina burden, quality of life, and overall health status scores were similar between diabetic and nondiabetic patients over 1 year. Although technical success was lower in patients with diabetes, this reflected lower success among patients with prior bypass surgery, without any significant difference in success rate after adjusting for prior bypass and disease complexity. CTO PCI complication rates are similar in diabetic and nondiabetic patients, and symptom improvement following CTO PCI is robust

  16. Registry of people with diabetes in three Latin American countries: a suitable approach to evaluate the quality of health care provided to people with type 2 diabetes.

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    Commendatore, V; Dieuzeide, G; Faingold, C; Fuente, G; Luján, D; Aschner, P; Lapertosa, S; Villena Chávez, J; Elgart, J; Gagliardino, J J

    2013-12-01

    To implement a patient registry and collect data related to the care provided to people with type 2 diabetes in six specialized centers of three Latin American countries, measure the quality of such care using a standardized form (QUALIDIAB) that collects information on different quality of care indicators, and analyze the potential of collecting this information for improving quality of care and conducting clinical research. We collected data on clinical, metabolic and therapeutic indicators, micro- and macrovascular complications, rate of use of diagnostic and therapeutic elements and hospitalization of patients with type 2 diabetes in six diabetes centers, four in Argentina and one each in Colombia and Peru. We analyzed 1157 records from patients with type 2 diabetes (Argentina, 668; Colombia, 220; Peru, 269); 39 records were discarded because of data entry errors or inconsistencies. The data demonstrated frequency performance deficiencies in several procedures, including foot and ocular fundus examination and various cardiovascular screening tests. In contrast, HbA1c and cardiovascular risk factor assessments were performed with a greater frequency than recommended by international guidelines. Management of insulin therapy was sub-optimal, and deficiencies were also noted among diabetes education indicators. Patient registry was successfully implemented in these clinics following an interactive educational program. The data obtained provide useful information as to deficiencies in care and may be used to guide quality of care improvement efforts. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Statewide Quality Improvement Initiative to Reduce Early Elective Deliveries and Improve Birth Registry Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Heather C; King, Eileen; White, Beth E; Ford, Susan E; Fuller, Sandra; Krew, Michael A; Marcotte, Michael P; Iams, Jay D; Bailit, Jennifer L; Bouchard, Jo M; Friar, Kelly; Lannon, Carole M

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the success of a quality improvement initiative to reduce early elective deliveries at less than 39 weeks of gestation and improve birth registry data accuracy rapidly and at scale in Ohio. Between February 2013 and March 2014, participating hospitals were involved in a quality improvement initiative to reduce early elective deliveries at less than 39 weeks of gestation and improve birth registry data. This initiative was designed as a learning collaborative model (group webinars and a single face-to-face meeting) and included individual quality improvement coaching. It was implemented using a stepped wedge design with hospitals divided into three balanced groups (waves) participating in the initiative sequentially. Birth registry data were used to assess hospital rates of nonmedically indicated inductions at less than 39 weeks of gestation. Comparisons were made between groups participating and those not participating in the initiative at two time points. To measure birth registry accuracy, hospitals conducted monthly audits comparing birth registry data with the medical record. Associations were assessed using generalized linear repeated measures models accounting for time effects. Seventy of 72 (97%) eligible hospitals participated. Based on birth registry data, nonmedically indicated inductions at less than 39 weeks of gestation declined in all groups with implementation (wave 1: 6.2-3.2%, Pinitiative, they saw significant decreases in rates of early elective deliveries as compared with wave 3 (control; P=.018). All waves had significant improvement in birth registry accuracy (wave 1: 80-90%, P=.017; wave 2: 80-100%, P=.002; wave 3: 75-100%, Pinitiative enabled statewide spread of change strategies to decrease early elective deliveries and improve birth registry accuracy over 14 months and could be used for rapid dissemination of other evidence-based obstetric care practices across states or hospital systems.

  18. GCK-MODY in the US National Monogenic Diabetes Registry: frequently misdiagnosed and unnecessarily treated.

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    Carmody, David; Naylor, Rochelle N; Bell, Charles D; Berry, Shivani; Montgomery, Jazzmyne T; Tadie, Elizabeth C; Hwang, Jessica L; Greeley, Siri Atma W; Philipson, Louis H

    2016-10-01

    GCK-MODY leads to mildly elevated blood glucose typically not requiring therapy. It has been described in all ethnicities, but mainly in Caucasian Europeans. Here we describe our US cohort of GCK-MODY. We examined the rates of detection of heterozygous mutations in the GCK gene in individuals referred to the US Monogenic Diabetes Registry with a phenotype consistent with GCK-MODY. We also assessed referral patterns, treatment and demography, including ethnicity, of the cohort. Deleterious heterozygous GCK mutations were found in 54.7 % of Registry probands selected for GCK sequencing for this study. Forty-nine percent were previously unnecessarily treated with glucose-lowering agents, causing hypoglycemia and other adverse effects in some of the subjects. The proportion of probands found to have a GCK mutation through research-based testing was similar across each ethnic group. However, together African-American, Latino and Asian subjects represented only 20.5 % of screened probands and 17.2 % of those with GCK-MODY, despite higher overall diabetes prevalence in these groups. Our data show that a high detection rate of GCK-MODY is possible based on clinical phenotype and that prior to genetic diagnosis, a large percentage are inappropriately treated with glucose-lowering therapies. We also find low minority representation in our Registry, which may be due to disparities in diagnostic diabetes genetic testing and is an area needing further investigation.

  19. Diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors in a society with a type 2 diabetes epidemic: a Saudi National Diabetes Registry-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors have not been studied in a society known to have diabetes epidemic like Saudi Arabia. Using a large data base registry will provide a better understanding and accurate assessment of this chronic complication and its related risk factors.A total of 54,670 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were selected from the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR and analyzed for the presence of diabetic nephropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA criterion was used to identify cases with microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and end stage renal disease (ESRD for prevalence estimation and risk factor assessment.The overall prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was 10.8%, divided into 1.2% microalbuminuria, 8.1%macroalbuninuria and 1.5% ESRD. Age and diabetes duration as important risk factors have a strong impact on the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, ranging from 3.7% in patients aged 25-44 years and a duration of >5 years, to 21.8% in patients ≥ 65 years with a diabetes duration of ≥ 15 years. Diabetes duration, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension, age >45 years, hyperlipidemia, male gender, smoking, and chronologically, poor glycemic control has a significantly high risk for diabetic nephropathy.The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is underestimated as a result of a shortage of screening programs. Risk factors related to diabetic nephropathy in this society are similar to other societies. There is thus an urgent need for screening and prevention programs for diabetic nephropathy among the Saudi population.

  20. Diabetic Nephropathy and Its Risk Factors in a Society with a Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic: A Saudi National Diabetes Registry-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ahmad, Najlaa A.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Al-Mutlaq, Hind M.; David, Satish K.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra

    2014-01-01

    Aims The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and its risk factors have not been studied in a society known to have diabetes epidemic like Saudi Arabia. Using a large data base registry will provide a better understanding and accurate assessment of this chronic complication and its related risk factors. Methodology A total of 54,670 patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥25 years were selected from the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) and analyzed for the presence of diabetic nephropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) criterion was used to identify cases with microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria and end stage renal disease (ESRD) for prevalence estimation and risk factor assessment. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic nephropathy was 10.8%, divided into 1.2% microalbuminuria, 8.1%macroalbuninuria and 1.5% ESRD. Age and diabetes duration as important risk factors have a strong impact on the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy, ranging from 3.7% in patients aged 25–44 years and a duration of >5 years, to 21.8% in patients ≥65 years with a diabetes duration of ≥15 years. Diabetes duration, retinopathy, neuropathy, hypertension, age >45 years, hyperlipidemia, male gender, smoking, and chronologically, poor glycemic control has a significantly high risk for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is underestimated as a result of a shortage of screening programs. Risk factors related to diabetic nephropathy in this society are similar to other societies. There is thus an urgent need for screening and prevention programs for diabetic nephropathy among the Saudi population. PMID:24586457

  1. Pooled analysis of the CONFIRM registries: safety outcomes in diabetic patients treated with orbital atherectomy for peripheral artery disease.

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    Lee, Michael S; Yang, Tae; Adams, George

    2014-04-01

    To compare the acute outcomes of orbital atherectomy treatment in diabetic vs. non-diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). The CONFIRM registry series contained 1842 diabetic patients (1111 men; mean age 70.6±10.2 years) with 2819 lesions and 1247 non-diabetic patients (732 men; mean age 72.9±10.7 years) with 1885 lesions. The composite rate of procedure-related complications, including dissection, perforation, slow flow, vessel closure, spasm, embolism, and thrombus formation, was analyzed for the diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Diabetics were younger but had a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (patherectomy resulted in similar low procedure-related complication rates in both the diabetic and non-diabetic groups, despite diabetics having more unfavorable baseline clinical and lesion characteristics. This study suggests that orbital atherectomy is a safe and effective treatment modality in both the diabetic and the non-diabetic populations.

  2. Adoption and implementation of mandated diabetes registries by community health centers.

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    Helfrich, Christian D; Savitz, Lucy A; Swiger, Kathleen D; Weiner, Bryan J

    2007-07-01

    Innovations adopted by healthcare organizations are often externally mandated. However, few studies examine how mandated innovations progress from adoption to sustained effective use. This study uses Rogers's model of organizational innovation to explore community health centers' (CHCs') mandated adoption and implementation of disease registries in the federal Health Disparities Collaborative (HDC). Case studies were conducted on six CHCs in North Carolina participating in the HDC on type 2 diabetes mellitus. Data were collected from semistructured interviews with key staff, and from site-level and individual-level surveys. Although disease registry adoption and implementation were mandated, CHCs exercised prerogative in the timing of registry adoption and the functions emphasized. Executive and medical director involvement, often directly on the HDC teams, was the single most salient influence on adoption and implementation. Staff members' personal experience with diabetes also provided context and gave registries added significance. Participants lauded HDC's technique of small-scale, rapid-cycle change, but valued even more shared problem solving and peer learning among HDC teams. However, lack of cross-training, inadequate resources, and staff turnover posed serious threats to sustainability of the registries. The present study illustrates the usefulness of Rogers's model for studying mandated innovation and highlights several key factors, including direct, personal involvement of organizational leadership, and shared problem solving and peer learning facilitated by the HDC. However, these six CHCs elected to participate early in the HDC, and may not be typical of North Carolina's remaining CHCs. Furthermore, most face important long-term challenges that threaten routinization.

  3. Management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus by cardiovascular and endocrine physicians: a China registry.

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    Song, Jie; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Li, Li-Hua; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Li-Nong; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-08-01

    We investigated hypertension and diabetes mellitus in two management settings, namely cardiology and endocrinology, and their associations with albuminuria while accounting for the management of these two diseases. Our multicentre registry included patients (≥20 years) seen for hypertension in cardiology or for diabetes mellitus in endocrinology. We administered a questionnaire and measured blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and albuminuria. Presence of both hypertension and diabetes was observed in 32.9% of hypertensive patients in cardiology (n = 1291) and 58.9% of diabetic patients in endocrinology (n = 1168). When both diseases were present, the use of combination antihypertensive therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.31, P hypertension and diabetes, however, was not different between the two management settings (P ≥ 0.21), regardless of the therapeutic target (SBP/DBP hypertension (12.6%) or diabetes alone (15.9%). Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were often jointly present, especially in the setting of endocrinology. The management was insufficient on the use of combination antihypertensive therapy and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system in endocrinology and for combination antidiabetic therapy in cardiology, indicating a need for more intensive management and better control of both clinical conditions.

  4. Management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus by cardiovascular and endocrine physicians: a China registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Li, Li-Hua; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Li-Nong; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated hypertension and diabetes mellitus in two management settings, namely cardiology and endocrinology, and their associations with albuminuria while accounting for the management of these two diseases. Methods: Our multicentre registry included patients (≥20 years) seen for hypertension in cardiology or for diabetes mellitus in endocrinology. We administered a questionnaire and measured blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and albuminuria. Results: Presence of both hypertension and diabetes was observed in 32.9% of hypertensive patients in cardiology (n = 1291) and 58.9% of diabetic patients in endocrinology (n = 1168). When both diseases were present, the use of combination antihypertensive therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.31, P hypertension and diabetes, however, was not different between the two management settings (P ≥ 0.21), regardless of the therapeutic target (SBP/DBP hypertension (12.6%) or diabetes alone (15.9%). Conclusion: Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were often jointly present, especially in the setting of endocrinology. The management was insufficient on the use of combination antihypertensive therapy and inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system in endocrinology and for combination antidiabetic therapy in cardiology, indicating a need for more intensive management and better control of both clinical conditions. PMID:27270188

  5. A Web-based interactive diabetes registry for health care management and planning in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A; Youssef, Amira M; Subhani, Shazia N; Ahmad, Najlaa A; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H; Ibrahim, Heba M

    2013-09-09

    Worldwide, eHealth is a rapidly growing technology. It provides good quality health services at lower cost and increased availability. Diabetes has reached an epidemic stage in Saudi Arabia and has a medical and economic impact at a countrywide level. Data are greatly needed to better understand and plan to prevent and manage this medical problem. The Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) is an electronic medical file supported by clinical, investigational, and management data. It functions as a monitoring tool for medical, social, and cultural bases for primary and secondary prevention programs. Economic impact, in the form of direct or indirect cost, is part of the registry's scope. The registry's geographic information system (GIS) produces a variety of maps for diabetes and associated diseases. In addition to availability and distribution of health facilities in the Kingdom, GIS data provide health planners with the necessary information to make informed decisions. The electronic data bank serves as a research tool to help researchers for both prospective and retrospective studies. A Web-based interactive GIS system was designed to serve as an electronic medical file for diabetic patients retrieving data from medical files by trained registrars. Data was audited and cleaned before it was archived in the electronic filing system. It was then used to produce epidemiologic, economic, and geographic reports. A total of 84,942 patients were registered from 2000 to 2012, growing by 10% annually. The SNDR reporting system for epidemiology data gives better understanding of the disease pattern, types, and gender characteristics. Part of the reporting system is to assess quality of health care using different parameters, such as HbA1c, that gives an impression of good diabetes control for each institute. Economic reports give accurate cost estimation of different services given to diabetic patients, such as the annual insulin cost per patient for type 1, type 2, and

  6. Diabetes mellitus in Friedreich Ataxia: A case series of 19 patients from the German-Austrian diabetes mellitus registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Angeliki; Häusler, Martin G; Veigel, Andreas; Tzamouranis, Konstantina; Pfeifer, Martin W; Schmidt, Andreas; Bökamp, Martin; Haberland, Holger; Wagner, Siegfried; Brückel, Joachim; de Sousa, Gideon; Hackl, Lukas; Bollow, Esther; Holl, Reinhard W

    2018-05-12

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a multisystem autosomal recessive disease with progressive clinical course involving the neuromuscular and endocrine system. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one typical non-neurological manifestation, caused by beta cell failure and insulin resistance. Because of its rarity, knowledge on DM in FRDA is limited. Based on data from 200 301 patients with DM of the German-Austrian diabetes registry (DPV) and two exemplary patient reports, characteristics of patients with DM and FRDA are compared with classical type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Diabetes phenotype in FRDA is intermediate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes with ketoacidosis being frequent at presentation and blood glucose levels similar to T1Dm but higher than in T2Dm (356 ±165 and 384± 203 mg/dl). 63.2% of FRDA patients received insulin monotherapy, 21% insulin plus oral antidiabetics and 15.8% lifestyle change only, applying similar doses of insulin in all three groups. FRDA patients did not show overweight and HbA1c levels were even lower than in T1Dm or T2Dm patients, respectively, indicating good overall diabetes control. FRDADm can be controlled by individualized treatment regimen with insulin or oral antidiabetics. Patients with DM in FRDA may show a relevant risk to ketoacidotic complications, which should be avoided. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Marked improvements in outcomes of contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Andrew M; Abbott, J Dawn; Jacobs, Alice K; Vlachos, Helen A; Selzer, Faith; Laskey, Warren K; Detre, Katherine M; Williams, David O

    2006-12-01

    We sought to determine if advances in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are associated with better outcomes among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients with DM enrolled in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) early PTCA Registry (1985-1986) were compared to those in the subsequent contemporary Dynamic Registry (1999-2002) for in-hospital and one-year cardiovascular outcomes. The study population included 945 adults with DM, 325 from the PTCA Registry and 620 from the Dynamic Registry. Multivariable Cox regression models were built to estimate the risk of clinical events. Dynamic Registry patients were older, had more noncardiac comorbidities, and a lower mean ejection fraction (50.5% vs 57.8%, P diabetes had more advanced coronary disease, in-hospital and late adverse events were lower. A combination of the use of stents and an increase in adjunctive medical therapy are likely responsible for the observed improvements in outcomes in contemporary PCI.

  8. Increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome in patients with primary aldosteronism of the German Conn's Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslik, Gregor; Wallaschofski, Henri; Dietz, Anna; Riester, Anna; Reincke, Martin; Allolio, Bruno; Lang, Katharina; Quack, Ivo; Rump, Lars C; Willenberg, Holger S; Beuschlein, Felix; Quinkler, Marcus; Hannemann, Anke

    2015-11-01

    Abnormalities in glucose homeostasis have been described in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) but most studies show inconsistent results. Therefore, we aimed to compare the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in newly diagnosed PA patients to a matched control cohort of the background population. In total, 305 PA patients of the prospective German Conn's Registry were compared to the population-based Study of Health In Pomerania (SHIP1; n=2454). A 1:1 match regarding sex, age, and BMI resulted in 269 matched pairs regarding type 2 diabetes and 183 matched pairs regarding MetS. Of the total, 153 PA patients underwent oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) at diagnosis and 38 PA patients were reevaluated at follow-up. Type 2 diabetes and MetS were significantly more frequent in PA patients than in the control population (17.2% vs 10.4%, P=0.03; 56.8% vs 44.8%, P=0.02 respectively). Also, HbA1c levels were higher in PA patients than in controls (P<0.01). Of the total, 35.3% of non-diabetic PA patients showed an abnormal OGTT (¼ newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and ¾ impaired glucose tolerance). PA patients with an abnormal OGTT at baseline presented with significantly improved 2 h OGTT glucose (P=0.01) at follow-up. We detected a negative correlation between 2 h OGTT glucose levels and serum potassium (P<0.01). Type 2 diabetes and MetS are more prevalent in patients with PA than in controls matched for sex, age, BMI, and blood pressure. This may explain in part the increased cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in PA patients. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Initial presentation of type 2 diabetes in adolescents predicts durability of successful treatment with metformin monotherapy: Insights from the pediatric diabetes consortium T2D registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have rapid deterioration of glycemic control on metformin monotherapy within 2 years of diagnosis. Enrollment data from the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium T2D registry were used to categorize 276 youth with a T2D duration >/-2 years into two groups: (1) par...

  10. Does diabetes appear in distinct phenotypes in young people? Results of the diabetes mellitus incidence Cohort Registry (DiMelli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Warncke

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The diabetes mellitus Incidence Cohort Registry (DiMelli aims to characterize diabetes phenotypes by immunologic, metabolic, and genetic markers. We classified patients into three groups according to islet autoantibody status and examined whether patients with multiple diabetes-associated autoantibodies, one autoantibody, or without autoantibodies differed with respect to clinical, metabolic, and genetic parameters, including an insulin sensitivity (IS score based on waist, HbA1c, and triglycerides. We also assessed whether metabolic markers predicted the immune status. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As of June 2012, 630 patients in Bavaria, Germany, aged <20 years diagnosed with any type of diabetes within the preceding 6 months were registered in DiMelli. We compared the clinical and laboratory parameters between islet autoantibody status defined patient groups. Parameters showing the strongest associations were included in principal component analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess the ability of the IS Score to predict islet autoantibody status. RESULTS: Patients with multiple islet autoantibodies, one autoantibody, or without autoantibodies were significantly different in terms of BMI percentile, weight loss before diagnosis, fasting C-peptide (all, P<0.001, and IS Score (P=0.034. However, principal component analysis revealed no distinct patterns according to autoantibody status. At the optimal IS Score cut-off for predicting islet autoantibody positivity (single compared to none, the specificity was 52.0% and the sensitivity was 86.8%. With respect to prediction of multiple autoantibodies (compared to none, specificity and sensitivity were slightly lower and in combination inferior to those obtained using the BMI percentile and fasting C-peptide. DISCUSSION: The DiMelli study indicated that patients with and without islet autoantibodies differed with respect to metabolic and genetic markers but there

  11. Renal replacement therapy for diabetic end-stage renal disease: Data from 10 registries in Europe (1991-2000)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Paul C. W.; Jager, Kitty J.; Stengel, Bénédicte; Grönhagen-Riska, Carola; Feest, Terry G.; Briggs, J. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Background. There is concern about the rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and of the resultant nephropathy. This study uses data from the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) Registry to provide information on the epidemiology and outcome of

  12. National kidney dialysis and transplant registries in Latin America: how to implement and improve them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carlota González-Bedat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Strategic Plan of the Pan American Health Organization, 2014-2019, Championing Health: Sustainable Development and Equityrecognizes that "Chronic kidney disease, caused mainly by complications of diabetes and hypertension, has increased in the Region." This Plan includes the first concrete goal on chronic kidney disease: to achieve a prevalence rate for renal replacement therapy of at least 700 patients per million population by 2019. National dialysis and transplant registries (DTR are a useful tool for epidemiological research, health care planning, and quality improvement. Their success depends on the quality of their data and quality control procedures. This article describes the current situation of national DTRs in the Region and the content of their information and health indicators, and it offers recommendations for creating and maintaining them. It points to their heterogeneity or absence in some countries, in line with the inequities that patients face in access to renal replacement therapy. The complete lack of information in Caribbean countries prevents their inclusion in this communication, which requires immediate attention.

  13. Managing Type 1 Diabetes: Trends and Outcomes over 20 years of Follow-up in the Wisconsin Diabetes Registry Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Mari; LeCaire, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Context The WDRS is a Wisconsin cohort with type 1 diabetes, diagnosed 1987–1992 and actively followed. The study provides patients and health care professionals with better prognostic information and helps identify aspects of diabetes management that need improvement. Objective To describe diabetes management and acute and chronic complications from the time of diagnosis. Design and setting All incident cases diagnosed at age ≤30 in 28 counties were eligible and 590 enrolled. A baseline interview, blood sample kits, biannual/annual questionnaires and study examinations at 4, 7, 9, 14 and 20 year's duration were administered. Main outcome measures Diabetes management indicators, general health, and acute and chronic complications. Results Glycemic control was poor in adolescence, but improved with age. A high percentage of individuals do not meet treatment standards for blood pressure and lipid profile. Self reported health deteriorated with age, and BMI was similar to that of the general U.S. population. Chronic complications were present at 15–20 years duration, but tended to be relatively mild. Conclusion There is room for improvement in diabetes management, especially in meeting goals for blood pressure and lipid profile. Nonetheless, individuals with type 1 diabetes can be offered a more optimistic prognosis than in the past. PMID:19743752

  14. Epidemiology of diabetes mellitus in Russian Federation: clinical and statistical report according to the federal diabetes registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We analysed the main epidemiological characteristics of diabetes mellitus (DM in the Russian Federation (prevalence, incidence, mortality and mean life span, degree of diabetes control, and prevalence of diabetic complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and diabetic foot syndrome and macrovascular pathology according to the federal DM registry. Materials and methods. The database of the federal DM registry of 79 regions was included using the online system until 31.12.2016. Results. TThe total number of patients with DM in the Russian Federation on 31.12.2016 was 4.348 million (2.97% of the population, comprising 4 million patients with DM2 (92%, 255,000 with type 1 diabetes (T1DM (6%, and 75,000 with other types of DM (2%. DM prevalence per 100,000 population was as follows: T1DM, 164.19/100,000; type 2 diabetes (T2DM, 2637.17/100,000; and other types of DM, 50.62/100. The incidence per 100,000 population was as follows: T1DM, 16.15/100,000; T2DM, 154.9/100,000; and other types of DM, 8.65/100,000. Mortality per 100,000 population was as follows: T1DM, 2.1/100,000; T2DM, 60.29/100,000; and other types of DM, 0.57/100,000. Mortality decreased in patients with T1DM by 6.6% and with T2DM by 3.6%. Mean life span in patients with T1DM was 50.3 years for men and 58.5 years for women. Mean life span in patients with T2DM was 70.1 years for men and 75.5 years for women. Glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels in T1DM was <7% in 33.4%, 7%–7.9% in 28.3%, 8%–8.9% in 16.2%, and ≥9.0% in 22.1% of patients. HbA1c levels in T2DM was <7% in 52.1%, 7%–7.9% in 29.1%, 8%–8.9% in 10%, and ≥9.0% in 8.7% of patients. Conclusions. This study evaluated the increase in DM prevalence in the Russian Federation in 2016 and in the dynamics of 2013–2016, which was mainly due to T2DM. An increase in patients with a target HbA1c level <7% and a decrease in the proportion of patients with severe uncontrolled DM was observed; however, the treatment

  15. Quality Registries in Sweden, Healthcare Improvements and Elderly Persons with Cognitive Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Titti

    2016-12-01

    Policy-makers, the medical industry and researchers are demonstrating a keen interest in the potential of large registries of patient data, both nationally and internationally. The registries offer promising ways to measure and develop operational quality within health and medical care services. As a result of certain favourable patient data regulations and government funding, the development of quality registries is advanced in Sweden. The combination of increasing demand for more cost-efficient healthcare that can accommodate the demographic development of a rapidly ageing population, and the emergence of eHealth with an increasing digitalisation of patient data, calls attention to quality registries as a possible way for healthcare improvements. However, even if the use of registries has many advantages, there are some drawbacks from a patient privacy point of view. This article aims to analyse this growing interdependence of quality registries for the healthcare sector. It discusses some lessons from the Swedish case, with particular focus on the collection of data from elderly persons with cognitive impairments.

  16. Are data from national quality registries used in quality improvement at Swedish hospital clinics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Mio; Halford, Christina; Eldh, Ann Catrine; Dahlström, Tobias; Vengberg, Sofie; Wallin, Lars; Winblad, Ulrika

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the use of data from national quality registries (NQRs) in local quality improvement as well as purported key factors for effective clinical use in Sweden. Comparative descriptive: a web survey of all Swedish hospitals participating in three NQRs with different levels of development (certification level). Heads of the clinics and physician(s) at clinics participating in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke), the Swedish National Registry of Gallstone Surgery and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (GallRiks) and the Swedish Lung Cancer Registry (NLCR). Individual and unit level use of NQRs in local quality improvement, and perceptions on data quality, organizational conditions and user motivation. Riksstroke data were reported as most extensively used at individual and unit levels (x̅ 17.97 of 24 and x̅ 27.06 of 35). Data quality and usefulness was considered high for the two most developed NQRs (x̅ 19.86 for Riksstroke and x̅ 19.89 for GallRiks of 25). Organizational conditions were estimated at the same level for Riksstroke and GallRiks (x̅ 12.90 and x̅ 13.28 of 20) while the least developed registry, the NLCR, had lower estimates (x̅ 10.32). In Riksstroke, the managers requested registry data more often (x̅ 15.17 of 20). While there were significant differences between registries in key factors such as management interest, use of NQR data in local quality improvement seems rather prevalent, at least for Riksstroke. The link between the registry's level of development and factors important for routinization of innovations such as NQRs needs investigation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Can public health registry data improve Emergency Medical Dispatch?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M S; Christensen, E F; Jepsen, S B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency Medical Dispatchers make decisions based on limited information. We aimed to investigate if adding demographic and hospitalization history information to the dispatch process improved precision. METHODS: This 30-day follow-up study evaluated time-critical emergencies...

  18. #DDOD Use Case: Improve National Death Registry for use with outcomes research

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — SUMMARY DDOD use case request to improve National Death Registry for use with outcomes research. WHAT IS A USE CASE? A “Use Case” is a request that was made by the...

  19. [Is cancer incidence different between type 2 diabetes patients compared to non-diabetics in hemodialysis? A study from the REIN registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, Aurélie; Pladys, Adelaide; Kihal, Wahida; Siebert, Muriel; Haddj-Elmrabet, Atman; Cernon, Charlotte; Bernard, Anne; Charasse, Christophe; Mandart, Lise; Hamel, Didier; Tanquerel, Tugdual; Strullu, Bernard; Richer, Christine; Siohan, Pascale; Sawadogo, Théophile; Baleynaud, Juliette; Baluta, Simona; Bayat, Sahar; Vigneau, Cécile

    2018-05-01

    In France, diabetes mellitus is now the second cause of end stage renal disease. In a large previous French national study, we observed that dialyzed diabetics have a significant lower risk of death by cancer. This first study was focused on cancer death but did not investigate cancer incidence. In this context, the aim of this second study was to compare the incidence of cancer in diabetic dialyzed patients compared to non-diabetic dialyzed patients in a French region. This epidemiologic multicentric study included 588 diabetic and non-diabetic patients starting hemodialysis between 2002 and 2007 in Bretagne. Data were issued from REIN registry and cancer incidence were individually collected from medical records. Diabetics and non-diabetics were matched one by one on age, sex and year of dialysis initiation. During the follow-up, we observed 28 cancers (9.4%) in diabetic patients and 26 cancers (8.9%) in non-diabetics patients. The cumulative incidence to develop a cancer 2 years after the dialysis start was approximately 6% in both diabetics and non-diabetics patients. In univariate Fine and Gray analysis, BMI, hemoglobin, statin use had P-value<0.2. However, in the adjusted model, these variables were not significantly associated with cancer incidence. This study lead on a little number of dialyzed patients did not show any significant difference on cancer incidence between diabetic and non-diabetic patients after hemodialysis start. Copyright © 2017 Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al-Rubeaan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk.

  1. Using an International Clinical Registry of Regional Anesthesia to Identify Targets for Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites, Brian D.; Barrington, Michael J.; Davis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread use of regional anesthesia, limited information on clinical performance exists. Institutions, therefore, have little knowledge of how they are performing in regards to both safety and effectiveness. In this study, we demonstrate how a medical institution (or physician/physician group) may use data from a multi-center clinical registry of regional anesthesia to inform quality improvement strategies. Methods We analyzed data from the International Registry of Regional Anesthesia that includes prospective data on peripheral regional anesthesia procedures from 19 centers located around the world. Using data from the clinical registry, we present summary statistics of the overall safety and effectiveness of regional anesthesia. Furthermore, we demonstrate, using a variety of performance measures, how these data can be used by hospitals to identify areas for quality improvement. To do so, we compare the performance of one member institution (a United States medical center in New Hampshire) to that of the other 18 member institutions of the clinical registry. Results The clinical registry contained information on 23,271 blocks that were performed between June 1, 2011, and May 1, 2014, on 16,725 patients. The overall success rate was 96.7%, immediate complication rate was 2.2%, and the all-cause 60-day rate of neurological sequelae was 8.3 (95% CI, 7.2–9.7) per 10,000. Registry wide major hospital events included 7 wrong site blocks, 3 seizures, 1 complete heart block, 1 retroperitoneal hematoma, and 3 pneumothoraces. For our reference medical center, we identified areas meriting quality improvement. Specifically, after accounting for differences in the age, sex, and health status of patient populations, the reference medical center appeared to rely more heavily on opioids for post procedure management, had higher patient pain scores, and experienced delayed discharge when compared with other member institutions. Conclusions To our

  2. Type II diabetes and its therapy in clinical practice - results from the standardised non-interventional registry SIRTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallwitz, B; Kusterer, K; Hildemann, S; Fresenius, K

    2014-12-01

    Modern antidiabetic therapies should achieve low HbA1c values and avoid hypoglycaemic complications. The registry SIRTA included 1522 patients with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from 306 German medical practices. Patients had an HbA1c > 6.5% under the maximum tolerated metformin dose. If required, they received combination therapy with other antidiabetics according to the guideline of the German Diabetes Society [Deutsche Diabetes Gesellschaft (DDG)] or usual medical practice. Patients were followed up for 6 months. The target criteria included the achievement of HbA1c target values and the emergence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes. Most patients (64.0%) were planned to achieve an HbA1c target < 6.5%, the standard target recommended by the 2009 DDG guideline valid throughout the registry. Primarily to reduce the individual risk for hypoglycaemia, 32.4% of patients had a less strict HbA1c-target of 6.5-7.0%. These targets were achieved by 31.3% and 44.3% of patients, respectively. Combination therapies increased from 45% to 56% over the 6 months registry. Four patients had severe hypoglycaemias (0.26%). The registry confirms results from other epidemiologic studies on the therapy of T2DM in everyday practice. The treatment strategies applied effectively reduced blood glucose and avoided severe hypoglycaemias. An early therapy of insufficiently controlled patients with T2DM is important, as lower baseline values facilitated achieving HbA1c targets. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The paradox of clopidogrel use in patients with acute coronary syndromes and diabetes: insight from the Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndrome Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlini, Marco; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Grieco, Niccolò; Rossini, Roberta; De Servi, Stefano; Mafrici, Antonio; Sponzilli, Carlo; Demarchi, Andrea; Assanelli, Emilio M; Camisasca, Paola; Chizzola, Giuliano; Corrada, Elena; Farina, Andrea; Pedrinazzi, Claudio; Lettieri, Corrado; Oltrona Visconti, Luigi

    2018-06-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and acute coronary syndromes have a greater level of platelet aggregation and a poor response to oral antiplatelet drugs. Clopidogrel is still widely used in clinical practice, despite the current evidence favoring ticagrelor and prasugrel. The aim of this study was to investigate the determinants of clopidogrel use in the population of the multicenter prospective 'Acute Coronary Syndrome and Diabetes Registry' carried out during a 9-week period between March and May 2015 at 29 Hospitals. A total of 559 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients [mean age: 68.7±11.3 years, 50% ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)], with 'known DM' (56%) or 'hyperglycemia' at admission, were included in the registry; 460 (85%) patients received a myocardial revascularization. At hospital discharge, dual antiplatelet therapy was prescribed to 88% of the patients (clopidogrel ticagrelor and prasugrel to 39, 38, and 23%, respectively). Differences in P2Y12 inhibitor administration were recorded on the basis of history of diabetes, age, and clinical presentation (unstable angina/non-STEMI vs. non-STEMI). On univariate analysis, age older than 75 years or more, known DM, peripheral artery disease, previous myocardial infarction, previous revascularization, complete revascularization, previous cerebrovascular event, creatinine clearance, unstable angina/non-STEMI at presentation, Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Score, EuroSCORE, CRUSADE Bleeding Score, and oral anticoagulant therapy were significantly associated with clopidogrel choice at discharge. On multivariate analysis, only oral anticoagulant therapy and the CRUSADE Bleeding Score remained independent predictors of clopidogrel prescription. In the present registry of a high-risk population, clopidogrel was the most used P2Y12 inhibitor at hospital discharge, confirming the 'paradox' to treat sicker patients with the less effective drug. Diabetic status, a marker of higher

  4. Longitudinal Trajectories of Metabolic Control From Childhood to Young Adulthood in Type 1 Diabetes From a Large German/Austrian Registry: A Group-Based Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Anke; Hermann, Julia M; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Boettcher, Claudia; Dunstheimer, Désirée; Grulich-Henn, Jürgen; Kuss, Oliver; Rami-Merhar, Birgit; Vogel, Christian; Holl, Reinhard W

    2017-03-01

    Worsening of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes during puberty is a common observation. However, HbA 1c remains stable or even improves for some youths. The aim is to identify distinct patterns of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes from childhood to young adulthood. A total of 6,433 patients with type 1 diabetes were selected from the prospective, multicenter diabetes patient registry Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation (DPV) (follow-up from age 8 to 19 years, baseline diabetes duration ≥2 years, HbA 1c aggregated per year of life). We used latent class growth modeling as the trajectory approach to determine distinct subgroups following a similar trajectory for HbA 1c over time. Five distinct longitudinal trajectories of HbA 1c were determined, comprising group 1 = 40%, group 2 = 27%, group 3 = 15%, group 4 = 13%, and group 5 = 5% of patients. Groups 1-3 indicated stable glycemic control at different HbA 1c levels. At baseline, similar HbA 1c was observed in group 1 and group 4, but HbA 1c deteriorated in group 4 from age 8 to 19 years. Similar patterns were present in group 3 and group 5. We observed differences in self-monitoring of blood glucose, insulin therapy, daily insulin dose, physical activity, BMI SD score, body-height SD score, and migration background across all HbA 1c trajectories (all P ≤ 0.001). No sex differences were present. Comparing groups with similar initial HbA 1c but different patterns, groups with higher HbA 1c increase were characterized by lower frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose and physical activity and reduced height (all P demographics were related to different HbA 1c courses. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Exploring correlates of diabetes-related stress among adults with Type 1 diabetes in the T1D exchange clinic registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Matthew Tyler; Gala, Sasha

    2018-04-01

    To explore relations between diabetes-related stress and multiple sociodemographic, diabetes health, other health, and treatment-related variables among a large sample of adults with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). The sample consisted of 10,821 adults (over 18 years old) enrolled in the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry. The T1D Exchange clinic network consists of 67 diabetes clinical centers throughout the United States selected to broadly represent pediatric and adult patients with T1D. Variables were assessed through participant self-report and extraction of clinic chart data. Univariate and multiple linear regression (with simultaneous entry of all predictors) analyses were conducted. Robustly associated with increased diabetes-related stress across analyses were multiple sociodemographic (female [vs. male], native Hawaiian/other Pacific islander [vs. white/Caucasian], decreased age and diabetes duration), diabetes health (higher HbA1c), other health (lower general health, presence of major life stress and depression, less physical activity), and treatment related variables (use of injections/pen or combination injection/pen/pump [vs. pump], use of CGM, increased frequency of missing insulin doses and BG checking, decreased frequency of BG checking prior to bolus, receipt of mental health treatment). We replicated and extended research demonstrating that diabetes-related stress among people with T1D occurs at higher levels among those with particular sociodemographic characteristics and is associated with a range poorer diabetes health and other health variables, and multiple treatment-related variables. The strong incremental prediction of diabetes-related stress by multiple variables in our study suggests that a multi-variable, personalized approach may increase the effectiveness of treatments for diabetes-related stress. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Airway registry and training curriculum improve intubation outcomes in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malo J

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intubation in critically ill patients remains a highly morbid procedure, and the optimal approach is unclear. We sought to improve the safety of intubation by implementing a simulation curriculum and monitoring performance with an airway registry. Methods and Methods: This is a prospective, single-center observational study of all intubations performed by the medical intensive care unit (ICU team over a five-year period. All fellows take part in a simulation curriculum to improve airway management performance and minimize complications. An airway registry form is completed immediately after each intubation to capture relevant patient, operator, and procedural data. Results: Over a five-year period, the medical ICU team performed 1411 intubations. From Year 1 to Year 5, there were significant increases in first-attempt success (72.6 vs. 88.0%, p<0.001, use of video laryngoscopy (72.3 vs. 93.5%, p<0.001, and use of neuromuscular blocking agents (73.5 vs. 88.4%, p<0.001. There were concurrent decreases in rates of desaturation (25.6 vs. 17.1%, p=0.01 and esophageal intubations (5 vs. 1%, p=0.009. Low rates of hypotension (8.3% and cardiac arrest (0.6% were also observed. Conclusions: The safety of intubation in critically ill patients can be markedly improved through joint implementation of an airway registry and simulation curriculum.

  7. Cohort profile: the TrueNTH Global Registry - an international registry to monitor and improve localised prostate cancer health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sue M; Millar, Jeremy L; Moore, Caroline M; Lewis, John D; Huland, Hartwig; Sampurno, Fanny; Connor, Sarah E; Villanti, Paul; Litwin, Mark S

    2017-11-28

    Globally, prostate cancer treatment and outcomes for men vary according to where they live, their race and the care they receive. The TrueNTH Global Registry project was established as an international registry monitoring care provided to men with localised prostate cancer (CaP). Sites with existing CaP databases in Movember fundraising countries were invited to participate in the international registry. In total, 25 Local Data Centres (LDCs) representing 113 participating sites across 13 countries have nominated to contribute to the project. It will collect a dataset based on the International Consortium for Health Outcome Measures (ICHOM) standardised dataset for localised CaP. A governance strategy has been developed to oversee registry operation, including transmission of reversibly anonymised data. LDCs are represented on the Project Steering Committee, reporting to an Executive Committee. A Project Coordination Centre and Data Coordination Centre (DCC) have been established. A project was undertaken to compare existing datasets, understand capacity at project commencement (baseline) to collect the ICHOM dataset and assist in determining the final data dictionary. 21/25 LDCs provided data dictionaries for review. Some ICHOM data fields were well collected (diagnosis, treatment start dates) and others poorly collected (complications, comorbidities). 17/94 (18%) ICHOM data fields were relegated to non-mandatory fields due to poor capture by most existing registries. Participating sites will transmit data through a web interface biannually to the DCC. Recruitment to the TrueNTH Global Registry-PCOR project will commence in late 2017 with sites progressively contributing reversibly anonymised data following ethical review in local regions. Researchers will have capacity to source deidentified data after the establishment phase. Quality indicators are to be established through a modified Delphi approach in later 2017, and it is anticipated that reports on

  8. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals MODY in up to 6.5% of antibody-negative diabetes cases listed in the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Bente B; Irgens, Henrik U; Molnes, Janne; Sztromwasser, Paweł; Aukrust, Ingvild; Juliusson, Petur B; Søvik, Oddmund; Levy, Shawn; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Joner, Geir; Molven, Anders; Johansson, Stefan; Njølstad, Pål R

    2017-04-01

    MODY can be wrongly diagnosed as type 1 diabetes in children. We aimed to find the prevalence of MODY in a nationwide population-based registry of childhood diabetes. Using next-generation sequencing, we screened the HNF1A, HNF4A, HNF1B, GCK and INS genes in all 469 children (12.1%) negative for both GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies and 469 antibody-positive matched controls selected from the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry (3882 children). Variants were classified using clinical diagnostic criteria for pathogenicity ranging from class 1 (neutral) to class 5 (pathogenic). We identified 58 rare exonic and splice variants in cases and controls. Among antibody-negative patients, 6.5% had genetic variants of classes 3-5 (vs 2.4% in controls; p = 0.002). For the stricter classification (classes 4 and 5), the corresponding number was 4.1% (vs 0.2% in controls; p = 1.6 × 10 -5 ). HNF1A showed the strongest enrichment of class 3-5 variants, with 3.9% among antibody-negative patients (vs 0.4% in controls; p = 0.0002). Antibody-negative carriers of variants in class 3 had a similar phenotype to those carrying variants in classes 4 and 5. This is the first study screening for MODY in all antibody-negative children in a nationwide population-based registry. Our results suggest that the prevalence of MODY in antibody-negative childhood diabetes may reach 6.5%. One-third of these MODY cases had not been recognised by clinicians. Since a precise diagnosis is important for treatment and genetic counselling, molecular screening of all antibody-negative children should be considered in routine diagnostics.

  9. Call to action: A new path for improving diabetes care for Indigenous peoples, a global review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stewart B; Tompkins, Jordan W; TeHiwi, Braden

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in Indigenous populations around the globe, and there is an urgent need to improve the health and health equity of Indigenous peoples with diabetes through timely and appropriate diabetes prevention and management strategies. This review describes the evolution of the diabetes epidemic in Indigenous populations and associated risk factors, highlighting gestational diabetes and intergenerational risk, lifestyle risk factors and social determinants as having particular importance and impact on Indigenous peoples. This review further describes the impact of chronic disease and diabetes on Indigenous peoples and communities, specifically diabetes-related comorbidities and complications. This review provides continued evidence that dramatic changes are necessary to reduce diabetes-related inequities in Indigenous populations, with a call to action to support programmatic primary healthcare transformation capable of empowering Indigenous peoples and communities and improving chronic disease prevention and management. Promising strategies for transforming health services and care for Indigenous peoples include quality improvement initiatives, facilitating diabetes and chronic disease registry and surveillance systems to identify care gaps, and prioritizing evaluation to build the evidence-base necessary to guide future health policy and planning locally and on a global scale. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Charting improvements in US registry HLA typing ambiguity using a typing resolution score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunić, Vanja; Gragert, Loren; Schneider, Joel; Müller, Carlheinz; Maiers, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated stem cell registries have been collecting HLA typing of volunteer bone marrow donors for over 25years. Donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is based primarily on matching the alleles of donors and patients at five polymorphic HLA loci. As HLA typing technologies have continually advanced since the beginnings of stem cell transplantation, registries have accrued typings of varied HLA typing ambiguity. We present a new typing resolution score (TRS), based on the likelihood of self-match, that allows the systematic comparison of HLA typings across different methods, data sets and populations. We apply the TRS to chart improvement in HLA typing within the Be The Match Registry of the United States from the initiation of DNA-based HLA typing to the current state of high-resolution typing using next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, we present a publicly available online tool for evaluation of any given HLA typing. This TRS objectively evaluates HLA typing methods and can help define standards for acceptable recruitment HLA typing. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing a caries risk registry to support caries risk assessment and management for children: A quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Jesley C; Herndon, Jill Boylston; Horton, Roger A; Lynch, Julie; Mathwig, Dawn C; Leonard, Audra; Aravamudhan, Krishna

    2017-10-27

    Health registries are commonly used in medicine to support public health activities and are increasingly used in quality improvement (QI) initiatives. Illustrations of dental registries and their QI applications are lacking. Within dentistry, caries risk assessment implementation and documentation are vital to optimal patient care. The purpose of this article is to describe the processes used to develop a caries risk assessment registry as a QI initiative to support clinical caries risk assessment, caries prevention, and disease management for children. Developmental steps reflected Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality recommendations for planning QI registries and included engaging "champions," defining the project, identifying registry features, defining performance dashboard indicators, and pilot testing with participant feedback. We followed Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence guidelines. Registry eligibility is patients aged 0-17 years. QI tools include prompts to register eligible patients; decision support tools grounded in evidence-based guidelines; and performance dashboard reports delivered at the provider and aggregated levels at regular intervals. The registry was successfully piloted in two practices with documented caries risk assessment increasing from 57 percent to 92 percent and positive feedback regarding the potential to improve dental practice patient centeredness, patient engagement and education, and quality of care. The caries risk assessment registry demonstrates how dental registries may be used in QI efforts to promote joint patient and provider engagement, foster shared decision making, and systematically collect patient information to generate timely and actionable data to improve care quality and patient outcomes at the individual and population levels. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  12. Registry and health insurance claims data in vascular research and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Heidemann, Franziska; Rieß, Henrik Christian; Stoberock, Konstanze; Debus, Sebastian Eike

    2017-01-01

    The expansion of procedures in multidisciplinary vascular medicine has sparked a controversy regarding measures of quality improvement. In addition to primary registries, the use of health insurance claims data is becoming of increasing importance. However, due to the fact that health insurance claims data are not collected for scientific evaluation but rather for reimbursement purposes, meticulous validation is necessary before and during usage in research and quality improvement matters. This review highlights the advantages and disadvantages of such data sources. A recent comprehensive expert opinion panel examined the use of health insurance claims data and other administrative data sources in medicine. Results from several studies concerning the validity of administrative data varied significantly. Validity of these data sources depends on the clinical relevance of the diagnoses considered. The rate of implausible information was 0.04 %, while the validity of the considered diagnoses varied between 80 and 97 % across multiple validation studies. A matching study between health insurance claims data of the third-largest German health insurance provider, DAK-Gesundheit, and a prospective primary registry of the German Society for Vascular Surgery demonstrated a good level of validity regarding the mortality of endovascular and open surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in German hospitals. In addition, a large-scale international comparison of administrative data for the same disorder presented important results in treatment reality, which differed from those from earlier randomized controlled trials. The importance of administrative data for research and quality improvement will continue to increase in the future. When discussing the internal and external validity of this data source, one has to distinguish not only between its intended usage (research vs. quality improvement), but also between the included diseases and/or treatment procedures

  13. Current use of metformin in addition to insulin in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: an analysis based on a large diabetes registry in Germany and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Katja; Datz, Nicolin; Engelsberger, Ilse; Grulich-Henn, Jürgen; Hoertenhuber, Thomas; Knauth, Burkhild; Meissner, Thomas; Wiegand, Susanna; Woelfle, Joachim; Holl, Reinhard W

    2015-11-01

    With increasing obesity in childhood and adolescence, weight gain, and insulin resistance become also more frequent in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Especially during puberty, insulin therapy often has to be intensified and higher insulin doses are necessary. Some studies point to a beneficial effect of metformin in addition to insulin in these patients. In order to describe current practice and possible benefits, we compared pediatric T1DM patients with insulin plus metformin (n = 525) to patients with insulin therapy only (n = 57 487) in a prospective multicenter analysis. Auxological and treatment data from 58 012 patients aged 1 yr with T1DM in the German/Austrian Diabetes Patienten Verlaufsdokumentation (DPV) registry were analyzed by multivariable mixed regression modeling. Patients with additional metformin were older [median (interquartile range)]: [16.1 (14.1-17.6) vs. 15.2 (11.5-17.5) yr] with female preponderance (61.0 vs. 47.2%, p 1). They had higher body mass index-standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) [+2.03 (+1.29 to +2.56) vs. +0.51 (-0.12 to +1.15); p 1] and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (9.0 vs. 8.6%, p 1). Hypertension (43.7 vs. 24.8%) and dyslipidemia (58.4 vs. 40.6%) were significantly more prevalent. Adjusted insulin dose was significantly higher (0.98 vs. 0.93 IU/kg bodyweight). In a subgroup of 285 patients followed-up longitudinally (average treatment period 1.42 yr), addition of metformin resulted in a slight reduction of BMI-SDS [-0.01 (-2.01 to +1.40)], but did not improve HbA1c or insulin requirement. Additional metformin therapy in T1DM is primarily used in obese females. Additional therapy with metformin was associated with minor benefits. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes have been compiled and circulated to health care workers, but ... studied and attempted to improve the quality of diabetes care in primary care ..... project indicators in the Indian Health Service primary care setting. Diabetes Care ...

  15. Designing exposure registries for improved tracking of occupational exposure and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrandale, Victoria H; Bornstein, Stephen; King, Andrew; Takaro, Timothy K; Demers, Paul A

    2016-06-27

    Registries are one strategy for collecting information on occupational exposure and disease in populations. Recently leaders in the Canadian occupational health and safety community have shown an interest in the use of occupational exposure registries. The primary goal of this study was to review a series of Canadian exposure registries to identify their strengths and weaknesses as a tool for tracking occupational exposure and disease in Canada. A secondary goal was to identify the features of an exposure registry needed to specifically contribute to prevention, including the identification of new exposure-disease relationships. A documentary review of five exposure registries from Canada was completed. Strengths and limitations of the registries were compared and key considerations for designing new registries were identified. The goals and structure of the exposure registries varied considerably. Most of the reviewed registries had voluntary registration, which presents challenges for the use of the data for either surveillance or epidemiology. It is recommended that eight key issues be addressed when planning new registries: clear registry goal(s), a definition of exposure, data to be collected (and how it will be used), whether enrolment will be mandatory, as well as ethical, privacy and logistical considerations. When well constructed, an exposure registry can be a valuable tool for surveillance, epidemiology and ultimately the prevention of occupational disease. However, exposure registries also have a number of actual and potential limitations that need to be considered.

  16. Implementation of a stroke registry is associated with an improvement in stroke performance measures in a tertiary hospital in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ana Lucia; Góngora-Rivera, Fernando; Muruet, Walter; Villarreal, Héctor Jorge; Gutiérrez-Herrera, Mildred; Huerta, Lena; Carrasco, Diana; Soto-García, Anally; Espinosa-Ortega, Meztli

    2015-04-01

    Stroke registries provide a simple way for improving patient care, and its use has been associated with a better adherence to the published guidelines. Few Latin American countries had established stroke registries. Our study is the first in Mexico to report the effects of implementing a stroke registry. To determine if the implementation of a systematized registry is associated with an improved adherence to the performance measures. We compared prospective data (August 2008-November 2010) against historical controls (February 2005-July 2008). Our stroke registry (i-Registro Neurovascular) consists of a standardized clinical form that includes demographic and clinical variables (risk factors, medications, neuroimaging, etiology, acute and outpatient treatments, and neurologic scores [National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin Scale]). We evaluated 9 performance measures suggested by the American Heart Association and the Joint Commission. We analyzed the data from 574 patients, 260 from the prospective phase and 314 from historical controls. No significant statistical differences in demographic characteristics or stroke risk factors were found. The implementation of the stroke registry was associated with a statistically significant (P cost and readily achievable and a viable option for encouraging an increased report of guidelines adherence of other hospitals in Latin America. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Diabetes in Mexico: Analysis of the National Tuberculosis Registry 2000–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Castellanos-Joya, Martín; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Hernández, Andrés; Ortega-Baeza, Victor Manuel; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Sulca, José Antonio; Martínez-Olivares, Ma. de Lourdes; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; González-Roldán, Jesús Felipe; López-Gatell, Hugo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem in Mexico while the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) has increased rapidly in recent years. Objective To describe the trends of incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated with DM and not associated with DM and to compare the results of treatment outcomes in patients with and without DM. Materials and Methods We analysed the National Tuberculosis Registry from 2000 to 2012 including patients with pulmonary TB among individuals older than 20 years of age. The association between DM and treatment failure was analysed using logistic regression, accounting for clustering due to regional distribution. Results In Mexico from 2000 to 2012, the incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated to DM increased by 82.64%, (p pulmonary TB rate without DM, which decreased by 26.77%, (p pulmonary TB. In addition, patients who suffer from both diseases have a greater probability of treatment failure. PMID:26075393

  18. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Diabetes in Mexico: Analysis of the National Tuberculosis Registry 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Castellanos-Joya, Martín; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Hernández, Andrés; Ortega-Baeza, Victor Manuel; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Sulca, José Antonio; Martínez-Olivares, Ma de Lourdes; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; González-Roldán, Jesús Felipe; López-Gatell, Hugo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem in Mexico while the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) has increased rapidly in recent years. To describe the trends of incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated with DM and not associated with DM and to compare the results of treatment outcomes in patients with and without DM. We analysed the National Tuberculosis Registry from 2000 to 2012 including patients with pulmonary TB among individuals older than 20 years of age. The association between DM and treatment failure was analysed using logistic regression, accounting for clustering due to regional distribution. In Mexico from 2000 to 2012, the incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated to DM increased by 82.64%, (ppulmonary TB rate without DM, which decreased by 26.77%, (ppulmonary TB. In addition, patients who suffer from both diseases have a greater probability of treatment failure.

  19. Association between sleep duration and urinary albumin excretion in patients with type 2 diabetes: the Fukuoka diabetes registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Ohkuma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Few studies have so far investigated the impact of sleep duration on chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between sleep duration and albuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 4,870 Japanese type 2 diabetic patients ≥20 years of age were divided into six groups according to self-reported sleep duration: less than 4.5 hours, 4.5-5.4 hours, 5.5-6.4 hours, 6.5-7.4 hours, 7.5-8.4 hours and more than 8.5 hours. The association between sleep duration and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR was examined cross-sectionally. RESULTS: Both short and long sleep durations were significantly associated with higher UACR levels and higher proportions of patients with albuminuria (≥30 mg/g and macroalbuminuria (≥300 mg/g compared with a sleep duration of 6.5-7.4 hours (P for quadratic trend <0.001. A U-shaped association between sleep duration and UACR remained significant even after adjustment for potential confounders, including age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking habits, former smoking habits, current drinking habits, regular exercise habits, total energy intake, total protein intake, hypnotic use and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Furthermore, the association remained substantially unchanged after additional adjustment for body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, renin-angiotensin system inhibitor use and depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that sleep duration has a U-shaped association with the UACR levels in type 2 diabetic patients, independent of potential confounders.

  20. Temporal changes in the outcomes of patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute dynamic registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holper, Elizabeth M; Abbott, J Dawn; Mulukutla, Suresh; Vlachos, Helen; Selzer, Faith; McGuire, Darren; Faxon, David P; Laskey, Warren; Srinivas, Vankeepuram S; Marroquin, Oscar C; Jacobs, Alice K

    2011-02-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at higher risk for adverse outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). To determine whether outcomes have improved over time, we analyzed data from 2,838 consecutive patients with medically treated DM, including 1,066 patients (37.6%) treated with insulin, in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry undergoing PCI registered in waves 1 (1997-1998), 2 (1999), 3 (2001-2002), 4 (2004), and 5 (2006). We compared baseline demographics and 1-year outcomes in the overall cohort and in analyses stratified by recruitment wave and insulin use. Crude mortality rates by chronological wave were 9.5%, 12.5%, 8.9%, 11.6%, and 6.6% (P value(trend) = .33) among those treated with insulin and, respectively, 9.7%, 6.5%, 4.1%, 5.4%, and 4.7% (P value(trend) = .006) among patients treated with oral agents,. The adjusted hazard ratios of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and overall major adverse cardiovascular events (death, MI, revascularization) in insulin-treated patients with DM in waves 2 to 5 as compared with wave 1 were either higher or the same. In contrast, the similar adjusted hazard ratios for oral agent-treated patients with DM were either similar or lower. Significant improvements over time in adverse events by 1 year were detected in patients with DM treated with oral agents. In insulin-treated diabetic patients, despite lower rates of repeat revascularization over time, death and MI following PCI have not significantly improved. These findings underscore the need for continued efforts at optimizing outcomes among patients with DM undergoing PCI, especially those requiring insulin treatment. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Constructing a Local Potential Participant Registry to Improve Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Research Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Joshua D; Hoang, Dan; Gillen, Daniel L; Cox, Chelsea G; Gombosev, Adrijana; Klein, Kirsten; O'Leary, Steve; Witbracht, Megan; Pierce, Aimee

    2018-01-01

    Potential participant registries are tools to address the challenge of slow recruitment to clinical research. In particular, registries may aid recruitment to secondary prevention clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD), which enroll cognitively normal older individuals meeting specific genetic or biomarker criteria. Evidence of registry effectiveness is sparse, as is guidance on optimal designs or methods of conduct. We report our experiences of developing a novel local potential participant registry that implemented online enrollment and data collection. In the first year of operation, 957 individuals submitted email addresses to the registry, of whom 592 self-reported demographic, family history, and medical data. In addition, registrants provided information related to their interest and willingness to be contacted about studies. Local earned media and community education were the most effective methods of recruitment into the registry. Seventy-six (26%) of 298 registrants contacted about studies in the first year enrolled in those studies. One hundred twenty-nine registrants were invited to enroll in a preclinical AD trial, of whom 25 (18%) screened and 6 were randomized. These results indicate that registries can aid recruitment and provide needed guidance for investigators initiating new local registries.

  2. Improving vaccine registries through mobile technologies: a vision for mobile enhanced Immunization information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kumanan; Atkinson, Katherine M; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    Immunization registries or information systems are critical to improving the quality and evaluating the ongoing success of immunization programs. However, the completeness of these systems is challenged by a myriad of factors including the fragmentation of vaccine administration, increasing mobility of individuals, new vaccine development, use of multiple products, and increasingly frequent changes in recommendations. Mobile technologies could offer a solution, which mitigates some of these challenges. Engaging individuals to have more control of their own immunization information using their mobile devices could improve the timeliness and accuracy of data in central immunization information systems. Other opportunities presented by mobile technologies that could be exploited to improve immunization information systems include mobile reporting of adverse events following immunization, the capacity to scan 2D barcodes, and enabling bidirectional communication between individuals and public health officials. Challenges to utilizing mobile solutions include ensuring privacy of data, access, and equity concerns, obtaining consent and ensuring adoption of technology at sufficiently high rates. By empowering individuals with their own health information, mobile technologies can also serve as a mechanism to transfer immunization information as individuals cross local, regional, and national borders. Ultimately, mobile enhanced immunization information systems can help realize the goal of the individual, the healthcare provider, and public health officials always having access to the same immunization information. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Partnering with diabetes educators to improve patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Burke SD; Sherr D; Lipman RD

    2014-01-01

    Sandra D Burke,1,2 Dawn Sherr,3 Ruth D Lipman3 1American Association of Diabetes Educators, Chicago, IL, USA; 2University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Urbana, IL, USA; 3Science and Practice, American Association of Diabetes Educators, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Diabetes is a chronic, progressive disease that affects millions worldwide. The paradigm of diabetes management has shifted to focus on empowering the person with diabetes to manage the disease successfully and to improv...

  4. A quality improvement project using statistical process control methods for type 2 diabetes control in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, David; Douglas, Kate; Goldberg, Vera; Martinez, Boris; Garcia, Pablo; Arbour, MaryCatherine; Rohloff, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is a key strategy for improving diabetes care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study reports on a diabetes QI project in rural Guatemala whose primary aim was to improve glycemic control of a panel of adult diabetes patients. Formative research suggested multiple areas for programmatic improvement in ambulatory diabetes care. This project utilized the Model for Improvement and Agile Global Health, our organization's complementary healthcare implementation framework. A bundle of improvement activities were implemented at the home, clinic and institutional level. Control charts of mean hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) and proportion of patients meeting target HbA1C showed improvement as special cause variation was identified 3 months after the intervention began. Control charts for secondary process measures offered insights into the value of different components of the intervention. Intensity of home-based diabetes education emerged as an important driver of panel glycemic control. Diabetes QI work is feasible in resource-limited settings in LMICs and can improve glycemic control. Statistical process control charts are a promising methodology for use with panels or registries of diabetes patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Genetic overlap between type 2 diabetes and depression in Swedish and Danish twin registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kan, C; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Christensen, K

    2016-01-01

    A bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and depression has been consistently reported. Depression is associated with worse biomedical outcomes and increased mortality. The mechanisms underlying the association of T2DM with depression remain unclear. One possible question we can...... the association is primarily attributed to genetic effects in females. In the Danish sample, genetic effects account for the majority of the covariance in both males and females. Qualitative genetic sex differences are observed in both samples. We believe this is the first study to demonstrate significant genetic...

  6. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the cente...

  7. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Diabetes in Mexico: Analysis of the National Tuberculosis Registry 2000-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Delgado-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a public health problem in Mexico while the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM has increased rapidly in recent years.To describe the trends of incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated with DM and not associated with DM and to compare the results of treatment outcomes in patients with and without DM.We analysed the National Tuberculosis Registry from 2000 to 2012 including patients with pulmonary TB among individuals older than 20 years of age. The association between DM and treatment failure was analysed using logistic regression, accounting for clustering due to regional distribution.In Mexico from 2000 to 2012, the incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated to DM increased by 82.64%, (p<0.001 in contrast to rates of pulmonary TB rate without DM, which decreased by 26.77%, (p<0.001. Patients with a prior diagnosis of DM had a greater likelihood of failing treatment (adjusted odds ratio, 1.34 (1.11-1.61 p<0.002 compared with patients who did not have DM. There was statistical evidence of interaction between DM and sex. The odds of treatment failure were increased in both sexes.Our data suggest that the growing DM epidemic has an impact on the rates of pulmonary TB. In addition, patients who suffer from both diseases have a greater probability of treatment failure.

  8. ESC guidelines adherence is associated with improved survival in patients from the Norwegian Heart Failure Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blois, Jonathan; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Grundtvig, Morten; Semb, Anne Grete; Gullestad, Lars; Westheim, Arne; Hole, Torstein; Atar, Dan; Agewall, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    To assess the adherence to heart failure (HF) guidelines for angiotensin-converting enzyme-I (ACE-I), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB), and β-blockers and the possible association of ACE-I or ARB, β-blockers, and statins with survival in the large contemporary Norwegian Heart Failure Registry. The study included 5761 outpatients who were diagnosed with HF of any aetiology (mean left ventricular ejection fraction 32% ± 11%) from January 2000 to January 2010 and followed up until death or February 2010. Adherence to treatment according to the guidelines was high. Cox regression analysis to identify risk factors for all-cause mortality, after adjustment for many factors, showed that ACE-I ≥ 50% of target dose, use of beta-blockers, and statins were significantly related to improved survival (P = 0.003, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively). Propensity scoring showed the same benefit for these variables. Both multivariable and propensity scoring analyses showed survival benefits with β-blockers, statins, and adequate doses of ACE-I in this contemporary HF cohort. This study stresses the importance of guidelines adherence, even in the context of high levels of adherence to guidelines. Moreover, respecting the recommended target doses of ACE-I appears to have a crucial role in survival improvement and, in the multivariate Cox regression analysis, ARB treatment was not significantly associated with a lower all-cause mortality. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. ©The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Physician education programme improves quality of diabetes care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine if a physician education programme and a structured consultation schedule would improve the quality of diabetes patient care in a diabetes clinic. Setting. Two tertiary care diabetes clinics at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Study design. Quasi-experimental controlled before-and-after study. Methods.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Registries: Improving Care across the SCI Care Continuum by Identifying Knowledge Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Marcel F; Cheng, Christiana L; Fallah, Nader; Santos, Argelio; Atkins, Derek; Humphreys, Suzanne; Rivers, Carly S; White, Barry A B; Ho, Chester; Ahn, Henry; Kwon, Brian K; Christie, Sean; Noonan, Vanessa K

    2017-10-15

    Timely access and ongoing delivery of care and therapeutic interventions is needed to maximize recovery and function after traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI). To ensure these decisions are evidence-based, access to consistent, reliable, and valid sources of clinical data is required. The Access to Care and Timing Model used data from the Rick Hansen SCI Registry (RHSCIR) to generate a simulation of healthcare delivery for persons after tSCI and to test scenarios aimed at improving outcomes and reducing the economic burden of SCI. Through model development, we identified knowledge gaps and challenges in the literature and current health outcomes data collection throughout the continuum of SCI care. The objectives of this article were to describe these gaps and to provide recommendations for bridging them. Accurate information on injury severity after tSCI was hindered by difficulties in conducting neurological assessments and classifications of SCI (e.g., timing), variations in reporting, and the lack of a validated SCI-specific measure of associated injuries. There was also limited availability of reliable data on patient factors such as multi-morbidity and patient-reported measures. Knowledge gaps related to structures (e.g., protocols) and processes (e.g., costs) at each phase of care have prevented comprehensive evaluation of system performance. Addressing these knowledge gaps will enhance comparative and cost-effectiveness evaluations to inform decision-making and standards of care. Recommendations to do so were: standardize data element collection and facilitate database linkages, validate and adopt more outcome measures for SCI, and increase opportunities for collaborations with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds.

  11. Second generation registry framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Render, Lee; Radochonski, Maciej; Hunter, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Information management systems are essential to capture data be it for public health and human disease, sustainable agriculture, or plant and animal biosecurity. In public health, the term patient registry is often used to describe information management systems that are used to record and track phenotypic data of patients. Appropriate design, implementation and deployment of patient registries enables rapid decision making and ongoing data mining ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. A major bottleneck encountered is the static nature of these registries. That is, software developers are required to work with stakeholders to determine requirements, design the system, implement the required data fields and functionality for each patient registry. Additionally, software developer time is required for ongoing maintenance and customisation. It is desirable to deploy a sophisticated registry framework that can allow scientists and registry curators possessing standard computing skills to dynamically construct a complete patient registry from scratch and customise it for their specific needs with little or no need to engage a software developer at any stage. This paper introduces our second generation open source registry framework which builds on our previous rare disease registry framework (RDRF). This second generation RDRF is a new approach as it empowers registry administrators to construct one or more patient registries without software developer effort. New data elements for a diverse range of phenotypic and genotypic measurements can be defined at any time. Defined data elements can then be utilised in any of the created registries. Fine grained, multi-level user and workgroup access can be applied to each data element to ensure appropriate access and data privacy. We introduce the concept of derived data elements to assist the data element standards communities on how they might be best categorised. We introduce the second generation RDRF that

  12. The Diabetes Telephone Study: Design and challenges of a pragmatic cluster randomized trial to improve diabetic peripheral neuropathy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alyce S; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Altschuler, Andrea; Dyer, Wendy; Neugebauer, Romain; Jaffe, Marc; Young, Joseph D; Kim, Eileen; Grant, Richard W

    2016-06-01

    Challenges to effective pharmacologic management of symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy include the limited effectiveness of available medicines, frequent side effects, and the need for ongoing symptom assessment and treatment titration for maximal effectiveness. We present here the rationale and implementation challenges of the Diabetes Telephone Study, a randomized trial designed to improve medication treatment, titration, and quality of life among patients with symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy. We implemented a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of an automated interactive voice response tool designed to provide physicians with real-time patient-reported data about responses to newly prescribed diabetic peripheral neuropathy medicines. A total of 1834 primary care physicians treating patients in the diabetes registry at Kaiser Permanente Northern California were randomized into the intervention or control arm. In September 2014, we began identification and recruitment of patients assigned to physicians in the intervention group who receive three brief interactive calls every 2 months after a medication is prescribed to alleviate diabetic peripheral neuropathy symptoms. These calls provide patients with the opportunity to report on symptoms, side effects, self-titration of medication dose and overall satisfaction with treatment. We plan to compare changes in self-reported quality of life between the intervention group and patients in the control group who receive three non-interactive automated educational phone calls. Successful implementation of this clinical trial required robust stakeholder engagement to help tailor the intervention and to address pragmatic concerns such as provider time constraints. As of 27 October 2015, we had screened 2078 patients, 1447 of whom were eligible for participation. We consented and enrolled 1206 or 83% of those eligible. Among those enrolled, 53% are women and the mean age

  13. Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Walid F Gellad,3,4 Jivan Moaddeb,2,5 Matthew J Crowley,1,2 William Shrank,6 Bradi B Granger,7 Christopher B Granger,8 Troy Trygstad,9 Larry Z Liu,10 Hayden B Bosworth1,2,7,11 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 6CVS Caremark Corporation; 7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 8Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; 9North Carolina Community Care Networks, Raleigh, NC, USA; 10Pfizer, Inc., and Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Effective medications are a cornerstone of prevention and disease treatment, yet only about half of patients take their medications as prescribed, resulting in a common and costly public health challenge for the US healthcare system. Since poor medication adherence is a complex problem with many contributing causes, there is no one universal solution. This paper describes interventions that were not only effective in improving medication adherence among patients with diabetes, but were also potentially scalable (ie, easy to implement to a large population. We identify key characteristics that make these interventions effective and scalable. This information is intended to inform healthcare systems seeking proven, low resource, cost-effective solutions to improve medication adherence. Keywords: medication adherence, diabetes mellitus, chronic disease, dissemination research

  14. Diabetic foot workshop: Improving technical and educational skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaa, Maryam; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Shahbazi, Samimeh; Shayeganmehr, Zahra; Abooeirad, Maryam; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Adibi, Hossien; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus as one of the most common metabolic disorders has some complications, one of the main ones is diabetic foot (DF). Appropriate care and education prevents 85% of diabetic foot amputations. An ideal management to prevent and treat diabetic foot necessitates a close collaboration between the health team members and the diabetic patient. Therefore, improving nurses' knowledge about DF care and advancement in the quality of care provided by the nurses could significantly improve diabetic foot prevention and management. Therefore, the aim of DF workshop was to improve technical and educational skills of the nurses to prevent and manage diabetic foot. Considering the vital role of the nurses in providing DF care, EMRI decided to conduct Diabetic foot workshop for them. The following five steps were designed for the 14 coordinating sessions in the workshop: Goals definition, deciding about attendees, location selection, creating agenda, and developing a follow-up plan. "Diabetic Foot Workshop for Nurses" provides appropriate training to DF nurses at the national level; and combining theory and practice in this workshop not only increases nurses' knowledge, but also improves their skills in the field of the diabetic foot. Providing education and care to patients by DF nurse specialists instead of general nurses could be an important output of this workshop, which may lead to DF prevention and amputation decrease in the long term.

  15. Diabetes technology: improving care, improving patient-reported outcomes and preventing complications in young people with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, P; Tanenbaum, M; Hood, K; Maahs, D M

    2018-04-01

    With the evolution of diabetes technology, those living with Type 1 diabetes are given a wider arsenal of tools with which to achieve glycaemic control and improve patient-reported outcomes. Furthermore, the use of these technologies may help reduce the risk of acute complications, such as severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, as well as long-term macro- and microvascular complications. In addition, diabetes technology can have a beneficial impact on psychosocial health by reducing the burden of diabetes. Unfortunately, diabetes goals are often unmet and people with Type 1 diabetes too frequently experience acute and long-term complications of this condition, in addition to often having less than ideal psychosocial outcomes. Increasing realization of the importance of patient-reported outcomes is leading to diabetes care delivery becoming more patient-centred. Diabetes technology in the form of medical devices, digital health and big data analytics have the potential to improve clinical care and psychosocial support, resulting in lower rates of acute and chronic complications, decreased burden of diabetes care, and improved quality of life. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  16. Structuring diabetes care in general practices: many improvements, remaining challenges.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-08-07

    BACKGROUND: For people with type 2 diabetes to enjoy improved longevity and quality of life, care needs to be organised in a systematic way. AIM: To test if processes and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes changed with the move to structured care in general practice shared with secondary care. METHODS: An audit of process and intermediate outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes before and after the change to structured care in 10 Dublin general practices shared with secondary care four years on. RESULTS: Structured diabetes care in general practice has led to more dedicated clinics improved processes of care and increased access to multidisciplinary expertise. Improvement in blood pressure control, the use of aspirin and the use of lipid lowering agents indicate a significant decrease in absolute risk of vascular events for this population. CONCLUSIONS: Structured care in general practice improves intermediate outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes. Further improvements need to be made to reach international targets.

  17. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix

    2015-01-01

    previously 4.0 to 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/year. During a median follow-up of 9.1 years, 29% of participants doubled their plasma creatinine or developed end-stage renal disease. Mortality risk was similar to our prior study (hazard ratio 1.05 (0.76-1.43). However, after age adjustment, as both diabetes......-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them...... and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal...

  18. Paclitaxel-eluting versus sirolimus-eluting stents in diabetes mellitus: a report from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, William M; Vlachos, Helen A; Marroquin, Oscar C; Lee, Joon S; Smith, Conrad; Anderson, William D; Schindler, John T; Holper, Elizabeth M; Abbott, J Dawn; Williams, David O; Laskey, Warren K; Kip, Kevin E; Kelsey, Sheryl F; Mulukutla, Suresh R

    2010-02-01

    Diabetes is a powerful predictor of adverse events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Drug-eluting stents reduce restenosis rates compared with bare metal stents; however, controversy remains regarding which drug-eluting stents provides greater benefit in patients with diabetes. Accordingly, we compared the safety and efficacy of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) with paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) among diabetic patients in a contemporary registry. Using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry, we evaluated 2-year outcomes of diabetic patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions with SES (n=677) and PES (n=328). Clinical and demographic characteristics, including age, body mass index, insulin use, left ventricular function, and aspirin/clopidogrel use postprocedure, did not differ significantly between the groups except that PES-treated patients had a greater frequency of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. At the 2-year follow-up, no significant differences were observed between PES and SES with regard to safety or efficacy end points. PES- and SES-treated patients had similar rates of death (10.7% versus 8.2%, P=0.20), death and myocardial infarction (14.9% versus 13.6%, P=0.55), repeat revascularization (14.8% versus 17.8%, P=0.36), and stent thrombosis (1.3% versus 1.3%, P=0.95). After adjustment, no significant differences between the 2 stent types in any outcome were observed. PES and SES are equally efficacious and have similar safety profiles in diabetic patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions in clinical practice.

  19. Effectiveness of selective risk based screening for Gestational Diabetes (GDM) in Malaysia: A retrospective cohort study based on the National Obstetric Registry (NOR) of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniswaran, G; Soelar, S A; Karalasingam, S D; Bujang, M A; Jeganathan, R; Suharjono, H

    2017-02-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) has significant maternal and foetal implications. screening allows active interventions which significantly improves pregnancy outcomes. Despite World Health Organization (WHO), FIGO and National Institute of clinical Excellence (NIcE) recommendations for universal screening especially among high risk population; Malaysia currently adopts a selective risk based screening for GDM. the objective is to audit the effectiveness of the current practice of selective risk based screening in detection of GDM in Malaysia. this is a retrospective cohort study based on the National Obstetric Registry (NOR) which comprises of 14 major tertiary hospitals in Malaysia. the study period was from 1st January 2011 till 31st December 2012 and a total of 22,044 patients with GDM were analysed. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the crude odd ratio. the incidence of GDM in Malaysia is 8.4%. Maternal age of ≥25, booking bMI ≥27kg/m2, booking weight ≥80kg and previous hypertension are non-significant risk of developing GDM in Malaysia. Parity 5 and more was only associated with an odds-ratio of 1.02 (95% confidence Interval: 0.90-1.17) as compared to parity below 5. the association of women with previous stillbirth with GDM was not significant. current risk based screening for GDM based on maternal age, booking bMI, weight and hypertension is inappropriate. An ideal screening tool should precede disease complications, which is the novel objective of screening. Universal screening for GDM in Malaysia may be a more accurate measure, especially with regards to reducing maternal and foetal complications.

  20. Melatonin improves spatial navigation memory in male diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrin Babaei-Balderlou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin as an antioxidant on spatial navigation memory in male diabetic rats. Thirty-two male white Wistar rats weighing 200 ± 20 g were divided into four groups, randomly: control, melatonin, diabetic and melatonin-treated diabetic. Experimental diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg kg-1 streptozotocin. Melatonin was injected (10 mg kg-1 day-1, ip for 2 weeks after 21 days of diabetes induction. At the end of administration period, the spatial navigation memory of rats was evaluated by cross-arm maze. In this study lipid peroxidation levels, glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities were measured in hippocampus. Diabetes caused to significant decrease in alternation percent in the cross-arm maze, as a spatial memory index, compared to the control group (p < 0.05, whereas administration of melatonin prevented the spatial memory deficit in diabetic rats. Also melatonin injection significantly increased the spatial memory in intact animals compared to the control group (p < 0.05. Assessment of hippocampus homogenates indicated an increase in lipid peroxidation levels and a decrease in GSH-Px and CAT activities in the diabetic group compared to the control animals, while melatonin administration ameliorated these indices in diabetic rats. In conclusion, diabetes induction leads to debilitation of spatial navigation memory in rats, and the melatonin treatment improves the memory presumably through the reduction of oxidative stress in hippocampus of diabetic rats.

  1. Risk of cardiovascular disease and total mortality in adults with type 1 diabetes: Scottish registry linkage study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shona J Livingstone

    previously reported in other developed countries, CVD and mortality rates may not be generalizable to other countries. Limitations included lack of information on the specific insulin therapy used.Although the relative risks for CVD and total mortality associated with T1DM in this population have declined relative to earlier studies, T1DM continues to be associated with higher CVD and death rates than the non-diabetic population. Risk factor management should be improved to further reduce risk but better treatment approaches for achieving good glycaemic control are badly needed. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  2. Association of Genetically Determined Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Activity with Diabetic Complications in Relation to Alcohol Consumption in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Idewaki

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 detoxifies aldehyde produced during ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress. A genetic defect in this enzyme is common in East Asians and determines alcohol consumption behaviors. We investigated the impact of genetically determined ALDH2 activity on diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications in relation to drinking habits in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. An ALDH2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs671 was genotyped in 4,400 patients. Additionally, the relationship of clinical characteristics with ALDH2 activity (ALDH2 *1/*1 active enzyme activity vs. *1/*2 or *2/*2 inactive enzyme activity and drinking habits (lifetime abstainers vs. former or current drinkers was investigated cross-sectionally (n = 691 in *1/*1 abstainers, n = 1,315 in abstainers with *2, n = 1,711 in *1/*1 drinkers, n = 683 in drinkers with *2. The multiple logistic regression analysis for diabetic complications was adjusted for age, sex, current smoking habits, leisure-time physical activity, depressive symptoms, diabetes duration, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, insulin use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and renin-angiotensin system inhibitors use. Albuminuria prevalence was significantly lower in the drinkers with *2 than that of other groups (odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 0.94 [0.76-1.16] in abstainers with *2, 1.00 [0.80-1.26] in *1/*1 drinkers, 0.71 [0.54-0.93] in drinkers with *2. Retinal photocoagulation prevalence was also lower in drinkers with ALDH2 *2 than that of other groups. In contrast, myocardial infarction was significantly increased in ALDH2 *2 carriers compared with that in ALDH2 *1/*1 abstainers (odds ratio [95% CI]: *1/*1 abstainers as the referent, 2.63 [1.28-6.13] in abstainers with *2, 1.89 [0.89-4.51] in *1/*1 drinkers, 2.35 [1.06-5.79] in drinkers with *2. In summary, patients with type 2 diabetes and ALDH2 *2

  3. A new DAWN: Improving the psychosocial management of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard I. G. Holt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN-2 study assessed psychosocial issues and health-care provision of people with diabetes, their family members and health-care professionals. Materials and Methods: Participants completed an online, telephone or in-person survey designed to assess health-related quality-of-life, self-management, attitudes/beliefs, social support and priorities for improving diabetes care as well as health-care provision and the impact of diabetes on family life. Results: A total of 8596 adults with diabetes, 2057 family members of people with diabetes and 4785 health-care professionals across 17 countries completed the survey. There were significant between country differences, but no one country′s outcomes were consistently better or worse than others. A high proportion of people with diabetes reported likely depression (13.8% and poor quality-of-life (12.2%. Diabetes had a negative impact on many aspects of life, including relationships with family/friends and physical health. A third of family members did not know how to help the person with diabetes, but wanted to be more involved in their care. Many health-care professionals indicated that major improvements were needed across a range of areas including health-care organization, resources for diabetes prevention, earlier diagnosis and treatment and psychological support. Conclusions: DAWN-2 is a multinational, multidisciplinary systematic study that compared unmet needs of people with diabetes and those who care for them in 17 countries across four continents. Its findings should facilitate innovative efforts to improve self-management and psychosocial support in diabetes, with the aim of reducing the burden of disease. The implications for India are discussed.

  4. Pooling and expanding registries of familial hypercholesterolaemia to assess gaps in care and improve disease management and outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J; Akram, Asif; Kondapally Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential for global collaborations to better inform public health policy regarding major non-communicable diseases has been successfully demonstrated by several large-scale international consortia. However, the true public health impact of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH...... to integrate individual efforts across the world to tackle the global burden of FH. The information garnered from the registry will help reduce gaps in knowledge, inform best practices, assist in clinical trials design, support clinical guidelines and policies development, and ultimately improve the care of FH...

  5. Vildagliptin improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, P.C.; Netea, M.G.; Smits, P.; Tack, C.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects with type 2 diabetes (age 59.8 +/- 6.8 years, BMI 29.1 +/- 4.8 kg/m(2), HbA(1c) 6.97 +/-

  6. Lean diabetes in middle-aged adults: A joint analysis of the German DIVE and DPV registries

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Bettina; Lanzinger, Stefanie; Bramlage, Peter; Gro?, Felix; Danne, Thomas; Wagner, Siegfried; Krakow, Dietmar; Zimmermann, Artur; Malcharzik, Christian; Holl, Reinhard W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims To assess differences in demographics, treatment and outcome of lean (LD) compared to overweight and obese people with diabetes clinically classified as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and methods We combined data from the German DIVE (Diabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation) and DPV (Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation) databases to produce a large cohort of people with T2DM. The characteristics of people with Body Mass Index (BMI)

  7. Treatment intensification without improved HbA1c levels in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sildorf, S M; Hertel, N T; Thomsen, J; Fredheim, S; Hastrup, H; Pipper, C; Hertz, B; Svensson, J

    2016-04-01

    To examine trends in diabetes treatment in Danish children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus, comparing treatment intensity with metabolic outcomes in the population, and to describe the challenges of population-based registries in a clinical setting with rapidly changing treatment methods. This observational study is based on the Danish national population registry of childhood diabetes, which includes 99% of children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes before the age of 15 years. We included 4527 people diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. Self-monitored blood glucose measurements, insulin injections/boluses, treatment method and metabolic control quantifications were analysed and adjusted for the effects of gender and ethnicity, the combined effect of age, visit year and duration, and for the random effects of individual and hospital settings. Treatment was intensified via an increasing number of self-monitored blood glucose measurements and injections/boluses. More than six injections/boluses and an increased number of self-monitored blood glucose measurements were significantly associated with lower metabolic control. No reduction, however, in the overall mean HbA1c concentration was observed between 2005 [66 mmol/mol (8.2%)] and 2012 [65 mmol/mol (8.1%)]. Changed registration practices in 2009 introduced artificial jumps in data. Intensifying treatment alone does not lead to improved metabolic control in the overall population despite the appearance of lower HbA1c in individuals with a greater number of self-monitored blood glucose measurements and injections/boluses. The contradictory results reflect difficulties in using observational studies to predict results of intervention in the individual. Data collected from population-based registries need to be adjusted continuously to reflect changes in care. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  8. 7606 IMPROVEMENT OF DIABETIC DYSLIPIDEMIA BY LEGUMES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rotimi

    2013-04-02

    Apr 2, 2013 ... Grain legumes are a valuable source of food proteins; hence, their exploitation is ... Diabetes is an endocrine-metabolic disease characterised by hyperglycemia associated ... The high level of dietary fibre in legumes has long.

  9. Gallic acid improves the memory and pain in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam Rafieirad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complications of diabetes can be caused by the production of free radicals, which lead to memory problems and increase the risk of dementia. Diabetics are at risk of nervous pains. Gallic acid has antioxidant properties and activity against free radicals. In this study the effect of oral administration of Gallic acid, were examined on passive‌ avoidance ‌memory and pain in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into control, diabetes with STZ (60mg/kg, 3-groups of control and 3‌groups of diabetic rats and received Gallic ‌‌acid (10, 50&100 mg/kg oral, for two weeks. Blood glucose levels were measured from tail. Results: Results showed a significant reduction in memory (delayed coming down from the podium in the diabetic group all days except day of learning (P≤0.01. Dose of 50 mg/kg Gallic‌ acid caused a significant increase in non-diabetic rats on the first day of memory (P≤0.01, third and seventh (P≤0.05 and dose of 10 mg/kg on the first day (P≤0.05. Compared with diabetic group a significant increase was observed in the first day (P≤0.01, third and seventh (P≤0.05 in diabetics receiving doses of 50 and 10mg/kg Gallic‌ acid. The reflex for tail pulling away from the center of pain was significantly lower (P≤0.01 in the diabetic group. And only the dose of 50 caused a significant increase in the diabetic group (P≤0.01. Conclusion: Probably Gallic‌ acid with strong antioxidant effect led to scavenge free radicals and reduced the complications of diabetes, including pain and may have effects on neural pathways in specific brain regions and has led to improved memory in normal rats and diabetic.

  10. Strategy to improve the burden of gestational diabetes in African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategy to improve the burden of gestational diabetes in African women: Rwandan perspective. Herbert T. Mapira, David K. Tumusiime, Kevin Yarasheski, Nadine Rujeni, Todd W. Cade, Eugene Mutimura ...

  11. Stroke acute management with urgent risk-factor assessment and improvement (SAMURAI) rt-PA registry. General results and subanalyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk-factor Assessment and Improvement [SAMURAI] rt-PA Registry is a multicenter retrospective observational study from 10 Japanese stroke centers. A total of 600 patients (223 women, 72±12 years old) treated with intravenous alteplase (0.6 mg/kg) were studied. Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage within 36 hours with ≥4 point-increase from the baseline National Institutes of Health (NIH) Stroke Scale score developed in 8 patients (1.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.6%). At 3 months, 199 patients (33.2%, 29.5-37.0%) had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤1. Analysis of 399 patients with a premorbid mRS score ≤1 who met the criteria of the European license (≤80 years old, an initial NIHSS score ≤24, etc.) showed that 40.6% (35.9-45.5%) had a 3-month mRS ≤1. In the subanalyses from this registry, early ischemic change on diffusion-weighted imaging assessed by the Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score, as well as reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, was associated with early intracerebral hemorrhage and 3-month outcomes of patients. (author)

  12. Stroke acute management with urgent risk-factor assessment and improvement (SAMURAI) rt-PA registry. General results and subanalyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Shiokawa, Yoshiaki [Kyorin Univ., School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk-factor Assessment and Improvement [SAMURAI] rt-PA Registry is a multicenter retrospective observational study from 10 Japanese stroke centers. A total of 600 patients (223 women, 72{+-}12 years old) treated with intravenous alteplase (0.6 mg/kg) were studied. Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage within 36 hours with {>=}4 point-increase from the baseline National Institutes of Health (NIH) Stroke Scale score developed in 8 patients (1.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.6%). At 3 months, 199 patients (33.2%, 29.5-37.0%) had a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score {<=}1. Analysis of 399 patients with a premorbid mRS score {<=}1 who met the criteria of the European license ({<=}80 years old, an initial NIHSS score {<=}24, etc.) showed that 40.6% (35.9-45.5%) had a 3-month mRS {<=}1. In the subanalyses from this registry, early ischemic change on diffusion-weighted imaging assessed by the Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score, as well as reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, was associated with early intracerebral hemorrhage and 3-month outcomes of patients. (author)

  13. High event rate after a first percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with diabetes mellitus: results from the Swedish coronary angiography and angioplasty registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsinger, Viveca; Saleh, Nawsad; Lagerqvist, Bo; Norhammar, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have reduced longevity after acute coronary syndromes and revascularization. However, knowledge of the long-term complication rates and patterns from an everyday life setting is lacking. Consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention included in the Swedish Coronary Angiography Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR) between 2006 and 2010 and with no previous revascularization were prospectively followed up for combined cardiovascular events (first of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure) until December 31, 2010. The mean follow-up period was 920 days (SD, 530 days). Differences in background and procedural characteristics were adjusted for in a multivariate Cox regression model. Of 58 891 patients, mean age 67 years, 19% had diabetes mellitus; 27% of them were on diet treatment, 33% on oral glucose lowering, and 40% on insulin treatment. At admission, cardiovascular risk factors, multiple coronary vessel, and left main stem disease were more frequent in patients with diabetes mellitus and their revascularization was less often complete. The adjusted risk for combined cardiovascular events was higher in patients on insulin (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.63 [1.55-1.72]), on oral treatment (1.23 [1.15-1.31]), and on diet alone (1.21 [1.12-1.29]) compared with patients without diabetes mellitus. Insulin-treated patients ran an increased risk of restenosis (1.54 [1.39-1.71]) and stent thrombosis (1.56 [1.25-1.96]). The prognosis after a first percutaneous coronary intervention is more severe in patients with diabetes mellitus, in particular, in patients treated with insulin, with higher rates of mortality, cardiovascular events, and stent thrombosis over the following 5 years. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Effect of assistance on peritonitis risk in diabetic patients treated by peritoneal dialysis: report from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabed, Anais; Bechade, Clemence; Ficheux, Maxence; Verger, Christian; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic patients treated by peritoneal dialysis (PD) have been reported to be at an increased risk of peritonitis. This has been attributed to impairment in host defense, visual impairment, disability and muscle wasting, which could compromise ability to safely perform catheter connections. This study aimed to evaluate whether assisted PD is associated with a lower risk of peritonitis in diabetic patients. This was a retrospective study based on data from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry. We included diabetic patients starting PD between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2012. The end of the observation period was 31 December 2013. Using complementary regression analysis (Fine and Gray, Hurdle models), we assessed the relationship between peritonitis occurrence, peritonitis number over time and the type of assisted PD. Of the 3598 diabetic patients, there were 2040 patients on nurse-assisted PD. These patients were older, more comorbid and more frequently on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In the multivariate analysis, nurse assistance was associated with a reduced risk of peritonitis in the Fine and Gray [subdistribution hazard ratio: 0.78 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.68-0.89)] and in the first component of the Hurdle models [rate ratio: 0.82 (95% CI 0.71-0.93)], but not a lower incidence of peritonitis after an initial episode [rate ratio: 0.82 (95% CI 0.95-1.38)]. Transplant failure, glomerulonephritis and CAPD were associated with an increased risk. In France, nurse-assisted PD is associated with a lower risk of peritonitis in diabetic patients treated by PD but not a lower incidence of peritonitis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  15. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  16. Revascularization Trends in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus and Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease Presenting With Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Insights From the National Cardiovascular Data Registry Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network Registry-Get with the Guidelines (NCDR ACTION Registry-GWTG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ambarish; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A; Das, Sandeep R; Berry, Jarett D; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Banerjee, Subhash; Marso, Steven P; Barsness, Gregory W; Simon, DaJuanicia N; Roe, Matthew; Goyal, Abhinav; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Amsterdam, Ezra A; Kumbhani, Dharam J

    2016-05-01

    Current guidelines recommend surgical revascularization (coronary artery bypass graft [CABG]) over percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with diabetes mellitus and multivessel coronary artery disease. Few data are available describing revascularization patterns among these patients in the setting of non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Using Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network Registry-Get with the Guidelines (ACTION Registry-GWTG), we compared the in-hospital use of different revascularization strategies (PCI versus CABG versus no revascularization) in diabetes mellitus patients with non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction who had angiography, demonstrating multivessel coronary artery disease between July 2008 and December 2014. Factors associated with use of CABG versus PCI were identified using logistic multivariable regression analyses. A total of 29 769 patients from 539 hospitals were included in the study, of which 10 852 (36.4%) were treated with CABG, 13 760 (46.2%) were treated with PCI, and 5157 (17.3%) were treated without revascularization. The overall use of revascularization increased over the study period with an increase in the proportion undergoing PCI (45% to 48.9%; Ptrend=0.0002) and no change in the proportion undergoing CABG (36.1% to 34.7%; ptrend=0.88). There was significant variability between participating hospitals in the use of PCI and CABG (range: 22%-100%; 0%-78%, respectively; P value treatment of adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists at presentation, older age, female sex, and history of heart failure. Among patients with diabetes mellitus and multivessel coronary artery disease presenting with non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, only one third undergo CABG during the index admission. Furthermore, the use of PCI, but not CABG, increased modestly over the past 6 years. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Five-year outcomes of percutaneous versus surgical coronary revascularization in patients with diabetes mellitus (from the CREDO-Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Akira; Kimura, Takeshi; Nishiwaki, Noboru; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Hanyu, Michiya; Shiomi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shiro; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2015-04-15

    We investigated the impact of diabetes mellitus on long-term outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the drug-eluting stent era versus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in a real-world population with advanced coronary disease. We identified 3,982 patients with 3-vessel and/or left main disease of 15,939 patients with first coronary revascularization enrolled in the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2 (patients without diabetes: n = 1,984 [PCI: n = 1,123 and CABG: n = 861], and patients with diabetes: n = 1,998 [PCI: n = 1,065 and CABG: n = 933]). Cumulative 5-year incidence of all-cause death after PCI was significantly higher than after CABG both in patients without and with diabetes (19.8% vs 16.2%, p = 0.01, and 22.9% vs 19.0%, p = 0.046, respectively). After adjusting confounders, the excess mortality risk of PCI relative to CABG was no longer significant (hazard ratio [HR] 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88 to 1.54; p = 0.29) in patients without diabetes, whereas it remained significant (HR 1.31; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.70; p = 0.04) in patients with diabetes. The excess adjusted risks of PCI relative to CABG for cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), and any coronary revascularization were significant in both patients without (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.51, p = 0.047; HR 2.16, 95% CI 1.20 to 3.87, p = 0.01; and HR 3.30, 95% CI 2.55 to 4.25, p PCI relative to CABG for all-cause death, cardiac death, MI, and any revascularization. In conclusion, in both patients without and with diabetes with 3-vessel and/or left main disease, CABG compared with PCI was associated with better 5-year outcomes in terms of cardiac death, MI, and any coronary revascularization. There was no difference in the direction and magnitude of treatment effect of CABG relative to PCI regardless of diabetic status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patients' expectations and solutions for improving primary diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Brigitte; Huynh, Ai-Thuy; Breton, Mylaine; Quesnel, Louise; Camirand, Michel; Leblanc, Jeannette; Tardif, Sylvie

    2017-07-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to document health care needs expressed by people living with diabetes, describe the solutions they envisaged for improving the quality of primary care (PC) services and empower them to make better use of PC services. Design/methodology/approach A participatory research approach was used. Six workshops were organised to provide diabetes patients with knowledge on available services and to engage them in sharing their experience. Group discussions were recorded. Data were analysed using the thematic analysis method. Findings In total, 79 persons living with diabetes for a mean of 13 years participated. Needs expressed were grouped under seven themes: assurance of satisfactory follow-up by a family physician, continuous access to services adapted to evolving needs, motivation to adopt and maintain healthy behaviours, maintenance of knowledge about diabetes, psychological support, financial constraints, and collaboration with secondary-level services. Patients proposed solutions for improving services that were grouped under five themes: facilitating access to services, disseminating information about available services, centralising diabetes information on the internet, offering personalised services and improving interprofessional collaboration. Practical implications Needs expressed by diabetic patients concern different aspects of care such as accessibility, organisation, coordination, and better dissemination and visibility of services. The solutions proposed by patients focussed on better access to information and interprofessional services. Originality/value The workshop format used in this study offers an original and interesting approach and tool for actively engaging patients in quality improvement of services.

  19. High rate of hypoglycemia in 6770 type 2 diabetes patients with comorbid dementia: A multicenter cohort study on 215,932 patients from the German/Austrian diabetes registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Nicole; Stingl, Julia; Dapp, Albrecht; Denkinger, Michael D; Fasching, Peter; Jehle, Peter M; Merger, Sigrun; Mühldorfer, Steffen; Pieper, Urte; Schuler, Andreas; Zeyfang, Andrej; Holl, Reinhard W

    2016-02-01

    Dementia and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two major phenomena in older people. To compare anti-hyperglycemic therapy and diabetes-related comorbidities between elderly T2D patients with or without comorbid dementia. 215,932 type 2 diabetes patients aged ≥ 40 years (median [Q1;Q3]: 70.4 [61.2;77.7] years) from the standardized, multicenter German/Austrian diabetes patient registry, DPV, were studied. To identify patients with comorbid dementia, the registry was searched by ICD-10 codes, DSM-IV/-5 codes, respective search terms and/or disease-specific medication. For group comparisons, multiple hierarchic regression modeling with adjustments for age, sex, and duration of diabetes was applied. 3.1% (n=6770; 57% females) of the eligible T2D patients had clinically recognized comorbid dementia. After adjustment for demographics, severe hypoglycemia (insulin group: 14.8 ± 0.6 vs. 10.4 ± 0.2 events per 100 patient-years, p<0.001), hypoglycemia with coma (insulin group: 7.6 ± 0.4 vs. 3.9 ± 0.1 events per 100 patient-years, p<0.001), depression (9.9 vs. 4.7%, p<0.001), hypertension (74.7 vs. 72.2%, p<0.001), stroke (25.3 vs. 6.5%, p<0.001), diabetic foot syndrome (6.0 vs. 5.2%, p=0.004), and microalbuminuria (34.7 vs. 32.2%, p<0.001) were more common in dementia patients compared to T2D without dementia. Moreover, patients with dementia received insulin therapy more frequently (59.3 vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), but metabolic control (7.7 ± 0.1 vs. 7.7 ± 0.1%) was comparable to T2D without dementia. In T2D with dementia, higher rates of hypoglycemia and other diabetes-related comorbidities were observed. Hence, the risks of a glucocentric and intense diabetes management with insulin and a focus on tight glycemic control without considering other factors may outweigh the benefits in elderly T2D patients with comorbid dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interventions to Improve Rate of Diabetes Testing Postpartum in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Maureen S; Werner, Erika F

    2017-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. In the USA, four million women are screened annually for GDM in pregnancy in part to improve pregnancy outcomes but also because diagnosis predicts a high risk of future type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, among women with GDM, postpartum care should be focused on T2DM prevention. This review describes the current literature aimed to increase postpartum diabetes testing among women with GDM. Data suggest that proactive patient contact via a health educator, a phone call, or even postal mail is associated with higher rates of postpartum diabetes testing. There may also be utility to changing the timing of postpartum diabetes testing. Despite the widespread knowledge regarding the importance of postpartum testing for women with GDM, testing rates remain low. Alternative testing strategies and large randomized trials addressing postpartum testing are warranted.

  1. Markers of DNA/RNA damage from oxidation as predictors of a registry-based diagnosis of psychiatric illness in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Siersma, Volkert; Davidsen, Annette S.

    2018-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a potential biological mediator of the higher rates of psychiatric illness (PI) observed after the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We investigated validated urinary markers of systemic DNA/RNA damage from oxidation (8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo respectively) as predictors of incident PI......, this association was most predominant in minor PIs (unipolar depression and anxiety) compared to major PIs such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These observations indicate that higher levels of systemic oxidative stress are not associated with a higher risk of PI after T2DM onset. Only PI patients treated...... in a cohort of 1381 newly diagnosed T2DM patients, who were followed prospectively for a total of 19 years after diagnosis. Psychiatric diagnoses were from Danish national registries. Patients were examined at the time of diagnosis and at a 6-year follow-up. At baseline, 8-oxodG was slightly lower in PI vs...

  2. Challenges of implementation and implementation research: Learning from an intervention study designed to improve tumor registry reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Scheck McAlearney

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Implementation of interventions designed to improve the quality of medical care often proceeds differently from what is planned. Improving existing conceptual models to better understand the sources of these differences can help future projects avoid these pitfalls and achieve desired effectiveness. To inform an adaptation of an existing theoretical model, we examined unanticipated changes that occurred in an intervention designed to improve reporting of adjuvant therapies for breast cancer patients at a large, urban academic medical center. Methods: Guided by the complex innovation implementation conceptual framework, our study team observed and evaluated the implementation of an intervention designed to improve reporting to a tumor registry. Findings were assessed against the conceptual framework to identify boundary conditions and modifications that could improve implementation effectiveness. Results: The intervention successfully increased identification of the managing medical oncologist and treatment reporting. During implementation, however, unexpected external challenges including hospital acquisitions of community practices and practices’ responses to government incentives to purchase electronic medical record systems led to unanticipated changes and associated threats to implementation. We present a revised conceptual model that incorporates the sources of these unanticipated challenges. Conclusion: This report of our experience highlights the importance of monitoring implementation over time and accounting for changes that affect both implementation and measurement of intervention impact. In this article, we use our study to examine the challenges of implementation research in health care, and our experience can help future implementation efforts.

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer: A veteran administration registry study

    OpenAIRE

    Makhoul, Issam; Yacoub, Abdulraheem; Siegel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The etiology of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. Several studies have suggested a role for diabetes mellitus, but the magnitude of its contribution remains controversial. Objectives: Utilizing a large administrative database, this retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer. Patients and design: Using the Veterans Integrated Services Network 16 database, 322,614 subjects were enrolled in the study...

  4. Exercise improves cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgari, Christina; Pagoni, Stamatina; Vinik, Aaron; Poirier, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Physical activity is a key element in the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes. Regular physical activity efficiently supports diet-induced weight loss, improves glycemic control, and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Furthermore, physical activity positively affects lipid profile, blood pressure, reduces the rate of cardiovascular events and associated mortality, and restores the quality of life in type 2 diabetes. However, recent studies have documented that a high percentage of the cardiovascular benefits of exercise cannot be attributed solely to enhanced cardiovascular risk factor modulation. Obesity in concert with diabetes is characterized by sympathetic overactivity and the progressive loss of cardiac parasympathetic influx. These are manifested via different pathogenetic mechanisms, including hyperinsulinemia, visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and increased thrombosis. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an underestimated risk factor for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes. The same is true for the role of physical exercise in the restoration of the heart cardioprotective autonomic modulation in these individuals. This review addresses the interplay of cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes, and focuses on the importance of exercise in improving cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the diabetes health plan to improve diabetes care and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, O Kenrik; Mangione, Carol M; Chan, Charles; Keckhafer, Abigail; Kimbro, Lindsay; Kirvan, K Anya; Turk, Norman; Luchs, Robert; Li, Jinnan; Ettner, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Investigators from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and members of the leadership and data analysis teams at UnitedHealthcare (UHC) are partnering to evaluate the Diabetes Health Plan (DHP), an innovative disease-specific insurance product designed by UHC specifically for patients with prediabetes or diabetes. The DHP provides improved access to care management, telephone coaching, and enhanced Internet-based communication with enrollees. The evaluation will use a quasi-experimental design, comparing patients from employer groups that offer the DHP with patients from groups that do not, to determine the effect of the DHP on incidence of diabetes, adherence to metformin, and costs of care among patients with prediabetes. Other factors studied will be cardiovascular risk factor control, adherence to preventive services, health care use, and costs of care among patients with existing diabetes.

  6. Comparison of carotid endarterectomy and stenting in real world practice using a regional quality improvement registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brian W.; De Martino, Randall R.; Goodney, Philip P.; Schanzer, Andres; Stone, David H.; Butzel, David; Kwolek, Christopher J.; Cronenwett, Jack L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Carotid artery stenting (CAS) vs endarterectomy (CEA) remains controversial and has been the topic of recent randomized controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to compare the practice and outcomes of CAS and CEA in a real world setting. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of 7649 CEA and 430 CAS performed at 17 centers from 2003 to 2010 within the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE). The primary outcome measures were (1) any in-hospital stroke or death and (2) any stroke, death, or myocardial infarction (MI). Patients undergoing CEA in conjunction with cardiac surgery were excluded. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of stroke or death in patients undergoing CAS. Results CEA was performed in 17 centers by 111 surgeons, while CAS was performed in 6 centers by 30 surgeons and 8 interventionalists. Patient characteristics varied by procedure. Patients undergoing CAS had a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and prior ipsilateral CEA. Embolic protection was used in 97% of CAS. Shunts were used in 48% and patches in 86% of CEA. The overall in-hospital stroke or death rate was higher among patients undergoing CAS (2.3% vs 1.1%; P = .03). Overall stroke, death, or MI (2.8% CAS vs 2.1% CEA; P = .32) were not different. Asymptomatic patients had similar rates of stroke or death (CAS 0.73% vs CEA 0.89%; P = .78) and stroke, death, or MI (CAS 1.1% vs CEA 1.8%; P = .40). Symptomatic patients undergoing CAS had higher rates of stroke or death (5.1% vs 1.6%; P = .001), and stroke, death, or MI (5.8% vs 2.7%; P = .02). By multivariate analysis, major stroke (odds ratio, 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9–10.8), minor stroke (2.7; CI, 1.5–4.8), prior ipsilateral CEA (3.2, CI, 1.7–6.1), age >80 (2.1; CI, 1.3–3.4), hypertension (2.6; CI, 1.0–6.3), and a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1.6; CI, 1.0–2.4) were predictors of stroke or death

  7. Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) in Brazil: Establishment of a national registry and appraisal of available genetic and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Fernando M A; Moises, Regina S; Weinert, Leticia S; Calliari, Luis E; Manna, Thais Della; Dotto, Renata P; Franco, Luciana F; Caetano, Lilian A; Teles, Milena G; Lima, Renata Andrade; Alves, Crésio; Dib, Sergio A; Silveiro, Sandra P; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus R; Reis, Andre F

    2017-01-01

    Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) comprises a heterogeneous group of monogenic forms of diabetes caused by mutations in at least 14 genes, but mostly by mutations in Glucokinase (GCK) and hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 homeobox A (HNF1A). This study aims to establish a national registry of MODY cases in Brazilian patients, assessing published and unpublished data. 311 patients with clinical characteristics of MODY were analyzed, with unpublished data on 298 individuals described in 12 previous publications and 13 newly described cases in this report. 72 individuals had GCK mutations, 9 described in Brazilian individuals for the first time. One previously unpublished novel GCK mutation, Gly178Ala, was found in one family. 31 individuals had HNF1A mutations, 2 described for the first time in Brazilian individuals. Comparisons of GCK probands vs HNF1A: age 16±11 vs 35±20years; age at diagnosis 11±8 vs 21±7years; BMI 19±6 vs 25±6kg/m 2 ; sulfonylurea users 5 vs 83%; insulin users 5 vs 17%; presence of arterial hypertension 0 vs. 33%, all pMODY cases in Brazil are due to GCK mutations. In agreement with other studied populations, novel mutations are common. Only 14% of patients with familial diabetes carry a HNF1A mutation. Diagnosis of other rare forms of MODY is still a challenge in Brazilian population, as well as adequate strategies to screen individuals for molecular diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stress-Induced Hyperglycemia in Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Analysis to Explore the Definition Based on the Trauma Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chien, Peng-Chen; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2017-12-07

    Background: The diagnosis of diabetic hyperglycemia (DH) does not preclude a diabetes patient from having a stress-induced hyperglycemic response. This study aimed to define the optimal level of elevated glucose concentration for determining the occurrence of stress-induced hyperglycemia (SIH) in patients with diabetes. Methods: This retrospective study reviewed the data of all hospitalized trauma patients, in a Level I trauma center, from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2016. Only adult patients aged ≥20 years, with available data on serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels upon admission, were included in the study. Long-term average glucose levels, as A1c-derived average glucose (ADAG), using the equation, ADAG = ((28.7 × HbA1c) - 46.7), were calculated. Patients with high glucose levels were divided into three SIH groups with diabetes mellitus (DM), based on the following definitions: (1) same glycemic gap from ADAG; (2) same percentage of elevated glucose of ADAG, from which percentage could also be reflected by the stress hyperglycemia ratio (SHR), calculated as the admission glucose level divided by ADAG; or (3) same percentage of elevated glucose as patients with a defined SIH level, in trauma patients with and without diabetes. Patients with incomplete registered data were excluded. The primary hypothesis of this study was that SIH in patients with diabetes would present worse mortality outcomes than in those without. Detailed data of SIH in patients with diabetes were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System. Results: Among the 546 patients with DH, 332 (32.0%), 188 (18.1%), and 106 (10.2%) were assigned as diabetes patients with SIH, based on defined glucose levels, set at 250 mg/dL, 300 mg/dL, and 350 mg/dL, respectively. In patients with defined cut-off glucose levels of 250 mg/dL and 300 mg/dL, SIH was associated with a 3.5-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-7.46; p = 0.001) and 3-fold (95% CI 1.11-8.03; p = 0.030) higher odds

  9. Stress-Induced Hyperglycemia in Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Analysis to Explore the Definition Based on the Trauma Registry Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Shyuan Rau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The diagnosis of diabetic hyperglycemia (DH does not preclude a diabetes patient from having a stress-induced hyperglycemic response. This study aimed to define the optimal level of elevated glucose concentration for determining the occurrence of stress-induced hyperglycemia (SIH in patients with diabetes. Methods: This retrospective study reviewed the data of all hospitalized trauma patients, in a Level I trauma center, from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2016. Only adult patients aged ≥20 years, with available data on serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels upon admission, were included in the study. Long-term average glucose levels, as A1c-derived average glucose (ADAG, using the equation, ADAG = ((28.7 × HbA1c − 46.7, were calculated. Patients with high glucose levels were divided into three SIH groups with diabetes mellitus (DM, based on the following definitions: (1 same glycemic gap from ADAG; (2 same percentage of elevated glucose of ADAG, from which percentage could also be reflected by the stress hyperglycemia ratio (SHR, calculated as the admission glucose level divided by ADAG; or (3 same percentage of elevated glucose as patients with a defined SIH level, in trauma patients with and without diabetes. Patients with incomplete registered data were excluded. The primary hypothesis of this study was that SIH in patients with diabetes would present worse mortality outcomes than in those without. Detailed data of SIH in patients with diabetes were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System. Results: Among the 546 patients with DH, 332 (32.0%, 188 (18.1%, and 106 (10.2% were assigned as diabetes patients with SIH, based on defined glucose levels, set at 250 mg/dL, 300 mg/dL, and 350 mg/dL, respectively. In patients with defined cut-off glucose levels of 250 mg/dL and 300 mg/dL, SIH was associated with a 3.5-fold (95% confidence interval (CI 1.61–7.46; p = 0.001 and 3-fold (95% CI 1.11–8.03; p = 0

  10. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations betwee...

  11. A pragmatic comparison of two diabetes education programs in improving type 2 diabetes mellitus outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorland, Katherine; Liddy, Clare

    2014-03-28

    Although it is clear that education programs constitute key elements of improved diabetes management, uncertainty exists regarding the optimal method of delivering that education. In addition to the lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate delivery methods for these programs, there is a paucity of research which evaluates these methods in terms of specific clinical outcomes. This pragmatic study compares the effectiveness of two distinct diabetes education programs in improving clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting. The two diabetes education classes (n = 80 enrolled) retrospectively evaluated were 'the ABC's of Diabetes' (one 2-hour didactic teaching session) and 'Conversation Maps' (3 highly interactive weekly classes, 6 hours in total). Eligible participants (n = 32) had their charts reviewed and outcome measures (i.e., glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), low density lipoprotein (LDL), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and weight) recorded 1 year prior to and 6 months following the class. Pre- and post-class outcome measures were compared. A trend towards lower HbA1c was observed after completion of both classes, with an average reduction of 0.2%, and 0.6% after 6 months in the 'ABC's of Diabetes' class and 'Conversation Maps' class respectively. A significant decrease in weight was observed 6 months after the 'ABC's of Diabetes' class (p = 0.028), and in LDL after the 'Conversation Maps' class (p = 0.049). Patients with HbA1c ≥ 8% showed a drop of 1.1% in HbA1c 3 months after either class (p = 0.004). No significant difference in outcomes was found between the two diabetes education classes assessed. There was a trend towards improved glycemic control after both classes, and patients with high HbA1c levels demonstrated statistically significant improvements. This indicates that shorter sessions using didactic teaching methods may be equally

  12. Modeling Major Adverse Outcomes of Pediatric and Adult Patients With Congenital Heart Disease Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization: Observations From the NCDR IMPACT Registry (National Cardiovascular Data Registry Improving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Natalie; Spertus, John A; Kennedy, Kevin F; Vincent, Robert; Martin, Gerard R; Curtis, Jeptha P; Nykanen, David; Moore, Phillip M; Bergersen, Lisa

    2017-11-21

    Risk standardization for adverse events after congenital cardiac catheterization is needed to equitably compare patient outcomes among different hospitals as a foundation for quality improvement. The goal of this project was to develop a risk-standardization methodology to adjust for patient characteristics when comparing major adverse outcomes in the NCDR's (National Cardiovascular Data Registry) IMPACT Registry (Improving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment). Between January 2011 and March 2014, 39 725 consecutive patients within IMPACT undergoing cardiac catheterization were identified. Given the heterogeneity of interventional procedures for congenital heart disease, new procedure-type risk categories were derived with empirical data and expert opinion, as were markers of hemodynamic vulnerability. A multivariable hierarchical logistic regression model to identify patient and procedural characteristics predictive of a major adverse event or death after cardiac catheterization was derived in 70% of the cohort and validated in the remaining 30%. The rate of major adverse event or death was 7.1% and 7.2% in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Six procedure-type risk categories and 6 independent indicators of hemodynamic vulnerability were identified. The final risk adjustment model included procedure-type risk category, number of hemodynamic vulnerability indicators, renal insufficiency, single-ventricle physiology, and coagulation disorder. The model had good discrimination, with a C-statistic of 0.76 and 0.75 in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Model calibration in the validation cohort was excellent, with a slope of 0.97 (standard error, 0.04; P value [for difference from 1] =0.53) and an intercept of 0.007 (standard error, 0.12; P value [for difference from 0] =0.95). The creation of a validated risk-standardization model for adverse outcomes after congenital cardiac catheterization can support reporting of risk

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign- ...

  14. Lean diabetes in middle-aged adults: A joint analysis of the German DIVE and DPV registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Bettina; Lanzinger, Stefanie; Bramlage, Peter; Groß, Felix; Danne, Thomas; Wagner, Siegfried; Krakow, Dietmar; Zimmermann, Artur; Malcharzik, Christian; Holl, Reinhard W

    2017-01-01

    To assess differences in demographics, treatment and outcome of lean (LD) compared to overweight and obese people with diabetes clinically classified as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We combined data from the German DIVE (Diabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation) and DPV (Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation) databases to produce a large cohort of people with T2DM. The characteristics of people with Body Mass Index (BMI) demographics, cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, comorbidities and outcomes. A total of 37,870 people were included in the analysis, 3,191 of these (8.4%) had a BMI < 25 kg/m2. LD reported more nicotine (41.6% of 2,070 vs. 38.1% of 6,070 and 33.4% of 16,823; P<0.001)and alcohol consumption (12.0% of 1,282, 10.3% of 3,594 and 6.6% of 9,418; P<0.001)compared to overweight and obese people. More LD were treated with insulin in comparison to the other subgroups (short acting insulin 33.1% of 3,191 vs. 28.4% of 9,234 and 28.0% of 25,445; P <0.001; long acting insulin 31.3% of 3,191 vs. 28.9% of 9,234 and 29.3% of 25,445; P = 0.043). Regression models adjusted for age, gender and diabetes duration showed a 2.50 times higher odds ratio (OR) for hypoglycemia and a 2.52 higher OR for mortality in LD compared to the BMI subgroup ≥30 kg/m2. LD is associated with an increased risk of hypoglycaemia and death. Patients are characterized by male gender, lifestyle habits as smoking and alcohol consumption while cardiovascular comorbidities are less important. In comparison to patients of the other weight groups they are treated with insulin more often and considerably less with metformin.

  15. Lean diabetes in middle-aged adults: A joint analysis of the German DIVE and DPV registries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Hartmann

    Full Text Available To assess differences in demographics, treatment and outcome of lean (LD compared to overweight and obese people with diabetes clinically classified as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.We combined data from the German DIVE (Diabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation and DPV (Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation databases to produce a large cohort of people with T2DM. The characteristics of people with Body Mass Index (BMI <25 kg/m2, ≥25-30 kg/m2 and ≥30 kg/m2 aged 30 to 50 years were compared, including demographics, cardiovascular (CV risk factors, comorbidities and outcomes.A total of 37,870 people were included in the analysis, 3,191 of these (8.4% had a BMI < 25 kg/m2. LD reported more nicotine (41.6% of 2,070 vs. 38.1% of 6,070 and 33.4% of 16,823; P<0.001and alcohol consumption (12.0% of 1,282, 10.3% of 3,594 and 6.6% of 9,418; P<0.001compared to overweight and obese people. More LD were treated with insulin in comparison to the other subgroups (short acting insulin 33.1% of 3,191 vs. 28.4% of 9,234 and 28.0% of 25,445; P <0.001; long acting insulin 31.3% of 3,191 vs. 28.9% of 9,234 and 29.3% of 25,445; P = 0.043. Regression models adjusted for age, gender and diabetes duration showed a 2.50 times higher odds ratio (OR for hypoglycemia and a 2.52 higher OR for mortality in LD compared to the BMI subgroup ≥30 kg/m2.LD is associated with an increased risk of hypoglycaemia and death. Patients are characterized by male gender, lifestyle habits as smoking and alcohol consumption while cardiovascular comorbidities are less important. In comparison to patients of the other weight groups they are treated with insulin more often and considerably less with metformin.

  16. Dynamic Aerobic Exercise Induces Baroreflex Improvement in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP, heart rate (HR, and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n=8 and diabetic (n=8 groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R and postexercise session (PE on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103±2 versus PE: 111±3 mmHg and HR (R: 290±7 versus PE: 328±10 bpm reductions and BR dysfunction (R: -0.70±0.06 versus PE: -1.21±0.09 bpm/mmHg was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  17. Dynamic Aerobic Exercise Induces Baroreflex Improvement in Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y.; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: −0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: −1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes. PMID:22203833

  18. Probiotic yogurt improves antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejtahed, Hanie S; Mohtadi-Nia, Javad; Homayouni-Rad, Aziz; Niafar, Mitra; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Mofid, Vahid

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetes. Among various functional foods with an antioxidant effect, probiotic foods have been reported to repress oxidative stress. The objective of this clinical trial was to assess the effects of probiotic and conventional yogurt on blood glucose and antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic patients. Sixty-four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 30 to 60 y old, were assigned to two groups in this randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial. The patients in the intervention group consumed 300 g/d of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and those in the control group consumed 300 g/d of conventional yogurt for 6 wk. Fasting blood samples, 24-h dietary recalls, and anthropometric measurements were collected at the baseline and at the end of the trial. Probiotic yogurt significantly decreased fasting blood glucose (P activities and total antioxidant status (P activity within either group (P > 0.05). The consumption of probiotic yogurt improved fasting blood glucose and antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic patients. These results suggest that probiotic yogurt is a promising agent for diabetes management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Community to clinic navigation to improve diabetes outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E. Schoenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rural residents experience rates of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM that are considerably higher than their urban or suburban counterparts. Two primary modifiable factors, self-management and formal clinical management, have potential to greatly improve diabetes outcomes. “Community to Clinic Navigation to Improve Diabetes Outcomes,” is the first known randomized clinical trial pilot study to test a hybrid model of diabetes self-management education plus clinical navigation among rural residents with T2DM. Forty-one adults with T2DM were recruited from two federally qualified health centers in rural Appalachia from November 2014–January 2015. Community health workers provided navigation, including helping participants understand and implement a diabetes self-management program through six group sessions and, if needed, providing assistance in obtaining clinic visits (contacting providers' offices for appointments, making reminder calls, and facilitating transportation and dependent care. Pre and post-test data were collected on T2DM self-management, physical measures, demographics, psychosocial factors, and feasibility (cost, retention, and satisfaction. Although lacking statistical significance, some outcomes indicate trends in positive directions, including diet, foot care, glucose monitoring, and physical health, including decreased HbA1c and triglyceride levels. Process evaluations revealed high levels of satisfaction and feasibility. Due to the limited intervention dose, modest program expenditures (~$29,950, and a severely affected population most of whom had never received diabetes education, outcomes were not as robust as anticipated. Given high rates of satisfaction and retention, this culturally appropriate small group intervention holds promise for hard to reach rural populations. Modifications should include expanded recruitment venues, sample size, intervention dosage and longer term assessment.

  20. [Primary care for diabetic patients: a quality improvement cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Martínez, A; Suárez-Beke, M P; Sánchez-Nicolás, J A; Lázaro-Aragues, P; de Jesús Jiménez-Vázquez, E; Huertas-de Mora, O

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and improve the quality of medical care provided to diabetic patients following the standards proposed by the American Diabetes Association. The study was conducted in three phases by analyzing data from the computerized clinical history of a sample of 340 patients. First phase (2010): cross-sectional, descriptive study which assessed the proportion of patients who met the standards related to the screening of diabetes, and goals of control and treatment. Subsequently, health professionals reviewed the results in order to promote the implementation of corrective action. Finally (2012), a new assessment with the same standards was performed. An increase in the number of patients treated with insulin (12.7% in 2010 and 20.2% in 2012) was observed (P < .01). There were also percentage increases in the number of patients who met the screening standards as regards analytical determinations: glycosylated hemoglobin (from 44.4% to 68.2%), lipid profile (47.6%-73.8%), creatinine (32.5% - 73.5%), and albumin-creatinine ratio (9.2%-24.4%) (P < .001). Only 6.4% (CI: 3.2- 9.8) of diabetic patients attained the composite target of glycosylated hemoglobin < 7%, blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 100 mg/dl in 2012. This study shows that medical care has improved the goals related to analytical determinations and the number of insulin-treated diabetic type 2 patients. An optimal level was also maintained in metabolic control of diabetes, but there was still poor control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves blood pressure in patients with diabetes and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Ali; Khalili, Mohammad; Haghighat, Neda; Eghtesadi, Shahryar; Shidfar, Farzad; Heidari, Iraj; Ebrahimpour-Koujan, Soraiya; Eghtesadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effects of high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate on lipid profiles, weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, and inflammation in individuals with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Sixty individuals [32 in dark chocolate group (DCG) and 28 in white chocolate group (WCG)] with Type 2 diabetes on stable medication were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study. Subjects were randomized to consume 25 g DCG or WCG for 8 weeks. Changes in weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, lipid profile, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured at the beginning and end of the intervention. This clinical trial was registered at the Iranian registry of clinical trials. In DCC group, compared with baseline, serum levels of Apo A-1 (P = 0.045) was increased and fasting blood sugar (FBS) (P = 0.027), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (P = 0.025), Apo B (P = 0.012) and Log of hsCRP (P = 0.043) levels were decreased at the end of study. No changes were seen within the WCG in studied parameters. High polyphenol chocolate consumption compared to white chocolate resulted in significant decrease in of systolic (-5.93 ± 6.25 vs. -1.07 ± 7.97 mmHg, P = 0.004) and diastolic blood pressure (-6.4 ± 6.25 vs. 0.17 ± 7.9 mmHg, P = 0.002), FBS (-7.84 ± 19.15 vs. 4.00 ± 20.58 mg/dl, P = 0.019) over the course of 8 weeks of daily chocolate consumption neither weight nor body mass index and TG levels altered from baseline. High polyphenol chocolate is effective in improving TG levels in hypertensive patients with diabetes and decreasing blood pressure and FBS without affecting weight, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance or glycemic control.

  2. Clinical outcomes of patients with diabetes mellitus treated with Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: a subanalysis of the European Multicentre GHOST-EU Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capranzano, Piera; Capodanno, Davide; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Latib, Azeem; Mehilli, Julinda; Nef, Holger; Gori, Tommaso; Lesiak, Maciej; Geraci, Salvatore; Pyxaras, Stelios; Mattesini, Alessio; Münzel, Thomas; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander; Caramanno, Giuseppe; Naber, Christoph; Di Mario, Carlo; Sabatè, Manel; Colombo, Antonio; Wiebe, Jens; Tamburino, Corrado

    2018-02-15

    Data on the clinical performance of bioresorbable scaffolds in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are still limited. The present study reported 1-year clinical outcomes associated with the use of everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (Absorb BVS; Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA) in DM patients. This was a subanalysis from the GHOST-EU (Gauging coronary Healing with biOresorbable Scaffolding plaTforms in Europe) multicenter retrospective registry including patients treated with Absorb BVS between November 2011 and September 2014. In this study, a comparative analysis stratified according to DM was performed. The primary endpoint was target lesion failure (TLF), defined as the combination of cardiac death, target-vessel myocardial infarction (MI) and clinically-driven target-lesion revascularization (TLR). A total of 1,477 patients were treated with 2,224 Absorb BVS; 381 (25.8%) and 1,096 (74.2%) patients were with and without DM, respectively. The 1-year rate of TLF was higher among patients with DM (7.8%) than those without DM (4.3%); the increase in TLF was driven by TLR (6.5% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.009); no significant differences in cardiac death (1.1% vs. 0.9%, P = 0.68) and target-vessel MI (3.1% vs. 2.2%, P = 0.38) were observed, respectively. Definite/probable scaffold thrombosis rate tended to be higher among patients with DM than those without DM (3.0% vs. 1.7%, P = 0.14, respectively). Absorb BVS use in patients with DM was associated with increased 1-year TLF and scaffold thrombosis compared with non-diabetes patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-12-11

    Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life.

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Diabetic Macular Edema in Turkey: A Real-Life Registry Study—TURK-DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Eldem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the clinical and diagnostic characteristics of patients with newly diagnosed diabetic macular edema (DME in Turkey in a real-life setting. Methods. A total of 945 consecutive patients (mean (SD age: 61.3 (9.9 years, 55.2% male with newly diagnosed DME were included. Data on patient demographics, comorbidities, ocular history, ophthalmic examination findings including type of DME, central macular thickness (CMT via time domain (TD and spectral domain (SD optical coherence tomography (OCT, and planned treatments were recorded. Results. OCT (98.8% and fundoscopy (92.9% were the two most common diagnostic methods. Diffuse and focal DMEs were detected in 39.2% and 36.9% of cases, respectively. Laser photocoagulation (32.1% and antivascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF; 31.8% were the most commonly planned treatments. The median CMT in the right eye was significantly greater in untreated than in treated patients [376.5 μm (range: 160–840 versus 342 μm (range: 146–999 (p=0.002] and in the left eye [370 μm (range: 201–780 versus 329 μm (range: 148–999 (p<0.001]. Conclusions. This study is the first large-scale real-life registry of DME patients in Turkey. SD-OCT and fundoscopy were the most common diagnostic methods. Laser photocoagulation and anti-VEGF therapy were the most common treatments.

  5. Dyslipidaemia and its treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes: A joint analysis of the German DIVE and DPV registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlage, Peter; Lanzinger, Stefanie; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Gillessen, Anton; Scheper, Nikolaus; Schmid, Sebastian M; Kaltheuner, Matthias; Seufert, Jochen; Danne, Thomas; Holl, Reinhard W

    2016-09-04

    To compare lipid abnormalities in people with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to assess the effect of treatment. We combined data from the German DIVE (DIabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation) and DPV (Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation) databases to produce a large cohort of people with T2DM. The characteristics of people receiving and not receiving lipid-modifying therapy (LMT) were compared, including demographics, cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and comorbidities. Lipid profiles were evaluated, and the achievement of recommended LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol targets was assessed. The effect on lipid levels in subgroups of patients aged ≥60 years, being obese or with CV disease was also investigated. A total of 363 949 people were included in the analysis. Of these, only 97 160 (26.7%) were receiving LMT. These individuals were older than those not receiving LMT, and comorbidities were more prevalent. Statins were the most commonly used agents (84.2%), with ezetimibe, fibrates and nicotinic acid taken by a small proportion of people. The median LDL cholesterol level was lower for the LMT group (100.5 vs 114.0 mg/dL; P < .001), as was the non-HDL cholesterol level (131.0 vs 143.1 mg/dL; P < .001), while the triglyceride level was higher (160.3 vs 152.0 mg/dL; P < .001). HDL cholesterol was lower in the LMT group for both men (41.0 vs 42.0 mg/dL; P < .001) and women (47.5 vs 48.0 mg/dL; P < .001). Elderly people were more likely to have achieved the target lipid levels, while obese people were less likely. For people with CV disease, there was a greater likelihood of achieving LDL, total and non-HDL cholesterol targets, but less chance of attaining a desired HDL cholesterol level. Dyslipidaemia was highly prevalent in this large population and management of lipid abnormalities was suboptimal. The distinct lipid profile of people with T2DM warrants further investigation into the use of non-statins in addition to statin LMT. © 2016 John

  6. Favorable Outcomes after Implantation of Biodegradable Polymer Coated Sirolimus-Eluting Stents in Diabetic Population: Results from INDOLIMUS-G Diabetic Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Polavarapu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main aim is to evaluate safety, efficacy, and clinical performance of the Indolimus (Sahajanand Medical Technologies Pvt. Ltd., Surat, India sirolimus-eluting stent in high-risk diabetic population with complex lesions. Methods. It was a multicentre, retrospective, non-randomized, single-arm study, which enrolled 372 diabetic patients treated with Indolimus. The primary endpoint of the study was major adverse cardiac events (MACE, which is a composite of cardiac death, target lesion revascularization (TLR, target vessel revascularization (TVR, myocardial infarction (MI, and stent thrombosis (ST. The clinical follow-ups were scheduled at 30 days, 6 months, and 9 months. Results. The mean age of the enrolled patients was 53.4 ± 10.2 years. A total of 437 lesions were intervened successfully with 483 stents (1.1 ± 0.3 per lesion. There were 256 (68.8% male patients. Hypertension and totally occluded lesions were found in 202 (54.3% and 45 (10.3% patients, respectively. The incidence of MACE at 30 days, 6 months and 9 months was 0 (0%, 6 (1.6%, and 8 (2.2%, respectively. The event-free survival at 9-month follow-up by Kaplan Meier method was found to be 97.8%. Conclusion. The use of biodegradable polymer coated sirolimus-eluting stent is associated with favorable outcomes. The results demonstrated in our study depict its safety and efficacy in diabetic population.

  7. Petalonia improves glucose homeostasis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong-Il; Jin, Young-Jun; Ko, Hee-Chul; Choi, Soo-Youn; Hwang, Joon-Ho; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Moo-Han; Shin, Hye-Sun; Jeong, Hyung-Bok; Kim, Se-Jae

    2008-01-01

    The anti-diabetic potential of Petalonia binghamiae extract (PBE) was evaluated in vivo. Dietary administration of PBE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice significantly lowered blood glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance. The mode of action by which PBE attenuated diabetes was investigated in vitro using 3T3-L1 cells. PBE treatment stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation as evidenced by increased triglyceride accumulation. At the molecular level, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and terminal marker protein aP2, as well as the mRNA of GLUT4 were up-regulated by PBE. In mature adipocytes, PBE significantly stimulated the uptake of glucose and the expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Furthermore, PBE increased PPARγ luciferase reporter gene activity in COS-1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo anti-diabetic effect of PBE is mediated by both insulin-like and insulin-sensitizing actions in adipocytes

  8. Improved Metabolic Control in Diabetes, HSP60, and Proinflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Blasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-atherosclerosis relationship remains to be fully defined. Repeated prolonged hyperglycemia, increased ROS production and endothelial dysfunction are important factors. One theory is that increased blood levels of heat shock protein (HSP60 are proinflammatory, through activation of innate immunity, and contribute to the progression of vascular disease. It was hypothesized that improvement of diabetes control in patients presenting with metabolic syndrome would lower HSP60, and anti-HSP60 antibody levels and decrease inflammatory markers. Paired sera of 17 Italian patients, before and after intensive treatment, were assayed for cytokines, HSP60 and anti-HSP60 antibodies. As expected, intensive treatment was associated with a decrease in HgbA1C (P<0.001 and BMI (P<0.001. After treatment, there was a significant decrease in IL-6 (P<0.05. HSP60 levels were before treatment −6.9+1.9, after treatment −7.1+2.0 ng/mL (P=ns. Overall HSP60 concentrations were lower than published reports. Anti-HSP60 antibody titers were high and did not decrease with treatment. In conclusion, improvement of diabetic control did not alter HSP60 concentrations or antiHSP60 antibody titers, but led to a reduction of IL-6 levels.

  9. Diabetes and Obesity as Independent Risk Factors for Osteoporosis: Updated Results from the ROIS/EMEROS Registry in a Population of Five Thousand Post-Menopausal Women Living in a Region Characterized by Heavy Environmental Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neglia, Cosimo; Argentiero, Alberto; Chitano, Giovanna; Agnello, Nadia; Ciccarese, Roberta; Vigilanza, Antonella; Pantile, Valerio; Argentiero, Domenico; Quarta, Raffaele; Rivezzi, Matteo; Di Tanna, Gian Luca; Di Somma, Carolina; Migliore, Alberto; Iolascon, Giovanni; Gimigliano, Francesca; Distante, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2016-11-01

    Objectives : We aimed to analyze bone mineralization and the effect of different risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Methods : We found 4909 postmenopausal subjects within ≥10,000 records from the ROIS/EMEROS (Ionian and Salento Osteoporosis Registry/Euro Mediterranean Registry of Osteoporosis) registry, a population study carried out in an area characterized by heavy environmental pressure between Brindisi and Taranto from 2009 to 2016. All subjects were assessed via phalangeal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) to evaluate their bone mineralization (assessed via amplitude dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS)) and the association between demineralization and the presence of other conditions or risk factors. Results : Mean age was 64 ± 9.5 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 28.7 ± 3.5 kg/m². Pearson correlation analyses revealed a negative association between bone mineralization (AD-SoS) and BMI ( p osteoporosis (adjusted for age, physical activity, and the use of drugs known to increase the risk of fractures) in subjects with diabetes and obesity: 1.39 (confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.83) and 1.46 (CI: 1.20-1.78), respectively. A statistically significant linear trend of higher ORs of osteoporosis was found for increasing values of BMI. Conclusions : Our study confirmed the high impact of obesity and type 1 and type 2 diabetes on osteoporosis.

  10. Data from a national lung cancer registry contributes to improve outcome and quality of surgery: Danish results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Palshof, Torben; Østerlind, Kell

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In 1998 The Danish Lung Cancer Group published the first edition of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. A national registry was implemented in the year 2000 with the primary objective to monitor the implementation of these guidelines and nationwide to secure and impr......OBJECTIVE: In 1998 The Danish Lung Cancer Group published the first edition of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. A national registry was implemented in the year 2000 with the primary objective to monitor the implementation of these guidelines and nationwide to secure...... has decreased from 23% to 11%. The proportion of patients having surgery within 14 days from referral has increased from 69% to 87%. CONCLUSIONS: Establishment of a national lung cancer group with the primary tasks to implement updated national guidelines and to secure valid registration of clinical...

  11. Enhancing diabetes management while teaching quality improvement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Beth A; Negley, Kristin D F; Carlson, Marny L; Nelson, Joyce L; Pearson, Kristina K

    2014-01-01

    Six medical units realized that they were having issues with accurate timing of bedtime blood glucose measurement for their patients with diabetes. They decided to investigate the issues by using their current staff nurse committee structure. The clinical nurse specialists and nurse education specialists decided to address the issue by educating and engaging the staff in the define, measure, analyze, improve, control (DMAIC) framework process. They found that two issues needed to be improved, including timing of bedtime blood glucose measurement and snack administration and documentation. Several educational interventions were completed and resulted in improved timing of bedtime glucose measurement and bedtime snack documentation. The nurses understood the DMAIC process, and collaboration and cohesion among the medical units was enhanced. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. [Reduction of in-hospital mortality and improved secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction. First results from the registry of secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (SAMI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbe, U; Messer, C; Stammwitz, E; The, G S; Dietl, J; Bischoff, K-O; Schulten-Baumer, U; Tebbenjohanns, J; Gohlke, H; Bramlage, P

    2007-07-30

    In hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been reduced due to the availability of better therapeutic strategies. But there is still a gap between mortality rates in randomised trials and daily clinical practice. Thus, it was aim of the present registry to document the course and outcome of patients with AMI and to improve patient care by implementing recent guidelines. In a nationwide registry study in hospitals in Germany with a cardiology unit or an internal medicine department data on consecutive patients were recorded for six to twelve months at admission, discharge and during a follow-up of one year. From 02/2003 until 10/2004 a total of 5,353 patients with acute myocardial infarction (65.7 % male, mean age of 67.6 +/- 17.7 years; 55.1 % of them with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were included in the registry. Of the patients with STEMI, 76.6 % underwent acute intervention, 37.1 % had thrombolysis, 69.7 % percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). 40.0 % of those with non-Stemi (NSTEMI) had an acute intervention, 6.6 % thrombolysis, 73.5 % PTCA. Recommended secondary prevention consisted of ASS (93.2 %), beta-blockers (93.0 %), CSE-inhibitors (83.5 %), ACE-inhibitors (80.9 %) and clopidogrel (74.0 %). In-hospital mortality was 10.5 % (STEMI) and 7.4 % (NSTEMI). The 9 % mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in the hospitals participating in the SAMI registry is low compared to that in similar collectives. The high number of patients who had thrombofibrinolysis and coronary interventions as well as the early initiation of drug therapy contributed to these results. Medical treatment in the prehospital phase of these patients remains still insufficient and to a substantial extent contributes to the mortality of acute myocardial infarction.

  13. Improving School Experiences for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Saori S.; Hopkins, Amanda; Burke, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is one of the most common metabolic diseases in children worldwide and the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is growing. T1D is complicated to manage and adolescents with diabetes face unique, age-specific challenges. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which schools can create a positive…

  14. Vildagliptin Improves Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilatation in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poppel, Pleun C.M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Smits, Paul; Tack, Cees J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixteen subjects with type 2 diabetes (age 59.8 ± 6.8 years, BMI 29.1 ± 4.8 kg/m2, HbA1c 6.97 ± 0.61) on oral blood glucose–lowering treatment were included. Participants received vildagliptin 50 mg b.i.d. or acarbose 100 mg t.i.d. for four consecutive weeks in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each treatment period, we measured forearm vasodilator responses to intra-arterially administered acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilator) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent vasodilator). RESULTS Infusion of acetylcholine induced a dose-dependent increase in forearm blood flow in the experimental arm, which was higher during vildagliptin (3.1 ± 0.7, 7.9 ± 1.1, and 12.6 ± 1.4 mL ⋅ dL−1 ⋅ min−1 in response to three increasing dosages of acetylcholine) than during acarbose (2.0 ± 0.7, 5.0 ± 1.2, and 11.7 ± 1.6 mL ⋅ dL−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively; P = 0.01 by two-way ANOVA). Treatment with vildagliptin did not significantly change the vascular responses to sodium nitroprusside. CONCLUSIONS Four weeks’ treatment with vildagliptin improves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in subjects with type 2 diabetes. This observation might have favorable cardiovascular implications. PMID:21788633

  15. Quality improvement in practice: improving diabetes care and patient outcomes in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneman, Alice; Atkinson, David; Davey, Maureen; Marley, Julia V

    2014-10-07

    Management of chronic disease, including diabetes, is a central focus of most Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) in Australia. We have previously demonstrated that diabetes monitoring and outcomes can be improved and maintained over a 10-year period at Derby Aboriginal Health Service (DAHS). While continuous quality improvement (CQI) has been shown to improve service delivery rates and clinical outcome measures, the process of interpreting audit results and developing strategies for improvement is less well described. This paper describes the evaluation of care of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and features of effective CQI in ACCHSs in the remote Kimberley region of north Western Australia. Retrospective audit of records for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary care patients aged ≥15 years with a confirmed diagnosis of T2DM at four Kimberley ACCHSs from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012. Interviews with health service staff and focus group discussions with patients post audit. diabetes care related activities, clinical outcome measures and factors influencing good diabetes related care and effective CQI. A total of 348 patients from the four ACCHSs were included in the study. Clinical care activities were generally high across three of the four health services (at least 71% of patients had cholesterol recorded, 89% blood pressure, 84% HbA1c). Patients from DAHS had lower median cholesterol levels (4.4 mmol/L) and the highest proportion of patients meeting clinical targets for HbA1c (31% v 16% ACCHS-3; P = 0.02). Features that facilitated good care included clearly defined staff roles for diabetes management, support and involvement of Aboriginal Health Workers, efficient recall systems, and well-coordinated allied health services. Effective CQI features included seamless and timely data collection, local ownership of the process, openness to admitting deficiencies and willingness to embrace change. Well

  16. Improving diabetes management with a patient portal: a qualitative study of diabetes self-management portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urowitz, Sara; Wiljer, David; Dupak, Kourtney; Kuehner, Zachary; Leonard, Kevin; Lovrics, Emily; Picton, Peter; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joe

    2012-11-30

    Effective management and care of diabetes is crucial to reducing associated risks such as heart disease and kidney failure. With increasing access and use of the Internet, online chronic disease management is being explored as a means of providing patients with support and the necessary tools to monitor and manage their disease. The objective of our study was to evaluate the experience of patients and providers using an online diabetes management portal for patients. Participants were recruited from a large sample population of 887 for a follow-up questionnaire to be completed after 6 months of using the patient portal. Participants were presented with the option to participate in an additional interview and, if the participant agreed, a time and date was scheduled for the interview. A 5-item, open-ended questionnaire was used to capture providers' opinions of the patient portal. Providers included general practitioners (GPs), nurses, nurse practitioners (NPs), dieticians, diabetes educators (DECs), and other clinical staff. A total of 854 patients were consented for the questionnaire. Seventeen (8 male, 9 female) patients agreed to participate in a telephone interview. Sixty-four health care providers completed the five open-ended questions; however, an average of 48.2 responses were recorded per question. Four major themes were identified and will be discussed in this paper. These themes have been classified as: facilitators of disease management, barriers to portal use, patient-provider communication and relationship, and recommendations for portal improvements. This qualitative study shows that online chronic disease management portals increase patient access to information and engagement in their health care, but improvements in the portal itself may improve usability and reduce attrition. Furthermore, this study identifies a grey area that exists in the roles that GPs and AHPs should play in the facilitation of online disease management.

  17. Diabetes patients show different time-course of myocardial perfusion improvement after coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. J.; Seok, J. W.; Eo, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Diabetes is known to cause microangiopathy. The microangiopathy is hardly detectable on the coronary angiography. Myocardial perfusion imaging shows the resultant perfusion status which reflects the microangiopathy. For patients who underwent revascularization, the microangiopathy could affect the myocardial perfusion improvement. Diabetes patients probably experience the different myocardial perfusion improvement as compared to the non-diabetes patients although they have similar angiographic findings. The aim of this study is to find out whether there is a time-course difference of perfusion improvement between the diabetes and non diabetes patients who showed patent angiographic findings after coronary artery grafting surgery (CABG). A total of 129 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery were enrolled in this study. Myocardial SPECTs performed at previous, short-term (3 month), and mid-term (1 year) to CABG. One-year follow up angiography was done 411±121 days after surgery. Graft patency was determined according to the FitzGibbon et al. Segments were assigned to vascular territories using a 20 segment model. The segments of excellent patency were included in this study. Time course differences of concerned segments were analyzed using RMANOVA. The number of segments enrolled was 764 of diabetes and 1083 of non-diabetes. At short-term follow up, reversibility score was 2.8±8.1% in diabetes and 0.3±7.5% in non-diabetes. At long-term follow up, reversibility score was 1.8±8.0% in diabetes and 0.1±7.3% in non-diabetes. The time-course of reversibility score was significantly different between the diabetes and non diabetes (p<0.001) Diabetic segments showed high residual reversibility score than non-diabetic segments after CABG although the angiographic finding was patent in both groups. This result is maybe attributable to microangiopathy induced by diabetes

  18. Clinical Case Registries (CCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Clinical Case Registries (CCR) replaced the former Immunology Case Registry and the Hepatitis C Case Registry with local and national databases. The CCR:HIV and...

  19. An Innovative Approach to Improve Completeness of Treatment and Other Key Data Elements in a Population-Based Cancer Registry: A15-Month Data Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Mumphrey, Brent; Pareti, Lisa; Yi, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to comply with the Louisiana legislative obligation and meet funding agencies’ requirement of case completeness for 12-month data submission, hospital cancer registries are mandated to submit cancer incidence data to the Louisiana Tumor Registry (LTR) within 6 months of diagnosis. However, enforcing compliance with timely reporting may result in incomplete data on adjuvant treatment received by the LTR. Although additional treatment information can be obtained via retransmission of the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR)–modified abstracts, consolidating multiple NAACCR-modified abstracts for the same case is extremely time consuming. To avoid a huge amount of work while obtaining timely and complete data, the LTR has requested hospital cancer registries resubmit their data 15 months after the close of the diagnosis year. The purpose of this report is to assess the improvement in the completeness of data items related to treatment, staging and site specific factors. METHODS: The LTR requested that hospital cancer registries resubmit 15-month data between April 1, 2016 and April 15, 2016 for cases diagnosed in 2014. Microsoft Visual Studio Visual Basic script was used to link and compare resubmitted data with existing data in the LTR database. Data elements used for matching same patient/tumor were name, Social Security number, date of birth, primary site, laterality, and hospital identifier number. Treatment data items were compared as known vs none/ unknown and known vs known with different code. Matched records with updated information were imported into the LTR database and flagged as modified abstract records for manual consolidation. Nonmatched records were also loaded in the LTR database as potential new cases for further investigation. RESULTS: A total of 25,207 resubmitted NAACCR abstracts were received from 38 hospitals and freestanding radiation centers. About 11.1% had at least 1 update related to

  20. Treatment intensification without improved HbA1c levels in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sildorf, S. M.; Hertel, N T; Thomsen, J.

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To examine trends in diabetes treatment in Danish children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus, comparing treatment intensity with metabolic outcomes in the population, and to describe the challenges of population-based registries in a clinical setting with rapidly changing...... treatment methods. METHODS: This observational study is based on the Danish national population registry of childhood diabetes, which includes 99% of children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes before the age of 15 years. We included 4527 people diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. Self-monitored blood glucose...... measurements, insulin injections/boluses, treatment method and metabolic control quantifications were analysed and adjusted for the effects of gender and ethnicity, the combined effect of age, visit year and duration, and for the random effects of individual and hospital settings. RESULTS: Treatment...

  1. Polarized light improves cutaneous healing on diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Oliveira, Priscila Chagas; Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio L.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of 3rd degree burn on diabetic rats submitted or not to treatment with Polarized Light. Diabetes mellitus (Streptozotocin, 60mg/kg) was induced on 45 male Wistar albinus rats and a third degree burn (1.5× 1.5cm) was created in the dorsum of each animal under general anesthesia. After a regular quarantine period, the animals were randomly distributed into three groups as follows: G1: control (no treatment, n =15); G2: Polarized Light (λ=400-2000nm, 20J/cm2) and G3: Polarized Light (λ=400-2000nm, 40J/cm2). The phototherapy performed on group G2 was Polarized Light dose 20J/cm2 and G3 was Polarized Light dose 40J/cm2 (Bioptron®, λ400-2000 nm, 40mW; 2.4J/cm2 per minute; Φ +/- 5.5 cm; Bioptron AG, Monchaltorf, Switzerland). The phototherapy started immediately post-burning and was repeated daily until the day before the animal death. The energy was applied transcutaneously respecting the focal distance of 10cm as recommended by the manufacturer. The dose was 20 or 40J/cm2 (4min 15s or 8min.and 30s). At each time point chosen (7, 14, and 21 days post-burning) and following macroscopic examination, each animal was killed by an overdose of general anesthesia. Slides were stained with HE, Sirius Red, and CK AE1/AE3 antibody. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses were performed under light microscopy. The animals submitted to phototherapy (20J/cm2) showed significant differences on regards revascularization and epithelialization. The use of 20J/cm2 was effective on improving the healing of third degree buns on diabetic animals at both early and late stages of the repair.

  2. High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves blood pressure in patients with diabetes and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rostami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim was to examine the effects of high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate on lipid profiles, weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, and inflammation in individuals with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. METHODS: Sixty individuals [32 in dark chocolate group (DCG and 28 in white chocolate group (WCG] with Type 2 diabetes on stable medication were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study. Subjects were randomized to consume 25 g DCG or WCG for 8 weeks. Changes in weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, lipid profile, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP were measured at the beginning and end of the intervention. This clinical trial was registered at the Iranian registry of clinical trials. RESULTS: In DCC group, compared with baseline, serum levels of Apo A-1 (P = 0.045 was increased and fasting blood sugar (FBS (P = 0.027, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c (P = 0.025, Apo B (P = 0.012 and Log of hsCRP (P = 0.043 levels were decreased at the end of study. No changes were seen within the WCG in studied parameters. High polyphenol chocolate consumption compared to white chocolate resulted in significant decrease in of systolic (−5.93 ± 6.25 vs. −1.07 ± 7.97 mmHg, P = 0.004 and diastolic blood pressure (−6.4 ± 6.25 vs. 0.17 ± 7.9 mmHg, P = 0.002, FBS (−7.84 ± 19.15 vs. 4.00 ± 20.58 mg/dl, P = 0.019 over the course of 8 weeks of daily chocolate consumption neither weight nor body mass index and TG levels altered from baseline. CONCLUSION: High polyphenol chocolate is effective in improving TG levels in hypertensive patients with diabetes and decreasing blood pressure and FBS without affecting weight, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance or glycemic control.    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE FA

  3. High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves blood pressure in patients with diabetes and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Ali; Khalili, Mohammad; Haghighat, Neda; Eghtesadi, Shahryar; Shidfar, Farzad; Heidari, Iraj; Ebrahimpour-Koujan, Soraiya; Eghtesadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to examine the effects of high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate on lipid profiles, weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, and inflammation in individuals with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. METHODS Sixty individuals [32 in dark chocolate group (DCG) and 28 in white chocolate group (WCG)] with Type 2 diabetes on stable medication were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study. Subjects were randomized to consume 25 g DCG or WCG for 8 weeks. Changes in weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, lipid profile, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured at the beginning and end of the intervention. This clinical trial was registered at the Iranian registry of clinical trials. RESULTS In DCC group, compared with baseline, serum levels of Apo A-1 (P = 0.045) was increased and fasting blood sugar (FBS) (P = 0.027), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (P = 0.025), Apo B (P = 0.012) and Log of hsCRP (P = 0.043) levels were decreased at the end of study. No changes were seen within the WCG in studied parameters. High polyphenol chocolate consumption compared to white chocolate resulted in significant decrease in of systolic (−5.93 ± 6.25 vs. −1.07 ± 7.97 mmHg, P = 0.004) and diastolic blood pressure (−6.4 ± 6.25 vs. 0.17 ± 7.9 mmHg, P = 0.002), FBS (−7.84 ± 19.15 vs. 4.00 ± 20.58 mg/dl, P = 0.019) over the course of 8 weeks of daily chocolate consumption neither weight nor body mass index and TG levels altered from baseline. CONCLUSION High polyphenol chocolate is effective in improving TG levels in hypertensive patients with diabetes and decreasing blood pressure and FBS without affecting weight, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance or glycemic control. PMID:26089927

  4. Implementation of the trauma registry as a tool for quality improvement in trauma care in a brazilian hospital: the first 12 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ GUSTAVO PARREIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective:to analyze the implementation of a trauma registry in a university teaching hospital delivering care under the unified health system (SUS, and its ability to identify points for improvement in the quality of care provided.Methods:the data collection group comprised students from medicine and nursing courses who were holders of FAPESP scholarships (technical training 1 or otherwise, overseen by the coordinators of the project. The itreg (ECO Sistemas-RJ/SBAIT software was used as the database tool. Several quality "filters" were proposed to select those cases for review in the quality control process.Results:data for 1344 trauma patients were input to the itreg database between March and November 2014. Around 87.0% of cases were blunt trauma patients, 59.6% had RTS>7.0 and 67% ISS<9. Full records were available for 292 cases, which were selected for review in the quality program. The auditing filters most frequently registered were laparotomy four hours after admission and drainage of acute subdural hematomas four hours after admission. Several points for improvement were flagged, such as control of overtriage of patients, the need to reduce the number of negative imaging exams, the development of protocols for achieving central venous access, and management of major TBI.Conclusion: the trauma registry provides a clear picture of the points to be improved in trauma patient care, however, there are specific peculiarities for implementing this tool in the Brazilian milieu.

  5. Implementation of the trauma registry as a tool for quality improvement in trauma care in a brazilian hospital: the first 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, José Gustavo; de Campos, Tércio; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A Gianinni; Soldá, Silvia C; Assef, José Cesar; Gonçalves, Augusto Canton; Zuffo, Bruno Malteze; Floriano, Caio Gomes; de Oliveira, Erik Haruk; de Oliveira, Renato Vieira Rodrigues; Oliveira, Amanda Lima; de Melo, Caio Gullo; Below, Cristiano; Miranda, Dino R Pérez; Santos, Gabriella Colasuonno; de Almeida, Gabriele Madeira; Brianti, Isabela Campos; Votto, Karina Baruel de Camargo; Schues, Patrick Alexander Sauer; dos Santos, Rafael Gomes; de Figueredo, Sérgio Mazzola Poli; de Araujo, Tatiani Gonçalves; Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; Ferreira, Laura Cardoso Manduca; Tanaka, Giuliana Olivi; Matos, Thiara; da Sousa, Maria Daiana; Augusto, Samara de Souza

    2015-01-01

    to analyze the implementation of a trauma registry in a university teaching hospital delivering care under the unified health system (SUS), and its ability to identify points for improvement in the quality of care provided. the data collection group comprised students from medicine and nursing courses who were holders of FAPESP scholarships (technical training 1) or otherwise, overseen by the coordinators of the project. The itreg (ECO Sistemas-RJ/SBAIT) software was used as the database tool. Several quality "filters" were proposed to select those cases for review in the quality control process. data for 1344 trauma patients were input to the itreg database between March and November 2014. Around 87.0% of cases were blunt trauma patients, 59.6% had RTS>7.0 and 67% ISSquality program. The auditing filters most frequently registered were laparotomy four hours after admission and drainage of acute subdural hematomas four hours after admission. Several points for improvement were flagged, such as control of overtriage of patients, the need to reduce the number of negative imaging exams, the development of protocols for achieving central venous access, and management of major TBI. the trauma registry provides a clear picture of the points to be improved in trauma patient care, however, there are specific peculiarities for implementing this tool in the Brazilian milieu.

  6. Converged Registries Solution (CRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Converged Registries platform is a hardware and software architecture designed to host individual patient registries and eliminate duplicative development effort...

  7. [Prognostic factors in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome concurrent with type 2 diabetes mellitus (according to the results of the registry)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golikov, A P; Berns, S A; Stryuk, R I; Shmidt, E A; Golikova, A A; Barbarash, O L

    To investigate factors that influence annual prognosis in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome ((NSTEACS) concurrent with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The registry of patients with NSTEACS (non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), unstable angina) included 415 patients, of them 335 had no carbohydrate metabolic disorders, 80 had DM2. The follow-up period, during which the prognosis was evaluated in the patients, was one year after hospital discharge following the index NSTEACS event. Lipidogram readings and the serum levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1), sP-selectin, sE-selectin, and sPECAM were determined on day 10 after admission to hospital. All the patients underwent coronary angiography (CA), Doppler ultrasound of peripheral arteries during their hospital stay. The patients with DM2 versus those without diabetes proved to be significantly older and to have a higher body mass index; among them there were more women, they were noted to have more frequently hypertension and less frequently smoked. The presence of DM2 was associated with significantly increased intima-media thickness and higher GRACE scores (p=0.013) as compared to those in the patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. There were significant differences in high-density lipoprotein levels that were lower, as well as in triglyceride levels and atherogenic index, which were higher in patients with DM2 than in those without this condition. In addition, there were significant differences in ET-1, sP-selectin, sE-selectin, and sPECAM levels that were significantly higher in the DM2 group. Moreover, the levels of ET-1 and sPECAM were above normal in both the DM and non-DM2 groups. Assessment of poor outcomes at one year of the observation established that cardiovascular mortality rates were significantly higher and coronary angiography was performed much less frequently in the DM2 group. The most significant prognostic factors associated with a poor prognosis

  8. Improvement of diabetes, obesity and hypertension in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice by bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro; Katoh, Akira; Takada, Jitsuya; Sakurai, Hiromu

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we found that bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (VO(alx) 2 ) exhibits a potent hypoglycemic activity in type 1-like diabetic mice. Since the enhancement of insulin sensitivity is involved in one of the mechanisms by which vanadium exerts its anti-diabetic effects, VO(alx) 2 was further tested in type 2 diabetes with low insulin sensitivity. The effect of oral administration of VO(alx) 2 was examined in obesity-linked type 2 diabetic KKA y mice. Treatment of VO(alx) 2 for 4 weeks normalized hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in KKA y mice; however, it had no effect on hypoadiponectinemia. VO(alx) 2 also improved hyperleptinemia, following attenuation of obesity in KKA y mice. This is the first example in which a vanadium compound improved leptin resistance in type 2 diabetes by oral administration. On the basis of these results, VO(alx) 2 is proposed to enhance not only insulin sensitivity but also leptin sensitivity, which in turn improves diabetes, obesity and hypertension in an obesity-linked type 2 diabetic animal

  9. Patient web portals to improve diabetes outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Mulvaney, Shelagh A; Hess, Rachel

    2010-12-01

    Patient web portals (PWPs), defined as the integration of electronic medical records and patient health records, have been related to enhanced patient outcomes. A literature review was conducted to characterize the design and evaluation of PWPs to improve health care processes and outcomes in diabetes. A summary of 26 articles revealed the positive impact PWPs have on patient outcomes, patient-provider communication, disease management, and access to and patient satisfaction with health care. Innovative and useful approaches included the evaluation of specific components of the PWPs, assessing the impact of PWPs on mediators of health behaviors, such as patient distress, identification of barriers to use, and patient willingness to pay for access. Future research should focus on relevant processes that mediate patient and provider use, impact on health care utilization, and a patient-centered approach to the design and integration of educational opportunities afforded through PWPs.

  10. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Ratio Is Improved When Using a Digital, Nonmydriatic Fundus Camera Onsite in a Diabetes Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Roser

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of onsite screening with a nonmydriatic, digital fundus camera for diabetic retinopathy (DR at a diabetes outpatient clinic. Research Design and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 502 patients, 112 with type 1 and 390 with type 2 diabetes. Patients attended screenings for microvascular complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN, diabetic polyneuropathy (DP, and DR. Single-field retinal imaging with a digital, nonmydriatic fundus camera was used to assess DR. Prevalence and incidence of microvascular complications were analyzed and the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting complications for all entities was calculated in order to differentiate natural progress from missed DRs. Results. For both types of diabetes, prevalence of DR was 25.0% (n=126 and incidence 6.4% (n=32 (T1DM versus T2DM: prevalence: 35.7% versus 22.1%, incidence 5.4% versus 6.7%. 25.4% of all DRs were newly diagnosed. Furthermore, the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting DR was higher than those for DN (p=0.12 and DP (p=0.03 representing at least 13 patients with missed DR. Conclusions. The results indicate that implementing nonmydriatic, digital fundus imaging in a diabetes outpatient clinic can contribute to improved early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Measurement of the Inter-Rater Reliability Rate Is Mandatory for Improving the Quality of a Medical Database: Experience with the Paulista Lung Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauricella, Leticia L; Costa, Priscila B; Salati, Michele; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo M; Terra, Ricardo M

    2018-06-01

    Database quality measurement should be considered a mandatory step to ensure an adequate level of confidence in data used for research and quality improvement. Several metrics have been described in the literature, but no standardized approach has been established. We aimed to describe a methodological approach applied to measure the quality and inter-rater reliability of a regional multicentric thoracic surgical database (Paulista Lung Cancer Registry). Data from the first 3 years of the Paulista Lung Cancer Registry underwent an audit process with 3 metrics: completeness, consistency, and inter-rater reliability. The first 2 methods were applied to the whole data set, and the last method was calculated using 100 cases randomized for direct auditing. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using percentage of agreement between the data collector and auditor and through calculation of Cohen's κ and intraclass correlation. The overall completeness per section ranged from 0.88 to 1.00, and the overall consistency was 0.96. Inter-rater reliability showed many variables with high disagreement (>10%). For numerical variables, intraclass correlation was a better metric than inter-rater reliability. Cohen's κ showed that most variables had moderate to substantial agreement. The methodological approach applied to the Paulista Lung Cancer Registry showed that completeness and consistency metrics did not sufficiently reflect the real quality status of a database. The inter-rater reliability associated with κ and intraclass correlation was a better quality metric than completeness and consistency metrics because it could determine the reliability of specific variables used in research or benchmark reports. This report can be a paradigm for future studies of data quality measurement. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetes and Obesity as Independent Risk Factors for Osteoporosis: Updated Results from the ROIS/EMEROS Registry in a Population of Five Thousand Post-Menopausal Women Living in a Region Characterized by Heavy Environmental Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Neglia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aimed to analyze bone mineralization and the effect of different risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Methods: We found 4909 postmenopausal subjects within ≥10,000 records from the ROIS/EMEROS (Ionian and Salento Osteoporosis Registry/Euro Mediterranean Registry of Osteoporosis registry, a population study carried out in an area characterized by heavy environmental pressure between Brindisi and Taranto from 2009 to 2016. All subjects were assessed via phalangeal quantitative ultrasound (QUS to evaluate their bone mineralization (assessed via amplitude dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS and the association between demineralization and the presence of other conditions or risk factors. Results: Mean age was 64 ± 9.5 years and mean body mass index (BMI was 28.7 ± 3.5 kg/m2. Pearson correlation analyses revealed a negative association between bone mineralization (AD-SoS and BMI (p < 0.001. By using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we observed significant values of odds ratios (ORs of osteoporosis (adjusted for age, physical activity, and the use of drugs known to increase the risk of fractures in subjects with diabetes and obesity: 1.39 (confidence interval (CI: 1.05–1.83 and 1.46 (CI: 1.20–1.78, respectively. A statistically significant linear trend of higher ORs of osteoporosis was found for increasing values of BMI. Conclusions: Our study confirmed the high impact of obesity and type 1 and type 2 diabetes on osteoporosis.

  13. Improving Diabetes Care in the Latino Population: The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Britt; Greene, Rachel; Ferez-Pinzon, Anyul M.; Mejia, Robert; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of diabetes in Latinos is 12.8% compared to 9.3% of the general population. Latinos suffer from a higher prevalence of diabetic complications and mortality than whites yet receive less monitoring tests and education. Purpose: (1) Identify changes in clinical indicators among subjects with type 2 diabetes participating in…

  14. The Danish Schizophrenia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Haller, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database: To systematically monitor and improve the quality of treatment and care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. In addition, the database is accessible as a resource for research. Study population: Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and receiving mental health care...... to the data for use in specific research projects by applying to the steering committee. Conclusion: The Danish Schizophrenia Registry represents a valuable source of informative data to monitor and improve the quality of care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. However, continuous resources and time...

  15. Diabetes Australia position statement. A new language for diabetes: improving communications with and about people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, J; Conn, J; Dunning, T; Skinner, T C

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic condition in Australia, affecting 1.7 million Australians, requiring daily self-care, and known to reduce quantity and quality of life. On average, people with diabetes experience greater emotional distress than those without diabetes. One source of distress can be the language used to refer to diabetes, its management and the person with diabetes. The way verbal and written language is used reflects and shapes people's thoughts, beliefs and behaviours. Language has the power to persuade, change or reinforce beliefs and stereotypes - for better or worse. Words do more than reflect people's reality: they create reality and affect how people view the world and their diabetes. Language needs to engage people with diabetes and support their self-care efforts. Importantly, language that de-motivates or induces fear, guilt or distress needs to be avoided and countered. Diabetes Australia believes optimal communication increases the motivation, health and well-being of people with diabetes, and that careless or negative language can be de-motivating, is often inaccurate, and can be harmful. Diabetes Australia developed this position statement to encourage greater awareness of the language surrounding diabetes and provide recommendations for more careful and positive language use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bent; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in January 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the first registry based outcome data of a national population with radiological and clinical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI......) undergoing hip arthroscopic treatment. Our primary hypothesis was that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy would improve significantly in pain, quality of life and sports related outcome measurements in Patient Related Outcome Measures (PROM). Peri-operative data and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROM......-5 D demonstrated improvement after 1 and 2 years from 0.66 pre-op to 0.78 at 2 years. HSAS improved significantly from 2.5 to 3.3. Pain score data demonstrated improvement in NRS-rest 39 to 17 and NRS Walk 49 to 22 at follow-up. We conclude that patients with FAI undergoing hip arthroscopy...

  17. A novel botanical formula prevents diabetes by improving insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Juntao; Velliquette, Rodney A; Grann, Kerry; Burns, Charlie R; Scholten, Jeff; Tian, Feng; Zhang, Qi; Gui, Min

    2017-07-05

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and the prevalence has increased significantly in recent decades to epidemic proportions in China. Individually, fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) seed, mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaf and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) root can improve glycemia in various animal models and humans with impaired glucose metabolism and T2DM. The aim of this study was to design an optimized botanical formula containing these herbal extracts as a nutritional strategy for the prevention of insulin resistance and T2DM. Cell-free α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzyme assays were used to determine inhibitory potential of extracts. Glucose uptake was examined in differentiated human adipocytes using radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided and glycemia balanced into 5 groups: two controls (naïve and model) and three doses of the botanical test formula containing standardized fenugreek seed, mulberry leaf and American ginseng extracts (42.33, 84.66 and 169.33 mg/kg BW). Insulin resistance and T2DM was induced by feeding animals a high fat diet and with an alloxan injection. Glucose tolerance was examined by measuring serum glucose levels following an oral glucose load. Fenugreek seed and mulberry leaf dose dependently inhibited α-amylase (IC50 = 73.2 μg/mL) and α-glucosidase (IC50 = 111.8 ng/mL), respectively. All three botanical extracts improved insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in human adipocytes, which lead to the design of an optimized botanical test formula. In a rat model of insulin resistance and T2DM, the optimized botanical test formula improved fasting serum glucose levels, fasting insulin resistance and the development of impaired glucose tolerance. The reduction in epididymal adipose tissue GLUT4 and PDK1 expression induced by high fat diet and alloxan was blunted by the botanical test formula. A novel botanical formula containing standardized

  18. SveDem, the Swedish Dementia Registry - a tool for improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of dementia patients in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Religa

    Full Text Available The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem was developed with the aim to improve the quality of diagnostic work-up, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem is an internet based quality registry where several indicators can be followed over time. It includes information about the diagnostic work-up, medical treatment and community support (www.svedem.se. The patients are diagnosed and followed-up yearly in specialist units, primary care centres or in nursing homes.The database was initiated in May 2007 and covers almost all of Sweden. There were 28 722 patients registered with a mean age of 79.3 years during 2007-2012. Each participating unit obtains continuous online statistics from its own registrations and they can be compared with regional and national data. A report from SveDem is published yearly to inform medical and care professionals as well as political and administrative decision-makers about the current quality of diagnostics, treatment and care of patients with dementia disorders in Sweden.SveDem provides knowledge about current dementia care in Sweden and serves as a framework for ensuring the quality of diagnostics, treatment and care across the country. It also reflects changes in quality dementia care over time. Data from SveDem can be used to further develop the national guidelines for dementia and to generate new research hypotheses.

  19. 5'-Monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) improves autophagic activity in diabetes and diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fan; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), an endocrine disorder, will be one of the leading causes of death world-wide in about two decades. Cellular injuries and disorders of energy metabolism are two key factors in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which also become the important causes for the process of diabetic complications. AMPK is a key enzyme in maintaining metabolic homeostasis and has been implicated in the activation of autophagy in distinct tissues. An increasing number of researchers have confirmed that autophagy is a potential factor to affect or induce diabetes and its complications nowadays, which could remove cytotoxic proteins and dysfunctional organelles. This review will summarize the regulation of autophagy and AMPK in diabetes and its complications, and explore how AMPK stimulates autophagy in different diabetic syndromes. A deeper understanding of the regulation and activity of AMPK in autophagy would enhance its development as a promising therapeutic target for diabetes treatment.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of a quality improvement collaborative focusing on patients with diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.M.T.; Niessen, L.W.; Pas, J.W. van der; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Hulscher, M.E.J.L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the lifelong health effects, costs, and cost-effectiveness of a quality improvement collaborative focusing on improving diabetes management in an integrated care setting. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Economic evaluation from a healthcare perspective with lifetime horizon

  1. Multistrategic approach to improve quality of care of people with diabetes at the primary care level: Study design and baseline data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes, Mariana; Gayarre, María Angelica; Elgart, Jorge Federico; Gonzalez, Lorena; Rucci, Enzo; Gagliardino, Juan José

    2017-04-01

    To test the one year-post effect of an integrated diabetes care program that includes system changes, education, registry (clinical, metabolic and therapeutic indicators) and disease management (DIAPREM), implemented at primary care level, on care outcomes and costs. We randomly selected 15 physicians and 15 nurses from primary care units of La Matanza County to be trained (Intervention-IG) and another 15 physicians/nurses to use as controls (Control-CG). Each physician-nurse team controlled and followed up 10 patients with type 2 diabetes for one year; both groups use structured medical data registry. Patients in IG had quarterly clinical appointments whereas those in CG received traditional care. DIAPREM includes system changes (use of guidelines, programmed quarterly controls and yearly visits to the specialist) and education (physicians' and nurses' training courses). Statistical data analysis included parametric/nonparametric tests according to data distribution profile and Chi-squared test for proportions. Baseline data from both groups showed comparable values and 20-30% of them did not perform HbA1c and lipid profile measurements. Majority were obese, 59% had HbA1C ≥7%, 86% fasting blood glucose ≥100mg/dL, 45%, total cholesterol ≥200mg/dL, and 92% abnormal HDL- and LDL-cholesterol values. Similarly, micro and macroangiopathic complications had not been detected in the previous year. Most patients received oral antidiabetic agents (monotherapy), and one third was on insulin (mostly a single dose of an intermediate/long-acting formulation). Most people with hypertension received specific drug treatment but only half of them reached target values; dyslipidemia treatment showed similar data. Baseline data demonstrated the need of implementing an intervention to improve diabetes care and treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementation of a quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics: feasibility and initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggen, Kris; Van Acker, Kristien; Beele, Hilde; Dumont, Isabelle; Félix, Patricia; Lauwers, Patrick; Lavens, Astrid; Matricali, Giovanni A; Randon, Caren; Weber, Eric; Van Casteren, Viviane; Nobels, Frank

    2014-07-01

    This article aims to describe the implementation and initial results of an audit-feedback quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics. Using self-developed software and questionnaires, diabetic foot clinics collected data in 2005, 2008 and 2011, covering characteristics, history and ulcer severity, management and outcome of the first 52 patients presenting with a Wagner grade ≥ 2 diabetic foot ulcer or acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy that year. Quality improvement was encouraged by meetings and by anonymous benchmarking of diabetic foot clinics. The first audit-feedback cycle was a pilot study. Subsequent audits, with a modified methodology, had increasing rates of participation and data completeness. Over 85% of diabetic foot clinics participated and 3372 unique patients were sampled between 2005 and 2011 (3312 with a diabetic foot ulcer and 111 with acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy). Median age was 70 years, median diabetes duration was 14 years and 64% were men. Of all diabetic foot ulcers, 51% were plantar and 29% were both ischaemic and deeply infected. Ulcer healing rate at 6 months significantly increased from 49% to 54% between 2008 and 2011. Management of diabetic foot ulcers varied between diabetic foot clinics: 88% of plantar mid-foot ulcers were off-loaded (P10-P90: 64-100%), and 42% of ischaemic limbs were revascularized (P10-P90: 22-69%) in 2011. A unique, nationwide quality improvement initiative was established among diabetic foot clinics, covering ulcer healing, lower limb amputation and many other aspects of diabetic foot care. Data completeness increased, thanks in part to questionnaire revision. Benchmarking remains challenging, given the many possible indicators and limited sample size. The optimized questionnaire allows future quality of care monitoring in diabetic foot clinics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Need for better diabetes treatment for improved renal outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossing, Peter; de Zeeuw, Dick

    Diabetic nephropathy has become a worldwide epidemic accounting for approximately one-third of all cases of end-stage renal disease. The problem is expected to grow, as the prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase from 285 million patients at present to 438 million patients in the year 2030,

  4. Strategy to improve the burden of gestational diabetes in African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal Series F:Medicine and Health Sciences Vol 4 No.1, 2017. 36 ... The global prevalence of gestational diabetes (GDM) in pregnant 20-49 year old women has ... estimate of adult 20-79 years type 2 diabetes (T2D) confirms.

  5. Beating diabetes: strategies to improve pancreatic islet transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilderink, J.

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that is caused by nearly complete destruction of insulin producing beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans, affecting approximately 25 million people worldwide. Prior to the discovery of insulin, diabetes most certainly led to death. To date, patients with type 1

  6. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit: Development and Evaluation of Novel Literacy and Culturally Sensitive Diabetes Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L

    2016-02-01

    Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a "superior" score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Bezafibrate ameliorates diabetes via reduced steatosis and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity in diabetic TallyHo mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Franko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recently, we have shown that Bezafibrate (BEZ, the pan-PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activator, ameliorated diabetes in insulin deficient streptozotocin treated diabetic mice. In order to study whether BEZ can also improve glucose metabolism in a mouse model for fatty liver and type 2 diabetes, the drug was applied to TallyHo mice. Methods: TallyHo mice were divided into an early (ED and late (LD diabetes progression group and both groups were treated with 0.5% BEZ (BEZ group or standard diet (SD group for 8 weeks. We analyzed plasma parameters, pancreatic beta-cell morphology, and mass as well as glucose metabolism of the BEZ-treated and control mice. Furthermore, liver fat content and composition as well as hepatic gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial mass were determined. Results: Plasma lipid and glucose levels were markedly reduced upon BEZ treatment, which was accompanied by elevated insulin sensitivity index as well as glucose tolerance, respectively. BEZ increased islet area in the pancreas. Furthermore, BEZ treatment improved energy expenditure and metabolic flexibility. In the liver, BEZ ameliorated steatosis, modified lipid composition and increased mitochondrial mass, which was accompanied by reduced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Conclusions: Our data showed that BEZ ameliorates diabetes probably via reduced steatosis, enhanced hepatic mitochondrial mass, improved metabolic flexibility and elevated hepatic insulin sensitivity in TallyHo mice, suggesting that BEZ treatment could be beneficial for patients with NAFLD and impaired glucose metabolism. Keywords: Bezafibrate, Glucose metabolism, Insulin resistance, Lipid metabolism, NAFLD

  8. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Schäfer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. RESULTS: The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1 Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2 Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3 Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4 Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. CONCLUSIONS: First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if

  9. Strategies for improving participation in diabetes education. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Ingmar; Pawels, Marc; Küver, Claudia; Pohontsch, Nadine Janis; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is highly prevalent and can lead to serious complications and mortality. Patient education can help to avoid negative outcomes, but up to half of the patients do not participate. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' attitudes towards diabetes education in order to identify barriers to participation and develop strategies for better patient education. We conducted a qualitative study. Seven GP practices were purposively selected based on socio-demographic data of city districts in Hamburg, Germany. Study participants were selected by their GPs in order to increase participation. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 14 patients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Categories were determined deductively and inductively. The interviews yielded four types of barriers: 1) Statements and behaviour of the attending physician influence the patients' decisions about diabetes education. 2) Both, a good state of health related to diabetes and physical/psychosocial comorbidity can be reasons for non-participation. 3) Manifold motivational factors were discussed. They ranged from giving low priority to diabetes to avoidance of implications of diabetes education as being confronted with illness narratives of others. 4) Barriers also include aspects of the patients' knowledge and activity. First, physicians should encourage patients to participate in diabetes education and argue that they can profit even if actual treatment and examination results are promising. Second, patients with other priorities, psychic comorbidity or functional limitations might profit more from continuous individualized education adapted to their specific situation instead of group education. Third, it might be justified that patients do not participate in diabetes education if they have slightly increased blood sugar values only and no

  10. Physical Activity and Improvement of Glycaemia in Pre-diabetes by Different Diagnostic Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Brunner, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Context: The effects of physical activity (PA) on improvement of glycaemia may differ between pre-diabetic individuals defined by OGTT versus HbA1c. Objective: We studied the association between PA and improvement of glycaemia in individuals with pre-diabetes defined by glucose versus HbA1c...... criteria. Design, setting and participants: From the Whitehall II study, 957 participants with pre-diabetes defined by isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or both (IFG+IGT), and 457 with pre-diabetes defined by HbA1c were included. Main outcome measures......-up, 405 (42%) individuals with glucose-defined pre-diabetes reverted to NGT. A 5-year increase in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA was associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function, but PA was not generally associated with reversion to NGT. Only among women ≥50 years with i...

  11. Diabetes care may be improved with Steno Quality Assurance Tool--a self-assessment tool in diabetes management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Nielsen, Annemette Anker; Binder, Christian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate if improvements in the quality of diabetes care in Indian clinics can be obtained by simple self-surveillance PC-based software. METHOD: Nineteen Indian diabetes clinics were introduced to the principles of quality assurance (QA), and to a software program, the Steno Quality...... patients (baseline) and 4440 (follow-up). The average examination frequency per clinic of the following indicators increased significantly: lipid examination (72-87%) (p=0.007), foot examination (80-94%) (p=0.02), HbA1c investigation (59-77%) (p=0.006), and urine albumin excretion investigation (72-87%) (p.......002). CONCLUSION: Quality of diabetes care can be improved by applying SQAT, a QA self-surveillance software that enables documentation of changes in process and outcome indicators....

  12. The value of trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Clark, David E

    2008-06-01

    Trauma registries are databases that document acute care delivered to patients hospitalised with injuries. They are designed to provide information that can be used to improve the efficiency and quality of trauma care. Indeed, the combination of trauma registry data at regional or national levels can produce very large databases that allow unprecedented opportunities for the evaluation of patient outcomes and inter-hospital comparisons. However, the creation and upkeep of trauma registries requires a substantial investment of money, time and effort, data quality is an important challenge and aggregated trauma data sets rarely represent a population-based sample of trauma. In addition, trauma hospitalisations are already routinely documented in administrative hospital discharge databases. The present review aims to provide evidence that trauma registry data can be used to improve the care dispensed to victims of injury in ways that could not be achieved with information from administrative databases alone. In addition, we will define the structure and purpose of contemporary trauma registries, acknowledge their limitations, and discuss possible ways to make them more useful.

  13. Improvement noted after a multifaceted approach to diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Optimal control of diabetes mellitus remains elusive, especially in developing countries. A comprehensive and standardised approach, coupled with intensive patient and clinician education, may provide the solution. Methods: Comprehensive datasheets accompanied by patient education from a ...

  14. EMI Registry Design

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, S

    2011-01-01

    Grid services are the fundamental building blocks of today's Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). The discovery of services in the DCI is a primary function that is a precursor to other tasks such as workload and data management. In this context, a service registry can be used to fulfil such a requirement. Existing service registries, such as the ARC Information Index or UNICORE Registry, are examples that have proven themselves in production environments. Such implementations provide a centralized service registry, however, todays DCIs, such as EGI, are based on a federation model. It is therefore necessary for the service registry to mirror such a model in order for it to seamlessly fit into the operational and management requirements - a DCI built using federated approach. This document presents an architecture for a federated service registry and a prototype based on this architecture, the EMI Registry. Special attention is given to how the federated service registry is robust to environment failu...

  15. Diabetic complications do not hamper improvement of health-related quality of life over the course of treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersma, Volkert; Thorsen, Hanne; Holstein, Per E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic complications, and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), are associated with low health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated whether the presence of diabetic complications also influenced the improvement of HRQoL during DFU treatment. Methods: 1088 patients presenting...

  16. Improvement of perinatal outcome in diabetic pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, A; Szabo, I

    2001-01-01

    Obstetrical and perinatal outcomes in newborns of diabetic pregnant women depend on metabolic control and fetal surveillance during pregnancy. The effects of fetal surveillance on perinatal mortality and morbidity was analyzed in diabetic pregnant women with appropriate glucose control in our regional center for diabetes and pregnancy. 480 deliveries complicated by frank or gestational diabetes occurred in our Department in the period of 1988-1999. Perinatal mortality and morbidity, prevalence of premature deliveries, methods of fetal surveillance, options for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) profilaxis, cesarean section rate, timing of delivery and its indications and occurrence of malformations have been analyzed. It was found that malformation rate and perinatal mortality may be reduced to even lower level than that of in healthy pregnant women by appropriate glucose control and by using the latest methods of intrauterine fetal surveillance including cardiotocography (non stress test and oxytocin challenge test), doppler fetal artery velocimetry and fetal pulse oximetry. Timing of delivery was needed in 35% of the cases with IDDM and 15% of gestational diabetes due to chronic placental insufficiency. If labour induction was needed before the 38 weeks, amniocentesis was performed to test fetal lung maturity. Direct fetal glucocorticoid administration was used to enhance fetal lung maturation in 14 cases. C-section rate was slightly higher than that of in non diabetic pregnant women. Our perinatal morbidity data (macrosomia, hyperbilirubinemia, hypoglycemia, injuries, infections) are comparable with the data from the literature. Although perinatal mortality with the help of thorough fetal surveillance is even better in diabetic pregnant women than in non diabetic patients, future eye should be focused on factors affecting perinatal morbidity, because it is still higher than in newborns of healthy mothers.

  17. Immunization registries in the EMR Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lindsay A.; Palma, Jonathan P.; Pandher, Kiran K.; Longhurst, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The CDC established a national objective to create population-based tracking of immunizations through regional and statewide registries nearly 2 decades ago, and these registries have increased coverage rates and reduced duplicate immunizations. With increased adoption of commercial electronic medical records (EMR), some institutions have used unidirectional links to send immunization data to designated registries. However, access to these registries within a vendor EMR has not been previously reported. Purpose: To develop a visually integrated interface between an EMR and a statewide immunization registry at a previously non-reporting hospital, and to assess subsequent changes in provider use and satisfaction. Methods: A group of healthcare providers were surveyed before and after implementation of the new interface. The surveys addressed access of the California Immunization Registry (CAIR), and satisfaction with the availability of immunization information. Information Technology (IT) teams developed a “smart-link” within the electronic patient chart that provides a single-click interface for visual integration of data within the CAIR database. Results: Use of the tool has increased in the months since its initiation, and over 20,000 new immunizations have been exported successfully to CAIR since the hospital began sharing data with the registry. Survey data suggest that providers find this tool improves workflow and overall satisfaction with availability of immunization data. (p=0.009). Conclusions: Visual integration of external registries into a vendor EMR system is feasible and improves provider satisfaction and registry reporting. PMID:23923096

  18. Diabetes Support Groups Improve Patient’s Compliance and Control Blood Glucose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamrotul Izzah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing information is not enough to improve diabetic patient’s compliance and achieve goals of therapy. Patient’s good awareness as well as emotional and social supports from family and community may play an important role to improve their compliance and clinical outcomes. Therefore, diabetes support groups were developed and each support group consisted of two pharmacists, two nurses, diabetic patients and their family members. A total of 70 type 2 diabetic patient’s were enrolled and randomized into support group 1 and support group 2. Patients in the group 1 received information leaflets only, while patient in the group 2 received pharmacist counselling and information leaflets at each meeting. Patient’s awareness of diabetes and compliance with medications were assessed by a short questionnaire at baseline and final follow-up. Blood glucose and cholesterol levels were also evaluated in both groups. At the end of study, the overall patient’s awareness and compliance improved by 61.5%. The random and fasting blood glucose levels decreased over than 30% in the group 2 and around 14% in the group 1. This study reveals that collaboration between health care professionals and community in the diabetes support group might help diabetic patients to increase their knowledge and compliance with the diabetes therapy as well as glycaemic control.

  19. Responsive parenting is associated with improved type 1 diabetes-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Harbaum, M; Nansel, T; Haynie, D L; Iannotti, R J; Simons-Morton, B

    2008-09-01

    Improved quality of life is an important treatment goal for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. While previous research supports a relationship between family environment and quality of life, little research has addressed the relationship of parenting style constructs to quality of life in children with chronic disease. The present investigation assesses the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness with diabetes-related quality of life among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Baseline and 12-month follow-up self-report assessments were collected on a sample of 81 children with type 1 diabetes participating in an efficacy trial of a behavioural intervention to enhance adherence. The sample had a mean age of 13.3 years (SD=1.7) and duration of diabetes of 7.7 years (SD=3.7). Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship of parent responsiveness and demandingness to diabetes-related quality of life at each time point. After adjusting for demographic and diabetes characteristics, as well as diabetes-specific parent-child behaviours, parent responsiveness was significantly associated with baseline diabetes-related quality of life (beta=0.23; P=0.04). This relationship was sustained at 12-month follow-up (beta=0.22; P=0.04) after adjusting for baseline quality of life and treatment group assignment, suggesting that parent responsiveness is associated with improved quality of life. Findings indicate the importance of a supportive and emotionally warm parenting style in promoting improved quality of life for children with type 1 diabetes. Appropriate parenting skills should be an element of diabetes family management health care.

  20. Impact of diabetes mellitus on acute outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention in chronic total occlusions: insights from a US multicentre registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Parachini, J R; Karatasakis, A; Karmpaliotis, D; Alaswad, K; Jaffer, F A; Yeh, R W; Patel, M; Bahadorani, J; Doing, A; Nguyen-Trong, P-K; Danek, B A; Karacsonyi, J; Alame, A; Rangan, B V; Thompson, C A; Banerjee, S; Brilakis, E S

    2017-04-01

    To examine the impact of diabetes mellitus on procedural outcomes of patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion. We assessed the impact of diabetes mellitus on the outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion among 1308 people who underwent such procedures at 11 US centres between 2012 and 2015. The participants' mean ± sd age was 66 ± 10 years, 84% of the participants were men and 44.6% had diabetes. As compared with participants without diabetes, participants with diabetes were more likely to have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery (38 vs 31%; P = 0.006), and to have had previous heart failure (35 vs 22%; P = 0.0001) and peripheral arterial disease (19 vs 13%; P = 0.002). They also had a higher BMI (31 ± 6 kg/m 2 vs 29 ± 6 kg/m 2 ; P = 0.001), similar Japanese chronic total occlusion scores (2.6 ± 1.2 vs 2.5 ± 1.2; P = 0.82) and similar final successful crossing technique: antegrade wire escalation (46 vs 47%; P = 0.66), retrograde (30 vs 28%; P = 0.66) and antegrade dissection re-entry (24 vs 25%; P = 0.66). Technical (91 vs 90%; P = 0.80) and procedural (89 vs 89%; P = 0.93) success was similar in the two groups, as was the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (2.2 vs 2.5%; P = 0.61). In a contemporary cohort of people undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion, nearly one in two (45%) had diabetes mellitus. Procedural success and complication rates were similar in people with and without diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  1. Brewer's Yeast Improves Glycemic Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Payam; Javanbakht, Mohammad Hassan; Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Djalali, Mahmoud; Derakhshanian, Hoda; Hajianfar, Hossein; Bahonar, Ahmad; Djazayery, Abolghassem

    2013-10-01

    Brewer's yeast may have beneficial effects on insulin receptors because of itsglucose tolerance factor in diabetic patients. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brewer's yeast supplementation on glycemic indices in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, 84 adults (21 men and 63 women) aged 46.3 ± 6.1 years old with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited and divided randomly into two groups: Supplement group receiving brewer's yeast (six 300mg tablets/day, total 1800 mg) and control group receiving placebo (six 300mg tablets/day) for 12 weeks. Body weight, height, body mass index, food consumption (based on 24h food record), fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin sensitivity, and insulin resistance were measured before and after the intervention. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 18.0). The changes in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity were significantly different between the two groups during the study (respectively P brewer›s yeast besides the usual treatment of diabetes can ameliorate blood glucose variables in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  2. Aloe vera gel improves behavioral deficits and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Reza Fatemi; Ghaderi, Shahab; Bahrami-Tapehebur, Mohammad; Farbood, Yaghoob; Rashno, Masome

    2017-12-01

    Oxidative stress has a major role in progression of diabetes-related behavioral deficits. It has been suggested that Aloe vera has anti-diabetic, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. The present study was designed to determine the effects of Aloe vera gel on behavioral functions, oxidative status, and neuronal viability in the hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Fifty five adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, including: control (normal saline 8ml/kg/day; P.O.), diabetic (normal saline 8ml/kg/day; P.O.), Aloe vera gel (100mg/kg/day; P.O.), diabetic+Aloe vera gel (100mg/kg/day; P.O.) and diabetic+NPH insulin (10 IU/kg/day; S.C.). All treatments were started immediately following confirmation of diabetes in diabetic groups and were continued for eight weeks. Behavioral functions were evaluated by employing standard behavioral paradigms. Additionally, oxidative status and neuronal viability were assessed in the hippocampus. The results of behavioral tests showed that diabetes enhanced anxiety/depression-like behaviors, reduced exploratory and locomotor activities, decreased memory performance, and increased stress related behaviors. These changes in diabetic rats were accompanied by increasing oxidative stress and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Interestingly, eight weeks of treatment with Aloe vera gel not only alleviated all the mentioned deficits related to diabetes, but in some aspects, it was even more effective than insulin. In conclusion, the results suggest that both interrelated hypoglycemic and antioxidative properties of Aloe vera gel are possible mechanisms that improve behavioral deficits and protect hippocampal neurons in diabetic animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic Rumex Patientia Seed Feeding Improves Passive Avoidance Learning and Memory in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourandokht Baluchnejadmojarad

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C T Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is accompanied with disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills in the human society and experimental animals. Due to anti-diabetic and antioxidant activity of Rumex patientia (RP, this research study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of chronic Rumex patientia feeding on alleviation of learning and memory disturbance in streptozotocindiabetic rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into control, diabetic, RP-treatedcontrol and -diabetic groups. For induction of diabetes, streptozotcin (STZ was administered at a dose of 60 mg/Kg. Meanwhile, RP-treated groups received RP seed powder mixed with standard pelleted food at a weight ratio of 6% for 4 weeks. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency (IL and step-through latency (STL were determined at the end of study using passive avoidance test. Results: It was found out that regarding initial latency, there was no significant difference among the groups. In addition, diabetic rats developed a significant impairment in retention and recall in passive avoidance test (p<0.01, as it is evident by a lower STL. Furthermore, RP treatment of diabetic rats did produce a significant improvement in retention and recall (p<0.05. Discussion: Taken together, chronic RP feeding could improve retention and recall capability in passive avoidance test in STZ-diabetic rats

  4. Consequences of implementing a cardiac troponin assay with improved sensitivity at Swedish coronary care units: an analysis from the SWEDEHEART registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Kai M; Lindahl, Bertil; Melki, Dina; Jernberg, Tomas

    2016-08-07

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) assays with improved sensitivity are increasingly utilized for the assessment of patients admitted because of suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, data on the clinical consequences of the implementation of such assays are limited. In a retrospective register-based study (37 710 coronary care unit admissions; SWEDEHEART registry), we compared the case mix, the use of diagnostic procedures, treatments, and 1-year all-cause mortality 1 year before the implementation of a cTn assay with improved sensitivity (study period 1) and 1 year thereafter (study period 2). During study period 2, more at-risk patients were admitted and more patients had cTn levels above the myocardial infarction cut-off (ACS patients +13.1%; non-ACS patients +160.1%). cTn levels above this cut-off exhibited stronger associations with mortality risk in study period 2 (adjusted HR 4.45 [95% confidence interval, CI, 3.36-5.89]) compared with period 1 (adjusted HR 2.43 [95% CI 2.11-2.80]), similar as for the cTn ratio relative to the respective 99th percentile. While there was no multivariable-adjusted increase in the use of diagnostic procedures, significant trends towards more differentiated treatment depending on the cause of cTn elevation, i.e. ACS or non-ACS, were noted. The implementation of a cTn assay with improved sensitivity was associated with an increase in the number of patients who due to their cTn-status were identified as suitable for beneficial therapies. There was no inappropriate increase in hospital resource utilization. As such, cTn assays with improved sensitivity provide an opportunity to improve the clinical management of patients with suspected ACS. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Improving outcomes for hospital patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: the Australian and New Zealand Massive Transfusion Registry study methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, J C; Venardos, K M; Aoki, N J; Zatta, A J; McQuilten, Z K; Phillips, L E; Andrianopoulos, N; Cooper, D J; Cameron, P A; Isbister, J P; Wood, E M

    2016-10-06

    The Australian and New Zealand (ANZ) Massive Transfusion (MT) Registry (MTR) has been established to improve the quality of care of patients with critical bleeding (CB) requiring MT (≥ 5 units red blood cells (RBC) over 4 h). The MTR is providing data to: (1) improve the evidence base for transfusion practice by systematically collecting data on transfusion practice and clinical outcomes; (2) monitor variations in practice and provide an opportunity for benchmarking, and feedback on practice/blood product use; (3) inform blood supply planning, inventory management and development of future clinical trials; and (4) measure and enhance translation of evidence into policy and patient blood management guidelines. The MTR commenced in 2011. At each participating site, all eligible patients aged ≥18 years with CB from any clinical context receiving MT are included using a waived consent model. Patient information and clinical coding, transfusion history, and laboratory test results are extracted for each patient's hospital admission at the episode level. Thirty-two hospitals have enrolled and 3566 MT patients have been identified across Australia and New Zealand between 2011 and 2015. The majority of CB contexts are surgical, followed by trauma and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Validation studies have verified that the definition of MT used in the registry correctly identifies 94 % of CB events, and that the median time of transfusion for the majority of fresh products is the 'product event issue time' from the hospital blood bank plus 20 min. Data linkage between the MTR and mortality databases in Australia and New Zealand will allow comparisons of risk-adjusted mortality estimates across different bleeding contexts, and between countries. Data extracts will be examined to determine if there are differences in patient outcomes according to transfusion practice. The ratios of blood components (e.g. FFP:RBC) used in different types of critical bleeding will also

  6. Using GIS Maps to Improve Diabetes Prevention in New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast features Rachael Ruberto, MPH, New York State Department of Health research scientist and lead author of PCD’s most recent Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Snapshots article. Rachael provides an overview of her article and how GIS was used for the analysis of diabetes prevention in New York.

  7. The pediatric diabetes consortium: improving care of children with type 1 diabetes through collaborative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Although there are some interactions between the major pediatric diabetes programs in the United States, there has been no formal, independent structure for collaboration, the sharing of information, and the development of joint research projects that utilize common outcome measures. To fill this unmet clinical and research need, a consortium of seven pediatric diabetes centers in the United States has formed the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) through an unrestricted grant from Novo Nordisk, Inc. (Princeton, NJ). This article describes the organizational structure of the PDC and the design of a study of important clinical outcomes in children and adolescents with new-onset, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The outcomes study will describe the changes in A1c levels, the frequency of adverse events (diabetic ketoacidosis/severe hypoglycemia), and the frequency and timing of the "honeymoon" phase in newly diagnosed patients with T1DM over the first 12-24 months of the disease and examine the relationship between these clinical outcomes and demographic, socioeconomic, and treatment factors. This project will also allow the Consortium to develop a cohort of youth with T1DM whose clinical course has been well characterized and who wish to participate in future clinical trials and/or contribute to a repository of biological samples.

  8. Hydro-alcoholic Extract of Commiphora mukul Gum Resin May Improve Cognitive Impairments in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes causes cognitive impairment. Medicinal plants due to different mechanisms, such as antioxidant activities may improve diabetes and relieve its symptoms. Commiphora mukul (Burseraceae has a significant antioxidant activity. Objectives This study aimed to examine the effect of hydro- alcoholic extract of C. mukul on passive-avoidance learning and memory in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic male rats. Materials and Methods Thirty-two adult male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to four groups: normal, diabetic, normal + extract of C. mukul and diabetic + extract of C. mukul groups with free access to regular rat diet. Diabetes was induced in male rats by single interaperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg STZ. After the confirmation of diabetes, 300 mg/kg C. mukul extract was orally administered to the extract-treated groups. Control groups received normal saline at the same time. Passive-avoidance memory was tested eight weeks after the STZ treatment, and blood glucose and body weight were measured in all groups at the beginning and end of the experiment. Results In the present study, diabetes decreased learning and memory. Although the administration of C. mukul extract did not affect the step-through latency (STLa and the number of trials of the diabetic groups during the first acquisition trial, a significant decrease was observed in STLr and also a significant increase in time spent in the dark compartment (TDC and number of crossing (NOC in the retention test (after 24 and 48 hours. Although no significant difference was observed in body weight of diabetic + extract of C. mukul (DE and diabetic control (DC groups, the plasma glucose of DE group was significantly lower in comparison to DC group. Conclusions Commiphora mukul extract can improve passive-avoidance learning and memory impairments in the STZ-induced diabetic rats. This improvement may be due to the antioxidant, acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, anti

  9. Danish National Lymphoma Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Josefsson, Pär; Jørgensen, Judit

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish National Lymphoma Registry (LYFO) was established in order to monitor and improve the diagnostic evaluation and the quality of treatment of all lymphoma patients in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The LYFO database was established in 1982 as a seminational database including...... all lymphoma patients referred to the departments of hematology. The database became nationwide on January 1, 2000. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables include both clinical and paraclinical variables as well as details of treatment and treatment evaluation. Up to four forms are completed for each......-100 years) and a male/female ratio of 1.23:1. Patients can be registered with any of 42 different subtypes according to the World Health Organization classifications. CONCLUSION: LYFO is a nationwide database for all lymphoma patients in Denmark and includes detailed information. This information is used...

  10. Validation of Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry: a medical informatics system for intensive care unit research, quality of care improvement, and daily patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, Joseph F; Fadlalla, Adam M A; Kan, Justin A; Patel, Nilam P; Yowler, Charles J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    We developed a prototype electronic clinical information system called the Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry (SIC-IR) to prospectively study infectious complications and monitor quality of care improvement programs in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit. The objective of this study was to validate SIC-IR as a successful health information technology with an accurate clinical data repository. Using the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success as a framework, we evaluated SIC-IR in a 3-month prospective crossover study of physician use in one of our two surgical and trauma intensive care units (SIC-IR unit versus non SIC-IR unit). Three simultaneous research methodologies were used: a user survey study, a pair of time-motion studies, and an accuracy study of SIC-IR's clinical data repository. The SIC-IR user survey results were positive for system reliability, graphic user interface, efficiency, and overall benefit to patient care. There was a significant decrease in prerounding time of nearly 4 minutes per patient on the SIC-IR unit compared with the non SIC-IR unit. The SIC-IR documentation and data archiving was accurate 74% to 100% of the time depending on the data entry method used. This accuracy was significantly improved compared with normal hand-written documentation on the non SIC-IR unit. SIC-IR proved to be a useful application both at individual user and organizational levels and will serve as an accurate tool to conduct prospective research and monitor quality of care improvement programs.

  11. [A blood glucose slide chart for improving diabetes patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potteau, Marie-Hélène

    2015-03-01

    A blood glucose slide chart has been developed in order to help patients with type 2 diabetes who do not speak French or who have comprehension difficulties. Combined with pictograms to help patients visualise the action they need to take depending on the recorded glucose level, it constitutes a therapeutic education tool which can be useful on a day-to-day basis both for patients as well as caregivers.

  12. Improving outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes using general practice networks: a quality improvement project in east London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Sally; Chowdhury, Tahseen A; Mathur, Rohini; Robson, John

    2014-02-01

    Structured diabetes care can improve outcomes and reduce risk of complications, but improving care in a deprived, ethnically diverse area can prove challenging. This report evaluates a system change to enhance diabetes care delivery in a primary care setting. All 35 practices in one inner London Primary Care Trust were geographically grouped into eight networks of four to five practices, each supported by a network manager, clerical staff and an educational budget. A multidisciplinary team developed a 'care package' for type 2 diabetes management, with financial incentives based on network achievement of targets. Monthly electronic performance dashboards enabled networks to track and improve performance. Network multidisciplinary team meetings including the diabetic specialist team supported case management and education. Key measures for improvement included the number of diabetes care plans completed, proportion of patients attending for digital retinal screen and proportions of patients achieving a number of biomedical indices (blood pressure, cholesterol, glycated haemoglobin). Between 2009 and 2012, completed care plans rose from 10% to 88%. The proportion of patients attending for digital retinal screen rose from 72% to 82.8%. The proportion of patients achieving a combination of blood pressure ≤ 140/80 mm Hg and cholesterol ≤ 4 mmol/L rose from 35.3% to 46.1%. Mean glycated haemoglobin dropped from 7.80% to 7.66% (62-60 mmol/mol). Investment of financial, organisational and education resources into primary care practice networks can achieve clinically important improvements in diabetes care in deprived, ethnically diverse communities. This success is predicated on collaborative working between practices, purposively designed high-quality information on network performance and engagement between primary and secondary care clinicians.

  13. Cohort Profile : The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R.; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A.

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved

  14. Clinical disease registries in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Reza; Hussain, Hussain; Brisk, Robert; Boardman, Leanne; Weston, Clive

    2014-06-26

    Disease registries, containing systematic records of cases, have for nearly 100 years been valuable in exploring and understanding various aspects of cardiology. This is particularly true for myocardial infarction, where such registries have provided both epidemiological and clinical information that was not readily available from randomised controlled trials in highly-selected populations. Registries, whether mandated or voluntary, prospective or retrospective in their analysis, have at their core a common study population and common data definitions. In this review we highlight how registries have diversified to offer information on epidemiology, risk modelling, quality assurance/improvement and original research-through data mining, transnational comparisons and the facilitation of enrolment in, and follow-up during registry-based randomised clinical trials.

  15. Improvement and emergence of insulin restriction in women with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel-Fabbri, Ann E; Anderson, Barbara J; Fikkan, Janna; Franko, Debra L; Pearson, Kimberly; Weinger, Katie

    2011-03-01

    To determine the distinguishing characteristics of women who report stopping insulin restriction at 11 years of follow-up from those continuing to endorse insulin restriction as well as those characteristics differing in patients who continue to use insulin appropriately from new insulin restrictors. This is an 11-year follow-up study of 207 women with type 1 diabetes. Insulin restriction, diabetes self-care behaviors, diabetes-specific distress, and psychiatric and eating disorder symptoms were assessed using self-report surveys. Of the original sample, 57% participated in the follow-up study. Mean age was 44 ± 12 years, diabetes duration was 28 ± 11 years, and A1C was 7.9 ± 1.3%. At follow-up, 20 of 60 baseline insulin restrictors had stopped restriction. Women who stopped reported improved diabetes self-care and distress, fewer problems with diabetes self-management, and lower levels of psychologic distress and eating disorder symptoms. Logistic regression indicated that lower levels of fear of weight gain with improved blood glucose and fewer problems with diabetes self-management predicted stopping restriction. At follow-up, 34 women (23%) reported new restriction, and a larger proportion of new insulin restrictors, relative to nonrestrictors, endorsed fear of weight gain with improved blood glucose. Findings indicate that fear of weight gain associated with improved blood glucose and problems with diabetes self-care are core issues related to both the emergence and resolution of insulin restriction. Greater attention to these concerns may help treatment teams to better meet the unique treatment needs of women struggling with insulin restriction.

  16. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  17. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Text Messaging to Improve Disease Management in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Victoria; Goodman, Nancy; Lapin, Brittany; Cooley, Camille; Wang, Ed; Craig, Terri L; Glosner, Scott E; Juhn, Mark S; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Sadosky, Alesia B; Masi, Christopher

    2018-06-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of educational text messages on diabetes self-management activities and outcomes in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN). Methods Patients with pDPN identified from a large integrated health system who agreed to participate were randomized to 6 months of usual care (UC) or UC plus twice-daily diabetes self-management text messages (UC+TxtM). Outcomes included the Pain Numerical Rating Scale, Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA), questions on diabetes health beliefs, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C). Changes from baseline were evaluated at 6 months and compared between groups. Results Demographic characteristics were balanced between groups (N = 62; 53% female, mean age = 63 years, 94% type 2 diabetes), as were baseline measures. After 6 months, pain decreased with UC+TxtM from 6.3 to 5.5 and with UC from 6.5 to 6.0, with no difference between groups. UC+TxtM but not UC was associated with significant improvements from baseline on all SDSCA subscales. On diabetes health beliefs, UC+TxtM patients reported significantly increased benefits and reduced barriers and susceptibility relative to UC at 6 months. A1C declined in both groups, but neither change was significant relative to baseline. Conclusions Patients with pDPN who receive twice-daily text messages regarding diabetes management reported reduced pain relative to baseline, although this change was not significant compared with usual care. In addition, text messaging was associated with increased self-management activities and improved diabetes health beliefs and total self-care. These results warrant further investigation.

  19. [Multicenter international registry to evaluate the clinical practice delivered to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a sub-analysis of the experience in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanghänel Salmón, Guillermo; Sánchez-Reyes, Leticia; Chiquete Anaya, Erwin; de la Luz Castro, Julieta; Escalante Herrera, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of information on the characteristics of the medical attention delivered to Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our aim was to describe the current state on the medical management of T2D in Mexico. Among 17,232 patients included in the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS), 2,620 (15%) corresponded to Mexico. Information regarding clinical, demographics and management characteristics, as well as the impact of T2D in the patient is clinical and social condition was registered. The metabolic control and achievement of therapeutic goals were also analyzed. Diagnosis of T2D was performed by the general practitioner in 76% of cases. Only about a quarter of the cohort had a blood pressure goal of diabetes. The managing physician is personal impression about the quality of the metabolic control was not in accordance with HbA1c. Eight percent of patients had work absences in the last 3 months due to complications of T2D (mean of 15 days lost). In Mexico, quality of metabolic control of T2D patients could have important deficiencies. The personal impression of the physician on the patient is metabolic control is not consistent with objective data.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, an ideal cell source for regenerative therapy with no ethical issues, play an important role in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. Growing evidence has demonstrated that MSCs transplantation can accelerate wound closure, ameliorate clinical parameters, and avoid amputation. In this review, we clarify the mechanism of preclinical studies, as well as safety and efficacy of clinical trials in the treatment of DFU. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs, compared with MSCs derived from other tissues, may be a suitable cell type that can provide easy, effective, and cost-efficient transplantation to treat DFU and protect patients from amputation.

  1. Using GIS Maps to Improve Diabetes Prevention in New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    This podcast features Rachael Ruberto, MPH, New York State Department of Health research scientist and lead author of PCD’s most recent Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Snapshots article. Rachael provides an overview of her article and how GIS was used for the analysis of diabetes prevention in New York.  Created: 2/26/2014 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  2. Improving adherence to medication in adults with diabetes in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haj Mohd, Mohammed M M; Phung, Hai; Sun, Jing; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-08-24

    Diabetes is a chronic medical condition and adherence to medication in diabetes is important. Improving medication adherence in adults with diabetes would help prevent the chronic complications associated with diabetes. A case control trial was used to study the effects of an educational session on medication adherence among adults with diabetes as measured by the Morisky Medication adherence scale (MMAS-8©). The study took place at the Dubai Police Health Centre between February 2015 and November 2015. Questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic, clinical and disease related variables and the primary measure of outcome was adherence levels as measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8©). The intervention group involved a standardized thirty minute educational session focusing on the importance of adherence to medication. The change in MMAS-8© was measured at 6 months. Four hundred and forty six patients were enrolled. Mean age 61 year +/- 11. 48.4 % were male. The mean time since diagnosis of diabetes was 3.2 years (Range 1-15 years). At baseline two hundred and eighty eight (64.6 %) patients were considered non-adherent (MMAS-8© adherence score strategies should focus on wider educational strategies targeting medication adherence in diabetic patients in the UAE.

  3. EMI Registry Development Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, S.; Szigeti, G.; Field, L.

    2012-01-01

    This documents describes the overall development plan of the EMI Registry product, the plan focuses on the realisation of the EMI Registry specification as defined in the document. It is understood that during the course of the development phase the specification will likely evolve and the changes will be fed into the specification document.

  4. The Qingdao Twin Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Haiping; Ning, Feng; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, the Qingdao Twin Registry was initiated as the main part of the Chinese National Twin Registry. By 2005, a total of 10,655 twin pairs had been recruited. Since then new twin cohorts have been sampled, with one longitudinal cohort of adolescent twins selected to explore determinants of me...

  5. Paths to improving care of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women following gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandra; Roux, Nicolette; Preece, Cilla; Rafter, Eileen; Davis, Bronwyn; Mein, Jackie; Boyle, Jacqueline; Fredericks, Bronwyn; Chamberlain, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    Aim To understand enablers and barriers influencing postpartum screening for type 2 diabetes following gestational diabetes in Australian Indigenous women and how screening might be improved. Australian Indigenous women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are less likely than other Australian women to receive postpartum diabetes screening. This is despite a fourfold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes within eight years postpartum. We conducted interviews with seven Indigenous women with previous GDM, focus groups with 20 Indigenous health workers and workshops with 24 other health professionals. Data collection included brainstorming, visualisation, sorting and prioritising activities. Data were analysed thematically using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Barriers are presented under the headings of 'capability', 'motivation' and 'opportunity'. Enabling strategies are presented under 'intervention' and 'policy' headings. Findings Participants generated 28 enabling environmental, educational and incentive interventions, and service provision, communication, guideline, persuasive and fiscal policies to address barriers to screening and improve postpartum support for women. The highest priorities included providing holistic social support, culturally appropriate resources, improving Indigenous workforce involvement and establishing structured follow-up systems. Understanding Indigenous women's perspectives, developing strategies with health workers and action planning with other health professionals can generate context-relevant feasible strategies to improve postpartum care after GDM. Importantly, we need evidence which can demonstrate whether the strategies are effective.

  6. [Efficacy of the strategy to improve the quality indicators of Diabetes Mellitus 2 Care Process in Advanced Diabetes Centre Macarena].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, Juan Manuel; García, Rosa; Pina, Enrique; Morales, Cristóbal; Escalera, Carmen; Ortega, Antonio; Poyatos, Blas; Carrasco, Dolores; Prieto, Jesús; Ángeles Eslava, M; Antonio Corrales, J; Barón, María O; Llano, Mercedes; Ruiz, Francisco; Sánchez, Romualdo; Victorino Pino, Manuel; Luisa Redondo, M; Castellanos, Antonio; Mayoral, Eduardo

    2018-02-21

    The assessment of the Diabetes Mellitus 2 Care Process (PAI-DM2) through the assessment tool for the chronic illness' care models (IEMAC-Diabetes) allows the design of health interventions for the improvement of medical care. Analysing the quality of healthcare provided to DM2 patients. Quasiexperimental study before and after intervention with a not randomised control group. Health care district of primary care Sevilla. 12 groups of ascribed patients, 5 Primary Care Healthcenter, chosen in a discretionary way. Physicians and nurses from the 12 intervention groups took part in a training program, including an external rotation in the Diabetes Daycare Hospital. Number of included patients, glycated hemoglobin, feet exploration (FE), and ocular fundus (OF). 1,475 DM-2 patients were analysed. The proportion of included patients per group was 8.5%, 45.5% were women. At the beginning of the study, the rate of patients with HbA1c<7% were 38.9% in 2013 against 47.7% in 2014 and 40.2% in 2016; 33% of the patients had an OF in 2013 against 41.77% in 2014; 51.6% of patients had an EF against 54.7% in 2014. After the intervention, statistically significant differences were reached in HbA1c (p=0.01) and retinography requested (p=0.01). IEMAC-Diabetes allows spotting improvement areas in the PAI-DM2. The absence of statistically significant differences may be the result of contamination in the sample and/or Hawthorne effect. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The Danish Lung Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established by the Danish Lung Cancer Group. The primary and first goal of the DLCR was to improve survival and the overall clinical management of Danish lung cancer patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish primary lung cancer patients since...... 2000 are included into the registry and the database today contains information on more than 50,000 cases of lung cancer. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information on patient characteristics such as age, sex, diagnostic procedures, histology, tumor stage, lung function, performance...... the results are commented for local, regional, and national audits. Indicator results are supported by descriptive reports with details on diagnostics and treatment. CONCLUSION: DLCR has since its creation been used to improve the quality of treatment of lung cancer in Denmark and it is increasingly used...

  8. Ludwigia octovalvis extract improves glycemic control and memory performance in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Sheng; Lo, Jung-Hsin; Yang, Jo-Hsuan; Wang, Hao-Wei; Fan, Shou-Zen; Yen, Jui-Hung; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2017-07-31

    Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) P.H. Raven (Onagraceae) extracts have historically been consumed as a healthful drink for treating various conditions, including edema, nephritis, hypotension and diabetes. We have previously shown that Ludwigia octovalvis extract (LOE) can significantly extend lifespan and improve age-related memory deficits in Drosophila melanogaster through activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Since AMPK has become a critical target for treating diabetes, we herein investigate the anti-hyperglycemic potential of LOE. Differentiated C2C12 muscle cells, HepG2 hepatocellular cells, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice and high fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice were used to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic potential of LOE. The open field test and novel object recognition test were used to evaluate spontaneous motor activity and memory performance of HFD-induced diabetic mice. In differentiated C2C12 muscle cells and HepG2 hepatocellular cells, treatments with LOE and its active component (β-sitosterol) induced significant AMPK phosphorylation. LOE also enhanced uptake of a fluorescent glucose derivative (2-NBDG) and inhibited glucose production in these cells. The beneficial effects of LOE were completely abolished when an AMPK inhibitor, dorsomorphin, was added to the culture system, suggesting that LOE requires AMPK activation for its action in vitro. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, we found that both LOE and β-sitosterol induced an anti-hyperglycemic effect comparable to that of metformin, a drug that is commonly prescribed to treat diabetes. Moreover, LOE also improved glycemic control and memory performance of mice fed a HFD. These results indicate that LOE is a potent anti-diabetic intervention that may have potential for future clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Resveratrol Improves Cognitive Impairment by Regulating Apoptosis and Synaptic Plasticity in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyan Tian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To investigate the effects of resveratrol on cognitive impairment in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats and to explore the mechanisms of that phenomenon. Methods: Sixty healthy male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control group (Con group, n = 15, Res group (normal Sprague Dawley rats treated with resveratrol, n = 15, diabetes mellitus group (DM group, n = 15 and DM + Res group (diabetic rats treat with resveratrol, n = 15. Streptozotocin (STZ was injected intraperitoneally to establish the diabetic model. One week after diabetic model induction, the animals in the Res group and the DM + Res group received resveratrol intraperitoneally once a day for consecutive 4 weeks. The Morris water maze test was applied to assess the effect of resveratrol on learning and memory. To explore the mechanisms of resveratrol on cognition, we detected the protein expression levels of Caspase-3, Bcl-2, Bax, NMDAR1 (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor and BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor via western blotting analysis. Results: Resveratrol has no obvious effect on normal SD rats. Compared to Con group, cognitive ability was significantly impaired with increased expression of Caspase-3, Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2, NMDAR1 and BDNF in diabetic rats. By contrast, resveratrol treatment improved the cognitive decline. Evidently, resveratrol treatment reversed diabetes-induced changes of protein expression. Conclusions: Resveratrol significantly ameliorates cognitive decline in STZ-induced diabetic model rats. The potential mechanism underlying the protective effect could be attributed to the inhibition of hippocampal apoptosis through the Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 signaling pathways and improvement of synaptic dysfunction. BDNF may also play an indispensable role in this mechanism.

  10. Improved outcome after primary vitrectomy in diabetic patients treated with statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuuminen, Raimo; Sahanne, Sari; Haukka, Jari; Loukovaara, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of preoperative statin treatment on the outcome of primary vitrectomy in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients. In this open, observational institutional study, a total of 192 eyes of 171 type 1 and 2 adult diabetic patients admitted for primary vitrectomy for management of sight-threatening forms of diabetic retinopathy were divided according to the use of lipid-lowering therapy: those with statin treatment (79 eyes of 73 patients) and those taking no statin medication (113 eyes of 98 patients). One-month best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gain and cumulative 12-month revitrectomy frequency were analyzed. In multivariate linear regression, diabetic patients with statin treatment had a better 1-month BCVA improvement than did those without statin treatment (absolute difference 0.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.50, p = 0.028). Subgroup analysis revealed that diabetic patients on statin had better postoperative BCVA improvement when preoperative status included partial or panretinal laser photocoagulation (p = 0.042 and p = 0.049) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy (p = 0.011). Moreover, diabetic patients with preoperative macular edema (p = 0.009), vitreous hemorrhage (p<0.001), proliferative retinopathy (p<0.001), or tractional retinal detachment (p = 0.010) had better BCVA recovery if receiving statin. In Cox proportional hazards regression model, revitrectomies in our 12-month follow-up were less frequent in diabetic patients on statin treatment (hazard ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.08-0.93, p = 0.037). These data provide novel insight into the potential clinical benefit for patients with sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy undergoing vitrectomy treated with statin.

  11. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... examined the content, data quality, and research potential of the WDHR-CCTR. METHODS: We retrieved 2008-2012 data to examine the 1) content; 2) completeness of procedure registration using the Danish National Patient Registry as reference; 3) completeness of variable registration comparing observed vs...

  12. Diabetes care may be improved with Steno Quality Assurance Tool--a self-assessment tool in diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Nielsen, Annemette Anker; Binder, Christian; Hansen, Jes B; Eldrup, Ebbe

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate if improvements in the quality of diabetes care in Indian clinics can be obtained by simple self-surveillance PC-based software. Nineteen Indian diabetes clinics were introduced to the principles of quality assurance (QA), and to a software program, the Steno Quality Assurance Tool (SQAT). Data was entered for an initial 3 months period. Subsequently data were analyzed by the users, who designed plans to improve indicator status and set goals for the upcoming period. A second data entry period followed after 7-9 months. QA data was analyzed from 4487 T2DM patients (baseline) and 4440 (follow-up). The average examination frequency per clinic of the following indicators increased significantly: lipid examination (72-87%) (p=0.007), foot examination (80-94%) (p=0.02), HbA1c investigation (59-77%) (p=0.006), and urine albumin excretion investigation (72-87%) (p=0.006). Outcome parameters also improved significantly: mean (SD) fasting and post prandial BG reduced from 144(16) to 132(16)mg/dl (p=0.02) and 212(24)-195(29)mg/dl (p=0.03), respectively. Systolic BP reduced from 139(6) to 133(4) (p=0.0008)mmHg and diastolic BP from 83(3) to 81(3)mmHg (p=0.002). Quality of diabetes care can be improved by applying SQAT, a QA self-surveillance software that enables documentation of changes in process and outcome indicators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and Evaluation of an Implementation Strategy for Collecting Data in a National Registry and the Use of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Physical Therapist Practices: Quality Improvement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerhoff, Guus A; van Dulmen, Simone A; Maas, Marjo J M; Heijblom, Karin; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Van der Wees, Philip J

    2017-08-01

    In 2013, the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy launched the program "Quality in Motion." This program aims to collect data from electronic health record systems in a registry that is fed back to physical therapists, facilitating quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to describe the development of an implementation strategy for the program and to evaluate the feasibility of building a registry and implementing patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in physical therapist practices. A stepwise approach using mixed methods was established in 3 consecutive pilots with 355 physical therapists from 66 practices. Interim results were evaluated using quantitative data from a self-assessment questionnaire and the registry and qualitative data from 21 semistructured interviews with physical therapists. Descriptive statistics and McNemar's symmetry chi-squared test were used to summarize the feasibility of implementing PROMs. PROMs were selected for the 5 most prevalent musculoskeletal conditions in Dutch physical therapist practices. A core component of the implementation strategy was the introduction of knowledge brokers to support physical therapists in establishing the routine use of PROMs in clinical practice and to assist in executing peer assessment workshops. In February 2013, 30.3% of the physical therapist practices delivered 4.4 completed treatment episodes per physical therapist to the registry; this increased to 92.4% in November 2014, delivering 54.1 completed patient episodes per physical therapist. Pre- and posttreatment PROM use increased from 12.2% to 39.5%. It is unclear if the participating physical therapists reflect a representative sample of Dutch therapists. Building a registry and implementing PROMs in physical therapist practices are feasible. The routine use of PROMs needs to increase to ensure valid feedback of outcomes. Using knowledge brokers is promising for implementing the program via peer assessment workshops. © 2017

  14. Improving diabetes care for young people with type 1 diabetes through visual learning on mobile phones: mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøisland, Dag Helge; Arsand, Eirik; Skårderud, Finn

    2012-08-06

    Only 17% of Norwegian children and adolescents with diabetes achieve international treatment goals measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)). Classic patient-physician consultations seem to be poorly adapted to young children. New strategies that are better attuned to young people to improve support of adolescents' self-management of diabetes need to be tested and evaluated. (1) To explore how applications for mobile phones can be used in follow-up of adolescents with type 1 diabetes, and (2) to use the findings to guide further development of the applications and as a basis for future studies. We pilot tested two mobile phone applications: (1) an application that contained a picture-based diabetes diary to record physical activity and photos taken with the phone camera of food eaten, where the phone also communicated with the glucometer by Bluetooth technology to capture blood glucose values, and (2) a Web-based, password-secured and encrypted short message service (SMS), based on access using login passwords received via SMS to be used by participants to send messages to their providers when they faced obstacles in everyday life, and to send educational messages to the participants. At the end of the 3-month pilot study, 12 participants (7 girls and 5 boys ) aged 13-19 years completed semistructured interviews. The participants had a mean HbA(1c )value of 8.3 (SD 0.3), mean age of 16.2 (SD 1.7) years, mean body mass index of 23.3 (SD 3.2) kg/m(2), and mean diabetes duration of 7.5 (SD 4.6) years. We applied three additional measurements: change in metabolic control as measured by HbA(1c), the System Usability Scale, and diabetes knowledge. From the interviews, three main categories emerged: visualization, access, and software changes. Participants appreciated the picture-based diary more than the SMS solution. Visualization of cornerstones in diabetes self-care (ie, diet, insulin dosage, physical activity, and pre- and postprandial glucose measurements all

  15. Black Seed Thymoquinone Improved Insulin Secretion, Hepatic Glycogen Storage, and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba M. A. Abdelrazek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the metabolic diseases having several complications. Nigella sativa oil (NSO might have beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetic complications. Thirty-two mature male Wistar rats were equally divided into four experimental groups: control, control NSO 2 mL/kg, streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic, and diabetic (STZ-induced treated with oral NSO 2 mg/kg for 30 days. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, insulin, and lipid profile levels were determined. Pancreatic and hepatic tissues were used for catalase and GSH. Histopathology, hepatic glycogen contents, insulin immunohistochemistry, and pancreatic islet morphometry were performed. NSO 2 mL/kg was noticed to decrease (P<0.05 FBG and increase (P<0.05 insulin levels in diabetic rats than in diabetic nontreated animals. Lipid profile showed significant (P<0.5 improvement in diabetic rats that received NSO 2 mL/kg than in the diabetic group. Both pancreatic and hepatic catalase and GSH activities revealed a significant (P<0.05 increment in the diabetic group treated with NSO than in the diabetic animals. NSO improved the histopathological picture and hepatic glycogen contents of the diabetic group as well as increased (P<0.05 insulin immunoreactive parts % and mean pancreatic islet diameter. NSO exerts ameliorative and therapeutic effects on the STZ-induced diabetic male Wistar rats.

  16. Vacuum assisted closure improves the quality of life in patients with diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatepe, O; Eken, I; Acet, E; Unal, O; Mert, M; Koc, B; Karahan, S; Filizcan, U; Ugurlucan, M; Aksoy, M

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is the most common endocrine disease worldwide. One of the most important chronic complications of this disease is the development of diabetic foot. The management of diabetic foot wounds is quite important with respect to public health. To determine the effect of Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) therapy on the quality of life in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers and compare it with standart wound care. Between May 2007 to December 2008, 67 consecutive patients with diabetic foot ulcers were randomly assigned to VAC therapy (Group 1, n : 30) or standart wound care (Group 2, n : 37). The SF-36 questionnaire was administered the day before and in the month following wound healing. Global analyses of the 8 domains and 2 comprehensive indexes of SF-36, Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) were performed. Clinical measures included standard antidiabetic treatment, daily wound care including antiseptic bath, debridement, toe removal for gangrene when necessary, and wound care with conventional methods or VAC. Healing time was calculated as the time from hospital admission to the time of re-epithelization. There were no differences in the mean age, ulcer size and pulse status of the patients in both groups. Healing time in the VAC group was significantly reduced (p VAC therapy. Vacuum Assisted Closure therapy was found to be effective in the treatment of chronic diabetic ulcers. The improvement of quality of life demonstrates a clear-cut indication in this particular group of patients.

  17. [Trauma registry and injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, S C

    2001-10-01

    The trauma registry network constitutes an essential database in every injury prevention system. In order to rationally estimate the extent of injury in general, and injuries from traffic accidents in particular, the trauma registry systems should contain the most comprehensive and broad database possible, in line with the operational definitions. Ideally, the base of the injury pyramid should also include mild injuries and even "near-misses". The Israeli National Trauma Registry has come a long way in the last few years. The eventual inclusion of all trauma centers in Israel will enable the establishment of a firm base for the allocation of resources by decision-makers.

  18. Peer Coaches to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Rural Alabama: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Monika M; Andreae, Susan; Cherrington, Andrea L; Martin, Michelle Y; Halanych, Jewell; Lewis, Marquita; Patel, Ashruta; Johnson, Ethel; Clark, Debra; Gamboa, Christopher; Richman, Joshua S

    2015-08-01

    It is unclear whether peer coaching is effective in minority populations living with diabetes in hard-to-reach, under-resourced areas such as the rural South. We examined the effect of an innovative peer-coaching intervention plus brief education vs brief education alone on diabetes outcomes. This was a community-engaged, cluster-randomized, controlled trial with primary care practices and their surrounding communities serving as clusters. The trial enrolled 424 participants, with 360 completing baseline and follow-up data collection (84.9% retention). The primary outcomes were change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (BP), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), body mass index (BMI), and quality of life, with diabetes distress and patient activation as secondary outcomes. Peer coaches were trained for 2 days in community settings; the training emphasized motivational interviewing skills, diabetes basics, and goal setting. All participants received a 1-hour diabetes education class and a personalized diabetes report card at baseline. Intervention arm participants were also paired with peer coaches; the protocol called for telephone interactions weekly for the first 8 weeks, then monthly for a total of 10 months. Due to real-world constraints, follow-up was protracted, and intervention effects varied over time. The analysis that included the 68% of participants followed up by 15 months showed only a significant increase in patient activation in the intervention group. The analysis that included all participants who eventually completed follow-up revealed that intervention arm participants had significant differences in changes in systolic BP (P = .047), BMI (P = .02), quality of life (P = .003), diabetes distress (P = .004), and patient activation (P = .03), but not in HbA1c (P = .14) or LDL-C (P = .97). Telephone-delivered peer coaching holds promise to improve health for individuals with diabetes living in under-resourced areas. © 2015

  19. The Guyana Diabetes and Foot Care Project: Improved Diabetic Foot Evaluation Reduces Amputation Rates by Two-Thirds in a Lower Middle Income Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, R. Gary; Martin, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes is the fourth leading cause of death in Guyana, South America. A complex, interprofessional, quality improvement intervention to improve foot and diabetes care was rolled out in two phases. Methods & Findings. Phase 1: Establishment of an Interprofessional Diabetic Foot Center (DFC) of Excellence to improve foot care and reduce diabetes-related amputations at the national referral hospital. Phase 2: Regionalization to cover 90% of the Guyanese population and expansion to include improved management of diabetes and hypertension. Fourteen key opinion leaders were educated and 340 health care professionals from 97 facilities trained. Eight centers for the evaluation and treatment of foot ulcers were established and 7567 people with diabetes evaluated. 3452 participants had foot screening and 48% were deemed high risk; 10% of these had undocumented foot ulcers. There was a 68% reduction in rate of major amputations (P diabetes with women (F/M = 2.09) and increased risk of major amputation in men [odds ratio 2.16 (95% CI 1.83, 2.56)] were documented. Conclusions. This intervention improved foot care with reduction in major amputations sustained over 5 years. PMID:26089901

  20. Monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Oddmund Søvika; Henrik Underthun Irgens; Janne Molnes; Jørn V. Sagena; Lise Bjørkhaug; Helge Ræder; Anders Molveng; Pål R. Njølstad

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review data on monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway based on the Norwegian MODY Registry at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen. This registry comprises established or suspected cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) referred to our laboratory for genetic testing. We also present data on neonatal diabetes, another group of monogenic diabetes. To date, we have genetically diagnosed nearly 500 MODY cases in Norway. Mutations in the HNF1A gene (MODY3) were detected in a...

  1. Inhibition of protein kinase Cbeta does not improve endothelial function in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Joshua A; Goldfine, Allison B; Goldin, Alison; Prsic, Adnan; Kim, Sora; Creager, Mark A

    2010-08-01

    Antagonism of protein kinase Cbeta (PKCbeta) restores endothelial function in experimental models of diabetes and prevents vascular dysfunction in response to hyperglycemia in healthy humans. We tested the hypothesis that PKCbeta antagonism would improve vascular function in subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with healthy control subjects. The effect of PKCbeta was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover trial. The study was performed in the outpatient setting of a university medical center. Thirteen subjects with type 2 diabetes without evidence of cardiovascular disease and 15 healthy control subjects were recruited via newspaper advertisement. Subjects underwent a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial of the selective PKCbeta antagonist ruboxistaurin mesylate. Subjects received each treatment for 14 d. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation of forearm resistance vessels was measured with mercury-in-silastic, strain-gauge plethysmography during intraarterial administration of methacholine chloride and verapamil, respectively. Markers of inflammation, fibrinolysis, endothelial damage, and oxidative stress were measured after each treatment. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation of forearm resistance vessels was attenuated in diabetic subjects when compared with healthy subjects (P=0.001). Endothelium-independent vasodilation did not differ between groups (P value not significant). Ruboxistaurin did not significantly change endothelium-dependent or endothelium-independent vasodilation or blood-based markers of inflammation, fibrinolysis, endothelial damage, and oxidative stress in either diabetic or healthy subjects. Endothelial dysfunction of forearm resistance vessels was not improved by 2 wk of selective PKCbeta inhibition in patients with diabetes. These results suggest that PKCbeta does not contribute significantly to vascular dysfunction in otherwise healthy patients with type 2

  2. Improved pregnancy outcome in type 1 diabetic women with microalbuminuria or diabetic nephropathy: effect of intensified antihypertensive therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2009-01-01

    To describe pregnancy outcome in type 1 diabetic women with normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, or diabetic nephropathy after implementation of an intensified antihypertensive therapeutic strategy.......To describe pregnancy outcome in type 1 diabetic women with normoalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, or diabetic nephropathy after implementation of an intensified antihypertensive therapeutic strategy....

  3. Ethnic differences in glycaemic control and complications: the adult diabetes control and management (ADCM), Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, B H; Mastura, I; Lee, P Y; Wahyu, T Sri; Cheong, A T; Zaiton, A

    2011-08-01

    Ethnicity is an important factor in diabetes care. The understanding of its effect in this country may help to improve diabetes care, glycaemic control and diabetic complication rates. This study was to determine the diabetes control profile in relation to complication rates between the three main ethnics group in Malaysia. This nested cross-sectional study was part of the Audit of Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM), an ongoing cohort patient registry focused on diabetes control and management in the primary care setting in Malaysia. This registry registers all diabetes patients aged 18 years old and above. Demographic data, diabetes duration, treatment modalities, as well as various risk factors and diabetes complications are reported. Data was handled by statisticians using STATA version 9. A total of 20330 patients from 54 health centers were registered at the time of this report. The majority were type 2 diabetics (99.1%) of whom 56.6% were female. The mean age was 57.9 years (SD 11.58). Malay accounted for 56.3%, Chinese 19.5% and Indian 22.5%. There were 30.3% who attained HbA1c profiles. The Chinese diabetics suffer as many diabetes-related complications despite better glycaemic control. Further studies will need to look into other socio-genetic factors in order to provide a more personalized effective diabetes care.

  4. 3',4'-Dihydroxyflavonol reduces superoxide and improves nitric oxide function in diabetic rat mesenteric arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Huei Leo

    Full Text Available 3',4'-Dihydroxyflavonol (DiOHF is an effective antioxidant that acutely preserves nitric oxide (NO activity in the presence of elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS. We hypothesized that DiOHF treatment (7 days, 1 mg/kg per day s.c. would improve relaxation in mesenteric arteries from diabetic rats where endothelial dysfunction is associated with elevated oxidant stress.In mesenteric arteries from diabetic rats there was an increase in ROS, measured by L-012 and 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide levels, assayed by lucigenin chemiluminescence, were also significantly increased in diabetic mesenteric arteries (diabetes, 4892±946 counts/mg versus normal 2486±344 counts/mg, n = 7-10, p<0.01 associated with an increase in Nox2 expression but DiOHF (2094±300 counts/mg, n = 10, p<0.001 reversed that effect. Acetylcholine (ACh-induced relaxation of mesenteric arteries was assessed using wire myography (pEC(50 = 7.94±0.13 n = 12. Diabetes significantly reduced the sensitivity to ACh and treatment with DiOHF prevented endothelial dysfunction (pEC(50, diabetic 6.86±0.12 versus diabetic+DiOHF, 7.49±0.13, n = 11, p<0.01. The contribution of NO versus endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF to ACh-induced relaxation was assessed by evaluating responses in the presence of TRAM-34+apamin+iberiotoxin or N-nitro-L-arginine+ODQ respectively. Diabetes impaired the contribution of both NO (maximum relaxation, R(max diabetic 24±7 versus normal, 68±10, n = 9-10, p<0.01 and EDHF (pEC(50, diabetic 6.63±0.15 versus normal, 7.14±0.12, n = 10-11, p<0.01 to endothelium-dependent relaxation. DiOHF treatment did not significantly affect the EDHF contribution but enhanced NO-mediated relaxation (R(max 69±6, n = 11, p<0.01. Western blotting demonstrated that diabetes also decreased expression and increased uncoupling of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. Treatment of the

  5. Clinical coaching in primary care: Capable of improving control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guajardo, Eduardo Enrique; Salinas-Martínez, Ana María; Botello-García, Antonio; Mathiew-Quiros, Álvaro

    2016-06-01

    Few clinical coaching studies are both endorsed by real cases and focused on reducing suboptimal diabetes control. We evaluated the effectiveness of coaching on improving type 2 diabetes goals after 3 years of implementation in primary care. A cross-sectional study with follow up was conducted during 2008-2011. Coaching consisted of guiding family doctors to improve their clinical abilities, and it was conducted by a medical doctor trained in skill building, experiential learning, and goal setting. Effectiveness was assessed by means of fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin outcomes. The main analysis consisted of 1×3 and 2×3 repeated measures ANOVAs. A significant coaching×time interaction was observed, indicating that the difference in glucose between primary care units with and without coaching increased over time (Wilks' lambda multivariate test, PCoaching increased 1.4 times (95%CI 1.3, 1.5) the possibility of reaching the fasting glucose goal after controlling for baseline values. There was also a significant improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin (Bonferroni-corrected p-value for pairwise comparisons, Pcoaching was found to be worth the effort to improve type 2 diabetes control in primary care. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cooking Schools Improve Nutrient Intake Patterns of People with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Jackson, K'Dawn; Bock, Margaret Ann; Eastman, Wanda; Powell, Jennifer; Titone, Michelle; Marr, Carol; Wells, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether cooking classes offered by the Cooperative Extension Service improved nutrient intake patterns in people with type 2 diabetes. Design: Quasi-experimental using pretest, posttest comparisons. Setting: Community locations including schools, churches, and senior centers. Participants: One hundred seventeen people with…

  7. Data Element Registry Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data Element Registry Services (DERS) is a resource for information about value lists (aka code sets / pick lists), data dictionaries, data elements, and EPA data...

  8. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten; Maagaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the epidemiologic and perioperative data of the first 2000 procedures in a Danish hip arthroscopy population and to describe the development of DHAR...... was 0.65 and HAGOS sub-scores were 51 (pain), 49 (symptoms), 53 (ADL), 35 (sport), 20 (physical activity) and 29, respectively. We conclude that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy report considerable pain, loss of function, reduced level of activity and reduced quality-of-life prior to surgery....... The problems with development and maintaining a large clinical registry are described and further studies are needed to validate data completeness. We consider the development of a national clinical registry for hip arthroscopy as a successful way of developing and maintaining a valuable clinical...

  9. 911 Master PSAP Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — Updated as of 5Oct2017. The Registry lists PSAPs by an FCC assigned identification number, PSAP Name, State, County, City, and provides information on any type of...

  10. Is glycemic control in patients with type-2 diabetes in Rawalpindi improving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, D.A.; Saeed, M.; Khan, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Glycaemic control is critical for managing diabetes and related complications. Considering high prevalence of Diabetes in Pakistan, our study aimed to assess the status of glycaemic control in Type-II Diabetics by measurement of HbA1c from 2005-2007 at Rawalpindi. We also evaluated changes in its trends in relation with sex and age. It was a retrospective analysis of data from Clinical Pathology Laboratory, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi during 2005-2007. A total of 2875 patients, aged 24-70 years, taking oral hypoglycaemic agents, were included. HbA1c was measured by using Human kit. International Diabetes Federation guidelines, 6.5%, 6.6%-8.4% and 8.5% were used to classify patients into good, fair and poor control categories. The number of patients (n=2875) tested for HbAlc increased from 904,974 to 997 during 2005-2007. The patients had an age of 48+-13 years and comprised of 54% males and 46% females. Improvement in patient's glycaemic control among the three categories during 2005 to 2007 was as follows: good (41% vs. 47%), fair (38% vs. 40%) and poor (21% vs. 13%) respectively. The average HbA1c values improved from 7.25 % in 2005 to 6.69% in 2007 (p<0.05). Overall, males (45%) and youngest age group (53%) patients had good diabetic control. Glycaemic control improved in diabetic patients from 41% to 47% during 2005-2007 at Rawalpindi. Males, especially the youngest patients comprised majority of good control population. For effective disease management and optimal HbA1c values, a combined effort by the patient and physician is required. (author)

  11. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  12. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  13. Towards a national trauma registry for the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barka Ezedin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma is a major health problem in the United Arab Emirates (UAE as well as worldwide. Trauma registries provide large longitudinal databases for analysis and policy improvement. We aim in this paper to report on the development and evolution of a national trauma registry using a staged approach by developing a single-center registry, a two-center registry, and then a multi-center registry. The three registries were established by developing suitable data collection forms, databases, and interfaces to these databases. The first two registries collected data for a finite period of time and the third is underway. The steps taken to establish these registries depend on whether the registry is intended as a single-center or multi-center registry. Findings Several issues arose and were resolved during the development of these registries such as the relational design of the database, whether to use a standalone database management system or a web-based system, and the usability and security of the system. The inclusion of preventive medicine data elements is important in a trauma registry and the focus on road traffic collision data elements is essential in a country such as the UAE. The first two registries provided valuable data which has been analyzed and published. Conclusions The main factors leading to the successful establishment of a multi-center trauma registry are the development of a concise data entry form, development of a user-friendly secure web-based database system, the availability of a computer and Internet connection in each data collection center, funded data entry personnel well trained in extracting medical data from the medical record and entering it into the computer, and experienced personnel in trauma injuries and data analysis to continuously maintain and analyze the registry.

  14. Physical Exercise Improves Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafaina, Santos; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Fuentes, Juan Pedro; Merellano-Navarro, Eugenio; Gusi, Narcis

    2017-09-23

    The aim of the present systematic review is to provide an up-to-date analysis of the research on the effects of exercise programs on heart rate variability (HRV) in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). An electronic search of the literature (PubMed, PEDro and Web of Science) was performed. "HRV", "heart rate variability", "exercise", "physical" and "diabetes" were the terms used for article retrieval. Lastly, 15 articles were selected. PRISMA methodology was employed and data were extracted according to the PICOS approach. Although HRV is not routinely measured in the management of T2DM, it is an important measure due to its relation with mortality and diabetic neuropathy. Physical exercise has become a therapy for T2DM, because it improves physical fitness and functional capacity, enhances metabolic control and insulin sensitivity, reduces inflammatory markers and neuropathy symptoms and can increase the regenerative capacity of cutaneous axons, slowing or preventing neuropathy progression. However, it is not clear to what extent physical exercise can improve HRV in this population. Participation in the 15 selected studies was similar in men and women (48.01% men and 51.99% women). All the intervention programs included aerobic training, and it was complemented by strength training in four studies. Duration of physical exercise sessions ranged between 30 and 75 min, the frequency being between 2 and 7 days/week. Statistically significant improvements in groups with diabetes, relative to baseline, were observed in nine studies. More than 3 days per week of aerobic training, complemented by strength training, during at least 3 months seems to improve HRV in T2DM. Weekly frequency might be the most important factor to improve HRV. These aspects could help to design better programs based in scientific evidence, incorporating HRV as an important variable associated with diabetic neuropathy and mortality.

  15. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign-up for a ... to help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical ...

  16. Linked Registries: Connecting Rare Diseases Patient Registries through a Semantic Web Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sernadela, Pedro; González-Castro, Lorena; Carta, Claudio; van der Horst, Eelke; Lopes, Pedro; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Thompson, Mark; Thompson, Rachel; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Lopez, Estrella; Wood, Libby; Robertson, Agata; Lamanna, Claudia; Gilling, Mette; Orth, Michael; Merino-Martinez, Roxana; Posada, Manuel; Taruscio, Domenica; Lochmüller, Hanns; Robinson, Peter; Roos, Marco; Oliveira, José Luís

    2017-01-01

    Patient registries are an essential tool to increase current knowledge regarding rare diseases. Understanding these data is a vital step to improve patient treatments and to create the most adequate tools for personalized medicine. However, the growing number of disease-specific patient registries brings also new technical challenges. Usually, these systems are developed as closed data silos, with independent formats and models, lacking comprehensive mechanisms to enable data sharing. To tackle these challenges, we developed a Semantic Web based solution that allows connecting distributed and heterogeneous registries, enabling the federation of knowledge between multiple independent environments. This semantic layer creates a holistic view over a set of anonymised registries, supporting semantic data representation, integrated access, and querying. The implemented system gave us the opportunity to answer challenging questions across disperse rare disease patient registries. The interconnection between those registries using Semantic Web technologies benefits our final solution in a way that we can query single or multiple instances according to our needs. The outcome is a unique semantic layer, connecting miscellaneous registries and delivering a lightweight holistic perspective over the wealth of knowledge stemming from linked rare disease patient registries.

  17. Improving adherence to medication in adults with diabetes in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. M. Al-Haj Mohd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a chronic medical condition and adherence to medication in diabetes is important. Improving medication adherence in adults with diabetes would help prevent the chronic complications associated with diabetes. A case control trial was used to study the effects of an educational session on medication adherence among adults with diabetes as measured by the Morisky Medication adherence scale (MMAS-8©. Methods The study took place at the Dubai Police Health Centre between February 2015 and November 2015. Questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic, clinical and disease related variables and the primary measure of outcome was adherence levels as measured by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8©. The intervention group involved a standardized thirty minute educational session focusing on the importance of adherence to medication. The change in MMAS-8© was measured at 6 months. Results Four hundred and forty six patients were enrolled. Mean age 61 year +/− 11. 48.4 % were male. The mean time since diagnosis of diabetes was 3.2 years (Range 1–15 years. At baseline two hundred and eighty eight (64.6 % patients were considered non-adherent (MMAS-8© adherence score < 6 while 118 (26.5 % and 40 (9.0 % had low adherence (MMAS-8© adherence score < 6 and medium adherence (MMAS-8© adherence scores of 6 to 7 to their medication respectively. The percentage of patients scoring low adherence MMAS-8 scores in the interventional group dropped from 64.60 % at baseline to 44.80 % at 6-months (p = 0.01. There was no obvious change in the adherence scores at baseline and at 6-months in the control group. Based on the study data, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that at 6 months, the educational 30-min session on diabetes and adherence to medication did elicit a statistically significant change in adherence levels in adults with diabetes enrolled in the intervention arm (Z = −6

  18. The Usability of Diabetes MAP: A Web-delivered Intervention for Improving Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Bethune, Magaela C; Lagotte, Andrea E; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2016-05-12

    Web-delivered interventions are a feasible approach to health promotion. However, if a website is poorly designed, difficult to navigate, and has technical bugs, it will not be used as intended. Usability testing prior to evaluating a website's benefits can identify barriers to user engagement and maximize future use. We developed a Web-delivered intervention called Diabetes Medication Adherence Promotion (Diabetes MAP) and used a mixed-methods approach to test its usability prior to evaluating its efficacy on medication adherence and glycemic control in a randomized controlled trial. We recruited English-speaking adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from an academic medical center who were prescribed diabetes medications. A trained research assistant administered a baseline survey, collected medical record information, and instructed participants on how to access Diabetes MAP. Participants were asked to use the site independently for 2 weeks and to provide survey and/or focus group feedback on their experience. We analyzed survey data descriptively and qualitative data thematically to identify participants' favorable and unfavorable experiences, characterize usability concerns, and solicit recommendations for improving Diabetes MAP. Enrolled participants (N=32) were an average of 51.7 ± 11.8 years old, 66% (21/32) female, 60% (19/32) non-Hispanic White, 88% (28/32) had more than 12 years of education, half had household incomes over $50,000, and 78% (25/32) were privately insured. Average duration of diagnosed diabetes was 7.8 ± 6.3 years, average A1c was 7.4 ± 2.0, and 38% (12/32) were prescribed insulin. Of enrolled participants, 91% (29/32) provided survey and/or focus group feedback about Diabetes MAP. On the survey, participants agreed website information was clear and easy to understand, but in focus groups they reported navigational challenges and difficulty overcoming user errors (eg, entering data in an unspecified format). Participants also

  19. Effect of quality of life improvement on type 2 diabetes patients' self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Mahboubeh; Samadi, Nasrin; Mahmoodi, Mahmood

    2011-09-01

    To study the effects of the quality of life (QoL) improvement on their QoL and self-esteem. This was a random controlled clinical trial study on 123 type 2 diabetes patients admitted to the Diabetes Clinic in Imam Khomeini Hospital at Ardebil, Iran from April 2009 to June 2010. The 30-70 years old participants are afflicted with type 2 diabetes, and randomly divided into 2 groups (experimental group n=61, and control group n=62). The questionnaires were composed of sociodemographic status, Farrel & Grant, and Rosenberg's self-esteem questionnaires and the quality of life (QoL) improvement plan was codified to educate and evaluate them. A plow self-esteem (13%) before QOL training, and they had moderate self-esteem after the intervention (39%), however, the control group had moderate self-esteem (62.5%) in the pre-test, and changed to low self-esteem (12.9%) in the post-test, and there was significant difference in the previous and next intervention (pself-esteem, and QOL as improved may help to reduce the side effects of type 2 diabetes process.

  20. Dose- and time-dependent association of smoking and its cessation with glycemic control and insulin resistance in male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Ohkuma

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of smoking and its cessation on glycemic control in diabetic patients has not been fully examined yet. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of smoking status with glycemic level and markers of insulin resistance and secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.A total of 2,490 Japanese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus aged ≥20 years were divided according to smoking status, amount of cigarettes smoked and years since quitting. The associations with glycemic level and markers of insulin resistance and secretion were examined cross-sectionally.HbA1c levels increased progressively with increases in both number of cigarettes per day and pack-years of cigarette smoking compared with never smokers (P for trend = 0.001 and <0.001, respectively, whereas fasting plasma glucose did not. On the other hand, HbA1c, but not fasting plasma glucose, decreased linearly with increase in years after smoking cessation (P for trend <0.001. These graded relationships persisted significantly after controlling for the confounders, including total energy intake, current drinking, regular exercise, depressive symptoms, and BMI. In addition, a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein also showed similar trends.Smoking and its cessation showed dose- and time-dependent relationship with glycemic control and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. These findings may highlight the importance of smoking cessation in the clinical management of diabetes mellitus.

  1. An interprofessional diabetes experience to improve pharmacy and nursing students' competency in collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Amy L; Westberg, Sarah; Rowan, Mary; Schweiss, Sarah

    2013-11-12

    To improve pharmacy and nursing students' competency in collaborative practice by having them participate in an interprofessional diabetes experience involving social networking. An existing elective course on diabetes management was modified to include interprofessional content based on Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competency domains. Web-based collaborative tools (social networking and video chat) were used to allow nursing and pharmacy students located on 2 different campuses to apply diabetes management content as an interprofessional team. Mixed-method analyses demonstrated an increase in students' knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the other profession and developed an understanding of interprofessional communication strategies and their central role in effective teamwork. Interprofessional content and activities can be effectively integrated into an existing course and offered successfully to students from other professional programs and on remote campuses.

  2. A low-fat Diet improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, AM; Almdal, Thomas Peter; Viggers, Lone

    2006-01-01

    diet (P = 0.039). The daily protein and carbohydrate intake increased (+4.4% of total energy intake, P = 0.0049 and +2.5%, P = 0.34, respectively), while alcohol intake decreased (-3.2% of total energy intake, P = 0.02). There was a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity on the isocaloric, low-fat......AIMS: To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Thirteen Type 1 patients were...... by the insulin clamp technique at baseline and after each of the diet intervention periods. RESULTS: On an isocaloric low-fat diet, Type 1 diabetic patients significantly reduced the proportion of fat in the total daily energy intake by 12.1% (or -3.6% of total energy) as compared with a conventional diabetes...

  3. Ultra-wide-field angiography improves the detection and classification of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Matthew M; Aaker, Grant D; Parlitsis, George; Cho, Minhee; D'Amico, Donald J; Kiss, Szilárd

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate patients with diabetic retinopathy using ultra-wide-field fluorescein angiography and to compare the visualized retinal pathology with that seen on an overly of conventional 7 standard field (7SF) imaging. Two hundred and eighteen eyes of 118 diabetic patients who underwent diagnostic fluorescein angiography using the Optos Optomap Panoramic 200A imaging system were included. The visualized area of the retina, retinal nonperfusion, retinal neovascularization, and panretinal photocoagulation were quantified by two independent masked graders. The respective areas identified on the ultra-wide-field fluorescein angiography image were compared with an overly of a modified 7SF image as outlined in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study. Ultra-wide-field fluorescein angiograms imaging, on average, demonstrated 3.2 times more total retinal surface area than 7SF. When compared with 7SF, ultra-wide-field fluorescein angiography showed 3.9 times more nonperfusion (P diabetic retinopathy. Improved retinal visualization may alter the classification of diabetic retinopathy and may therefore influence follow-up and treatment of these patients.

  4. Improved diabetes management in Swedish schools: results from two national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särnblad, Stefan; Åkesson, Karin; Fernström, Lillemor; Ilvered, Rosita; Forsander, Gun

    2017-09-01

    Support in diabetes self-care in school is essential to achieve optimal school performance and metabolic control. Swedish legislation regulating support to children with chronic diseases was strengthened 2009. To compare the results of a national survey conducted 2008 and 2015 measuring parents' and diabetes specialist teams' perceptions of support in school. All pediatric diabetes centers in Sweden were invited to participate in the 2015 study. In each center, families with a child being treated for T1DM and attending preschool class or compulsory school were eligible. The parents' and the diabetes teams' opinions were collected in two separate questionnaires. Forty-one out of 42 eligible diabetes centers participated and 568 parents answered the parental questionnaire in 2015. Metabolic control had improved since the 2008 survey (55.2 ± 10.6 mmol/mol, 7.2% ± 1.0%, in 2015 compared with 61.8 ± 12.4 mmol/mol, 7.8% ± 1.1% in 2008). The proportion of children with a designated staff member responsible for supporting the child's self-care increased from 43% to 59%, (P self-care in school in 2015 compared with 2008. More efforts are needed to implement the national legislation to achieve equal support in all Swedish schools. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Participation in a National Lifestyle Change Program is associated with improved diabetes Control outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sandra L; Staimez, Lisa R; Safo, Sandra; Long, Qi; Rhee, Mary K; Cunningham, Solveig A; Olson, Darin E; Tomolo, Anne M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Narayan, Venkat K M; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2017-09-01

    Clinical trials show lifestyle change programs are beneficial, yet large-scale, successful translation of these programs is scarce. We investigated the association between participation in the largest U.S. lifestyle change program, MOVE!, and diabetes control outcomes. This longitudinal, retrospective cohort study used Veterans Health Administration databases of patients with diabetes who participated in MOVE! between 2005 and 2012, or met eligibility criteria (BMI ≥25kg/m 2 ) but did not participate. Main outcomes were diabetic eye disease, renal disease, and medication intensification. There were 400,170 eligible patients with diabetes, including 87,366 (22%) MOVE! Included patients were 96% male, 77% white, with mean age 58years and BMI 34kg/m 2 . Controlling for baseline measurements and age, race, sex, BMI, and antidiabetes medications, MOVE! participants had lower body weight (-0.6kg), random plasma glucose (-2.8mg/dL), and HbA1c (-0.1%) at 12months compared to nonparticipants (each plifestyle change programs in U.S. health systems may improve health among the growing patient population with diabetes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Exenatide Treatment Alone Improves β-Cell Function in a Canine Model of Pre-Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Ionut

    Full Text Available Exenatide's effects on glucose metabolism have been studied extensively in diabetes but not in pre-diabetes.We examined the chronic effects of exenatide alone on glucose metabolism in pre-diabetic canines.After 10 weeks of high-fat diet (HFD, adult dogs received one injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 18.5 mg/kg. After induction of pre-diabetes, while maintained on HFD, animals were randomized to receive either exenatide (n = 7 or placebo (n = 7 for 12 weeks. β-Cell function was calculated from the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT, expressed as the acute insulin response, AIRG, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, insulinogenic index and the graded-hyperglycemic clamp (clamp insulinogenic index. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was assessed by the IVGTT. At the end of the study, pancreatic islets were isolated to assess β-cell function in vitro.OGTT: STZ caused an increase in glycemia at 120 min by 22.0% (interquartile range, IQR, 31.5% (P = 0.011. IVGTT: This protocol also showed a reduction in glucose tolerance by 48.8% (IQR, 36.9% (P = 0.002. AIRG decreased by 54.0% (IQR, 40.7% (P = 0.010, leading to mild fasting hyperglycemia (P = 0.039. Exenatide, compared with placebo, decreased body weight (P<0.001 without altering food intake, fasting glycemia, insulinemia, glycated hemoglobin A1c, or glucose tolerance. Exenatide, compared with placebo, increased both OGTT- (P = 0.040 and clamp-based insulinogenic indexes (P = 0.016, improved insulin secretion in vitro (P = 0.041, but had no noticeable effect on insulin sensitivity (P = 0.405.In pre-diabetic canines, 12-week exenatide treatment improved β-cell function but not glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity. These findings demonstrate partial beneficial metabolic effects of exenatide alone on an animal model of pre-diabetes.

  7. A novel telemonitoring device for improving diabetes control: protocol and results from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Alice R; Kinoshita, Linda; Kirk, Susan; Barbosa, Gina Monraz; Chou, Cathy; Minkoff, Jerome

    2014-02-01

    Telemedicine is one approach to managing patients with chronic illness. Several telephone-based monitoring studies of diabetes patients have shown improved glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an investigational in-home telemetry device for improving glucose and BP control over 6 months for patients with type 2 diabetes. The device was used to transmit weekly blood glucose, weight, and BP readings to a diabetes care manager. We conducted a two-arm, parallel-comparison, single-blind, randomized controlled trial among Kaiser Permanente Northern California members 18-75 years old with type 2 diabetes mellitus and entry HbA1c levels between 7.5% and 10.0%. Participants were randomly assigned to either the telemonitoring arm or the usual care arm. We observed very small, nonsignificant changes in fructosamine (telemonitoring, -54.9 μmol; usual care, -59.4 μmol) and systolic BP (telemonitoring, -6.3 mm Hg; usual care, -3.2 mm Hg) from baseline to 6 weeks in both groups. At 6 months, we observed no significant intergroup differences in change from baseline for HbA1c, fructosamine, or self-efficacy. However, LDL cholesterol in the telemonitoring arm decreased more than in the usual care arm (-17.1 mg/dL versus -5.4 mg/dL; P=0.045). Although HbA1c improved significantly over 6 months in both groups, the difference in improvement between the groups was not significant. This lack of significance may be due to the relatively healthy status of the volunteers in our study and to the high level of care provided by the care managers in the Santa Rosa, CA clinic. Further study in subgroups of less healthy diabetes patients is recommended.

  8. Lifestyle Change Plus Dental Care (LCDC) program improves knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) toward oral health and diabetes mellitus among the elderly with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengtipbovorn, Saruta; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2015-03-01

    Currently, there is an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus among the elderly. Chronic inflammation from diabetes mellitus effects glycemic control and increases risk of diabetes complications. To assess the effectiveness of a Lifestyle Change plus Dental Care (LCDC) program by improved knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) toward oral health and diabetes mellitus among the elderly with type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in two Health Centers (HC 54 intervention and HC 59 control) between October 2013 and April 2014. Sixty-six diabetic patients per health center were recruited. At baseline, the intervention group attended a 20-minute lifestyle and oral health education program, individual lifestyle counseling using motivational interviewing, application of self-regulation manual, and individual oral hygiene instruction. At 3-month follow-up, the intervention group received individual lifestyle counseling and oral hygiene instruction. The intervention group received booster education every visit by viewing a 15-minute educational video. The control group received the routine program. Participants were assessed at baseline, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up for knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) toward oral health and diabetes mellitus. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistic, Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and repeated measure ANOVA. After the 6-month follow-up, repeated measure ANOVA analysis showed that participants in the intervention group had significantly higher knowledge and attitude toward oral health and diabetes mellitus. The participants in the intervention group were more likely to exercise, modify diet, have foot examinations, always wear covered shoes, participate in self-feet screening, use dental floss, and use inter-proximal brush than the control group with statistically significant differences. The combination of lifestyle change and dental care in one program improved knowledge, attitude

  9. Diabetic and Obese Patient Clinical Outcomes Improve During a Care Management Implementation in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Piatt, Gretchen; Green, Lee A; Chen, Qiaoling; Piette, John

    2017-10-01

    To address the increasing burden of chronic disease, many primary care practices are turning to care management and the hiring of care managers to help patients coordinate their care and self-manage their conditions. Care management is often, but not always, proving effective at improving patient outcomes, but more evidence is needed. In this pair-matched cluster randomized trial, 5 practices implemented care management and were compared with 5 comparison practices within the same practice organization. Targeted patients included diabetic patients with a hemoglobin A1c >9% and nondiabetic obese patients. Clinical values tracked were A1c, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, microalbumin, and weight. Clinically important improvements were demonstrated in the intervention versus comparison practices, with diabetic patients improving A1c control and obese patients experiencing weight loss. There was a 12% relative increase in the proportion of patients meeting the clinical target of A1c management practices lost 5% or more of their body weight as compared with 10% of comparison patients (adjusted relative improvement, 15%; CI, 2%-28%). These findings add to the growing evidence-base for the effectiveness of care management as an effective clinical practice with regard to improving diabetes- and obesity-related outcomes.

  10. Crocin Improved Learning and Memory Impairments in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Crocin influences many biological functions including memory and learning. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of crocin on learning and memory impairments in streptozotocine-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal (IP injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 45 mg/kg. Transfer latency (TL paradigm in elevated plus-maze (EPM was used as an index of learning and memory. Plasma levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC and malondialdehyde (MDA, blood levels of glucose, and serum concentrations of insulin were measured. The number of hippocampal neurons was also counted. Results: STZ increased acquisition transfer latency (TL1 and retention transfer latency (TL2, and MDA, decreased transfer latency shortening (TLs and TCA, produced hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, and reduced the number of neurons in the hippocampus. Learning and memory impairments and blood TCA, MDA, glucose, and insulin changes induced by streptozotocin were improved with long-term IP injection of crocin at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. Crocin prevented hippocampal neurons number loss in diabetic rats. Conclusion: The results indicate that oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and reduction of hippocampal neurons may be involved in learning and memory impairments in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, antihypoinsulinemic, and neuroprotective activities of crocin might be involved in improving learning and memory impairments.

  11. Mechanism by Sambucus nigra Extract Improves Bone Mineral Density in Experimental Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentiu Badescu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of polyphenols extracted from Sambucus nigra fruit were studied in streptozotocin- (STZ- induced hyperglycemic rats to evaluate its possible antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiglycosylation activity, and antiosteoporosis effects in diabetes. DEXA bone mineral density tests were performed in order to determine bone mineral density (BMD, bone mineral content (BMC, and fat (%Fat in control and diabetic animals, before and after polyphenol delivery. As compared to the normoglycemic group, the rats treated with STZ (60 mg/kg body weight revealed a significant malondialdehyde (MDA increase, as an index of the lipid peroxidation level, by 69%, while the total antioxidant activity (TAS dropped by 36%, with a consistently significant decrease (<0.05 in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX. Also, the treatment of rats with STZ revealed a significant increase of IL-6, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, and osteopenia detected by DEXA bone mineral density tests. The recorded results highlight a significant improvement (<0.001 in the antioxidative capacity of the serum in diabetic rats treated with natural polyphenols, bringing back to normal the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH, as well as an important decrease in the serum concentration of MDA, with improved osteoporosis status. Knowing the effects of polyphenols could lead to the use of the polyphenolic extract of Sambucus nigra as a dietary supplement in diabetic osteoporosis.

  12. Task oriented training improves the balance outcome & reducing fall risk in diabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Javeria; Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Amjad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the balance impairments and to compare task oriented versus traditional balance training in fall reduction among diabetic patients. The randomized control trial with descriptive survey and 196 diabetic patients were recruited to assess balance impairments through purposive sampling technique. Eighteen patients were randomly allocated into two groups; task oriented balance training group TOB (n=8) and traditional balance training group TBT (n=10). The inclusion criteria were 30-50 years age bracket and diagnosed cases of Diabetes Mellitus with neuropathy. The demographics were taken through standardized & valid assessment tools include Berg Balance Scale and Functional Reach Test. The measurements were obtained at baseline, after 04 and 08 weeks of training. The mean age of the participants was 49 ±6.79. The result shows that 165(84%) were at moderate risk of fall and 31(15%) were at mild risk of fall among total 196 diabetic patients. There was significant improvement (p balance training group for dynamic balance, anticipatory balance and reactive balance after 8 weeks of training as compare to traditional balance training. Task oriented balance training is effective in improving the dynamic, anticipator and reactive balance. The task oriented training reduces the risk of falling through enhancing balance outcome.

  13. Capabilities of gravitational surgery for improvement of treatment results in patients with diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Akhmedov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Improvement of complex treatment results in patients with diabetic foot syndrome by introducing methods of gravitational surgery and α-lipoic acid. Methods. The results of treatment were analyzed for 558 patients with diabetic foot syndrome treated in Scientific Centre of Surgery named after M.A. Topchubashov (Baku, Azerbaijan from 1988 to 2015. The age varied from 28 to 83 years. The patients included 416 men and 142 women. The control group included 90 patients who at the perioperative period underwent basic therapy including antibiotics, anticoagulants, antiaggregants, dextrans, angioprotectors, spasmolytics, corticosteroids, narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics. The study group included 468 patients, along with traditional therapy receiving efferent methods (plasmapheresis, ultraviolet blood irradiation, ozone therapy and α-lipoic acid. 282 patients of the study group received outpatient treatment and 186 - complex inpatient surgical treatment. A comparative evaluation of the results was performed separately in three groups: angiopathy, neuropathy, angioneuropathy. The results were evaluated by clinical and instrumental examinations before and after treatment (6, 12, 60 months and more. Results. In the study group a satisfactory result of treatment was registered in 85.5% of patients, in the control group - in 62.2%, unsatisfactory in 14.5 and 37.8% of patients, respectively (p=0.046. Conclusion. The use of efferent methods and α-lipoic acid provided prompt elimination of numerous pathogenetic disorders observed in diabetes mellitus, decrease of amputation frequency and improvement of complex surgical treatment results in patients with diabetic foot syndrome.

  14. Pediatric Diabetes Telemedicine Program Improves Access to Care for Rural Families: Role of APRNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nancy Marie; Satyshur, Rosemarie DiMauro

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus has increased in children by 23% from 2001 to 2009. Rural communities additionally have increased disparities related to access barriers and a large minority population with poorer overall health. Research evidence supports telemedicine as an effective alternative to bring preventive diabetes care to remote areas. This article presents an overview of the leadership role of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) with the implementation and evaluation of a pediatric diabetes telemedicine program at a rural pediatric outpatient specialty clinic in partnership with a tertiary center telemedicine network. The telemedicine program quality improvement (QI) project explored caregiver satisfaction with a convenience sample of caregivers (N = 14) using a nine-item Telemedicine Diabetes Caregiver Satisfaction Survey (TDCSS), with responses ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. Findings indicate caregivers were highly satisfied with communication/ privacy (M = 4.8), access to care (M = 4.1), and quality of services (M = 5.0). The multidisciplinary collaborative teamwork, continuous QI, and dependable technology were integral to the quality of the telemedicine clinical initiative. APRNs provided technology expertise, interdisciplinary collaboration leadership, care coordination, and advocacy for policy changes. Results demonstrate that telemedicine and APRN leadership can help implement innovative programs into rural communities to improve access to care, healthcare cost, and outcomes.

  15. Vildagliptin/pioglitazone combination improved the overall glycemic control in type I diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Amir Mohamed; Abdelaziz, Rania Ramadan; Salem, Hatem Abdelrahman Ali

    2018-03-06

    Type I diabetes (TID) is generally assumed to be caused by an immune associated, if not directly immune-mediated, destruction of pancreatic β-cells. In patients with long-term diabetes, the pancreas lacks insulin-producing cells and the residual β-cells are unable to regenerate. Patients with TID are subjected to a lifelong insulin therapy which shows risks of hypoglycemia, suboptimal control and ketosis. In this study, we investigated the potential role of vildagliptin (Vilda) alone or in combination with pioglitazone (Pio), as treatment regimens for TID using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced TID model in rats. Daily oral administration of Vilda (5 mg/kg) alone or in combination with Pio (20 mg/kg) for 7 weeks significantly reduced blood glucose levels and HbA 1c . It increased serum insulin levels and decreased serum glucagon. It also showed a strong antioxidant activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a marked improvement in β-cells in treated groups when compared with the diabetic group, which appeared in the normal cellular and architecture restoration of β-cells in the islets of Langerhans. Vilda alone or in combination with Pio has the ability to improve the overall glycemic control in type I diabetic rats and may be considered a hopeful and effective remedy for TID.

  16. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  17. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  18. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04. The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75.Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone.

  19. Do quality improvement initiatives for diabetes care address social inequities? Secondary analysis of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jacquie Boyang; Danko, Kristin J; Elfassy, Michael D; Welch, Vivian; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Ivers, Noah M

    2018-02-14

    Socially disadvantaged populations carry a disproportionate burden of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. There is an emerging interest in quality improvement (QI) strategies in the care of patients with diabetes, however, the effect of these interventions on disadvantaged groups remains unclear. This is a secondary analysis of a systematic review that seeks to examine the extent of equity considerations in diabetes QI studies, specifically quantifying the proportion of studies that target interventions toward disadvantaged populations and conduct analyses on the impact of interventions on disadvantaged groups. Studies were identified using Medline, HealthStar and the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care database. Randomised controlled trials assessing 12 QI strategies targeting health systems, healthcare professionals and/or patients for the management of adult outpatients with diabetes were eligible. The place of residence, race/ethnicity/culture/language, occupational status, gender/sexual identity, religious affiliations, education level, socioeconomic status, social capital, plus age, disability, sexual preferences and relationships (PROGRESS-Plus) framework was used to identify trials that focused on disadvantaged patient populations, to examine the types of equity-relevant factors that are being considered and to explore temporal trends in equity-relevant diabetes QI trials. Of the 278 trials that met the inclusion criteria, 95 trials had equity-relevant considerations. These include 64 targeted trials that focused on a disadvantaged population with the aim to improve the health status of that population and 31 general trials that undertook subgroup analyses to assess the extent to which their interventions may have had differential impacts on disadvantaged subgroups. Trials predominantly focused on race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status and place of residence as potential factors for disadvantage in patients receiving diabetes care. Less

  20. Definition, epidemiology and registries of pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awdish, R; Cajigas, H

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a subcategory of pulmonary hypertension (PH) that comprises a group of disorders with similar pulmonary vascular pathology. Though PH is common, the estimated incidence of IPAH is 1-3 cases per million, making it a rare disease. The hemodynamic definition of PAH is a mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest >OR = 25 mm Hg in the presence of a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure registries. These registries have been indispensable in the characterization and mapping of the natural history of the disease. Equations and risk calculators derived from registries have given clinicians a basis for risk stratification and prognostication. The sequential accumulation of data since the registries began in the 1980s allows for comparisons to be made. Patients who are differentiated by treatment eras and environments can be contrasted. Variability among inclusion criteria similarly allows for comparisons of these subpopulations. This article provides an overview of available registries, highlights insights provided by each and discusses key issues around the interpretation and extrapolation of data from PAH registries. Registries have allowed us to appreciate the improvement in survival afforded by modern therapy and enhanced detection of this disease. Moving forward, a more global approach to registries is needed, as is enhanced collaboration and centralization.

  1. Occupational Disease Registries-Characteristics and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Somayeh; Haghighi, Khosro Sadeghniat; Kalhori, Sharareh Rostam Niakan; Hosseini, Narges Shams; Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Safdari, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Due to growth of occupational diseases and also increase of public awareness about their consequences, attention to various aspects of diseases and improve occupational health and safety has found great importance. Therefore, there is the need for appropriate information management tools such as registries in order to recognitions of diseases patterns and then making decision about prevention, early detection and treatment of them. These registries have different characteristics in various countries according to their occupational health priorities. Aim of this study is evaluate dimensions of occupational diseases registries including objectives, data sources, responsible institutions, minimum data set, classification systems and process of registration in different countries. In this study, the papers were searched using the MEDLINE (PubMed) Google scholar, Scopus, ProQuest and Google. The search was done based on keyword in English for all motor engines including "occupational disease", "work related disease", "surveillance", "reporting", "registration system" and "registry" combined with name of the countries including all subheadings. After categorizing search findings in tables, results were compared with each other. Important aspects of the registries studied in ten countries including Finland, France, United Kingdom, Australia, Czech Republic, Malaysia, United States, Singapore, Russia and Turkey. The results show that surveyed countries have statistical, treatment and prevention objectives. Data sources in almost the rest of registries were physicians and employers. The minimum data sets in most of them consist of information about patient, disease, occupation and employer. Some of countries have special occupational related classification systems for themselves and some of them apply international classification systems such as ICD-10. Finally, the process of registration system was different in countries. Because occupational diseases are often

  2. Comprehensive yogic breathing program improves quality of life in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of a comprehensive yogic breathing program on glycemic control and quality of life (QOL in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Patients having HbA1c between 6 and 9% for at least 3 months with lifestyle modification and oral antidiabetic medication were included. They were followed-up and randomized at 6 months into two groups: one group receiving standard treatment of diabetes and the other group receiving standard treatment of diabetes and taught and told to regularly practice the comprehensive yogic breathing program (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga and Pranayam. Change in fasting and post-prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin and QOL as assessed by the World Health Organization QOL WHOQOL BREF questionnaire were assessed. Results: There was a trend toward improvement in glycemic control in the group practicing the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared with the group following standard treatment alone, although this was not significant. There was significant improvement in physical, psychological and social domains and total QOL post-intervention in the group practicing the comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared with the group following standard treatment alone. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in the QOL and a non-significant trend toward improvement in glycemic control in the group practicing the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared with the group that was following standard treatment alone.

  3. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  4. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...

  5. Long-term effectiveness of a quality improvement program for patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renders, C.M.; Valk, G.D.; Franse, L.V.; Schellevis, F.; Eijk, J.T.M. van; Wal, G. van der

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— To assess the long-term effectiveness of a quality improvement program on care provided and patient outcomes in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— A nonrandomized trial was performed with 312 patients with type 2 diabetes in the intervention group and 77 patients with

  6. Pharmacist-Led Self-management Interventions to Improve Diabetes Outcomes. A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eikenhorst, Linda; Taxis, Katja; van Dijk, Liset; de Gier, Han

    2017-01-01

    Background: Treatment of diabetes requires a strict treatment scheme which demands patient self-management. Pharmacists are in a good position to provide self-management support. This review examines whether pharmacist-led interventions to support self-management in diabetes patients improve

  7. A systematic review of interventions to improve outcomes for young adults with Type 1 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hara, M C

    2016-10-20

    Many young adults with Type 1 diabetes experience poor outcomes. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving clinical, behavioural or psychosocial outcomes for young adults with Type 1 diabetes.

  8. Pharmacist-led self-management interventions to improve diabetes outcomes. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikenhorst, L. van; Dijk, L. van; Taxis, K; Gier, H. de

    2017-01-01

    Background Treatment of diabetes requires a strict treatment scheme which demands patient self-management. Pharmacists are in a good position to provide self-management support. This review examines whether pharmacist-led interventions to support self-management in diabetes patients improve clinical

  9. Impacts of chronic kidney disease and albuminuria on associations between coronary heart disease and its traditional risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients – the Hong Kong diabetes registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockram Clive S

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, blood pressure and body mass index (BMI are risk factors for albuminuria, the latter in turn can lead to hyperlipidaemia. We used novel statistical analyses to examine how albuminuria and chronic kidney disease (CKD may influence the effects of other risk factors on coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods A prospective cohort of 7067 Chinese type 2 diabetic patients without history of CHD enrolled since 1995 were censored on July 30th, 2005. Cox proportional hazard regression with restricted cubic spline was used to auto-select predictors. Hazard ratio plots were used to examine the risk of CHD. Based on these plots, non-linear risk factors were categorised and the categorised variables were refitted into various Cox models in a stepwise manner to confirm the findings. Results Age, male gender, duration of diabetes, spot urinary albumin: creatinine ratio, estimated glomerular filtration rate, total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and current smoking status were risk factors of CHD. Linear association between TC and CHD was observed only in patients with albuminuria. Although in general, increased HDL-C was associated with decreased risk of CHD, full-range HDL-C was associated with CHD in an A-shaped manner with a zenith at 1.1 mmol/L. Albuminuria and CKD were the main contributors for the paradoxically positive association between HDL-C and CHD for HDL-C values less than 1.1 mmol/L. Conclusion In type 2 diabetes, albuminuria plays a linking role between conventional risk factors and CHD. The onset of CKD changes risk associations between lipids and CHD.

  10. Nigella sativa improves glycemic control and ameliorates oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: placebo controlled participant blinded clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Kaatabi

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Our previous study has shown glucose lowering effect produced by 3 months supplementation of Nigella sativa (NS in combination with oral hypoglycemic drugs among type 2 diabetics. This study explored the long term glucose lowering effect (over one year of NS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on oral hypoglycemic drugs and to study its effect on redox status of such patients.114 type 2 diabetic patients on standard oral hypoglycemic drugs were assigned into 2 groups by convenience. The control group (n = 57 received activated charcoal as placebo and NS group (n = 57 received 2g NS, daily, for one year in addition to their standard medications. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, C- peptide, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS at the baseline, and every 3 months thereafter were determined. Insulin resistance and β-cell activity were calculated using HOMA 2 calculator.Comparison between the two groups showed a significant drop in FBG (from 180 ± 5.75 to 180 ± 5.59 in control Vs from 195 ± 6.57 to 172 ± 5.83 in NS group, HbA1c (from 8.2 ± 0.12 to 8.5 ± 0.14 in control VS from 8.6 ± 0.13 to 8.2 ± 0.14 in NS group, and TBARS (from 48.3 ± 6.89 to 52.9 ± 5.82 in control VS from 54.1 ± 4.64 to 41.9 ± 3.16 in NS group, in addition to a significant elevation in TAC, SOD and glutathione in NS patients compared to controls. In NS group, insulin resistance was significantly lower, while β-cell activity was significantly higher than the baseline values during the whole treatment period.Long term supplementation with Nigella sativa improves glucose homeostasis and enhances antioxidant defense system in type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs.Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI CTRI/2013/06/003781.

  11. The Western Denmark Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Morten; Maeng, Michael; Madsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    The WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry) is a seminational, multicenter-based registry with longitudinal registration of detailed patient and procedure data since 1999. The registry includes as of January 1, 2017 approximately 240,000 coronary angiographies, 90,000 percutaneous coronary interven......The WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry) is a seminational, multicenter-based registry with longitudinal registration of detailed patient and procedure data since 1999. The registry includes as of January 1, 2017 approximately 240,000 coronary angiographies, 90,000 percutaneous coronary...

  12. Xylitol improves pancreatic islets morphology to ameliorate type 2 diabetes in rats: a dose response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Atiar; Islam, Md Shahdiul

    2014-07-01

    Xylitol has been reported as a potential antidiabetic sweetener in a number of recent studies; however, the most effective dietary dose and organ-specific effects are still unclear. Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (DBC), diabetic xylitol 2.5% (DXL2.5), diabetic xylitol 5.0% (DXL5), and diabetic xylitol 10.0% (DXL10). Diabetes was induced only in the animals in DBC and DXL groups and considered diabetic when their nonfasting blood glucose level was >300 mg/dL. The DXL groups were fed with 2.5%, 5.0%, and 10% xylitol solution, whereas the NC and DBC groups were supplied with normal drinking water. After 4-wk intervention, body weight, food and fluid intake, blood glucose, serum fructosamine, liver glycogen, serum alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, uric acid, creatinine, and most serum lipids were significantly decreased, and serum insulin concentration, glucose tolerance ability, and pancreatic islets morphology were significantly improved in the DXL10 group compared to the DBC group. The data of this study suggest that 10% xylitol has the better antidiabetic effects compared to 2.5% and 5.0% and it can be used as an excellent antidiabetic sweetener and food supplement in antidiabetic foods. Xylitol is widely used as a potential anticariogenic and sweetening agent in a number of oral care and food products when many of its health benefits are still unknown. Due to its similar sweetening power but lower calorific value (2.5 compared with 4 kcal) and lower glycemic index (13 compared with 65) compared to sucrose, recently it has been widely used as a sugar substitute particularly by overweight, obese, and diabetic patients in order to reduce their calorie intake from sucrose. However, the potential antidiabetic effects of xylitol have been discovered recently. The results of this study confirmed the effective dietary dose of xylitol for

  13. A tale of two audits: statistical process control for improving diabetes care in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussein, Fahad Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes constitutes a major burden of disease globally. Both primary and secondary prevention need to improve in order to face this challenge. Improving management of diabetes in primary care is therefore of fundamental importance. The objective of these series of audits was to find means of improving diabetes management in chronic disease mini-clinics in primary health care. In the process, we were able to study the effect and practical usefulness of different audit designs - those measuring clinical outcomes, process of care, or both. King Saud City Family and Community Medicine Centre, Saudi National Guard Health Affairs in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. Simple random samples of 30 files were selected every two weeks from a sampling frame of file numbers for all diabetes clients seen over the period. Information was transferred to a form, entered on the computer and an automated response was generated regarding the appropriateness of management, a criterion mutually agreed upon by care providers. The results were plotted on statistical process control charts, p charts, displayed for all employees. Data extraction, archiving, entry, analysis, plotting and design and preparation of p charts were managed by nursing staff specially trained for the purpose by physicians with relevant previous experience. Audit series with mixed outcome and process measures failed to detect any changes in the proportion of non-conforming cases over a period of one year. The process measures series, on the other hand, showed improvement in care corresponding to a reduction in the proportion non-conforming by 10% within a period of 3 months. Non-conformities dropped from a mean of 5.0 to 1.4 over the year (P process audits and feedbacks. Frequent process audits in the context of statistical process control should be supplemented with concurrent outcome audits, once or twice a year.

  14. Linagliptin increases incretin levels, lowers glucagon, and improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, Thomas; Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2012-01-01

    Linagliptin is a xanthine-based dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor that is now available in numerous countries worldwide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study was to evaluate further the mechanisms underlying the improvements in glycemic control observed...... with linagliptin. The effects of linagliptin on DPP-4, pharmacodynamic parameters, and glycemic control versus placebo were assessed in patients with inadequately controlled T2DM....

  15. A potential synbiotic product improves the lipid profile of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselino Mariana N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that intake of yacon or some lactic acid bacteria was able to inhibit the development of diabetes mellitus, by reducing glucose and associated symptoms, for example, the lipid profile. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the consumption influence of a potential symbiotic product of soybean and yacon extract and fermented Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Lactobacillus helveticus ssp jugurti 416 in reducing blood glucose and lipid levels in an animal model. Methods Diabetes mellitus was chemically induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight. The rats were divided into four groups (n=10: GI – non-diabetic animals that received only a standard chow diet (negative control, GII – diabetic animals that received only chow diet (positive control, GIII – diabetic animals that received the chow diet + 1 mL/kg body weight/day of soybean and yacon unfermented product, GIV – diabetic rats that received the chow diet + 1 mL/kg body weight/day of soybean and yacon fermented product. There was a seven-week treatment period and the following parameters were evaluated: animal body weight, food and water intake, blood glucose, enzyme activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT, triglycerides levels, total cholesterol, HDL-C, non-HDL-C. Cell viability of the fermented product was checked weekly for a seven-week period. Results The product average viable population was 108-109 CFU/mL, by ensuring both the rods and cocci regular intake. No difference was observed between the water and feed intake and body weight of groups that received unfermented and fermented products and the untreated diabetic group. The same was observed for the blood glucose and AST and ALT activities, while some improvement was observed for a lipid profile, represented by reduction of triglycerides level by 15.07% and 33.50% in groups III and IV

  16. A web-based, patient driven registry for Angelman syndrome: the global Angelman syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Kathryn R; Tones, Megan; Simons, Chloe; Heussler, Helen; Hunter, Adam A; Cross, Meagan; Bellgard, Matthew I

    2017-08-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterised by severe global developmental delays, ataxia, loss of speech, epilepsy, sleep disorders, and a happy disposition. There is currently no cure for AS, though several pharmaceutical companies are anticipating drug trials for new therapies to treat AS. The Foundation for Angelman Therapeutics (FAST) Australia therefore identified a need for a global AS patient registry to identify patients for recruitment for clinical trials.The Global AS Registry was deployed in September 2016 utilising the Rare Disease Registry Framework, an open-source tool that enables the efficient creation and management of patient registries. The Global AS Registry is web-based and allows parents and guardians worldwide to register, provide informed consent, and enter data on individuals with AS. 286 patients have registered in the first 8 months since deployment.We demonstrate the successful deployment of the first patient-driven global registry for AS. The data generated from the Global AS Registry will be crucial in identifying patients suitable for clinical trials and in informing research that will identify treatments for AS, and ultimately improve the lives of individuals and their families living with AS.

  17. Acarbose improved severe postprandial hypotension in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, E; Goda, K; Nagata, K; Kitaoka, H; Ohsawa, N; Hanafusa, T

    2001-01-01

    Postprandial hypotension (PPH) is defined as a decrease of systolic blood pressure by more than 20 mmHg after meals. Severe PPH is a troublesome diabetic complication, which has no established means of treatment. We encountered a patient who had diabetes mellitus complicated by severe PPH and attempted to treat this problem using several medications (octreotide, midodrine hydrochloride, and acarbose). A 58-year-old male with diabetic triopathy complained of orthostatic dizziness and vertigo after meals. The blood pressure was monitored for 24 h with an ambulatory blood pressure monitor, revealing that the systolic blood pressure decreased markedly after breakfast and dinner by 45 and 50 mmHg, respectively. PPH was not improved by a subcutaneous injection of octreotide. Administration of midodrine hydrochloride reduced the frequency of hypotensive episodes from twice to once daily, but the magnitude of the postprandial fall in blood pressure was still around 30 mmHg. After the patient started to receive acarbose therapy, the postprandial fall in blood pressure was diminished to 18 mmHg and his symptoms largely disappeared. For the treatment of PPH in diabetic patients, our experience suggests that it may be appropriate to try first on alpha-glucosidase inhibitor like acarbose.

  18. [Opportunities to improve hospital emergency care of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Díaz, Francisco José; Amillo, Mónica; Rosales, María; Panadero, Ana; Ena, Javier

    2015-02-01

    To identify opportunities to improve the care of adult patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in the emergency room. Retrospective observational study of records for 2010 to 2013. Searching for International Classification of Diseases discharge codes 250.1–250.3 we identified patients who met the following 3 criteria: ketonuria of 100 mg/dL or more, diagnosed diabetes or glucose concentration of 250 mg/dL or more, and venous blood pH below 7.30 (or venous bicarbonate concentration less than 18 mEq/L). We reviewed the cases to extract patient and clinical characteristics and time from triage until diagnosis and start of treatment. The findings were compared with recommendations in clinical practice guidelines. We identified 49 episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (4 mild, 32 moderate, and 13 severe) in 43 patients. The median delay between triage until the first blood test results were available was 142 minutes (range, 59-597 minutes). In 50% of the cases fluid therapy was delayed beyond the time recommended in clinical practice guidelines. Intravenous insulin was also delayed (in 66%) and insuficient intravenous potassium was given in 65%. Sodium bicarbonate was overused (in 50%). Half the patients developed hypokalemia in the hospital. Diagnosis and initiation of treatment were often delayed for patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in our emergency department.

  19. Grapefruit Derived Flavonoid Naringin Improves Ketoacidosis and Lipid Peroxidation in Type 1 Diabetes Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Murunga

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemic effects of grapefruit juice are well known but the effects of naringin, its main flavonoid on glucose intolerance and metabolic complications in type 1 diabetes are not known.To investigate the effects of naringin on glucose intolerance, oxidative stress and ketonemia in type 1 diabetic rats.Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 5 groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily with 3.0 ml/kg body weight (BW/day of distilled water (group 1 or 50 mg/kg BW of naringin (groups 2 and 4, respectively. Groups 3, 4 and 5 were given a single intra-peritoneal injection of 60 mg/kg BW of streptozotocin to induce diabetes. Group 3 was further treated with subcutaneous insulin (4.0 IU/kg BW twice daily, respectively.Stretozotocin (STZ only-treated groups exhibited hyperglycemia, polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss, glucose intolerance, low fasting plasma insulin and reduced hepatic glycogen content compared to the control group. Furthermore they had significantly elevated Malondialdehyde (MDA, acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, anion gap and significantly reduced blood pH and plasma bicarbonate compared to the control group. Naringin treatment significantly improved Fasting Plasma Insulin (FPI, hepatic glycogen content, malondialdehyde, β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, bicarbonate, blood pH and anion gap but not Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG compared to the STZ only-treated group.Naringin is not hypoglycemic but ameliorates ketoacidosis and oxidative stress. Naringin supplements could therefore mitigate complications of diabetic ketoacidosis.

  20. A Registry Framework Enabling Patient-Centred Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Napier, Kathryn; Render, Lee; Radochonski, Maciej; Lamont, Leanne; Graham, Caroline; Wilton, Steve D; Fletcher, Sue; Goldblatt, Jack; Hunter, Adam A; Weeramanthri, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decisions rely on expert knowledge that draws on quality patient phenotypic and physiological data. In this regard, systems that can support patient-centric care are essential. Patient registries are a key component of patient-centre care and can come in many forms such as disease-specific, recruitment, clinical, contact, post market and surveillance. There are, however, a number of significant challenges to overcome in order to maximise the utility of these information management systems to facilitate improved patient-centred care. Registries need to be harmonised regionally, nationally and internationally. However, the majority are implemented as standalone systems without consideration for data standards or system interoperability. Hence the task of harmonisation can become daunting. Fortunately, there are strategies to address this. In this paper, a disease registry framework is outlined that enables efficient deployment of national and international registries that can be modified dynamically as registry requirements evolve. This framework provides a basis for the development and implementation of data standards and enables patients to seamlessly belong to multiple registries. Other significant advances include the ability for registry curators to create and manage registries themselves without the need to contract software developers, and the concept of a registry description language for ease of registry template sharing.

  1. Current situation and challenge of registry in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Feng, Yuji; Qu, Zhi; Qi, Yali; Zhan, Siyan

    2014-09-01

    Increasing emphasis has been placed on registries for an organized system used in developing clinical research to improve health care. China has sufficient data that can be applied broadly, but the heterogeneity and irregularity of registries limit their applicability. This article aims to describe the status of registries in China and the related challenges. Patient registries for observational studies were retrieved from the International Clinical Trials Registry to quantitatively evaluate the number of comparatively high-quality registries in China. A literature search was also performed to provide support and updates. A total of 64 patient registries were retrieved from ClinicalTrials.gov using disease, product, and health service as criteria. The sample sizes ranged from 15 to 30,400, with only 12 registries marked as completed. This article describes and compares the detailed information in many aspects. The efficient use of registries has already made considerable progress in China; however, registries still require standardization, high-quality transition, and coordinated development.

  2. Evaluation of a program to improve diabetes care through intensified care management activities and diabetes medication copayment reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Stephen J; Johnson, Scott; Higgins, Tara; Quilliam, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Medication copayment reduction can be integrated with disease management programs to incentivize patient engagement in chronic care management. While disease management programs in diabetes have been evaluated across a range of settings and designs, less is known regarding the effectiveness of copayment reduction as a component of disease management. To evaluate the short-term results of a diabetes-focused disease management program that included copayment reduction, care coordination, and patient goal setting, focusing on rates of evidence-based care processes and all-cause pharmacy and health care costs. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island offered large employer groups the opportunity to participate in a diabetes disease management initiative that featured reduced copayments (from $7/$25/$40 for generic, tier 2, and tier 3 drugs, respectively, to $0 for generic and $0-$2 for brand drugs) for diabetes-related medications. In return for the copayment reduction, participants agreed to the following: (a) participate in care coordination with a case manager, (b) have an annual physical examination, (c) have a hemoglobin A1c blood test at least twice annually, and (d) have a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) test at least once annually. Patients received personalized support provided by a registered nurse and dietician, disease-related education provided by nurses, and intensified case management services, including working with a health coach to establish healthy behavioral change goals. All study subjects were aged 18 years or older and had at least 1 ICD-9-CM code for diabetes and at least 1 claim for an antidiabetic drug during a 12-month measurement period, which was each subject's most recent 12-month period of continuous enrollment from January 1, 2008, through May 31, 2010. Administrative claims data were used to determine the percentage of intervention (participating) and nonintervention (nonparticipating) subjects from among all of the plan

  3. A review of randomized controlled trials of medical record powered clinical decision support system to improve quality of diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Mustafa; Giordano, Richard; Lakhani, Saima; Walker, Dawn Marie

    2016-03-01

    A gap between current diabetes care practice and recommended diabetes care standards has consistently been reported in the literature. Many IT-based interventions have been developed to improve adherence to the quality of care standards for chronic illness like diabetes. The widespread implementation of electronic medical/health records has catalyzed clinical decision support systems (CDSS) which may improve the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, the objective of the review is to evaluate the effectiveness of CDSS in improving quality of type II diabetes care. Moreover, the review aims to highlight the key indicators of quality improvement to assist policy makers in development of future diabetes care policies through the integration of information technology and system. Setting inclusion criteria, a systematic literature search was conducted using Medline, Web of Science and Science Direct. Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tools were used to evaluate the quality of studies. Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected for the review. In the selected studies, seventeen clinical markers of diabetes care were discussed. Three quality of care indicators were given more importance in monitoring the progress of diabetes care, which is consistent with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. The presence of these indicators in the studies helped to determine which studies were selected for review. Clinical- and process-related improvements are compared between intervention group using CDSS and control group with usual care. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), low density lipid cholesterol (LDL-C) and blood pressure (BP) were the quality of care indicators studied at the levels of process of care and clinical outcome. The review has found both inconsistent and variable results for quality of diabetes care measures. A significant improvement has been found in the process of care for all three measures of quality of diabetes care

  4. Cancer Registry Data

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-24

    Dr. Loria Pollack, a Senior Medical Epidemiologist, talks about the importance of cancer registry data to understanding how cancer affects the United States–now and in the future.  Created: 5/24/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/24/2017.

  5. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Lund, Bent; Nielsen, Torsten Grønbech

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Predictors of outcome after femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) surgery are not well-documented. This study presents data from the Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) for such analyses. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of poor outcome after FAI surgery in a Danish FAI...

  6. The Danish Twin Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytthe, Axel; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Vilstrup Holm, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Twin Registry is a unique source for studies of genetic, familial and environmental factors on life events, health conditions and diseases. Content: More than 85,000 twin pairs born 1870-2008 in Denmark. Validity and coverage: Four main ascertainment methods have been emp...

  7. EFFECT OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION (PNF IN IMPROVING SENSORIMOTOR FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC NEUROPATHY AFFECTING LOWER LIMBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaljeet Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic Mellitus is a group of metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycaemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Distal Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes which mainly affects the lower limbs. Most of the studies aimed at individually increasing muscle strength or sensation but not on overall performance enhancements of the diabetic lower limbs. The evidence supporting the effectiveness of PNF in diabetic neuropathic patients is scarce. Methods: 30 patients, with age between 50 to 70 years, diagnosed with Diabetic Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy (DSP were selected from the department of Medicine and department of Neurosurgery Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital. Patients were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the intervention using Diabetic Neuropathy Examination scores. Patients received 3 sets of exercises one hour/day with 3 days/week for 3 months. Each set of exercises consists of 5 repetitions of PNF patterns (alternate day and techniques. Results: D1 & D2 patterns of PNF are effective in improving both motor and sensory functions of diabetic patients with neuropathic symptoms. Improvement in muscle strength, reflex and sensations occurred to a greater extent after the treatment of three months in these subjects. This study shows that PNF patterns were effective at enhancing sensorimotor problems of lower limbs. Conclusion: This study concluded that PNF is found to be effective in improving sensorimotor functions of diabetic neuropathic patients affecting lower limbs.

  8. Seeing Is Believing: Using Skype to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael A; Freeman, Kurt A; Duke, Danny C

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of two modes of delivering Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) to improve adherence and glycemic control among adolescents with type 1 diabetes with suboptimal glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≥9.0% [≥74.9 mmol/mol]): face to face in clinic (Clinic) and Internet videoconferencing (Skype) conditions. Adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and at least one adult caregiver were randomized to receive BFST-D via the Clinic or Skype condition. Participants completed up to 10 therapy sessions within a 12-week period. Changes in youth- and parent-reported adherence and glycemic control were compared before and after the intervention and at follow-up assessment. Using an intent-to-treat analytic approach, no significant between-group differences were identified between the before, after, and follow-up assessments. Groups were collapsed to examine the overall effects of BFST-D on adherence and glycemic control. Results identified that statistically significant improvements in adherence and glycemic control occurred from before to after the intervention; improvements were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Delivery of BFST-D via Internet-based videoconferencing is viable for addressing nonadherence and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, potentially reducing important barriers to care for youth and families. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  9. Eicosapentaenoic acid improves glycemic control in elderly bedridden patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Susumu; Abe, Takaaki; Nako, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Masashi; Senda, Miho; Sakamoto, Takuya; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids mainly contained in the blue-backed fish oil, and are effective in decreasing the lipids disorder and the cardiovascular incidence among diabetic patients. Moreover, it has been suggested that EPA and DHA may improve the insulin resistance and glucose metabolism. However, the clinical effects of EPA and DHA on glucose metabolism remain unclear. We aimed to clarify the effects of EPA/DHA treatment on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study was a multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial involving 30 elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. Their exercises were almost zero and the content of their meals was strictly managed and understood well. Therefore, the difference by the individual's life was a minimum. The subjects were divided into two groups: those receiving EPA/DHA-rich liquid diet [EPA/DHA (+)] or liquid diet lacking EPA/DHA [EPA/DHA (-)]. Changes in factors related to glucose and lipid metabolism were assessed after the three-month study. Serum concentrations of EPA rose in EPA/DHA (+), although the levels of DHA and fasting C-peptide remained unchanged in EPA/DHA (+). In addition, there was a significant decline in the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting remnant-like particles and apolipoprotein (apo) B in EPA/DHA (+), compared with the values in EPA/DHA (-). EPA/DHA-rich diet might improve glucose metabolism in elderly type 2 diabetic patients on a liquid diet. This phenomenon may be due to the improved insulin resistance mediated by the rise in serum EPA concentrations.

  10. Metabolic Correction in the Management of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improving Clinical Results Beyond Symptom Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Massari, Jorge R.; Gonzalez, Michael J.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Allende-Vigo, Myriam Z.; Duconge, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Current Clinical Management Guidelines of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) are based on adequate glucose control and symptomatic pain relief. However, meticulous glycemic control could delay the onset or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy in patients with DM type 2, but it does not completely prevent the progression of the disease. Complications of DPN as it continues its natural course, produce increasing pain and discomfort, loss of sensation, ulcers, infections, amputations and even death. In addition to the increased suffering, disability and loss of productivity, there is a very significant economic impact related to the treatment of DPN and its complications. In USA alone, it has been estimated that there are more than 5,000,000 patients suffering from DPN and the total annual cost of treating the disease and its complications is over $10,000 million dollars. In order to be able to reduce complications of DPN, it is crucial to improve or correct the metabolic conditions that lead to the pathology present in this condition. Pathophysiologic mechanisms implicated in diabetic neuropathy include: increased polyol pathway with accumulation of sorbitol and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity, microvascular damage and hypoxia due to nitric oxide deficit and increased oxygen free radical activity. Moreover, there is a decrease in glutathione and increase in homocysteine. Clinical trials in the last two decades have demonstrated that the use of specific nutrients can correct some of these metabolic derangements, improving symptom control and providing further benefits such as improved sensorium, blood flow and nerve regeneration. We will discuss the evidence on lipoic acid, acetyi-L-carnitine, benfotiamine and the combination of active B vitamins L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin and piridoxal-6-phosphate. In addition, we discuss the role of metforrnin, an important drug in the management of diabetes, and the presence of specific polymorphic genes, in the risk

  11. Exercise improves glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Anne L; Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F; Frawley, Helena C

    2016-10-01

    Does exercise improve postprandial glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus? A systematic review of randomised trials. Pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. Exercise, performed more than once a week, sufficient to achieve an aerobic effect or changes in muscle metabolism. Postprandial blood glucose, fasting blood glucose, glycated haemoglobin, requirement for insulin, adverse events and adherence. This systematic review identified eight randomised, controlled trials involving 588 participants; seven trials (544 participants) had data that were suitable for meta-analysis. Five trials scored ≥ 6 on the PEDro scale, indicating a relatively low risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that exercise, as an adjunct to standard care, significantly improved postprandial glycaemic control (MD -0.33mmol/L, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.17) and lowered fasting blood glucose (MD -0.31 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.05) when compared with standard care alone, with no increase in adverse events. Effects of similar magnitude were found for aerobic and resistance exercise programs, if performed at a moderate intensity or greater, for 20 to 30minutes, three to four times per week. Meta-analysis did not show that exercise significantly reduced the requirement for insulin. All studies reported that complications or other adverse events were either similar or reduced with exercise. Aerobic or resistance exercise, performed at a moderate intensity at least three times per week, safely helps to control postprandial blood glucose levels and other measures of glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. PROSPERO CRD42015019106. [Harrison AL, Shields N, Taylor NF, Frawley HC (2016) Exercise improves glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 188-196]. Copyright © 2016 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  12. The EuroMyositis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilleker, James B; Vencovsky, Jiri; Wang, Guochun

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The EuroMyositis Registry facilitates collaboration across the idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) research community. This inaugural report examines pooled Registry data. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of IIM cases from 11 countries was performed. Associations between clinical subtyp...

  13. Diabetic retinopathy screening in New Zealand requires improvement: results from a multi-centre audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Edward; Coppell, Kirsten J; Morris, Ainsley; Sanderson, Gordon

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether diabetic retinal screening services and retinopathy referral centres in New Zealand meet the national guidelines for referral and assessment of screen detected moderate retinal and mild macular diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinal screening pathways and the data collected at four main centre retinal screening services were described and compared with recommendations in the national diabetes retinal screening guidelines. A retrospective audit of photoscreen detected moderate retinopathy (grade R3), and mild maculopathy (grades M2B and M3) during May to August 2008 was undertaken. Data collected by retinopathy referral centres were used to examine the follow-up of screen detected cases and to make comparisons with the national recommendations. All four screening services used the guidelines for grading, but the recommended dataset was incomplete. Not all recorded data were readily accessible. The retinal photos of 157 (2.4%) patients were graded as R3, M2B, M3 or a combination. The proportion of those screened with these grades varied across the four centres from 1.2% to 3.4%. Follow-up of the 157 screen positive patients did not always comply with guideline recommendations. Seventy five (48%) were referred for review by an ophthalmologist as recommended, 45 (60% of referred) were seen within the recommended six months. Nine patients (15% of the 60 with a documented assessment) were referred for or received laser treatment at 12-months follow-up. Quality diabetic retinal screening data systems and quality assurance programs are required to improve the monitoring and quality of retinal screening in New Zealand. © 2012 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2012 Public Health Association of Australia.

  14. Improving the Quality of Outpatient Diabetes Care Using an Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Joerg; Mueller, Angelika; Messinger, Diethelm; Parkin, Christopher G.; Amann-Zalan, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of information management system (IMS) use with individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who were treated in outpatient settings. Methods: In this 7-month, prospective, observational study, 965 adults with diabetes, mean (SD) baseline HbA1c 8.61(1.2)% (70.6[13.1] mmol/mol), were recruited from 132 outpatient care centers in Germany and Denmark. HbA1c was measured at baseline, month 4, and month 7. IMS reports were generated from uploaded self-monitored blood glucose data and therapy adjustments were documented at months 1 and 4. Hypoglycemic events were documented. Results: Mean (SD) HbA1c decreased from baseline in type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at month 4 (–0.61[1.03]% (–6.7[11.3] mmol/mol), n = 213; –0.88[1.22]% (–9.6[13.3] mmol/mol), n = 589, respectively) and month 7 (–0.64[1.02]% (–7.0[11.1] mmol/mol), n = 219; –0.93[1.27]% (–10.2[13.9] mmol/mol), n = 594, respectively), all P < .0001, with no increase in hypoglycemic events. Therapy was adjusted in 106(42.7)% type 1 and 349(52.4)% type 2 diabetes patients at months 1 and 105(42.3)% type 1 and 282(42.3)% type 2 diabetes patients at month 4. Physicians used IMS reports to make therapy adjustments in 90% of patients at month 1 and 86% of patients at month 4. Conclusions: Integration of the IMS into outpatient care facilitates significant improvements in glycemic control. PMID:26224760

  15. Clinical informatics to improve quality of care: a population-based system for patients with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Chaudhry

    2009-06-01

    Conclusions A clinical informatics system, used to deliver proactive, co-ordinated care to a population of patients with diabetes mellitus, can improve process and also quality outcome measures. Larger studies are needed to confirm these early findings.

  16. Deferoxamine improves coronary vascular responses to sympathetic stimulation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Naoya; Bengel, Frank M.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Drzezga, Alexander E.; Schwaiger, Markus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technischen Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schnell, Oliver; Rihl, Julian; Standl, Eberhard [Diabetes Research Center, Schwabing City Hospital, Munich (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Effects of oxygen-derived free radicals are suggested to be a potential pathogenic factor for endothelial dysfunction. In this study we sought to evaluate the effect of hydroxyl radicals on the human coronary vascular bed in type I diabetes mellitus using positron emission tomography (PET). Thirteen patients with type 1 diabetes underwent PET using nitrogen-13 ammonia at rest and during sympathetic stimulation with the cold pressor test (CPT). The rest-stress study protocol was repeated twice (on different days) using pre-stress infusion of either saline as placebo or deferoxamine, an iron chelator which inhibits generation of hydroxyl radicals. At rest, global MBF was higher in diabetics than in normal controls (78.1{+-}17.5 vs 63.2{+-}14.9 mg 100 g{sup -1} min{sup -1}, P<0.05) and myocardial vascular resistance (MVR) showed a trend towards lower values (patients, 1.28{+-}0.35; controls, 1.55{+-}0.32, P=NS). CPT increased MBF in all controls while 7/13 diabetics responded normally. CPT decreased MVR in 10/13 controls but in only 4/13 diabetics. There was no significant difference in the duration of diabetes, HbA1c, daily insulin dose, body mass index, or lipid profiles between patients with and patients without abnormal MBF or MVR responses. Pre-stress infusion of deferoxamine normalized MBF response in all six patients, and MVR response in six of the nine patients. Another group consisting of seven patients underwent a rest-rest protocol after infusion of deferoxamine and saline to investigate the effect of deferoxamine on resting MBF. Deferoxamine did not change the resting MBF (deferoxamine, 81{+-}17 ml 100 g{sup -1} min{sup -1}; saline, 75{+-}19 ml 100 g{sup -1} min{sup -1}, P=NS) or MVR (deferoxamine, 1.0{+-}0.5 mmHg ml{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1} min{sup -1}; saline, 1.2{+-}0.6 mmHg ml{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1} min{sup -1}, P=NS). In conclusion, inhibition of hydroxyl radical formation using deferoxamine significantly improved the responses of coronary

  17. Improving Diabetes-Related Parent-Adolescent Communication With Individualized Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dana K K; Ellis, Deborah A; Cano, Annmarie; Dekelbab, Bassem

    2017-11-01

    To pilot a brief individualized feedback intervention to improve the communication skills of parents with an adolescent with type 1 diabetes. Parent-adolescent dyads (N = 79) discussed a diabetes-related problem, while an interventionist rated the parent's communication skills to give feedback to the parents. Parents were then randomized to a brief feedback session to target person-centered communication skills or an educational session. Dyads discussed another diabetes care problem to assess for change in communication skills. Independent raters coded parent communication skills from video recordings to rate behaviors in the service of examining possible changes in communication skills. Dyads completed ratings of perceived closeness and empathy after each conversation. Controlling for overall positive communication at baseline, parents who received feedback showed more improvement in specific person-centered communication skills than parents in the control group. Adolescents in the feedback group reported greater increases in parental empathy and intimacy from pre- to postmanipulation than the control. The feedback intervention showed preliminary efficacy for increasing person-centered communication skills and perceived empathy and intimacy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Hydrogen sulfide improves diabetic wound healing in ob/ob mice via attenuating inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huichen; Lu, Shengxia; Chai, Jiachao; Zhang, Yuchao; Ma, Xiaoli; Chen, Jicui; Guan, Qingbo; Wan, Meiyan; Liu, Yuantao

    2017-09-01

    The proposed mechanisms of impaired wound healing in diabetes involve sustained inflammation, excess oxidative stress and compromised agiogenesis. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) has been reported to have multiple biological activities. We aim to investigate the role of H 2 S in impaired wound healing in ob/ob mice and explore the possible mechanisms involved. Full-thickness skin dorsal wounds were created on ob/ob mice and C57BL/6 mice. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) expression and H 2 S production were determined in granulation tissues of the wounds. Effects of NaHS on wound healing were evaluated. Inflammation and angiogenesis in granulation tissues of the wounds were examined. CSE expression, and H 2 S content were significantly reduced in granulation tissues of wounds in ob/ob mice compared with control mice. NaHS treatment significantly improved wound healing in ob/ob mice, which was associated with reduced neutrophil and macrophage infiltration, decreased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6. NaHS treatment decreased metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, whereas increased collagen deposition and vascular-like structures in granulation tissues of wounds in ob/ob mice. CSE down-regulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic impaired wound healing. Exogenous H 2 S could be a potential agent to improve diabetic impaired wound healing by attenuating inflammation and increasing angiogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A diabetic retinopathy detection method using an improved pillar K-means algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogula, Susmitha Valli; Divakar, Ch; Satyanarayana, Ch; Rao, Allam Appa

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a new approach for medical image segmentation. Exudates are a visible sign of diabetic retinopathy that is the major reason of vision loss in patients with diabetes. If the exudates extend into the macular area, blindness may occur. Automated detection of exudates will assist ophthalmologists in early diagnosis. This segmentation process includes a new mechanism for clustering the elements of high-resolution images in order to improve precision and reduce computation time. The system applies K-means clustering to the image segmentation after getting optimized by Pillar algorithm; pillars are constructed in such a way that they can withstand the pressure. Improved pillar algorithm can optimize the K-means clustering for image segmentation in aspects of precision and computation time. This evaluates the proposed approach for image segmentation by comparing with Kmeans and Fuzzy C-means in a medical image. Using this method, identification of dark spot in the retina becomes easier and the proposed algorithm is applied on diabetic retinal images of all stages to identify hard and soft exudates, where the existing pillar K-means is more appropriate for brain MRI images. This proposed system help the doctors to identify the problem in the early stage and can suggest a better drug for preventing further retinal damage.

  20. High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves HDL cholesterol in Type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, D D; Sathyapalan, T; Kilpatrick, E S; Beckett, S; Atkin, S L

    2010-11-01

    To examine the effects of chocolate on lipid profiles, weight and glycaemic control in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Twelve individuals with Type 2 diabetes on stable medication were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study. Subjects were randomized to 45 g chocolate with or without a high polyphenol content for 8 weeks and then crossed over after a 4-week washout period. Changes in weight, glycaemic control, lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured at the beginning and at the end of each intervention. HDL cholesterol increased significantly with high polyphenol chocolate (1.16 ± 0.08 vs. 1.26 ± 0.08 mmol/l, P = 0.05) with a decrease in the total cholesterol: HDL ratio (4.4 ± 0.4 vs. 4.1 ± 0.4 mmol/l, P = 0.04). No changes were seen with the low polyphenol chocolate in any parameters. Over the course of 16 weeks of daily chocolate consumption neither weight nor glycaemic control altered from baseline. High polyphenol chocolate is effective in improving the atherosclerotic cholesterol profile in patients with diabetes by increasing HDL cholesterol and improving the cholesterol:HDL ratio without affecting weight, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance or glycaemic control.

  1. Artemisia Extract Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus by Up-Regulating Adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Jing; Ji, Xianghong

    2016-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has affected a great number of pregnant women worldwide. Artemisia extracts have been found to exhibit a potent antidiabetic effect in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to examine the effects of Artemisia extract on insulin resistance and lipid profiles in pregnant GDM patients. Patients in their second trimester were randomly assigned to the Artemisia extract group (AE) or to a placebo group (PO). They were instructed to consume either AE or PO daily for a period of 10 weeks. Glucose and insulin profiles and adiponectin level were assessed at baseline (week 0) and after the treatment (week 10). Compared to the PO group, fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and β-cell function (HOMA-B) were significantly reduced in the AE group participants. Moreover, levels of circulating adiponectin were also significantly up-regulated in the AE group, which also positively contributed to improved insulin sensitivity. Daily administration of Artemisia extract improves insulin sensitivity by up-regulating adiponectin in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Delivery of Flightless I Neutralizing Antibody from Porous Silicon Nanoparticles Improves Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christopher T; McInnes, Steven J P; Melville, Elizabeth; Cowin, Allison J; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2017-01-01

    Flightless I (Flii) is elevated in human chronic wounds and is a negative regulator of wound repair. Decreasing its activity improves healing responses. Flii neutralizing antibodies (FnAbs) decrease Flii activity in vivo and hold significant promise as healing agents. However, to avoid the need for repeated application in a clinical setting and to protect the therapeutic antibody from the hostile environment of the wound, suitable delivery vehicles are required. In this study, the use of porous silicon nanoparticles (pSi NPs) is demonstrated for the controlled release of FnAb to diabetic wounds. We achieve FnAb loading regimens exceeding 250 µg antibody per mg of vehicle. FnAb-loaded pSi NPs increase keratinocyte proliferation and enhance migration in scratch wound assays. Release studies confirm the functionality of the FnAb in terms of Flii binding. Using a streptozotocin-induced model of diabetic wound healing, a significant improvement in healing is observed for mice treated with FnAb-loaded pSi NPs compared to controls, including FnAb alone. FnAb-loaded pSi NPs treated with proteases show intact and functional antibody for up to 7 d post-treatment, suggesting protection of the antibodies from proteolytic degradation in wound fluid. pSi NPs may therefore enable new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of diabetic ulcers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Short- and long-term effects of a quality improvement collaborative on diabetes management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niessen Louis W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This study examined the short- and long-term effects of a quality improvement collaborative on patient outcomes, professional performance, and structural aspects of chronic care management of type 2 diabetes in an integrated care setting. Methods Controlled pre- and post-intervention study assessing patient outcomes (hemoglobin A1c, cholesterol, blood pressure, weight, blood lipid levels, and smoking status, professional performance (guideline adherence, and structural aspects of chronic care management from baseline up to 24 months. Analyses were based on 1,861 patients with diabetes in six intervention and nine control regions representing 37 general practices and 13 outpatient clinics. Results Modest but significant improvement was seen in mean systolic blood pressure (decrease by 4.0 mm Hg versus 1.6 mm Hg and mean high density lipoprotein levels (increase by 0.12 versus 0.03 points at two-year follow up. Positive but insignificant differences were found in hemoglobin A1c (0.3%, cholesterol, and blood lipid levels. The intervention group showed significant improvement in the percentage of patients receiving advice and instruction to examine feet, and smaller reductions in the percentage of patients receiving instruction to monitor blood glucose and visiting a dietician annually. Structural aspects of self-management and decision support also improved significantly. Conclusions At a time of heightened national attention toward diabetes care, our results demonstrate a modest benefit of participation in a multi-institutional quality improvement collaborative focusing on integrated, patient-centered care. The effects persisted for at least 12 months after the intervention was completed. Trial number http://clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT 00160017

  4. [AMD Annals: a model of continuous monitoring and improvement of the quality of diabetes care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    in recent years, several initiatives have been launched by the Associazione medici diabetologi (AMD) in the context of a national quality improvement program.These activities include: identification of specific indicators of quality of diabetes care, development of a software to calculate such indicators by using routine clinical data, creation of a network of diabetes clinics and analysis and publication of the results in ad hoc reports (AMD Annals). Through the best performer approach, each centre could compare its own performance not only with the theoretical targets suggested by existing guidelines, but also with the results achieved by the best centres operating within the same healthcare system.We evaluated whether the involvement of diabetes clinics into the AMD Annals initiative improved the quality of care over 4 years. a controlled before and after study was performed to compare data collected from 2004 to 2007 by two groups of centres: group A included centres that had been involved in the project since the first edition of AMD Annals; group B included centres only involved in the last edition. overall, 124 diabetes clinics provided data on over 100,000 type 2 diabetes patients/year seen from 2004 to 2007. process indicators included the proportion of patients with at least one measurement of HbA1c, blood pressure and lipid profile during the previous 12 months. Intermediate outcomes included percentages of patients with levels of HbA1c ≤ 7%, blood pressure ≤ 130/85 mmHg and LDL-cholesterol improvements in the proportion of patients with LDL-cholesterol at target were documented in both groups (group A: +10.5%; group B: +12.2%.) The proportion of patients treated with insulin increased in group A only (+5.8%), while the use of statins grew by 20%in both groups.The proportion of individuals treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs increased by 3.6% in group A and by 1.6% in group B. the AMD Annals approach can be considered as a case model for

  5. Neonatal Diabetes: An Expanding List of Genes Allows for Improved Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Rochelle N.; Philipson, Louis H.; Bell, Graeme I.

    2011-01-01

    There has been major progress in recent years uncovering the genetic causes of diabetes presenting in the first year of life. Twenty genes have been identified to date. The most common causes accounting for the majority of cases are mutations in the genes encoding the two subunits of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP), KCNJ11 and ABCC8, and the insulin gene (INS), as well as abnormalities in chromosome 6q24. Patients with activating mutations in KCNJ11 and ABCC8 can be treated with oral sulfonylureas in lieu of insulin injections. This compelling example of personalized genetic medicine leading to improved glucose regulation and quality of life may—with continued research—be repeated for other forms of neonatal diabetes in the future. PMID:21993633

  6. Participation in the Journey to Life Conversation Map Improves Control of Hypertension, Diabetes, and Hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Paul; Wiltz, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Diabetes Conversation Map program includes 4 "board game-like" education tools. We describe how the Journey to Life Conversation Map Education Class improves diabetes performance measures of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and blood pressure (BP). Retrospective case-control study in a military family medicine clinic from January 2007 to January 2010. We included 202 patients who completed ≥1 conversation map class and a comparison group of 209 patients who did not attend. Attendees started with HbA1c 8.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.86-8.64) and decreased to 6.96 (95% CI, 6.69-7.23). Patients in the comparison group started at 8.57 (95% CI, 8.18-8.95) and decreased to 8.27 (95% CI, 8.01-8.54) (P Board of Family Medicine.

  7. Dimethyl amiloride improves glucose homeostasis in mouse models of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Head, W Steven; Piston, David W

    2008-06-01

    Dimethyl amiloride (DMA) enhances insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell. DMA also enhances time-dependent potentiation (TDP) and enables TDP to occur in situations where it is normally absent. As we have demonstrated before, these effects are mediated in part through inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), resulting in increased availability of arginine. Thus both DMA and arginine have the potential to correct the secretory defect in diabetes by enabling or enhancing TDP. In the current study we have demonstrated the ability of these agents to improve blood glucose homeostasis in three mouse models of type 2 diabetes. The pattern of TDP under different conditions indicates that inhibition of NOS is not the only mechanism through which DMA exerts its positive effects. Thus we also have explored another possible mechanism through which DMA enables/enhances TDP, via the activation of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase.

  8. The NIH genetic testing registry: a new, centralized database of genetic tests to enable access to comprehensive information and improve transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Wendy S; Maglott, Donna R; Lee, Jennifer M; Kattman, Brandi L; Malheiro, Adriana J; Ovetsky, Michael; Hem, Vichet; Gorelenkov, Viatcheslav; Song, Guangfeng; Wallin, Craig; Husain, Nora; Chitipiralla, Shanmuga; Katz, Kenneth S; Hoffman, Douglas; Jang, Wonhee; Johnson, Mark; Karmanov, Fedor; Ukrainchik, Alexander; Denisenko, Mikhail; Fomous, Cathy; Hudson, Kathy; Ostell, James M

    2013-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health Genetic Testing Registry (GTR; available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/) maintains comprehensive information about testing offered worldwide for disorders with a genetic basis. Information is voluntarily submitted by test providers. The database provides details of each test (e.g. its purpose, target populations, methods, what it measures, analytical validity, clinical validity, clinical utility, ordering information) and laboratory (e.g. location, contact information, certifications and licenses). Each test is assigned a stable identifier of the format GTR000000000, which is versioned when the submitter updates information. Data submitted by test providers are integrated with basic information maintained in National Center for Biotechnology Information's databases and presented on the web and through FTP (ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/pub/GTR/_README.html).

  9. Cost of Operating Central Cancer Registries and Factors That Affect Cost: Findings From an Economic Evaluation of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Program of Cancer Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangka, Florence K L; Subramanian, Sujha; Beebe, Maggie Cole; Weir, Hannah K; Trebino, Diana; Babcock, Frances; Ewing, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) evaluated the economics of the National Program of Cancer Registries to provide the CDC, the registries, and policy makers with the economics evidence-base to make optimal decisions about resource allocation. Cancer registry budgets are under increasing threat, and, therefore, systematic assessment of the cost will identify approaches to improve the efficiencies of this vital data collection operation and also justify the funding required to sustain registry operations. To estimate the cost of cancer registry operations and to assess the factors affecting the cost per case reported by National Program of Cancer Registries-funded central cancer registries. We developed a Web-based cost assessment tool to collect 3 years of data (2009-2011) from each National Program of Cancer Registries-funded registry for all actual expenditures for registry activities (including those funded by other sources) and factors affecting registry operations. We used a random-effects regression model to estimate the impact of various factors on cost per cancer case reported. The cost of reporting a cancer case varied across the registries. Central cancer registries that receive high-quality data from reporting sources (as measured by the percentage of records passing automatic edits) and electronic data submissions, and those that collect and report on a large volume of cases had significantly lower cost per case. The volume of cases reported had a large effect, with low-volume registries experiencing much higher cost per case than medium- or high-volume registries. Our results suggest that registries operate with substantial fixed or semivariable costs. Therefore, sharing fixed costs among low-volume contiguous state registries, whenever possible, and centralization of certain processes can result in economies of scale. Approaches to improve quality of data submitted and increasing electronic reporting can also reduce cost.

  10. The critical role of Astragalus polysaccharides for the improvement of PPARα [ correction of PPRAα]-mediated lipotoxicity in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity-related diabetes mellitus leads to increased myocardial uptake and oxidation of fatty acids, resulting in a form of cardiac dysfunction referred to as lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. We have shown previously that Astragalus polysaccharides (APS administration was sufficient to improve the systemic metabolic disorder and cardiac dysfunction in diabetic models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the precise role of APS therapy in the pathogenesis of myocardial lipotoxity in diabetes, db/db diabetic mice and myosin heavy chain (MHC- peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR α mice were characterized and administrated with or without APS with C57 wide- type mice as normal control. APS treatment strikingly improved the myocyte triacylglyceride accumulation and cardiac dysfunction in both db/db mice and MHC-PPARα mice, with the normalization of energy metabolic derangements in both db/db diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts. Consistently, the activation of PPARα target genes involved in myocardial fatty acid uptake and oxidation in both db/db diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts was reciprocally repressed by APS administration, while PPARα-mediated suppression of genes involved in glucose utilization of both diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts was reversed by treatment with APS. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that APS therapy could prevent the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy through a mechanism mainly dependent on the cardiac PPARα-mediated regulatory pathways.

  11. Implementation of Health Action Process Approach to Improve Dietary Adherence in Type 2 Diabetic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetic patients usually unsuccessful to follow the diet recommendation due to lack of motivation, memory and intention. This study attempts to increase the motivation and also to improve intention in dietary adherence through the implementation of Health Action Process Approach (HAPA. Method: This study was a quasy-experiment. The population were type 2 diabetic patients in Puskesmas Krian Sidoarjo in March-April 2015. Respondents were only 16 and had been divided into experiment and control group. The independent variable was the implementation of HAPA. The dependent variable were self-efficacy, dietary adherence and blood sugar levels. The instruments in this study were questionnaires and blood sugar monitoring devices. Data were analyzed using statistical wilcoxon sign rank test and mann whitney u  test with significance level α ≤ 0.05. Result: Wilcoxon sign rank test showed there were differences between pre and post test significantly on self-efficacy (p=0.014, dietary adherence  (p=0.025, blood sugar levels (p=0.009 in  experiment group, while no significant differences in control group. Mann Witney U test showed that there was significant difference on dietary adherence (p=0.002 between two groups. Discussion: In conclusion, the implementation of HAPA can improve dietary adherence in type 2 diabetic patient. Further, following studies are expected with large number respondents and identify the whole variables in the HAPA theory. Keywords: Health Action Process Approach (HAPA, self efficacy, dietary adherence, blood glucose, Diabetes Mellitus (DM

  12. Anticipatory guidance in type 2 diabetes to improve disease management; next steps after basal insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric L; Frias, Juan P; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2018-03-23

    The alarming rise in the number of people living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) presents primary care physicians with increasing challenges associated with long-term chronic disease care. Studies have shown that the majority of patients are not achieving or maintaining glycemic goals, putting them at risk of a wide range of diabetes-related complications. Disease- and self-management programs have been shown to help patients improve their glycemic control, and are likely to be of particular benefit for patients with diabetes dealing with these issues. Anticipatory guidance is an individualized, proactive approach to patient education and counseling by a health-care professional to support patients in better coping with problems before they arise. It has been shown to improve disease outcomes in a variety of chronic conditions, including diabetes. While important at all stages, anticipatory guidance may be of particular importance during changes in treatment regimens, and especially during transition to, and escalation of, insulin-based regimens. The aim of this article is to provide advice to physicians on anticipatory guidance for basal-insulin dosing, focusing on appropriate basal-insulin-dose increase and prevention of potentially deleterious basal-insulin doses, so called overbasalization. It also provides an overview of new treatment options for patients with T2D who are not well controlled on basal-insulin therapy, fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, and advice on the type of anticipatory guidance needed to ensure safe and appropriate switching to these therapies.

  13. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and clinical outcomes: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Md Emdadul Hoque

    Full Text Available Clinical quality registries (CQRs are playing an increasingly important role in improving health outcomes and reducing health care costs. CQRs are established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care, providing feedback, benchmarking performance, describing pattern of treatment, reducing variation and as a tool for conducting research.To synthesise the impact of clinical quality registries (CQRs as an 'intervention' on (I mortality/survival; (II measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of health care; (III health care utilisation; and (IV healthcare-related costs.The following electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL and Google Scholar. In addition, a review of the grey literature and a reference check of citations and reference lists within articles was undertaken to identify relevant studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2016. The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard search strategy using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data extraction tools were used. Data on study design and methods, participant characteristics attributes of included registries and impact of the registry on outcome measures and/or processes of care were extracted.We identified 30102 abstracts from which 75 full text articles were assessed and finally 17 articles were selected for synthesis. Out of 17 studies, six focused on diabetes care, two on cardiac diseases, two on lung diseases and others on organ transplantations, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcer healing, surgical complications and kidney disease. The majority of studies were "before after" design (#11 followed by cohort design (#2, randomised controlled trial (#2, experimental non randomised study and one cross sectional comparison. The measures of impact of registries were multifarious and included change in processes of care, quality of care, treatment outcomes, adherence to guidelines and survival. Sixteen of 17

  14. A cluster randomized trial to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines on diabetes and reduce clinical inertia in primary care physicians in Belgium: study protocol [NTR 1369].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgermans, L.D.A.; Goderis, G.; Broeke, C.V.; Mathieu, C.; Aertgeerts, B.; Verbeke, G.; Carbonez, A.; Ivanova, A.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Heyrman, J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most quality improvement programs in diabetes care incorporate aspects of clinician education, performance feedback, patient education, care management, and diabetes care teams to support primary care physicians. Few studies have applied all of these dimensions to address

  15. Chronic leucine supplementation improves glycemic control in etiologically distinct mouse models of obesity and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Jue

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leucine may function as a signaling molecule to regulate metabolism. We have previously shown that dietary leucine supplementation significantly improves glucose and energy metabolism in diet-induced obese mice, suggesting that leucine supplementation could potentially be a useful adjuvant therapy for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Since the underlying cause for obesity and type 2 diabetes is multifold, we further investigated metabolic effects of leucine supplementation in obese/diabetes mouse models with different etiologies, and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Leucine supplementation was carried out in NONcNZO10/LtJ (RCS10 - a polygenic model predisposed to beta cell failure and type 2 diabetes, and in B6.Cg-Ay/J (Ay - a monogenic model for impaired central melanocortin receptor signaling, obesity, and severe insulin resistance. Mice in the treatment group received the drinking water containing 1.5% leucine for up to 8 months; control mice received the tap water. Body weight, body composition, blood HbA1c levels, and plasma glucose and insulin levels were monitored throughout and/or at the end of the study period. Indirect calorimetry, skeletal muscle gene expression, and adipose tissue inflammation were also assessed in Ay mice. Results Leucine supplementation significantly reduced HbA1c levels throughout the study period in both RCS10 and Ay mice. However, the treatment had no long term effect on body weight or adiposity. The improvement in glycemic control was associated with an increased insulin response to food challenge in RCS10 mice and decreased plasma insulin levels in Ay mice. In leucine-treated Ay mice, energy expenditure was increased by ~10% (p y mice whereas the expression levels of MCP-1 and TNF-alpha and macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue were significantly reduced. Conclusions Chronic leucine supplementation significantly improves glycemic control in multiple mouse models of

  16. A low-fat diet improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in patients with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Almdal, T; Viggers, L

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes.......To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes....

  17. [Influence on glycemic control of improved diabetic gastroparesis by long-term cisapride therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, K; Tanabe, S; Mitsuhashi, T; Saigenji, K

    1995-10-01

    To investigate the effect on glycemic control of improving diabetic gastroparesis, we evaluated symptoms (scored), gastric motor functions (solid and liquid gastric emptying studies and electrogastrography), and glycemic control in 11 patients with diabetic gastroparesis (5 men, 6 women, 50.4 +/- 4.5 years old) before and after treatment with cisapride (15 mg/day p.o., 12 weeks). None of the patients had organic abnormalities on gastrointestinal endoscopy. The dysmotility symptom score (maximum: 18) on cisapride significantly improved from 13.1 to 4.0 (p instant noodles labeled with 37 MBq (1 mCi) technetium-99m (both p < 0.05). Liquid gastric emptying, evaluated using a sulfamethizole technique, also improved but not significantly. Electrogastrography revealed no significant changes after treatment, but the postprandial rate of normal frequency waves tended to increase. Glycemic control was assessed based on HbA1C, fructosamine and M value. There were no significant changes in glycemic control after treatment with cisapride. We conclude that long-term administration of cisapride reduced dysmotility symptoms and improved solid and liquid gastric emptying without adversely affecting glycemic control.

  18. Berberine improves glucose metabolism in diabetic rats by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Xia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR is a compound originally identified in a Chinese herbal medicine Huanglian (Coptis chinensis French. It improves glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic patients. The mechanisms involve in activation of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK and improvement of insulin sensitivity. However, it is not clear if BBR reduces blood glucose through other mechanism. In this study, we addressed this issue by examining liver response to BBR in diabetic rats, in which hyperglycemia was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by high fat diet. We observed that BBR decreased fasting glucose significantly. Gluconeogenic genes, Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, were decreased in liver by BBR. Hepatic steatosis was also reduced by BBR and expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS was inhibited in liver. Activities of transcription factors including Forkhead transcription factor O1 (FoxO1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1 and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP were decreased. Insulin signaling pathway was not altered in the liver. In cultured hepatocytes, BBR inhibited oxygen consumption and reduced intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP level. The data suggest that BBR improves fasting blood glucose by direct inhibition of gluconeogenesis in liver. This activity is not dependent on insulin action. The gluconeogenic inhibition is likely a result of mitochondria inhibition by BBR. The observation supports that BBR improves glucose metabolism through an insulin-independent pathway.

  19. Human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 improved wound healing in diabetes through its anti-apoptotic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Guojuan; Ren, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Jinglu; Huang, Yanrui; Liu, Dan; Luo, Hengcong; Yang, Chuan; Yan, Li

    2017-09-08

    Impaired wound healing accompanies severe cell apoptosis in diabetic patients. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) was known to have effects on promoting growth and anti-apoptosis for cells. We aimed to determine the actual levels of TIMP-1 and cell apoptosis in: (i) the biopsies of diabetic and non-diabetic foot tissue and (ii) the human fibroblasts with or without treatments of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Next, we aimed to determine the improved levels of cell apoptosis and wound healing after the treatments of either active protein of TIMP-1 or in vivo expression of gene therapy vector-mediated TIMP-1 in both the human fibroblasts and the animal model of diabetic rats. The levels of TIMP-1 were significantly reduced in diabetic skin tissues and in AGEs-treated fibroblasts. Both AGEs-treated cells were effectively protected from apoptosis by active protein of TIMP-1 at appropriate dose level. So did the induced in vivo TIMP-1 expression after gene delivery. Similar effects were also found on the significant improvement of impaired wound healing in diabetic rats. We concluded that TIMP-1 improved wound healing through its anti-apoptotic effect. Treatments with either active protein TIMP-1 or TIMP-1 gene therapy delivered in local wound sites may be used as a strategy for accelerating diabetic wound healing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.; Filipy, R.E.; Dietert, S.E.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes the primary scientific activities of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries for the period October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. The Registries are parallel human tissue research programs devoted to the study of the actinide elements in humans. To date there have been 261 autopsy or surgical specimen donations, which include 11 whole bodies. The emphasis of the Registry was directed towards quality improvement and the development of a fully computerized data base that would incorporate not only the results of postmortem radiochemical analysis, but also medical and monitoring information obtained during life. Human subjects reviews were also completed. A three compartment biokinetic model for plutonium distribution is proposed. 2 tabs

  1. Setting the top 10 research priorities to improve the health of people with Type 2 diabetes: a Diabetes UK-James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, S; Robb, P; Cowan, K; Daly, A; Shah, K; Farmer, A

    2018-07-01

    To describe processes and outcomes of a priority setting partnership to identify the 'top 10 research priorities' in Type 2 diabetes, involving people living with the condition, their carers, and healthcare professionals. We followed the four-step James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership process which involved: gathering uncertainties using a questionnaire survey distributed to 70 000 people living with Type 2 diabetes and their carers, and healthcare professionals; organizing the uncertainties; interim priority setting by resampling of participants with a second survey; and final priority setting in an independent group of participants, using the nominal group technique. At each step the steering group closely monitored and guided the process. In the first survey, 8227 uncertainties were proposed by 2587 participants, of whom 18% were from black, Asian and minority ethnic groups. Uncertainties were formatted and collated into 114 indicative questions. A total of 1506 people contributed to a second survey, generating a shortlist of 24 questions equally weighted to the contributions of people living with diabetes and their carers and those of healthcare professionals. In the final step the 'top 10 research priorities' were selected, including questions on cure and reversal, risk identification and prevention, and self-management approaches in Type 2 diabetes. Systematic and transparent methodology was used to identify research priorities in a large and genuine partnership of people with lived and professional experience of Type 2 diabetes. The top 10 questions represent consensus areas of research priority to guide future research, deliver responsive and strategic allocation of research resources, and improve the future health and well-being of people living with, and at risk of, Type 2 diabetes. © 2018 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  2. New Advanced Technology to Improve Prediction & Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trucco, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    The research hypothesis on which our project is based is that there is a genetic contribution associated with increased risk for developing diabetic complications, specifically diabetic-nephropathy...

  3. The iSCREEN Electronic Diabetes Dashboard: A Tool to Improve Knowledge and Implementation of Pediatric Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahanova, Stacy; Tsouka, Alexandra; Palmert, Mark R; Mahmud, Farid H

    2017-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPG) provide evidence-based recommendations for patient care but may not be optimally applied in clinical settings. As a pilot study, we evaluated the impact of a computerized, point-of-care decision support system (CDSS) on guideline knowledge and adherence in our diabetes clinic. iSCREEN, a CDSS, integrated with a province-wide electronic health record, was designed based on the Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. Evaluation data were gathered by retrospective chart review and clinician questionnaire prior to and after implementation of iSCREEN. Records of patients with type 1 diabetes, 14 to 18 years of age, were assessed for appropriate screening for complications and comorbidities. To assess guideline adherence, 50 charts were reviewed at 2 time periods (25 before and 25 after launch of iSCREEN). Results revealed improved frequency of appropriate screening for diabetic nephropathy (p=0.03) and retinopathy (p=0.04), accompanied by a decrease in under- and overscreening for these outcomes. To assess guideline knowledge, 58 surveys were collected (31 prior to and 27 after the launch of iSCREEN) from care providers in the field of pediatric diabetes. There was a trend toward improved guideline knowledge in all team members (p=0.06). Implementation of a de novo CDSS was associated with improved rates of appropriate screening for diabetes-related complications. A trend toward improvement in health professionals' knowledge of the guidelines was also observed. Evaluation of this point-of-care computerized decision support tool suggests that it may facilitate diabetes care by optimizing complication screening and CPG knowledge, with the potential for broader implementation. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Brazilian Twin Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Junqueira, Daniela R; Cisneros, Lígia C; Ferreira, Lucas C; Murphy, Kate; Ordoñana, Juan R; Hopper, John L; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-12-01

    The Brazilian Twin Registry (BTR) was established in 2013 and has impelled twin research in South America. The main aim of the initiative was to create a resource that would be accessible to the Brazilian scientific community as well as international researchers interested in the investigation of the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the development of common diseases, phenotypes, and human behavior traits. The BTR is a joint effort between academic and governmental institutions from Brazil and Australia. The collaboration includes the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) in Brazil, the University of Sydney and University of Melbourne in Australia, the Australian Twin Registry, as well as the research foundations CNPq and CAPES in Brazil. The BTR is a member of the International Network of Twin Registries. Recruitment strategies used to register twins have been through participation in a longitudinal study investigating genetic and environmental factors for low back pain occurrence, and from a variety of sources including media campaigns and social networking. Currently, 291 twins are registered in the BTR, with data on demographics, zygosity, anthropometrics, and health history having been collected from 151 twins using a standardized self-reported questionnaire. Future BTR plans include the registration of thousands of Brazilian twins identified from different sources and collaborate nationally and internationally with other research groups interested on twin studies.

  5. Evaluating the completeness of the national ALS registry, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Wendy E; Wagner, Laurie; Wu, Ruoming; Mehta, Paul

    2018-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the completeness of the United States National ALS Registry (Registry). We compared persons with ALS who were passively identified by the Registry with those actively identified in the State and Metropolitan Area ALS Surveillance project. Cases in the two projects were matched using a combination of identifiers, including, partial social security number, name, date of birth, and sex. The distributions of cases from the two projects that matched/did not match were compared and Chi-square tests conducted to determine statistical significance. There were 5883 ALS cases identified by the surveillance project. Of these, 1116 died before the Registry started, leaving 4767 cases. We matched 2720 cases from the surveillance project to those in the Registry. The cases identified by the surveillance project that did not match cases in the Registry were more likely to be non-white, Hispanic, less than 65 years of age, and from western states. The methods used by the Registry to identify ALS cases, i.e. national administrative data and self-registration, worked well but missed cases. These findings suggest that developing strategies to identify and promote the Registry to those who were more likely to be missing, e.g. non-white and Hispanic, could be beneficial to improving the completeness of the Registry.

  6. Will acarbose improve the metabolic abnormalities of insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R; Lintott, C J; Zimmet, P; Campbell, L; Bowen, K; Welborn, T

    1999-03-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 105; age 36-71 years) on diet therapy alone, and with quite good glycaemic control (mean HbA1c approximately 7.0%) were randomized to receive acarbose (100 mg three times daily) or placebo for 16 weeks, and changes in clinical and metabolic parameters indicative of Syndrome X were monitored. Fasting levels of glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), true insulin, proinsulin, fibrinogen and lipids were measured four times weekly, and glucose, insulin, proinsulin and triglyceride responses to a standardized 1.6 MJ breakfast were determined at 0, 1 and 2 h post meal. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Fasting levels of glucose (P fasting glucose and triglyceride levels, lowers HbA1c and limits the glycaemic and insulin response to food in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus with Syndrome X. Pharmacological agents that improve the metabolic environment and reduce insulin resistance have the potential to limit the progression of atherogenesis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Improvement of insulin secretion in rat models of diabetes after ACEI/ARB therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jingyan; Li Fengying; Liu Yun; Long Hongmei; Li Weiyi; Wang Xiao; Zhang Hongli; Li Guo; Luo Min

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of ACEI/ARB therapy on the secretion of insulin and glucagon as well as serum lipid peroxidation marker 8-iso PGF-2α levels in streptozoticin (STZ) induced diabetic rat models.Methods Twenty-four rat models of STZ induced diabetes were prepared (random blood sugar>16.7 mmol/L). Of which, 8 models were fed enalaprial 5mg/kg/d, 8 models were fed losartan 10μg/kg/d and 8 models left unterated. Fasting serum insulin,glucagon (with RIA) and 8-iso PGF-2α (with ELISA) levels were measured in these models and 8 control rats three weeks later. Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed in 12 rats (3 animals in each group) six weeks later. Results: Serum levels of insulin in the treated models were higher than those in the non-treated models but without significance (P>0.05). Serum levels of glucagon and 8-iso PGF-2α levels in the treated models were significantly lower than those in the non-treated models (P 6 x ) in the treated models. Conclusion: ACEI/ARB treatment could improve the secretion of insulin in rat models of diabetes, which might be beneficial for controlling the progression of the disease. This phenomenon is consistent with the result of clinical study. (authors)

  8. Mobile phone intervention to improve diabetes care in rural areas of Pakistan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Mahar, Saeed Ahmed; Shaikh, Shiraz; Shaikh, Zuhaib-u-ddin

    2015-03-01

    To determine the effect of mobile phone intervention on HbA1c in type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients living in rural areas of Pakistan. Randomized controlled trial. Department of Endocrinology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, from December 2013 to June 2014. A total of 440 patients in intervention and control groups were enrolled. All patients between 18 - 70 years of age, residing in rural areas of Pakistan, HbA1c ³ 8.0% and having personal functional mobile phone were included. The intervention group patients were called directly on mobile phone after every 15 days for a period of 4 months. They were asked about the self-monitoring blood glucose, intake of medications, physical activity, healthy eating and were physically examined after 4 months. However, the control group was examined initially and after 4 months physically in the clinic and there were no mobile phone contacts with these patients. Patients in intervention group showed improvement (p Mobile phone technology in rural areas of Pakistan was helpful in lowering HbA1c levels in intervention group through direct communication with the diabetic patients. Lowering LDL and following diabetic diet plan can reduce HbA1c in these patients and help in preventing future complications.

  9. Efficacy of insulin lispro in improving glycemic control in gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M C Deepaklal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the safety and efficacy of insulin lispro in improving glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted at a single center on 201 gestational women with diabetes. Subjects who received insulin lispro performed blood glucose self-monitoring and recorded the readings in the fasting state and 1 h after each meal. At each contact (in person or telephonic contact, the insulin dose was adjusted based on the readings measured. A total of 53 subjects also recorded glucose levels post-partum. Pregnancy and post-delivery glucose level and insulin requirements of these 53 patients were compared. Results: Analysis of glucose levels both fasting and post-prandial glucose levels revealed that after using insulin lispro, the number of episodes of post-prandial hyperglycemia (1 h plasma glucose >120 mg/dL was minimal and so was the incidence of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia was defined as a blood sugar value of. There was neither any congenital abnormality except for a poorly formed pinna in the right ear of one baby nor any post-partum complications of note. Conclusion: Insulin lispro is an effective and safe treatment option in gestational diabetes.

  10. Applying national survey results for strategic planning and program improvement: the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Susan; Piccinino, Linda; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-02-01

    Since the 1970s, the federal government has spearheaded major national education programs to reduce the burden of chronic diseases in the United States. These prevention and disease management programs communicate critical information to the public, those affected by the disease, and health care providers. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the leading federal program on diabetes sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), uses primary and secondary quantitative data and qualitative audience research to guide program planning and evaluation. Since 2006, the NDEP has filled the gaps in existing quantitative data sources by conducting its own population-based survey, the NDEP National Diabetes Survey (NNDS). The NNDS is conducted every 2–3 years and tracks changes in knowledge, attitudes and practice indicators in key target audiences. This article describes how the NDEP has used the NNDS as a key component of its evaluation framework and how it applies the survey results for strategic planning and program improvement. The NDEP's use of the NNDS illustrates how a program evaluation framework that includes periodic population-based surveys can serve as an evaluation model for similar national health education programs.

  11. Development of newborn screening connect (NBS connect): a self-reported patient registry and its role in improvement of care for patients with inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osara, Yetsa; Coakley, Kathryn; Devarajan, Aishwarya; Singh, Rani H

    2017-07-19

    Newborn Screening Connect (NBS Connect) is a web-based self-reported patient registry and resource for individuals and families affected by disorders included in the newborn screening panel. NBS Connect was launched in 2012 by Emory University after years of planning and grassroots work by professionals, consumers, and industry. Individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU), maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) or tyrosinemia (TYR) have been recruited through distribution of outreach materials, presentations at parent organization meetings and direct recruitment at clinic appointments. Participants complete online profiles generating data on diagnosis, treatment, symptoms, outcomes, barriers to care, and quality of life. Resources such as education materials, information on the latest research and clinical trials, recipes, interactive health tracking systems, and professional support tools are described. In addition, to examine the ability of NBS Connect to generate data that guides hypothesis-driven research, data pertaining to age at diagnosis, bone health, and skin conditions in individuals with PKU were assessed. The objective of this paper is to describe the development of NBS Connect and highlight its data, resources and research contributions. In September 2016, NBS Connect had 442 registered participants: 314 (71%) individuals with PKU, 68 (15%) with MSUD, 20 (5%) with TYR, and 40 (9%) with other disorders on the NBS panel. Age at diagnosis was less than 4 weeks in 285 (89%) of 319 respondents to this question and between 1 month and 14 years in 29 (9%) individuals. Of 216 respondents with PKU, 33 (15%) had a DXA scan in the past year. Of 217 respondents with PKU, 99 (46%) reported at least one skin condition. NBS Connect was built and refined with feedback from all stakeholders, including individuals with inherited metabolic disorders. Based on patient-reported data, future studies can be initiated to test hypotheses such as the relationship between PKU and skin

  12. Rauwolfia serpentina improves altered glucose and lipid homeostasis in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A

    2016-09-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina is well-reported in traditional medicines for the treatment of hypertensive and neurological disorders. However, its antidiabetic potential has been currently described in both alloxan-treated and normoglycemic mice. Present effort was carried out to investigate the effect of methanol root extract (MREt) of R.serpentina in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice. Experimental mice were grouped into normal control (distilled water 1ml/kg) and fructose-induced type 2 diabetic groups (10% fructose 1 ml/kg).The second group sub-divided into negative (0.05% DMSO 1ml/kg) control, positive (pioglitazone 15mg/kg) control and three test groups (MREt 10, 30 & 60 mg/kg). Each treatment was given orally for 14 days consecutively then mice were sacrificed in order to collect serum and liver samples to analyze physical, biochemical as well as hematological markers. MREt significantly improved percent body weight and glycemic change along with serum insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL-c), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterols (HDL-c), total hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hepatic glycogen, coronary risk and fasting insulin resistance indices while suppressed down the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase enzyme in test groups when compared with diabetic controls. The present findings conclude that MREt of R. serpentina can effectively betters the carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis by either inhibiting fructose absorption in intestine or decreasing insulin resistance in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice.

  13. Estimating the risk after gestational diabetes mellitus: can we improve the information from the postpartum OGTT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbl, Christian S; Bozkurt, Latife; Prikoszovich, Thomas; Tura, Andrea; Pacini, Giovanni; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Risk stratification after pregnancy with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is based on screening with the 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Actually, prediabetes and diabetes are diagnosed by impaired fasting [fasting plasma glucose (FPG)] and 120 min-postload glucose levels (120'-PLG). We hypothesized that the clinical information could be improved by including measurements at different time points from the OGTT in the medical decision-making process. One hundred ten women with previous gestational diabetes (pGDM) and 41 controls were included 3-6 mo after delivery and underwent specific metabolic assessments: 3-h OGTT, frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) with markers of inflammation and endothelial function. pGDMs were annually invited for reexaminations for a maximum of 10 yr. Multiple linear regression suggested that postload glucose levels at 60 min (60'-PLG) were a better predictor for insulin sensitivity [β: -0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.14 to -0.05, P importance in women after GDM. We further identified associations of 60'-PLG with ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, tissue plasminogen activator, endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. There appeared to be no interactions between females with pGDM and controls, suggesting comparable effects. We observed that 60'-PLG levels were closely related to the later onset of diabetes independent from the routinely measured FPG and 120'-PLG levels. Our data suggest that the sole interpretation of FPG and 120'-PLG of the OGTT leads to significant loss of information. Particularly 60'-PLG was shown to distinguish women at low or high metabolic and cardiovascular risk.

  14. COPD predicts mortality in HF: the Norwegian Heart Failure Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blois, Jonathan; Simard, Serge; Atar, Dan; Agewall, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (HF) are common clinical conditions that share tobacco as a risk factor. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic impact of COPD on HF patients. The Norwegian Heart Failure Registry was used. The study included 4132 HF patients (COPD, n = 699) from 22 hospitals (mean follow-up, 13.3 months). COPD patients were older, more often smokers and diabetics, less often on beta-blockers and had a higher heart rate. They were more often in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III or IV (COPD, 63%; no COPD, 51%), although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) distribution was similar. COPD independently predicted death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.188; 95% CI: 1.015 to 1.391; P = 0.03) along with age, creatinine, NYHA Class III/IV (HR, 1.464; 95% CI: 1.286 to 1.667) and diabetes. beta-blockers at baseline were associated with improved survival in patients with LVEF < or =40% independently of COPD. COPD is associated with a poorer survival in HF patients. COPD patients are overrated in terms of NYHA class in comparison with patients with similar LVEF. Nonetheless, NYHA class remains the strongest predictor of death in these patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diabetic complications do not hamper improvement of health-related quality of life over the course of treatment of diabetic foot ulcers - the Eurodiale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siersma, Volkert; Thorsen, Hanne; Holstein, Per E; Kars, Marleen; Apelqvist, Jan; Jude, Edward B; Piaggesi, Alberto; Bakker, Karel; Edmonds, Michael; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Mauricio, Didac; Reike, Heinrich; Spraul, Maximilian; Uccioli, Luigi; Urbancic, Vilma; van Acker, Kristien; van Baal, Jeff; Schaper, Nicolaas C

    2017-07-01

    Diabetic complications, and in particular diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), are associated with low health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated whether the presence of diabetic complications also influenced the improvement of HRQoL during DFU treatment. 1088 patients presenting for DFU treatment at the centers participating in the Eurodiale study were followed prospectively up to one year. HRQoL was measured both at presentation and after healing or at end of follow up, using EQ-5D: a standardized instrument consisting of five domains and a summary index. The influence of diabetic comorbidity on the course of HRQoL was evaluated for each of the EQ-5D outcomes in multi-level linear regression analyses, adjusting for baseline characteristics. HRQoL improved in all EQ-5D outcomes over the course of treatment for those DFUs that healed. The few significant differences in the development of HRQoL between patients with and without comorbidity showed a more beneficial development for patients with comorbidity in DFUs that did not heal or healed slowly. Comorbidity does not hamper improvement of HRQoL in DFU treatment. On the contrary, HRQoL improved sometimes more in patients with certain comorbidity with hard-to-heal ulcers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Audit of Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastura, I; Zanariah, H; Fatanah, I; Feisul Idzwan, M; Wan Shaariah, M Y; Jamaiyah, H; Geeta, A

    2008-09-01

    Diabetes is a chronic condition that is one of the major causes of illness, disability, and death in Malaysia. Cost in managing diabetes plus indirect cost of lost work, pain, and suffering have all increased. The optimal management of patients with diabetes require the tracking of patients over time to monitor the progression of the disease, compliance with treatment, and preventive care. Diabetes care can be improved by standardizing access to, and improving the use of, clinical information. Access to timely, accurate and well-organized electronic data will improve the quality of care for patients with diabetes. Clinical Research Center convened an expert workshop to forecast how physicians, hospitals and clinics will employ clinical information technology (IT) applications to diabetes care over the next year. Workshop participants included experts from research organizations, government, and the IT vendor. This is a summary of the workshop organised for the purpose of the Audit of Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM) project. We hope to identify the gaps, if any, that exists in delivering diabetes care and to improve the quality of care. In future, we hope to develop an expansion of this project for the Adult Diabetes Registry that will be implemented for the whole country.

  17. Defining and improving quality management in Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics: design of the study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, the organisation of diabetes care is changing. As a result general practices and diabetes teams in hospitals are becoming part of new organisations in which multidisciplinary care programs are implemented. In the Netherlands, 97 diabetes care groups and 104 outpatient clinics are working with a diabetes care program. Both types of organisations aim to improve the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, it is essential to understand the comprehensive elements needed for optimal quality management at organisational level. This study aims to assess the current level of diabetes quality management in both care groups and outpatient clinics and its improvement after providing feedback on their quality management system and tailored support. Methods/design This study is a before-after study with a one-year follow-up comparing the levels of quality management before and after an intervention to improve diabetes quality management. To assess the status of quality management, online questionnaires were developed based on current literature. They consist of six domains: organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance management, quality improvement policy and management strategies. Based on the questionnaires, respondents will receive feedback on their score in a radar diagram and an elucidating table. They will also be granted access to an online toolbox with instruments that proved to be effective in quality of care improvement and with practical examples. If requested, personal support in implementing these tools will be available. After one year quality management will be measured again using the same questionnaire. Discussion This study will reveal a nationwide picture of quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics in the Netherlands and evaluate the effect of offering tailored support. The operationalisation of quality management on organisational level may be of interest for other countries

  18. The Improvement of Hypertension by Probiotics: Effects on Cholesterol, Diabetes, Renin, and Phytoestrogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Shi Lye

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live organisms that are primarily used to improve gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, lactose intolerance, and to inhibit the excessive proliferation of pathogenic intestinal bacteria. However, recent studies have suggested that probiotics could have beneficial effects beyond gastrointestinal health, as they were found to improve certain metabolic disorders such as hypertension. Hypertension is caused by various factors and the predominant causes include an increase in cholesterol levels, incidence of diabetes, inconsistent modulation of renin and imbalanced sexual hormones. This review discusses the antihypertensive roles of probiotics via the improvement and/or treatment of lipid profiles, modulation of insulin resistance and sensitivity, the modulation of renin levels and also the conversion of bioactive phytoestrogens as an alternative replacement of sexual hormones such as estrogen and progesterone.

  19. Improving Patients' Adherence to Physical Activity in Diabetes Mellitus: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-hu Qiu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity (PA is a key element in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Participation in regular PA improves blood glucose control and can prevent or delay T2DM and its complications, along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life. However, most people with T2DM are not active and show poor adherence. This paper reviews the possible barriers to PA and strategies to improve the adherence to PA. Based on the currently available literature, it is concluded that self-efficacy and social support from family, friends, and health care providers play the important role in adoption and maintenance of regular PA. Here we also highlight some new modern and innovative interventions that facilitate exercise participation and improve the adherence.

  20. Do Electrochemiluminescence Assays Improve Prediction of Time to Type 1 Diabetes in Autoantibody-Positive TrialNet Subjects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Alexandra; Pyle, Laura; Yu, Liping; Miao, Dongmei; Michels, Aaron; Krischer, Jeffrey; Sosenko, Jay; Gottlieb, Peter; Steck, Andrea K

    2016-10-01

    To explore whether electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assays can help improve prediction of time to type 1 diabetes in the TrialNet autoantibody-positive population. TrialNet subjects who were positive for one or more autoantibodies (microinsulin autoantibody, GAD65 autoantibody [GADA], IA-2A, and ZnT8A) with available ECL-insulin autoantibody (IAA) and ECL-GADA data at their initial visit were analyzed; after a median follow-up of 24 months, 177 of these 1,287 subjects developed diabetes. Univariate analyses showed that autoantibodies by radioimmunoassays (RIAs), ECL-IAA, ECL-GADA, age, sex, number of positive autoantibodies, presence of HLA DR3/4-DQ8 genotype, HbA1c, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) measurements were all significantly associated with progression to diabetes. Subjects who were ECL positive had a risk of progression to diabetes within 6 years of 58% compared with 5% for the ECL-negative subjects (P < 0.0001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were compared, with the base model including age, sex, OGTT measurements, and number of positive autoantibodies by RIAs. The model with positivity for ECL-GADA and/or ECL-IAA was the best, and factors that remained significantly associated with time to diabetes were area under the curve (AUC) C-peptide, fasting C-peptide, AUC glucose, number of positive autoantibodies by RIAs, and ECL positivity. Adding ECL to the Diabetes Prevention Trial risk score (DPTRS) improved the receiver operating characteristic curves with AUC of 0.83 (P < 0.0001). ECL assays improved the ability to predict time to diabetes in these autoantibody-positive relatives at risk for developing diabetes. These findings might be helpful in the design and eligibility criteria for prevention trials in the future. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  1. Bariatric Surgery in Obese Women of Reproductive Age Improves Conditions That Underlie Fertility and Pregnancy Outcomes: Retrospective Cohort Study of UK National Bariatric Surgery Registry (NBSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Eric; Whyte, Martin; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Jones, Simon; Gatenby, Piers; de Lusignan, Simon; Shawe, Jill

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study are the following: to describe the female population of reproductive age having bariatric surgery in the UK, to assess the age and ethnicity of women accessing surgery, and to assess the effect of bariatric surgery on factors that underlie fertility and pregnancy outcomes. Demographic details, comorbidities, and operative type of women aged 18-45 years were extracted from the National Bariatric Surgery Registry (NBSR). A comparison was made with non-operative cases (aged 18-45 and BMI ≥40 kg/m 2 ) from the Health Survey for England (HSE, 2007-2013). Analyses were performed using "R" software. Data were extracted on 15,222 women from NBSR and 1073 from HSE. Women aged 18-45 comprised 53 % of operations. Non-Caucasians were under-represented in NBSR compared to HSE (10 vs 16 % respectively, p years (Wilcoxon test p year postoperatively from 48.2 ± 8.3 to 37.4 ± 7.5 kg/m 2 (t test, p fertility and pregnancy outcomes. A prospective study is required to verify these effects.

  2. Factors associated with persistent poorly controlled diabetes mellitus: clues to improving management in patients with resistant poor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Matthew J; Holleman, Rob; Klamerus, Mandi L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Edelman, David; Heisler, Michele

    2014-12-01

    Patients with persistent poorly controlled diabetes mellitus (PPDM), defined as an uninterrupted hemoglobin A1c >8.0% for ≥1 year despite standard care, are at high risk for complications. Additional research to define patient factors associated with PPDM could suggest barriers to improvement in this group and inform the development of targeted strategies to address these patients' resistant diabetes. We analyzed patients with type 2 diabetes from a multi-site randomized trial. We characterized patients with PPDM relative to other patients using detailed survey data and multivariable modeling. Of 963 patients, 118 (12%) had PPDM, 265 (28%) were intermittently poorly controlled, and 580 (60%) were well-controlled. Patients with PPDM had younger age, earlier diabetes diagnosis, insulin use, higher antihypertensive burden, higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lower statin use relative to well-controlled patients. Among patients with objective adherence data (Veterans Affairs patients), a larger oral diabetes medication refill gap was associated with PPDM. Strategies are needed to target-specific barriers to improvement among patients whose diabetes is resistant to standard diabetes care. Our data suggest that strategies for targeting PPDM should accommodate younger patients' lifestyles, include medication management for insulin titration and comorbid disease conditions, and address barriers to self-management adherence. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Exercise interventions in polypathological aging patients that coexist with diabetes mellitus: improving functional status and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-06-01

    In elderly populations, diabetes is associated with reduced muscle strength, poor muscle quality, and accelerated loss of muscle mass. In addition, diabetes mellitus increases risk for accelerated aging and for the development of frailty syndrome. This disease is also associated with a polypathological condition, and its complications progressively affect quality of life and survival. Exercise interventions, including resistance training, represent the cornerstones of diabetes management, especially in patients at severe functional decline. This review manuscript aimed to describe the beneficial effects of different exercise interventions on the functional capacity of elderly diabetics, including those at polypathological condition. The SciELO, Science Citation Index, MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and ScienceDirect databases were searched from 1980 to 2015 for articles published from original scientific investigations. In addition to the beneficial effects of exercise interventions on glycemic control, and on the cardiovascular risk factors associated with diabetes, physical exercise is an effective intervention to improve muscle strength, power output, and aerobic power and functional capacity in elderly diabetic patients. Thus, a combination of resistance and endurance training is the most effective exercise intervention to promote overall physical fitness in these patients. In addition, in diabetic patients with frailty and severe functional decline, a multicomponent exercise program including strength and power training, balance exercises, and gait retraining may be an effective intervention to reduce falls and improve functional capacity and quality of life in these patients.

  4. Evaluation of a mobile social networking application for improving diabetes Type 2 knowledge: an intervention study using WhatsApp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Alanzi; Sulaiman, Bah; Sara, Alzahrani; Sirah, Alshammari; Fatima, Almunsef

    2018-06-26

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the WhatsApp social networking application for improving knowledge, self-efficacy and awareness about diabetes management. The study was conducted with intervention and control groups at Teaching Hospital in Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. The intervention group received weekly educational messages using WhatsApp, while the control group received regular care. Statistically, compared with the control group, the diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy of the intervention group increased significantly after the intervention with the WhatsApp application. The WhatsApp application can be effectively used for enhancing diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy and awareness among the Saudi population.

  5. Plasma proteomics classifiers improve risk prediction for renal disease in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; Jankowski, Joachim; Heinze, Georg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro and macroalbuminuria are strong risk factors for progression of nephropathy in patients with hypertension or type 2 diabetes. Early detection of progression to micro and macroalbuminuria may facilitate prevention and treatment of renal diseases. We aimed to develop plasma...... proteomics classifiers to predict the development of micro or macroalbuminuria in hypertension or type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Patients with hypertension (n = 125) and type 2 diabetes (n = 82) were selected for this case-control study from the Prevention of REnal and Vascular ENd-stage Disease cohort....... RESULTS: In hypertensive patients, the classifier improved risk prediction for transition in albuminuria stage on top of the reference model (C-index from 0.69 to 0.78; P diabetes, the classifier improved risk prediction for transition from micro to macroalbuminuria (C-index from 0...

  6. Quality of Care Improves for Patients with Diabetes in Medicare Shared Savings Accountable Care Organizations: Organizational Characteristics Associated with Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraze, Taressa K; Lewis, Valerie A; Tierney, Emily; Colla, Carrie H

    2017-12-06

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs), a primary care-centric delivery and payment model, aim to promote integrated population health, which may improve care for those with chronic conditions such as diabetes. Research has shown that, overall, the ACO model is effective at reducing costs, but there is substantial variation in how effective different types of ACOs are at impacting costs and improving care delivery. This study examines how ACO organizational characteristics - such as composition, staffing, care management, and experiences with health reform - were associated with quality of care delivered to patients with diabetes. Secondary data were analyzed retrospectively to examine Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) ACOs' performance on diabetes metrics in the first 2 years of ACO contracts. Ordinary least squares was used to analyze 162 MSSP ACOs with publicly available performance data and the National Survey of ACOs. ACOs improved performance significantly for patients with diabetes between contract years 1 and 2. In year 1, also having a private payer contract and an increased number of services within the ACO were positively associated with performance, while having a community health center or a hospital were negatively associated with performance. Better performance in year 1 was negatively associated with improved performance in year 2. This study found that ACOs substantively improved diabetes management within initial contract years. ACOs may need different types of support throughout their contracts to ensure continued improvements in performance.

  7. The gait and balance of patients with diabetes can be improved: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allet, L; Armand, S; de Bie, R A; Golay, A; Monnin, D; Aminian, K; Staal, J B; de Bruin, E D

    2010-03-01

    Gait characteristics and balance are altered in diabetic patients. Little is known about possible treatment strategies. This study evaluates the effect of a specific training programme on gait and balance of diabetic patients. This was a randomised controlled trial (n=71) with an intervention (n=35) and control group (n=36). The intervention consisted of physiotherapeutic group training including gait and balance exercises with function-orientated strengthening (twice weekly over 12 weeks). Controls received no treatment. Individuals were allocated to the groups in a central office. Gait, balance, fear of falls, muscle strength and joint mobility were measured at baseline, after intervention and at 6-month follow-up. The trial is closed to recruitment and follow-up. After training, the intervention group increased habitual walking speed by 0.149 m/s (pbalance (time to walk over a beam, balance index recorded on Biodex balance system), their performance-oriented mobility, their degree of concern about falling, their hip and ankle plantar flexor strength, and their hip flexion mobility compared with the control group. After 6 months, all these variables remained significant except for the Biodex sway index and ankle plantar flexor strength. Two patients developed pain in their Achilles tendon: the progression for two related exercises was slowed down. Specific training can improve gait speed, balance, muscle strength and joint mobility in diabetic patients. Further studies are needed to explore the influence of these improvements on the number of reported falls, patients' physical activity levels and quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00637546 This work was supported by the Swiss National Foundation (SNF): PBSKP-123446/1/

  8. Educational needs for improving self-care in heart failure patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, EunSeok; Clark, Patricia C; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Lobb, Maureen; Smith, Andrew L; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2012-01-01

    To explore the need for self-monitoring and self-care education in heart failure patients with diabetes (HF- DM patients) by describing cognitive and affective factors to provide guidance in developing effective self-management education. A cross-sectional correlation design was employed using baseline patient data from a study testing a 12-week patient and family dyad intervention to improve dietary and medication-taking self-management behaviors in HF patients. Data from 116 participants recruited from metropolitan Atlanta area were used. Demographic and comorbidities, physical function, psychological distress, relationship with health care provider, self-efficacy (medication taking and low sodium diet), and behavioral outcomes (medications, dietary habits) were assessed. Descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square tests, t tests, or Mann-Whitney tests were performed to compare HF patients with and without DM. HF-DM patients were older and heavier, had more comorbidities, and took more daily medications than HF patients. High self-efficacy on medication and low-sodium diet was reported in both groups with no significant difference. Although HF-DM patients took more daily medications than HF, both groups exhibited high HF medication-taking behaviors. The HF-DM patients consumed significantly lower total sugar than HF patients but clinically higher levels of sodium. Diabetes educators need to be aware of potential conflicts of treatment regimens to manage 2 chronic diseases. Special and integrated diabetes self-management education programs that incorporate principles of HF self-management should be developed to improve self-management behavior in HF-DM patients.

  9. Improvement in Neuropathy Specific Quality of Life in Patients with Diabetes after Vitamin D Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uazman Alam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effect of vitamin D supplementation on neuropathy specific quality of life (NeuroQoL in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Methods. This prospective, open label study was conducted between June 2012 and April 2013. Patients with symptomatic diabetic neuropathy were given a single dose of 600,000 IU intramuscular vitamin D, and NeuroQol was assessed at baseline and at five follow-up visits every 4 weeks. Results. Of 143 participants, 41.3% were vitamin D deficient (vitamin D < 20 ng/ml. Treatment with vitamin D resulted in a significant increase in 25(OHD (P<0.0001 and a significant improvement in the NeuroQoL subscale score for emotional distress (P=0.04, with no significant change in the other NeuroQoL domains of painful symptoms and paresthesia, loss of temperature and touch sensation, unsteadiness, limitation in daily activities, and interpersonal problems. There was a significant reduction in patient perception about foot problems on QoL of “quite a lot” (P<0.05 and “very much” (P<0.0001 with a significant reduction in the baseline response of having a “poor” QoL from 5.2% to 0.7% (P<0.0001 and an increase in the response of an “excellent QoL” from 1.5% to 7.4% (P<0.0001. Conclusion. Vitamin D is effective in improving quality of life in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy.

  10. Improvement of diabetic patients nursing care by the development of educational programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalis Vissarion; Maria Malliarou; Paraskevi Theofilou; Sofia Zyga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion edu...

  11. Macular edema in underserved diabetic patients: Improving detection by enhancing the optical signature and data analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamami, Mastour Abdullah

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are chief causes of vision loss in working adults. Thus, retinal screening of patients with diabetes has become standard practice in some countries to prevent visual impairment and blindness from diabetic retinopathy. One goal is to improve techniques currently used to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Another goal is to probe pathophysiological changes seen with imaging methods. Analysis was performed on a novel dataset from more than 2000 underserved adult diabetic patients, who were recruited for a screening study for diabetic eye disease. Data were collected from four county clinics at Alameda Health, Alameda County, CA. Over 90% of patients self-identified as a racial/ethnic identity other than non-Hispanic white. We investigated the prevalence and optical properties of macular edema. In the first study, a retrospective cohort study was performed to compare macular thickness in diabetic patients with and without macular edema to determine the presence of damage to the external limiting membrane or and the relation of damage to the ELM to damage to photoreceptors. In the second study, we investigated whether the information in red light better visualizes cysts in diabetic macular edema, as compared to green light. In the third study, we investigated whether the demographic and blood glucose information predict diabetic macular edema. Three logistic regression analyses were compared. In the fourth study, we examined how different outcome measures of retinal thickness vary with demographic and blood glucose measures, using a trichotomous variable for retinal thickness. The findings point strongly to large individual differences in the development of macular edema, which is difficult to diagnose with the most common methods in dark eyes. Further, while blood glucose was found to be important, there are additional differences in the potential for macular edema that are associated with ethnic group and gender.

  12. Interactive Web-Based Learning: Translating Health Policy Into Improved Diabetes Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Briana B; Lier, Silje C; Johnson, Tisha K; Hu, Dale J

    2016-01-01

    In August 2014, the U.S. DHHS's Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion released the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention, highlighting prevention of diabetes agent-related hypoglycemia as a key area for improvement. In support of the Action Plan, the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion then developed a web-based interactive module, or eLearning lesson, based on formative research and stakeholder feedback to educate healthcare professionals on strategies to prevent adverse drug events from diabetes agents. The training incorporates health literacy principles by demonstrating, through video scenarios, how to apply shared decision making when setting individualized glycemic targets, and how to use the teach-back method to confirm patients' understanding. Prior to release in September 2014, the training went through intensive usability testing and was pilot tested using a 36-item evaluation. Six months after its release (September 2014 to March 2015), the training landing page on health.gov had 24,334 unique page views. More than 90% of the 234 participants who earned continuing education credit agreed that they will be able to apply the knowledge gained from the lesson to their practice. Online trainings that model key prevention strategies are well received by health professional users and may play an important role in translating policy into improved outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The association between improved quality diabetes indicators, health outcomes and costs: towards constructing a "business case" for quality of diabetes care--a time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf-Miron, Rachel; Bolotin, Arkadi; Gordon, Nesia; Porath, Avi; Peled, Ronit

    2014-12-01

    In primary health care systems where member's turnover is relatively low, the question, whether investment in quality of care improvement can make a business case, or is cost effective, has not been fully answered.The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the relationship between improvement in selected measures of diabetes (type 2) care and patients' health outcomes; and (2) to estimate the association between improvement in performance and direct medical costs. A time series study with three quality indicators - Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) testing, HbA1C and LDL- cholesterol (LDL-C) control - which were analyzed in patients with diabetes, insured by a large health fund. Health outcomes measures used: hospitalization days, Emergency Department (ED) visits and mortality. Poisson, GEE and Cox regression models were employed. Covariates: age, gender and socio-economic rank. 96,553 adult (age >18) patients with diabetes were analyzed. The performance of the study indicators, significantly and steadily improved during the study period (2003-2009). Poor HbA1C (>9%) and inappropriate LDL-C control (>100 mg/dl) were significantly associated with number of hospitalization days. ED visits did not achieve statistical significance. Improvement in HbA1C control was associated with an annual average of 2% reduction in hospitalization days, leading to substantial reduction in tertiary costs. The Hazard ratio for mortality, associated with poor HbA1C and LDL-C, control was 1.78 and 1.17, respectively. Our study demonstrates the effect of continuous improvement in quality care indicators, on health outcomes and resource utilization, among patients with diabetes. These findings support the business case for quality, especially in healthcare systems with relatively low enrollee turnover, where providers, in the long term, could "harvest" their investments in improving quality.

  14. Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Peripheral Tissue Oxygenation and Accelerates Angiogenesis in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoyoung Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN is known to have anti-inflammatory and angiogenic effects and to accelerate wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PDRN could improve peripheral tissue oxygenation and angiogenesis in diabetic foot ulcers. Methods This was a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Twenty patients with a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer were randomly distributed into a control group (n=10 and a PDRN group (n=10. Initial surgical debridement and secondary surgical procedures such as a split-thickness skin graft, primary closure, or local flap were performed. Between the initial surgical debridement and secondary surgical procedures, 0.9% normal saline (3 mL or PDRN was injected for 2 weeks by the intramuscular (1 ampule, 3 mL, 5.625 mg, 5 days per week and perilesional routes (1 ampule, 3 mL, 5.625 mg, 2 days per week. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2 was evaluated using the Periflux System 5000 with TcPO2/CO2 unit 5040 before the injections and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 after the start of the injections. A pathologic review (hematoxylin and eosin stain of the debrided specimens was conducted by a pathologist, and vessel density (average number of vessels per visual field was calculated. Results Compared with the control group, the PDRN-treated group showed improvements in peripheral tissue oxygenation on day 7 (P<0.01, day 14 (P<0.001, and day 28 (P<0.001. The pathologic review of the specimens from the PDRN group showed increased angiogenesis and improved inflammation compared with the control group. No statistically significant difference was found between the control group and the PDRN group in terms of vessel density (P=0.094. Complete healing was achieved in every patient. Conclusions In this study, PDRN improved peripheral tissue oxygenation. Moreover, PDRN is thought to be effective in improving inflammation and angiogenesis in diabetic foot ulcers.

  15. Contextualized B2B Registries

    OpenAIRE

    Radetzki, U; Boniface, M.J.; Surridge, M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. Service discovery is a fundamental concept underpinning the move towards dynamic service-oriented business partnerships. The business process for integrating service discovery and underlying registry technologies into busi-ness relationships, procurement and project management functions has not been examined and hence existing Web Service registries lack capabilities required by business today. In this paper we present a novel contextualized B2B registry that supports dynamic regist...

  16. Improvement in distance and near visual acuities using low vision devices in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Gopalakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to elucidate the causes and level of visual impairment (VI in patients with different pathologies of diabetic retinopathy (DR who presented to a low vision care (LVC clinic, to analyze the type of distant and near devices prescribed to them and the visual benefits thereof. Methods: A retrospective chart review was done for 100 consecutive patients with DR who were referred to the LVC clinic from June 2015 to June 2016. The reason for referral was assessed from the electronic medical records and available fundus photographs, fundus fluorescein angiograms, and optical coherence tomography images by a retina specialist. The details of low-vision devices and subsequent improvements were noted. Results: Of the 100 patients, 52% had moderate VI, 19% mild VI, 16% severe VI, and 13% had profound VI or blindness. The most commonly prescribed low vision device was half-eye spectacles (38.4%. The pathologies which had statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05 in distance vision with low vision devices were DR with disc pallor (4.4% improvement, ischemic maculopathy (11.9% improvement, and plaque of hard exudate (10.1% improvement. However, in all pathologies, there was statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05 in near vision. Conclusion: Usually, the patients with DR presented to the LVC clinic with moderate VI. The use of low vision devices can help these patients in cases where medical and surgical treatment have no or a limited role in restoring useful vision.

  17. Improving the management of diabetes in hospitalized patients: the results of a computer-based house staff training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand; Hurwitz, Shelley; Yialamas, Maria; Min, Le; Garg, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes in hospitalized patients is associated with poor clinical outcomes. We hypothesized that computer-based diabetes training could improve house staff knowledge and comfort for the management of diabetes in a large tertiary-care hospital. We implemented a computer-based training program on inpatient diabetes for internal medicine house staff at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA) in September 2009. House staff were required to complete the program and answer a set of questions, before and after the program, to evaluate their level of comfort and knowledge of inpatient diabetes. Chart reviews of all non-critically ill patients with diabetes managed by house staff in August 2009 (before the program) and December 2009 (after the program) were performed. Chart reviews were also performed for August 2008 and December 2008 to compare house staff management practices when the computer-based educational program was not available. A significant increase in comfort levels and knowledge in the management of inpatient diabetes was seen among house staff at all levels of training (Pstaff compared with junior house staff. Nonsignificant trends suggesting increased use of basal-bolus insulin (P=0.06) and decreased use of sliding-scale insulin (P=0.10) were seen following the educational intervention in 2009, whereas no such change was seen in 2008 (P>0.90). Overall, house staff evaluated the training program as "very relevant" and the technology interface as "good." A computer-based diabetes training program can improve the comfort and knowledge of house staff and potentially improve their insulin administration practices at large academic centers.

  18. Cholecalciferol improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients: a 6-month prospective interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada AM

    2017-07-01

    insignificant (P=0.069, 0.376, 0.058, respectively. FI decreased by 22%, HOMA-IR by 27.6%, and c-peptide by 1.83%. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, parathyroid hormone, alkaline phosphatase, serum creatinine, and pulse rate significantly decreased (4.3±0.9 vs 4.0±0.9 mmol/L, P=0.036; 2.5±0.8 vs 2.2±0.8 mmol/L, P=0.018; 4.6±2.1 vs 3.5±1.8 pmol/L, P=0.001; 82.1±26.2 vs 66.2±19.5 U/L, P<0.001; 74.6±15.6 vs 70.7±14.7 µmol/L, P=0.047; and 81.6±11.9 vs 77.5±12.0 bpm, P=0.045, respectively. Triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, both systolic and diastolic BP, and BMI did not show significant change.Conclusion: Cholecalciferol helps improve blood glucose control and cholesterol profile in vitamin D3-deficient type 2 diabetic patients. Keywords: vitamin D, type 2 diabetes, HbA1c, cholesterol, creatinine, parathyroid hormone

  19. Chrysin treatment improves diabetes and its complications in liver, brain, and pancreas in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Samini, Fariborz; Farkhondeh, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    Chrysin (CH) is a natural flavonoid with pharmacological influences. The purpose of the current study was the assessment of possible protective effects of CH against oxidative damage in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas of streptozotocin (STZ)- induced diabetic rats. In the present study, the rats were divided into the following groups of 8 animals each: control, untreated diabetic, 3 CH (20, 40, 80 mg/kg/day)-treated diabetic groups. To find out the modulations of cellular antioxidant defense systems, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and antioxidant enzymes including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were determined in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas. STZ caused an elevation of glucose, MDA, TG, TC, LDL-C and with reduction of HDL-C, total protein, SOD, CAT, and GST in the serum, liver, brain, and pancreas (p < 0.01). The findings showed that the significant elevation in the glucose, MDA, TG, TC, LDL-C and reduction of HDL-C, total protein, SOD, CAT, and GST were ameliorated in the CH-treated diabetic groups versus to the untreated groups, in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). The current study offers that CH may be recovered diabetes and its complications by modification of oxidative stress.

  20. Multiple educational programs improves glycemic control, quality of life with diminishing the impact of diabetes in poorly controlled type 1 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Chintan; Dalal, Lopa; Talaviya, Praful; Saboo, Banshi

    2017-12-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the outcomes of multiple educational programs on glycemic control, quality of life and impact of diabetes in poorly controlled Type 1 Diabetic patients. A 12 months diabetes education programs were conducted every week for first one month then followed by every 3 months with follow up on improvement of HbA1c and QOL in T1D patients (n=54). Clinical characteristics were recorded at baseline visit. The QOL was evaluated by 15 set DQOL questionnaires in 40 consecutive patients at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after education programs. The HbA1c level (%) was evaluated at same time point. Decrease in DQOL score was reported as improvement in QOL. The rate of patients response to educational programs was noted 74.07% (n=40) at end of the study (12 months). The prevalence of T1D was reported higher in men than in women. The overall DQOL score and HbA1c% level was significantly (Peducational programs. Patients exhibited greater satisfaction and diminished impact of diabetes after educational programs was observed after 3 months and it was continue up to end of study. The frequencies of self-monitoring of blood glucose were increased. Numbers of hypoglycemic and DKA events were decreased after educational programs when compared to baseline. Results of study revealed that the appropriate education and counseling diminish impact of diabetes, improve QOL and help to achieve desired glycemic (HbA1c) level in poorly control T1D patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Turmeric improves post-prandial working memory in pre-diabetes independent of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Chou, Yu-Ching; Fang, Wen-Hui; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Kuan, Jen-Chun; Liu, Hsiao-Yu; Lu, Ting-Mei; Xiu, Lili; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Andrews, Zane B; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment develops with pre-diabetes and dementia is a complication of diabetes. Natural products like turmeric and cinnamon may ameliorate the underlying pathogenesis. People ≥ 60 years (n=48) with newly-recognised untreated pre-diabetes were randomised to a double-blind metabolic study of placebo, turmeric (1 g), cinnamon (2 g) or both (1 g & 2 g respectively), ingested at a white bread (119 g) breakfast. Observations were made over 6 hours for pre- and post-working memory (WM), glycaemic and insulin responses and biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD)(0, 2, 4 and 6 hours): amyloid precursor protein (APP), γ-secretase subunits presenilin-1 (PS1), presenilin-2 (PS2), and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β). Differences between natural product users and non-users were determined by Students t and chi square tests; and between pre-test and post-test WM by Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Interaction between turmeric and cinnamon was tested by 2-way ANOVA. Multivariable linear regression (MLR) took account of BMI, glycaemia, insulin and AD biomarkers in the WM responses to turmeric and cinnamon. No interaction between turmeric and cinnamon was detected. WM increased from 2.6 to 2.9 out of 3.0 (p=0.05) with turmeric, but was unchanged with cinnamon. WM improvement was inversely associated with insulin resistance (r=-0.418, pturmeric were best predicted with an R2 of 34.5%; and with significant turmeric, BMI and insulin/glucose AUC beta-coefficients. Co-ingestion of turmeric with white bread increases working memory independent of body fatness, glycaemia, insulin, or AD biomarkers.

  2. A Team-Based Online Game Improves Blood Glucose Control in Veterans With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, B Price; Gagnon, David R; McMahon, Graham T; Orlander, Jay D; Kurgansky, Katherine E; Conlin, Paul R

    2017-09-01

    Rigorous evidence is lacking whether online games can improve patients' longer-term health outcomes. We investigated whether an online team-based game delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) to patients via e-mail or mobile application (app) can generate longer-term improvements in hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ). Patients ( n = 456) on oral diabetes medications with HbA 1c ≥58 mmol/mol were randomly assigned between a DSME game (with a civics booklet) and a civics game (with a DSME booklet). The 6-month games sent two questions twice weekly via e-mail or mobile app. Participants accrued points based on performance, with scores posted on leaderboards. Winning teams and individuals received modest financial rewards. Our primary outcome measure was HbA 1c change over 12 months. DSME game patients had significantly greater HbA 1c reductions over 12 months than civics game patients (-8 mmol/mol [95% CI -10 to -7] and -5 mmol/mol [95% CI -7 to -3], respectively; P = 0.048). HbA 1c reductions were greater among patients with baseline HbA 1c >75 mmol/mol: -16 mmol/mol [95% CI -21 to -12] and -9 mmol/mol [95% CI -14 to -5] for DSME and civics game patients, respectively; P = 0.031. Patients with diabetes who were randomized to an online game delivering DSME demonstrated sustained and meaningful HbA 1c improvements. Among patients with poorly controlled diabetes, the DSME game reduced HbA 1c by a magnitude comparable to starting a new diabetes medication. Online games may be a scalable approach to improve outcomes among geographically dispersed patients with diabetes and other chronic diseases. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. eRegistries: Electronic registries for maternal and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøen, J Frederik; Myhre, Sonja L; Frost, Michael J; Chou, Doris; Mehl, Garrett; Say, Lale; Cheng, Socheat; Fjeldheim, Ingvild; Friberg, Ingrid K; French, Steve; Jani, Jagrati V; Kaye, Jane; Lewis, John; Lunde, Ane; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Nankabirwa, Victoria; Nyanchoka, Linda; Stone, Hollie; Venkateswaran, Mahima; Wojcieszek, Aleena M; Temmerman, Marleen; Flenady, Vicki J

    2016-01-19

    The Global Roadmap for Health Measurement and Accountability sees integrated systems for health information as key to obtaining seamless, sustainable, and secure information exchanges at all levels of health systems. The Global Strategy for Women's, Children's and Adolescent's Health aims to achieve a continuum of quality of care with effective coverage of interventions. The WHO and World Bank recommend that countries focus on intervention coverage to monitor programs and progress for universal health coverage. Electronic health registries - eRegistries - represent integrated systems that secure a triple return on investments: First, effective single data collection for health workers to seamlessly follow individuals along the continuum of care and across disconnected cadres of care providers. Second, real-time public health surveillance and monitoring of intervention coverage, and third, feedback of information to individuals, care providers and the public for transparent accountability. This series on eRegistries presents frameworks and tools to facilitate the development and secure operation of eRegistries for maternal and child health. In this first paper of the eRegistries Series we have used WHO frameworks and taxonomy to map how eRegistries can support commonly used electronic and mobile applications to alleviate health systems constraints in maternal and child health. A web-based survey of public health officials in 64 low- and middle-income countries, and a systematic search of literature from 2005-2015, aimed to assess country capacities by the current status, quality and use of data in reproductive health registries. eRegistries can offer support for the 12 most commonly used electronic and mobile applications for health. Countries are implementing health registries in various forms, the majority in transition from paper-based data collection to electronic systems, but very few have eRegistries that can act as an integrating backbone for health

  4. Impact Of Patient Counseling And Education Of Diabetic Patients In Improving Their Quality Of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Pais

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The current study which is randomized comparative intervention (concurrent control attempts to study the effect of counseling and education provided by clinical pharmacist regarding the disease and related issues to achieve glycemic control and ultimately better quality of life of Diabetic patients; which was carried out for a period of 6months in the out-patient medicine department of St.Martha’sHospital, Bangalore.Materials and Method: A total of 98 (53 intervention, 45control patients were randomized into intervention and control group by chit method. Intervention group received counseling and education along with the information leaflet;follow up was done at intervals of 2nd, 4th & 6th month after baseline. Pre-validated questionnaires for KAP & QoL were administered at the baseline and last follow up. In a group of25 patients HbA1c was recorded at baseline & last follow-up.All the parameters (FBS, PPBS, HbA1c and scores were compared between intervention & control group postcounseling. Significant improvement (P<0.05 was observed inthe intervention group in terms of glycemic control and HbA1cvalues in comparison with the control group.Results: In the intervention group; Knowledge about the disease improved (P<0.05 along with better compliance to diet, however change in attitude towards need for exercise and regular checkups could not be achieved but significant improvement (p<0.05 in Quality of Life (QoL was achieved with education and counseling.Conclusion: The findings revealed that the clinical pharmacist can contribute to the better management of diabetes through patient education and counseling.

  5. Long-term obestatin treatment of mice type 2 diabetes increases insulin sensitivity and improves liver function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Pruszyńska-Oszmałek, Ewa; Strowski, Mathias Z; Nowak, Krzysztof W

    2017-06-01

    Obestatin and ghrelin are peptides encoded by the preproghrelin gene. Obestatin inhibits food intake, in addition to regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we test the ability of obestatin at improving metabolic control and liver function in type 2 diabetic animals (type 2 diabetes mellitus). The effects of chronic obestatin treatment of mice with experimentally induced type 2 diabetes mellitus on serum levels of glucose and lipids, and insulin sensitivity are characterized. In addition, alterations of hepatic lipid and glycogen contents are evaluated. Obestatin reduced body weight and decreased serum glucose, fructosamine, and β-hydroxybutyrate levels, as well as total and low-density lipoprotein fractions of cholesterol. In addition, obestatin increased high-density lipoproteins cholesterol levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity in mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, obestatin diminished liver mass, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol contents, while glycogen content was higher in livers of healthy and mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with obestatin. These changes were accompanied by reduction of increased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase in T2DM mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Obestatin increased adiponectin levels and reduced leptin concentration. Obestatin influenced the expression of genes involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by increasing Fabp5 and decreasing G6pc, Pepck, Fgf21 mRNA in the liver. Obestatin increased both, AKT and AMPK phosphorylation, and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein levels as well as mRNA expression in the liver. Obestatin improves metabolic abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus, restores hepatic lipid contents and decreases hepatic enzymes. Therefore, obestatin could potentially have a therapeutic relevance in treating of insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunctions in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Quality improvement for integrated management of patients with type 2 diabetes (PRIHTA project stage 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Agostino; Mauri, Alessandra; Spinella, Nello

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to show how a different collaborative relationship with family doctors and increasingly specialized diabetologists could lead to a 50% reduction in recurrent appointments due to procedural errors and a 50% reduction in the average waiting times for a specialist medical visit. A qualitative and quantitative definition of the problem was made using the Lean Six Sigma method: (Define); process indicators were observed that might interfere with the objectives of this study (Measure); descriptive statistics were used to confirm the validity and significance of the results (Analyze); and finally strategies were established to intervene on these variables (Improve). Four groups of action led to optimization of the objectives: (1) establishing clinical protocols for primary care physicians for treating hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia; (2) increasing the autonomy of nursing care staff; (3) reorganizing the appointments booking office; and (4) making diabetes clinics more specialized. Thanks to this project, primary care physicians have rediscovered their role and defined their diagnostic-therapeutic function under a shared scientific protocol. The model presented in this study provides scope for reflection on the role of the diabetologist, proposing an "alternative" that concerns only the care of patients with metabolic decompensation.

  7. Antioxidant Sol-Gel Improves Cutaneous Wound Healing in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yen-Hsien; Chang, Jung-Jhih; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Yang, Ming-Chien; Chien, Hsiung-Fei

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of vitamin C in Pluronic F127 on diabetic wound healing. Full-thickness excision skin wounds were made in normal and diabetic Wistar rats to evaluate the effect of saline, saline plus vitamin C (antioxidant sol), Pluronic F127, or Pluronic F127 plus vitamin C (antioxidant sol-gel). The rate of wound contraction, the levels of epidermal and dermal maturation, collagen synthesis, and apoptosis production in the wound tissue were determined. In vitro data showed that after 6 hours of air exposure, the order of the scavenging abilities for HOCl, H2O2, and O2  − was antioxidant sol-gel > antioxidant saline > Pluronic F127 = saline. After 7 and 14 days of wound injury, the antioxidant sol-gel improved wound healing significantly by accelerated epidermal and dermal maturation, an increase in collagen content, and a decrease in apoptosis formation. However, the wounds of all treatments healed mostly at 3 weeks. Vitamin C in Pluronic F127 hastened cutaneous wound healing by its antioxidant and antiapoptotic mechanisms through a good drug delivery system. This study showed that Pluronic F127 plus vitamin C could potentially be employed as a novel wound-healing enhancer. PMID:22919368

  8. Low carbohydrate diet and improved glycaemic control in a patient with type one diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Eiswirth

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an adult female with type 1 diabetes, whose HbA1c was trending at 58 mmol/mol (7.5% for the past 3 years. In August 2016, she reduced her total daily carbohydrate intake to 30–50 g and adjusted her other macronutrients to compensate for the calorific deficit. Her HbA1c fell to 34 mmol/mol (5.3% by January 2017 and average daily blood glucose readings decreased significantly from 10.4 to 6.1 mmol/L. Moreover, she observed a marked reduction of average daily glucose variability. Notably, there were no significant episodes of hypo- or hyperglycaemia and her lipid profile remained static. Subjectively, she described an improvement in her quality of life and the dietary transition was extremely well tolerated. We discuss these findings in detail and the potential clinical benefits for patients with type 1 diabetes that can be gained by following a low carbohydrate diet.

  9. OPTIMIZING LIFESTYLE IMPROVES GLYCEMIC PROFILE IN PATIENTS AT RISK FOR DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucsandra Dănciulescu Miulescu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a pandemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus due to urban and sedentary lifestyle, ageing and obesity.The most important means to prevent this disease is to optimize the lifestyle.Our study aimed to follow-up the effect of moderate caloric restriction and increase of physical activityon clinical and metabolic parameters in persons at risk to develop type 2 diabetes.Twenty-three overweight or obese patients with either altered fasting glucose or altered glucosetolerance were included in this study. They were followed up for 2 years for clinical progress and metabolicprofile, while on lifestyle counseling.The dietary and physical recommendations to improve lifestyle were followed by a small reduction inthe BMI, total cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, together with an increase of HDL at 1 and 2years of dietary counseling. However there was a significant reduction in abdominal circumference, fastingglycemia and glycemia at 2 hours during oral glucose tolerance test.The small reduction in BMI indicates the need of a more intensive lifestyle conseling.

  10. [Nicorandil improves cognitive dysfunction in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Chun-Xi; Xing, Tong; Gong, Xue; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Li, Yi-Nuo; Liu, Xuan; Ayijiang, Jiamaliding; Yu, Ye; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Li-Na

    2018-04-20

    To observe the protective effects of potassium channel opener nicorandil against cognitive dysfunction in mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. C57BL/6J mouse models of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) were established by intraperitoneal injection of STZ and received daily treatment with intragastric administration of nicorandil or saline (model group) for 4 consecutive weeks, with normal C57BL/6J mice serving as control. Fasting blood glucose level was recorded every week and Morris water maze was used to evaluate the cognitive behavior of the mice in the 4th week. At the end of the experiment, the mice were sacrificed to observe the ultrastructural changes in the hippocampus and pancreas under transmission electron microscopy; the contents of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the hippocampus and SOD activity and MDA level in the brain tissue were determined. Compared with the control group, the model group showed significantly increased fasting blood glucose (P<0.001), significantly prolonged escape latency (P<0.05) and increased swimming distance (P<0.01) with ultrastructural damage of pancreatic β cells and in the hippocampus; GIP and GLP-1 contents in the hippocampus (P<0.01) and SOD activity in the brain were significantly decreased (P<0.05) and MDA content was significantly increased in the model group (P<0.05). Compared with the model group, nicorandil treatment did not cause significant changes in fasting blood glucose, but significantly reduced the swimming distance (P<0.05); nicorandil did not improve the ultrastructural changes in pancreatic β cells but obviously improved the ultrastructures of hippocampal neurons and synapses. Nicorandil also significantly increased the contents of GIP and GLP-1 in the hippocampus (P<0.05), enhanced SOD activity (P<0.05) and decreased MDA level (P<0.01) in the brain tissue. Nicorandil improves cognitive dysfunction in mice with STZ-induced diabetes by

  11. Diabetes Health Information Technology Innovation to Improve Quality of Life for Health Plan Members in Urban Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Handley, Margaret A.; Sarkar, Urmimala; Quan, Judy; Pfeifer, Kelly; Soria, Catalina; Schillinger, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Safety net systems need innovative diabetes self-management programs for linguistically diverse patients. A low-income government-sponsored managed care plan implemented a 27-week automated telephone self-management support (ATSM) / health coaching intervention for English, Spanish-, and Cantonese-speaking members from four publicly-funded clinics in a practice-based research network. Compared to waitlist, immediate intervention participants had greater 6-month improvements in overall diabetes self-care behaviors (standardized effect size [ES] 0.29, pimproving patient-reported self-management and may also improve some outcomes. PMID:24594561

  12. Exendin-4 improves resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in diabetic db/db mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hsien Yueh; Chung, Chih-Yao; Yang, Wen-Chin; Liang, Chih-Lung; Wang, Chi-Young; Chang, Chih-Yu; Chang, Cicero Lee-Tian

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus is increasing among companion animals. This disease has similar characteristics in both humans and animals. Diabetes is frequently identified as an independent risk factor for infections associated with increased mortality. In the present study, homozygous diabetic (db/db) mice were infected with Listeria (L.) monocytogenes and then treated with the anti-diabetic drug exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue. In aged db/db mice, decreased CD11b+ macroph...

  13. Daptomycin experience in critical care patients: results from a registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jack E; Fominaya, Cory; Christensen, Keith J; McConnell, Scott A; Lamp, Kenneth C

    2012-04-01

    Vancomycin is often the drug of choice in critically ill patients with gram-positive infections, although circumstances often prevent its use. In these situations, clinicians are frequently left with limited data regarding alternative agents. To describe patients with reported sepsis receiving daptomycin in a critical care unit. This multicenter, noncomparative, noninterventional study identified patients in critical care units, using the Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE) 2005-2009 registry. A descriptive account of patient characteristics, infectious etiology, outcomes at the end of daptomycin therapy, and 30-day mortality is reported. Nonevaluable patients were excluded from the efficacy analysis but included in the safety analysis. We identified 128 patients, 98 (77%) of whom were evaluable for efficacy. Patient characteristics for the efficacy population were 55 (56%) males, 30 (31%) aged 66 years or older, 38 (39%) had creatinine clearance less than 30 mL/min, and 27 (28%) were on dialysis. Common underlying diseases included acute or chronic renal failure 44 (45%), hypertension 40 (41%), and diabetes 27 (28%). Seventy-two (73%) patients were bacteremic. The most common pathogens found were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (32%), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (21%), and coagulase-negative staphylococci (20%). Prior to daptomycin, antibiotics were used in 84 (86%) patients, most commonly vancomycin (65/84; 77%). The median (range) initial daptomycin dose was 6 mg/kg (3-10) and duration of 10 days (1-58). Overall success rate was 70% (31% cured; 39% improved). Twelve adverse events possibly related to daptomycin were reported in 9 of 128 (7%) patients in the safety population; 4 of these in 4 (3%) patients were serious. The mortality rate within 30 days of completing daptomycin was 42 of 128 (33%) patients. These data provide preliminary results on the use of daptomycin in critically ill patients with complicated conditions

  14. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, J Thomas; Klemann, Nina; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    of SNOMED codes were identified. A computer algorithm was developed to transcode SNOMED codes into an analyzable format including procedure (eg, biopsy, transurethral resection, etc), diagnosis, and date of diagnosis. For validation, ~55,000 pathological reports were manually reviewed. Prostate-specific...... antigen, vital status, causes of death, and tumor-node-metastasis classification were integrated from national registries. RESULTS: Of the 161,525 specimens from 113,801 males identified, 83,379 (51.6%) were sets of prostate biopsies, 56,118 (34.7%) were transurethral/transvesical resections......BACKGROUND: Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) codes are computer-processable medical terms used to describe histopathological evaluations. SNOMED codes are not readily usable for analysis. We invented an algorithm that converts prostate SNOMED codes into an analyzable format. We...

  15. Protocol for the Northern Manhattan Diabetes Community Outreach Project. A randomised trial of a community health worker intervention to improve diabetes care in Hispanic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmas, Walter; Teresi, Jeanne A; Findley, Sally; Mejia, Miriam; Batista, Milagros; Kong, Jian; Silver, Stephanie; Luchsinger, Jose A; Carrasquillo, Olveen

    2012-01-01

    Hispanics in the USA are affected by the diabetes epidemic disproportionately, and they consistently have lower access to care, poorer control of the disease and higher risk of complications. This study evaluates whether a community health worker (CHW) intervention may improve clinically relevant markers of diabetes care in adult underserved Hispanics. The Northern Manhattan Diabetes Community Outreach Project (NOCHOP) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial to be performed as a community-based participatory research study performed in a Primary Care Setting in Northern Manhattan (New York City). 360 Hispanic adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (haemoglobin A1c >8%), aged 35-70 years, will be randomised at a 1:1 ratio, within Primary Care Provider clusters. The two study arms are (1) a 12-month CHW intervention and (2) enhanced usual care (educational materials mailed at 4-month intervals, preceded by phone calls). The end points, assessed after 12 months, are primary = haemoglobin A1c and secondary = blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. In addition, the study will describe the CHW intervention in terms of components and intensity and will assess its effects on (1) medication adherence, (2) medication intensification, (3) diet and (4) physical activity. All participants will provide informed consent; the study protocol has been approved by the Institutional Review Board of Columbia University Medical Center. CHW interventions hold great promise in improving the well-being of minority populations who suffer from diabetes mellitus. The NOCHOP study will provide valuable information about the efficacy of those interventions vis-à-vis clinically relevant end points and will inform policy makers through a detailed characterisation of the programme and its effects. NCT00787475 at clinicaltrials.gov.

  16. Evaluation of peripheral microcirculation improvement of foot after tarsal tunnel release in diabetic patients by transcutaneous oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trignano, Emilio; Fallico, Nefer; Chen, Hung-Chi; Faenza, Mario; Bolognini, Alfonso; Armenti, Andrea; Santanelli Di Pompeo, Fabio; Rubino, Corrado; Campus, Gian Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    According to recent studies, peripheral nerve decompression in diabetic patients seems to not only improve nerve function, but also to increase microcirculation; thus decreasing the incidence of diabetic foot wounds and amputations. However, while the postoperative improvement of nerve function is demonstrated, the changes in peripheral microcirculation have not been demonstrated yet. The aim of this study is to assess the degree of microcirculation improvement of foot after the tarsal tunnel release in the diabetic patients by using transcutaneous oximetry. Twenty diabetic male patients aged between 43 and 72 years old (mean age 61.2 years old) suffering from diabetic peripheral neuropathy with superimposed nerve compression underwent transcutaneous oximetry (PtcO2) before and after tarsal tunnel release by placing an electrode on the skin at the level of the dorsum of the foot. Eight lower extremities presented diabetic foot wound preoperatively. Thirty-six lower extremities underwent surgical release of the tibialis posterior nerve only, whereas four lower extremities underwent the combined release of common peroneal nerve, anterior tibialis nerve, and posterior tibialis nerve. Preoperative values of transcutaneous oximetry were below the critical threshold, that is, lower than 40 mmHg (29.1 ± 5.4 mmHg). PtcO2 values at one month after surgery (45.8 ± 6.4 mmHg) were significantly higher than the preoperative ones (P = 0.01). The results of postoperative increase in PtcO2 values demonstrate that the release of the tarsal tunnel determines a relevant increase in microcirculation in the feet of diabetic patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evaluating the implementation of a national clinical programme for diabetes to standardise and improve services: a realist evaluation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S; Tracey, M L; Riordan, F; O'Neill, K; Mays, N; Kearney, P M

    2016-07-28

    Over the last three decades in response to the growing burden of diabetes, countries worldwide have developed national and regional multifaceted programmes to improve the monitoring and management of diabetes and to enhance the coordination of care within and across settings. In Ireland in 2010, against a backdrop of limited dedicated strategic planning and engrained variation in the type and level of diabetes care, a national programme was established to standardise and improve care for people with diabetes in Ireland, known as the National Diabetes Programme (NDP). The NDP comprises a range of organisational and service delivery changes to support evidence-based practices and policies. This realist evaluation protocol sets out the approach that will be used to identify and explain which aspects of the programme are working, for whom and in what circumstances to produce the outcomes intended. This mixed method realist evaluation will develop theories about the relationship between the context, mechanisms and outcomes of the diabetes programme. In stage 1, to identify the official programme theories, documentary analysis and qualitative interviews were conducted with national stakeholders involved in the design, development and management of the programme. In stage 2, as part of a multiple case study design with one case per administrative region in the health system, qualitative interviews are being conducted with frontline staff and service users to explore their responses to, and reasoning about, the programme's resources (mechanisms). Finally, administrative data will be used to examine intermediate implementation outcomes such as service uptake, acceptability, and fidelity to models of care. This evaluation is using the principles of realist evaluation to examine the implementation of a national programme to standardise and improve services for people with diabetes in Ireland. The concurrence of implementation and evaluation has enabled us to produce formative

  18. Improvement of type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese and non-obese patients after the duodenal switch operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenken, M; Cho, E Y; Karcz, W K; Grueneberger, J; Kuesters, S

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most important obesity-related comorbidities. This study was undertaken to characterise the effect of the biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) in morbidly obese and nonmorbidly obese diabetic patients. Methods. Outcome of 74 obese diabetic patients after BPD-DS and 16 non-obese diabetic patients after BPD or gastric bypass surgery was evaluated. Insulin usage, HbA(1c)-levels, and index of HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistence) were measured. Results. A substantial fraction of patients is free of insulin and shows an improved insulin sensitivity early after the operation, another fraction gets free of insulin in a 12-month period after the operation and a small fraction of long-term insulin users will not get free of insulin but nevertheless shows an improved metabolic status (less insulin needed, normal HbA(1c)-levels). Conclusion. BPD-DS leads to an improvement of T2DM in obese and non-obese patients. Nevertheless, more data is needed to clarify indications and mechanisms of action and to adjust our operation techniques to the needs of non-obese diabetic patients.

  19. Improvement of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Obese and Non-Obese Patients after the Duodenal Switch Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Frenken

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is one of the most important obesity-related comorbidities. This study was undertaken to characterise the effect of the biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS in morbidly obese and nonmorbidly obese diabetic patients. Methods. Outcome of 74 obese diabetic patients after BPD-DS and 16 non-obese diabetic patients after BPD or gastric bypass surgery was evaluated. Insulin usage, HbA1c-levels, and index of HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistence were measured. Results. A substantial fraction of patients is free of insulin and shows an improved insulin sensitivity early after the operation, another fraction gets free of insulin in a 12-month period after the operation and a small fraction of long-term insulin users will not get free of insulin but nevertheless shows an improved metabolic status (less insulin needed, normal HbA1c-levels. Conclusion. BPD-DS leads to an improvement of T2DM in obese and non-obese patients. Nevertheless, more data is needed to clarify indications and mechanisms of action and to adjust our operation techniques to the needs of non-obese diabetic patients.

  20. Methanolic Root Extract of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth Improves the Glycemic, Antiatherogenic, and Cardioprotective Indices in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Bilal Azmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the phytochemistry and the effect of methanolic root extract (MREt of Rauwolfia serpentina on alloxan-induced diabetic Wister male mice. Mice were divided in control (distilled water at 1 mL/kg and alloxan-induced diabetic mice which subdivided into diabetic (distilled water at 1 mL/kg, negative (0.05% dimethyl sulfoxide at 1 mL/kg, positive (glibenclamide at 5 mg/kg controls, and three test groups (MREt at 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg. All treatments were given orally for 14 days. Qualitatively MREt showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, phlobatannins, resins, saponins, steroids, tannins, and triterpenoids, while quantitatively extract was rich in total phenols. The flavonoids, saponins and alkaloids were also determined in root powder. MREt found effective in improving the body weights, glucose and insulin levels, insulin/glucose ratio, glycosylated and total hemoglobin in test groups as compared to diabetic control. Similarly, significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c cholesterols were found in test groups. Significant lipolysis with improved glycogenesis was also found in liver tissues of all test groups. ALT levels were found normal in all groups. Thus, MREt improves the glycemic, antiatherogenic, coronary risk, and cardioprotective indices in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

  1. Methanolic Root Extract of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth Improves the Glycemic, Antiatherogenic, and Cardioprotective Indices in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the phytochemistry and the effect of methanolic root extract (MREt) of Rauwolfia serpentina on alloxan-induced diabetic Wister male mice. Mice were divided in control (distilled water at 1 mL/kg) and alloxan-induced diabetic mice which subdivided into diabetic (distilled water at 1 mL/kg), negative (0.05% dimethyl sulfoxide at 1 mL/kg), positive (glibenclamide at 5 mg/kg) controls, and three test groups (MREt at 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg). All treatments were given orally for 14 days. Qualitatively MREt showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, phlobatannins, resins, saponins, steroids, tannins, and triterpenoids, while quantitatively extract was rich in total phenols. The flavonoids, saponins and alkaloids were also determined in root powder. MREt found effective in improving the body weights, glucose and insulin levels, insulin/glucose ratio, glycosylated and total hemoglobin in test groups as compared to diabetic control. Similarly, significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c) cholesterols were found in test groups. Significant lipolysis with improved glycogenesis was also found in liver tissues of all test groups. ALT levels were found normal in all groups. Thus, MREt improves the glycemic, antiatherogenic, coronary risk, and cardioprotective indices in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

  2. Registry Assessment of Peripheral Interventional Devices (RAPID): Registry assessment of peripheral interventional devices core data elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W Schuyler; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Morales, Pablo; Wilgus, Rebecca W; Heath, Anne H; Williams, Mary F; Tcheng, James E; Marinac-Dabic, J Danica; Malone, Misti L; Reed, Terrie L; Fukaya, Rie; Lookstein, Robert A; Handa, Nobuhiro; Aronow, Herbert D; Bertges, Daniel J; Jaff, Michael R; Tsai, Thomas T; Smale, Joshua A; Zaugg, Margo J; Thatcher, Robert J; Cronenwett, Jack L

    2018-02-01

    The current state of evaluating patients with peripheral artery disease and more specifically of evaluating medical devices used for peripheral vascular intervention (PVI) remains challenging because of the heterogeneity of the disease process, the multiple physician specialties that perform PVI, the multitude of devices available to treat peripheral artery disease, and the lack of consensus about the best treatment approaches. Because PVI core data elements are not standardized across clinical care, clinical trials, and registries, aggregation of data across different data sources and physician specialties is currently not feasible. Under the auspices of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Medical Device Epidemiology Network initiative-and its PASSION (Predictable and Sustainable Implementation of the National Registries) program, in conjunction with other efforts to align clinical data standards-the Registry Assessment of Peripheral Interventional Devices (RAPID) workgroup was convened. RAPID is a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort to develop a consensus lexicon and to promote interoperability across clinical care, clinical trials, and national and international registries of PVI. The current manuscript presents the initial work from RAPID to standardize clinical data elements and definitions, to establish a framework within electronic health records and health information technology procedural reporting systems, and to implement an informatics-based approach to promote the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials and registry efforts in PVI. Ultimately, we hope this work will facilitate and improve device evaluation and surveillance for patients, clinicians, health outcomes researchers, industry, policymakers, and regulators. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors predicting visual improvement post pars plana vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Tai Li Min

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify factors predicting visual improvement post vitrectomy for sequelae of proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR.METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of pars plana vitrectomy indicated for sequelae of PDR from Jan. to Dec. 2014 in Hospital Sultanah Bahiyah, Alor Star, Kedah, Malaysia. Data collected included patient demographics, baseline visual acuity(VAand post-operative logMAR best corrected VA at 1y. Data analysis was performed with IBM SPSS Statistics Version 22.0. RESULTS: A total of 103 patients were included. The mean age was 51.2y. On multivariable analysis, each pre-operative positive deviation of 1 logMAR from a baseline VA of 0 logMAR was associated with a post-operative improvement of 0.859 logMAR(P0.001. Likewise, an attached macula pre-operatively was associated with a 0.374(P=0.003logMAR improvement post vitrectomy. Absence of iris neovascularisation and absence of post-operative complications were associated with a post vitrectomy improvement in logMAR by 1.126(P=0.001and 0.377(P=0.005respectively. Absence of long-acting intraocular tamponade was associated with a 0.302(P=0.010improvement of logMAR post vitrectomy.CONCLUSION: Factors associated with visual improvement after vitrectomy are poor pre-operative VA, an attached macula, absence of iris neovascularisation, absence of post-operative complications and abstaining from use of long-acting intraocular tamponade. A thorough understanding of the factors predicting visual improvement will facilitate decision-making in vitreoretinal surgery.

  4. Effects of vitamin E and its derivativeson diabetic nephropathy in Ratsand identification of diacylglycerol kinase subtype involved in the improvement of diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kakehi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is a significant social issue. Controlling diabetic complications such as nephropathy is very important for QOL of diabetic patients. One of the mechanisms which causes diabetic complications is the abnormal activation of protein kinase C (PKC by increased diacylglycerol (DG from hyperglycemia. Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK can attenuate PKC activity by converting DG to phosphatidic acid. Thus far, d-a-tocopherol (VtE treatment has been shown to prevent early changes of diabetic renal dysfunctions by activating DGK. However, it is still unknown whether VtE derivatives improve diabetic nephropathy similarly to VtE, and which DGK subtype is activated by VtE and/or the derivatives. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate effects of VtE and its derivatives on diabetic nephropathy in rats, in addition to identifying the DGK subtype involved in the improvement of nephropathy in vivo. Methods: To induce diabetes in rats, six weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitonealy administrated 65 mg/kg streptozocin (STZ in 20 mM citrate buffer. For two or eight weeks, 40 mg/kg VtE, 44 mg/kg acetate VtE (aVtE or 49.3 mg/kg succinate VtE (sVtE was intraperitonealy administrated every other day after STZ administration. The blood glucose level, body weight, and kidney weight, in addition to urinary volume, albumin, and BUN were measured every week after STZ administration. Additionally, in order to identify the DGK subtype activated by VtE and aVtE, the DGK subtype expressed in the rat glomerulus was checked by RT-PCR and western blotting, and the activity in the glomerulus from the rats before and after the VtE and aVtE treatments were measured in the presence or absence of EGTA. Results: Averages of kidney weight and BUN of rats treated with VtE, aVtE and sVtE for 8 weeks were reduced, compared to the control. However, the intraperitoneal administration of sVtE was toxic. Additionally, the amount of urine volume and

  5. Improving risk-stratification of Diabetes complications using temporal data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Lucia; Dagliati, Arianna; Segagni, Daniele; Leporati, Paola; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    To understand which factor trigger worsened disease control is a crucial step in Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) patient management. The MOSAIC project, funded by the European Commission under the FP7 program, has been designed to integrate heterogeneous data sources and provide decision support in chronic T2D management through patients' continuous stratification. In this work we show how temporal data mining can be fruitfully exploited to improve risk stratification. In particular, we exploit administrative data on drug purchases to divide patients in meaningful groups. The detection of drug consumption patterns allows stratifying the population on the basis of subjects' purchasing attitude. Merging these findings with clinical values indicates the relevance of the applied methods while showing significant differences in the identified groups. This extensive approach emphasized the exploitation of administrative data to identify patterns able to explain clinical conditions.

  6. German diabetes management programs improve quality of care and curb costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Stephanie; Drabik, Anna; Büscher, Guido; Graf, Christian; Ullrich, Walter; Gerber, Andreas; Lauterbach, Karl W; Lüngen, Markus

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the results of a large-scale analysis of a nationwide disease management program in Germany for patients with diabetes mellitus. The German program differs markedly from "classic" disease management in the United States. Although it combines important hallmarks of vendor-based disease management and the Chronic Care Model, the German program is based in primary care practices and carried out by physicians, and it draws on their personal relationships with patients to promote adherence to treatment goals and self-management. After four years of follow-up, overall mortality for patients and drug and hospital costs were all significantly lower for patients who participated in the program compared to other insured patients with similar health profiles who were not in the program. These results suggest that the German disease management program is a successful strategy for improving chronic illness care.

  7. Benazepril hydrochloride improves diabetic nephropathy and decreases proteinuria by decreasing ANGPTL-4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lingyu; Feng, Xiaoqing; Wang, Chuanhai; Zhang, Xuebin; Sun, Wenqiang; Yu, Kebo

    2017-10-04

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of benazepril hydrochloride (BH) on proteinuria and ANGPTL-4 expression in a diabetic nephropathy (DN) rat model. A total of 72 Wistar male rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control (NC), DN group and BH treatment (BH) groups. The DN model was induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Weight, glucose, proteinuria, biochemical indicators and the kidney weight index were examined at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. In addition, ANGPTL-4 protein and mRNA expressions were assessed by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR, respectively. Relationships between ANGPTL-4 and biochemical indicators were investigated using Spearman analysis. Weight was significantly lower but glucose levels were significantly higher in both the DN and BH groups than in the NC group (P Benazepril hydrochloride improves DN and decreases proteinuria by decreasing ANGPTL-4 expression.

  8. Improved survival and renal prognosis of patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy with improved control of risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken; Carstensen, Bendix

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate long-term survival, development of renal end points, and decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy (DN) after renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibition and multifactorial treatment of cardiovascular risk factors ha...

  9. Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade Associated with Statin Improves Endothelial Function in Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Altenburg Gismondi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Studies suggest that statins have pleiotropic effects, such as reduction in blood pressure, and improvement in endothelial function and vascular stiffness.Objective:To analyze if prior statin use influences the effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors on blood pressure, endothelial function, and vascular stiffness.Methods:Patients with diabetes and hypertension with office systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 80 mmHg had their antihypertensive medications replaced by amlodipine during 6 weeks. They were then randomized to either benazepril or losartan for 12 additional weeks while continuing on amlodipine. Blood pressure (assessed with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, and vascular stiffness (pulse wave velocity were evaluated before and after the combined treatment. In this study, a post hoc analysis was performed to compare patients who were or were not on statins (SU and NSU groups, respectively.Results:The SU group presented a greater reduction in the 24-hour systolic blood pressure (from 134 to 122 mmHg, p = 0.007, and in the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (from 6.5 to 10.9%, p = 0.003 when compared with the NSU group (from 137 to 128 mmHg, p = 0.362, and from 7.5 to 8.3%, p = 0.820. There was no statistically significant difference in pulse wave velocity (SU group: from 9.95 to 9.90 m/s, p = 0.650; NSU group: from 10.65 to 11.05 m/s, p = 0.586.Conclusion:Combined use of statins, amlodipine, and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors improves the antihypertensive response and endothelial function in patients with hypertension and diabetes.

  10. Mortality after percutaneous coronary revascularization: Prior cardiovascular risk factor control and improved outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Awsan; Balasubramaniam, Karthik; Alhous, M Hafez A; Lee, Kelvin; Jesudason, Peter; Rashid, Muhammad; Mamas, Mamas A; Zaman, Azfar G

    2017-06-01

    To assess the mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) according to their insulin requirement and PCI setting (elective, urgent, and emergency). DM is a major risk factor to develop coronary artery disease (CAD). It is unclear if meticulous glycemic control and aggressive risk factor management in patients with DM has improved outcomes following PCI. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 9,224 patients treated with PCI at a regional tertiary center between 2008 and 2011. About 7,652 patients were nondiabetics (non-DM), 1,116 had non-insulin treated diabetes mellitus (NITDM) and 456 had ITDM. Multi-vessel coronary artery disease, renal impairment and non-coronary vascular disease were more prevalent in DM patients. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.4%. In a logistic regression model, the adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for 30-day mortality were 1.28 (0.81-2.03, P = 0.34) in NITDM and 2.82 (1.61-4.94, P diabetes, this study reveals higher mortality only in insulin-treated diabetic patients following PCI for stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome. Importantly, diabetic patients with good risk factor control and managed on diet or oral hypoglycemics have similar outcomes to the non-diabetic population. © 2016 The Authors Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Utility of registries for post-marketing evaluation of medicines. A survey of Swedish health care quality registries from a regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltelius, Nils; Gedeborg, Rolf; Holm, Lennart; Zethelius, Björn

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe content and procedures in some selected Swedish health care quality registries (QRs) of relevance to regulatory decision-making. A workshop was organized with participation of seven Swedish QRs which subsequently answered a questionnaire regarding registry content on drug treatments and outcomes. Patient populations, coverage, data handling and quality control, as well as legal and ethical aspects are presented. Scientific publications from the QRs are used as a complementary measure of quality and scientific relevance. The registries under study collect clinical data of high relevance to regulatory and health technology agencies. Five out of seven registries provide information on the drug of interest. When applying external quality criteria, we found a high degree of fulfillment, although information on medication was not sufficient to answer all questions of regulatory interest. A notable strength is the option for linkage to the Prescribed Drug Registry and to information on education and socioeconomic status. Data on drugs used during hospitalization were also collected to some extent. Outcome measures collected resemble those used in relevant clinical trials. All registries collected patient-reported outcome measures. The number of publications from the registries was substantial, with studies of appropriate design, including randomized registry trials. Quality registries may provide a valuable source of post-marketing data on drug effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Closer collaboration between registries and regulators to improve quality and usefulness of registry data could benefit both regulatory utility and value for health care providers.

  12. Marrow donor registry and cord blood bank in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsung Dao

    2002-08-01

    Unrelated Bone marrow transplant was initiated thirty years ago. Though there are over millions of donors registered with the bone marrow registries worldwide, Asian patients rarely find a match with all these donors. Tzu Chi Marrow Donor Registry was established to meet this need. It has become the largest Asian marrow donor registry in the world. With the introduction of high technology to test the HLA of the donors and recipients, the success rate of bone marrow transplant is greatly improved among Asian countries. 50% of blood disease Asian patients who cannot find a bone marrow matched donor will be complemented by the establishment of cord blood banks in Taiwan.

  13. [Efficacy of topical ketorolac for improving visual function after photocoagulation in diabetic patients with focal macular edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razo Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros; Lima-Gómez, Virgilio; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Photocoagulation reduces the incidence of visual loss in diabetic patients with focal macular edema, but it can induce it for Efficacy of topical ketorolac for improving visual function after photocoagulation in diabetic patients with focal macular edema 6 weeks after treatment and produces visual improvement in some cases. Topical ketorolac may reduce the inflammation caused by photocoagulation and improve visual outcome. To determine the efficacy of topical ketorolac for improving visual function after photocoagulation in diabetic patients with focal macular edema. An experimental, comparative, prospective, longitudinal study in diabetic patients with focal macular edema was conducted. Eyes were randomized into two groups of topical treatment for 3 weeks after photocoagulation (A: ketorolac, B: placebo). Best corrected visual acuity before and after treatment was compared in each group (paired t test), and the proportion of eyes with visual improvement was compared between groups (χ(2)). The evaluation was repeated after stratifying for initial visual acuity (≥ 0.5, < 0.5). There were 105 eyes included. In group A (n= 46) mean visual acuity changed from 0.50 to 0.58 (p= 0.003), and from 0.55 to 0.55 in group B (n= 59, p= 0.83); mean percent change was 22.3% in group A and 3.5% in group B (p= 0.03). Visual improvement was identified in 25 eyes from group A (54.3%) and 19 from group B (32.2%, p= 0.019, RR 1.65); the difference only persisted when initial visual acuity was ≥ 0.5 (10 [40%], group A, 5 [14.7%], group B, p= 0.02, RR 2.72). Topical ketorolac was more effective than placebo to improve best corrected visual acuity in diabetic patients with focal macular edema.

  14. Hydrogen improves glycemic control in type1 diabetic animal model by promoting glucose uptake into skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Amitani

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H(2 acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. However, there are few reports on H(2 function in other capacities in diabetes mellitus (DM. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of H(2 in glucose transport by studying cultured mouse C2C12 cells and human hepatoma Hep-G2 cells in vitro, in addition to three types of diabetic mice [Streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice, high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and genetically diabetic db/db mice] in vivo. The results show that H(2 promoted 2-[(14C]-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG uptake into C2C12 cells via the translocation of glucose transporter Glut4 through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K, protein kinase C (PKC, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, although it did not stimulate the translocation of Glut2 in Hep G2 cells. H(2 significantly increased skeletal muscle membrane Glut4 expression and markedly improved glycemic control in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice after chronic intraperitoneal (i.p. and oral (p.o. administration. However, long-term p.o. administration of H(2 had least effect on the obese and non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mouse models. Our study demonstrates that H(2 exerts metabolic effects similar to those of insulin and may be a novel therapeutic alternative to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus that can be administered orally.

  15. Improvement of C peptide zero BMI 24-34 diabetic patients after tailored one anastomosis gastric bypass (BAGUA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciacaballero, M; Martínez-Moreno, J M; Toval, J A; Miralles, F; Mínguez, A; Osorio, D; Mata, J M; Reyes-Ortiz, A

    2013-03-01

    Although bariatric surgery proved to be a very effective method in the treatment of patients in whose pancreas still produce insulin (type 2 diabetes), the accompanied metabolic syndrome and their diabetes complications, there is no information on the effect of this type of surgery in BMI24-34 patients when pancreas do not produce insulin at all (type 1, LADA and long term evolution type 2 diabetes among others). We report preliminary data of a serie of 11 patients all with a C-peptide values below 0.0 ng/ml. They were followed for 6 to 60 months (mean 19 months) after surgery. We studied the changes in glycemic control, evolution of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes complications after one anastomosis gastric bypass (BAGUA). All values relative to glycemic control were improved HbA1c (from 8.9 ± 0.6 to 6.7 ± 0.2%), FPG (Fasting Plasma Glucose) [from 222.36 ± 16.87 to 94 ± 5 (mg/dl)] as well as the daily insulin requirement of rapid (from 40.6 ± 12.8 to 0 (U/d) and long-lasting insulin (from 41.27 ± 7.3 U/day to 15.2 ± 3.3 U/day). It resolved 100% of the metabolic syndrome diseases as well as severe hypoglycaemia episodes present before surgery and improved some serious complications from diabetes like retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, peripheral vasculopathy and cardiopathy. Tailored one anastomosis gastric bypass in BMI 24-34 C peptide zero diabetic patients eliminated the use of rapid insulin, reduced to only one injection per day long-lasting insulin and improved the glycemic control. After surgery disappear metabolic syndrome and severe hypoglycaemia episodes and improves significantly retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, peripheral vasculopathy and cardiopathy. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. A Pilot Food Bank Intervention Featuring Diabetes-Appropriate Food Improved Glycemic Control Among Clients In Three States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Hilary K; Lyles, Courtney; Marshall, Michelle B; Prendergast, Kimberly; Smith, Morgan C; Headings, Amy; Bradshaw, Georgiana; Rosenmoss, Sophie; Waxman, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Food insecurity--defined as not having adequate quantity and quality of food at all times for all household members to have an active, healthy life--is a risk factor for poor diabetes control, yet few diabetes interventions address this important factor. Food pantries, which receive food from food banks and distribute it to clients in need, may be ideal sites for diabetes self-management support because they can provide free diabetes-appropriate food to people in low-income communities. Between February 2012 and March 2014, we enrolled 687 food pantry clients with diabetes in three states in a six-month pilot intervention that provided them with diabetes-appropriate food, blood sugar monitoring, primary care referral, and self-management support. Improvements were seen in pre-post analyses of glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c decreased from 8.11 percent to 7.96 percent), fruit and vegetable intake (which increased from 2.8 to 3.1 servings per day), self-efficacy, and medication adherence. Among participants with elevated HbA1c (at least 7.5 percent) at baseline, HbA1c improved from 9.52 percent to 9.04 percent. Although food pantries are nontraditional settings for diabetes support, this pilot study suggests a promising health promotion model for vulnerable populations. Policies supporting such interventions may be particularly effective because of food pantries' food access and distribution capacity. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Ginsenoside Rh2 Improves Cardiac Fibrosis via PPARδ–STAT3 Signaling in Type 1-Like Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsiang Lo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2 is an active principal ingredient contained in ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer, a medicinal herb used to enhance health worldwide. The present study is designed to investigate the effect of Rh2 on myocardial fibrosis in diabetic rats. In a streptozotocin-induced model of type-1 diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats, the increased fasting blood glucose levels and heart weight/body weight (HW/BW ratio were substantially alleviated by Rh2. Moreover, Rh2 improved cardiac performance in STZ-diabetic rats. Histological results from Masson staining showed that Rh2 attenuated cardiac fibrosis in STZ-diabetic rats. The effects of Rh2 were reversed by GSK0660 at a dose sufficient to inhibit peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ in STZ-diabetic rats. The role of PPARδ was subsequently investigated in vitro. Rh2 restored the decreased PPARδ expression level in high glucose-cultured cardiomyocytes. Moreover, increased protein levels of fibrotic signals, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, connective tissue growth factor (CCN2 and fibronectin, were reduced by Rh2 in high glucose-cultured cardiomyocytes. These effects of Rh2 were reversed by GSK0660 or siRNA specific for PPARδ Taken together, PPARδ activation may inhibit STAT3 activation to reduce CCN2 and fibronectin expression in diabetic rats with cardiac fibrosis. Moreover, Rh2 improves cardiac function and fibrosis by increasing PPARδ signaling. Therefore, Rh2 is suitable to develop as an alternative remedy for cardiac fibrosis.

  18. Improvement of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by 3-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Xiao-Ling; Kou, Hong-Ju; Ni, Xian-Wei; Wu, Qing; Zou, Chun-Peng; Wu, Dao-Zhu; Liu, Yong-Fang

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) was used to evaluate the improvement of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on the left ventricular (LV) systolic function of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitu (T2DM). We recruited T2DM patients (38 cases, diabetic group) and healthy volunteers (35 cases, control group) to collect LV full volume imaging. TomTec software was used for calculating LV global longitudinal strain (LVGLS), global circumferential strain (LVGCS), peak twist (LVTW), peak apical rotation (LVPAR), ejection fraction (LVEF), and torsion (LVT). All indices were re-tested 2 weeks later after intensive treatment of insulin pump. LVGLS, LVGCS, LVTW and LVPAR in diabetic group were significantly decreased than control group. LVGLS and LVGCS in pre-treatment diabetic group were significantly increased than post-treatment. LVGLS, LVGCS, LVTW and LVPAR had correlations among control, pre-treatment and post-treatment diabetic groups. There were no significant differences in LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF, LVT and R-R. LV systolic function of patients with T2DM complicated with microangiopathy was improved after treatment of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. In addition, therapeutic effect could be accurately evaluated by 3D-STE which had vital clinical application.

  19. The prediction of resting energy expenditure in type 2 diabetes mellitus is improved by factoring for glycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougeon, R; Lamarche, M; Yale, J-F; Venuta, T

    2002-12-01

    Predictive equations have been reported to overestimate resting energy expenditure (REE) for obese persons. The presence of hyperglycemia results in elevated REE in obese persons with type 2 diabetes, and its effect on the validity of these equations is unknown. We tested whether (1) indicators of diabetes control were independent associates of REE in type 2 diabetes and (2) their inclusion would improve predictive equations. A cross-sectional study of 65 (25 men, 40 women) obese type 2 diabetic subjects. Variables measured were: REE by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry, body composition by bioimpedance analysis, body circumferences, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A(1c). Data were analyzed using stepwise multiple linear regression. REE, corrected for weight, fat-free mass, age and gender, was significantly greater with FPG>10 mmol/l (P=0.017) and correlated with FPG (P=0.013) and hemoglobin A(1c) as percentage upper limit of normal (P=0.02). Weight was the main determinant of REE. Together with hip circumference and FPG, it explained 81% of the variation. FPG improved the predictability of the equation by >3%. With poor glycemic control, it can represent an increase in REE of up to 8%. Our data indicate that in a population of obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus, REE is better predicted when fasting plasma glucose is included as a variable.

  20. Metformin Improves Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Diabetic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Independent from Glycemia Control : Comparison to Vildagliptin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamidi Shishavan, Mahdi; Henning, Robert H; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Goris, Maaike; Deelman, Leo E; Buikema, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Metformin confers vascular benefits beyond glycemia control, possibly via pleiotropic effects on endothelial function. In type-1-diabetes-mellitus (T1DM-)patients metformin improved flow-mediated dilation but also increased prostaglandin(PG)-F-2 alpha, a known endothelial-contracting factor. To

  1. Use of automated reminder letters to improve diabetes management in primary care: outcomes of a quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Sally H; Sick, Brian T; Wang, Qi; Swan, Paul J; Weber-Main, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Effective management of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) can be time-consuming and costly. One patient-centred quality improvement strategy is to generate reminder letters to prompt patient action(s), but this strategy's effect on DM outcomes is uncertain. To determine whether using the electronic medical record to automatically generate reminder letters for patients not meeting recommended DM targets is associated with improvement in practice level quality metrics for DM management. Over 15 months, letters were sent monthly to all patients with DM in a large, urban, primary care teaching practice whose records for haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or blood pressure (BP) indicated non-compliance with recommended levels and testing intervals. Logistic regression was used to analyse cross-sectional, practice-level differences in the proportion of patients meeting DM quality metrics (HbA1c < 7%, LDL < 100 mg/dl and BP < 130/80 mmHg; rates of checking each value within the last 12 months; and a composite of these five measures) across four time points: six months before the intervention, start of the intervention, end of the 15-month intervention period and six months after the intervention. The number of letters sent per month ranged from 284 to 392, representing 28-38% of all patients with DM. At the end of the intervention, patients' odds of being at goal were higher than before the intervention began for LDL < 100 mg/dl, and for HbA1c and LDL tested once within the last 12 months (or 1.24, P = 0.005; or 1.35, P = 0.03; or 1.48, P < 0.001, respectively). Post intervention, declines were seen in LDL checked within the last 12 months (or 0.76, P = 0.003) and in the composite endpoint (or 0.78, P = 0.005). The automated patient-reminder letter intervention was associated with modest improvements in several, but not all DM measures. This approach may be an effective tool for improving quality of care for patients with DM.

  2. A systematic literature review of diabetes self-management education features to improve diabetes education in women of Black African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin American ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Chan, Vivian Wing-Sheung; Manuel, Lisa; Sidani, Souraya

    2013-08-01

    This systematic literature review aims to identify diabetes self-management education (DSME) features to improve diabetes education for Black African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin American women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a literature search in six health databases for randomized controlled trials and comparative studies. Success rates of intervention features were calculated based on effectiveness in improving glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c), anthropometrics, physical activity, or diet outcomes. Calculations of rate differences assessed whether an intervention feature positively or negatively affected an outcome. From 13 studies included in our analysis, we identified 38 intervention features in relation to their success with an outcome. Five intervention features had positive rate differences across at least three outcomes: hospital-based interventions, group interventions, the use of situational problem-solving, frequent sessions, and incorporating dietitians as interventionists. Six intervention features had high positive rate differences (i.e. ≥50%) on specific outcomes. Different DSME intervention features may influence broad and specific self-management outcomes for women of African/Caribbean and Hispanic/Latin ethnicity. With the emphasis on patient-centered care, patients and care providers can consider options based on DSME intervention features for its broad and specific impact on outcomes to potentially make programming more effective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Restoration of autophagy in endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus improves nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Holbrook, Monica; Flint, Nir; Feng, Bihua; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Duess, Mai-Ann; Farb, Melissa G; Gokce, Noyan; Shirihai, Orian S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Vita, Joseph A

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Autophagy is a multistep mechanism for the removal of damaged proteins and organelles from the cell. Under diabetic conditions, inadequate autophagy promotes cellular dysfunction and insulin resistance in non-vascular tissue. We hypothesized that impaired autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. We measured autophagy markers and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in freshly isolated endothelial cells from diabetic subjects (n = 45) and non-diabetic controls (n = 41). p62 levels were higher in cells from diabetics (34.2 ± 3.6 vs. 20.0 ± 1.6, P = 0.001), indicating reduced autophagic flux. Bafilomycin inhibited insulin-induced activation of eNOS (64.7 ± 22% to -47.8 ± 8%, P = 0.04) in cells from controls, confirming that intact autophagy is necessary for eNOS signaling. In endothelial cells from diabetics, activation of autophagy with spermidine restored eNOS activation, suggesting that impaired autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction (P = 0.01). Indicators of autophagy initiation including the number of LC3-bound puncta and beclin 1 expression were similar in diabetics and controls, whereas an autophagy terminal phase indicator, the lysosomal protein Lamp2a, was higher in diabetics. In endothelial cells under diabetic conditions, the beneficial effect of spermidine on eNOS activation was blocked by autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin or 3-methyladenine. Blocking the terminal stage of autophagy with bafilomycin increased p62 (P = 0.01) in cells from diabetics to a lesser extent than in cells from controls (P = 0.04), suggesting ongoing, but inadequate autophagic clearance. Inadequate autophagy contributes to endothelial dysfunction in patients with diabetes and may be a target for therapy of diabetic vascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bent; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in January 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the first registry based outcome data of a national population with radiological and clinical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI......) data from DHAR between January 2012 and November 2015 were extracted. Radiological pincer-type FAI was defined as LCE > 35° and cam FAI as alpha-angle > 55°. These data were combined with FAI surgical data such as osteochondroplasty and labral repair or resection. PROMs consisting of HAGOS, EQ-5 D...

  5. Antithyroid Therapy Improves Glycemic Control in Hyperthyroid Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Mihaela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Thyroid disorders are more frequently met in patients with diabetes mellitus than in general population. Thyroid hormones increase glycemia by several mechanisms, but the effect of antithyroid treatment on glucose control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM cases is not well studied. The aim of our work was to analyze the evolution of glycemic control of T1DM patients submitted to specific therapy when hyperthyroidism was diagnosed. Material and method. The study group comprised by 37 patients, 35 women (94.6% and 2 men (5.4%, known as having T1DM and diagnosed with hyperthyroidism during a 10-years interval. They were treated with antithyroid medication and reassessed after 6 months regarding thyroid function and glycemic control. Results. In the whole group, there was a significant decrease in mean HbA1c level (with 0.41% and a significant increase in the percentage of patients being in the glycemic target (from 10.8% to 35.1%. The better glycemic control was obtained with a lower mean insulin dose. Patients who became euthyroid had a better evolution regarding glucose control in comparison to those who remained hyperthyroid. Changes in other cardiovascular risk factors were noted: systolic blood pressure decreased; diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and body weight increased. TSH and HbA1c values were inversely correlated. Conclusions. The therapeutic control of excessive thyroid function significantly contributes to the improvement of glycemic control in patients with T1DM and induces changes in the cardiovascular risk factors profile.

  6. Improved Automated Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy on a Publicly Available Dataset Through Integration of Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael David; Lou, Yiyue; Erginay, Ali; Clarida, Warren; Amelon, Ryan; Folk, James C; Niemeijer, Meindert

    2016-10-01

    To compare performance of a deep-learning enhanced algorithm for automated detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR), to the previously published performance of that algorithm, the Iowa Detection Program (IDP)-without deep learning components-on the same publicly available set of fundus images and previously reported consensus reference standard set, by three US Board certified retinal specialists. We used the previously reported consensus reference standard of referable DR (rDR), defined as International Clinical Classification of Diabetic Retinopathy moderate, severe nonproliferative (NPDR), proliferative DR, and/or macular edema (ME). Neither Messidor-2 images, nor the three retinal specialists setting the Messidor-2 reference standard were used for training IDx-DR version X2.1. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, area under the curve (AUC), and their confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Sensitivity was 96.8% (95% CI: 93.3%-98.8%), specificity was 87.0% (95% CI: 84.2%-89.4%), with 6/874 false negatives, resulting in a negative predictive value of 99.0% (95% CI: 97.8%-99.6%). No cases of severe NPDR, PDR, or ME were missed. The AUC was 0.980 (95% CI: 0.968-0.992). Sensitivity was not statistically different from published IDP sensitivity, which had a CI of 94.4% to 99.3%, but specificity was significantly better than the published IDP specificity CI of 55.7% to 63.0%. A deep-learning enhanced algorithm for the automated detection of DR, achieves significantly better performance than a previously reported, otherwise essentially identical, algorithm that does not employ deep learning. Deep learning enhanced algorithms have the potential to improve the efficiency of DR screening, and thereby to prevent visual loss and blindness from this devastating disease.

  7. Biomarkers for predicting type 2 diabetes development-Can metabolomics improve on existing biomarkers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Savolainen

    Full Text Available The aim was to determine if metabolomics could be used to build a predictive model for type 2 diabetes (T2D risk that would improve prediction of T2D over current risk markers.Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics was used in a nested case-control study based on a screening sample of 64-year-old Caucasian women (n = 629. Candidate metabolic markers of T2D were identified in plasma obtained at baseline and the power to predict diabetes was tested in 69 incident cases occurring during 5.5 years follow-up. The metabolomics results were used as a standalone prediction model and in combination with established T2D predictive biomarkers for building eight T2D prediction models that were compared with each other based on their sensitivity and selectivity for predicting T2D.Established markers of T2D (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance (HOMA, smoking, serum adiponectin alone, and in combination with metabolomics had the largest areas under the curve (AUC (0.794 (95% confidence interval [0.738-0.850] and 0.808 [0.749-0.867] respectively, with the standalone metabolomics model based on nine fasting plasma markers having a lower predictive power (0.657 [0.577-0.736]. Prediction based on non-blood based measures was 0.638 [0.565-0.711].Established measures of T2D risk remain the best predictor of T2D risk in this population. Additional markers detected using metabolomics are likely related to these measures as they did not enhance the overall prediction in a combined model.

  8. Practice context affects efforts to improve diabetes care for primary care patients: a pragmatic cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, L Miriam; Dickinson, W Perry; Nutting, Paul A; Fisher, Lawrence; Harbrecht, Marjie; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Glasgow, Russell E; West, David R

    2015-04-01

    Efforts to improve primary care diabetes management have assessed strategies across heterogeneous groups of patients and practices. However, there is substantial variability in how well practices implement interventions and achieve desired outcomes. To examine practice contextual features that moderate intervention effectiveness. Secondary analysis of data from a cluster randomized trial of three approaches for implementing the Chronic Care Model to improve diabetes care. Forty small to mid-sized primary care practices participated, with 522 clinician and staff member surveys. Outcomes were assessed for 822 established patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes who had at least one visit to the practice in the 18 months following enrollment. The primary outcome was a composite measure of diabetes process of care, ascertained by chart audit, regarding nine quality measures from the American Diabetes Association Physician Recognition Program: HgA1c, foot exam, blood pressure, dilated eye exam, cholesterol, nephropathy screen, flu shot, nutrition counseling, and self-management support. Data from practices included structural and demographic characteristics and Practice Culture Assessment survey subscales (Change Culture, Work Culture, Chaos). Across the three implementation approaches, demographic/structural characteristics (rural vs. urban + .70(p = .006), +2.44(p Culture (high vs. low: -.86(p = .048), +1.71(p = .005), +.34(p = .22)), Work Culture (high vs. low: -.67(p = .18), +2.41(p Culture (high vs. low: -.24(p = .006), -.20(p = .0771), -.44(p = .0019) and Work Culture (high vs. low: +.56(p = .3160), -1.0(p = .008), -.25 (p = .0216) were associated with trajectories of change in diabetes process of care, either directly or differentially by study arm. This study supports the need for broader use of methodological approaches to better examine contextual effects on implementation and effectiveness of quality improvement interventions in primary care settings.

  9. Comparing the Effectiveness of a Clinical Registry and a Clinical Data Warehouse for Supporting Clinical Trial Recruitment: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost. PMID:21347102

  10. Exercise training does not improve myocardial diastolic tissue velocities in Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenonen Arja

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial diastolic tissue velocities are reduced already in newly onset Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. Poor disease control may lead to left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction and heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exercise training on myocardial diastolic function in T2D patients without ischemic heart disease. Methods 48 men (52.3 ± 5.6 yrs with T2D were randomized to supervised training four times a week and standard therapy (E, or standard treatment alone (C for 12 months. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, oxygen consumption (VO2max, and muscle strength (Sit-up were measured. Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI was used to determine the average maximal mitral annular early (Ea and late (Aa diastolic as well as systolic (Sa velocities, systolic strain (ε and strain rate (έ from the septum, and an estimation of left ventricular end diastolic pressure (E/Ea. Results Exercise capacity (VO2max, E 32.0 to 34.7 vs. C 32.6 to 31.5 ml/kg/min, p = .001, muscle strength (E 12.7 to 18.3 times vs. C 14.6 to 14.7 times, p 1c (E 8.2 to 7.5% vs. C 8.0 to 8.4%, p = .006 improved significantly in the exercise group compared to the controls (ANOVA. Systolic blood pressure decreased in the E group (E 144 to 138 mmHg vs. C 146 to 144 mmHg, p = .04. Contrary to risk factor changes diastolic long axis relaxation did not improve significantly, early diastolic velocity Ea from 8.1 to 7.9 cm/s for the E group vs. C 7.4 to 7.8 cm/s (p = .85, ANOVA. Likewise, after 12 months the mitral annular systolic velocity, systolic strain and strain rate, as well as E/Ea were unchanged. Conclusion Exercise training improves endurance and muscle fitness in T2D, resulting in better glycemic control and reduced blood pressure. However, myocardial diastolic tissue velocities did not change significantly. Our data suggest that a much longer exercise intervention may be needed in order to reverse diastolic impairment in diabetics, if at all

  11. Improving self-management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anne

    2016-01-06

    Diabetes is an increasingly common life-long condition, which has significant physical, psychological and behavioural implications for individuals. Self-management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes can be complex and challenging. A collaborative approach to care, between healthcare professionals and patients, is essential to promote self-management skills and knowledge to help patients engage in shared decision making and manage any difficulties associated with a diagnosis of diabetes.

  12. An improved early detection method of type-2 diabetes mellitus using multiple classifier system

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The specific causes of complex diseases such as Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) have not yet been identified. Nevertheless, many medical science researchers believe that complex diseases are caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Detection of such diseases becomes an issue because it is not free from false presumptions and is accompanied by unpredictable effects. Given the greatly increased amount of data gathered in medical databases, data mining has been used widely in recent years to detect and improve the diagnosis of complex diseases. However, past research showed that no single classifier can be considered optimal for all problems. Therefore, in this paper, we focus on employing multiple classifier systems to improve the accuracy of detection for complex diseases, such as T2DM. We proposed a dynamic weighted voting scheme called multiple factors weighted combination for classifiers\\' decision combination. This method considers not only the local and global accuracy but also the diversity among classifiers and localized generalization error of each classifier. We evaluated our method on two real T2DM data sets and other medical data sets. The favorable results indicated that our proposed method significantly outperforms individual classifiers and other fusion methods.

  13. The national dose registry of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    In 1951, when the National Dosimetry Service was established by the Department of National Health and Welfare, a system of centralized records was created as an integral part of the new service. Over the last few years the dose record system has expanded in size and content, and improvements have been made in the physical methods of record storage. In addition to the 250 000 individual dose records from the National Dosimetry Service, the National Dose Registry now includes internal tritium and external doses from nuclear generating stations, and radon daughter exposures submitted by uranium mining companies. With the increase in the use of radiation in the medical, industrial and research fields, it is becoming more important to have a comprehensive and readily accessible centralized record system. The Canadian National Dose Registry is particularly suited for continuing health risk studies of radiation workers and provides a base for future epidemiological studies

  14. Histone deacetylase 3 inhibition improves glycaemia and insulin secretion in obese diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Morten; Galbo, Thomas; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β cells to compensate for insulin resistance is a prerequisite for the development of type 2 diabetes. Sustained elevated circulating levels of free fatty acids and glucose contribute to β-cell failure. Selective inhibition of Histone deacetylase (HDAC)-3 protects pancreatic β...... cells against inflammatory and metabolic insults in vitro. Here we tested the ability of a selective HDAC3 inhibitor, BRD3308, to reduce hyperglycemia and increase insulin secretion in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. At diabetes onset, an ambulatory hyperglycemic clamp was performed. HDAC3......3 as a key therapeutic target for β-cell protection in type 2 diabetes....

  15. The Role of Mobile Applications in Improving Alcohol Health Literacy in Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Help or Hindrance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamony, Peter; Holt, Richard; Barnard, Katharine

    2015-08-06

    Mobile health (mHealth) is an expanding field which includes the use of social media and mobile applications (apps). Apps are used in diabetes self-management but it is unclear whether these are being used to support safe drinking of alcohol by people with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Alcohol health literacy is poor among young adults with T1DM despite specific associated risks. Systematic literature review followed by critical appraisal of commercially available apps. An eSurvey investigating access to mHealth technology, attitudes toward apps for diabetes management and their use to improve alcohol health literacy was completed by participants. Of 315 articles identified in the literature search, 7 met the inclusion criteria. Ten diabetes apps were available, most of which lacked the educational features recommended by clinical guidelines. In all, 27 women and 8 men with T1DM, aged 19-31 years were surveyed. Of them, 32 had access to a smartphone/tablet; 29 used apps; 20 used/had used diabetes apps; 3 had used apps related to alcohol and diabetes; 11 had discussed apps with their health care team; 22 felt more communication with their health care team would increase awareness of alcohol-associated risks. Use of mobile apps is commonplace but the use of apps to support safe drinking in this population was rare. Most participants expressed a preference for direct communication with their health care teams about this subject. Further research is needed to determine the preferences of health care professionals and how they can best support young adults in safe drinking. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. Improving self-management in insulin-treated adults participating in diabetes education. The role of overprotection by the partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedoorn, M; Keers, J C; Links, T P; Bouma, J; Ter Maaten, J C; Sanderman, R

    2006-03-01

    To examine the role of overprotection by the partner--i.e. excessive protection, unnecessary help, excessive praise for accomplishments, or attempts to restrict activities as a consequence of underestimating the patient's capabilities--in changes in patient self-management in the context of diabetes education. Sixty-seven insulin-treated patients with a partner completed questionnaires on admission to a Multidisciplinary Intensive Education Programme (MIEP) and 3 months after completing the core module of MIEP. Factors assessed were overprotection by their partner and three aspects of diabetes self-management, namely internal locus of control, diabetes-related distress and HbA1c. Regression analyses were used to test the independent associations of patient sex, baseline overprotection and the interaction between sex and overprotection with diabetes self-management at the follow-up stage, controlling for the baseline value of the dependent variable. The increase in internal locus of control and decrease in HbA1c were both significantly less for female patients who perceived their partner to be rather overprotective than for female patients who did not perceive their partner to be overprotective. The more patients, both male and female, perceived their partner to be overprotective, the less their diabetes-related distress decreased. Overprotection by the partner showed a negative association with improvement in diabetes self-management, especially for female patients. Thus, an intervention programme with the aim of reducing overprotection by the partner, or the perception of this, may enhance self-management in patients participating in diabetes education.

  17. A Home-Based Educational Intervention Improves Patient Activation Measures and Diabetes Health Indicators among Zuni Indians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallabh O Shah

    Full Text Available One in three people will be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050, and the proportion will likely be higher among Native Americans. Diabetes control is currently suboptimal in underserved populations despite a plethora of new therapies. Patient empowerment is a key determinant of diabetes control, but such empowerment can be difficult to achieve due to resource limitation and cultural, language and health literacy barriers. We describe a home-based educational intervention using Community Health Representatives (CHRs, leading to improvement in Patient Activation Measures scores and clinical indicators of diabetes control.Sixty participants with type 2 diabetes (T2D completed a baseline evaluation including physical exam, Point of Care (POC testing, and the Patient Activation Measure (PAM survey. Participants then underwent a one hour group didactic session led by Community Health Representatives (CHRs who subsequently carried out monthly home-based educational interventions to encourage healthy lifestyles, including diet, exercise, and alcohol and cigarette avoidance until follow up at 6 months, when clinical phenotyping and the PAM survey were repeated.PAM scores were increased by at least one level in 35 (58% participants, while 24 participants who started at higher baseline score did not change. Six months after intervention, mean levels of A1C decreased by 0.7 ± 1.2%; fasting blood glucose decreased by 24.0 ± 38.0 mg/dl; BMI decreased by 1.5 ± 2.1 kg/m2; total cholesterol decreased by 12.0 ± 28.0 mg/dl; and triglycerides decreased by 52.0 ± 71.0 mg/dl. All of these changes were statistically significant (p < 0.05.This six month, CHR led and community-oriented educational intervention helps inform standards of practice for the management of diabetes, engages diabetic populations in their own care, and reduces health disparities for the underserved population of Zuni Indians.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02339311.

  18. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Registry: A Multicenter Electronic Health Record Registry of Pediatric Emergency Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakyne Davies, Sara J; Grundmeier, Robert W; Campos, Diego A; Hayes, Katie L; Bell, Jamie; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Bajaj, Lalit; Chamberlain, James M; Gorelick, Marc H; Enriquez, Rene; Casper, T Charles; Scheid, Beth; Kittick, Marlena; Dean, J Michael; Alpern, Elizabeth R

    2018-04-01

     Electronic health record (EHR)-based registries allow for robust data to be derived directly from the patient clinical record and can provide important information about processes of care delivery and patient health outcomes.  A data dictionary, and subsequent data model, were developed describing EHR data sources to include all processes of care within the emergency department (ED). ED visit data were deidentified and XML files were created and submitted to a central data coordinating center for inclusion in the registry. Automated data quality control occurred prior to submission through an application created for this project. Data quality reports were created for manual data quality review.  The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Registry, representing four hospital systems and seven EDs, demonstrates that ED data from disparate health systems and EHR vendors can be harmonized for use in a single registry with a common data model. The current PECARN Registry represents data from 2,019,461 pediatric ED visits, 894,503 distinct patients, more than 12.5 million narrative reports, and 12,469,754 laboratory tests and continues to accrue data monthly.  The Registry is a robust harmonized clinical registry that includes data from diverse patients, sites, and EHR vendors derived via data extraction, deidentification, and secure submission to a central data coordinating center. The data provided may be used for benchmarking, clinical quality improvement, and comparative effectiveness research. Schattauer.

  19. Cardiac lipid content is unresponsive to a physical activity training intervention in type 2 diabetic patients, despite improved ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiner Tim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased cardiac lipid content has been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently showed that cardiac lipid content is reduced after 12 weeks of physical activity training in healthy overweight subjects. The beneficial effect of exercise training on cardiovascular risk is well established and the decrease in cardiac lipid content with exercise training in healthy overweight subjects was accompanied by improved ejection fraction. It is yet unclear whether diabetic patients respond similarly to physical activity training and whether a lowered lipid content in the heart is necessary for improvements in cardiac function. Here, we investigated whether exercise training is able to lower cardiac lipid content and improve cardiac function in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Eleven overweight-to-obese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 58.4 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 29.9 ± 0.01 kg/m2 followed a 12-week training program (combination endurance/strength training, three sessions/week. Before and after training, maximal whole body oxygen uptake (VO2max and insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp was determined. Systolic function was determined under resting conditions by CINE-MRI and cardiac lipid content in the septum of the heart by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Results VO2max increased (from 27.1 ± 1.5 to 30.1 ± 1.6 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001 and insulin sensitivity improved upon training (insulin stimulated glucose disposal (delta Rd of glucose improved from 5.8 ± 1.9 to 10.3 ± 2.0 μmol/kg/min, p = 0.02. Left-ventricular ejection fraction improved after training (from 50.5 ± 2.0 to 55.6 ± 1.5%, p = 0.01 as well as cardiac index and cardiac output. Unexpectedly, cardiac lipid content in the septum remained unchanged (from 0.80 ± 0.22% to 0.95 ± 0.21%, p = 0.15. Conclusions Twelve weeks of progressive endurance/strength training was effective in improving VO2max, insulin sensitivity

  20. Direct Renin Inhibition with Aliskiren Improves Ischemia-Induced Neovasculogenesis in Diabetic Animals via the SDF-1 Related Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Chang

    Full Text Available Aliskiren is a direct renin inhibitor which is suggested to modify proangiogenic cells in addition to lower blood pressure. Given that angiogenesis is impaired in the presence of diabetes mellitus, we would like to investigate whether and how aliskiren enhances endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and improves ischemic-induced neovasculogenesis by an effect independent of blood pressure reduction in diabetic animals.Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were administered with either aliskiren (5 or 25 mg/kg/day using an osmotic pump or hydralazine (2 or 10 mg/kg/day given in drinking water for two weeks prior to a hind-limb ischemia surgery. Laser Doppler imaging and flow cytometry were used to evaluate the degree of neovasculogenesis and the circulating levels of EPCs, respectively.In streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, aliskiren enhanced the recovery of limb perfusion and capillary density, increased the number of circulating Sca-1+/Flk-1+ EPC-like cells, and elevated the levels of the plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1α in a dose-dependent manner, whereas there were no such effects in hydralazine-treated mice. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-SDF-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies abolished the effects of aliskiren.Independent of the reduction of blood pressure, aliskiren enhanced ischemia-induced neovasculogenesis in a dose-dependent manner via VEGF/SDF-1α related mechanisms in diabetic mice.

  1. Diabetes and complications of the heart in Sub-Saharan Africa: An urgent need for improved awareness, diagnostics and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezeva, Nadezhda; Chisale, Master; McDonald, Kenneth; Ledwidge, Mark; Gallagher, Joe; Watson, Chris J

    2018-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is no longer a disease of high income countries but a global health pandemic. With the continued and rapid increase in its prevalence worldwide it is forecasted that diabetes will be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. A major concern stems from its role in development and progression of cardiovascular disease, including cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Within low- and middle-income areas such as Sub-Saharan Africa the burden of diabetes is already significant driven by many factors, including, socioeconomic (urbanisation), nutritional (high-calorie "western-diet", obesity) and lifestyle (physical inactivity) changes. Insufficient economic and community resources, poor health care system development and chronic disease management, poor education, and a lack of preventative and diagnostic measures further aggravate the severity of the diabetes problem. This review outlines the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Sub-Saharan Africa and highlights the need for improved community health care and regulations to reduce its epidemiological spread and devastating impact on health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prospective randomized controlled intervention trial: Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Improves Cardiac autonomic functions and Quality of life in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To assess the effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Program on glycemic control, quality of life, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 120 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes (n = 56 and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program (n = 64. Standard therapy included advice on diet, walk, and oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was an interactive session in which Sudarshan kriya yoga, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam was taught under guidance of a certified teacher. Change in fasting, post prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin, and quality of life were assessed. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and six months after intervention. Results: There was significant improvement in psychological (P = 0.006 and social domains (P = 0.04 and total quality of life (P = 0.02 in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared to the group following standard therapy alone. In the group following breathing program, the improvement in sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions was statistically significant (P = 0.01, while the change in the standard group was not significant (P = 0.17. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P = 0.07. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P = 0.76. The parameters of glycemic control were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in quality of life and cardiac autonomic functions in the diabetes patients practicing comprehensive yogic breathing

  3. Pioglitazone improves insulin sensitivity, reduces visceral fat and stimulates lipolysis in non diabetic dialyzed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Zanchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is common in dialyzed patients and is associated with increased mortality and protein-energy wasting. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pioglitazone (PIO, a powerful insulin sensitizer, on insulin sensitivity, body composition and adipose tissue metabolism, in dialyzed patients. A double blind randomized cross-over study was performed in non diabetic dialysis patients. Each patient followed 2 treatment phases of 16 weeks, starting either with oral PIO 45 mg/d or placebo (PL, and then switched to the other phase. At the end of each phase, patients underwent hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, an abdominal CT, and extensive plasma biochemical analysis. Twelve patients including 8 HD (59.6±4.4 y and 4 PD patients (43.5±3.6 y were recruited. Nine patients completed both phases and 3 patients dropped out (renal transplantation/2 HD and peritonitis/1 PD. PIO was safe and well tolerated. Under PIO, insulin sensitivity improved, as assessed by increased total glucose disposal rate (1.98±0.24 for PIO versus 1.58±0.12 umol/kg/min for PL, p<0.05, and reduced glucose endogenous hepatic production. PIO did not affect post-dialysis body weight, total fat and lean body mass, but significantly reduced visceral adipose tissue (VAT area and the VAT/SAT (subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio. HDL-cholesterol significantly increased. PIO decreased CRP (3.96±1.44 mg/l vs 7.88±2.56, p<0.05, plasma leptin, and dramatically reduced leptin/adiponectin ratio. Glycerol turnover, circulating glycerol and non esterified fatty acids were paradoxically increased. In conclusion, the improvement in insulin sensitivity by PIO, in non diabetic dialyzed patients, was associated with favorable metabolic effects, reduction in inflammation and body fat redistribution. The stimulation of systemic lipolysis was a surprising finding which may reflect adipose tissue remodeling and/or a paradoxical lypolitic

  4. Comorbidity in heart failure. Results of the Spanish RICA Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Laiglesia, F-J; Sánchez-Marteles, M; Pérez-Calvo, J-I; Formiga, F; Bartolomé-Satué, J A; Armengou-Arxé, A; López-Quirós, R; Pérez-Silvestre, J; Serrado-Iglesias, A; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M

    2014-12-01

    We sought to identify the comorbidities associated with heart failure (HF) in a non-selected cohort of patients, and its influence on mortality and rehospitalization. Data were obtained from the 'Registro de Insuficiencia Cardiaca' (RICA) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine. The registry includes patients prospectively admitted in Internal Medicine units for acute HF. Variables included in Charlson Index (ChI) were collected and analysed according to age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and Barthel Index. The primary end point of study was the likelihood of rehospitalization and death for any cause during the year after discharge. We included 2051 patients, mean age 78 and 53% females. LVEF was ⩾ 50% in 59.1% of the cohort. There was a high degree of dependency as measured by Barthel Index (14.8 % had an index ≤ 60). Mean ChI was 2.91 (SD ± 2.4). The most frequent comorbidities included in ChI were diabetes mellitus (44.3%), chronic renal impairment (30.8%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (27.4%). Age, myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease, dementia, COPD, chronic renal impairment and diabetes with target-organ damage were all identified as independent prognostic factors for the combined end point of rehospitalization and death at 1 year. However, if multivariate analysis was done including ChI, only this remained as an independent prognostic factor for the combined end point (P < 0.001). HF is a comorbid condition. ChI is a simple and feasible tool for estimating the burden of comorbidities in such population. We believe that a holistic approach to HF would improve prognosis and the relief the pressure exerted on public health services. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Acute Resveratrol Consumption Improves Neurovascular Coupling Capacity in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel H.X. Wong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poor cerebral perfusion may contribute to cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that resveratrol can enhance cerebral vasodilator function and thereby alleviate the cognitive deficits in T2DM. We have already reported that acute resveratrol consumption improved cerebrovascular responsiveness (CVR to hypercapnia. We now report the effects of resveratrol on neurovascular coupling capacity (CVR to cognitive stimuli, cognitive performance and correlations with plasma resveratrol concentrations. Methods: Thirty-six T2DM adults aged 40–80 years were randomized to consume single doses of resveratrol (0, 75, 150 and 300 mg at weekly intervals. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to monitor changes in blood flow velocity (BFV during a cognitive test battery. The battery consisted of dual-tasking (finger tapping with both Trail Making task and Serial Subtraction 3 task and a computerized multi-tasking test that required attending to four tasks simultaneously. CVR to cognitive tasks was calculated as the per cent increase in BFV from pre-test basal to peak mean blood flow velocity and also as the area under the curve for BFV. Results: Compared to placebo, 75 mg resveratrol significantly improved neurovascular coupling capacity, which correlated with plasma total resveratrol levels. Enhanced performance on the multi-tasking test battery was also evident following 75 mg and 300 mg of resveratrol. Conclusion: a single 75 mg dose of resveratrol was able to improve neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in T2DM. Evaluation of benefits of chronic resveratrol supplementation is now warranted.

  6. The gait and balance of patients with diabetes can be improved: a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allet, L.; Armand, S.; Bie, R.A. de; Golay, A.; Monnin, D.; Aminian, K.; Staal, J.B.; Bruin, E.D. de

    2010-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Gait characteristics and balance are altered in diabetic patients. Little is known about possible treatment strategies. This study evaluates the effect of a specific training programme on gait and balance of diabetic patients. METHODS: This was a randomised controlled trial (n=71)

  7. Diabetes Cooking Schools Improve Knowledge and Skills in Making Healthful Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Halderson, Karen; Wells, Linda; Bock, Margaret Ann

    2012-01-01

    Rates of type 2 diabetes are increasing nationally and in New Mexico, particularly in ethnic minorities. A key self-care area with challenging barriers is healthy eating. The New Mexico Cooperative Extension Service conducts diabetes cooking schools statewide together with community health providers. The study reported here determined if this…

  8. How can structured self-management patient education improve outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarvis, J.; Skinner, T. C.; Carey, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a long-term chronic condition that is complex to manage, with the majority of management being done by the person with diabetes outside of the clinical setting. Because of its complexities, effective self-management requires skills, confidence and the ability to make dec...

  9. Exercise training improves glycemic control in long-standing insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feyter, de H.M.M.L.; Praet, S.F.E.; Broek, van den N.M.A.; Kuipers, H.; Stehouwer, C.D.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.; Loon, van L.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Regular exercise represents an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat type 2 diabetes ( 1 , 2 ). However, the clinical benefits of exercise intervention in a vastly expanding group of long-standing insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients with comorbidities are less evident. As these patients

  10. Treatment with the first TNF inhibitor in rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Hellenic Registry of Biologic Therapies improves quality of life especially in young patients with better baseline functional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Flouri, Irini; Drosos, Alexandros A; Boki, Kyriaki; Settas, Loukas; Zisopoulos, Dimitrios; Skopouli, Fotini N; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Iliopoulos, Alexios; Kyriopoulos, John; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Athanasakis, Konstantinos; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos

    2016-01-01

    To assess in daily practice in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the effect of treatment with first tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor (TNFi) in quality of life (Qol), disease activity and depict possible baseline predictors for gains in Qol. Patients followed prospectively by the Hellenic Registry of Biologic Therapies were analysed. Demographics were recorded at baseline, while RA-related characteristics at baseline and every 6 months. Paired t-tests were used to detect divergences between patient-reported (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), EuroQol (EQ-5D)) and clinical tools (Disease Activity Score-28 joints (DAS28)). Clinical versus self-reported outcomes were examined via cross-tabulation analysis. Multiple regression analysis was performed for identifying baseline predictors of improvements in QALYs. We analysed 255 patients (age (mean±SD) 57.1±13.0, disease duration 9.2±9.1 years, prior non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs 2.3±1.2). Baseline EQ-5D, HAQ and DAS28 were 0.36 (0.28), 1.01 (0.72) and 5.9 (1.3), respectively, and were all significantly improved after 12 months (0.77 (0.35), 0.50 (0.66), 3.9 (1.5), respectively, p<0.05 for all). 90% of patients who improved from high to a lower DAS28 status (low-remission or moderate) had clinically important improvement in Qol (phi-coefficient=0.531,p<0.05). Independent predictors of gains in Qol were lower baseline HAQ, VAS global and younger age (adjusted R2=0.27). In daily practice TNFi improve both disease activity and Qol for the first 12 months of therapy. 90% of patients who improved from high to a lower DAS28 status had clinically important improvement in Qol. Younger patients starting with lower HAQ and VAS global are more likely to benefit.

  11. [Audit and feedback, and continuous quality improvement strategies to improve the quality of care for type 2 diabetes: a systematic review of literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchi, Simona; Agabiti, Nera; Mitrova, Susanna; Cacciani, Laura; Amato, Laura; Davoli, Marina; Bargagli, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    we analysed evidence on effective interventions to improve the quality of care and management in patients with diabetes type 2. This review focuses particularly on audit and feedback intervention, targeted to healthcare providers, and continuous quality improvement (CQI) involving health professionals and health care systems, respectively. we searched The Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE (search period: January 2005-December 2015) to identify systematic reviews (SR) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) considering patients' outcomes and process measures as quality indicators in diabetes care. Selection of studies and data extraction were carried out independently by two reviewers. Methodological quality of individual studies was assessed using the checklist «Assessment of methodological quality of systematic review» (AMSTAR) and the Cochrane's tool, respectively. We produced summaries of results for each study design. the search process resulted in 810 citations. One SR and 7 RCTs that compared any intervention in which audit and feedback and CQI was a component vs. other interventions were selected. The SR found that audit and feedback activity was associated with improvements of glycaemic (mean difference: 0.26; 95%CI 0.08;0.44) and cholesterol control (mean difference: 0.03; 95%CI -0.04;0.10). CQI interventions were not associated with an improvement of quality of diabetes care. The RCTs considered in this review compared a broad range of interventions including feedback as unique activity or as part of more complex strategies. The methodological quality was generally poor in all the included trials. the available evidence suggests that audit and feedback and CQI improve quality of care in diabetic patients, although the effect is small and heterogeneous among process and outcomes indicators.

  12. [Association between visual improvement after photocoagulation and the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in diabetic macular oedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somilleda-Ventura, Selma Alin; García-Rubio, Yatzul Zuhaila; Razo Blanco-Hernández, Dulce Milagros; Lima-Gómez, Virgilio

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are effective in delaying the progression of diabetic retinopathy. It is unknown if their use is associated with a better visual outcome in patients with diabetic macular oedema. A non-experimental, comparative, longitudinal and retrospective study was performed on patients with diabetic macular oedema treated by focal photocoagulation, and with systemic arterial hypertension treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (Group 1), and without hypertension (Group 2). The dependent variable was the proportion with visual improvement, operatively defined as the gain of one or more lines of vision three weeks after photocoagulation. The independent variable was the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The proportion of eyes with visual improvement after treatment was compared between groups using the Chi squared (χ(2)) test. A total of 33 eyes (51.6%) were assigned to group 1, and 31 (48.2%), to group 2. The mean of visual acuity improved after three weeks, compared with baseline (p=0.002). The proportion of eyes with visual improvement did not differ between patients treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (45.5%) and those that did not use them (51.6%, p=0.4). There was no statistical difference in the proportion of eyes with visual improvement between patients treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and in those where they were not used. There is no support for the inhibition of angiotensin II in addition to photocoagulation for improving the outcome in patients with diabetic macular oedema. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Review of patient registries in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Gabriella; Hill, Dane; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-10-01

    Patient registries are datasets containing information on patients with a particular disease or patients who are undergoing a specific treatment. Our objective was to search for and catalog the types of registries being used in dermatology and investigate their characteristics and uses. We searched Google, the Registry of Patient Registries, Orphanet, and ClinicalTrials.gov to compile a list of dermatology disease registries. We also conducted a literature review on the uses of dermatology registries using PubMed. We identified 48 dermatology patient registries, with 23 distinct diseases represented. We also identified 11 registries used for postmarketing surveillance of skin disease. Our search was limited to registries in English. Registries are commonly used for the study of rare dermatologic diseases and for postsurveillance monitoring of systemic therapies in more common dermatologic diseases, such as psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Brazilian Green Propolis Improves Antioxidant Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liting Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propolis contains a variety of bioactive components and possesses many biological properties. This study was designed to evaluate potential effects of Brazilian green propolis on glucose metabolism and antioxidant function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. In the 18-week randomized controlled study, enrolled patients with T2DM were randomly assigned to Brazilian green propolis group (900 mg/day (n = 32 and control group (n = 33. At the end of the study, no significant difference was found in serum glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin, aldose reductase or adiponectin between the two groups. However, serum GSH and total polyphenols were significantly increased, and serum carbonyls and lactate dehydrogenase activity were significantly reduced in the Brazilian green propolis group. Serum TNF-α was significantly decreased, whereas serum IL-1β and IL-6 were significantly increased in the Brazilian green propolis group. It is concluded that Brazilian green propolis is effective in improving antioxidant function in T2DM patients.

  15. Copper Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles Stabilized with Folic Acid Improve Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jisheng; Zhu, Yunxiao; Huddleston, Samantha; Li, Peng; Xiao, Baixue; Farha, Omar K; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2018-02-27

    The successful treatment of chronic nonhealing wounds requires strategies that promote angiogenesis, collagen deposition, and re-epithelialization of the wound. Copper ions have been reported to stimulate angiogenesis; however, several applications of copper salts or oxides to the wound bed are required, leading to variable outcomes and raising toxicity concerns. We hypothesized that copper-based metal-organic framework nanoparticles (Cu-MOF NPs), referred to as HKUST-1, which are rapidly degraded in protein solutions, can be modified to slowly release Cu 2+ , resulting in reduced toxicity and improved wound healing rates. Folic acid was added during HKUST-1 synthesis to generate folic-acid-modified HKUST-1 (F-HKUST-1). The effect of folic acid incorporation on NP stability, size, hydrophobicity, surface area, and copper ion release profile was measured. In addition, cytotoxicity and in vitro cell migration processes due to F-HKUST-1 and HKUST-1 were evaluated. Wound closure rates were assessed using the splinted excisional dermal wound model in diabetic mice. The incorporation of folic acid into HKUST-1 enabled the slow release of copper ions, which reduced cytotoxicity and enhanced cell migration in vitro. In vivo, F-HKUST-1 induced angiogenesis, promoted collagen deposition and re-epithelialization, and increased wound closure rates. These results demonstrate that folic acid incorporation into HKUST-1 NPs is a simple, safe, and promising approach to control Cu 2+ release, thus enabling the direct application of Cu-MOF NPs to wounds.

  16. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sing-Chung; Liu, Yen-Hua; Liu, Jen-Fang; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Chiao-Ming; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2011-04-01

    Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-week randomized crossover clinical trial was that almond consumption would improve glycemic control and decrease the risk for cardiovascular disease in 20 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (9 male, 11 female; 58 years old; body mass index, 26 kg/m²) with mild hyperlipidemia. After a 2-week run-in period, patients were assigned to either a control National Cholesterol Education Program step II diet (control diet) or an almond diet for 4 weeks, with a 2-week washout period between alternative diets. Almonds were added to the control diet to replace 20% of total daily calorie intake. Addition of approximately 60 g almonds per day increased dietary intakes of fiber, magnesium, polyunsaturated fatty acid, monounsaturated fatty acid, and vitamin E. Body fat determined with bioelectrical impedance analysis was significantly lower in patients consuming almonds (almonds vs control: 29.6% vs 30.4%). The almond diet enhanced plasma α-tocopherol level by a median 26.8% (95% confidence intervals, 15.1-36.6) compared with control diet. Furthermore, almond intake decreased total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 6.0% (1.6-9.4), 11.6% (2.8-19.1), and 9.7% (0.3-20.9), respectively. Plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B levels, apo B/apo A-1 ratio, and nonesterified fatty acid also decreased significantly by 15.6% (5.1-25.4), 17.4% (2.8-19.9), and 5.5% (3.0-14.4), respectively. Compared with subjects in the control diet, those in the almond diet had 4.1% (0.9-12.5), 0.8% (0.4-6.3), and 9.2% (4.4-13.2) lower levels of fasting insulin, fasting glucose, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, respectively. Our results suggested that incorporation of almonds into a healthy diet has beneficial effects on

  17. Opportunities for improved diabetes care among patients of safety net practices: a safety net providers' strategic alliance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichsman, Ann; Werner, James; Cella, Peggi; Bobiak, Sarah; Stange, Kurt C

    2009-01-01

    To identify barriers and opportunities for quality diabetes care in safety net practices. In 3 federally qualified health centers and 1 free clinic, 19 primary care clinicians profiled patient and visit characteristics and quality of care measures for 181 consecutive visits by adult type 2 diabetic patients. Open-ended questions assessed patient and clinician perception of barriers to diabetes care and patient report of enabling factors. A multidisciplinary team identified themes from open-ended responses. Logistic regression analyses assessed the association of the identified barriers/enablers with 2 measures of quality care: glycosylated hemoglobin and prophylactic aspirin use. Ranked barriers noted by patients included adherence (40%), financial/insurance (23%), and psychosocial (13%) factors. Clinicians ranked systemic factors, including financial/ insurance (32%) and cultural/psychosocial (29%) factors, as important to adherence (29%) in determining quality diabetes care. Patients reported dietary and medical adherence (37%) and family/health care worker support (17%) as helpful factors. Among 175 patients with available data, glycosylated hemoglobin levels were associated with patient report of financial/insurance factors both as a barrier when visits and medications were unaffordable and as an opportunity when free or low-cost medications and services were provided. Patients' adherence with aspirin prophylaxis was strongly associated with African American race, prior prescription of aspirin and distribution of aspirin at the practice site (p<.001). Patients were less likely than clinicians to identify systemic and contextual factors contributing to poor diabetes care. From the front line's perspective, enabling patient self-management and systemic support is a target for improving diabetes care in safety net practices.

  18. Improving the Quality of Outpatient Diabetes Care Using an Information Management System: Results From the Observational VISION Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Joerg; Mueller, Angelika; Messinger, Diethelm; Parkin, Christopher G; Amann-Zalan, Ildiko

    2015-07-29

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of information management system (IMS) use with individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who were treated in outpatient settings. In this 7-month, prospective, observational study, 965 adults with diabetes, mean (SD) baseline HbA1c 8.61(1.2)% (70.6[13.1] mmol/mol), were recruited from 132 outpatient care centers in Germany and Denmark. HbA1c was measured at baseline, month 4, and month 7. IMS reports were generated from uploaded self-monitored blood glucose data and therapy adjustments were documented at months 1 and 4. Hypoglycemic events were documented. Mean (SD) HbA1c decreased from baseline in type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at month 4 (-0.61[1.03]% (-6.7[11.3] mmol/mol), n = 213; -0.88[1.22]% (-9.6[13.3] mmol/mol), n = 589, respectively) and month 7 (-0.64[1.02]% (-7.0[11.1] mmol/mol), n = 219; -0.93[1.27]% (-10.2[13.9] mmol/mol), n = 594, respectively), all P < .0001, with no increase in hypoglycemic events. Therapy was adjusted in 106(42.7)% type 1 and 349(52.4)% type 2 diabetes patients at months 1 and 105(42.3)% type 1 and 282(42.3)% type 2 diabetes patients at month 4. Physicians used IMS reports to make therapy adjustments in 90% of patients at month 1 and 86% of patients at month 4. Integration of the IMS into outpatient care facilitates significant improvements in glycemic control. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Topiramate improves neurovascular function, epidermal nerve fiber morphology, and metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Amanda L Boyd, Patricia M Barlow, Gary L Pittenger, Kathryn F Simmons, Aaron I VinikDepartment of Internal Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAPurpose: To assess the effects of topiramate on C-fiber function, nerve fiber morphology, and metabolism (including insulin sensitivity, obesity, and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.Patients and methods: We conducted an 18-week, open-label trial treating patients with topiramate. Twenty subjects with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy (61.5 ± 1.29 years; 15 male, 5 female were enrolled and completed the trial. Neuropathy was evaluated by total neuropathy scores, nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory tests, laser Doppler skin blood flow, and intraepidermal nerve fibers in skin biopsies.Results: Topiramate treatment improved symptoms compatible with C-fiber dysfunction. Weight, blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c also improved. Laser Doppler skin blood flow improved significantly after 12 weeks of treatment, but returned to baseline at 18 weeks. After 18 weeks of treatment there was a significant increase in intraepidermal nerve fiber length at the forearm, thigh, and proximal leg. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density was significantly increased by topiramate in the proximal leg.Conclusion: This study is the first to demonstrate that it is possible to induce skin intraepidermal nerve fiber regeneration accompanied by enhancement of neurovascular function, translating into improved symptoms as well as sensory nerve function. The simultaneous improvement of selective metabolic indices may play a role in this effect, but this remains to be determined.Keywords: diabetic neuropathy, skin blood flow, skin biopsy, diabetes

  20. Inulin-type fructan improves diabetic phenotype and gut microbiota profiles in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Hongyue; Xiao, Xinhua; Hu, Ling; Xin, Fengjiao; Yu, Xiaobing

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating research has addressed the linkage between the changes to gut microbiota structure and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Inulin is one type of soluble dietary fiber that can alleviate T2D. As a prebiotic, inulin cannot be digested by humans, but rather is digested by probiotics. However, whether inulin treatment can benefit the entire gut bacteria community remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the differences in gut microbiota composition among diabetic, inulin-treated diabetic, normal control, and inulin-treated normal control rats. A diabetic rat model was generated by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin injections (HF/STZ). Inulin was orally administered to normal and diabetic rats. To determine the composition of the gut microbiota, fecal DNA extraction and 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing were performed. We found that inulin treatment reduced fasting blood glucose levels and alleviated glucose intolerance and blood lipid panels in diabetic rats. Additionally, inulin treatment increased the serum glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) level, reduced serum IL-6 level, Il6 expression in epididymal adipose tissue, and Pepck , G6pc expression in liver of diabetic rats. Pyrophosphate sequencing of the 16s V3-V4 region demonstrated an elevated proportion of Firmicutes and a reduced abundance of Bacteroidetes at the phylogenetic level in diabetic rats compared to normal control rats. The characteristics of the gut microbiota in control and inulin-treated rats were similar. Inulin treatment can normalize the composition of the gut microbiota in diabetic rats. At the family and genus levels, probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA)-producing bacteria Lachnospiraceae , Phascolarctobacterium , and Bacteroides were found to be significantly more abundant in the inulin-treated diabetic group than in the non-treated diabetic group. In addition, inulin-treated rats had a lower abundance of Desulfovibrio , which produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The

  1. Use of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of the risk classification of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosenko, Jay M; Skyler, Jay S; Mahon, Jeffrey; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Greenbaum, Carla J; Rafkin, Lisa E; Beam, Craig A; Boulware, David C; Matheson, Della; Cuthbertson, David; Herold, Kevan C; Eisenbarth, George; Palmer, Jerry P

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE We studied the utility of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of type 1 diabetes (T1D) risk classification in TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS) participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The cumulative incidence of T1D was compared between normoglycemic individuals with DPTRS values >7.00 and dysglycemic individuals in the TNNHS (n = 991). It was also compared between individuals with DPTRS values 7.00 among those with dysglycemia and those with multiple autoantibodies in the TNNHS. DPTRS values >7.00 were compared with dysglycemia for characterizing risk in Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) (n = 670) and TNNHS participants. The reliability of DPTRS values >7.00 was compared with dysglycemia in the TNNHS. RESULTS The cumulative incidence of T1D for normoglycemic TNNHS participants with DPTRS values >7.00 was comparable to those with dysglycemia. Among those with dysglycemia, the cumulative incidence was much higher (P 7.00 than for those with values 7.00). Dysglycemic individuals in DPT-1 were at much higher risk for T1D than those with dysglycemia in the TNNHS (P 7.00. The proportion in the TNNHS reverting from dysglycemia to normoglycemia at the next visit was higher than the proportion reverting from DPTRS values >7.00 to values <7.00 (36 vs. 23%). CONCLUSIONS DPTRS thresholds can improve T1D risk classification accuracy by identifying high-risk normoglycemic and low-risk dysglycemic individuals. The 7.00 DPTRS threshold characterizes risk more consistently between populations and has greater reliability than dysglycemia.

  2. [Short-term prognosis of transient ischemic attacks. Mexican multicenter stroke registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Antonio; Cantú, Carlos; Ruiz-Sandoval, José Luis; Villarreal-Careaga, Jorge; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Murillo-Bonilla, Luis; Fernández, José Antonio; Torres, Bertha; León, Carolina; Rodríguez-Leyva, Idelfonso; Rangel-Guerra, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    There are no data on Mexican population referring to frequency and prognosis of transient ischemic attacks (TIA). The purpose of the present study was to: (1) estimate the prevalence, vascular risk factors and short-term outcome in patients with TIA included in the first Mexican registry of cerebrovascular disease, and (2) analyze the acute care provided in these patients. This national registry of cerebrovascular diseases is a multicenter, observational, and hospital-based registry that was conducted from November 2002 to October 2004. The registry was developed to improve our knowledge in Mexico regarding risk factors profile, outcome, current diagnostic and treatment strategies, and short-term follow-up in patients with acute cerebral ischemia. Standardized data assessment was used by all centers which included information on demographics, pre-hospital events (including stroke onset and arrival to hospital), emergency department triage and workup. Short-term outcome was evaluated at day 30. Of this registry, TIA cases were selected and associated risk factors, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment were analyzed. During the study time period, 2,000 patients were enrolled; 97 (5%) with diagnosis of TIA; 51 women and 46 men, mean age 69.3 +/- 11.4 years. Among these 97 patients; 51 (52.6%) were admitted to the hospital for evaluation. The main risk factors were; age > or = 65 years in 74%, hypertension in 64%, diabetes in 45%, and dislipidemia in 36% and obesity in 31%. The affected arterial territory was carotid TIA in 74% and vertebrobasilar in 26%. TIA was attributed to atherosclerosis in 63% of the patients, cardioembolism in 17%, and small vessels disease in 5%. At 30 days follow-up; three patients died during the initial evaluation (two secondary to cardiac arrhythmia, and one secondary to pneumonia). Among 14 of the 94 survivors (14.9%) we documented an early stroke recurrence, including cerebral infarction in nine patients (9.6%) and new TIA in

  3. Sensory nerve desensitization by resiniferatoxin improves glucose tolerance and increases insulin secretion in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats and is associated with reduced plasma activity of dipeptidyl peptidase IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Dorte X; Hansen, Anker J; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2005-01-01

    Sensory nerve desensitization by capsaicin has been shown to improve the diabetic condition in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. However, administration of capsaicin to adult rats is associated with an increased mortality. Therefore, in this experiment, we examined the influence of resiniferatoxin...

  4. Improvements in insulin sensitivity after aerobic exercise and weight loss in older women with a history of gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alice S

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether a hypocaloric diet alone (WL) or with exercise training (AEX + WL) is effective in improving body composition, fitness, glucose utilization and CVD risk factors in sedentary women with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) and with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Longitudinal clinical investigation of 25 overweight/obese (BMI: 32 ± 1 kg/m(2)) women (59 ± 1 yrs) with a GDM history (n = 20) or T2DM (n = 5). Women completed 6 months WL (n = 10) or AEX+WL (n = 15) with VO2max, body composition, and glucose tolerance testing. Insulin sensitivity was measured during the last 30 min of 2 h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps (40 mU·m(-2.)min(-1)) before and after interventions. Body weight decreased ~7% after WL and AEX+WL (p exercise program combined with moderate weight loss reduces body weight, visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat, and improves insulin sensitivity in older women who had previously been diagnosed with GDM and those with T2DM. These findings should encourage women with a history of GDM to engage in an active lifestyle and reduce caloric intake to lower the risk for the development of T2DM.

  5. The utah beacon experience: integrating quality improvement, health information technology, and practice facilitation to improve diabetes outcomes in small health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennison, Janet; Rajeev, Deepthi; Woolsey, Sarah; Black, Jeff; Oostema, Steven J; North, Christie

    2014-01-01

    The Utah Improving Care through Connectivity and Collaboration (IC3) Beacon community (2010-2013) was spearheaded by HealthInsight, a nonprofit, community-based organization. One of the main objectives of IC(3) was to improve health care provided to patients with diabetes in three Utah counties, collaborating with 21 independent smaller clinics and two large health care enterprises. This paper will focus on the use of health information technology (HIT) and practice facilitation to develop and implement new care processes to improve clinic workflow and ultimately improve patients' diabetes outcomes at 21 participating smaller, independent clinics. Early in the project, we learned that most of the 21 clinics did not have the resources needed to successfully implement quality improvement (QI) initiatives. IC(3) helped clinics effectively use data generated from their electronic health records (EHRs) to design and implement interventions to improve patients' diabetes outcomes. This close coupling of HIT, expert practice facilitation, and Learning Collaboratives was found to be especially valuable in clinics with limited resources. Through this process we learned that (1) an extensive readiness assessment improved clinic retention, (2) clinic champions were important for a successful collaboration, and (3) current EHR systems have limited functionality to assist in QI initiatives. In general, smaller, independent clin