WorldWideScience

Sample records for regions affecting minimum

  1. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  2. Minimum Competency Testing: A Report of Four Regional Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Barbara Soloth, Ed.

    Summaries are presented of the problems and issues of minimum competency testing which were discussed at four regional conferences for political and educational practitioners. The Education Commission of the States sponsored the conferences, but took no official position of support or opposition. Section 1 compares the legislative, practitioner,…

  3. Regional climate impacts of a possible future grand solar minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Sarah; Maycock, Amanda C; Gray, Lesley J; Scaife, Adam A; Dunstone, Nick J; Harder, Jerald W; Knight, Jeff R; Lockwood, Mike; Manners, James C; Wood, Richard A

    2015-06-23

    Any reduction in global mean near-surface temperature due to a future decline in solar activity is likely to be a small fraction of projected anthropogenic warming. However, variability in ultraviolet solar irradiance is linked to modulation of the Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillations, suggesting the potential for larger regional surface climate effects. Here, we explore possible impacts through two experiments designed to bracket uncertainty in ultraviolet irradiance in a scenario in which future solar activity decreases to Maunder Minimum-like conditions by 2050. Both experiments show regional structure in the wintertime response, resembling the North Atlantic Oscillation, with enhanced relative cooling over northern Eurasia and the eastern United States. For a high-end decline in solar ultraviolet irradiance, the impact on winter northern European surface temperatures over the late twenty-first century could be a significant fraction of the difference in climate change between plausible AR5 scenarios of greenhouse gas concentrations.

  4. Minimum Wage and Community College Attendance: How Economic Circumstances Affect Educational Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    How do changes in minimum wages affect community college enrollment and employment? In particular, among adults without associate's or bachelor's degrees who may earn near the minimum wage, do endowment effects of a higher minimum wage encourage school attendance? Among adults without associate's or bachelor's degrees who may earn near the minimum…

  5. Regional Minimum Wage and the Increase in the Personal Exemption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solihin Makmur Alam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The policy of the Central Government raised the limit on Income Not Taxable (PTKP to reduce the income tax burden on workers. At the same time, local governments also raise the Regional Minimum Wage (UMR in 2013 to customize it with the level of inflation and rising prices. Some people think that the policy of the Central Government to improve the welfare of workers by doing adjustments on PTKP is useless because in fact the increase coincided with increases in PTKP UMR. In 2013, almost all local governments set the UMR under PTKP. Thus, the workers who work in these areas did not have to pay income tax. This condition does not apply to workers who work in areas that have the above PTKP UMR. The workers who work in these areas will not receive earnings as a whole. Thus, the income tax has reduced the level of their well -being.

  6. Studi Tentang Kebijakan Upah Minimum Regional di Propinsi Jawa Tengah

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    Dyah Lukisari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main policy problem of labor and manpower in Indonesian provinces, as exemplified by the case study in Central Java Province, is the the low rate of Regional Minimum Wage (UMR. The UMR policy are decided through negotiations among three institutions: labor unions, enterpreneur groups, and the government. The bargaining power of labor unions is very much depended upon the internal cohession of its members, meanwhile of the enterpreneur groups are relatively in better positions as they could deal with governmental policy makers by giving rewards through their economic resources. Government officials, who are supposed to back employees, have not played their role as most of them did not act as a good mediator of the conflicts. , Unfortunately, as most of the NGOs are still easily co-opted by the bueaucratic policy makers and the media have not given enough concern to the labor issues, policies regarding UMR do not always help the employees. It can be concluded, therefore, that the low UMR rate in Central Java is caused by patrimonial political culture in the bureaucracy as evidenced in a "collaborative" decisions between entrepreneurs and bureaucrat officials. Moreover, the UMR rate is also worsened by current economic austerity in the province as reflected in low Consumer Price Index (IHK, limited job opportunities and underemployment.

  7. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part II: minimum temperatures in winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of minimum temperatures during winter is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, winter minimum temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent cold-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict cold-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that low temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily minimum temperatures during winter over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the winter forecast period from 1 December 2007 - 31 March 2008. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated minimum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme cold episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia

  8. 25 CFR 542.4 - How do these regulations affect minimum internal control standards established in a Tribal-State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do these regulations affect minimum internal control... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM INTERNAL CONTROL STANDARDS § 542.4 How do these regulations affect minimum internal control standards established in a Tribal-State compact? (a) If there is...

  9. Minimum quantity of urban refuse compost affecting physical and chemical soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzoffi

    Full Text Available The increasing production of urban waste requires urgent responses because of various environmental problems that arise when urban refuse is stored in landfills or incinerated. Recycling of domestic waste and composting of its organic fraction has been indicated as a possible disposal solution. A three-year experiment was conducted to quantify the minimum rate of urban refuse compost (URC addition able to improve some physical and chemical soil properties at the lowest cost and environmental impact. URC was added to a silty clay soil and to a sandy loam soil 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% rate (w/w. Samplings were made 12, 24 and 36 months after URC application. To study the only effect of compost on soil due to its interaction with the soil matrix, each soil-compost mixture was divided into three boxes and kept outdoors weed free. After 12 months, 3% URC resulted the minimum quantity able to ameliorate several soil properties. In silty clay soil this rate significantly ameliorated microaggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity, but negative effects were observed on electrical conductivity. After 24 months, 3% rate significantly increased soil organic matter content. In the sandy loam soil, after 12 months, 3% rate of URC determined a positive effect on organic matter and cone resistance in dry soil condition. Electrical conductivity increased at 3% URC addition. The minimum URC quantity affecting hydraulic conductivity and plastic limit was 6%, and 9% for the liquid limit. Under these experimental conditions, the lowest rate (3% of URC incorporation to soils appears to be the minimum quantity able to improve most of the soil properties influencing fertility. What the results show is that, to achieve sustainability of urban refuse compost application to agricultural soil, further research is needed to investigate soil property changes in the range between 0% and 3%.

  10. Minimum quantity of urban refuse compost affecting physical and chemical soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rocchini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing production of urban waste requires urgent responses because of various environmental problems that arise when urban refuse is stored in landfills or incinerated. Recycling of domestic waste and composting of its organic fraction has been indicated as a possible disposal solution. A three-year experiment was conducted to quantify the minimum rate of urban refuse compost (URC addition able to improve some physical and chemical soil properties at the lowest cost and environmental impact. URC was added to a silty clay soil and to a sandy loam soil 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% rate (w/w. Samplings were made 12, 24 and 36 months after URC application. To study the only effect of compost on soil due to its interaction with the soil matrix, each soil-compost mixture was divided into three boxes and kept outdoors weed free. After 12 months, 3% URC resulted the minimum quantity able to ameliorate several soil properties. In silty clay soil this rate significantly ameliorated microaggregate stability and hydraulic conductivity, but negative effects were observed on electrical conductivity. After 24 months, 3% rate significantly increased soil organic matter content. In the sandy loam soil, after 12 months, 3% rate of URC determined a positive effect on organic matter and cone resistance in dry soil condition. Electrical conductivity increased at 3% URC addition. The minimum URC quantity affecting hydraulic conductivity and plastic limit was 6%, and 9% for the liquid limit. Under these experimental conditions, the lowest rate (3% of URC incorporation to soils appears to be the minimum quantity able to improve most of the soil properties influencing fertility. What the results show is that, to achieve sustainability of urban refuse compost application to agricultural soil, further research is needed to investigate soil property changes in the range between 0% and 3%.

  11. Potential Impact of Fulfilment of Minimum Essential Force (MEF to The Regional Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Tri Haryanto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As with other aspects, the element of meeting the needs of national defence and security becomes very crucial aspect. These elements are not only coming from the domestic, but also related to the system of inter-state relations. To ensure the creation of the defence system and optimal security, policy will require minimum essential forces (MEF, which will outline the major components of the minimum requirements of national defence should be prepared to face any threats. The fulfilment of MEF must also provide welfare impacts for the region. For this reason this study was conducted with the purpose of calculating the impact of compliance with the MEF on the welfare of the region, especially in West Java province. IRIO using spatial approach, it can be concluded that the domestic defence industry is projected to have a role that is quite high, especially for the regional economy. To the West Java region, industrial goods of metal, in which there is the defence industry, encourage the creation of outputs and increase the income of workers. Although most of the economy and its impact enjoyed by workers in the territory, region or other provinces also continue to enjoy the effects of the increase in output and labour income.

  12. Brazil's sugarcane boom could affect regional temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-04-01

    With the world seeking to cut its dependence on fossil fuels, the use of bioethanol and other biofuels is on the rise. In Brazil, the second largest producer and consumer of bioethanol, this has led to a boom in sugarcane production. Based on new laws and trade agreements, researchers expect Brazil's production of sugarcane-derived ethanol to increase tenfold over the next decade, with considerable land being converted for growing sugarcane. Much of this expansion is expected to come at a loss of some of the country's cerrado savannas. So while a major aim of the turn to biofuels is to reduce the transfer of carbon to the atmosphere and mitigate global climate change, the shifting agricultural activity could have direct consequences on Brazil's climate by changing the region's physical and biogeochemical properties.

  13. Resident, nursing home, and state factors affecting the reliability of Minimum Data Set quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ning; Mor, Vincent; Roy, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Nursing home quality measures impact policy decisions such as reimbursement or consumer choice. Quality indicators in the United States are collected through the federally mandated Minimum Data Set (MDS). Bias in MDS data collection or coding can thus have a negative impact on policy applications. To understand whether bias was present in coding, the authors studied 5174 pairs of MDS assessments that were independently collected by nursing home staff and study nurses from 206 nursing homes. The authors developed multivariate multilevel models to identify nursing home and resident characteristics that were significantly associated with the data quality of multiple MDS measures of nursing home quality. The outcomes were coding differences between nursing home staff and study nurses. Resident characteristics explained little of the variation in coding differences among facilities, while facilities characteristics explained 4% to 20% of the variation and state location further explained 13% to 34% of the variation. A generalized effect of nursing home state location tended to be consistent across measures. States that overidentified problems also tended to have worse quality indicators and vice versa. Comparisons of MDS-based quality indicators reflect differences in assessment practices at least as much as true quality differences. Efforts to standardize assessment practices across states are needed.

  14. Microbial Ecological Niche Partitioning Affects N2 gas Production in the Largest Marine Oxygen Minimum Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsman, C. A.; Penn, J. L.; Devol, A.; Palevsky, H. I.; Deutsch, C. A.; Keil, R.; Ward, B. B.; Rocap, G.

    2016-02-01

    Up to half of oceanic N2 production occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). In the Eastern Tropical North Pacific OMZ in April 2012, we measured a nine station coast to open ocean transect of N2 gas in the heart of the ETNP OMZ. Depth profiles of excess N2 gas had dual maxima located at the top of the OMZ and at 300m. An ecosystem biogeochemical model of the ETNP was also found to produce dual maxima at stations with a shallow OMZ. The model indicated that high N2 production rates caused the upper N2 maxima while long water residence time caused the deeper maxima. At a low productivity open ocean station where dual N2 maxima were observed, we obtained a depth profile of metagenomic sequences from both free living and >30 μm fractions to determine which N2 producing microbes were living in these three ecological niches. We use a phylogenetically-aware approach to identify metagenomic sequences by placing them on reference trees, which allows us to utilize them in a semi-quantitative manner. Overall, genes for denitrification (napA, nirS, nirK, qnor, nosZ) were enriched on particles while anammox was free-living. However, separation of genes into phylotypes indicated that the system is more complicated. For example, 4 out of 5 N2O reductase denitrifier phylotypes were actually free-living, while the fifth, most abundant phylotype was particle-attached. In the water column, denitrifier and anammox genes were spatially separated with depth with denitrifiers focused on the top section of the OMZ and with anammox becoming abundant slightly deeper and being more dominant at the deep N2 maxima. Interestingly, different phylotypes of denitrifiers have different depth profiles, implying individual adaptations and niches. The presence of measurable ammonia (>200 nM) at the top 20m of the OMZ along with the very low numbers of anammox bacteria is consistent with recent shoaling of the OMZ at the time of sampling. Thus the spatial separation of denitrifiers and anammox at the

  15. Genomic Regions Affecting Cheese Making Properties Identified in Danish Holsteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard; Poulsen, Nina Aagaard

    The cheese renneting process is affected by a number of factors associated to milk composition and a number of Danish Holsteins has previously been identified to have poor milk coagulation ability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genomic regions affecting the technological...

  16. Genomic Regions Affecting Cheese Making Properties Identified in Danish Holsteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard; Poulsen, Nina Aagaard

    The cheese renneting process is affected by a number of factors associated to milk composition and a number of Danish Holsteins has previously been identified to have poor milk coagulation ability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genomic regions affecting the technological...

  17. NeQuick 2 total electron content predictions for middle latitudes of North American region during a deep solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Scidá, L. A.; Migoya Orué, Y. O.; Lescano, G. E.; Alazo-Cuartas, K.; Cabrera, M. A.; Radicella, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of NeQuick 2 model in computing the vertical total electron content (VTEC) over a wide region placed at middle latitudes of North America during the deep solar minimum that occurred in 2008 has been checked. The long term relationship between EUV irradiance and F10.7 solar flux has changed markedly during the cycle 23/24 minimum with EUV levels decreasing more than expected from F10.7 proxy. A decrease of ionization in the ionosphere could have occurred. Thus, it could be expected that the models overestimate the value of ionospheric parameters for that deep solar minimum. For this study a high density VTEC data grid that covers the Continental United States (CONUS) has been compared with monthly median maps constructed with NeQuick 2. The results show that NeQuick 2 generally gives good predictions for the region which lies between 35°N to 50°N suggesting that nothing exceptional was happening during the 2008 minimum in terms of VTEC NeQuick 2's predictive capabilities. Taking into account that the modeled value is obtained by integration in height of the electron density profile, NeQuick2 would be assuming an inadequate profile for the few highest deviations observed, between 30°N and 35°N. Overall, the model does not give significant overestimation of VTEC as could be expected.

  18. Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State

    OpenAIRE

    Regnier, Stephane; Priest, Eric

    2007-01-01

    To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We inves...

  19. Potential impacts of a future Grand Solar Minimum on decadal regional climate change and interannual hemispherical climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegl, Tobias; Langematz, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    The political, technical and socio-economic developments of the next decades will determine the magnitude of 21st century climate change, since they are inextricably linked to future anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. To assess the range of uncertainty that is related to these developments, it is common to assume different emission scenarios for 21st climate projections. While the uncertainties associated with the anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing have been studied intensely, the contribution of natural climate drivers (particularly solar variability) to recent and future climate change are subject of intense debate. The past 1,000 years featured at least 5 excursions (lasting 60-100 years) of exceptionally low solar activity, induced by a weak magnetic field of the Sun, so called Grand Solar Minima. While the global temperature response to such a decrease in solar activity is assumed to be rather small, nonlinear mechanisms in the climate system might amplify the regional temperature signal. This hypothesis is supported by the last Grand Solar Minimum (the Maunder Minimum, 1645-1715) which coincides with the Little Ice Age, an epoch which is characterized by severe cold and hardship over Europe, North America and Asia. The long-lasting minimum of Solar Cycle 23 as well as the overall weak maximum of Cycle 24 reveal the possibility for a return to Grand Solar Minimum conditions within the next decades. The quantification of the implications of such a projected decrease in solar forcing is of ultimate importance, given the on-going public discussion of the role of carbon dioxide emissions for global warming, and the possible role a cooling due to decreasing solar activity could be ascribed to. Since there is still no clear consensus about the actual strength of the Maunder Minimum, we used 3 acknowledged solar reconstruction datasets that show significant differences in both, total solar irradiance (TSI) and spectral irradiance (SSI) to simulate a future

  20. THE CHROMOSPHERIC SOLAR MILLIMETER-WAVE CAVITY ORIGINATES IN THE TEMPERATURE MINIMUM REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Luz, Victor [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 (Mexico); Raulin, Jean-Pierre [CRAAM, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP 01302-907 (Brazil); Lara, Alejandro [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high-frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions, we used VALC, SEL05, and C7 solar chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allow us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models, we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer that is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The temperature profile, which features temperature minimum layers and a subsequent temperature rise, produces the CSMC phenomenon. The CSMC shows the complexity of the relation between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help us to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temperature in the millimeter wavelength range.

  1. Performance of IRI-2012 model during a deep solar minimum and a maximum year over global equatorial regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    Present paper inspects the prediction capability of the latest version of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model in predicting the total electron content (TEC) over seven different equatorial regions across the globe during a very low solar activity phase 2009 and a high solar activity phase 2012. This has been carried out by comparing the ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS)-derived VTEC with those from the IRI-2012 model. The observed GPS-TEC shows the presence of winter anomaly which is prominent during the solar maximum year 2012 and disappeared during solar minimum year 2009. The monthly and seasonal mean of the IRI-2012 model TEC with IRI-NeQ topside has been compared with the GPS-TEC, and our results showed that the monthly and seasonal mean value of the IRI-2012 model overestimates the observed GPS-TEC at all the equatorial stations. The discrepancy (or over estimation) in the IRI-2012 model is found larger during solar maximum year 2012 than that during solar minimum year 2009. This is a contradiction to the results recently presented by Tariku (2015) over equatorial regions of Uganda. The discrepancy is found maximum during the December solstice and a minimum during the March equinox. The magnitude of discrepancy in the IRI-2012 model showed longitudinal dependent which maximized in western longitude sector during both the years 2009 and 2012. The significant discrepancy in the IRI-2012 model observed during the solar minimum year 2009 could be attributed to larger difference between F10.7 flux and EUV flux (26-34 nm) during low solar activity period 2007-2009 than that during high solar activity period 2010-2012. This suggests that to represent the solar activity impact in the IRI model, implementation of new solar activity indices is further required for its better performance.

  2. The Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity, as a Result of the Temperature Minimum Region

    CERN Document Server

    De la Luz, V; Lara, A

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the local radio emission at the lower part of the solar atmosphere. To accomplish this, we have used a numerical code to simulate the emission and transport of high frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 GHz up to 10 THz. As initial conditions we used three well know chromospheric models. In this way, the generated synthetic spectra allows us to study the local emission and absorption processes with high resolution in both altitude and frequency. Associated with the temperature minimum predicted by these models we found that the local optical depth at millimeter wavelengths remains constant, producing an optically thin layer which is surrounded by two layers of high local emission. We call this structure the Chromospheric Solar Millimeter-wave Cavity (CSMC). The CSMC shows the complexity of the relationship between the theoretical temperature profile and the observed brightness temperature and may help to understand the dispersion of the observed brightness temper...

  3. Detailed finite element analysis of Darlington NGS feeder pipes with locally thinned regions below pressure minimum thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haq, I.; Stojakovic, M.; Li, M. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Pickering, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Feeder Pipes in CANDU nuclear stations are experiencing wall thinning due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) resulting in locally thinned regions in addition to general thinning. In Darlington NGS these locally thinned regions can be below pressure based minimum thickness (t{sub min}), required as per ASME Code Section III NB-3600 Equation (1). A methodology is presented to qualify the locally thinned regions under NB-3200 (NB-3213 and NB-3221) for internal pressure loading only. Detailed finite element models are used for internal pressure analysis using ANSYS v11.0. All other loadings such as deadweight, thermal and seismic loadings are qualified under NB-3600 using a general purpose piping stress analysis software. The piping stress analysis is based on average thickness equal to t{sub min} along with maximum values of ASME Code stress indices (Table NB-3681(a)-1). The requirement for the use of this methodology is that the average thickness of each cross-section with the locally thinned region shall be at least t{sub min}. The finite element analysis models are thinned to 0.75 t{sub min} (in increments of 0.05 t{sub min}) all-around the circumference in the straight section region allowing for flexible inspection requirements. Two different thicknesses of 1.10 t{sub min} and 1.30 t{sub min} are assigned to the bends. Thickness vs the allowable axial extent curves were developed for different types of feeder pipes in service. Feeders differ in pipe size, straight section length, bend angle and orientation. The stress analysis results show that all Darlington NGS outlet feeder pipes are fit for service with locally thinned regions up to 75% of the pressure based minimum thickness. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of finite element analysis in extending the useful life of degraded piping components. (author)

  4. CME-related particle acceleration regions during a simple eruptive event near solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Rouillard, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    An intriguing feature of many solar energetic particle (SEP) events is the detection of particles over a very extended range of longitudes in the Heliosphere. This may be due to peculiarities of the magnetic field in the corona, to a broad accelerator, to cross-field transport of the particles, or to a combination of these processes. The eruptive flare of the 26th of April 2008 offered an opportunity to study relevant processes under particularly favorable conditions, since it occurred in a very quiet solar and interplanetary environment. This allowed us to investigate the physical link between a single well-identified Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), electron acceleration as traced by radio emission, and the production of SEPs. We conduct a detailed analysis combining radio observations (Nançay Radioheliograph and Decameter Array, Wind/WAVES spectrograph) with remote-sensing observations of the corona in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light as well as in-situ measurements of energetic particles near 1AU (SoHO and STEREO spacecraft). By combining images taken from multiple vantage points we were able to derive the time-dependent evolution of the 3-D pressure front developing around the erupting CME. Magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet accelerated electrons that remained confined in closed magnetic fields in the corona, while the acceleration of escaping particles can be attributed to the pressure front generated ahead of the expanding CME. The CME accelerated electrons remotely from the parent active region, due to the interaction of its laterally expanding flank, traced by an EUV wave, with the ambient corona. SEPs detected at one STEREO spacecraft and SoHO were accelerated later, when the frontal shock of the CME intercepted the spacecraft-connected interplanetary magnetic field line. The injection regions into the Heliosphere inferred from the radio and SEP observations are separated in longitude by about 140°. The observations for this event

  5. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS) across populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Margaret E; Goldstein, Toby H; Maher, Brion S; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-12-30

    In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA). Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6-7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS). Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin) at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p value value value < 0.05 for 7-14 cM, the region adjacent to D4). This GSMA analysis approach demonstrates the power of linkage meta-analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. The MRMS method enhances this powerful tool to focus on more localized regions of linkage.

  6. Arts-Based Practices in Regions Affected By War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpha M Woodward

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, cultural disintegration, political confusion and unresolved inter-ethnic conflict are just some of the hurdles that can face citizens in war affected areas. After the Dayton Accord had been signed in 1995, international government and charity organizations and a variety of NGOs flooded into Bosnia and Herzegovina to help rebuild the infrastructure and to offer transitional economic and political support for the beleaguered, fragmented population. Although arts-based activities, therapies and projects were also part of the international influx, this form of psychosocial intervention was piecemeal, somewhat random, and often unable to sustain a long term or systemic approach to the massive psychosocial needs of the people. There appears to be little peer-reviewed fieldwork research to support claims of effectiveness of arts-based projects in post-conflict regions. Therefore, considering the growing number of projects that use the creative arts as an intervention for trauma, conflict transformation and community building in war affected populations, the purpose of this paper is to search for, and critically examine, empirical arts-based research conducted in war affected areas and/or any population that may have been directly impacted by activities of armed conflict.

  7. Identifying genomic regions for fine-mapping using genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA to identify the minimum regions of maximum significance (MRMS across populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Brion S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to detect linkage of the simulated complex disease Kofendrerd Personality Disorder across studies from multiple populations, we performed a genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA. Using the 7-cM microsatellite map, nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were performed separately on each of the four simulated populations independently to determine p-values. The genome of each population was divided into 20-cM bin regions, and each bin was rank-ordered based on the most significant linkage p-value for that population in that region. The bin ranks were then averaged across all four studies to determine the most significant 20-cM regions over all studies. Statistical significance of the averaged bin ranks was determined from a normal distribution of randomly assigned rank averages. To narrow the region of interest for fine-mapping, the meta-analysis was repeated two additional times, with each of the 20-cM bins offset by 7 cM and 13 cM, respectively, creating regions of overlap with the original method. The 6–7 cM shared regions, where the highest averaged 20-cM bins from each of the three offsets overlap, designated the minimum region of maximum significance (MRMS. Application of the GSMA-MRMS method revealed genome wide significance (p-values refer to the average rank assigned to the bin at regions including or adjacent to all of the simulated disease loci: chromosome 1 (p p-value p-value p-value

  8. Zooplankton Responses to Low-Oxygen Condition upon a Shallow Oxygen Minimum Zone in the Upwelling Region off Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, P.; Escribano, R.

    2015-12-01

    A shallow oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a critical component in the coastal upwelling ecosystem off Chile. This OMZ causes oxygen-deficient water entering the photic layer and affecting plankton communities having low tolerance to hypoxia. Variable, and usually species-dependent, responses of zooplankton to hypoxia condition can be found. Most dominant species avoid hypoxia by restricting their vertical distribution, while others can temporarily enter and even spent part of their life cycle within the OMZ. Whatever the case, low-oxygen conditions appear to affect virtually all vital rates of zooplankton, such as mortality, fecundity, development and growth and metabolism, and early developmental stages seem more sensitive, with significant consequences for population and community dynamics. For most study cases, these effects are negative at individual and population levels. Observations and predictions upon increasing upwelling intensity over the last 20-30 years indicate a gradual shoaling of the OMZ, and so that an expected enhancement of these negative effects of hypoxia on the zooplankton community. Unknown processes of adaptation and community-structure adjustments are expected to take place with uncertain consequences for the food web of this highly productive eastern boundary current ecosystem.

  9. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  10. Occurrence of blanketing Es layer (Esb) over the equatorial region during the peculiar minimum of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, V.; Kakad, B.; Nayak, C. K.; Surve, G.; Emperumel, K.

    2014-05-01

    A thin and highly dense sporadic E layer, which can occasionally block the upper ionospheric layers, is called blanketing sporadic E (Esb). We present the statistical seasonal local time occurrence pattern of Esb at equatorial station Tirunelveli (8.7° N, 77.8° E, dip latitude 0.7° N) during the extended minimum of solar cycle 24 (2007-2009). In spite of nearly the same average solar activity during both 2007 and 2009, considerable differences are noticed in the seasonal occurrence of Esb during this period. The percentage of Esb occurrence is found to be the highest during the summer solstice (≥ 50%) for both 2007 and 2009, which is in general accordance with the earlier studies. The occurrences of Esb during the vernal equinox (~ 33%) and January-February (~ 28%) are substantial in 2009 as compared to those during the same seasons in 2007. We find that, during winter (January-February), ~ 75% of Esb occurred during or just after the period of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW). We suggest that enhanced Esb occurrence during winter (January-February) and the vernal equinox of 2009 could be associated with SSW-driven changes in the E region ambient conditions. Furthermore, the close association of Esb with counter equatorial electrojet (CEEJ) suggested by earlier studies is re-examined carefully using the scenario of Esb occurrence on non-CEEJ days. Such an exercise is crucial as we are unaware whether the physical mechanisms driving Esb and CEEJ are linked or not. We find that, of all the seasons, the association of Esb and CEEJ is strongest during winter (November-December).

  11. Do Minimum Wages in Latin America and the Caribbean Matter? Evidence from 19 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai; Cunningham, Wendy

    Despite the existence of minimum wage legislation in most Latin American countries, there is little empirical evidence demonstrating its impact on the distribution of wages. In this study, cross-country data for 19 Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries is analyzed to gain an understanding...... of if and how minimum wages affect wage distributions in LAC countries. Although there is no single minimum wage institution in the LAC region, we find regional trends. Minimum wages affect the wage distribution in both the formal and, especially, the informal sector, both at the minimum wage and at multiples...... of the minimum. The minimum does not uniformly benefit low-wage workers: in countries where the minimum wage is relatively low compared to mean wages, the minimum wage affects the more disadvantaged segments of the labor force, namely informal sector workers, women, young and older workers, and the low skilled...

  12. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  13. Seasonal variability of the oxygen minimum zone off Peru in a high-resolution regional coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Oscar; Dewitte, Boris; Montes, Ivonne; Garçon, Veronique; Ramos, Marcel; Paulmier, Aurélien; Pizarro, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    In addition to being one of the most productive upwelling systems, the oceanic region off Peru is embedded in one of the most extensive oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the world ocean. The dynamics of the OMZ off Peru remain uncertain, partly due to the scarcity of data and to the ubiquitous role of mesoscale activity on the circulation and biogeochemistry. Here we use a high-resolution coupled physical/biogeochemical model simulation to investigate the seasonal variability of the OMZ off Peru. The focus is on characterizing the seasonal cycle in dissolved O2 (DO) eddy flux at the OMZ boundaries, including the coastal domain, viewed here as the eastern boundary of the OMZ, considering that the mean DO eddy flux in these zones has a significant contribution to the total DO flux. The results indicate that the seasonal variations of the OMZ can be interpreted as resulting from the seasonal modulation of the mesoscale activity. Along the coast, despite the increased seasonal low DO water upwelling, the DO peaks homogeneously over the water column and within the Peru Undercurrent (PUC) in austral winter, which results from mixing associated with the increase in both the intraseasonal wind variability and baroclinic instability of the PUC. The coastal ocean acts therefore as a source of DO in austral winter for the OMZ core, through eddy-induced offshore transport that is also shown to peak in austral winter. In the open ocean, the OMZ can be divided vertically into two zones: an upper zone above 400 m, where the mean DO eddy flux is larger on average than the mean seasonal DO flux and varies seasonally, and a lower part, where the mean seasonal DO flux exhibits vertical-zonal propagating features that share similar characteristics than those of the energy flux associated with the annual extratropical Rossby waves. At the OMZ meridional boundaries where the mean DO eddy flux is large, the DO eddy flux has also a marked seasonal cycle that peaks in austral winter (spring

  14. Zooplankton associated with the oxygen minimum zone system in the northern upwelling region of Chile during March 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Ruben; Hidalgo, Pamela; Krautz, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    Zooplankton in the coastal upwelling region off northern Chile may play a significant biogeochemical role by promoting carbon flux into the subsurface OMZ (oxygen minimum zone). This work identifies the dominant zooplankton species inhabiting the area influenced by the OMZ in March 2000 off Iquique (20°S, northern Chile). Abundance and vertical distribution studies revealed 17 copepod and 9 euphausiid species distributed between the surface and 600 m at four stations sampled both by day and by night. Some abundant species remained in the well-oxygenated upper layer (30 m), with no evidence of diel vertical migration, apparently restricted by a shallow (40-60 m) oxycline. Other species, however, were found closely associated with the OMZ. The large-sized copepod Eucalanus inermis was found below the oxycline and performed diel vertical migrations into the OMZ, whereas the very abundant Euphausia mucronata performed extensive diel vertical migrations between the surface waters and the core of the OMZ (200 m), even crossing it. A complete assessment of copepods and euphausiids revealed that the whole sampled water column (0-600 m) is occupied by distinct species having well-defined habitats, some of them within the OMZ. Ontogenetic migrations were evident in Eucalanidae and E. mucronata. Estimates of species biomass showed a substantial (>75% of total zooplankton biomass) daily exchange of C between the photic layer and the OMZ. Both E. inermis and E. mucronata can actively exchange about 37.8 g C m -2 d -1 between the upper well-oxygenated (0-60 m) layer and the deeper (60-600 m) OMZ layer. This migrant biomass may contribute about 7.2 g C m -2 d -1 to the OMZ system through respiration, mortality, and production of fecal pellets within the OMZ. This movement of zooplankton in and out of the OMZ, mainly as a result of the migratory behavior of E. mucronata, suggests a very efficient mechanism for introducing large amounts of freshly produced carbon into the OMZ

  15. The Minimum Impact House: Applications of the Frankfurt Prototype for sustainable building in Cities of the European Rhine Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drexler, H.; Jauslin, D.; Curiel, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Minimum Impact House in Frankfurt am Main is a sustainable solution for low cost living within city centers - a prototype typology with minimal footprint, built on a leftover urban space. The planning process itself became part of a scientific study. The ecological advantages of building in the

  16. Insect prey characteristics affecting regional variation in chimpanzee tool use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Crickette M; Deblauwe, Isra; Tagg, Nikki; Morgan, David B

    2014-06-01

    It is an ongoing interdisciplinary pursuit to identify the factors shaping the emergence and maintenance of tool technology. Field studies of several primate taxa have shown that tool using behaviors vary within and between populations. While similarity in tools over spatial and temporal scales may be the product of socially learned skills, it may also reflect adoption of convergent strategies that are tailored to specific prey features. Much has been claimed about regional variation in chimpanzee tool use, with little attention to the ecological circumstances that may have shaped such differences. This study examines chimpanzee tool use in termite gathering to evaluate the extent to which the behavior of insect prey may dictate chimpanzee technology. More specifically, we conducted a systematic comparison of chimpanzee tool use and termite prey between the Goualougo Triangle in the Republic of Congo and the La Belgique research site in southeast Cameroon. Apes at both of these sites are known to use tool sets to gather several species of termites. We collected insect specimens and measured the characteristics of their nests. Associated chimpanzee tool assemblages were documented at both sites and video recordings were conducted in the Goualougo Triangle. Although Macrotermitinae assemblages were identical, we found differences in the tools used to gather these termites. Based on measurements of the chimpanzee tools and termite nests at each site, we concluded that some characteristics of chimpanzee tools were directly related to termite nest structure. While there is a certain degree of uniformity within approaches to particular tool tasks across the species range, some aspects of regional variation in hominoid technology are likely adaptations to subtle environmental differences between populations or groups. Such microecological differences between sites do not negate the possibility of cultural transmission, as social learning may be required to transmit

  17. Features of Salt—Affected Soils and Salinization Hazard in East Asia and Its Neighboring Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGJING-SONG; MATSUMOTO; 等

    1995-01-01

    Asia is the largest distribution area of salt-affected soils in the world,Very few countries in Asia could escape from hazard of salinization.This paper deals with various salt-affected soils spreading in East Asia and its neighboring regions (including China,Japan,Kampuchea,Democratic Peolpe's Republic of Kores,Republic of Korea,Laos,Mongolia,Burma,Thailand and Vietnam),Principles of occurrence of salinization,and features of salt-affected soils in these regions have been studied in the present paper,Based on studies on types,features and distribution patterns of salt-affected soils.a salt-affected soil map of East Asia and its neighboring regions has been complied.Mechanism and manifestation of the salinization hazard on the regional agriculture and ecological environment,measures of preventing salinization hazard and exploiting salt-affected soils in these regions are also discussed.

  18. Involvement of Sensory Regions in Affective Experience: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpute, Ajay B; Kang, Jian; Bickart, Kevin C; Yardley, Helena; Wager, Tor D; Barrett, Lisa F

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of work suggests that sensory processes may also contribute to affective experience. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of affective experiences driven through visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and somatosensory stimulus modalities including study contrasts that compared affective stimuli to matched neutral control stimuli. We found, first, that limbic and paralimbic regions, including the amygdala, anterior insula, pre-supplementary motor area, and portions of orbitofrontal cortex were consistently engaged across two or more modalities. Second, early sensory input regions in occipital, temporal, piriform, mid-insular, and primary sensory cortex were frequently engaged during affective experiences driven by visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and somatosensory inputs. A classification analysis demonstrated that the pattern of neural activity across a contrast map diagnosed the stimulus modality driving the affective experience. These findings suggest that affective experiences are constructed from activity that is distributed across limbic and paralimbic brain regions and also activity in sensory cortical regions.

  19. Involvement of sensory regions in affective experience: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay eSatpute

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of work suggests that sensory processes may also contribute to affective experience. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of affective experiences driven through visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and somatosensory stimulus modalities including study contrasts that compared affective stimuli to matched neutral control stimuli. We found, first, that limbic and paralimbic regions, including the amygdala, anterior insula, pre-supplementary motor area and portions of orbitofrontal cortex were consistently engaged across two or more modalities. Second, early sensory input regions in occipital, temporal, piriform, mid-insular, and primary sensory cortex were frequently engaged during affective experiences driven by visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory and somatosensory inputs. A classification analysis demonstrated that the pattern of neural activity across a contrast map diagnosed the stimulus modality driving the affective experience. These findings suggest that affective experiences are constructed from activity that is distributed across limbic and paralimbic brain regions and also activity in sensory cortical regions.

  20. Period–color and Amplitude–color Relations at Maximum and Minimum Light for RR Lyrae Stars in the SDSS Stripe 82 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Bhardwaj, Anupam; Schrecengost, Zachariah; Singh, Harinder P.

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of period–color (PC) and amplitude–color (AC) relations at the maximum and minimum light can be used to probe the interaction of the hydrogen ionization front (HIF) with the photosphere and the radiation hydrodynamics of the outer envelopes of Cepheids and RR Lyraes. For example, theoretical calculations indicated that such interactions would occur at minimum light for RR Lyrae and result in a flatter PC relation. In the past, the PC and AC relations have been investigated by using either the (V ‑ R)MACHO or (V ‑ I) colors. In this work, we extend previous work to other bands by analyzing the RR Lyraes in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 Region. Multi-epoch data are available for RR Lyraes located within the footprint of the Stripe 82 Region in five (ugriz) bands. We present the PC and AC relations at maximum and minimum light in four colors: (u ‑ g)0, (g ‑ r)0, (r ‑ i)0, and (i ‑ z)0, after they are corrected for extinction. We found that the PC and AC relations for this sample of RR Lyraes show a complex nature in the form of flat, linear or quadratic relations. Furthermore, the PC relations at minimum light for fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars are separated according to the Oosterhoff type, especially in the (g ‑ r)0 and (r ‑ i)0 colors. If only considering the results from linear regressions, our results are quantitatively consistent with the theory of HIF-photosphere interaction for both fundamental and first overtone RR Lyraes.

  1. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  2. Trophic ecology and vertical patterns of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in zooplankton from oxygen minimum zone regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rebecca L.; Wakeham, Stuart; McKinney, Rick; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-08-01

    The unique physical and biogeochemical characteristics of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) influence plankton ecology, including zooplankton trophic webs. Using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, this study examined zooplankton trophic webs in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ. δ13C values were used to indicate zooplankton food sources, and δ15N values were used to indicate zooplankton trophic position and nitrogen cycle pathways. Vertically stratified MOCNESS net tows collected zooplankton from 0 to 1000 m at two stations along a north-south transect in the ETNP during 2007 and 2008, the Tehuantepec Bowl and the Costa Rica Dome. Zooplankton samples were separated into four size fractions for stable isotope analyses. Particulate organic matter (POM), assumed to represent a primary food source for zooplankton, was collected with McLane large volume in situ pumps. The isotopic composition and trophic ecology of the ETNP zooplankton community had distinct spatial and vertical patterns influenced by OMZ structure. The most pronounced vertical isotope gradients occurred near the upper and lower OMZ oxyclines. Material with lower δ13C values was apparently produced in the upper oxycline, possibly by chemoautotrophic microbes, and was subsequently consumed by zooplankton. Between-station differences in δ15N values suggested that different nitrogen cycle processes were dominant at the two locations, which influenced the isotopic characteristics of the zooplankton community. A strong depth gradient in zooplankton δ15N values in the lower oxycline suggested an increase in trophic cycling just below the core of the OMZ. Shallow POM (0-110 m) was likely the most important food source for mixed layer, upper oxycline, and OMZ core zooplankton, while deep POM was an important food source for most lower oxycline zooplankton (except for samples dominated by the seasonally migrating copepod Eucalanus inermis). There was no consistent isotopic progression among the four

  3. University, Knowledge and Regional Development: Factors Affecting Knowledge Transfer in a Developing Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongwa, Neba Samuel; Marais, Lochner

    2016-01-01

    The role of knowledge in the current knowledge economy cannot be overly emphasised. Successful regions are continuously being linked to excellence in the production, accumulation, and application of knowledge. Universities have increasingly been at the centre of such knowledge production, application and transfer. Yet, there is little research and…

  4. University, Knowledge and Regional Development: Factors Affecting Knowledge Transfer in a Developing Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongwa, Neba Samuel; Marais, Lochner

    2016-01-01

    The role of knowledge in the current knowledge economy cannot be overly emphasised. Successful regions are continuously being linked to excellence in the production, accumulation, and application of knowledge. Universities have increasingly been at the centre of such knowledge production, application and transfer. Yet, there is little research and…

  5. Do mining lakes in the Lusatian lignite mining region (Eastern Germany) affect regional precipitation patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Yasemine; Pohle, Ina; Keuler, Klaus; Schaller, Eberhard; Hinz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Due to the flooding of former open-pit mines, Europe's largest artificial lake district is created in Eastern Germany. Between 1990 and 2006 more than 80 km² of new lakes have already been formed. These large-scale land cover changes may impact regional meteorological characteristics, therefore it is of interest, whether effects of the mining lakes can already be observed. We especially focus on whether the evaporation from the mining pit lakes leads to a higher precipitation on their lee side. To detect changes in the precipitation patterns, we analysed daily precipitation data (1980-2014) of 25 stations in an area of 10 000 km² widely around the lake district. Under the assumption that the influences of the lakes should be detectable either directly as trends in the observed data or as a deviation from a general measure for precipitation we combined statistical tests and principal component analysis (PCA). We applied pre-whitening Mann-Kendall tests to detect precipitation trends and Mann-Whitney tests to detect differences between split samples (before and after the flooding of most of the lakes). The PCA was applied based on the correlation matrix of daily precipitation at the different stations. As the daily precipitation can sufficiently be explained by the first five principal components, the recombination of these five principal components was used as a general measure of precipitation in the region. By regression trees (random forests) a relationship between the eigenvectors of the first five principal components and physiogeographic characteristics of the stations (e.g. altitude) was shown. Both the observed data and the deviations between the measurements and the recombination of the first five principal components showed divergent trends with high spatial variability and also interannual variability, but a pattern consistent with the lee side of the lake could not be detected. Therefore, it has been demonstrated that the emerging lakes had no

  6. Miscanthus establishment and overwintering in the Midwest USA: a regional modeling study of crop residue management on critical minimum soil temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, Christopher J; Vanloocke, Andy; Lenters, John D; Motew, Melissa M

    2013-01-01

    Miscanthus is an intriguing cellulosic bioenergy feedstock because its aboveground productivity is high for low amounts of agrochemical inputs, but soil temperatures below -3.5 °C could threaten successful cultivation in temperate regions. We used a combination of observed soil temperatures and the Agro-IBIS model to investigate how strategic residue management could reduce the risk of rhizome threatening soil temperatures. This objective was addressed using a historical (1978-2007) reconstruction of extreme minimum 10 cm soil temperatures experienced across the Midwest US and model sensitivity studies that quantified the impact of crop residue on soil temperatures. At observation sites and for simulations that had bare soil, two critical soil temperature thresholds (50% rhizome winterkill at -3.5 °C and -6.0 °C for different Miscanthus genotypes) were reached at rhizome planting depth (10 cm) over large geographic areas. The coldest average annual extreme 10 cm soil temperatures were between -8 °C to -11 °C across North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. Large portions of the region experienced 10 cm soil temperatures below -3.5 °C in 75% or greater for all years, and portions of North and South Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin experienced soil temperatures below -6.0 °C in 50-60% of all years. For simulated management options that established varied thicknesses (1-5 cm) of miscanthus straw following harvest, extreme minimum soil temperatures increased by 2.5 °C to 6 °C compared to bare soil, with the greatest warming associated with thicker residue layers. While the likelihood of 10 cm soil temperatures reaching -3.5 °C was greatly reduced with 2-5 cm of surface residue, portions of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Wisconsin still experienced temperatures colder than -3.5 °C in 50-80% of all years. Nonetheless, strategic residue management could help increase the likelihood of overwintering of miscanthus rhizomes in the first few years after

  7. Evaluation of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures as simulated with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM over Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraehenmann, Stefan; Kothe, Steffen; Ahrens, Bodo [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences; Panitz, Hans-Juergen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The representation of the diurnal 2-m temperature cycle is challenging because of the many processes involved, particularly land-atmosphere interactions. This study examines the ability of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (version 4.8) to capture the statistics of daily maximum and minimum 2-m temperatures (Tmin/Tmax) over Africa. The simulations are carried out at two different horizontal grid-spacings (0.22 and 0.44 ), and are driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses as near-perfect lateral boundary conditions. As evaluation reference, a high-resolution gridded dataset of daily maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmin/Tmax) for Africa (covering the period 2008-2010) is created using the regression-kriging-regression-kriging (RKRK) algorithm. RKRK applies, among other predictors, the remotely sensed predictors land surface temperature and cloud cover to compensate for the missing information about the temperature pattern due to the low station density over Africa. This dataset allows the evaluation of temperature characteristics like the frequencies of Tmin/Tmax, the diurnal temperature range, and the 90{sup th} percentile of Tmax. Although the large-scale patterns of temperature are reproduced well, COSMO-CLM shows significant under- and overestimation of temperature at regional scales. The hemispheric summers are generally too warm and the day-to-day temperature variability is overestimated over northern and southern extra-tropical Africa. The average diurnal temperature range is underestimated by about 2 C across arid areas, yet overestimated by around 2 C over the African tropics. An evaluation based on frequency distributions shows good model performance for simulated Tmin (the simulated frequency distributions capture more than 80% of the observed ones), but less well performance for Tmax (capture below 70%). Further, over wide parts of Africa a too large fraction of daily Tmax values exceeds the observed 90{sup th} percentile of Tmax, particularly across

  8. Miscanthus establishment and overwintering in the Midwest USA: a regional modeling study of crop residue management on critical minimum soil temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Kucharik

    Full Text Available Miscanthus is an intriguing cellulosic bioenergy feedstock because its aboveground productivity is high for low amounts of agrochemical inputs, but soil temperatures below -3.5 °C could threaten successful cultivation in temperate regions. We used a combination of observed soil temperatures and the Agro-IBIS model to investigate how strategic residue management could reduce the risk of rhizome threatening soil temperatures. This objective was addressed using a historical (1978-2007 reconstruction of extreme minimum 10 cm soil temperatures experienced across the Midwest US and model sensitivity studies that quantified the impact of crop residue on soil temperatures. At observation sites and for simulations that had bare soil, two critical soil temperature thresholds (50% rhizome winterkill at -3.5 °C and -6.0 °C for different Miscanthus genotypes were reached at rhizome planting depth (10 cm over large geographic areas. The coldest average annual extreme 10 cm soil temperatures were between -8 °C to -11 °C across North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. Large portions of the region experienced 10 cm soil temperatures below -3.5 °C in 75% or greater for all years, and portions of North and South Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin experienced soil temperatures below -6.0 °C in 50-60% of all years. For simulated management options that established varied thicknesses (1-5 cm of miscanthus straw following harvest, extreme minimum soil temperatures increased by 2.5 °C to 6 °C compared to bare soil, with the greatest warming associated with thicker residue layers. While the likelihood of 10 cm soil temperatures reaching -3.5 °C was greatly reduced with 2-5 cm of surface residue, portions of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Wisconsin still experienced temperatures colder than -3.5 °C in 50-80% of all years. Nonetheless, strategic residue management could help increase the likelihood of overwintering of miscanthus rhizomes in the first few

  9. Regional brain activation as a biological marker of affective responsivity to acute exercise: influence of fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzello, S J; Hall, E E; Ekkekakis, P

    2001-01-01

    Previous research has shown that regional brain activation, assessed via frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry, predicts affective responsivity to aerobic exercise. To replicate and extend this work, in the present study we examined whether resting brain activation was associated with affective responses to an acute bout of aerobic exercise and the extent to which aerobic fitness mediated this relationship. Participants (high-fit, n = 22; low/moderate-fit, n = 45) ran on a treadmill for 30 min at 75% VO2max. EEG and affect were assessed pre- and 0-, 10-, 20-, and 30-min postexercise. Resting EEG asymmetry predicted positive affect (as measured by the energetic arousal subscale of the Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List) postexercise. Furthermore, resting frontal EEG asymmetry predicted affect only in the high-fit group, suggesting the effect might be mediated by some factor related to fitness. It was also shown that subjects with relatively greater left frontal activation had significantly more energy (i.e., activated pleasant affect) following exercise than subjects with relatively greater right frontal activation. In conclusion, aerobic fitness influenced the relationship between resting frontal asymmetry and exercise-related affective responsivity.

  10. Plasma Motions and Turbulent Magnetic Diffusivity of Active Region AR 12158 Using a Minimum Energy Functional and Non-Force-Free Reconstructions of Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Benoit; Vincent, Alain

    2017-01-01

    We present a generalization of the resistive minimum-energy fit (MEF-R: Tremblay and Vincent, Solar Phys. 290, 437, 2015) for non-force-free (NFF) magnetic fields. In MEF-R, an extremum principle is used to infer two-dimensional maps of plasma motions [boldsymbol{v}(x,y)] and magnetic eddy diffusivity [η _{eddy}(x,y)] at the photosphere. These reconstructions could be used as boundary conditions in data-driven simulations or in data assimilation. The algorithm is validated using the analytical model of a resistive expanding spheromak by Rakowski, Laming, and Lyutikov ( Astrophys. J. 730, 30, 2011). We study the flaring Active Region AR 12158 using a series of magnetograms and Dopplergrams provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The results are discussed for a non-force-free magnetic-field reconstruction [boldsymbol{B}_{NFF}] (Hu and Dasgupta in Solar Phys. 247, 87, 2008). We found that the vertical plasma velocities [vz(x,y)] inferred using MEF-R are very similar to the observed Doppler velocities [vr(x,y)]. Finally, we study the potential spatial correlation between microturbulent velocities and significant values of η_{eddy}(x,y).

  11. Bovine chromosomal regions affecting rheological traits in rennet-induced skim milk gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Gustavsson, F; Glantz, M

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing cheese yield and quality is of central importance to cheese manufacturing. The yield is associated with the time it takes before the gel has an optimal consistency for further processing, and it is well known that gel formation differs between individual milk samples. By identifying...... genomic regions affecting traits related to rennet-induced gelation, the aim of this study was to identify potential candidate genes affecting these traits. Hence, rennet-induced gelation, including rennet coagulation time, gel strength, and yield stress, was measured in skim milk samples collected from...

  12. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  13. Ionospheric response to geomagnetic disturbances in the north-eastern region of Asia during the minimum of 23rd cycle of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, V. I.; Pirog, O. M.; Polekh, N. M.; Mikhalev, A. V.; Poddelsky, I. N.; Stepanov, A. E.

    2008-12-01

    We present the results of studies of the subauroral and mid-latitude ionosphere variations in the north-eastern region of Asia. We used the data from network of vertical and oblique-incidence sounding ionosondes and optical measurements. Long-term experiments on the radio paths Magadan-Irkutsk and Norilsk-Irkutsk were carried out within the period 2005-2007. Vertical sounding stations operated in standard regime. Observation of airglow near Irkutsk was provided by the zenith photometer that measured intensities of 557.7 and 630.0 nm atomic oxygen emissions. The results may be summarized as follows. (1) Large daytime negative disturbances are observed during the main and recovery phases mainly at high latitudes, whereas the positive disturbances observed during the main phase at mid latitudes. The disturbances changed their sign between Yakutsk and Irkutsk. (2) During the main and recovery storm phases the fall of foF2 associated with the equatorward wall of the main ionospheric trough is observed in the afternoon and evening. (3) Fluctuations of the electron density more intensive at mid latitudes during the storm main phase are observed during all considered periods. They are classed as traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID). Such sharp gradients of electron density are responsible for the strong changes in the characteristics of the radio wave propagation, particularity MOF. (4) A large-scale ionospheric disturbance is noted at the meridional chain of ionosonds in December 2006 as the sharp increase of foF2. It appears in the evening in the minimum of Dst at high latitude and propagate to equator. (5) A maximum of 630 nm emission above Irkutsk corresponds to the foF2 increase. (6) The obtained experimental data on the net of vertical and oblique-incidence sounding with high time resolution show that such net is the effective facility to study the conditions of the radio wave propagation and can be used for the diagnostic of the ionosphere.

  14. The use of "stabilization exercises" to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-06-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term "core stability" is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. "stabilization exercise", "motor control exercise"). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms "core stability" and "stabilization exercise", 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process.

  15. Further analysis of previously implicated linkage regions for Alzheimer's disease in affected relative pairs

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    Lannfelt Lars

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide linkage studies for Alzheimer's disease have implicated several chromosomal regions as potential loci for susceptibility genes. Methods In the present study, we have combined a selection of affected relative pairs (ARPs from the UK and the USA included in a previous linkage study by Myers et al. (Am J Med Genet, 2002, with ARPs from Sweden and Washington University. In this total sample collection of 397 ARPs, we have analyzed linkage to chromosomes 1, 9, 10, 12, 19 and 21, implicated in the previous scan. Results The analysis revealed that linkage to chromosome 19q13 close to the APOE locus increased considerably as compared to the earlier scan. However, linkage to chromosome 10q21, which provided the strongest linkage in the previous scan could not be detected. Conclusion The present investigation provides yet further evidence that 19q13 is the only chromosomal region consistently linked to Alzheimer's disease.

  16. DILEMATIKA PENETAPAN UPAH MINIMUM

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    . Pitaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the effort of creating appropiate wage for employees, it is necessary to determine the wages by considering the increase of poverty without ignoring the increase of productivity, the progressivity of companies and the growth of economic. The new minimum wages in the provincial level and the regoinal/municipality level have been implemented per 1st January in Indonesia since 2001. The determination of minimum wage for provinvial level should be done 30 days before 1st January, whereas the determination of minimumwage for regional/municipality level should be done 40 days before 1st January. Moreover,there is an article which governs thet the minimumwage will be revised annually. By considering the time of determination and the time of revision above,it can be predicted that before and after the determination date will be crucial time. This is because the controversy among parties in industrial relationships will arise. The determination of minimum wage will always become a dilemmatic step which has to be done by the Government. Through this policy, on one side the government attempts to attract many investors, however, on the other side the government also has to protect the employees in order to have the appropiate wage in accordance with the standard of living.

  17. Minimum Specific Fuel Consumption of a Liquid-Cooled Multicylinder Aircraft Engine as Affected by Compression Ratio and Engine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Feder, Melvin S.; Harries, Myron L.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a 12-cylinder V-type liquid-cooled aircraft engine of 1710-cubic-inch displacement to determine the minimum specific fuel consumption at constant cruising engine speed and compression ratios of 6.65, 7.93, and 9.68. At each compression ratio, the effect.of the following variables was investigated at manifold pressures of 28, 34, 40, and 50 inches of mercury absolute: temperature of the inlet-air to the auxiliary-stage supercharger, fuel-air ratio, and spark advance. Standard sea-level atmospheric pressure was maintained at the auxiliary-stage supercharger inlet and the exhaust pressure was atmospheric. Advancing the spark timing from 34 deg and 28 deg B.T.C. (exhaust and intake, respectively) to 42 deg and 36 deg B.T.C. at a compression ratio of 6.65 resulted in a decrease of approximately 3 percent in brake specific fuel consumption. Further decreases in brake specific fuel consumption of 10.5 to 14.1 percent (depending on power level) were observed as the compression ratio was increased from 6.65 to 9.68, maintaining at each compression ratio the spark advance required for maximum torque at a fuel-air ratio of 0.06. This increase in compression ratio with a power output of 0.585 horsepower per cubic inch required a change from . a fuel- lend of 6-percent triptane with 94-percent 68--R fuel at a compression ratio of 6.65 to a fuel blend of 58-percent, triptane with 42-percent 28-R fuel at a compression ratio of 9.68 to provide for knock-free engine operation. As an aid in the evaluation of engine mechanical endurance, peak cylinder pressures were measured on a single-cylinder engine at several operating conditions. Peak cylinder pressures of 1900 pounds per square inch can be expected at a compression ratio of 9.68 and an indicated mean effective pressure of 320 pounds per square inch. The engine durability was considerably reduced at these conditions.

  18. Region and site conditions affect phenotypic trait variation in five forest herbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Isgard Holle; Kolb, Annette; Diekmann, Martin Reemt

    2012-02-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of organisms to express different phenotypes under different environmental conditions. It may buffer individuals both against short-term environmental fluctuations and long-term effects of global change. A plastic behaviour in response to changes in the environment may be especially important in species with low migration rates and colonization capacities, such as in many forest plants in present-day fragmented landscapes. We compared the phenotypic trait variation (used as a proxy for the amount of phenotypic plasticity) of five forest herbs (Brachypodium sylvaticum, Circaea lutetiana, Impatiens noli-tangere, Sanicula europaea and Stachys sylvatica) between two regions in Germany that differ in their overall environmental conditions (Bremen in the northwest, Freiburg in the southwest; 5 species × 2 regions × 8-15 populations × 25-50 individuals). In addition, we measured light intensity and important soil parameters (soil pH, moisture, K, P and N) in all populations. We found consistent differences in trait variability between the two regions in several species. In Brachypodium and Stachys both vegetative and reproductive traits were more variable in Freiburg. Similarly, reproductive traits of Impatiens and Sanicula appeared to be more variable in Freiburg, while in both species at least one of the vegetative traits was more variable in Bremen. Mean local environmental conditions also affected trait variation; in most of the species both vegetative and reproductive traits were more variable in sites with higher nutrient contents and higher light availability. Across all traits and both regions, seed or fruit production was most variable. In summary, at least some of the studied forest herbs appear to respond strongly to large-scale environmental differences, showing a higher trait variability in the more southern region. Given the assumption that phenotypic trait variation is positively associated with phenotypic plasticity

  19. Were equatorial regions less affected by the 2009 influenza pandemic? The Brazilian experience.

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    Cynthia Schuck-Paim

    Full Text Available Although it is in the Tropics where nearly half of the world population lives and infectious disease burden is highest, little is known about the impact of influenza pandemics in this area. We investigated the mortality impact of the 2009 influenza pandemic relative to mortality rates from various outcomes in pre-pandemic years throughout a wide range of latitudes encompassing the entire tropical, and part of the subtropical, zone of the Southern Hemisphere (+5(°N to -35(°S by focusing on a country with relatively uniform health care, disease surveillance, immunization and mitigation policies: Brazil. To this end, we analyzed laboratory-confirmed deaths and vital statistics mortality beyond pre-pandemic levels for each Brazilian state. Pneumonia, influenza and respiratory mortality were significantly higher during the pandemic, affecting predominantly adults aged 25 to 65 years. Overall, there were 2,273 and 2,787 additional P&I- and respiratory deaths during the pandemic, corresponding to a 5.2% and 2.7% increase, respectively, over average pre-pandemic annual mortality. However, there was a marked spatial structure in mortality that was independent of socio-demographic indicators and inversely related with income: mortality was progressively lower towards equatorial regions, where low or no difference from pre-pandemic mortality levels was identified. Additionally, the onset of pandemic-associated mortality was progressively delayed in equatorial states. Unexpectedly, there was no additional mortality from circulatory causes. Comparing disease burden reliably across regions is critical in those areas marked by competing health priorities and limited resources. Our results suggest, however, that tropical regions of the Southern Hemisphere may have been disproportionally less affected by the pandemic, and that climate may have played a key role in this regard. These findings have a direct bearing on global estimates of pandemic burden and the

  20. Mangrove forest distributions and dynamics (1975–2005) of the tsunami-affected region of Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, C.; Zhu, Z.; Tieszen, L.L.; Singh, A.; Gillette, S.; Kelmelis, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim  We aimed to estimate the present extent of tsunami-affected mangrove forests and determine the rates and causes of deforestation from 1975 to 2005.Location  Our study region covers the tsunami-affected coastal areas of Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Burma (Myanmar), Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka in Asia.Methods  We interpreted time-series Landsat data using a hybrid supervised and unsupervised classification approach. Landsat data were geometrically corrected to an accuracy of plus-or-minus half a pixel, an accuracy necessary for change analysis. Each image was normalized for solar irradiance by converting digital number values to the top-of-the atmosphere reflectance. Ground truth data and existing maps and data bases were used to select training samples and also for iterative labelling. We used a post-classification change detection approach. Results were validated with the help of local experts and/or high-resolution commercial satellite data.Results  The region lost 12% of its mangrove forests from 1975 to 2005, to a present extent of c. 1,670,000 ha. Rates and causes of deforestation varied both spatially and temporally. Annual deforestation was highest in Burma (c. 1%) and lowest in Sri Lanka (0.1%). In contrast, mangrove forests in India and Bangladesh remained unchanged or gained a small percentage. Net deforestation peaked at 137,000 ha during 1990–2000, increasing from 97,000 ha during 1975–90, and declining to 14,000 ha during 2000–05. The major causes of deforestation were agricultural expansion (81%), aquaculture (12%) and urban development (2%).Main conclusions  We assessed and monitored mangrove forests in the tsunami-affected region of Asia using the historical archive of Landsat data. We also measured the rates of change and determined possible causes. The results of our study can be used to better understand the role of mangrove forests in saving lives and property from natural disasters such as the Indian Ocean tsunami

  1. Fungi infection in honeybee hives in regions affected by Brazilian sac brood

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    K.M. Keller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Sac Brood is a disease that affects apiaries of Africanized bee hives in Brazil, thereby making them susceptible to high losses. This study investigated the pathogenicity of Africanized bee hives by the entomopathogenic fungi in a Brazilian Sac Brood endemic region. The degree of fungal contamination, presence of mycotoxins in beehive elements, and vulnerability of healthy beehives in environments subjected and not subjected to the disease were investigated. From the contaminating fungal load, species that are mycotoxin producers and pathogenic causing mortality in the bees have been isolated. The analysis of bee pollen and bee bread samples did not show the presence of the toxic pollen of Stryphnodendron (Fabaceae, which has been indicated as the causative agent of mortality in pre-pupal stage larvae. However, bee bread showed the highest correlation between substrate and fungal contamination.

  2. A study of air flow patterns affecting pollutant concentrations in the Central Region of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazcilevich, Aron D.; García, Agustín. R.; Ruíz-Suárez, L. Gerardo

    Using a prognostic air quality model that includes actual emissions, air pollution regimes over the central region of Mexico are simulated. It is shown that due to the complex orography, vertical circular patterns develop over the metropolitan area of Mexico City. In this way reactive and non-reactive pollutants can travel near the surface, be transported vertically and land in an area opposite to its initial route due to convective downward currents. This changes the surface pollutant concentrations on the landing area. Also, it is shown that air pollution is transported near the surface from the metropolitan area of Mexico City through Chalco in the South-east corner of the Mexico Valley, to the Valley of Cuautla affecting this area.

  3. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

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    Burkhard Pleger

    Full Text Available The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  4. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  5. Identification of a short region on chromosome 6 affecting direct calving ease in Piedmontese cattle breed.

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    Silvia Bongiorni

    Full Text Available Calving in cattle is affected by calf morphology and by dam characteristics. It is described by two different traits: maternal calving ease, which is the ability to generate dams with good physiological predisposition to calving, and direct calving ease, which is the ability to generate calves that are easily born. The aim of this study was to identify regions of cattle genome harboring genes possibly affecting direct calving ease in the Piedmontese cattle breed. A population of 323 bulls scored for direct calving ease (EBV was analyzed by a medium-density SNP marker panel (54,001 SNPs to perform a genome-wide scan. The strongest signal was detected on chromosome 6 between 37.8 and 38.7 Mb where 13 SNPs associated to direct calving ease were found. Three genes are located in this region: LAP3, encoding for a leucine aminopeptidase involved in the oxytocin hydrolysis; NCAPG, encoding for a non-SMC condensin I complex, which has been associated in cattle with fetal growth and carcass size; and LCORL, which has been associated to height in humans and cattle. To further confirm the results of the genome-wide scan we genotyped additional SNPs within these genes and analyzed their association with direct calving ease. The results of this additional analysis fully confirmed the findings of the GWAS and particularly indicated LAP3 as the most probable gene involved. Linkage Disequilibrium (LD analysis showed high correlation between SNPs located within LAP3 and LCORL indicating a possible selection signature due either to increased fitness or breeders' selection for the trait.

  6. Analysis of Changing Land Use Land Cover in Salinity Affected Coastal Region

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    Vikrant Vijay Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities have induced many changes in land use over a period of three decades in a salinity affected semi-arid region of coastal Saurashtra in Gujarat. To overcome water scarcity and quality issues, efforts have been undertaken by state authorities to conserve and effectively use surface water resource to supplement the irrigation and domestic water requirements. Surface water schemes implemented in the area have altered the general land use conditions. In the present study, remotely sensed data coupled with ancillary data are used for analysing the land use-land cover change. Supervised classification and post classification techniques are employed to classify various land use-land cover classes and to detect changes, respectively. Landscape pattern change has been studied by analysing the spatial pattern of land use land cover classes structure. The results show that the region has experienced significant changes over a thirty year period. Growth in agricultural activities, policies developed to conserve freshwater runoff, and increase in built-up area, are the main driving forces behind these changes.

  7. Revision of the tsunami catalogue affecting Turkish coasts and surrounding regions

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    Y. Altinok

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The coasts of Turkey have been hit by tsunamis in the past. The first national earthquake-tsunami catalogues were compiled in the early 1980s while the most up-to-date tsunami catalogues are mainly the products of recent European projects. The EU projects GITEC and GITEC-TWO (Genesis and Impact of Tsunamis on the European Coasts and TRANSFER (Tsunami Risk ANd Strategies For the European Region have added important contributions in establishing and developing unified criteria for tsunami parameterisation, standards for the quality of the data, the data format and the database general architecture. On the basis of these new aspects and based on recent marine geophysical data, tsunamigenic earthquakes, tsunami intensities and their reliability have been revised. The current version of the database contains 134 events, most of which have affected the Turkish coasts seriously during the last 3500 years. The reliability index of 76 events was "probable" and "definite", so that they could be used for assessment of the risk along the Turkish coastal region and for implementation of prevention policies.

  8. Maturity stages affect the postharvest quality and shelf-life of fruits of strawberry genotypes growing in subtropical regions

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    M. Moshiur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The postharvest changes of five promising strawberry genotypes viz. Sweet Charlie, Festival, Camarosa, FA 008 and BARI Strawberry-1 at ambient temperature were studied under sub tropical region during the winter season (December–April of 2010–2011 and 2011–2012 in Bangladesh. Irrespective of maturity stages percent fruit decay and weight of fruits were noted minimum in Camarosa and maximum in FA 008 up to day 4 of storage. The shelf life of fruits was maximum in Camarosa and minimum in FA 008 and BARI Strawberry-1 regardless of maturity stage throughout the storage period. The TSS, total sugar and ascorbic acid content of fruits were increased with the increase in maturity stage during the storage period. In 1/3rd and 2/3rd maturity stages, the TSS and total sugar content were found the highest in Festival but at full maturity stage those were recorded higher in Camarosa. The titratable acidity was noticed the highest in 1/3rd matured fruits and gradually decreased with the increase in maturity stage as well as storage duration in all the genotypes. Ascorbic acid content of strawberry gradually decreases during the storage period. Fully matured fresh fruits of Festival contained maximum ascorbic acid content while BARI Strawberry-1 contained minimum ascorbic acid that was reduced after 3 days of storage.

  9. Distribution and abundance of predators that affect duck production--prairie pothole region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, A.B.; Greenwood, R.J.; Sovada, M.A.; Shaffer, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    During 1983-88, the relative abundance of 18 species and species-groups of mammalian and avian predators affecting duck production in the prairie pothole region was determined in 33 widely scattered study areas ranging in size from 23-26 km2. Accounts of each studied species and species-group include habitat and history, population structure and reported densities, and information on distribution and abundance from the present study. Index values of undetected, scarce, uncommon, common, or numerous were used to rate abundance of nearly all species in each study area. Principal survey methods were livetrapping of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and Franklin's ground squirrels (Spermophilus franklinii), systematic searches for carnivore tracks in quarter sections (0.65 km2), daily records of sightings of individual predator species, and systematic searches for occupied nests of tree-nesting avian predators. Abundances of predators in individual areas were studied 1-3 years.The distribution and abundance of predator species throughout the prairie pothole region have undergone continual change since settlement of the region by Europeans in the late 1800's. Predator populations in areas we studied differed markedly from those of pristine times. The changes occurred from habitat alterations, human-inflicted mortality of predators, and interspecific relations among predator species. Indices from surveys of tracks revealed a decline in the abundance of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and an albeit less consistent decline in the abundance of raccoons (Procyon lotor) with an increase in the abundance of coyotes (Canis latrans). Records of locations of occupied nests revealed great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) tended to nest 0.5 km apart, and American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) tended to avoid nesting 0.5 km of nests of red-tailed hawks. Excluding large gulls, for which no measurements of abundance were obtained, the number of

  10. Factors affecting motivation and retention of primary health care workers in three disparate regions in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojakaa, David; Olango, Susan; Jarvis, Jordan

    2014-06-06

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Government of Kenya alike identify a well-performing health workforce as key to attaining better health. Nevertheless, the motivation and retention of health care workers (HCWs) persist as challenges. This study investigated factors influencing motivation and retention of HCWs at primary health care facilities in three different settings in Kenya - the remote area of Turkana, the relatively accessible region of Machakos, and the disadvantaged informal urban settlement of Kibera in Nairobi. A cross-sectional cluster sample design was used to select 59 health facilities that yielded interviews with 404 health care workers, grouped into 10 different types of service providers. Data were collected in November 2011 using structured questionnaires and a Focus Group Discussion guide. Findings were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate methods of the associations and determinants of health worker motivation and retention. The levels of education and gender factors were lowest in Turkana with female HCWs representing only 30% of the workers against a national average of 53%. A smaller proportion of HCWs in Turkana feel that they have adequate training for their jobs. Overall, 13% of the HCWs indicated that they had changed their job in the last 12 months and 20% indicated that they could leave their current job within the next two years. In terms of work environment, inadequate access to electricity, equipment, transport, housing, and the physical state of the health facility were cited as most critical, particularly in Turkana. The working environment is rated as better in private facilities. Adequate training, job security, salary, supervisor support, and manageable workload were identified as critical satisfaction factors. Family health care, salary, and terminal benefits were rated as important compensatory factors. There are distinct motivational and retention factors that affect HCWs in the three regions. Findings and

  11. Prognostic factors affecting the surgical outcome of anterolateral benign tumors in the foramen magnum region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chuanyuan; Liu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yuekang; Liu, Fan; You, Chao

    2016-09-01

    Anterior and anterolateral tumors in foramen magnum region are rare and surgically challenging although most of them are benign. The optimal approach is debatable and prognostic factors affecting surgical outcome remains unclear. We aimed to identify factors including surgical approach determining postoperative outcome. The data of 49 patients diagnosed benign tumors involving the anterior and anterolateral foramen magnum were retrospectively analyzed in our institution from January 2009 to January 2015. The demographic, clinicoradiological, surgical and follow-up information were collected. Primary surgical outcome was new neurological deficits. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine predictors of postoperative neurological deficits. Patients were operated on either via suboccipital (31 cases, 63.3%) or far lateral (18 cases, 36.7%) approach. Newly developed neurological deficits occurred in 11 (22.4%) patients, improved over time in 6 (12.2%) patients. 2 (4.1%) patients died within 3 month after operation and 2 (4.1%) suffered tumor recurrence. 44 (93.6%) out of 47 survivors had good functional outcome (postoperative Karnofsky performance score ≥80) at last follow-up period. Patients with postoperative new neurodeficits harbored tumors which tended to more frequently involve lower third clivus (p = 0.083), to be meningiomas (p = 0.059), were more likely to be removed through far lateral approach (p = 0.010) and have extradural extension (p = 0.024). Multivariate analysis showed that the far lateral approach was the sole predictor independently related to postoperative neurological deficits (p = 0.029). The far lateral approach to benign tumors anterolateral to foramen magnum experienced higher rate of immediate new neurological deficits compared to suboccipital approach. The role of the suboccipital approach may be underestimated and should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Water-supply options in arsenic-affected regions in Cambodia: targeting the bottom income quintiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Jim F; Sabatini, David A

    2014-08-01

    In arsenic-affected regions of Cambodia, rural water committees and planners can choose to promote various arsenic-avoidance and/or arsenic-removal water supply systems. Each of these has different costs of providing water, subsequently born by the consumer in order to be sustainable. On a volumetric basis ($/m3-yr) and of the arsenic-avoidance options considered, small-scale public water supply - e.g., treated water provided to a central tap stand - is the most expensive option on a life-cycle cost basis. Rainwater harvesting, protected hand dug wells, and vendor-supplied water are the cheapest with a normalized present worth value, ranging from $2 to $10 per cubic meter per year of water delivered. Subsidization of capital costs is needed to make even these options affordable to the lowest (Q5) quintile. The range of arsenic-removal systems considered here, using adsorptive media, is competitive with large-scale public water supply and deep tube well systems. Both community level and household-scale systems are in a range that is affordable to the Q4 quintile, though more research and field trials are needed. At a target cost of $5.00/m3, arsenic removal systems will compete with the OpEx costs for most of the arsenic-safe water systems that are currently available. The life-cycle cost approach is a valuable method for comparing alternatives and for assessing current water supply practices as these relate to equity and the ability to pay.

  13. Changes in behavioural responses to infrastructure affect local and regional connectivity – a simulation study on pond breeding amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj-Britt Pontoppidan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An extensive and expanding infrastructural network destroys and fragments natural habitat and has detrimental effect on abundance and population viability of many amphibian species. Roads function as barriers in the landscape. They separate local populations from each other or prevent access to necessary resources. Therefore, road density and traffic intensity in a region may have severe impact on regional as well as local connectivity. Amphibians may be able to detect and avoid unsuitable habitat. Individuals’ ability to avoid roads can reduce road mortality but at the same time road avoidance behaviour, can increase the barrier effect of the road and reduce connectivity. We use an individual based model to explore how changes in road mortality and road avoidance behaviour affect local and regional connectivity in a population of Moor frogs (Rana arvalis. The results indicate that road mortality has a strong negative effect on regional connectivity, but only a small effect on local connectivity. Regional connectivity is positively affected by road avoidance and the effect becomes more pronounced as road mortality decreases. Road avoidance also has a positive effect on local connectivity. When road avoidance is total and the road functions as a 100% barrier regional connectivity is close to zero, while local connectivity exhibit very elevated values. The results suggest that roads may affect not only regional or metapopulation dynamics but also have a direct effect on local population dynamics.

  14. The influence of forest shelterbelts on 137Cs fallout in Chernobyl affected areas (Tula region, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Maxim; Shamshurina, Eugeniya; Tatyana, Paramonova; Vladimir, Belyaev; Angelina, Gavruchenkova; Nikolai, Lugovoy; Konstantinov, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    The radioactive fallout after Chernobyl accident caused serious contamination by 137Cs along extensive area of East-European plain.Cs137 fall down on earth surface in two ways: gravitational - "dry" and rainfall - "wet" way. "Dry" fallout is a result of direct deposition of radionuclides from atmosphere with average speed of about 0.1-1 mm/sec. The fate of "dry fall"is far less than rainfall mechanism. Erupted water steam of reactor zone full of radioactive material enriched precipitation with 137Cs. Therefore, the derived spatial structure of contamination was under control of rainfall pattern in May-June 1986. On the areas affected by rainfall fallout was the Southern part of Tula region in Middle Russia. It got name as "Plava hot spot" by the town in the center of this area. Tula is a traditional rural region, the vast areas covered by chernozem soils are cultivated for centuries. During cultivation forest cover was reduced that urged growth of wind erosion and loss of soil fertility. Hence, in the middle of 20 the century large arrangements for creation of forest shelterbelts were conducted. High efficiency of shelterbelts made them a widely provided part of new human-transformed landscape. Usually shelterbelts are set as a regular network across main direction of winds in particular region. Such organization help to reduce speed of air steam in the lowest 20-30 m layer of atmosphere. In addition, shelterbelts are very good collectors of snow in winter time which increase total moisture of soil and its fertility. Represented investigation is conducted to find out any correlation between shelterbelts and fallout of radionuclides. If such correlation is significant, it has to be taken into account for further environmental surveys. Two shelterbelts on the interfluve positions were chosen for detailed examination. Both selected objects emerged before 1986 but have different width, floristic composition, orientation and type of construction. One of shelterbelts is

  15. Cooling Town - How landscape is affecting urban climates in mountain regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Leitinger, Georg; Heinl, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Cities and urban areas are known to have a local climate different from that of surrounding rural landscapes. The so-called 'urban heat island' phenomenon results from the replacement of natural with impervious, non-evaporative surfaces such as concrete and asphalt. Urban areas usually have higher solar radiation absorption and a greater thermal conductivity and capacity that lead to greater heat storage during the day and heat release at night. This results in a modified climate that is warmer than the surrounding rural areas. Despite being often considered as 'heating islands', cities are not isolated from their environment and are affected by their thermal properties. Reports for the cities of Vienna (Austria) or Stuttgart (Germany) document the importance of the environmental setting for the climate in the cities. Especially large forest areas around the cities have shown to provide cooling and higher air quality. It is therefore not only the core urban area that needs to be considered for climatic effects but also the large-scale surrounding and environmental setting of the city. But only very few studies (e.g. for rice fields in Japan and Taiwan) specifically investigated this temperature effect of surrounding landscapes on urban areas. The research project "Cooling Town" (www.coolingtown.at) addresses this little knowledge on temperature regimes of urban areas and their thermal connectivity with surrounding landscapes, focusing on mountain environments. One major aspect in this research is to assess the summer temperature regime of the city of Bolzano in South Tyrol (northern Italy). The spatial distribution of air and surface temperatures is analyzed to derive rural and urban and regions with specific temperature regimes and climates and their connectivity. Twelve climate stations were placed in and around the city of Bolzano to measure air and surface temperatures together with wind parameters throughout summer 2012. Thermal infrared images were taken from

  16. Precipitation variability on global pasturelands may affect food security in livestock-dependent regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloat, L.; Gerber, J. S.; Samberg, L. H.; Smith, W. K.; West, P. C.; Herrero, M.; Brendan, P.; Cecile, G.; Katharina, W.; Smith, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    this information to identify regions in which changes in the variability of precipitation may already be affecting the ability of grazing systems to support intensified livestock production, and assess the potential impacts of those changes on pasture productivity.

  17. Regional brain activity and strenuous exercise: predicting affective responses using EEG asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Petruzzello, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Previous research using the model proposed by Davidson has shown that resting frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry can predict affective responses to aerobic exercise at moderate intensities. Specifically, greater relative left frontal activity has been shown to predict positive affect (i.e., energy) following exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if resting frontal EEG asymmetry would predict affective responses following strenuous exercise. Thirty participants (13 women, 17 men) completed a maximal graded exercise test on a treadmill. EEG was recorded prior to exercise. Affect was measured by the Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List prior to the graded exercise test, immediately following, 10 and 20-min following exercise. Greater relative left frontal activity predicted tiredness and calmness during recovery from exercise, but not tension or energy. Tiredness and calmness following exercise covaried, suggesting that tiredness following exercise might not have been linked with displeasure. These findings offer further support for the link between EEG asymmetry and affective responses to exercise.

  18. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark,…

  19. Genetic Variants in the STMN1 Transcriptional Regulatory Region Affect Promoter Activity and Fear Behavior in English Springer Spaniels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Ding

    Full Text Available Stathmin 1 (STMN1 is a neuronal growth-associated protein that is involved in microtubule dynamics and plays an important role in synaptic outgrowth and plasticity. Given that STMN1 affects fear behavior, we hypothesized that genetic variations in the STMN1 transcriptional regulatory region affect gene transcription activity and control fear behavior. In this study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, g. -327 A>G and g. -125 C>T, were identified in 317 English Springer Spaniels. A bioinformatics analysis revealed that both were loci located in the canine STMN1 putative promoter region and affected transcription factor binding. A statistical analysis revealed that the TT genotype at g.-125 C>T produced a significantly greater fear level than that of the CC genotype (P < 0.05. Furthermore, the H4H4 (GTGT haplotype combination was significantly associated with canine fear behavior (P < 0.01. Using serially truncated constructs of the STMN1 promoters and the luciferase reporter, we found that a 395 bp (-312 nt to +83 nt fragment constituted the core promoter region. The luciferase assay also revealed that the H4 (GT haplotype promoter had higher activity than that of other haplotypes. Overall, our results suggest that the two SNPs in the canine STMN1 promoter region could affect canine fear behavior by altering STMN1 transcriptional activity.

  20. Learning, Adjustment and Stress Disorders: With Special Reference to Tsunami Affected Regions. Beitrage zur Padagogischen und Rehabilitationspsychologie. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witruk, Evelin, Ed.; Riha, David, Ed.; Teichert, Alexandra, Ed.; Haase, Norman, Ed.; Stueck, Marcus, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This book contains selected contributions from the international workshop Learning, "Adjustment and Stress Disorders--with special reference to Tsunami affected Regions" organised by Evelin Witruk and the team of Educational and Rehabilitative Psychology at the University of Leipzig in January 2006. The book contains new results and the…

  1. Learning, Adjustment and Stress Disorders: With Special Reference to Tsunami Affected Regions. Beitrage zur Padagogischen und Rehabilitationspsychologie. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witruk, Evelin, Ed.; Riha, David, Ed.; Teichert, Alexandra, Ed.; Haase, Norman, Ed.; Stueck, Marcus, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This book contains selected contributions from the international workshop Learning, "Adjustment and Stress Disorders--with special reference to Tsunami affected Regions" organised by Evelin Witruk and the team of Educational and Rehabilitative Psychology at the University of Leipzig in January 2006. The book contains new results and the…

  2. 9 CFR 93.304 - Import permits for horses from regions affected with CEM and for horse specimens for diagnostic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the origin, history, and health status of the horses; the lack of satisfactory information necessary... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Import permits for horses from regions affected with CEM and for horse specimens for diagnostic purposes; reservation fees for space at quarantine...

  3. Does economic crisis affect prevention services? An Italian region as a study case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado De Vito

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Latium Region in Italy is currently under pressure from national government to achieve economic consolidation of regional health services and is subject to a formal regional recovery plan.Methods: Using recognized health indicators together with a government assessment tool, we evaluate the impact of the economic downturn on the health of the Latium Region population.Results: We find that healthcare spending in the Latium Region needs to become more efficient by improving primary healthcare and by restoring efficiency in hospitals.Conclusions: Prevention activities should not only be defended in the current financial and economic crisis, but also streamlined and strengthened.

  4. Factors affecting stream nutrient loads: A synthesis of regional SPARROW model results for the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Stephen D.; Alexander, Richard B.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the results of 12 recently calibrated regional SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) models covering most of the continental United States to evaluate the consistency and regional differences in factors affecting stream nutrient loads. The models - 6 for total nitrogen and 6 for total phosphorus - all provide similar levels of prediction accuracy, but those for major river basins in the eastern half of the country were somewhat more accurate. The models simulate long-term mean annual stream nutrient loads as a function of a wide range of known sources and climatic (precipitation, temperature), landscape (e.g., soils, geology), and aquatic factors affecting nutrient fate and transport. The results confirm the dominant effects of urban and agricultural sources on stream nutrient loads nationally and regionally, but reveal considerable spatial variability in the specific types of sources that control water quality. These include regional differences in the relative importance of different types of urban (municipal and industrial point vs. diffuse urban runoff) and agriculture (crop cultivation vs. animal waste) sources, as well as the effects of atmospheric deposition, mining, and background (e.g., soil phosphorus) sources on stream nutrients. Overall, we found that the SPARROW model results provide a consistent set of information for identifying the major sources and environmental factors affecting nutrient fate and transport in United States watersheds at regional and subregional scales. ?? 2011 American Water Resources Association. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Minimum wages and employment in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fang, Tony; Lin, Carl

    2015-01-01

    ... that minimum wage changes led to significant adverse effects on employment in the Eastern and Central regions of China, and resulted in disemployment for females, young adults, and low-skilled workers...

  6. What are the minimum requirements for ketogenic diet services in resource-limited regions? Recommendations from the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force for Dietary Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H; Al-Macki, Nabil; Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Kim, Heung D; Liao, Jianxiang; Megaw, Katherine; Nathan, Janak K; Raimann, Ximena; Rivera, Rocio; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Williams, Emma; Zupec-Kania, Beth A

    2015-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of dietary therapies for children and adults with refractory epilepsy, the availability of these treatments in developing countries with limited resources remains suboptimal. One possible contributory factor may be the costs. There is often reported a significant perceived need for a large ketogenic diet team, supplements, laboratory studies, and follow-up visits to provide this treatment. The 2009 Epilepsia Consensus Statement described ideal requirements for a ketogenic diet center, but in some situations this is not feasible. As a result, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Dietary Therapy was asked to convene and provide practical, cost-effective recommendations for new ketogenic diet centers in resource-limited regions of the world.

  7. A THEMIS Survey of Flux Ropes and Traveling Compression Regions: Location of the Near-Earth Reconnection Site During Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, S. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-01-01

    A statistical study of flux ropes and traveling compression regions (TCRs) during the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) second tail season has been performed. A combined total of 135 flux ropes and TCRs in the range GSM X approx -14 to -31 R(sub E) were identified, many of these occurring in series of two or more events separated by a few tens of seconds. Those occurring within 10 min of each other were combined into aggregated reconnection events. For the purposes of this survey, these are most likely the products of reconnect ion occurring simultaneously at multiple, closely spaced x-lines as opposed to statistically independent episodes of reconnection. The 135 flux ropes and TCRs were grouped into 87 reconnection events; of these, 28 were moving tailward and 59 were moving Earthward. The average location of the near-Earth x-line determined from statistical analysis of these reconnection events is (X(sub GSM), Y*(sub GSM)) = (-30R(sub E), 5R(sub E)), where Y* includes a correction for the solar aberration angle. A strong east-west asymmetry is present in the tailward events, with >80% being observed at GSM Y* > O. Our results indicate that the Earthward flows are similarly asymmetric in the midtail region, becoming more symmetric inside - 18 R(sub E). Superposed epoch analyses indicate that the occurrence of reconnection closer to the Earth, i.e., X > -20 R(sub E), is associated with elevated solar wind velocity and enhanced negative interplanetary magnetic field B(sub z). Reconnection events taking place closer to the Earth are also far more effective in producing geomagnetic activity, judged by the AL index, than reconnection initiated beyond X approx -25 R(sub E).

  8. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; (RPI); (IIT); (SDSU); (Vermont)

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  9. CHANGES IN LAND COVER AND USE AFFECT THE LOCAL AND REGIONAL CLIMATE IN PIRACICABA, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Pereira-Coltri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Land use and changes in land cover play an important role in local and regional climatic conditions, especially in tropical regions. Piracicaba, a city in southeastern Brazil, has an economy that is based primarily on sugar cane cultivation. The seasonality of this crop means that there are marked annual fluctuations in land use and cover in this municipality. In this work, we investigated the seasonal variation in urban heat-islands and local climatic variations by using remote sensing data, geographic information system (GIS and atmospheric modeling. The urban heat-islands were analyzed by using Landsat 7 (Enhanced Thematic Mapper+ images for the sugar cane crop (January to March and non-crop (August to November periods, and these images were subsequently converted to land surface brightness temperature. The average temperature in the non-crop period was 3.5°C higher than in the crop period, which suggested that heat-island intensity may be linked to the seasonality of sugar cane cultivation. In order to examine the influence of urban areas on regional temperature changes and heat fluxes, numerical simulations were done with the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS. Overall, the results obtained suggested that local and regional climatic dynamics were related to land use and changes in land cover.

  10. Minimum wage impacts on youth employment transitions, 1993-1999

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Campolieti; Tony Fang; Morley Gunderson

    2005-01-01

    The longitudinal nature of the Master File of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) for the period 1993-9, enables comparing transitions from employment to non-employment for individuals affected by minimum wage changes with appropriate comparison groups not affected by minimum wages. This is based on the large number (24) of minimum wage changes that have occurred across the different provincial jurisdictions in Canada over the 1990s. The results indicate that the minimum wage incr...

  11. Forces affecting employment dynamics in Groningen; Case study in a lagging rural region in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, I.J.; Post, J.H.; Wisselink, A.J.; Overbeek, M.M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this report the focus is on employment dynamics in Groningen since the beginning of the 1980s. This study is part of an EU wide research project on employment development in leading and lagging rural regions of the EU. Total employment in Groningen increased by 36,000 jobs or with one quarter in

  12. How Does Education Affect Environmental Knowledge: A Survey in Urban and Regional Planning Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergen, Baris; Ergen, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at measuring of environmental knowledge of students who select environmental science course in Urban and Regional Planning Department at Bozok University. This article includes a survey research, with this survey, we can get information about knowledge of environment of students and where they learn them. First briefly, it provides…

  13. Peripheral nerve pathology in patients with severely affected complex regional pain syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Bodde, Marlies I.; van den Dungen, Johannes; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is a chronic pain syndrome with no clinical evidence of nerve injury; however, recently, changes in muscle tissue have been found in case of CRPS-I. Our aim was to search for histological changes in peripheral nerves of amputated limbs from patients wit

  14. Forces affecting employment dynamics in Drenthe; Case study in a leading rural region in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, I.J.; Post, J.H.; Wisselink, A.J.; Overbeek, M.M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this report the focus is on employment dynamics in Drenthe since the beginning of the 1980s. This study is part of an EU wide research project on employment development in leading and lagging rural regions of the EU. Total employment in Drenthe increased by 24,500 jobs or with over 20% in the

  15. Factors Affecting School Participation in Turkey: An Analysis of Regional Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Sedat; Chudgar, Amita

    2016-01-01

    There are thousands of children who remain out of school at both primary and secondary levels in Turkey. The current disparities in access to education in Turkey are mostly driven by systematic regional differences and high gender inequalities. Although several existing studies have paid close attention to gender-based inequities in school access,…

  16. Regional cholinesterase activity in white-throated sparrow brain is differentially affected by acephate (Orthene?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, N.B.; Kuenzel, W.J.; Hill, E.F.; Romo, G.A.; Komaragiri, M.V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of a 14-day dietary exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, acephate (acetylphosphoramidothioic acid O,S-dimethyl ester), were determined on cholinesterase activity in three regions (basal ganglia, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) of the white-throated sparrow, Zonotrichia albicollis, brain. All three regions experienced depressed cholinesterase activity between 0.5-2 ppm acephate. The regions exhibited cholinesterase recovery at 2-16 ppm acephate; however, cholinesterase activity dropped and showed no recovery at higher dietary levels (>16 ppm acephate). Evidence indicates that the recovery is initiated by the magnitude of depression, not the duration. In general, as acephate concentration increased, differences in ChE activity among brain regions decreased. Three terms are introduced to describe ChE response to acephate exposure: (1) ChE resistance threshold, (2) ChE compensation threshold, and (3) ChE depression threshold. It is hypothesized that adverse effects to birds in the field may occur at pesticide exposure levels customarily considered negligible.

  17. Forces affecting employment dynamics in Drenthe; Case study in a leading rural region in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, I.J.; Post, J.H.; Wisselink, A.J.; Overbeek, M.M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this report the focus is on employment dynamics in Drenthe since the beginning of the 1980s. This study is part of an EU wide research project on employment development in leading and lagging rural regions of the EU. Total employment in Drenthe increased by 24,500 jobs or with over 20% in the per

  18. Forces affecting employment dynamics in Groningen; Case study in a lagging rural region in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, I.J.; Post, J.H.; Wisselink, A.J.; Overbeek, M.M.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this report the focus is on employment dynamics in Groningen since the beginning of the 1980s. This study is part of an EU wide research project on employment development in leading and lagging rural regions of the EU. Total employment in Groningen increased by 36,000 jobs or with one quarter in

  19. Regional paleofire regimes affected by non-uniform climate, vegetation and human drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blarquez, Olivier; Ali, Adam A.; Girardin, Martin P.; Grondin, Pierre; Fréchette, Bianca; Bergeron, Yves; Hély, Christelle

    2015-09-01

    Climate, vegetation and humans act on biomass burning at different spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we used a dense network of sedimentary charcoal records from eastern Canada to reconstruct regional biomass burning history over the last 7000 years at the scale of four potential vegetation types: open coniferous forest/tundra, boreal coniferous forest, boreal mixedwood forest and temperate forest. The biomass burning trajectories were compared with regional climate trends reconstructed from general circulation models, tree biomass reconstructed from pollen series, and human population densities. We found that non-uniform climate, vegetation and human drivers acted on regional biomass burning history. In the open coniferous forest/tundra and dense coniferous forest, the regional biomass burning was primarily shaped by gradual establishment of less climate-conducive burning conditions over 5000 years. In the mixed boreal forest an increasing relative proportion of flammable conifers in landscapes since 2000 BP contributed to maintaining biomass burning constant despite climatic conditions less favourable to fires. In the temperate forest, biomass burning was uncoupled with climatic conditions and the main driver was seemingly vegetation until European colonization, i.e. 300 BP. Tree biomass and thus fuel accumulation modulated fire activity, an indication that biomass burning is fuel-dependent and notably upon long-term co-dominance shifts between conifers and broadleaf trees.

  20. Demographic and social trends affecting intergenerational relations in the MENA region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Messkoub (Mahmood)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis paper focuses on poverty in the MENA region and whether it can be alleviated by intergenerational support within and across households. Intergenerational relations are mediated through several institutions. The most prominent of these are households, state, civil society and market.

  1. Minimum Length - Maximum Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Panes, Boris

    2011-01-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA about superluminal neutrinos.

  2. Different ways to balance the spine: subtle changes in sagittal spinal curves affect regional muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Andrew P; Hides, Julie A; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hodges, Paul W

    2009-03-15

    Exploratory study of regional muscle activity in different postures. To detail the relationship between spinal curves and regional muscle activity. Sagittal balanced spinal posture (C7 above S1 in the sagittal plane) is a goal for spinal surgery and conservative ergonomics. Three combinations of thoracolumbar and lumbar spinal curves can be considered sagittal balanced postures: (i) flat-at both regions, (ii) long lordosis-lordotic at both regions, and (iii) short lordosis-thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. This study compares regional muscle activity between these 3 sagittal balanced postures in sitting, as well as a slump posture. Fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrodes were inserted into the lumbar multifidus (deep and superficial), iliocostalis (lateral and medial), longissimus thoracis, and transversus abdominis in 14 healthy male volunteers. Fine-wire or surface EMG electrodes were also used to record activity of the obliquus internus, obliquus externus, and rectus abdominis muscles. Root mean square EMG amplitude in the flat, long lordosis, short lordosis, and slump sitting postures were normalized to maximal voluntary contraction, and also to the peak activity across the sitting postures. Muscle activity was compared between postures with a linear mixed model analysis. Of the extensor muscles, it was most notable that activity of the deep and superficial fibers of lumbar multifidus increased incrementally in the 3 sagittal balanced postures; flat, long lordosis, and short lordosis (P sagittal balanced postures, the flat posture showed the least muscle activity (similar to the slump posture at most muscles examined). Discrete combinations of muscle activity supported the 3 different sagittal balanced postures in sitting, providing new detail for surgeons, researchers, and therapists to distinguish between different sagittal balanced postures.

  3. Probing the innermost regions of AGN jets and their magnetic fields with RadioAstron. II. Observations of 3C 273 at minimum activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, G.; Gómez, J. L.; Casadio, C.; Lobanov, A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Lisakov, M. M.; Bach, U.; Marscher, A.; Jorstad, S.; Anderson, J. M.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Savolainen, T.; Vega-García, L.; Fuentes, A.; Zensus, J. A.; Alberdi, A.; Lee, S.-S.; Lu, R.-S.; Pérez-Torres, M.; Ros, E.

    2017-08-01

    Context. RadioAstron is a 10 m orbiting radio telescope mounted on the Spektr-R satellite, launched in 2011, performing Space Very Long Baseline Interferometry (SVLBI) observations supported by a global ground array of radio telescopes. With an apogee of 350 000 km, it is offering for the first time the possibility to perform μas-resolution imaging in the cm-band. Aims: The RadioAstron active galactic nuclei (AGN) polarization Key Science Project (KSP) aims at exploiting the unprecedented angular resolution provided by RadioAstron to study jet launching/collimation and magnetic-field configuration in AGN jets. The targets of our KSP are some of the most powerful blazars in the sky. Methods: We present observations at 22 GHz of 3C 273, performed in 2014, designed to reach a maximum baseline of approximately nine Earth diameters. Reaching an angular resolution of 0.3 mas, we study a particularly low-activity state of the source, and estimate the nuclear region brightness temperature, comparing with the extreme one detected one year before during the RadioAstron early science period. We also make use of the VLBA-BU-BLAZAR survey data, at 43 GHz, to study the kinematics of the jet in a 1.5-yr time window. Results: We find that the nuclear brightness temperature is two orders of magnitude lower than the exceptionally high value detected in 2013 with RadioAstron at the same frequency (1.4 × 1013 K, source-frame), and even one order of magnitude lower than the equipartition value. The kinematics analysis at 43 GHz shows that a new component was ejected 2 months after the 2013 epoch, visible also in our 22 GHz map presented here. Consequently this was located upstream of the core during the brightness temperature peak. Fermi-LAT observations for the period 2010-2014 do not show any γ-ray flare in conjunction with the passage of the new component by the core at 43 GHz. Conclusions: These observations confirm that the previously detected extreme brightness temperature in

  4. Large Aperture Scintillometer Used Over A Homogeneous Irrigated Area, Partly Affected By Regional Advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedjes, J. C. B.; Zuurbier, R. M.; Watts, C. J.

    Scintillometer measurements were collected over an irrigated wheat field ina semi-arid region in northwest Mexico. Conditions were unstable in the morning andstable during the afternoon, while latent heat fluxes remained high throughout the day.Regional advection was observed during near-neutral conditions. Monin-Obukhovsimilarity relationships for the structure parameter of temperature were verified in both unstable and stable conditions, but were violated close to near-neutral conditions. We found that, using additional measurements of radiation, soil heat flux and windspeed, areally averages of both sensible and latent heat fluxes can be reliably predicted by large aperture scintillometer measurements, as long as the net radiation is greater than zero.

  5. Survey of SSC12 regions affecting fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat using high density SNP data

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    María eMuñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid composition is a critical aspect of pork because it affects sensorial and technological aspects of meat quality and it is relevant for human health. Previous studies identified significant QTLs in porcine chromosome 12 for fatty acid profile of backfat and intramuscular fat. In the present study, 374 SNPs mapped in SSC12 from the 60K Porcine SNP Beadchip were used. We have combined linkage and association analyses with expression data analysis in order to identify regions of SSC12 that could affect fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat in longissimus muscle. The QTL scan showed a region around the 60 cM position that significantly affects palmitic fatty acid and two related fatty acid indexes. The Iberian QTL allele increased the palmitic content (+2.6% of mean trait. This QTL does not match any of those reported in the previous study on fatty acid composition of backfat, suggesting different genetic control acting at both tissues. The SNP association analyses showed significant associations with linolenic and palmitic acids besides several indexes. Among the polymorphisms that affect palmitic fatty acid and match the QTL region at 60 cM, there were three that mapped in the Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein (PCTP gene and one in the Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase  gene (ACACA. Interestingly one of the PCTP SNPs also affected significantly unsaturated and double bound indexes and the ratio between polyunsaturated/monounsaturated fatty acids. Differential expression was assessed on longissimus muscle conditional on the genotype of the QTL and on the most significant SNPs, according to the results obtained in the former analyses. Results from the microarray expression analyses, validated by RT-qPCR, showed that PCTP expression levels significantly vary depending on the QTL as well as on the own PCTP genotype. The results obtained with the different approaches point out the PCTP gene as a powerful candidate underlying the QTL for

  6. Propofol Affects Different Human Brain Regions Depending on Depth of Sedation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Quan; Tie-hu Ye; Si-fang Lin; Liang Zou; Shou-yuan Tian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of propofol on brain regions at different sedation levels and the association between changes in brain region activity and loss of consciousness using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and bispectral index (BIS) monitoring. Methods Forty-eight participants were enrolled at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from October 2011 to March 2012 and randomly assigned to a mild or a deep sedation group using computer- generated random numbers. Preliminary tests were performed a week prior to scanning to determine target effect site concentrations based on BIS and concomitant Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scores while under propofol. Within one week of the preliminary tests where propofol dose-response was established, BOLD-fMRI was conducted to examine brain activation with the subject awake, and with propofol infusion at the sedation level. Results Mild propofol sedation inhibited left inferior parietal lobe activation. Deep sedation inhibited activation of the left insula, left superior temporal gyrus, and right middle temporal gyrus. Compared with mild sedation, deep propofol sedation inhibited activation of the left thalamus, precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, and right basal nuclei. Conclusion Mild and deep propofol sedation are associated with inhibition of different brain regions, possibly explaining differences in the respective loss of consciousness processes.

  7. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  8. Strategies for flood hazard adaptation in drought affected regions of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleupner, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The development and management of water resources in Afghanistan are critically important for the economic development of the country. But Afghanistan presents a number of specific challenges in terms of water resource management and climate change impact assessment. Political instability and war has caused widespread devastation, insecurity, displacement, poverty and severe environmental degradation. Recent droughts have led to the collapse of many livelihoods, and poor national security restricts structured fieldwork. The recent restructuring and rebuilding of the state can be seen as opportunity to integrate climate change mitigation and adaptation measures into national, regional, and local planning. Governmental organizations are responsible to integrate climate change related issues and pro-active planning processes in water management and environmental considerations into relevant legislations, ministry and sector strategies. Integrated water resource management has been practically nonexistent during the last decades and consideration of climate change impacts are widely ignored in regional planning processes. However, flooding, landslides, drought, and extreme heat and freezing weather are already threatening the population. Climate models suggest that Afghanistan will be confronted by an increase of these events. Desertification and land degradation but also floods due to untimely rainfall are expected to broaden. Studies show that the impact of increasingly frequent flash floods may be amplified due to more rapid spring snow melt as a result of higher temperatures, combined with the downstream effects of land degradation, loss of vegetative cover and land mismanagement. It is further exacerbated by drought, which has the effect of hardening soils and reducing their permeability. In 2007 heavy floods already destroyed fields and harvests, killed livestock, damaged buildings, and claimed many lives. The intensified climatic conditions in Afghanistan will

  9. Factors Affecting Agricultural Sustainability–A Case Study of Hail Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Asiry

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Availability of data on agricultural activities and production are essential for an appropriate socio-economic planning and sustainability. This study was conducted using a questionnaire that was randomly distributed to farmers to identify some features of the agricultural activities in Hail region and to serve as baseline data on agricultural practices. The questionnaire was divided into main topics including socio-economic status of farms, farm area, main crops, production systems, agricultural practices, financial support, and use of wind breaks, water conservation, animal husbandry and marketing. Some of the results showed that date palms and alfalfa fodder were found to be the main grown crops in addition to citrus, grapes, vegetables, wheat and Rye. In most cases, all these crops were cultivated in open fields, compared to only 18% grown in green houses. About half of the farmers adopted the monoculture system and only 44.9% of them applied the crop rotation. More than 70% of farmers raise animals and the most commonly reared animal are sheep (53.6% followed by goats (23%, camels (18% and poultry (4.5%. The study revealed that Hail region is an important agricultural area in KSA and some agricultural practices need to be revised and directed towards sustainability through extension programmes.

  10. Arsenic in Surface Soils Affected by Mining and Metallurgical Processing in K. Mitrovica Region, Kosovo

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    Robert Sajn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study on the spatial distribution of arsenic in topsoil (0–5 cm over the K. Mitrovica region, Kosovo, are reported. The investigated region (300 km2 was covered by a sampling grid of 1.4 km × 1.4 km. In total, 159 soil samples were collected from 149 locations. Inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was applied for the determination of arsenic levels. It was found that the average content of arsenic in the topsoil for the entire study area was 30 mg/kg (from 2.1 to 3,900 mg/kg which exceeds the estimated European arsenic average in topsoil by a factor of 4.3. Contents of arsenic in the topsoil exceeded the optimum value recommended by the new Dutchlist (29 mg/kg As in 124 km2. The action value (55 mg/kg As was exceeded in 64 km2, with the average content of 105 mg/kg (from 55 to 3,900 mg/kg As.

  11. Identification of histological patterns in clinically affected and unaffected palm regions in dupuytren's disease.

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    Camilo-Andrés Alfonso-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Dupuytren's disease is a fibro-proliferative disease characterized by a disorder of the extracellular matrix (ECM and high myofibroblast proliferation. However, studies failed to determine if the whole palm fascia is affected by the disease. The objective of this study was to analyze several components of the extracellular matrix of three types of tissues-Dupuytren's diseased contracture cords (DDC, palmar fascia clinically unaffected by Dupuytren's disease contracture (NPF, and normal forehand fascia (NFF. Histological analysis, quantification of cells recultured from each type of tissue, mRNA microarrays and immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle actin (SMA, fibrillar ECM components and non-fibrillar ECM components were carried out. The results showed that DDC samples had abundant fibrosis with reticular fibers and few elastic fibers, high cell proliferation and myofibroblasts, laminin and glycoproteins, whereas NFF did not show any of these findings. Interestingly, NPF tissues had more cells showing myofibroblasts differentiation and more collagen and reticular fibers, laminin and glycoproteins than NFF, although at lower level than DDC, with similar elastic fibers than DDC. Immunohistochemical expression of decorin was high in DDC, whereas versican was highly expressed NFF, with no differences for aggrecan. Cluster analysis revealed that the global expression profile of NPF was very similar to DDC, and reculturing methods showed that cells corresponding to DDC tissues proliferated more actively than NPF, and NPF more actively than NFF. All these results suggest that NPF tissues may be affected, and that a modification of the therapeutic approach used for the treatment of Dupuytren's disease should be considered.

  12. Detection of Gully-Affected Areas by Applying Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA in the Region of Taroudannt, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian d'Oleire-Oltmanns

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at the detection of gully-affected areas by applying object-based image analysis in the region of Taroudannt, Morocco, which is highly affected by gully erosion while simultaneously  representing a major region of agro-industry with a high demand of arable land. As high-resolution optical satellite data are readily available from various sensors and with a much better temporal resolution than 3D terrain data, an area-wide mapping approach to extract gully-affected areas using only optical satellite imagery was developed. The methodology additionally incorporates expert knowledge and freely-available vector data in a cyclic object-based image analysis approach. This connects the two fields of geomorphology and remote sensing. The classification results show the successful implementation of the developed approach and allow conclusions on the current distribution of gullies. The results of the classification were checked against manually delineated reference data incorporating expert knowledge based on several field campaigns in the area, resulting in an overall classification accuracy of 62%. The error of omission accounts for 38% and the error of commission for 16%, respectively. Additionally, a manual assessment was carried out to assess the quality of the applied classification algorithm. The limited error of omission contributes with 23% to the overall error of omission and the limited error of commission contributes with 98% to the overall error of commission. This assessment improves the results and confirms the high quality of the developed approach for area-wide mapping of gully-affected areas in larger regions. In the field of landform mapping, the overall quality of the classification results is often assessed with more than one method to incorporate all aspects adequately.

  13. Increases in acute hepatitis C (HCV incidence across Europe: which regions and patient groups are affected?

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    Rockstroh J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background In the last decade, several outbreaks of sexually acquired acute HCV have been described in men who have sex with men (MSM infected with HIV in Australia, Europe, and North America. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of acute HCV within the large EuroSIDA cohort and to explore possible regional differences throughout Europe and in different HIV transmission risk groups. Methods Baseline was defined as 1st Jan of 2002 or entry into EuroSIDA, whichever comes later. All patients from EuroSIDA who were HCV antibody-negative at baseline and had at least 2 HCV antibody test results available were included into the study. HCV seroconversion was defined as change from negative to positive HCV-antibody test within the observation period from 2002 onwards. Follow-up was counted from baseline to HCV antibody positivity for seroconverters and to the last HCV antibody-negative test result for those that did not seroconvert for HCV. Poisson regression analyses were performed to identify predictive factors for HCV seroconversion. Results A total of 150 HCV seroconversions (95 [63.3%] in MSM occurred in 4295 patients during 18,928 person years of follow-up (PYFU, overall incidence of 0.79 acute infections per 100 PYFU (95% CI: 0.67–0.92 (see figure. The incidence of HCV seroconversions increased from 0.47 (CI: 0.19–0.74 in 2002 to 2.34 (CI: 1.24–3.44 in 2010. Similar patterns were observed across all European regions (p=0.89, test for interaction. In multivariate analysis, IDU was associated with a higher incidence rate ratio (IRR than MSM: 4.59 (2.40–8.80; p<0.0001, South and East Europe both had higher IRR compared to Western Europe, respectively (1.98 [1.12–3.49]; p=0.018 and 2.41 [1.41–4.12]; p=0.0014. Calendar year per 2 years was also associated with a higher IRR (1.29 [1.19–1.39]; p<0.0001. Conclusion The incidence of acute HCV within EuroSIDA increased over time. Although, the incidence of seroconversion was

  14. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers…

  15. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

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    Stephen J Sawiak

    Full Text Available Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala. Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawiak, Stephen J; Perumal, Sunthara Rajan; Rudiger, Skye R; Matthews, Loren; Mitchell, Nadia L; McLaughlan, Clive J; Bawden, C Simon; Palmer, David N; Kuchel, Timothy; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala). Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  17. Factors affecting regional per-capita carbon emissions in China based on an LMDI factor decomposition model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Dong

    Full Text Available China is considered to be the main carbon producer in the world. The per-capita carbon emissions indicator is an important measure of the regional carbon emissions situation. This study used the LMDI factor decomposition model-panel co-integration test two-step method to analyze the factors that affect per-capita carbon emissions. The main results are as follows. (1 During 1997, Eastern China, Central China, and Western China ranked first, second, and third in the per-capita carbon emissions, while in 2009 the pecking order changed to Eastern China, Western China, and Central China. (2 According to the LMDI decomposition results, the key driver boosting the per-capita carbon emissions in the three economic regions of China between 1997 and 2009 was economic development, and the energy efficiency was much greater than the energy structure after considering their effect on restraining increased per-capita carbon emissions. (3 Based on the decomposition, the factors that affected per-capita carbon emissions in the panel co-integration test showed that Central China had the best energy structure elasticity in its regional per-capita carbon emissions. Thus, Central China was ranked first for energy efficiency elasticity, while Western China was ranked first for economic development elasticity.

  18. Factors affecting regional per-capita carbon emissions in China based on an LMDI factor decomposition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Long, Ruyin; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingliang

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the main carbon producer in the world. The per-capita carbon emissions indicator is an important measure of the regional carbon emissions situation. This study used the LMDI factor decomposition model-panel co-integration test two-step method to analyze the factors that affect per-capita carbon emissions. The main results are as follows. (1) During 1997, Eastern China, Central China, and Western China ranked first, second, and third in the per-capita carbon emissions, while in 2009 the pecking order changed to Eastern China, Western China, and Central China. (2) According to the LMDI decomposition results, the key driver boosting the per-capita carbon emissions in the three economic regions of China between 1997 and 2009 was economic development, and the energy efficiency was much greater than the energy structure after considering their effect on restraining increased per-capita carbon emissions. (3) Based on the decomposition, the factors that affected per-capita carbon emissions in the panel co-integration test showed that Central China had the best energy structure elasticity in its regional per-capita carbon emissions. Thus, Central China was ranked first for energy efficiency elasticity, while Western China was ranked first for economic development elasticity.

  19. N deposition affects allelopathic potential of Amaranthus retroflexus with different distribution regions

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    CONGYAN WANG

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aims to determine the allelopathic potential of Amaranthus retroflexus (Ar with different climatic zones on seed germination and growth of A. tricolor (At treated with a gradient N addition. Ar leaf extracts only displayed significantly allelopathic potential on the underground growth of Ar but not the aboveground growth of At. The allelopathic potential of Ar leaf extracts on root length of At were enhanced under N addition and there may be a N-concentration-dependent relationship. The effects of the extracts of Ar leaves that collected from Zhenjiang on seed germination and growth of At may be higher than that collected from Jinan especially on root length of At under medium N addition. This reason may be the contained higher concentration of secondary metabolites for the leaves of plants that growths in high latitudes compare with that growth in low latitudes. This phenomenon may also partly be attributed to the fact that Ar originated in America and/or south-eastern Asia which have higher similarity climate conditions as Zhenjiang rather than Jinan. The allelopathic potential of Ar on seed germination and growth of acceptor species may play an important role in its successful invasion especially in the distribution region with low latitudes.

  20. Horse impoundments under Control of Horses legislation in the Munster region of Ireland: factors affecting euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane, M; O'Sullivan, E; Collins, D M; Byrne, A W; More, S J

    2015-01-24

    Recently, considerable international attention has been paid to the problem of unwanted horses. In Ireland, stray horses, particularly in urban areas, are a further problem. The Control of Horses Act 1996 was enacted in response to an ongoing problem of uncontrolled horses in public places. As yet, no research work has been conducted focusing on stray horses in Ireland. This paper describes horses impounded under the Act in the Munster region of Ireland during 2005-2012 and the factors influencing decisions regarding their disposal. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate factors influencing the probability that a horse was euthanised during impoundment. In total, 3625 seizure events were recorded, most towards the end of the study period. Predictors for euthanasia during 2010-2012 included seizure location, sex, age, colour, body condition score and year. This study highlights the problem of stray horses in Ireland, particularly in urban areas. There is a need for rigorous enforcement of newly enacted horse identification legislation, allowing a fully integrated traceability system. More is required to manage the long-established societal problems of stray horses in urban settings, with a uniform approach by all Local Authorities being long overdue.

  1. Regional responsiveness of the tibia to intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone as affected by skeletal unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Tanner, S.; Curren, T.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether the acute inhibition of bone formation and deficit in bone mineral induced by skeletal unloading can be prevented, we studied the effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration (8 micrograms/100 g/day) on growing rats submitted to 8 days of skeletal unloading. Loss of weight bearing decreased periosteal bone formation by 34 and 51% at the tibiofibular junction and tibial midshaft, respectively, and reduced the normal gain in tibial mass by 35%. Treatment with PTH of normally loaded and unloaded animals increased mRNA for osteocalcin (+58 and +148%, respectively), cancellous bone volume in the proximal tibia (+41 and +42%, respectively), and bone formation at the tibiofibular junction (+27 and +27%, respectively). Formation was also stimulated at the midshaft in unloaded (+47%, p < 0.05), but not loaded animals (-3%, NS). Although cancellous bone volume was preserved in PTH-treated, unloaded animals, PTH did not restore periosteal bone formation to normal nor prevent the deficit in overall tibial mass induced by unloading. We conclude that the effects of PTH on bone formation are region specific and load dependent. PTH can prevent the decrease in cancellous bone volume and reduce the decrement in cortical bone formation induced by loss of weight bearing.

  2. Whole transcriptome sequencing reveals gene expression and splicing differences in brain regions affected by Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A Twine

    Full Text Available Recent studies strongly indicate that aberrations in the control of gene expression might contribute to the initiation and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, alternative splicing has been suggested to play a role in spontaneous cases of AD. Previous transcriptome profiling of AD models and patient samples using microarrays delivered conflicting results. This study provides, for the first time, transcriptomic analysis for distinct regions of the AD brain using RNA-Seq next-generation sequencing technology. Illumina RNA-Seq analysis was used to survey transcriptome profiles from total brain, frontal and temporal lobe of healthy and AD post-mortem tissue. We quantified gene expression levels, splicing isoforms and alternative transcript start sites. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis revealed an overrepresentation of genes associated with a neuron's cytological structure and synapse function in AD brain samples. Analysis of the temporal lobe with the Cufflinks tool revealed that transcriptional isoforms of the apolipoprotein E gene, APOE-001, -002 and -005, are under the control of different promoters in normal and AD brain tissue. We also observed differing expression levels of APOE-001 and -002 splice variants in the AD temporal lobe. Our results indicate that alternative splicing and promoter usage of the APOE gene in AD brain tissue might reflect the progression of neurodegeneration.

  3. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. AL-Saleh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2011–2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia.

  4. Minimum feature size preserving decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Aloupis, Greg; Demaine, Martin L; Dujmovic, Vida; Iacono, John

    2009-01-01

    The minimum feature size of a crossing-free straight line drawing is the minimum distance between a vertex and a non-incident edge. This quantity measures the resolution needed to display a figure or the tool size needed to mill the figure. The spread is the ratio of the diameter to the minimum feature size. While many algorithms (particularly in meshing) depend on the spread of the input, none explicitly consider finding a mesh whose spread is similar to the input. When a polygon is partitioned into smaller regions, such as triangles or quadrangles, the degradation is the ratio of original to final spread (the final spread is always greater). Here we present an algorithm to quadrangulate a simple n-gon, while achieving constant degradation. Note that although all faces have a quadrangular shape, the number of edges bounding each face may be larger. This method uses Theta(n) Steiner points and produces Theta(n) quadrangles. In fact to obtain constant degradation, Omega(n) Steiner points are required by any al...

  5. Genetic variation of the RASGRF1 regulatory region affects human hippocampus-dependent memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eBarman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The guanine nucleotide exchange factor RASGRF1 is an important regulator of intracellular signaling and neural plasticity in the brain. RASGRF1-deficient mice exhibit a complex phenotype with learning deficits and ocular abnormalities. Also in humans, a genome-wide association study has identified the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs8027411 in the putative transcription regulatory region of RASGRF1 as a risk variant of myopia. Here we aimed to assess whether, in line with the RASGRF1 knockout mouse phenotype, rs8027411 might also be associated with human memory function. We performed computer-based neuropsychological learning experiments in two independent cohorts of young, healthy participants. Tests included the Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT and the logical memory section of the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS. Two sub-cohorts additionally participated in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies of hippocampus function. 119 participants performed a novelty encoding task that had previously been shown to engage the hippocampus, and 63 subjects participated in a reward-related memory encoding study. RASGRF1 rs8027411 genotype was indeed associated with memory performance in an allele dosage-dependent manner, with carriers of the T allele (i.e. the myopia risk allele showing better memory performance in the early encoding phase of the VLMT and in the recall phase of the WMS logical memory section. In fMRI, T allele carriers exhibited increased hippocampal activation during presentation of novel images and during encoding of pictures associated with monetary reward. Taken together, our results provide evidence for a role of the RASGRF1 gene locus in hippocampus-dependent memory and, along with the previous association with myopia, point towards pleitropic effects of RASGRF1 genetic variations on complex neural function in humans.

  6. A framework to improve hyper-resolution hydrological simulation in snow-affected regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinyi; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2017-09-01

    Snow processes in mid- and north-latitude basins and their interaction with runoff generation at hyperresolution (5 km), representing land surface processes based on simplified couplings of snow thermal physics and the water cycle in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere (SVA) layers. This paper evaluates a new hydrological model capable of simulating river flows for a range of basin scales (100 km2 to >10,000 km2), and a particular focus on mid- and north-latitude regions. The new model combines the runoff generation and fully distributed routing framework of the Coupled Routing and Excess STorage (CREST) model with a new land surface process model that strictly couples water and energy balances at the SVA layer, imposing closed energy balance solutions. The model is vectorized and parallelized to achieve long-term (>30 years) high-resolution (30 m to 500 m and subhourly) simulations of large river basins utilizing high-performance computing. The model is tested in the Connecticut River basin (20,000 km2), where flooding is frequently associated with interactions of snowmelt triggered by rainfall events. Model simulations of distributed evapotranspiration (ET) and snow water equivalence (SWE) at daily time step are shown to match accurately ET estimates from MODIS (average NSCE and bias are 0.77 and 6.79%) and SWE estimates from SNODAS (average correlation and normalized root mean square error are 0.94 and of 19%); the modeled daily river flow simulations exhibit an NSCE of 0.58 against USGS streamflow observations.

  7. Arteriolosclerosis that affects multiple brain regions is linked to hippocampal sclerosis of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neltner, Janna H.; Abner, Erin L.; Baker, Steven; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Smith, Charles D.; Hammack, Eleanor; Kukull, Walter A.; Brenowitz, Willa D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of ageing is a prevalent brain disease that afflicts older persons and has been linked with cerebrovascular pathology. Arteriolosclerosis is a subtype of cerebrovascular pathology characterized by concentrically thickened arterioles. Here we report data from multiple large autopsy series (University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Centre, Nun Study, and National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Centre) showing a specific association between hippocampal sclerosis of ageing pathology and arteriolosclerosis. The present analyses incorporate 226 cases of autopsy-proven hippocampal sclerosis of ageing and 1792 controls. Case–control comparisons were performed including digital pathological assessments for detailed analyses of blood vessel morphology. We found no evidence of associations between hippocampal sclerosis of ageing pathology and lacunar infarcts, large infarcts, Circle of Willis atherosclerosis, or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Individuals with hippocampal sclerosis of ageing pathology did not show increased rates of clinically documented hypertension, diabetes, or other cardiac risk factors. The correlation between arteriolosclerosis and hippocampal sclerosis of ageing pathology was strong in multiple brain regions outside of the hippocampus. For example, the presence of arteriolosclerosis in the frontal cortex (Brodmann area 9) was strongly associated with hippocampal sclerosis of ageing pathology (P ageing (n = 15) and control (n = 42) cases. Following technical studies to optimize immunostaining methods for small blood vessel visualization, our analyses focused on sections immunostained for smooth muscle actin (a marker of arterioles) and CD34 (an endothelial marker), with separate analyses on grey and white matter. A total of 43 834 smooth muscle actin-positive vascular profiles and 603 798 CD34-positive vascular profiles were evaluated. In frontal cortex of cases with hippocampal sclerosis of ageing, smooth muscle actin

  8. Phenotypic and genetic diversity in Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae from drought and salt affected regions of Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udupa Sripada M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae are symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria in root nodules of forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.. In Morocco, alfalfa is usually grown in marginal soils of arid and semi-arid regions frequently affected by drought, extremes of temperature and soil pH, soil salinity and heavy metals, which affect biological nitrogen fixing ability of rhizobia and productivity of the host. This study examines phenotypic diversity for tolerance to the above stresses and genotypic diversity at Repetitive Extragenic Pallindromic DNA regions of Sinorhizobium nodulating alfalfa, sampled from marginal soils of arid and semi-arid regions of Morocco. Results RsaI digestion of PCR amplified 16S rDNA of the 157 sampled isolates, assigned 136 isolates as S. meliloti and the rest as S. medicae. Further phenotyping of these alfalfa rhizobia for tolerance to the environmental stresses revealed a large degree of variation: 55.41%, 82.16%, 57.96% and 3.18% of the total isolates were tolerant to NaCl (>513 mM, water stress (-1.5 MPa, high temperature (40°C and low pH (3.5, respectively. Sixty-seven isolates of S. meliloti and thirteen isolates of S. medicae that were tolerant to salinity were also tolerant to water stress. Most of the isolates of the two species showed tolerance to heavy metals (Cd, Mn and Zn and antibiotics (chloramphenicol, spectinomycin, streptomycin and tetracycline. The phenotypic clusters observed by the cluster analysis clearly showed adaptations of the S. meliloti and S. medicae strains to the multiple stresses. Genotyping with rep-PCR revealed higher genetic diversity within these phenotypic clusters and classified all the 157 isolates into 148 genotypes. No relationship between genotypic profiles and the phenotypes was observed. The Analysis of Molecular Variance revealed that largest proportion of significant (P Conclusion High degree of phenotypic and genotypic diversity is present in S

  9. Factors Affecting Regional Per-Capita Carbon Emissions in China Based on an LMDI Factor Decomposition Model

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Feng; Long, Ruyin; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingliang

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the main carbon producer in the world. The per-capita carbon emissions indicator is an important measure of the regional carbon emissions situation. This study used the LMDI factor decomposition model–panel co-integration test two-step method to analyze the factors that affect per-capita carbon emissions. The main results are as follows. (1) During 1997, Eastern China, Central China, and Western China ranked first, second, and third in the per-capita carbon emissions...

  10. The use of “stabilization exercises” to affect neuromuscular control in the lumbopelvic region: a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Paul

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that the coordination of muscular activity in the lumbopelvic region is vital to the generation of mechanical spinal stability. Several models illustrating mechanisms by which dysfunctional neuromuscular control strategies may serve as a cause and/or effect of low back pain have been described in the literature. The term “core stability” is variously used by clinicians and researchers, and this variety has led to several rehabilitative approaches suggested to affect the neuromuscular control strategies of the lumbopelvic region (e.g. “stabilization exercise”, “motor control exercise”). This narrative review will highlight: 1) the ongoing debate in the clinical and research communities regarding the terms “core stability” and “stabilization exercise”, 2) the importance of sub-grouping in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from such therapeutic interventions, and 3) two protocols that can assist clinicians in this process. PMID:24932016

  11. The Factors Affecting Information Technology Usage Behavior of Tax Office Employees in the Black Sea Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Yilmaz,

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting information technology usage behavior of tax office employees in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. To accomplish this purpose, the data is gathered from 133 tax office employees who work in Black Sea Region of Turkey through a questionnaire that is formed with 5-point Likert-type scale. Research model is developed in the light of Theory of Reasoned Action, and a series of analyses is conducted. The predicted hypotheses are tested thought regression analyses. According to results, intention of tax office employees has the high predictive power on information technology usage. Additionally, attitude and subjective norms of tax office employees have an impact on their intention towards information technology usage. However, their attitude has the more predictive power than their subjective norms on their intentions towards information technology usage.

  12. How heterogeneous coseismic slip affects regional probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment: A case study in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Switzer, Adam D.; Chan, Chung-Han; Wang, Yu; Weiss, Robert; Qiu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Rupture complexity, typically in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution pattern, significantly affects the local tsunami wave field. However, the effect of rupture complexity is not commonly considered in any form of tsunami hazard assessment. Taking rupture complexity into account significantly increases the computational load, particularly in regional-scaled probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments (PTHAs) that usually require a large number of simulations based on synthetic scenarios. In this study, we investigate how the heterogeneous slip distribution affects the regional-scaled PTHA by taking the South China Sea (SCS) as an example. By doing this, we update PTHA for the SCS by incorporating the best available information of seismic tsunamigenic sources along the Manila megathrust. We integrate a stochastic source model into a Monte Carlo-type simulation, in which a broad range of slip distribution patterns is generated for large numbers of synthetic earthquake events. Green's function technique is employed to efficiently calculate the nearshore tsunami wave amplitude along the SCS coastlines. Our result suggests that for a relatively small and confined region like the SCS, the commonly used approach based on the uniform slip model significantly underestimates tsunami hazard not only in the near-source region like west Luzon, as expected, but also in the relative far field, such as south China and central Vietnam. Additionally, our sensitivity test of the patch size effects suggests that large patch size is unable to adequately resolve the details of heterogeneous seafloor deformation, and such approaches considerably underestimate the potential tsunami hazard for the SCS coasts.

  13. Sources and fate of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon in lakes of a Boreal Plains region recently affected by wildfire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Olefeldt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Downstream mineralization and sedimentation of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC render lakes important for landscape carbon cycling in the boreal region, with regulating processes potentially sensitive to perturbations associated with climate change including increased occurrence of wildfire. In this study we assessed chemical composition and reactivity (during both dark and UV incubations of DOC from lakes and terrestrial sources within a peatland-rich western boreal plains region partially affected by a recent wildfire. While wildfire was found to increase aromaticity of DOC in peat pore-water above the water table, it had no effect on concentrations or composition of DOC from peatland wells and neither affected mineral well or lake DOC characteristics. Lake DOC composition reflected a mixing of peatland and mineral groundwater, with a greater influence of mineral sources to lakes in coarse- than fine-textured settings. Peatland DOC was less biodegradable than mineral DOC, but both mineralization and sedimentation of peatland DOC increased substantially during UV incubations through selective removal of aromatic humic and fulvic acids. DOC composition in lakes with longer residence times had characteristics consistent with increased UV-mediated processing. We estimate that about half of terrestrial DOC inputs had been lost within lakes, mostly due to UV-mediated processes. The importance of within-lake losses of aromatic DOC from peatland sources through UV-mediated processes indicate that terrestrial-aquatic C linkages in the study region are largely disconnected from recent terrestrial primary productivity. Together, our results suggest that characteristics of the study region (climate, surface geology and lake morphometry render linkages between terrestrial and aquatic C cycling insensitive to the effects of wildfire by determining dominant terrestrial sources and within-lake processes of DOC removal.

  14. Integrated studies of a regional ozone pollution synthetically affected by subtropical high and typhoon system in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Lei; Xie, Min; Wang, Tijian; Gao, Da; Chen, Pulong; Han, Yong; Li, Shu; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Mengmeng

    2016-12-01

    Severe high ozone (O3) episodes usually have close relations to synoptic systems. A regional continuous O3 pollution episode was detected over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region in China during 7-12 August 2013, in which the O3 concentrations in more than half of the cities exceeded the national air quality standard. The maximum hourly concentration of O3 reached 167.1 ppb. By means of the observational analysis and the numerical simulation, the characteristics and the essential impact factors of the typical regional O3 pollution are comprehensively investigated. The observational analysis shows that the atmospheric subsidence dominated by the western Pacific subtropical high plays a crucial role in the formation of high-level O3. The favorable weather conditions, such as extremely high temperature, low relative humidity and weak wind speed, caused by the abnormally strong subtropical high are responsible for the trapping and the chemical production of O3 in the boundary layer. In addition, when the YRD cities are at the front of Typhoon Utor, the periphery circulation of typhoon system can enhance the downward airflows and cause worse air quality. However, when the typhoon system weakens the subtropical high, the prevailing southeasterly surface wind leads to the mitigation of the O3 pollution. The integrated process rate (IPR) analysis incorporated in the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is applied to further illustrate the combined influence of subtropical high and typhoon system in this O3 episode. The results show that the vertical diffusion (VDIF) and the gas-phase chemistry (CHEM) are two major contributors to O3 formation. During the episode, the contributions of VDIF and CHEM to O3 maintain the high values over the YRD region. On 10-12 August, the cities close to the sea are apparently affected by the typhoon system, with the contribution of VDIF increasing to 28.45 ppb h-1 in Shanghai and 19.76 ppb h-1 in Hangzhou. In contrast, the cities

  15. Mapping gully-affected areas in the region of Taroudannt, Morocco based on Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Oleire-Oltmanns, Sebastian; Marzolff, Irene; Tiede, Dirk; Blaschke, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The need for area-wide landform mapping approaches, especially in terms of land degradation, can be ascribed to the fact that within area-wide landform mapping approaches, the (spatial) context of erosional landforms is considered by providing additional information on the physiography neighboring the distinct landform. This study presents an approach for the detection of gully-affected areas by applying object-based image analysis in the region of Taroudannt, Morocco, which is highly affected by gully erosion while simultaneously representing a major region of agro-industry with a high demand of arable land. Various sensors provide readily available high-resolution optical satellite data with a much better temporal resolution than 3D terrain data which lead to the development of an area-wide mapping approach to extract gully-affected areas using only optical satellite imagery. The classification rule-set was developed with a clear focus on virtual spatial independence within the software environment of eCognition Developer. This allows the incorporation of knowledge about the target objects under investigation. Only optical QuickBird-2 satellite data and freely-available OpenStreetMap (OSM) vector data were used as input data. The OSM vector data were incorporated in order to mask out plantations and residential areas. Optical input data are more readily available for a broad range of users compared to terrain data, which is considered to be a major advantage. The methodology additionally incorporates expert knowledge and freely-available vector data in a cyclic object-based image analysis approach. This connects the two fields of geomorphology and remote sensing. The classification results allow conclusions on the current distribution of gullies. The results of the classification were checked against manually delineated reference data incorporating expert knowledge based on several field campaigns in the area, resulting in an overall classification accuracy of 62

  16. A new PKLR gene mutation in the R-type promoter region affects the gene transcription causing pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, L; Ribeiro, M L; Máximo, V; Almeida, H; Costa, A; Freitas, O; Barbot, J; Abade, A; Tamagnini, G

    2000-09-01

    Mutations in the PKLR gene responsible for pyruvate kinase (PK)-deficient anaemia are mainly located in the coding regions: 11 are in the splicing sites and, recently, three mutations have been described in the promoter region. We now report a novel point mutation A-->G on nucleotide 72, upstream from the initiation codon of the PKLR gene, in four Portuguese PK-deficient patients. This new regulatory mutation occurs within the most proximal of the four GATA motifs (GATA-A element) in the R-type promoter region. In two patients who were homozygous for this mutation, a semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was used to evaluate the amount of R-PK mRNA transcript in the reticulocytes. The mRNA level was about five times lower than in normal controls, demonstrating that the PKLR gene transcription is severely affected, most probably because the -72A-->G point mutation disables the binding of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 to the GATA-A element. Supporting these data, the two patients homozygous for the -72A-->G mutation had severe haemolytic anaemia and were transfusion dependent until splenectomy. Two other patients who were compound heterozygous for this mutation and the previously described missense mutation 1456C-->T had a mild condition.

  17. Detecting oil sands process-affected waters in the Alberta oil sands region using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Richard J; Burnison, B Kent; Frank, Richard A; Solomon, Keith R; Van Der Kraak, Glen

    2009-06-01

    Large volumes of oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) are produced during the extraction of bitumen from oil sand. There are approximately 10(9) m(3) of OSPW currently being stored in settling basins on oil sands mining sites in Northern Alberta. Developers plan to create artificial lakes with OSPW and it is expected that this water may eventually enter the environment. This study was conducted in order to determine if synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) could detect OSPW contamination in water systems. Water samples collected from ponds containing OSPW and selected sites in the Alberta oil sands region were evaluated using SFS with an offset value of 18 nm. OSPW ponds consistently displayed a minor peak at 282.5 nm and a broad major peak ranging between 320 and 340 nm. Water from reference sites within the oil sands region had little fluorescence at 282.5 nm but greater fluorescence beyond 345 nm. Naphthenic acids are the major toxic component of OSPW. Both a commercial naphthenic acid and a naphthenic acid extract prepared from OSPW had similar fluorescent spectra with peaks at 280 nm and 320 nm and minor shoulders at approximately 303 and 331 nm. The presence of aromatic acids closely associated with the naphthenic acids may be responsible for unique fluorescence at 320-340 nm. SFS is proposed to be a simple and fast method to monitor the release of OSPW into ground and surface waters in the oil sands region.

  18. Minimum Entropy Orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinal, Jean; Joret, Gwenaël

    2008-01-01

    We study graph orientations that minimize the entropy of the in-degree sequence. The problem of finding such an orientation is an interesting special case of the minimum entropy set cover problem previously studied by Halperin and Karp [Theoret. Comput. Sci., 2005] and by the current authors [Algorithmica, to appear]. We prove that the minimum entropy orientation problem is NP-hard even if the graph is planar, and that there exists a simple linear-time algorithm that returns an approximate solution with an additive error guarantee of 1 bit. This improves on the only previously known algorithm which has an additive error guarantee of log_2 e bits (approx. 1.4427 bits).

  19. Minimum quality standards and exports

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction of a minimum quality standard and exports in a vertical product differentiation model when firms sell global products. If ex ante quality of foreign firms is lower (higher) than the quality of exporting firms, a mild minimum quality standard in the home market hinders (supports) exports. The minimum quality standard increases quality in both markets. A welfare maximizing minimum quality standard is always lower under trade than under autarky. A minimum quali...

  20. Polarimetric Retrievals of Surface and Cirrus Clouds Properties in the Region Affected by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Matteo; Cairns, Brian; Chowdhary, Jacek; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Burton, Sharon; Hair, John; Obland, Michael D.; Rogers, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) performed several aerial surveys over the region affected by the oil spill caused by the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon offshore platform. The instrument was deployed on the NASA Langley B200 aircraft together with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), which provides information on the distribution of the aerosol layers beneath the aircraft, including an accurate estimate of aerosol optical depth. This work illustrates the merits of polarization measurements in detecting variations of ocean surface properties linked to the presence of an oil slick. In particular, we make use of the degree of linear polarization in the glint region, which is severely affected by variations in the refractive index but insensitive to the waviness of the water surface. Alterations in the surface optical properties are therefore expected to directly affect the polarization response of the RSP channel at 2264 nm, where both molecular and aerosol scattering are negligible and virtually all of the observed signal is generated via Fresnel reflection at the surface. The glint profile at this wavelength is fitted with a model which can optimally estimate refractive index, wind speed and direction, together with aircraft attitude variations affecting the viewing geometry. The retrieved refractive index markedly increases over oil-contaminated waters, while the apparent wind speed is significantly lower than in adjacent uncontaminated areas, suggesting that the slick dampens high-frequency components of the ocean wave spectrum. The constraint on surface reflectance provided by the short-wave infrared channels is a cornerstone of established procedures to retrieve atmospheric aerosol microphysical parameters based on the inversion of the RSP multispectral measurements. This retrieval, which benefits from the ancillary information provided by the HSRL, was in this specific case hampered by

  1. Factors Affecting Distribution of Vegetation Types on Abandoned Cropland in the Hilly-Gullied Loess Plateau Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted in the forest-steppe region of the Loess Plateau to provide insight into the factors affecting the process of vegetation establishment,and to provide recommendations for the selection of indigenous species in order to speed up the succession process and to allow the establishment of vegetation more resistant to soil erosion.Four distinctive vegetation types were identified,and their distribution was affected not only by the time since abandonment but also by other environmental factors,mainly soil water and total P in the upper soil layers.One of the vegetation types,dominated by Artemisia scoparia,formed the early successional stage after abandonment while the other three types formed later successional stages with their distribution determined by the soil water content and total P.It can be concluded that the selection of appropriate species for introduction to accelerate succession should be determined by the local conditions and especially the total P concentration and soil water content.

  2. Land-use and soil depth affect resource and microbial stoichiometry in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change, significantly affect elemental balances as well as the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the importance of shifts in soil nutrient stoichiometry for the regulation of belowground biota and soil food webs have not been intensively studied for tropical ecosystems. In the present account, we examine the effects of land-use change and soil depth on soil and microbial stoichiometry along a land-use sequence (natural forest, pastures of different ages, secondary succession) in the tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador. Furthermore, we analyzed (PLFA-method) whether shifts in the microbial community structure were related to alterations in soil and microbial stoichiometry. Soil and microbial stoichiometry were affected by both land-use change and soil depth. After forest disturbance, significant decreases of soil C:N:P ratios at the pastures were followed by increases during secondary succession. Microbial C:N ratios varied slightly in response to land-use change, whereas no fixed microbial C:P and N:P ratios were observed. Shifts in microbial community composition were associated with soil and microbial stoichiometry. Strong positive relationships between PLFA-markers 18:2n6,9c (saprotrophic fungi) and 20:4 (animals) and negative associations between 20:4 and microbial N:P point to land-use change affecting the structure of soil food webs. Significant deviations from global soil and microbial C:N:P ratios indicated a major force of land-use change to alter stoichiometric relationships and to structure biological systems. Our results support the idea that soil biotic communities are stoichiometrically flexible in order to adapt to alterations in resource stoichiometry.

  3. Minimum Error Entropy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Marques de Sá, Joaquim P; Santos, Jorge M F; Alexandre, Luís A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the minimum error entropy (MEE) concept applied to data classification machines. Theoretical results on the inner workings of the MEE concept, in its application to solving a variety of classification problems, are presented in the wider realm of risk functionals. Researchers and practitioners also find in the book a detailed presentation of practical data classifiers using MEE. These include multi‐layer perceptrons, recurrent neural networks, complexvalued neural networks, modular neural networks, and decision trees. A clustering algorithm using a MEE‐like concept is also presented. Examples, tests, evaluation experiments and comparison with similar machines using classic approaches, complement the descriptions.

  4. AN EXPLORATION OF FACTORS AFFECTING DEVELOPMENT OF CITRUS INDUSTRY IN TANZANIA: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM MUHEZA DISTRICT, TANGA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Makorere

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper stresses on understanding factors affecting development of citrus industry in Tanzania particularly in Muheza District, in Tanga region. Citrus fruit is one of the most important crops in Muheza District of Tanga region in Tanzania particularly in improving rural farmers’ income. The study employed institutional framework methodology. The study disclosed that the government of Tanzania has been implementing various agricultural development programmes in improving citrus fruit production as well as to enhance farmers’ income. However, yet the results reveal that the citrus farming practices in the surveyed area are not well developed. And these are because citruses are still grown under rain fed regime without any form of irrigation, citrus seedlings are produced by individual farmers locally in their backyard nurseries. There is no professional company responsible for seedling production. Also, citrus farmers’ skills in citrus husbandry practices are limited. Lastly, all citrus varieties used contain many seeds in the citrus fruits whereas the market demands seedless citrus fruits. It is therefore, recommended that the policy maker should focus on development of citrus industry in Tanzania using proper institutional framework support, which could increase growth and development of citrus production through the provision of subsides for inputs to reduce cost of production and enlightenment campaigns to improve farmer’s knowledge and technical skills on how to reach lucrative markets.

  5. Assessment of left ventricular regional function in affected and carrier dogs with duchenne muscular dystrophy using speckle tracking echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugeta Naoko

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE is a relatively new method to detect regional myocardial dysfunction. To assess left ventricular (LV regional myocardial dysfunction using STE in Duchenne muscular dystrophy model dogs (CXMDJ without overt clinical signs of heart failure. Methods Six affected dogs, 8 carrier dogs with CXMDJ, and 8 control dogs were used. Conventional echocardiography, systolic and diastolic function by Doppler echocardiography, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI, and strain indices using STE, were assessed and compared among the 3 groups. Results Significant differences were seen in body weight, transmitral E wave and E' wave derived from TDI among the 3 groups. Although no significant difference was observed in any global strain indices, in segmental analysis, the peak radial strain rate during early diastole in posterior segment at chordae the tendineae level showed significant differences among the 3 groups. Conclusions The myocardial strain rate by STE served to detect the impaired cardiac diastolic function in CXMDJ without any obvious LV dilation or clinical signs. The radial strain rate may be a useful parameter to detect early myocardial impairment in CXMDJ.

  6. Random search for shared chromosomal regions in four affected individuals: the assignment of a new hereditary ataxia locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikali, K.; Suomalainen, A.; Koskinen, T.; Peltonen, L. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Terwilliger, J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Weissenbach, J. [Genethon, Evry (France)

    1995-05-01

    Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) is an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurological disorder of unknown etiology. This ataxia, identified so far only in the genetically isolated Finnish population, does not share gene locus with any of the previously identified hereditary ataxias, and a random mapping approach was adopted to assign the IOSCA locus. Based on the assumption of one founder mutation, a primary screening of the genome was performed using samples from just four affected individuals in two consanguineous pedigrees. The identification of a shared chromosomal region in these four patients provided the first evidence that the IOSCA gene locus is on chromosome 10q23.3-q24.1, which was confirmed by conventional linkage analysis in the complete family material. Strong linkage disequilibrium observed between IOSCA and the linked markers was utilized to define accurately the critical chromosomal region. The results showed the power of linkage disequilibrium in the locus assignment of diseases with very limited family materials. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibition modulates histone acetylation at gene promoter regions and affects genome-wide gene transcription in Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Letícia; Gomes, Monete Rajão; daSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Pereira, Adriana da Silva Andrade; Mourão, Marina M.; Romier, Christophe; Pierce, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Treatment depends on a single drug, praziquantel, which kills the Schistosoma spp. parasite only at the adult stage. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) such as Trichostatin A (TSA) induce parasite mortality in vitro (schistosomula and adult worms), however the downstream effects of histone hyperacetylation on the parasite are not known. Methodology/Principal findings TSA treatment of adult worms in vitro increased histone acetylation at H3K9ac and H3K14ac, which are transcription activation marks, not affecting the unrelated transcription repression mark H3K27me3. We investigated the effect of TSA HDACi on schistosomula gene expression at three different time points, finding a marked genome-wide change in the transcriptome profile. Gene transcription activity was correlated with changes on the chromatin acetylation mark at gene promoter regions. Moreover, combining expression data with ChIP-Seq public data for schistosomula, we found that differentially expressed genes having the H3K4me3 mark at their promoter region in general showed transcription activation upon HDACi treatment, compared with those without the mark, which showed transcription down-regulation. Affected genes are enriched for DNA replication processes, most of them being up-regulated. Twenty out of 22 genes encoding proteins involved in reducing reactive oxygen species accumulation were down-regulated. Dozens of genes encoding proteins with histone reader motifs were changed, including SmEED from the PRC2 complex. We targeted SmEZH2 methyltransferase PRC2 component with a new EZH2 inhibitor (GSK343) and showed a synergistic effect with TSA, significantly increasing schistosomula mortality. Conclusions/Significance Genome-wide gene expression analyses have identified important pathways and cellular functions that were affected and may explain the schistosomicidal effect of TSA HDACi. The change in expression

  8. Do Minimum Wages Fight Poverty?

    OpenAIRE

    David Neumark; William Wascher

    1997-01-01

    The primary goal of a national minimum wage floor is to raise the incomes of poor or near-poor families with members in the work force. However, estimates of employment effects of minimum wages tell us little about whether minimum wages are can achieve this goal; even if the disemployment effects of minimum wages are modest, minimum wage increases could result in net income losses for poor families. We present evidence on the effects of minimum wages on family incomes from matched March CPS s...

  9. Satellite and ground detection of very dense smoke clouds produced on the islands of the Paraná river delta that affected a large region in Central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipiña, A.; Salum, G. M.; Crinó, E.; Piacentini, R. D.

    2012-03-01

    smoke clouds that extended over the Rosario area for several hours. The clouds were driven away from the fires by East-northeast and East-southeast winds. The minimum value of this index measured around noon allows to derive a maximum AOD(550)max = (3.65 ± 0.90) at 12:45 local time. Soot clouds extended over the Paraná river, transporting Burned Biomass Debris (BBD) that deposited on Rosario. In particular, burned leaves and small branches with dimensions of 1-20 cm were collected. The mean (BBD) particles deposited on the ground from 7:00 to 19:00 local time were (0.92 ± 0.20) BBD/(m2 h).The main purpose of the present work is to contribute to the understanding and quantification of the impact of very dense smoke clouds and BBD that directly and indirectly affected a densely populated area. All the events originated in a very particular and fragile region such as a river delta (with its specific native plants) were registered by using a multi-instrument approach (satellite as well as ground based devices).The analysis of these events, as detailed in this manuscript, was used as a scientific reference for the judicial claim made at the Supreme Court of Justice of Argentina by the National University of Rosario, against the authorities of the Entre Rios Province where the islands of the Paraná river are placed, in order to take the necessary measures for the suspension of the biomass burning in these islands.

  10. Polarimetric Retrievals of Surface and Aerosol Properties in the Region Affected by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, M.; Cairns, B.; Chowdhary, J.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Zhai, P.; Hu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In July 2010, the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) effectuated two flights in two consecutive days over the region affected by the oil spill of the Deepwater Horizon offshore platform. Integrated on the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft, the instrument is deployed together with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), which provides information on the distribution of the aerosol layers beneath the aircraft including an accurate estimate of aerosol optical depth. We present a sensitivity study to illustrate the merits of polarization measurements in detecting variations of ocean surface properties linked to the presence of an oil slick. In particular, the Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) in the glint region does not depend on the surface roughness, while is severely affected by variations in the refractive index of the ocean surface. Exploiting the RSP channel at 2250nm, where virtually all the signal is generated by the Fresnel reflection at the surface, the DoLP at any angle well into the glint region can therefore be used to detect alterations in the ocean surface. More specifically, the glint profile at this wavelength is fitted to the Cox-Munk model with a routine which can optimally estimate wind speed and direction, while taking into account aircraft attitude variations in determining the viewing geometry. The surveyed area also presents a complex mix of aerosol types. At least one major urban layer originating in the US Southeast mixes in the central portion of the flight trajectory with smoke caused by controlled burns around the damaged platform. The constrain on surface reflectance provided by the SWIR RSP channel, together with the aerosol optical depth provided by the HSRL, are used in Radiative Transfer computations to model the channels at shorter wavelengths and retrieve aerosol descriptive parameters such as aerosol size distribution and refractive index. Finally, the presence of smoke is ground for a discussion on the possibility to infer

  11. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  12. Minimum Bias and Underlying Event at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Fano, Livio

    2006-01-01

    The prospects of measuring minimum bias collisions (MB) and studying the underlying event (UE) at CMS are discussed. Two methods are described. The first is based on the measurement of charged tracks in the transverse region with respect to a charge-particle jet. The second technique relies on the selection of muon-pair events from Drell-Yan process.

  13. Minimum wages, earnings, and migration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boffy-Ramirez, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Does increasing a state’s minimum wage induce migration into the state? Previous literature has shown mobility in response to welfare benefit differentials across states, yet few have examined the minimum wage as a cause of mobility...

  14. Fertilization Affects Biomass Production of Suaeda salsa and Soil Organic Carbon Pool in East Coastal Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-feng; YANG Jing-song; YAO Rong-jiang; LIU Guang-ming; YU Shi-peng

    2013-01-01

    Land use practice significantly affects soil properties. Soil is a major sink for atmospheric carbon, and soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered as an essential indicator of soil quality. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of N and P applied to Suaeda salsa on biomass production, SOC concentration, labile organic carbon (LOC) concentration, SOC pool and carbon management index (CMI) as well as the effect of the land use practice on soil quality of coastal tidal lands in east coastal region of China. The study provided relevant references for coastal exploitation, tidal land management and related study in other countries and regions. The field experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design, consisting of four N-fertilization rates (0 (N0), 60 (N1), 120 (N2) and 180 kg ha-1 (N3)), three P-fertilization rates (0 (P0), 70 (P1) and 105 kg ha-1 (P2)) and bare land without vegetation. N and P applied to S. salsa on coastal tidal lands significantly affected biomass production (above-ground biomass and roots), bulk density (ρb), available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool and CMI. Using statistical analysis, significantly interactions in N and P were observed for biomass production and the dominant factor for S. salsa production was N in continuous 2-yr experiments. There were no significant interactions between N and P for SOC concentration, LOC concentration and SOC pool. However, significant interaction was obtained for CMI at the 0-20 cm depth and N played a dominant role in the variation of CMI. There were significant improvements for soil measured attributes and parameters, which suggested that increasing the rates of N and P significantly decreasedρb at the 0-20 cm depth and increased available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool as well as CMI at both the 0-20 and 20-40 cm depth, respectively. By correlation analysis, there were significantly positive correlations between biomass (above-ground biomass and roots) and SOC as well as LOC in

  15. Pregnancy outcomes, site of delivery, and community schisms in regions affected by the armed conflict in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentlinger, Paula E; Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor Javier; Cedeño, Marcos Arana; Morales, Lic Guadalupe Vargas; Hernán, Miguel A; Micek, Mark A; Ford, Douglas

    2005-09-01

    The Zapatista armed conflict began in the state of Chiapas, Mexico, in 1994, and overlaps pre-existing local disputes about land, religion, and other issues. Related disruptions in access to and utilization of health services have been alleged to have compromised local health status, particularly in vulnerable subgroups such as indigenous women and infants. The study objective was to measure maternal and perinatal mortality ratios and utilization of pregnancy-related health services in the region affected by the Zapatista conflict, and to describe associations between these primary outcome measures, socioeconomic and demographic factors, and factors associated with inter-party and intra-community conflict. A cross-sectional, population-based survey was conducted in 46 communities in three regions. The study subjects were 1227 women, 13-49 years old, who had been pregnant during the preceding 2 years (1999-2001). Principal outcome measures were maternal and perinatal mortality, and site of delivery. Secondary analyses explored associations between primary outcomes and socioeconomic, demographic, and conflict-related factors. Most births (87.1%) occurred at home. The crude observed maternal and perinatal mortality ratios were 607/100,000 and 23.5/1000 live births, respectively. Those who died had difficulty accessing emergency obstetrical care. Both home birth and mortality were associated with descriptors of intra-community conflict. Observed maternal and perinatal mortality ratios were substantially higher than those officially reported for Mexico or Chiapas. Reduction of high reproductive mortality ratios will require attention to socioeconomic and conflict-related problems, in addition to improved access to emergency obstetrical services.

  16. Iron-Restricted Diet Affects Brain Ferritin Levels, Dopamine Metabolism and Cellular Prion Protein in a Region-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. V. Pino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient for several physiological functions, including the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. On the other hand, both iron, and dopamine can affect the folding and aggregation of proteins related with neurodegenerative diseases, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC and α-synuclein, suggesting that deregulation of iron homeostasis and the consequential disturbance of dopamine metabolism can be a risk factor for conformational diseases. These proteins, in turn, are known to participate in the regulation of iron and dopamine metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary iron restriction on brain ferritin levels, dopamine metabolism, and the expression levels of PrPC and α-synuclein. To achieve this goal, C57BL/6 mice were fed with iron restricted diet (IR or with normal diet (CTL for 1 month. IR reduced iron and ferritin levels in liver. Ferritin reduction was also observed in the hippocampus. However, in the striatum of IR group, ferritin level was increased, suggesting that under iron-deficient condition, each brain area might acquire distinct capacity to store iron. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed only in hippocampus of IR group, where ferritin level was reduced. IR also generated discrete results regarding dopamine metabolism of distinct brain regions: in striatum, the level of dopamine metabolites (DOPAC and HVA was reduced; in prefrontal cortex, only HVA was increased along with the enhanced MAO-A activity; in hippocampus, no alterations were observed. PrPC levels were increased only in the striatum of IR group, where ferritin level was also increased. PrPC is known to play roles in iron uptake. Thus, the increase of PrPC in striatum of IR group might be related to the increased ferritin level. α-synuclein was not altered in any regions. Abnormal accumulation of ferritin, increased MAO-A activity or lipid peroxidation are molecular features observed in several neurological

  17. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Šedová

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16 and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001. The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1. Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic

  18. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Hady

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue.

  19. Genetic variants in SIRT3 transcriptional regulatory region affect promoter activity and fat deposition in three cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Linsheng; Hong, Jieyun; Raza, Sayed Haidar Abbas; Zan, Linsen

    2016-12-12

    Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is a mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase. It has crucial roles in regulating the respiratory chain, in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, and in both the citric acid and urea cycles. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SIRT3 could be used as a candidate gene in the breeding of cattle. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) indicated that expression levels of SIRT3 were highest in the kidney, rumen, liver, omasum and muscle. Using sequencing technology on a total of 913 cattle representing three indigenous Chinese beef cattle breeds, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the promoter region of SIRT3, and five haplotypes representing five potential transcription factor compositions of polymorphic potential cis-acting elements. Association analysis indicated that the Hap3/8 diplotype performed better than other combinations in intramuscular fat content. In addition, the promoter activity with Hap1 haplotype was higher than the Hap8 haplotype, consistent with the association analysis. The results indicate that the polymorphisms in transcription factor binding sites of SIRT3 promoter may affect the transcriptional activity of SIRT3, and thus alter intramuscular fat content in beef cattle.

  20. Factors Affecting Farmers’ Decision to Enter Agricultural Cooperatives Using Random Utility Model in the South Eastern Anatolian Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahri Karlı

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Farmers’ decision and perceptions to be a member of agricultural cooperatives in the South Eastern Anatolian Region were investigated. Factors affecting the probability of joining the agricultural cooperatives were determined using binary logit model. The model released that most of variables such as education, high communication, log of gross income, farm size, medium and high technology variables play important roles in determining the probability of entrance. Small farmers are likely expected to join the agricultural cooperatives than the wealthier farmers are. Small farmers may wish to benefit cash at hand, input subsidies, and services provided by the agricultural cooperatives since the risks associated with intensive high-returning crops are high. Some important factors playing pole role in abstention of farmers towards agricultural cooperatives are gross income and some social status variables. In addition, conservative or orthodox farmers are less likely to join agricultural cooperatives than moderate farmers are. We also found that the direct government farm credit programs mainly should be objected to providing farmers to better access to capital markets and creating the opportunity to use with allocation of capital inputs via using modern technology.

  1. Popularity at Minimum Cost

    CERN Document Server

    Kavitha, Telikepalli; Nimbhorkar, Prajakta

    2010-01-01

    We consider an extension of the {\\em popular matching} problem in this paper. The input to the popular matching problem is a bipartite graph G = (A U B,E), where A is a set of people, B is a set of items, and each person a belonging to A ranks a subset of items in an order of preference, with ties allowed. The popular matching problem seeks to compute a matching M* between people and items such that there is no matching M where more people are happier with M than with M*. Such a matching M* is called a popular matching. However, there are simple instances where no popular matching exists. Here we consider the following natural extension to the above problem: associated with each item b belonging to B is a non-negative price cost(b), that is, for any item b, new copies of b can be added to the input graph by paying an amount of cost(b) per copy. When G does not admit a popular matching, the problem is to "augment" G at minimum cost such that the new graph admits a popular matching. We show that this problem is...

  2. Social Security's special minimum benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K A; Hoffmeyer, D

    Social Security's special minimum primary insurance amount (PIA) provision was enacted in 1972 to increase the adequacy of benefits for regular long-term, low-earning covered workers and their dependents or survivors. At the time, Social Security also had a regular minimum benefit provision for persons with low lifetime average earnings and their families. Concerns were rising that the low lifetime average earnings of many regular minimum beneficiaries resulted from sporadic attachment to the covered workforce rather than from low wages. The special minimum benefit was seen as a way to reward regular, low-earning workers without providing the windfalls that would have resulted from raising the regular minimum benefit to a much higher level. The regular minimum benefit was subsequently eliminated for workers reaching age 62, becoming disabled, or dying after 1981. Under current law, the special minimum benefit will phase out over time, although it is not clear from the legislative history that this was Congress's explicit intent. The phaseout results from two factors: (1) special minimum benefits are paid only if they are higher than benefits payable under the regular PIA formula, and (2) the value of the regular PIA formula, which is indexed to wages before benefit eligibility, has increased faster than that of the special minimum PIA, which is indexed to inflation. Under the Social Security Trustees' 2000 intermediate assumptions, the special minimum benefit will cease to be payable to retired workers attaining eligibility in 2013 and later. Their benefits will always be larger under the regular benefit formula. As policymakers consider Social Security solvency initiatives--particularly proposals that would reduce benefits or introduce investment risk--interest may increase in restoring some type of special minimum benefit as a targeted protection for long-term low earners. Two of the three reform proposals offered by the President's Commission to Strengthen

  3. The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Teenagers. Recent Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallick, Bruce; Currie, Janet

    A study used individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to examine the effects of changes in the federal minimum wage on teenage employment. Individuals in the sample were classified as either likely or unlikely to be affected by these increases in the federal minimum wage on the basis of their wage rates and industry of…

  4. Noradrenergic stimulation modulates activation of extinction-related brain regions and enhances contextual extinction learning without affecting renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eLissek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Renewal in extinction learning describes the recovery of an extinguished response if the extinction context differs from the context present during acquisition and recall. Attention may have a role in contextual modulation of behavior and contribute to the renewal effect, while noradrenaline is involved in attentional processing. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study we investigated the role of the noradrenergic system for behavioral and brain activation correlates of contextual extinction and renewal, with a particular focus upon hippocampus and ventromedial PFC, which have crucial roles in processing of renewal. Healthy human volunteers received a single dose of the NA reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine prior to extinction learning. During extinction of previously acquired cue-outcome associations, cues were presented in a novel context (ABA or in the acquisition context (AAA. In recall, all cues were again presented in the acquisition context. Atomoxetine participants (ATO showed significantly faster extinction compared to placebo (PLAC. However, atomoxetine did not affect renewal. Hippocampal activation was higher in ATO during extinction and recall, as was ventromedial PFC activation, except for ABA recall. Moreover, ATO showed stronger recruitment of insula, anterior cingulate, and dorsolateral/orbitofrontal PFC. Across groups, cingulate, hippocampus and vmPFC activity during ABA extinction correlated with recall performance, suggesting high relevance of these regions for processing the renewal effect. In summary, the noradrenergic system appears to be involved in the modification of established associations during extinction learning and thus has a role in behavioral flexibility. The assignment of an association to a context and the subsequent decision on an adequate response, however, presumably operate largely independently of noradrenergic mechanisms.

  5. Nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashebir Kassahun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem covering approximately 347 million persons worldwide. Glycemic control has a main role in its management which mainly depends upon patient adherence to the treatment plan. Accurate assessment of medication adherence is necessary for effective management of diabetes. Objective: To assess nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital (AGH, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking anti-diabetic drug treatment and follow-up at AGH using structured questionnaire and reviewing the patient record card using check list from January 24, 2014 to February 7, 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the percentages and number of distributions of the variables in the study; and association was identified for categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result: Of all respondents, 149 (52.3% and 136 (47.7% were female and male, respectively. The majority of the study participants 189 (66.3% were in the age group of 30–60 years. Two-hundred nineteen (76.8% of respondents were married currently. The majority, 237 (83.2% of respondents did not have blood glucose self-monitoring equipment (glucometer. A total of 196 (68.8% respondents were adhered to anti-diabetic medication. There was a significant association between adherence to the medication and side effect, level of education, monthly income and presence of glucometer at home (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The participants in the area of study were moderately adherent to their anti-diabetic medications with nonadherence rate of 31.2%. Different factors of medication nonadherence were identified such as side effect and complexity of regimen, failure to remember, and sociodemographic factors such as educational level and monthly income.

  6. Genetic isolation of a chromosome 1 region affecting susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Lezin, E; Griffin, K A; Picken, M; Churchill, M C; Churchill, P C; Kurtz, T W; Liu, W; Wang, N; Kren, V; Zidek, V; Pravenec, M; Bidani, A K

    1999-08-01

    Linkage studies in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat have suggested that genes influencing susceptibility to hypertension-associated renal failure may exist on rat chromosome 1q. To investigate this possibility in a widely used model of hypertension, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), we compared susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage between an SHR progenitor strain and an SHR congenic strain that is genetically identical except for a defined region of chromosome 1q. Backcross breeding with selection for the markers D1Mit3 and Igf2 on chromosome 1 was used to create the congenic strain (designated SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2) that carries a 22 cM segment of chromosome 1 transferred from the normotensive Brown Norway rat onto the SHR background. Systolic blood pressure (by radiotelemetry) and urine protein excretion were measured in the SHR progenitor and congenic strains before and after the induction of accelerated hypertension by administration of DOCA-salt. At the same level of DOCA-salt hypertension, the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain showed significantly greater proteinuria and histologically assessed renal vascular and glomerular injury than the SHR progenitor strain. These findings demonstrate that a gene or genes that influence susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal damage have been trapped in the differential chromosome segment of the SHR.BN-D1Mit3/Igf2 congenic strain. This congenic strain represents an important new model for the fine mapping of gene(s) on chromosome 1 that affect susceptibility to hypertension-induced renal injury in the rat.

  7. Regional Algal Biofuel Production Potential in the Coterminous United States as Affected by Resource Availability Trade-offs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venteris, Erik R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Skaggs, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wigmosta, Mark S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Andre M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The warm sunny climate and unoccupied arid lands in the American southwest are favorable factors for algae cultivation. However, additional resources affect the overall viability of specific sites and regions. We investigated the tradeoffs between growth rate, water, and CO2 availability and costs for two strains: N. salina and Chlorella sp. We conducted site selection exercises (~88,000 US sites) to produce 21 billion gallons yr-1 (BGY) of renewable diesel (RD). Experimental trials from the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products (NAABB) team informed the growth model of our Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT). We simulated RD production by both lipid extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction. Sites were prioritized by the net value of biofuel minus water and flue gas costs. Water cost models for N. salina were based on seawater and high salinity groundwater and for Chlorella, fresh and brackish groundwater. CO2 costs were based on a flue gas delivery model. Selections constrained by production and water were concentrated along the Gulf of Mexico and southeast Atlantic coasts due to high growth rates and low water costs. Adding flue gas constraints increased the spatial distribution, but the majority of sites remained in the southeast. The 21 BGY target required ~3.8 million hectares of mainly forest (41.3%) and pasture (35.7%). Exclusion in favor of barren and scrub lands forced most production to the southwestern US, but with increased water consumption (5.7 times) and decreased economic efficiency (-38%).

  8. Where the minimum wage bites hard: the introduction of the UK national minimum wage to a low wage sector

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Machin; Alan Manning; Lupin Rahman

    2002-01-01

    Between 1993 and April 1999 there was no minimum wage in the United Kingdom (except in agriculture). In this paper we study the effects of the introduction of a National Minimum Wage (NMW) in April 1999 on one heavily affected sector, the residential care homes industry. This sector contains a large number of low paid workers and as such can be viewed as being very vulnerable to minimum wage legislation. We look at the impact on both wages and employment. Our results suggest that the minimum ...

  9. RADIATION SITUATION STATUS OF THE TERRITORY OF OREL REGION, AFFECTED BY THE RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION DUE TO CHERNOBYL NPP ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Zakharchenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains analysis of activities of Centers of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Inspection in Orel region during the first days after the Chernobyl NPP accident and consecutive years. The results of multi-year radiation and hygienic monitoring on the territory of Orel region are presented; efficiency of various measures of exposure dose reduction for the population of Orel region is analyzed.

  10. Planejamento agregado da produção ótimo com limite mínimo de estoque influenciado pelas incertezas de demanda Optimal aggregate production planning with minimum inventory limit affected by demand uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar S. Silva Filho

    1995-04-01

    probability distribution function assumed as gaussian. Thus the problem studied here is a stochastic planning one with probabilistic constraint at the inventory level variable. It is shown that it is possible to obtain, by means of appropriate transformations, a deterministic equivalent formulation, for which an open-loop solution to stochastic problems can be generated, using any applicable mathematical programming algorithm. It is also shown that the uncertainties concerning demand fluctuation are explicitly presented in the deterministic formulation through a constraint function that represents the minimum inventory level limit or safety stock. This function is essentially concave and increases during time and depends on the variance of inventory level and probabilistic degree supply by the user to the inventory constraint. To illustrate the theoretical developments, a simple example of a single product system is proposed and solved by dynamic programming. The open- loop solution (i.e. approximate solution from an equivalent problem is compared with the true solution obtained directly from the stochastic problem via stochastic dynamic programming.

  11. Minimum signals in classical physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓文基; 许基桓; 刘平

    2003-01-01

    The bandwidth theorem for Fourier analysis on any time-dependent classical signal is shown using the operator approach to quantum mechanics. Following discussions about squeezed states in quantum optics, the problem of minimum signals presented by a single quantity and its squeezing is proposed. It is generally proved that all such minimum signals, squeezed or not, must be real Gaussian functions of time.

  12. The density minimum at the Earth's magnetic equator

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Journal of Geophysical Research,Volume 97, pp. 1135-1150 Observations of the density structure in the plasmapause region reveal the existence of a local minimum in the total electron density at the magnetic equator.

  13. Radioactive contamination of food, sampled in regions of the USSR affected by the Chernobyl accident, and of radioactive exposure in these regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruig, de W.G.; Struijs, van der T.D.B.

    1991-01-01

    From 21.10.1990 to 01.11.1990 a Netherlands humanitarian fact finding mission on aid to people affected by the Chernobyl disaster visited the USSR. The Netherlands Government reacted positively to a request from the USSR for such aid and the aim of the mission was to gather facts for a useful aid

  14. Mapping patterns of depression-related brain regions with cytochrome oxidase histochemistry: relevance of animal affective systems to human disorders, with a focus on resilience to adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Matrov, Denis; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    The search for novel antidepressants may be facilitated by pre-clinical animal models that relay on specific neural circuit and related neurochemical endpoint measures, which are anchored in concrete neuro-anatomical and functional neural-network analyzes. One of the most important initial considerations must be which regions of the brain are candidates for the maladaptive response to depressogenic challenges. Consideration of persistent differences or changes in the activity of cerebral networks can be achieved by mapping oxidative metabolism in ethologically or pathogenetically relevant animal models. Cytochrome oxidase histochemistry is a technique suitable to detect regional long-term brain activity changes relative to control conditions and has been used in a variety of animal models. This work is summarized and indicates that major changes occur mainly in subcortical areas, highlighting specific brain regions where some alterations in regional oxidative metabolism may represent adaptive changes to depressogenic adverse life events, while others may reflect failures of adaptation. Many of these changes in oxidative metabolism may depend upon the integrity of serotonergic neurotransmission, and occur in several brain regions shown by other techniques to be involved in endogenous affective circuits that control emotional behaviors as well as related higher brain regions that integrate learning and cognitive information processing. These brain regions appear as primary targets for further identification of endophenotypes specific to affective disorders.

  15. Boundaries of the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone shaped by coherent mesoscale dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bettencourt, João H; García, Emilio Hernández; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Joël; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen in sea water is a major factor affecting marine habitats and biogeochemical cycles. Oceanic zones with oxygen deficits represent significant portions of the area and volume of the oceans and are thought to be expanding. The Peruvian oxygen minimum zone is one of the most pronounced and lies in a region of strong mesoscale activity in the form of vortices and frontal regions, whose effect in the dynamics of the oxygen minimum zone is largely unknown. Here, we study this issue from a modeling approach and a Lagrangian point of view, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical simulation of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone and finite-size Lyapunov exponent fields to understand the link between mesoscale dynamics and oxygen variations. Our results show that, at depths between 380 and 600 meters, mesoscale structures have a relevant dual role. First, their mean positions and paths delimit and maintain the oxygen minimum zone boundaries. Second, their high frequency fluctuations entrain oxygen across t...

  16. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  17. Against a Minimum Voting Age

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Philip

    2013-01-01

    A minimum voting age is defended as the most effective and least disrespectful means of ensuring all members of an electorate are sufficiently competent to vote. Whilst it may be reasonable to require competency from voters, a minimum voting age should be rejected because its view of competence is unreasonably controversial, it is incapable of defining a clear threshold of sufficiency and an alternative test is available which treats children more respectfully. This alternative is a procedura...

  18. Changes in behavioural responses to infrastructure affect local and regional connectivity – a simulation study on pond breeding amphibians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Maj-Britt; Nachman, Gøsta Støger

    2013-01-01

    An extensive and expanding infrastructural network destroys and fragments natural habitat and has detrimental effect on abundance and population viability of many amphibian species. Roads function as barriers in the landscape. They separate local populations from each other or prevent access...... to necessary resources. Therefore, road density and traffic intensity in a region may have severe impact on regional as well as local connectivity. Amphibians may be able to detect and avoid unsuitable habitat. Individuals’ ability to avoid roads can reduce road mortality but at the same time road...

  19. Changes in behavioural responses to infrastructure affect local and regional connectivity – a simulation study on pond breeding amphibians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Maj-Britt; Nachman, Gøsta Støger

    2013-01-01

    An extensive and expanding infrastructural network destroys and fragments natural habitat and has detrimental effect on abundance and population viability of many amphibian species. Roads function as barriers in the landscape. They separate local populations from each other or prevent access...... to necessary resources. Therefore, road density and traffic intensity in a region may have severe impact on regional as well as local connectivity. Amphibians may be able to detect and avoid unsuitable habitat. Individuals’ ability to avoid roads can reduce road mortality but at the same time road...

  20. NMDA and mGluR1 receptor subtypes as major players affecting depotentiation in the hippocampal CA1-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Latif-Hernandez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurons have the ability to modify their structure and function which ultimately serves for learning (Abraham and Bear, 1996. Dendritic events provide a major contribution to such modifications. For example, natural and artificial patterns of afferent activation have been shown to induce persistent forms of synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD at distinct dendritic synapses. LTP and LTD are both assumed to occur during the physiological processes of learning and memory formation and to sustain the latter (Abraham, 2008. In recent years, there has been a burgeoning interest in the understanding of metaplasticity, which refers to the plasticity of synaptic plasticity (Abraham and Bear, 1996. In particular, depotentiation (DP is the mechanism by which synapses that have recently undergone LTP can reverse their synaptic strengthening in response to low frequency stimulation (LFS; Abraham, 2008. Typically, DP is thought to prevent the saturation of synaptic potentiation by resetting synapses into a more efficient state to store new information. The detailed mechanisms that underlie DP still remain unclear. Bortolotto et al. (1994 first identified metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs as being involved in DP. Experimental evidence indicates that both subtypes of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5 have distinct functions in synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region (Gladding et al., 2008. However, their role in DP was not addressed yet in detail and appear to be distinct from those involved in NMDAR-dependent DP (Zho et al., 2002. Therefore, we investigated the precise mechanisms responsible for NMDAR and mGluR-dependent DP by combining electrophysiological recordings in vitro and pharmacological approach. Transverse hippocampal slices (400 µm thick were prepared from the right hippocampus with a tissue chopper and placed into a submerged-type chamber, where they were continuously perfused

  1. Measurement of Minimum Bias Observables with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kvita, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of Minimum Bias (MB) is a crucial ingredient to learn about the description of soft QCD processes. It has also a significant relevance for the simulation of the environment at the LHC with many concurrent pp interactions (“pileup”). The ATLAS collaboration has provided new measurements of the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at center of mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The measurements cover a wide spectrum using charged particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged particle multiplicities.

  2. Song competition affects monoamine levels in sensory and motor forebrain regions of male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra B Sewall

    Full Text Available Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM, because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA, because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state.

  3. Song competition affects monoamine levels in sensory and motor forebrain regions of male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewall, Kendra B; Caro, Samuel P; Sockman, Keith W

    2013-01-01

    Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii) modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM), because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state.

  4. The personal and contextual variables affecting the relationships between mentors and proteges in a regional program for the preparation of principals

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Fred W.

    1994-01-01

    The resurgence of public concern about the effectiveness of schools has brought with it a renewed appreciation of the importance of the principal in the educational process. Most preparation programs for school administrators now require some type of internship or field experience. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding about mentor-protege relationships and the personal and contextual factors affecting those relationships in a regional program for the ...

  5. Issues Affecting the Loco-regional and Systemic Management of Patients with Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Carmel; Clemons, Mark; Addison, Christina; Robertson, Susan; Arnaout, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast is the second most common type of invasive breast carcinoma accounting for 8-14% of all breast cancers. Traditional management of ILC has followed similar paradigms as that for invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). However, ILC represents a pathologically, clinically and biologically unique variant of breast cancer with particular management challenges. These challenges are seen in both the loco-regional management of ILC; where ILC tumors tend to avoid detection and hence present as more clinically advanced and surgically challenging carcinomas, and the systemic management with a unique response pattern to standard systemic therapies. Because of these challenges, the outcome for patients with ILC has likely lagged behind the continued improvements seen in outcome for patients with IDC. Here, we discuss some of the unique challenges ILC presents and discuss possible management strategies to best overcome the difficulties in the loco-regional and systemic management of patients with ILC.

  6. Small beetle, large-scale drivers: how regional and landscape factors affect outbreaks of the European spruce bark beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Rupert; Müller, Jörg; Hothorn, Torsten; Bässler, Claus; Heurich, Marco; Kautz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Summary 1. Unprecedented bark beetle outbreaks have been observed for a variety of forest ecosystems recently, and damage is expected to further intensify as a consequence of climate change. In Central Europe, the response of ecosystem management to increasing infestation risk has hitherto focused largely on the stand level, while the contingency of outbreak dynamics on large-scale drivers remains poorly understood. 2. To investigate how factors beyond the local scale contribute to the infestation risk from Ips typographus (Col., Scol.), we analysed drivers across seven orders of magnitude in scale (from 103 to 1010 m2) over a 23-year period, focusing on the Bavarian Forest National Park. Time-discrete hazard modelling was used to account for local factors and temporal dependencies. Subsequently, beta regression was applied to determine the influence of regional and landscape factors, the latter characterized by means of graph theory. 3. We found that in addition to stand variables, large-scale drivers also strongly influenced bark beetle infestation risk. Outbreak waves were closely related to landscape-scale connectedness of both host and beetle populations as well as to regional bark beetle infestation levels. Furthermore, regional summer drought was identified as an important trigger for infestation pulses. Large-scale synchrony and connectivity are thus key drivers of the recently observed bark beetle outbreak in the area. 4. Synthesis and applications. Our multiscale analysis provides evidence that the risk for biotic disturbances is highly dependent on drivers beyond the control of traditional stand-scale management. This finding highlights the importance of fostering the ability to cope with and recover from disturbance. It furthermore suggests that a stronger consideration of landscape and regional processes is needed to address changing disturbance regimes in ecosystem management. PMID:27041769

  7. The Chemical Composition of Surface Waters of Technogenically Affected Geo-Systems in the Eastern Donbas Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga S. Reshetnyak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on an analysis of literary data and the author’s own research findings, the paper assesses the factors in the formation of the chemical composition of surface and subterranean waters and the variability of the chemical composition and quality of river waters in the eastern Donbas region. The author illustrates that the major negative effect of the impact of technogenic waters on river waters is salinization. The paper points up a high level of pollution in river waters with a broad spectrum of metal compounds, among which the biggest threat comes from Fegen, Al, Mn, Cu, and Sr, which is of a steady nature. The quality of water in the majority of rivers in the eastern Donbas region is evaluated as Quality Class 4 – dirty and/or very dirty. The findings can be used in resolving a whole array of scientific and applied objectives related to assessing the migration of chemical substances and the level of pollution in surface and subterranean waters and forecasting the condition of water sites and the quality of water, as well as in carrying out water-protection activities in the region.

  8. Short 5'-flanking regions of the Amy gene of Drosophila kikkawai affect amylase gene expression and respond to food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Nakashima, Shuichi

    2008-04-15

    Evolution of the duplicated genes and regulation in gene expression is of great interest, especially in terms of adaptation. Molecular population genetic and evolutionary studies on the duplicated amylase genes of Drosophila species have suggested that their 5'-flanking (cis-regulatory) regions play an important role in evolution of these genes. For better understanding of evolution of the duplicated amylase genes and gene expression, we studied functional significance of the Amy1 gene of Drosophila kikkawai using in vitro deletion mutagenesis followed by P-element-mediated germline transformation. We found that a 1.6-kb of the 5'-flanking region can produce strikingly higher level of larval amylase activity on starch food compared with that on glucose food. We found two cis-regulatory elements, which increase larval amylase activity on starch food. We also found a larval cis-regulatory element, which responds to the food difference. This food-response element is necessary for the function of the element increasing larval activity on starch food. A 5-bp deletion in a putative GRE caused high amylase activity, indicating a cis-regulatory element decreasing amylase activity. These cis-regulatory elements identified in the 5'-flanking region could be the targets of natural selection.

  9. Estimation of minimum surface temperature at stage ll (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Dimri

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting minimum surface temperature at a station, Stage II, located in mountainous region requires information on the meteorological fields. An attempt has been made to develop a statistical model for forecasting minimum temperature at ground level using previous years' data. Surface data were collected at StageII (longitude 73 oB, latitude 34 oN, and altitude 2650 m. Atmospheric variables are influenced by complex orography and surface features to a great extent. In the present study, statistical relationship between atmosphere parameters and minimum temperature at the site has been established. Multivariate linear regression analysis has been used to establish the relationship to predict the minimum surface temperature for the following day. A comparison between the observed and the calculated forecast minimum temperature has been made. Most of the cases are well predicted (multiple correlation coefficient of 0.94.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo for minimum energy structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Lucas K

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient method to find minimum energy structures using energy estimates from accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations. This method involves a stochastic process formed from the stochastic energy estimates from Monte Carlo that can be averaged to find precise structural minima while using inexpensive calculations with moderate statistical uncertainty. We demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm by minimizing the energy of the H2O-OH- complex and showing that the structural minima from quantum Monte Carlo calculations affect the qualitative behavior of the potential energy surface substantially.

  11. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GAB2 HAPLOTYPE AND HIGHER GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE-AFFECTED BRAIN REGIONS IN COGNITIVELY NORMAL APOEε4 CARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Winnie S.; Chen, Kewei; Lee, Wendy; Sidhar, Kunal; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Allen, April N.; Myers, Amanda; Villa, Stephen; Meechoovet, Bessie; Pruzin, Jeremy; Bandy, Daniel; Fleisher, Adam S.; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Jensen, Kendall; Dunckley, Travis; Caselli, Richard J.; Kaib, Susan; Reiman, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), we found an association between common haplotypes of the GAB2 gene and AD risk in carriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, the major late-onset AD susceptibility gene. We previously proposed the use of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measurements as a quantitative presymptomatic endophenotype, more closely related to disease risk than the clinical syndrome itself, to help evaluate putative genetic and non-genetic modifiers of AD risk. In this study, we examined the relationship between the presence or absence of the relatively protective GAB2 haplotype and PET measurements of regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in several AD-affected brain regions in 158 cognitively normal late-middle-aged APOEε4 homozygotes, heterozygotes, and non-carriers. GAB2 haplotypes were characterized using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array data from each of these subjects. As predicted, the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype was associated with higher regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in AD-affected brain regions in APOEε4 carriers. While additional studies are needed, this study supports the association between the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype and the risk of late-onset AD in APOEε4 carriers. It also supports the use of brain-imaging endophenotypes to help assess possible modifiers of AD risk. PMID:20888920

  12. The Prevalence of Fragility Fractures in a Population of a Region of Southern Italy Affected by Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maccagnano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the literature there is no clear evidence of a relationship between thyropathies and fragility fractures. The aim of our study is to define the prevalence of thyroid disease in a study sample made up of subjects with fragility fractures and from the same geographical area. We retrospectively studied the “hospital discharge records” (HDR in the Apulian Database for the period 2008–2013 in order to identify all those patients with fragility fractures that required hospitalization. After detecting the prevalent population, we identified the patients affected by thyroid disease. We observed that, between 2008 and 2013 in Apulia, 16,636 patients were affected by hyperthyroidism. In the same period there were 92,341 subjects with hypothyroidism. The incidence of fragility fractures was 4.5% in the population with hyperthyroidism. As regards the population with hypothyroidism, the incidence of fragility fractures was 3.7%. Furthermore, we assessed the statistical connection between thyroid disease and fragility fractures revealing a higher incidence in patients with hyperthyroidism and clinical hypothyroidism.

  13. The properties of NodD were affected by mere variation in length within its hinge region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bihe Hou; Fengqing Li; Xiaoer Yang; Cruofan Hong

    2009-01-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum by. viciae, NodD, a member of the LysR-type transcriptional regulators, while auto-regulating, activates transcription of other nod genes in the presence of naringenin. A hinge region of NodD was previously identified in our lab-oratory as a functional region independent of its N-terminal DNA-binding and C-terminal regulatory domain. Further study was carried out to see the possible effect of the length variation in the hinge region on NodD's properties. To our surprise, as many as seven classes of phenotypes were observed. Class Ⅰ is deficient of activating nodA transcription and abolishes auto-regulation; class Ⅱ is able to acti-vate nodA transcription independently of naringenin and abolishes auto-regulation; class Ⅲ retains auto-regulating but partial activating ability; class Ⅳ is able to activate transcription independently of narin-genin and retains auto-regulation; in class Ⅴ, nod A is transcribed constitutively but the transcription level is drastically down-regulated in the presence of narin-genin; in class Ⅵ, nodA is transcribed constitutively with higher induction ratio; in class Ⅶ, nodA is tran-scribed constitutively with lower induction ratio. To learn more about the possible mechanism, circular permutation assays were done, which showed that the length variation of the hinge of NodD caused by mutation led to the change in bend angles of nod pro-moter. This finding should help to get an insight into how transcriptional regulation is mediated by NodD at the molecular level as well as to understand the regulatory system of this important family.

  14. Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Daniele; Pastore, Manuela; Gentiluomo, Manuel; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Malecka-Panas, Ewa; Neoptolemos, John P.; Niesen, Willem; Vodicka, Pavel; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gazouli, Maria; Pacetti, Paola; Di Leo, Milena; Ito, Hidemi; Klüter, Harald; Soucek, Pavel; Corbo, Vincenzo; Yamao, Kenji; Hosono, Satoyo; Kaaks, Rudolf; Vashist, Yogesh; Gioffreda, Domenica; Strobel, Oliver; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Dijk, Frederike; Andriulli, Angelo; Ivanauskas, Audrius; Bugert, Peter; Tavano, Francesca; Vodickova, Ludmila; Zambon, Carlo Federico; Lovecek, Martin; Landi, Stefano; Key, Timothy J.; Boggi, Ugo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice; Mambrini, Andrea; Bambi, Franco; Busch, Olivier; Pazienza, Valerio; Valente, Roberto; Theodoropoulos, George E.; Hackert, Thilo; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Pasquali, Claudio; Basso, Daniela; Sperti, Cosimo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Büchler, Markus; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Izbicki, Jakob; Costello, Eithne; Katzke, Verena; Michalski, Christoph; Stepien, Anna; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Canzian, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:27486979

  15. Chornobyl Accident and Iodine Deficiency as Risk Factors of Thyroid Pathology in Population of the Affected Regions of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Кravchenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The result of the Chornobyl nuclear power plant accident was the negative effect of radiation on the health of population of large areas of Ukraine and surrounding countries, the impact of this action will be shown over the years. Studies conducted in the 2011–2014 in Kyiv, Zhytomyr and Chernihiv regions showed that iodine deficiency in the diet of the population in these areas remains and has a negative effect on the health of residents exposed to Chornobyl accident factors. Solution of the problem of iodine deficiency disorders prevention lies in the aspect of the adoption of legislation relating to the mass and group iodine prophylaxis.

  16. Minimum Q Electrically Small Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, O. S.

    2012-01-01

    for a multiarm spherical helix antenna confirm the theoretical predictions. For example, a 4-arm spherical helix antenna with a magnetic-coated perfectly electrically conducting core (ka=0.254) exhibits the Q of 0.66 times the Chu lower bound, or 1.25 times the minimum Q.......Theoretically, the minimum radiation quality factor Q of an isolated resonance can be achieved in a spherical electrically small antenna by combining TM1m and TE1m spherical modes, provided that the stored energy in the antenna spherical volume is totally suppressed. Using closed-form expressions...... for the stored energies obtained through the vector spherical wave theory, it is shown that a magnetic-coated metal core reduces the internal stored energy of both TM1m and TE1m modes simultaneously, so that a self-resonant antenna with the Q approaching the fundamental minimum is created. Numerical results...

  17. Constrained length minimum inductance gradient coil design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronik, B A; Rutt, B K

    1998-02-01

    A gradient coil design algorithm capable of controlling the position of the homogeneous region of interest (ROI) with respect to the current-carrying wires is required for many advanced imaging and spectroscopy applications. A modified minimum inductance target field method that allows the placement of a set of constraints on the final current density is presented. This constrained current minimum inductance method is derived in the context of previous target field methods. Complete details are shown and all equations required for implementation of the algorithm are given. The method has been implemented on computer and applied to the design of both a 1:1 aspect ratio (length:diameter) central ROI and a 2:1 aspect ratio edge ROI gradient coil. The 1:1 design demonstrates that a general analytic method can be used to easily obtain very short gradient coil designs for use with specialized magnet systems. The edge gradient design demonstrates that designs that allow imaging of the neck region with a head sized gradient coil can be obtained, as well as other applications requiring edge-of-cylinder regions of uniformity.

  18. Dietary Methionine Affect Meat Qulity and Myostatin Gene Exon 1 Region Methylation in Skeletal Muscle Tissues of Broilers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guo-qing; ZONG Kai; ZHANG Li-li; CAO Shu-qing

    2010-01-01

    Dietary amino acids imbalance will result in stunted broiler performance and deteriorated meat quality,which are involved in various biochemical cycles in vivo.In this study,the effects of dietary methionine on meat quality and methylation of myostatin exon 1 were investigated.Drip loss of the broilers fed with diet of high methionine levels(0.2%)increased from(6.3±0.1)%(control group)to(10.1±1.0)%,and the muscle shearing force increased from(22.8±1.9)N(control group)to(26.3±2.3)N.Moreover,many CpG sites were found at the myostatin exon 1 region(nucleotides 2360-2540 bp).To further understand the regulation of broiler myostatin expression,the methylation status of broiler myostatin exon 1 and its mRNA expression were analyzed.At the myostatin exon 1 region where CG enriches(nucleotides 2360-2540 bp),the percentages of methylation were 46 and 84% in low Met and high Met content groups after 55-d feeding,respectively.In skeletal muscle tissues,the exon 1 hypermethylation status of myostatin gene was found to be negatively correlated with the gene expression.These results suggested that methylation of this gene is a dynamic process,which plays a dominant role in regulating gene expression for development of individuals.

  19. Gambling for self, friends, and antagonists: differential contributions of affective and social brain regions on adolescent reward processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, Barbara R; Peters, Sabine; Peper, Jiska S; Güroğlu, Berna; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-10-15

    Adolescence is a time of increasing emotional arousal, sensation-seeking and risk-taking, especially in the context of peers. Recent neuroscientific studies have pinpointed to the role of the ventral striatum as a brain region which is particularly sensitive to reward, and to 'social brain' regions, such as the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the precuneus, and the temporal parietal junction, as being particularly responsive to social contexts. However, no study to date has examined adolescents' sensitivity to reward across different social contexts. In this study we examined 249 participants between the ages 8 and 25, on a monetary reward-processing task. Participants could win or lose money for themselves, their best friend and a disliked peer. Winning for self resulted in a mid- to late adolescent specific peak in neural activation in the ventral striatum, whereas winning for a disliked peer resulted in a mid- to late adolescent specific peak in the mPFC. Our findings reveal that ventral striatum and mPFC hypersensitivity in adolescence is dependent on social context. Taken together, these results suggest that increased risk-taking and sensation seeking observed in adolescence might not be purely related to hyperactivity of the ventral striatum, but that these behaviors are probably strongly related to the social context in which they occur.

  20. Peripheral vagus nerve stimulation significantly affects lipid composition and protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain regions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowka, Artur Dawid; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Recent immunohistochemical studies point to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve as the point of departure of initial changes which are related to the gradual pathological developments in the dopaminergic system. In the light of current investigations, it is likely that biochemical changes within the peripheral nervous system may influence the physiology of the dopaminergic system, suggesting a putative role for it in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. By using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, coupled with statistical analysis, we examined the effect of chronic, unilateral electrical vagus nerve stimulation on changes in lipid composition and in protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain structures in rats. It was found that the chronic vagal nerve stimulation strongly affects the chain length of fatty acids within the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, striatum, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and the motor cortex. In particular, the level of lipid unsaturation was found significantly increasing in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and motor cortex as a result of vagal nerve stimulation. When it comes to changes in protein secondary structure, we could see that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways are particularly affected by vagus nerve stimulation. This is due to the co-occurrence of statistically significant changes in the content of non-ordered structure components, alpha helices, beta sheets, and the total area of Amide I. Macromolecular changes caused by peripheral vagus nerve stimulation may highlight a potential connection between the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system in rat during the development of neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Comprehensive Characterization of HIV-1 Molecular Epidemiology and Demographic History in the Brazilian Region Most Heavily Affected by AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado Fritsch, Hegger; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Maletich Junqueira, Dennis; Esteves de Matos Almeida, Sabrina; Pinto, Aguinaldo Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The high incidence of AIDS cases and the dominance of HIV-1 subtype C infections are two features that distinguish the HIV-1 epidemic in the two southernmost Brazilian states (Rio Grande do Sul [RS] and Santa Catarina [SC]) from the epidemic in other parts of the country. Nevertheless, previous studies on HIV molecular epidemiology were conducted mainly in capital cities, and a more comprehensive understanding of factors driving this unique epidemic in Brazil is necessary. Blood samples were collected from individuals in 13 municipalities in the Brazilian southern region. HIV-1 env and pol genes were submitted to phylogenetic analyses for assignment of subtype, and viral population phylodynamics were reconstructed by applying Skygrid and logistic coalescent models in a Bayesian analysis. A high prevalence of subtype C was observed in all sampled locations; however, an increased frequency of recombinant strains was found in RS, with evidence for new circulating forms (CRFs). In the SC state, subtype B and C epidemics were associated with distinct exposure groups. Although logistic models estimated similar growth rates for HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) and HIV-1B, a Skygrid plot reveals that the former epidemic has been expanding for a longer time. Our results highlight a consistent expansion of HIV-1C in south Brazil, and we also discuss how heterosexual and men who have sex with men (MSM) transmission chains might have impacted the current prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes in this region. IMPORTANCE The AIDS epidemic in south Brazil is expanding rapidly, but the circumstances driving this condition are not well known. A high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C was reported in the capital cities of this region, in contrast to the subtype B dominance in the rest of the country. This study sought to comparatively investigate the HIV-1 subtype B and C epidemics by sampling individuals from several cities in the two states with the highest AIDS incidences in Brazil. Our

  2. Factors Affecting Successful use of Erythropoietin in the Treatment of Anemia in Patients on Hemodialysis: Experience in Hajjah Region, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL-Rohani Muhamed

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo became an essential part of the treatment of anemia in patients with end stage renal failure (ESRF. Our experience at the Hajjah region, Yemen, confirms that the use of rHuEpo significantly increases the level of hemoglobin (HB and hematocrit (Hct, improves work tolerance and overall quality of life of patients on hemodialysis. The observable improvement occurred in 87.5% of patients. The most prominent factors that caused deterioration in the increment of HB and Hct were infection with malaria and chronic infection. Failure of patients′ compliance, largely due to lack of education, was another important factor effecting the results. Many of our patients did not understand the importance of diet and drug regime. It is very important to spend more time on educating such patients.

  3. Evaluating the potential for catastrophic fault-rupture-related hazards affecting a key hydroelectric and irrigation region in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D.; Korjenkov, A.; Tibaldi, A.; Usmanova, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Toktogul hydroelectric and irrigation scheme is the largest in central Asia, with a reservoir containing almost 20 km3 of water behind a 230 m-high dam. Annually, the scheme generates 1200 MW of electricity that is distributed over Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Russia. The scheme is vital for the economic, social and agricultural stability and development of the emerging central Asian republics it serves and, since it is no longer administered centrally as it was in Soviet times, is increasingly the focus of cross-border tensions involving competing needs for irrigation water and power supplies. Our work aims to identify and evaluate potential geo-environmental threats to this region for the benefit of stakeholders; with recommendations for measures to mitigate a range of threat scenarios, presented in a user-friendly GIS format. Most notably these scenarios involve the potential for very large magnitude earthquakes, with associated widespread slope instability, occurring on the little known Talas - Fergana fault. This structure, some 700 km long, bisects the Toktogul region within the actively (~20 mm a-1) contracting Tien Shan mountain range and exhibits geological characteristics similar to large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas. Historical records are limited in this inaccessible mountainous region that, until Soviet times, was occupied by mainly nomadic peoples, but do not indicate recent fault rupture. This highlights the role of geological investigations in assembling a record of past catastrophic events to serve as a guide for what may be expected in the future, as well as the inherent difficulties in attempting geological forecasts to a precision that is useful on human timescales. Such forecasts in this region must also include the presence of some 23 uranium mining waste dumps within the mountain valleys, a legacy from Soviet times, as well as arsenic-rich waste dumps remaining from an earlier era of gold mining. Many

  4. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B; Passy, Sophia I

    2013-09-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification,' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  5. The evolution of sex ratio distorter suppression affects a 25 cM genomic region in the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A Hornett

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Symbionts that distort their host's sex ratio by favouring the production and survival of females are common in arthropods. Their presence produces intense Fisherian selection to return the sex ratio to parity, typified by the rapid spread of host 'suppressor' loci that restore male survival/development. In this study, we investigated the genomic impact of a selective event of this kind in the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina. Through linkage mapping, we first identified a genomic region that was necessary for males to survive Wolbachia-induced male-killing. We then investigated the genomic impact of the rapid spread of suppression, which converted the Samoan population of this butterfly from a 100:1 female-biased sex ratio in 2001 to a 1:1 sex ratio by 2006. Models of this process revealed the potential for a chromosome-wide effect. To measure the impact of this episode of selection directly, the pattern of genetic variation before and after the spread of suppression was compared. Changes in allele frequencies were observed over a 25 cM region surrounding the suppressor locus, with a reduction in overall diversity observed at loci that co-segregate with the suppressor. These changes exceeded those expected from drift and occurred alongside the generation of linkage disequilibrium. The presence of novel allelic variants in 2006 suggests that the suppressor was likely to have been introduced via immigration rather than through de novo mutation. In addition, further sampling in 2010 indicated that many of the introduced variants were lost or had declined in frequency since 2006. We hypothesize that this loss may have resulted from a period of purifying selection, removing deleterious material that introgressed during the initial sweep. Our observations of the impact of suppression of sex ratio distorting activity reveal a very wide genomic imprint, reflecting its status as one of the strongest selective forces in nature.

  6. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Passy, Sophia I.

    2013-01-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  7. Minimum Thermal Conductivity of Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simkin, M. V.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-01-31

    The phonon thermal conductivity of a multilayer is calculated for transport perpendicular to the layers. There is a crossover between particle transport for thick layers to wave transport for thin layers. The calculations show that the conductivity has a minimum value for a layer thickness somewhat smaller then the mean free path of the phonons. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  8. Minimum aanlandingsmaat Brasem (Abramis brama)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hal, van R.; Miller, D.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Ter ondersteuning van een besluit aangaande een minimum aanlandingsmaat voor brasem, primair voor het IJsselmeer en Markermeer, heeft het ministerie van Economische Zaken IMARES verzocht een overzicht te geven van aanlandingsmaten voor brasem in andere landen en waar mogelijk de motivatie achter dez

  9. Coupling between minimum scattering antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Lessow, H; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Coupling between minimum scattering antennas (MSA's) is investigated by the coupling theory developed by Wasylkiwskyj and Kahn. Only rotationally symmetric power patterns are considered, and graphs of relative mutual impedance are presented as a function of distance and pattern parameters. Crossed...

  10. Grassland and Wheat Loss Affected by Corn and Soybean Expansion in the Midwest Corn Belt Region, 2006–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meimei Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increases in agricultural commodity price triggered by ethanol production and other socioeconomic conditions have dramatically affected land uses and agronomic practices in the U.S. This study used crop-specific land cover data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA to analyze agricultural expansion and crop rotation pattern from 2006 to 2013 in the Midwest Corn Belt (MWCB: nine states including Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and South Dakota. We identified a total of 3.9 million acres’ grassland loss between 2007 and 2012. The net loss of grassland occurred mainly along the western MWCB, an area with competing demand for limited water supply. Net conversion of grassland to corn or soybean is likely the result of a resumption of cropping on lands previously enrolled under the USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP, as well as expansion beyond CRP lands. Wheat, small grains, and other crops were also impacted by corn and soybean expansion. The amount of corn planted on corn increased by 23% between 2006 and 2013, whereas the amount of continuous soybean cropping fluctuated over time.

  11. Arabidopsis PTD is required for type I crossover formation and affects recombination frequency in two different chromosomal regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pingli; Wijeratne, Asela J; Wang, Zhengjia; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Ma, Hong

    2014-03-20

    In eukaryotes, crossovers together with sister chromatid cohesion maintain physical association between homologous chromosomes, ensuring accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis I and resulting in exchange of genetic information between homologues. The Arabidopsis PTD (Parting Dancers) gene affects the level of meiotic crossover formation, but its functional relationships with other core meiotic genes, such as AtSPO11-1, AtRAD51, and AtMSH4, are unclear; whether PTD has other functions in meiosis is also unknown. To further analyze PTD function and to test for epistatic relationships, we compared the meiotic chromosome behaviors of Atspo11-1 ptd and Atrad51 ptd double mutants with the relevant single mutants. The results suggest that PTD functions downstream of AtSPO11-1 and AtRAD51 in the meiotic recombination pathway. Furthermore, we found that meiotic defects in rck ptd and Atmsh4 ptd double mutants showed similar meiotic phenotypes to those of the relevant single mutants, providing genetic evidences for roles of PTD and RCK in the type I crossovers pathway. Moreover, we employed a pollen tetrad-based fluorescence method and found that the meiotic crossover frequencies in two genetic intervals were significantly reduced from 6.63% and 22.26% in wild-type to 1.14% and 6.36%, respectively, in the ptd-2 mutant. These results revealed new aspects of PTD function in meiotic crossover formation.

  12. DEXAMETHASON ADMINISTRATION IN INTRAVENOUS REGIONAL ANESTHESIA: ITS AFFECT ON POST OPERATIVE PAIN A RANDOMIZED DOUBLE BLINDED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H SARYAZDI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA is one of the successful method of anesthesia in relief of pain of surgery. It has a multiple advantages including feasibility, rapidity of recovery, rapid onest, muscular relaxation and controllable onset of anesthesia. But this technique dose not relief postoperative pain. In the previous studies it had been tried to add some drugs to local anesthetic in IVRA for relief postoperative pain. Methods. One hundred and ten adult patients in class I and II ASA scheduled for elective operation of unilatral upper extrimeties under IVRA, randomly allocated into interventional and control groups. NRA was done with Lidocaine 0.5 percent with or without dexamethason. Postoperative pain was assessed by visual analogue scale. Results. Addition of dexamethason to local anesthetic in IVRA resulted in better tolleration of turniquate pain and reduced VAS score. Frequency of severe postoperative pain was reduced in case group. Discussion. It seems that dexamethason usage in local anesthetic in IVRA prevents sever postoperative pain in patients. The results of this study is simillar to the study wich added ketorolac to IVRA solution.

  13. A review of factors affecting productivity of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region: implications for recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, W W; Giesy, J P; Best, D A; Kramer, V J

    1995-05-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America declined greatly after World War II due primarily to the eggshell thinning effects of p,p'-DDE, a biodegradation product of DDT. After the banning of DDT in the United States and Canada during the early 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. However, this population recovery has not been uniform. Eagles nesting along the shorelines of the North American Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes still exhibit impaired reproduction. We have explored both ecological and toxicological factors that would limit reproduction of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region. Based on our studies, the most critical factors influencing eagle populations are concentrations of environmental toxicants. While there might be some continuing effects of DDE, total PCBs and most importantly 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ) in fishes from the Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes currently represent a significant hazard to bald eagles living along these shorelines or near these rivers and are most likely related to the impaired reproduction in bald eagles living there.

  14. Estimativa das temperaturas máximas e mínimas do ar para a região do Circuito das Frutas, SP Estimation of maximum and minimum air temperatures for the "Circuito das Frutas" region (São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Bardin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveram-se, neste trabalho modelos de estimativa da temperatura do ar com base em fatores geográficos, visando estimar os valores máximos e mínimos médios mensais e anuais na região compreendida pelos municípios que compõem o Polo Turístico do Circuito das Frutas do Estado de São Paulo. Obtiveram-se equações de regressão múltipla em função da altitude, latitude e longitude e simples em função da altitude, cujos coeficientes de determinação variam entre 0,91 a 0,96, para as temperaturas máximas e 0,71 a 0,94 para as mínimas e se apresentam as variações espaciais das temperaturas máximas e mínimas médias mensais e anuais da região de estudo na forma de mapas.Multiple regression equations to estimate mean monthy and annual maximum and minimum temperatures were developed as a function of altitude, latitude, and longitude for the "Pólo Turístico do Circuito das Frutas" region. The obtained correlation coefficients varied from 0.91 to 0.96 and 0.71 to 0.94 of the maximum and minimum air temperature, respectively. Also, maps with the spacial variability of the maximum and minimum mean monthly and annual temperatures are presented for the region.

  15. HIV-1 prevalence and factors associated with infection in the conflict-affected region of North Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musinguzi Joshua

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1986, northern Uganda has been severely affected by civil strife with most of its population currently living internally displaced in protected camps. This study aims at estimating the HIV-1 prevalence among this population and the factors associated with infection. Methods In June-December 2005, a total of 3051 antenatal clinics attendees in Gulu, Kitgum and Pader districts were anonymously tested for HIV-1 infection as part of routine sentinel surveillance. Factors associated with the infection were evaluated using logistic regression models. Results The age-standardised HIV-1 prevalence was 10.3%, 9.1% and 4.3% in the Gulu, Kitgum and Pader district, respectively. The overall prevalence in the area comprised of these districts was 8.2% when data was weighted according to the districts' population size. Data from all sites combined show that, besides older women [20–24 years: adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.29–2.97; 25–29 years: AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.30–3.11; ≥ 30 years: AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.23–2.97], unmarried women (AOR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.06–2.04, and those with a partner with a non-traditional occupation (AOR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.18–2.21, women living outside of protected camps for internally displaced persons have a higher risk of being HIV-1 infected than internally displaced women (AOR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15–2.08. Conclusion Although published data from Gulu district show a declining HIV-1 prevalence trend that is consistent with that observed at the national level since 1993, the prevalence in North Uganda is still high. Internally displaced women have a lower risk of being infected probably because of their reduced mobility and accessibility, and increased access to health prevention services.

  16. Grey DGM(1,1) Dynamic Prediction Model of Regional Minimum Night Flow%区域夜间最小流量的灰色DGM(1,1)动态预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨龙; 吴珊; 董驹萍

    2013-01-01

    Taking an actual district metering area (DMA) as an example ,and based on the data from the supervisory control and data acquisition ,the characteristics of flow discharge at the inlet of DMA are analyzed using the trend chart and grey correlation analysis .Moreover ,4 grey models of minimum night flow (MNF) are developed based on the grey theory ,which suggests that the grey DGM (1 ,1) model is the best model for predicting DMA's MNF when comparing the accuracies of model and prediction results determined by the 4 models .The grey DGM (1 ,1) metabolic model has good dynamic prediction accuracy .The threshold of the DMA's MNF is obtained using the application of the grey DGM (1 ,1) metabolic model for interval prediction ,which has an early warning effect for assessing the leakage condition of DMA .%  针对一个实际独立计量区域(DMA),根据数据采集与监控系统(SCADA )的数据,采用趋势图和灰色关联度分析了DMA入水口的流量特征。然后基于灰色理论建立4个夜间最小流量的灰色模型,对比分析4个模型的模拟和预测精度,确定离散灰色DGM (1,1)模型是此DMA的夜间最小流量的最佳预测模型。灰色DGM (1,1)新陈代谢模型具有很好的动态预测精度,应用灰色DGM (1,1)新陈代谢区间预测方法分析了此DMA区域的夜间最小流量的阈值,从而为DMA的漏失状况起到预警作用。

  17. Analysis of Factors Affecting on Risk Management of Wheat Production Among Wheat Farmers (Razavieh Region, Khorasan-E-Razavi Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sarani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to analyze the Factors Affecting on risk management in wheat production among farmers of Razavieh region (Khorasan-E-Razavi province, Iran. Statistical population of the study was 1520 farmers that they had water cultivation. By using of stratified proportional random sampling 156 respondents were selected from 8 villages. For the calculation of the risk-aversion coefficient degree among farmers, the Safety First Rule model was used. The findings revealed that the dominant respondents (65% were risk-averse. The results of exploratory factorial analysis showed that five factors determined about 74.267 % from total variance for wheat farmers' risk management that consist of: economy & marketing management factor, planting management factor, harvest management factor, infrastructure management of farming and risk-sharing management factor. From among of the above mentioned factors, the most important factor of risk management in study region was factor of economy & marketing management

  18. A Chaotic Analysis of Factors Affecting Regional Crime Scale%地区犯罪规模影响因素的混沌分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶卫东

    2013-01-01

    区域社会和经济存在与发展的因素对犯罪规模有着不同程度的影响。文章基于这一事实将警务效率、人均 GDP、受教育状况、人口密度和基尼系数作为地区犯罪规模的评价因素,采用复回归方法建立了地区犯罪率模型,通过模糊动态聚类分析得到了影响犯罪规模各因素的混沌特征,从这种混沌优化的学习过程中确定了各个影响因素的权重,将它作为地区犯罪规模影响因素的程度。结果表明,警务效率对犯罪率的影响最大,其次是人口密度和受教育程度的影响。%The factors concerning regional social and economic development affect crime scale in varying degrees. Based on this fact, the article takes policing efficiency, GDP per capita, education level, density of population and Gini coefficient as the evaluation factors of regional crime scale. The paper sets up a regional crime rate model by way of multiple regression method and obtains through fuzzy, dynamic and cluster analysis the chaotic characteristics of various factors affecting crime scale. Finally, the study determines the weight of each influencing factor in the learning process of chaotic optimization and takes the weight as the influencing degree of the corresponding factor on regional crime scale. The results show that policing efficiency contributes the largest part to crime rate, followed by the density of population and education level.

  19. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  20. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for all...

  1. Quantum mechanics the theoretical minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    From the bestselling author of The Theoretical Minimum, an accessible introduction to the math and science of quantum mechanicsQuantum Mechanics is a (second) book for anyone who wants to learn how to think like a physicist. In this follow-up to the bestselling The Theoretical Minimum, physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman offer a first course in the theory and associated mathematics of the strange world of quantum mechanics. Quantum Mechanics presents Susskind and Friedman’s crystal-clear explanations of the principles of quantum states, uncertainty and time dependence, entanglement, and particle and wave states, among other topics. An accessible but rigorous introduction to a famously difficult topic, Quantum Mechanics provides a tool kit for amateur scientists to learn physics at their own pace.

  2. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  3. Fingerprinting with Minimum Distance Decoding

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Chun; Gamal, Hesham El

    2007-01-01

    This work adopts an information theoretic framework for the design of collusion-resistant coding/decoding schemes for digital fingerprinting. More specifically, the minimum distance decision rule is used to identify 1 out of t pirates. Achievable rates, under this detection rule, are characterized in two distinct scenarios. First, we consider the averaging attack where a random coding argument is used to show that the rate 1/2 is achievable with t=2 pirates. Our study is then extended to the general case of arbitrary $t$ highlighting the underlying complexity-performance tradeoff. Overall, these results establish the significant performance gains offered by minimum distance decoding as compared to other approaches based on orthogonal codes and correlation detectors. In the second scenario, we characterize the achievable rates, with minimum distance decoding, under any collusion attack that satisfies the marking assumption. For t=2 pirates, we show that the rate $1-H(0.25)\\approx 0.188$ is achievable using an ...

  4. Factors affecting distribution of microbiotic crusts in the grain-for-green land of the loess region,northern Shaanxi,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A field survey was conducted in the grain-for-green land of the loess region,northern Shaanxi,China,from July to August of 2005 to provide a scientific evaluation of the grain-for-green project,including its soil and water conservation and other ecological benefits for the region.The distribution of microbiotic crusts were studied,while human disturbance,aspect,topography,vegetation structure and other factors affecting it were obtained from the analysis of survey data from 78 sample plots.Results show that crust coverage is larger on lessdisturbed plots than on highly-disturbed ones,on northfacing plots than on south-facing ones and on gully-slopes than on ridge-slopes.Coverage increases with herbal coverage and trees can provide better conditions for distribution of crusts than shrubs.Therefore,crust coverage is larger in herb-dominated plots than in tree-dominated ones and crusts in shrub-dominated plots are smaller.However,we made no progress in our study on deciding how slope degrees and herb species affect the distribution of crusts.We believe that more studies are necessary for a further exploration of the relationship between them.

  5. A conceptual model of the controlling factors of soil organic carbon and nitrogen densities in a permafrost-affected region on the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Fang, Hongbing; Zhao, Yonghua; Smoak, Joseph M.; Li, Wangping; Shi, Wei; Sheng, Yu; Zhao, Lin; Ding, Yongjian

    2017-07-01

    Many investigations of the preservation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in permafrost regions have examined roles of geomorphology, pedogenesis, vegetation cover, and permafrost within particular regions. However, it is difficult to disentangle the effects of multiple factors on the SOC in permafrost regions due to the heterogeneity in environmental conditions. Based on data from 73 soil study sites in permafrost regions of the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, we developed a simple conceptual model, which relates SOC to topography, vegetation, and pedogenesis. We summarized the dominant factors and their controls on SOC using 31 measured soil physiochemical variables. Soil texture explains approximately 60% of the variations in the SOC stocks for the upper 0-2 m soil. Soil particle size closely correlates to soil moisture, which is an important determinant of SOC. Soil salinity and cations are important factors as well and can explain about 10% of the variations in SOC. The SOC and total nitrogen (TN) stocks for the 1-2 m depths have larger uncertainties than those of upper 1 m soil layer. The vegetation, pH, and bulk density mainly affects SOC and TN stocks for the upper 1 m soil layers, while the active layer thickness and soil particle size have greater influence on SOC and TN stocks for the 1-2 m soils. Our results suggest that the soil particle size is the most important controller of SOC pools, and the stocks of SOC and TN are strongly effected by soil development processes in the permafrost regions of the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  6. Analysis of microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes for susceptibility to bipolar affective disorder in the chromosome 12Q24.31 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shink, Eric; Harvey, Mario; Tremblay, Monique; Gagné, Bernard; Belleau, Pascal; Raymond, Catherine; Labbé, Michel; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Barden, Nicholas

    2005-05-05

    Previous results from our genetic analyses using pedigrees from a French Canadian population suggested that the interval delimited by markers D12S86 and D12S378 on chromosome 12 was the most probable genomic region to contain a susceptibility gene for affective disorders. Here we present a more detailed genetic analysis of a 7.7 Mb genomic region located on 12q24.31. This region was saturated with 20 microsatellite markers to refine the candidate region and linkage analysis performed in 41 families from the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) region of Quebec. The results of two point parametric analysis using MFLINK supported the presence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 12q24.31. Association studies with microsatellite markers using a case/control sample from the same population (n = 401) and analyzed with CLUMP revealed significant allelic associations between the bipolar phenotype and markers NBG6 (P = 0.008) and NBG12 (P < 10(-3)). According to these results, we investigated candidate genes in the NBG12 area. We analyzed 32 genes for the presence of polymorphisms in coding sequences and intron/exon junctions and genotyped 22 non-synonymous SNPs in the SLSJ case/control sample. Two uncommon polymorphisms (minor allele frequency < or = 0.03) found in KIAA1595 and FLJ22471 genes, gave P-values below 0.05 with the T1 statistic. Moreover, using haplotype analysis, a nearly significant haplotypic association was observed at the HM74 gene. These results do not give strong support for a role in the susceptibility to bipolar disorder of any of these genes analyzed. However, the significance of rare polymorphisms should be explored by further analyses. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  8. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; DeLong, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, contributing to major losses of fixed nitrogen as dinitrogen (N(2)) and nitrous...... environmental genomics and geochemical studies show the presence of other relevant processes, particularly those associated with the sulfur and carbon cycles. AMZs correspond to an intermediate state between two "end points" represented by fully oxic systems and fully sulfidic systems. Modern and ancient AMZs...... and sulfidic basins are chemically and functionally related. Global change is affecting the magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes and ocean chemical inventories, leading to shifts in AMZ chemistry and biology that are likely to continue well into the future....

  9. Minimum airflow reset of single-duct VAV terminal boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hum

    applied to actual systems for performance validation. The results of the theoretical analysis, numeric simulations, and experiments show that the optimal control algorithms can automatically identify the minimum rate of heating airflow under actual working conditions. Improved control helps to stabilize room air temperatures. The vertical difference in the room air temperature was lower than the comfort value. Measurements of room CO2 levels indicate that when the minimum airflow set point was reduced it did not adversely affect the indoor air quality. According to the measured energy results, optimal control algorithms give a lower rate of reheating energy consumption than conventional controls.

  10. 29 CFR 779.508 - Eighteen-year minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Other Provisions Which May Affect Retail Enterprises Child Labor Provisions... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eighteen-year minimum. 779.508 Section 779.508 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL...

  11. 29 CFR 779.507 - Fourteen-year minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Other Provisions Which May Affect Retail Enterprises Child Labor Provisions... to other specified limits. Under the provisions of Child Labor Regulations, subpart C (§§ 570.31... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fourteen-year minimum. 779.507 Section 779.507 Labor...

  12. 29 CFR 779.506 - Sixteen-year minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES Other Provisions Which May Affect Retail Enterprises Child Labor Provisions... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sixteen-year minimum. 779.506 Section 779.506 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL...

  13. State Flexibility: The Minimum Wage and Welfare Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Policies Inst., Washington, DC.

    In 1999, Congress for the first time, is debating a federal minimum wage hike that will affect low-skilled people who have dramatically fewer options if they cannot find work. This public policy debate has been occasioned by the new state focus on welfare reform that, to some, suggests that a state flexibility approach be applied to the minimum…

  14. Aligning Sequences by Minimum Description Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Conery

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new information theoretic framework for aligning sequences in bioinformatics. A transmitter compresses a set of sequences by constructing a regular expression that describes the regions of similarity in the sequences. To retrieve the original set of sequences, a receiver generates all strings that match the expression. An alignment algorithm uses minimum description length to encode and explore alternative expressions; the expression with the shortest encoding provides the best overall alignment. When two substrings contain letters that are similar according to a substitution matrix, a code length function based on conditional probabilities defined by the matrix will encode the substrings with fewer bits. In one experiment, alignments produced with this new method were found to be comparable to alignments from CLUSTALW. A second experiment measured the accuracy of the new method on pairwise alignments of sequences from the BAliBASE alignment benchmark.

  15. Radiation belt dynamics during solar minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G. (Geophysics Lab., Air Force Systems Command, Hanscom AFB, MA (US)); Holeman, E. (Physics Dept., Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (US))

    1989-12-01

    Two types of temporal variation in the radiation belts are studied using low altitude data taken onboard the DMSP F7 satellite: those associated with the solar cycle and those associated with large magnetic storm effects. Over a three-year period from 1984 to 1987 and encompassing solar minimum, the protons in the heart of the inner belt increased at a rate of approximately 6% per year. Over the same period, outer zone electron enhancements declined both in number and peak intensity. During the large magnetic storm of February 1986, following the period of peak ring current intensity, a second proton belt with energies up to 50 MeV was found at magnetic latitudes between 45{degrees} and 55{degrees}. The belt lasted for more than 100 days. The slot region between the inner and outer electron belts collapsed by the merging of the two populations and did not reform for 40 days.

  16. A UV-to-MIR monitoring of DR Tau: exploring how water vapor in the planet formation region of the disk is affected by stellar accretion variability

    CERN Document Server

    Banzatti, Andrea; Manara, Carlo F; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Testi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Young stars are known to show variability due to non-steady mass accretion rate from their circumstellar disks. Accretion flares can produce strong energetic irradiation and heating that may affect the disk in the planet formation region, close to the central star. During an extreme accretion outburst in the young star EX Lupi, the prototype of EXor variables, remarkable changes in molecular gas emission from $\\sim1$ AU in the disk have recently been observed (Banzatti et al. 2012). Here, we focus on water vapor and explore how it is affected by variable accretion luminosity in T Tauri stars. We monitored a young highly variable solar-mass star, DR Tau, using simultaneously two high/medium-resolution ESO-VLT spectrographs: VISIR at 12.4 $\\mu$m to observe water lines from the disk, and X-shooter covering from 0.3 to 2.5 $\\mu$m to constrain the stellar accretion. Three epochs spanning timescales from several days to several weeks were obtained. Accretion luminosity was estimated to change within a factor $\\sim2...

  17. Asymmetric k-Center with Minimum Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we give approximation algorithms and inapproximability results for various asymmetric k-center with minimum coverage problems. In the k-center with minimum coverage problem, each center is required to serve a minimum number of clients. These problems have been studied by Lim et al. [A....... Lim, B. Rodrigues, F. Wang, Z. Xu, k-center problems with minimum coverage, Theoret. Comput. Sci. 332 (1–3) (2005) 1–17] in the symmetric setting....

  18. Comparative study of fuelwood consumption by villagers and seasonal 'Dhaba owners' in the tourist affected regions of Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gajendra; Rawat, G.S. [Department of Habitat Ecology, Post Box 18, Chandrabani, Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun, Uttarakhand 248001 (India); Verma, Deepti [Indian Council of Forest Research and Education, Dehradun. Uttarakhand (India)

    2010-04-15

    The rural inhabitants of the Himalayan region have been exploiting forest resources for their livelihood for generations. The excessive and uncontrolled use of firewood for domestic purposes has ended up with severe deforestation. Therefore, quantification, assessment and restoration of such valuable but exhaustible resources and is imperative their scientific management. The estimates reflect that a total of 88 species are consumed as fuelwood (54 trees and 34 shrubs) by the local people. Fuelwood consumption by 'dhaba' (roadside refreshment establishments) owners (90-120 kg/household/day) was much higher over the common villagers (20-22 kg/household/day). The fuelwood is mainly burnt for cooking, water heating, space heating and lighting, etc. Among these, cooking consumes the fuelwood most. In addition, fuelwood demand increases due to influx of tourists. In the near future, this may also affect the status of the undisturbed forests at the middle elevation. The information in this communication could be utilized for developing various conservation and sustainable strategies in the region to mitigate the impact of forest resource for fodder and fuelwood. (author)

  19. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-08

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  20. A partial MECP2 duplication in a mildly affected adult male: a putative role for the 3' untranslated region in the MECP2 duplication phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanchard Neil A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplications of the X-linked MECP2 gene are associated with moderate to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, and neuropsychiatric illness in males, while triplications are associated with a more severe phenotype. Most carrier females show complete skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood and an apparent susceptibility to specific personality traits or neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods We describe the clinical phenotype of a pedigree segregating a duplication of MECP2 found on clinical array comparative genomic hybridization. The position, size, and extent of the duplication were delineated in peripheral blood samples from affected individuals using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well as targeted high-resolution oligonucleotide microarray analysis and long-range PCR. The molecular consequences of the rearrangement were studied in lymphoblast cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR, and western blot analysis. Results We observed a partial MECP2 duplication in an adult male with epilepsy and mild neurocognitive impairment who was able to function independently; this phenotype has not previously been reported among males harboring gains in MECP2 copy number. The same duplication was inherited by this individual’s daughter who was also affected with neurocognitive impairment and epilepsy and carried an additional copy-number variant. The duplicated segment involved all four exons of MECP2, but excluded almost the entire 3' untranslated region (UTR, and the genomic rearrangement resulted in a MECP2-TEX28 fusion gene mRNA transcript. Increased expression of MECP2 and the resulting fusion gene were both confirmed; however, western blot analysis of lysates from lymphoblast cells demonstrated increased MeCP2 protein without evidence of a stable fusion gene protein product. Conclusion The observations of a mildly affected adult male

  1. Minimum Competency Testing and the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    This brief overview of minimum competency testing and disabled high school students discusses: the inclusion or exclusion of handicapped students in minimum competency testing programs; approaches to accommodating the individual needs of handicapped students; and legal issues. Surveys of states that have mandated minimum competency tests indicate…

  2. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  3. Minimum income protection in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Peijpe, T.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the Dutch legal system of minimum income protection through collective bargaining, social security, and statutory minimum wages. In addition to collective agreements, the Dutch statutory minimum wage offers income protection to a small number of workers. Its effect

  4. Minimum Energy Requirements in Complex Distillation Arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Ivar J.

    2001-07-01

    the first part of the thesis has been to present a complete theory of minimum energy in directly coupled columns, not a design procedure for engineering purposes. Thus, our focus has been on the basic theory and on verification and analysis of the new results. However, based on these results, it is straightforward to develop design procedures including rigorous computations for real feed mixtures without the idealized assumptions used to deduce the analytic results. In part 2 we focus on optimization of operation, and in particular the concept of self-optimizing control. We consider a process where we have more degrees of freedom than are consumed by the product specifications. The remaining unconstrained degrees of freedom are used to optimize the operation, given by some scalar cost criterion. In addition there will in practice always be unknown disturbances, model uncertainty and uncertainty in measurements and implementation of manipulated inputs, which makes it impossible to precalculate and implement the optimal control inputs accurately. The main idea is to achieve self-optimizing control by turning the optimization problem into a constant setpoint problem. The issue is then to find (if possible) a set of variables, which when kept at their setpoints, indirectly ensures optimal operation. We have used the ternary Petlyuk arrangement to illustrate the concept. It is a quite challenging case where the potential energy savings may easily be lost if we do not manage to keep the manipulated inputs at their optimal values, and the optimum is strongly affected by changes in feed composition and column performance. This also applies to the best control structure selection, and we believe that the reported difficulties in control are really a control structure problem (the task of selecting the best variables to control and the best variables to manipulate). In this analysis we present in detail the properties of the Petlyuk arrangement, and show how important

  5. Vazões máximas e mínimas para bacias hidrográficas da região alto Rio Grande, MG Maximum and minimum discharges for Alto Rio Grande region basins, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rogério de Mello

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Vazões máximas são grandezas hidrológicas aplicadas a projetos de obras hidráulicas e vazões mínimas são utilizadas para a avaliação das disponibilidades hídricas em bacias hidrográficas e comportamento do escoamento subterrâneo. Neste estudo, objetivou-se à construção de intervalos de confiança estatísticos para vazões máximas e mínimas diárias anuais e sua relação com as características fisiográficas das 6 maiores bacias hidrográficas da região Alto Rio Grande à montante da represa da UHE-Camargos/CEMIG. As distribuições de probabilidades Gumbel e Gama foram aplicadas, respectivamente, para séries históricas de vazões máximas e mínimas, utilizando os estimadores de Máxima Verossimilhança. Os intervalos de confiança constituem-se em uma importante ferramenta para o melhor entendimento e estimativa das vazões, sendo influenciado pelas características geológicas das bacias. Com base nos mesmos, verificou-se que a região Alto Rio Grande possui duas áreas distintas: a primeira, abrangendo as bacias Aiuruoca, Carvalhos e Bom Jardim, que apresentaram as maiores vazões máximas e mínimas, significando potencialidade para cheias mais significativas e maiores disponibilidades hídricas; a segunda, associada às bacias F. Laranjeiras, Madre de Deus e Andrelândia, que apresentaram as menores disponibilidades hídricas.Maximum discharges are applied to hydraulic structure design and minimum discharges are used to characterize water availability in hydrographic basins and subterranean flow. This study is aimed at estimating the confidence statistical intervals for maximum and minimum annual discharges and their relationship wih the physical characteristics of basins in the Alto Rio Grande Region, State of Minas Gerais. The study was developed for the six (6 greatest Alto Rio Grande Region basins at upstream of the UHE-Camargos/CEMIG reservoir. Gumbel and Gama probability distribution models were applied to the

  6. Minimum Bias Measurements at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kar, Deepak; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged particle measurements at hadron colliders probe the low-energy nonperturbative region of QCD. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged-particles produced in pp collisions at 13 TeV have been measured by the CMS experiment. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam current, recorded at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The measurements present the first detailed studies in inclusive phase spaces with a minimum transverse momentum of 100 MeV and 500 MeV. The distribution of electromagnetic and hadronic energy in the very forward phase-space has been measured with the CASTOR calorimeters located at a pseudorapidity of -5.2 to -6.6 in the very forward region of CMS. The energy distributions are very powerful benchmarks to study the performance of MPI in hadronic interactions models at 13 TeV collision energy. All measurements are compared with predictions of ...

  7. A minimum income for healthy living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J N; Donkin, A J; Wonderling, D; Wilkinson, P; Dowler, E A

    2000-12-01

    Half a century of research has provided consensual evidence of major personal requisites of adult health in nutrition, physical activity and psychosocial relations. Their minimal money costs, together with those of a home and other basic necessities, indicate disposable income that is now essential for health. In a first application we identified such representative minimal costs for healthy, single, working men aged 18-30, in the UK. Costs were derived from ad hoc survey, relevant figures in the national Family Expenditure Survey, and by pragmatic decision for the few minor items where survey data were not available. Minimum costs were assessed at 131.86 pound sterling per week (UK April 1999 prices). Component costs, especially those of housing (which represents around 40% of this total), depend on region and on several assumptions. By varying these a range of totals from 106.47 pound sterling to 163.86 pound sterling per week was detailed. These figures compare, 1999, with the new UK national minimum wage, after statutory deductions, of pound 105.84 at 18-21 years and 121.12 pound sterling at 22+ years for a 38 hour working week. Corresponding basic social security rates are 40.70 pound sterling to 51.40 pound sterling per week. Accumulating science means that absolute standards of living, "poverty", minimal official incomes and the like, can now be assessed by objective measurement of the personal capacity to meet the costs of major requisites of healthy living. A realistic assessment of these costs is presented as an impetus to public discussion. It is a historical role of public health as social medicine to lead in public advocacy of such a national agenda.

  8. Identification of a single-nucleotide insertion in the promoter region affecting the sodC promoter activity in Brucella neotomae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A Moustafa

    Full Text Available Brucella neotomae is not known to be associated with clinical disease in any host species. Previous research suggested that B. neotomae might not express detectable levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD, a periplasmic enzyme known to be involved in protecting Brucella from oxidative bactericidal effects of host phagocytes. This study was undertaken to investigate the genetic basis for the disparity in SOD expression in B. neotomae. Our Western blot and SOD enzyme assay analyses indicated that B. neotomae does express SOD, but at a substantially reduced level. Nucleotide sequence analysis of region upstream to the sodC gene identified a single-nucleotide insertion in the potential promoter region. The same single-nucleotide insertion was also detected in the sodC promoter of B. suis strain Thomsen, belonging to biovar 2 in which SOD expression was undetectable previously. Examination of the sodC promoter activities using translational fusion constructs with E. coli β-galactosidase demonstrated that the B. neotomae and B. suis biovar 2 promoters were very weak in driving gene expression. Site-directed mutation studies indicated that the insertion of A in the B. neotomae sodC promoter reduced the promoter activity. Increasing the level of SOD expression in B. neotomae through complementation with B. abortus sodC gene did not alter the bacterial survival in J774A.1 macrophage-like cells and in tissues of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. These results for the first time demonstrate the occurrence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism affecting promoter function and gene expression in Brucella.

  9. Mycoplasma bovis infections and co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. with different clinical manifestations in affected cattle herds in eastern region of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szacawa Ewelina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of Mycoplasma bovis infection and co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. infections in cattle. The tested population was one in the eastern region of Poland containing 66 dairy cows and 23 calves showing different clinical signs and suffering from pneumonia, mastitis, and arthritis. The incidence of M. bovis in co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. was examined using serological traditional mycoplasma culture methods, and the molecular methods - PCR and polymerase chain reaction/denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR/DGGE. The PCR/DGGE method for detecting Mycoplasma spp. in cattle was used for the first time in Poland. The seroprevalence of M. bovis in the affected cattle herds in the eastern region of Poland was 47.8% in calves and 19.7% in dairy cows. The direct detection and identification of M. bovis from nasopharyngeal swabs by PCR revealed that 56.5% of calves were positive, but all of the dairy cows were negative. The PCR/DGGE identified eight (34.8% instances of M. arginini and eight (26.1% instances of M. bovirhinis co-infecting with M. bovis in ten calves. The seroprevalence of M. bovis in the tested population was 33.7%. Any future attempts to control mycoplasma infections require an insight into the current epidemiological situation of M. bovis infection and its relationship to other mycoplasmas in causing clinical disease in cattle. Using these diagnostic methods we have demonstrated that mycoplasmal infections are often caused by multiple species of Mycoplasma and not just the primary M. bovis pathogen.

  10. Linear Minimum variance estimation fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yunmin; LI Xianrong; ZHAO Juan

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that a general mulitisensor unbiased linearly weighted estimation fusion essentially is the linear minimum variance (LMV) estimation with linear equality constraint, and the general estimation fusion formula is developed by extending the Gauss-Markov estimation to the random paramem of distributed estimation fusion in the LMV setting.In this setting ,the fused estimator is a weighted sum of local estimatess with a matrix quadratic optimization problem subject to a convex linear equality constraint. Second, we present a unique solution to the above optimization problem, which depends only on the covariance matrixCK. Third, if a priori information, the expectation and covariance, of the estimated quantity is unknown, a necessary and sufficient condition for the above LMV fusion becoming the best unbiased LMV estimation with dnown prior information as the above is presented. We also discuss the generality and usefulness of the LMV fusion formulas developed. Finally, we provied and off-line recursion of Ck for a class of multisensor linear systems with coupled measurement noises.

  11. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-05-14

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal of proposed method is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Since motion estimation can be unreliable between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Observing more frames before declaring a detection may lead to a more accurate detection and segmentation, since more motion may be observed leading to a stronger motion cue. However, this leads to greater delay. The proposed method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms, defined as declarations of detection before the object moves or incorrect or inaccurate segmentation at the detection time. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  12. Dose variation during solar minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G.; Brautigam, D.H. (Phillips Lab., Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (US)); Holeman, E. (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    In this paper, the authors use direct measurement of dose to show the variation in inner and outer radiation belt populations at low altitude from 1984 to 1987. This period includes the recent solar minimum that occurred in September 1986. The dose is measured behind four thicknesses of aluminum shielding and for two thresholds of energy deposition, designated HILET and LOLET. The authors calculate an average dose per day for each month of satellite operation. The authors find that the average proton (HILET) dose per day (obtained primarily in the inner belt) increased systematically from 1984 to 1987, and has a high anticorrelation with sunspot number when offset by 13 months. The average LOLET dose per day behind the thinnest shielding is produced almost entirely by outer zone electrons and varies greatly over the period of interest. If any trend can be discerned over the 4 year period it is a decreasing one. For shielding of 1.55 gm/cm{sup 2} (227 mil) Al or more, the LOLET dose is complicated by contributions from {gt} 100 MeV protons and bremsstrahlung.

  13. Minimum-Cost Reachability for Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Fehnker, Ansgar; Hune, Thomas Seidelin

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the model of linearly priced timed automata as an extension of timed automata, with prices on both transitions and locations. For this model we consider the minimum-cost reachability problem: i.e. given a linearly priced timed automaton and a target state, determine...... the minimum cost of executions from the initial state to the target state. This problem generalizes the minimum-time reachability problem for ordinary timed automata. We prove decidability of this problem by offering an algorithmic solution, which is based on a combination of branch-and-bound techniques...... and a new notion of priced regions. The latter allows symbolic representation and manipulation of reachable states together with the cost of reaching them....

  14. Challenges and Opportunities of Social Care Services for seniors in the Czech Republic (based on an example of the town of Havířov (located in structurally affected Moravian-Silesian Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Šárka Prudká

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the issue of people over 65 years of age - seniors - who live in the town of Havířov in the Czech Republic. This town is located in the structurally affected region which nowadays faces both problems of aging population and high unemployment resulting in leaving of young people to more perspective regions. Great emphasis is, therefore, placed on social care services provided to seniors. The authors analyze the social service system with particular attention to the current challenges and opportunities and to the problems of this structurally affected region.

  15. Trying to Learn Lessons for Response to Extreme Events: Paradigm Shifts Affecting Civil Defense in the Trinational Region of Southwestern Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, G. L. P.

    2015-12-01

    The last ten years have seen several extreme climate events in southwestern Amazonia with historic impacts. The City of Rio Branco, Capital of Acre, Brazil´s westernmost State, suffered its seventh consecutive annual flooding and its worst in March 2015. The city of Tarauacá, also in Acre, registered 12 flooding events between November 2014 and April 2015. The most recent flood of the trinational Acre River in 2015 set historic records for flood stage and number of displaced persons in Cobija, the Capital of Pando, Bolivia. From February to April 2014, floods of the Madeira River disrupted the one highway between Acre and southern Brazil. Puerto Maldonado, the capital in Madre de Dios Region of Peru had its worst flood in 50 years during 2014. In 2005 and 2010, prolonged droughts combined with ignition sources resulted in tens to hundreds of thousands of hectares of fire-damaged rainforests in the Madre de Dios, Acre and Pando (MAP) Region. The Civil Defenses in these three contiguous political units faced several abrupt paradigm shifts that affected their responses: 1) The drought of 2005 showed dramatically that regional rainforests do burn; 2) The recent flooding history, particularly in 2012 and 2015, demolished the cultural icon of a nine-year recurrence interval; 3) What happens outside your territory can be devastating. The Madeira River flood impeded an estimated 200 million dollars from circulating in Acre; 4) The past can be a terrible guide. For Cobija and Rio Branco, the 2015 flood was on the order of a meter higher than any other. Many home dwellers did not evacuate in time because they used past floods as a guide; 5) A collapse in communication - cell phones, land lines, and Internet - can get worse. In 2012, such a collapse occurred in two border towns for 5 days, yet in 2015 it lasted more than 11 days. Research is needed to address how institutions linked to Civil Defense can shift paradigms in time to be more effective.

  16. Identifying and managing risk factors for salt-affected soils: a case study in a semi-arid region in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, De; Xu, Jianchun; Wang, Li; Lin, Zhulu; Liu, Liming

    2015-07-01

    Soil salinization and desalinization are complex processes caused by natural conditions and human-induced risk factors. Conventional salinity risk identification and management methods have limitations in spatial data analysis and often provide an inadequate description of the problem. The objectives of this study were to identify controllable risk factors, to provide response measures, and to design management strategies for salt-affected soils. We proposed to integrate spatial autoregressive (SAR) model, multi-attribute decision making (MADM), and analytic hierarchy process (AHP) for these purposes. Our proposed method was demonstrated through a case study of managing soil salinization in a semi-arid region in China. The results clearly indicated that the SAR model is superior to the OLS model in terms of risk factor identification. These factors include groundwater salinity, paddy area, corn area, aquaculture (i.e., ponds and lakes) area, distance to drainage ditches and irrigation channels, organic fertilizer input, and cropping index, among which the factors related to human land use activities are dominant risk factors that drive the soil salinization processes. We also showed that ecological irrigation and sustainable land use are acceptable strategies for soil salinity management.

  17. A Survey of Earthquake-Affected Region and Controlling Actions to Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad koosha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : There are always changes in our planet that can threat human life and earthquake is one of them and has an increasing importance. This study aims to survey earthquake-affected region and controlling actions to communicable and non-communicable diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012. Material and Methods : This is a cross-sectional study that its data were collected by East Azerbaijan province health center personnel and were analyzed and reported by current research team on the disease categories and relevant, controlling activities. In addition, the researchers assessed strengths and weaknesses of the teams’ performance from their members’ perspectives by interview. Results : The findings indicate that status of environmental health and psychological disorders is suitable and status of communicable and non-communicable diseases is acceptable. The strengths points of health teams included rapid assessment and on-time response to earthquake and constant monitoring of diseases and weaknesses were lack of coordination and organizing in disaster management Conclusion : This study showed that implemented activities for disease control and preventing epidemics had enough effectiveness and this experience can be used as a suitable model for disaster management in similar situations.

  18. Multiple Equilibria and Minimum Wages in Labor Markets with Informational Frictions and Heterogeneous Production Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. van den Berg (Gerard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIt is often argued that a mandatory minimum wage is binding only if the wage density displays a spike at it. In this paper we analyze a model with wage setting, search frictions, and heterogeneous production technologies, in which imposition of a minimum wage affects wages even though,

  19. How Do Alternative Minimum Wage Variables Compare?

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Lemos

    2005-01-01

    Several minimum wage variables have been suggested in the literature. Such a variety of variables makes it difficult to compare the associated estimates across studies. One problem is that these estimates are not always calibrated to represent the effect of a 10% increase in the minimum wage. Another problem is that these estimates measure the effect of the minimum wage on the employment of different groups of workers. In this paper we critically compare employment effect estimates using five...

  20. Minimum wages, globalization and poverty in Honduras

    OpenAIRE

    Gindling, T. H.; Terrell, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    To be competitive in the global economy, some argue that Latin American countries need to reduce or eliminate labour market regulations such as minimum wage legislation because they constrain job creation and hence increase poverty. On the other hand, minimum wage increases can have a direct positive impact on family income and may therefore help to reduce poverty. We take advantage of a complex minimum wage system in a poor country that has been exposed to the forces of globalization to test...

  1. Tracking error with minimum guarantee constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Barro; Elio Canestrelli

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the popularity of indexing has greatly increased in financial markets and many different families of products have been introduced. Often these products also have a minimum guarantee in the form of a minimum rate of return at specified dates or a minimum level of wealth at the end of the horizon. Period of declining stock market returns together with low interest rate levels on Treasury bonds make it more difficult to meet these liabilities. We formulate a dynamic asset alloca...

  2. Effect of Pressure on Minimum Fluidization Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhiping; Na Yongjie; Lu Qinggang

    2007-01-01

    Minimum fluidization velocity of quartz sand and glass bead under different pressures of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Mpa were investigated. The minimum fluidization velocity decreases with the increasing of pressure. The influence of pressure to the minimum fluidization velocities is stronger for larger particles than for smaller ones.Based on the test results and Ergun equation, an experience equation of minimum fluidization velocity is proposed and the calculation results are comparable to other researchers' results.

  3. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Denmark, East Germany, England, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein..., Switzerland, Wales, West Germany, Yugoslavia), or Greenland shall meet each applicable minimum requirement...

  4. Soil-restoration rate and initial soil formation trends on example of anthropogenically affected soils of opencast mine in Kursk region, Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigareva, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    The mining industry is one of the main factors which anthropogenically change the environment. Mining process results in removing of the rocks and mechanical changes of considerable amounts of ground. One of the main results of mining arising of antropic ecosystems as well as increasing of the new created soils total area is technosols. The main factor controlling the soil formation in postmining environment is the quality of spoiled materials. Initial soil formation has been investigated on spoils of the largest iron ore extraction complex in Russia - Mikhailovsky mining and concentration complex which is situated in Kursk region, Russia. Investigated soils are presented by monogenetic weak developed soils of different age (10-15-20 years). Young soils are formed on the loess parent materials (20 year-old soil), or on a mix of sand and clay overburdens (15 and 10-year-old soils). Anthropogenically affected soils are characterized by well-developed humus horizon which is gradually replaced by weakly changed soil-building rocks (profile type A-C for 10-, 15-years old soils, and A-AC-C for 20 years old soils). Gray-humus soils are characterized by presence of diagnostic humus horizon gradually replaced by soil-building rock. The maximum intensity of humus accumulation has been determined in a semi-hydromorphic 10-year-old soil developed on the mixed heaps which is connected with features of water-air conditions complicating mineralization of plant remnants. 20-year-old soil on loess is characterized by rather high rate of organic substances accumulation between all the automorphous soils. It was shown that one of the most effective restoration ways for anthropogenically affected soils is a biological reclamation. Since overburdens once appeared on a day surface are overgrown badly in the first years, they are subject to influence of water and wind erosion. Our researchers have found out that permanent grasses are able to grow quickly; they accumulate a considerable

  5. HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitude and practice among women in the least and most HIV/AIDS affected regions of mainland Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapa, R S; Rweyemamu, D K

    2014-03-01

    Among women in mainland Tanzania, Iringa region in the southern highlands has the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rate while Arusha region in the north-east has the lowest prevalence rate. In a 2007/8 survey, Iringa's HIV rate for women was 18.6% versus 0.8% in Arusha. Using data from a survey of women aged 15-49 years conducted in 2009 by the Champion project of EngenderHealth, a comparison was made of HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitude and practice between women in Iringa and Arusha regions. It was found that women in Arusha region had more knowledge of HIV/AIDS than women in Iringa region, and that more than three-quarters of the women in each region were married and 12% of the women in Arusha region had never been married compared with 8% of the women in Iringa region. The majority of women in each region had at least primary school education and there was no significant difference between their educational levels. Women in Arusha region were economically less active than women in Iringa region, a statistically significant association. More women in Arusha region than in Iringa region had never had children (24% versus 12%). Similarly, women in Arusha region had significantly fewer children compared with women in Iringa.

  6. Sequence Changes in the Ton Box Region of BtuB Affect Its Transport Activities and Interaction with TonB Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Nathalie; Bradbeer, Clive; Kadner, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Uptake of cobalamins by the transporter protein BtuB in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli requires the proton motive force and the transperiplasmic protein TonB. The Ton box sequence near the amino terminus of BtuB is conserved among all TonB-dependent transporters and is the only known site of mutations that confer a transport-defective phenotype which can be suppressed by certain substitutions at residue 160 in TonB. The crystallographic structures of the TonB-dependent transporter FhuA revealed that the region near the Ton box, which itself was not resolved, is exposed to the periplasmic space and undergoes an extensive shift in position upon binding of substrate. Site-directed disulfide bonding in intact cells has been used to show that the Ton box of BtuB and residues around position 160 of TonB approach each other in a highly oriented and specific manner to form BtuB-TonB heterodimers that are stimulated by the presence of transport substrate. Here, replacement of Ton box residues with proline or cysteine revealed that residue side chain recognition is not important for function, although replacement with proline at four of the seven Ton box positions impaired cobalamin transport. The defect in cobalamin utilization resulting from the L8P substitution was suppressed by cysteine substitutions in adjacent residues in BtuB or in TonB. This suppression did not restore active transport of cobalamins but may allow each transporter to function at most once. The uncoupled proline substitutions in BtuB markedly affected the pattern of disulfide bonding to TonB, both increasing the extent of cross-linking and shifting the pairs of residues that can be joined. Cross-linking of BtuB and TonB in the presence of the BtuB V10P substitution became independent of the presence of substrate, indicating an additional distortion of the exposure of the Ton box in the periplasmic space. TonB action thus requires a specific orientation for functional contact with the Ton box

  7. Kagami-Ogata syndrome: a clinically recognizable upd(14)pat and related disorder affecting the chromosome 14q32.2 imprinted region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tsutomu; Kagami, Masayo

    2016-02-01

    Human chromosome 14q32.2 carries paternally expressed genes including DLK1 and RTL1, and maternally expressed genes including MEG3 and RTL1as, along with the germline-derived DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) and the postfertilization-derived MEG3-DMR. Consistent with this, paternal uniparental disomy 14 (upd(14)pat), and epimutations (hypermethylations) and microdeletions affecting the IG-DMR and/or the MEG3-DMR of maternal origin, result in a unique phenotype associated with characteristic face, a small bell-shaped thorax with coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly and polyhydramnios. Recently, the name 'Kagami-Ogata syndrome' (KOS) has been approved for this clinically recognizable disorder. Here, we review the current knowledge about KOS. Important findings include the following: (1) the facial 'gestalt' and the increased coat-hanger angle constitute pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood/puberty; (2) the unmethylated IG-DMR and MEG3-DMR of maternal origin function as the imprinting control centers in the placenta and body respectively, with a hierarchical interaction regulated by the IG-DMR for the methylation pattern of the MEG3-DMR in the body; (3) RTL1 expression level becomes ~2.5 times increased in the absence of functional RTL1as-encoded microRNAs that act as a trans-acting repressor for RTL1; (4) excessive RTL1 expression and absent MEG expression constitute the primary underlying factor for the phenotypic development; and (5) upd(14)pat accounts for approximately two-thirds of KOS patients, and epimutations and microdeletions are identified with a similar frequency. Furthermore, we refer to diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  8. Kagami–Ogata syndrome: a clinically recognizable upd(14)pat and related disorder affecting the chromosome 14q32.2 imprinted region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tsutomu; Kagami, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Human chromosome 14q32.2 carries paternally expressed genes including DLK1 and RTL1, and maternally expressed genes including MEG3 and RTL1as, along with the germline-derived DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR) and the postfertilization-derived MEG3-DMR. Consistent with this, paternal uniparental disomy 14 (upd(14)pat), and epimutations (hypermethylations) and microdeletions affecting the IG-DMR and/or the MEG3-DMR of maternal origin, result in a unique phenotype associated with characteristic face, a small bell-shaped thorax with coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly and polyhydramnios. Recently, the name ‘Kagami–Ogata syndrome' (KOS) has been approved for this clinically recognizable disorder. Here, we review the current knowledge about KOS. Important findings include the following: (1) the facial ‘gestalt' and the increased coat-hanger angle constitute pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood/puberty; (2) the unmethylated IG-DMR and MEG3-DMR of maternal origin function as the imprinting control centers in the placenta and body respectively, with a hierarchical interaction regulated by the IG-DMR for the methylation pattern of the MEG3-DMR in the body; (3) RTL1 expression level becomes ~2.5 times increased in the absence of functional RTL1as-encoded microRNAs that act as a trans-acting repressor for RTL1; (4) excessive RTL1 expression and absent MEG expression constitute the primary underlying factor for the phenotypic development; and (5) upd(14)pat accounts for approximately two-thirds of KOS patients, and epimutations and microdeletions are identified with a similar frequency. Furthermore, we refer to diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26377239

  9. A risk-based approach for identifying constituents of concern in oil sands process-affected water from the Athabasca Oil Sands region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Andrew D; Kinley, Ciera M; Hendrikse, Maas; Gaspari, Daniel P; Calomeni, Alyssa J; Iwinski, Kyla J; Castle, James W; Haakensen, Monique C; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Rodgers, John H

    2017-04-01

    Mining leases in the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) region produce large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) containing constituents that limit beneficial uses and discharge into receiving systems. The aim of this research is to identify constituents of concern (COCs) in OSPW sourced from an active settling basin with the goal of providing a sound rational for developing mitigation strategies for using constructed treatment wetlands for COCs contained in OSPW. COCs were identified through several lines of evidence: 1) chemical and physical characterization of OSPW and comparisons with numeric water quality guidelines and toxicity endpoints, 2) measuring toxicity of OSPW using a taxonomic range of sentinel organisms (i.e. fish, aquatic invertebrates, and a macrophyte), 3) conducting process-based manipulations (PBMs) of OSPW to alter toxicity and inform treatment processes, and 4) discerning potential treatment pathways to mitigate ecological risks of OSPW based on identification of COCs, toxicological analyses, and PBM results. COCs identified in OSPW included organics (naphthenic acids [NAs], oil and grease [O/G]), metals/metalloids, and suspended solids. In terms of species sensitivities to undiluted OSPW, fish ≥ aquatic invertebrates > macrophytes. Bench-scale manipulations of the organic fractions of OSPW via PBMs (i.e. H2O2+UV254 and granular activated charcoal treatments) eliminated toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia (7-8 d), in terms of mortality and reproduction. Results from this study provide critical information to inform mitigation strategies using passive or semi-passive treatment processes (e.g., constructed treatment wetlands) to mitigate ecological risks of OSPW to aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analisis FTIR dan Minimum Loss pada Kaca Tellurite-Bismuth-Zinc-Plumbum untuk Aplikasi Fiber Optik Infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi -

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peneltian ini bertujuan menganalisis spektrum Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR dan menentukan minimum loss dari kaca Tellurite-Bismuth-Zinc-Plumbum (TBZP yang dipengaruhi oleh variasi (PbO. Kaca TBZP difabrikasi dengan teknik melt quenching dengan komposisi 55TeO2–2Bi2O3–[43-x]ZnO–xPbO (%mol dengan x=2, 3, 4, 5. Hasil uji spektrum Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR menunjukkan pita absorbsi terbesar berada pada panjang gelombang lebih dari 620nm. Absorbansi tersebut lebih diakibatkan oleh adanya transisi vibrasi pada daerah infrared. Minimum loss pada kaca TBZP diprediksikan secara teoritis melalui fitting data infrared edge dengan kurva Rayleigh scattering. Minimum loss kaca TBZP sebasar 2,94 dB/km hingga 2,35 dB/km pada λ=5534,2nm hingga 5821,2nm. Nilai minimum loss menurun seiring pertambahan konsentrasi ion Pb2+ dalam kaca TBZP. Sifat tersebut menjadikan kaca ini sebagai kandidat yang baik untuk aplikasi yang menggunakan gelombang infrared seperti fiber optik infrared. The aims of this research were to analyze the spectrum of Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR and determine the minimum loss of Tellurite-Bismuth-Zinc-Plumbum (TBZP based glass which affected by the variation of (PbO. The TBZP glass has been fabricated by melt quenching technique with composition 55TeO2–2Bi2O3–[43-x]ZnO–xPbO (mol% with x=2, 3, 4, 5. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectra test results showed that the greatest absorption bands were at wavelengths over 620nm. Vibrational transition has the reason behind the absorbance in the infrared region. Minimum loss on glass TBZP theoretically was predicted by fitted data from the infrared edge and rayleigh scattering curve. The minimum loss of TBZP was of the range 2,94 dB/km to 2,35 dB/km at λ=5534,2nm to 5821,2nm. The minimum loss of TBZP glass decreases as the Pb2+ content in glass increases. This makes these glasses are good candidate for IR-application such as infrared optical fiber.

  11. Stochastic variational approach to minimum uncertainty states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illuminati, F.; Viola, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova Univ. (Italy)

    1995-05-21

    We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schroedinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials. (author)

  12. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  13. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Definitions and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency...

  14. Stochastic variational approach to minimum uncertainty states

    CERN Document Server

    Illuminati, F; Illuminati, F; Viola, L

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schr\\"{o}dinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials.

  15. Monotonic Stable Solutions for Minimum Coloring Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, H.J.M.; Miquel, S.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    For the class of minimum coloring games (introduced by Deng et al. (1999)) we investigate the existence of population monotonic allocation schemes (introduced by Sprumont (1990)). We show that a minimum coloring game on a graph G has a population monotonic allocation scheme if and only if G is (P4,

  16. Regional odontodysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, D N; Bailoor, D; Patel, B

    2011-01-01

    Regional odontodysplasia is an unusual developmental anomaly in which ectodermal and mesodermal tooth components are affected. We present a rare case of a developmental anomaly called regional odontodysplasia or 'ghost teeth' in a 12-year-old Indian girl. The anomaly affected right maxillary permanent teeth. The mandibular teeth were unaffected. The clinical, radiographic and histological features are reviewed. The management of affected patients is discussed.

  17. Regional odontodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional odontodysplasia is an unusual developmental anomaly in which ectodermal and mesodermal tooth components are affected. We present a rare case of a developmental anomaly called regional odontodysplasia or ′ghost teeth′ in a 12-year-old Indian girl. The anomaly affected right maxillary permanent teeth. The mandibular teeth were unaffected. The clinical, radiographic and histological features are reviewed. The management of affected patients is discussed.

  18. The metabolic response of pteropods to acidification reflects natural CO2-exposure in oxygen minimum zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Wishner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shelled pteropods (Thecosomata are a group of holoplanktonic mollusks that are believed to be especially sensitive to ocean acidification because their aragonitic shells are highly soluble. Despite this concern, there is very little known about the physiological response of these animals to conditions of elevated carbon dioxide. This study examines the oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion of five pteropod species, collected from tropical regions of the Pacific Ocean, to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (0.10%, 1000 ppm. Our results show that pteropods that naturally migrate into oxygen minimum zones, such as Hyalocylis striata, Clio pyramidata, Cavolinia longirostris and Creseis virgula, were not affected by carbon dioxide at the levels and duration tested. Diacria quadridentata, which does not migrate, responds to high carbon dioxide conditions with reduced oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion. This indicates that the natural chemical environment of individual species may influence their resilience to ocean acidification.

  19. Predicting minimum fluidization velocities of multi-component solid mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Asif

    2013-01-01

    Employing well-established mixing rules for mean properties,appropriate expressions are aerivea for predicting minimum fluidization velocities of multi-component solid mixtures in terms of monocomponent values for the velocity and the bed voidage at incipient fluidization.Based on flow regime and the mixing level of constituent species,it is found that these relationships differ significantly from each other,whether related to size-different or density-different mixtures.For mixed beds of size-different mixtures,the effect of volume contraction is accounted for by the mean voidage term,which is absent for segregated beds.Incorporating the volume-change of mixing leads to values of the mixture minimum fluidization velocities even lower than corresponding values for segregated bed,thus conforming to the trend reported in the literature.Size-different mixtures exhibit flow regime dependence irrespective of whether the bed is mixed or segregated.On the other hand,the mixing of constituent species does not affect the minimum fluidization velocity of density-different mixtures,as the difference in the expressions for a segregated and a mixed system is rather inconsequential.Comparison with experimental data available in the literature is made to test the efficacy of the minimum fluidization velocity expressions derived here.

  20. Fish Ecology and Evolution in the World's Oxygen Minimum Zones and Implications of Ocean Deoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, N D; Levin, L A

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and oxygen limited zones (OLZs) are important oceanographic features in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean, and are characterized by hypoxic conditions that are physiologically challenging for demersal fish. Thickness, depth of the upper boundary, minimum oxygen levels, local temperatures, and diurnal, seasonal, and interannual oxycline variability differ regionally, with the thickest and shallowest OMZs occurring in the subtropics and tropics. Although most fish are not hypoxia-tolerant, at least 77 demersal fish species from 16 orders have evolved physiological, behavioural, and morphological adaptations that allow them to live under the severely hypoxic, hypercapnic, and at times sulphidic conditions found in OMZs. Tolerance to OMZ conditions has evolved multiple times in multiple groups with no single fish family or genus exploiting all OMZs globally. Severely hypoxic conditions in OMZs lead to decreased demersal fish diversity, but fish density trends are variable and dependent on region-specific thresholds. Some OMZ-adapted fish species are more hypoxia-tolerant than most megafaunal invertebrates and are present even when most invertebrates are excluded. Expansions and contractions of OMZs in the past have affected fish evolution and diversity. Current patterns of ocean warming are leading to ocean deoxygenation, causing the expansion and shoaling of OMZs, which is expected to decrease demersal fish diversity and alter trophic pathways on affected margins. Habitat compression is expected for hypoxia-intolerant species, causing increased susceptibility to overfishing for fisheries species. Demersal fisheries are likely to be negatively impacted overall by the expansion of OMZs in a warming world.

  1. Minimum-Cost Reachability for Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Fehnker, Ansgar; Hune, Thomas Seidelin;

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the model of linearly priced timed automata as an extension of timed automata, with prices on both transitions and locations. For this model we consider the minimum-cost reachability problem: i.e. given a linearly priced timed automaton and a target state, determine the mini......This paper introduces the model of linearly priced timed automata as an extension of timed automata, with prices on both transitions and locations. For this model we consider the minimum-cost reachability problem: i.e. given a linearly priced timed automaton and a target state, determine...... the minimum cost of executions from the initial state to the target state. This problem generalizes the minimum-time reachability problem for ordinary timed automata. We prove decidability of this problem by offering an algorithmic solution, which is based on a combination of branch-and-bound techniques...... and a new notion of priced regions. The latter allows symbolic representation and manipulation of reachable states together with the cost of reaching them....

  2. The minimum work requirement for distillation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, Cerci; Yunus, A. Cengel; Byard, Wood [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A typical ideal distillation process is proposed and analyzed using the first and second-laws of thermodynamics with particular attention to the minimum work requirement for individual processes. The distillation process consists of an evaporator, a condenser, a heat exchanger, and a number of heaters and coolers. Several Carnot engines are also employed to perform heat interactions of the distillation process with the surroundings and determine the minimum work requirement for processes. The Carnot engines give the maximum possible work output or the minimum work input associated with the processes, and therefore the net result of these inputs and outputs leads to the minimum work requirement for the entire distillation process. It is shown that the minimum work relation for the distillation process is the same as the minimum work input relation found by Cerci et al [1] for an incomplete separation of incoming saline water, and depends only on the properties of the incoming saline water and the outgoing pure water and brine. Also, certain aspects of the minimum work relation found are discussed briefly. (authors)

  3. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MINIMUM IGNITION TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor WACHTER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is an analysis of the minimum ignition temperature of dust layer and the minimum ignition temperatures of dust clouds. It could be used to identify the threats in industrial production and civil engineering, on which a layer of combustible dust could occure. Research was performed on spent coffee grounds. Tests were performed according to EN 50281-2-1:2002 Methods for determining the minimum ignition temperatures of dust (Method A. Objective of method A is to determine the minimum temperature at which ignition or decomposition of dust occurs during thermal straining on a hot plate at a constant temperature. The highest minimum smouldering and carbonating temperature of spent coffee grounds for 5 mm high layer was determined at the interval from 280 °C to 310 °C during 600 seconds. Method B is used to determine the minimum ignition temperature of a dust cloud. Minimum ignition temperature of studied dust was determined to 470 °C (air pressure – 50 kPa, sample weight 0.3 g.

  4. The Effects of Discourses in Regional Contexts on the Development of Curriculum-Based Literacy Standards for Adolescents in Schooling: A Comparative Study of South Australia and Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Lisl

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses how discourses in regional contexts affect the development of curriculum-based literacy standards for adolescents in schooling. A comparative case-study research design enabled the influences of discourses at the regional level to be analysed. The case studies include the development of curricula to define a minimum literacy…

  5. Does the Minimum Wage Cause Inefficient Rationing?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何满辉; 梁明秋

    2008-01-01

    By not allowing wages to dearthe labor market,the minimum wage could cause workers with low reservation wages to be rationed out while equally skilled woTkers with higher reservation wages are employed.I find that proxies for reservation wages of unskilled workers in high-impact stales did not rise relative to reservation wages in other states,suggesting that the increase in the minimum wage did not cause jobs to be allocated less efficiently.However,even if rationing is efficient,the minimum wage can still entail other efficiency costs.

  6. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  7. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; DeLong, Edward F; Letelier, Ricardo M; Stewart, Frank J

    2012-10-02

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, contributing to major losses of fixed nitrogen as dinitrogen (N(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) gases. Anaerobic microbial processes, including the two pathways of N(2) production, denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, are oxygen-sensitive, with some occurring only under strictly anoxic conditions. The detection limit of the usual method (Winkler titrations) for measuring dissolved oxygen in seawater, however, is much too high to distinguish low oxygen conditions from true anoxia. However, new analytical technologies are revealing vanishingly low oxygen concentrations in nitrite-rich OMZs, indicating that these OMZs are essentially anoxic marine zones (AMZs). Autonomous monitoring platforms also reveal previously unrecognized episodic intrusions of oxygen into the AMZ core, which could periodically support aerobic metabolisms in a typically anoxic environment. Although nitrogen cycling is considered to dominate the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of AMZs, recent environmental genomics and geochemical studies show the presence of other relevant processes, particularly those associated with the sulfur and carbon cycles. AMZs correspond to an intermediate state between two "end points" represented by fully oxic systems and fully sulfidic systems. Modern and ancient AMZs and sulfidic basins are chemically and functionally related. Global change is affecting the magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes and ocean chemical inventories, leading to shifts in AMZ chemistry and biology that are likely to continue well into the future.

  8. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  9. Quantitative Research on the Minimum Wage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert S.

    1975-01-01

    The article reviews recent research examining the impact of minimum wage requirements on the size and distribution of teenage employment and earnings. The studies measure income distribution, employment levels and effect on unemployment. (MW)

  10. Impact of the Minimum Wage on Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael N.; Candland, Charles W.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the impact of increases in the minimum wage on salary schedules, provides guidelines for creating a philosophy to deal with the impact, and outlines options and presents recommendations. (IRT)

  11. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  12. Minimum Wage Policy and Country's Technical Efficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohd Zaini Abd Karim; Sok-Gee Chan; Sallahuddin Hassan

    2016-01-01

    .... However, some quarters argued against the idea of a nationwide minimum wage asserting that it will lead to an increase in the cost of doing business and thus will hurt Malaysian competitiveness...

  13. Graph theory for FPGA minimum configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruan Aiwu; Li Wenchang; Xiang Chuanyin; Song Jiangmin; Kang Shi; Liao Yongbo

    2011-01-01

    A traditional bottom-up modeling method for minimum configuration numbers is adopted for the study of FPGA minimum configurations.This method is limited ifa large number of LUTs and multiplexers are presented.Since graph theory has been extensively applied to circuit analysis and test,this paper focuses on the modeling FPGA configurations.In our study,an internal logic block and interconnections of an FPGA are considered as a vertex and an edge connecting two vertices in the graph,respectively.A top-down modeling method is proposed in the paper to achieve minimum configuration numbers for CLB and IOB.Based on the proposed modeling approach and exhaustive analysis,the minimum configuration numbers for CLB and IOB are five and three,respectively.

  14. Price pass-through and minimum wages

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Aaronson

    1997-01-01

    A textbook consequence of competitive markets is that an industry-wide increase in the price of inputs will be passed on to consumers through an increase in prices. This fundamental implication has been explored by researchers interested in who bears the burden of taxation and exchange rate fluctuations. However, little attention has focused on the price implications of minimum wage hikes. From a policy perspective, this is an oversight. Welfare analysis of minimum wage laws should not ignore...

  15. The minimum wage and restaurant prices

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Aaronson; Eric French; MacDonald, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Using both store-level and aggregated price data from the food away from home component of the Consumer Price Index survey, we show that restaurant prices rise in response to an increase in the minimum wage. These results hold up when using several different sources of variation in the data. We interpret these findings within a model of employment determination. The model implies that minimum wage hikes cause employment to fall and prices to rise if labor markets are competitive but potential...

  16. Minimum Dominating Tree Problem for Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Hao; LIN Lan

    2014-01-01

    A dominating tree T of a graph G is a subtree of G which contains at least one neighbor of each vertex of G. The minimum dominating tree problem is to find a dominating tree of G with minimum number of vertices, which is an NP-hard problem. This paper studies some polynomially solvable cases, including interval graphs, Halin graphs, special outer-planar graphs and others.

  17. Estimates of AGN Black Hole Mass and Minimum Variability Timescale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Zhong Xie; Luo-En Chen; Huai-Zhen Li; Li-Sheng Mao; Hong Dai; Zhao-Hua Xie; Li Ma; Shu-Bai Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Black hole mass is one of the fundamental physical parameters of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), for which many methods of estimation have been proposed.One set of methods assumes that the broad-line region (BLR) is gravitationally bound by the central black hole potential, so the black hole mass can be estimated from the orbital radius and the Doppler velocity. Another set of methods assumes the observed variability timescale is determined by the orbital timescale near the innermost stable orbit around the Schwarzschild black hole or the Kerr black hole,or by the characteristic timescale of the accretion disk. We collect a sample of 21AGNs, for which the minimum variability timescales have been obtained and their black hole masses (Mσ) have been well estimated from the stellar velocity dispersion or the BLR size-luminosity relation. Using the minimum variability timescales we estimated the black hole masses for 21 objects by the three different methods,the results are denoted by Ms, Mk and Md, respectively. We compared each of them with Mσ individually and found that: (1) using the minimum variability timescale with the Kerr black hole theory leads to small differences between Mσand Mk, none exceeding one order of magnitude, and the mean difference between them is about 0.53 dex; (2) using the minimum variability timescale with the Schwarzschild black hole theory leads to somewhat larger difference between Mσ and Ms: larger than one order of magnitude for 6 of the 21 sources, and the mean difference is 0.74 dex; (3) using the minimum variability timescale with the accretion disk theory leads to much larger differences between Mσ and Md, for 13of the 21 sources the differences are larger than two orders of magnitude; and the mean difference is as high as about 2.01 dex.

  18. Thermodynamic geometry of minimum-dissipation driven barrier crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, David A.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the thermodynamic geometry of a simple system that models the bistable dynamics of nucleic acid hairpins in single molecule force-extension experiments. Near equilibrium, optimal (minimum-dissipation) driving protocols are governed by a generalized linear response friction coefficient. Our analysis demonstrates that the friction coefficient of the driving protocols is sharply peaked at the interface between metastable regions, which leads to minimum-dissipation protocols that drive rapidly within a metastable basin, but then linger longest at the interface, giving thermal fluctuations maximal time to kick the system over the barrier. Intuitively, the same principle applies generically in free energy estimation (both in steered molecular dynamics simulations and in single-molecule experiments), provides a design principle for the construction of thermodynamically efficient coupling between stochastic objects, and makes a prediction regarding the construction of evolved biomolecular motors.

  19. Measurement of Minimum Bias Observables with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kvita, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of Minimum Bias (MB) is a crucial ingredient to learn about the description of soft QCD processes. It has also a significant relevance for the simulation of the environment at the LHC with many concurrent pp interactions (“pileup”). The ATLAS collaboration has provided new measurements of the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at center of mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The measurements cover a wide spectrum using charged particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged particle multiplicities.

  20. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  1. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) errors for grass minimum temperature and the 4-h nowcasts.

  2. Minimum description length synthetic aperture radar image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas; Réfrégier, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    We present a new minimum description length (MDL) approach based on a deformable partition--a polygonal grid--for automatic segmentation of a speckled image composed of several homogeneous regions. The image segmentation thus consists in the estimation of the polygonal grid, or, more precisely, its number of regions, its number of nodes and the location of its nodes. These estimations are performed by minimizing a unique MDL criterion which takes into account the probabilistic properties of speckle fluctuations and a measure of the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid. This approach then leads to a global MDL criterion without an undetermined parameter since no other regularization term than the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid is necessary and noise parameters can be estimated with maximum likelihood-like approaches. The performance of this technique is illustrated on synthetic and real synthetic aperture radar images of agricultural regions and the influence of different terms of the model is analyzed.

  3. The impact of minimum wages on wages, work and poverty in Nicaragua

    OpenAIRE

    Alaniz, Enrique; Gindling, T. H.; Terrell, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    We use an individual-level panel data set to study the impact of changes in legal minimum wages on a host of labor market outcomes in Nicaragua including: a) wages and employment, b) transitions of workers across jobs (in the covered and uncovered sectors) and employment status (unemployment and out of the labor force), and c) transitions into and out of poverty. We find that changes in the legal minimum wage affect only those workers whose initial wage (before the change in minimum wages) is...

  4. Patterns of neural response in scene-selective regions of the human brain are affected by low-level manipulations of spatial frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David M; Hymers, Mark; Hartley, Tom; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have found distinct patterns of response to different categories of scenes. However, the relative importance of low-level image properties in generating these response patterns is not fully understood. To address this issue, we directly manipulated the low level properties of scenes in a way that preserved the ability to perceive the category. We then measured the effect of these manipulations on category-selective patterns of fMRI response in the PPA, RSC and OPA. In Experiment 1, a horizontal-pass or vertical-pass orientation filter was applied to images of indoor and natural scenes. The image filter did not have a large effect on the patterns of response. For example, vertical- and horizontal-pass filtered indoor images generated similar patterns of response. Similarly, vertical- and horizontal-pass filtered natural scenes generated similar patterns of response. In Experiment 2, low-pass or high-pass spatial frequency filters were applied to the images. We found that image filter had a marked effect on the patterns of response in scene-selective regions. For example, low-pass indoor images generated similar patterns of response to low-pass natural images. The effect of filter varied across different scene-selective regions, suggesting differences in the way that scenes are represented in these regions. These results indicate that patterns of response in scene-selective regions are sensitive to the low-level properties of the image, particularly the spatial frequency content.

  5. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect DNA methylation of the corticotropin-releasing factor gene promoter region in the adult rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelen, R.H. van der; Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Ghareh, H.; Och, L. van; Homberg, J.R.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between childhood maltreatment and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene linked polymorphic region has been associated with increased risk to develop major depression. This Gene x Environment interaction has furthermore been linked with increased levels of anxiety and glucocorticoid

  6. Reference respiratory waveforms by minimum jerk model analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anetai, Yusuke, E-mail: anetai@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamadaoka 2-2, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ota, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Osaka University Hospital, Yamadaoka 2-15, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    affected by respiratory phase was improved in the minimum jerk theoretical model by 7.0% and 13% compared with that of the waveforms modeled by cosine and free-breathing model, respectively. Conclusions: The minimum jerk theoretical respiratory wave can achieve smooth tracking by CyberKnife{sup ®} and may provide patient-specific respiratory modeling, which may be useful for respiratory training and coaching, as well as quality assurance of the mechanical CyberKnife{sup ®} robotic trajectory.

  7. Post-tsunami stress: a study of posttraumatic stress disorder in children living in three severely affected regions in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Frank; Schauer, Elisabeth; Catani, Claudia; Ruf, Martina; Elbert, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    At 3 to 4 weeks after the December 2004 tsunami disaster we assessed symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 264 children who lived in severely affected coastal communities in Manadkadu (northern coast), Kosgoda (western coast), and Galle (southern coast) in Sri Lanka. The prevalence rate of tsunami-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (ignoring the time criterion) ranged between 14% and 39% and an additional 5% to 8% had PTSD unrelated to the tsunami. The PTSD symptoms were explained by the severity of the trauma exposure and family loss, as well as previous traumatic events. The results confirm the relevance of the individual history of traumatic events for the genesis of PTSD and indicate a high need of mental health assistance among the tsunami-affected children in Sri Lanka.

  8. A minimum achievable PV electrical generating cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabisky, E.S. [11 Carnation Place, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States)

    1996-03-22

    The role and share of photovoltaic (PV) generated electricity in our nation`s future energy arsenal is primarily dependent on its future production cost. This paper provides a framework for obtaining a minimum achievable electrical generating cost (a lower bound) for fixed, flat-plate photovoltaic systems. A cost of 2.8 $cent/kWh (1990$) was derived for a plant located in Southwestern USA sunshine using a cost of money of 8%. In addition, a value of 22 $cent/Wp (1990$) was estimated as a minimum module manufacturing cost/price

  9. Weight-Constrained Minimum Spanning Tree Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Henn, Sebastian Tobias

    2007-01-01

    In an undirected graph G we associate costs and weights to each edge. The weight-constrained minimum spanning tree problem is to find a spanning tree of total edge weight at most a given value W and minimum total costs under this restriction. In this thesis a literature overview on this NP-hard problem, theoretical properties concerning the convex hull and the Lagrangian relaxation are given. We present also some in- and exclusion-test for this problem. We apply a ranking algorithm and the me...

  10. CO2 maximum in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmier, A.; Ruiz-Pino, D.; Garçon, V.

    2011-02-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), known as suboxic layers which are mainly localized in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems, have been expanding since the 20th "high CO2" century, probably due to global warming. OMZs are also known to significantly contribute to the oceanic production of N2O, a greenhouse gas (GHG) more efficient than CO2. However, the contribution of the OMZs on the oceanic sources and sinks budget of CO2, the main GHG, still remains to be established. We present here the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) structure, associated locally with the Chilean OMZ and globally with the main most intense OMZs (O22225 μmol kg-1, up to 2350 μmol kg-1) have been reported over the whole OMZ thickness, allowing the definition for all studied OMZs a Carbon Maximum Zone (CMZ). Locally off Chile, the shallow cores of the OMZ and CMZ are spatially and temporally collocated at 21° S, 30° S and 36° S despite different cross-shore, long-shore and seasonal configurations. Globally, the mean state of the main OMZs also corresponds to the largest carbon reserves of the ocean in subsurface waters. The CMZs-OMZs could then induce a positive feedback for the atmosphere during upwelling activity, as potential direct local sources of CO2. The CMZ paradoxically presents a slight "carbon deficit" in its core (~10%), meaning a DIC increase from the oxygenated ocean to the OMZ lower than the corresponding O2 decrease (assuming classical C/O molar ratios). This "carbon deficit" would be related to regional thermal mechanisms affecting faster O2 than DIC (due to the carbonate buffer effect) and occurring upstream in warm waters (e.g., in the Equatorial Divergence), where the CMZ-OMZ core originates. The "carbon deficit" in the CMZ core would be mainly compensated locally at the oxycline, by a "carbon excess" induced by a specific remineralization. Indeed, a possible co-existence of bacterial heterotrophic and autotrophic processes usually occurring at different depths could

  11. CO2 maximum in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Garçon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, known as suboxic layers which are mainly localized in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems, have been expanding since the 20th "high CO2" century, probably due to global warming. OMZs are also known to significantly contribute to the oceanic production of N2O, a greenhouse gas (GHG more efficient than CO2. However, the contribution of the OMZs on the oceanic sources and sinks budget of CO2, the main GHG, still remains to be established. We present here the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC structure, associated locally with the Chilean OMZ and globally with the main most intense OMZs (O2−1 in the open ocean. To achieve this, we examine simultaneous DIC and O2 data collected off Chile during 4 cruises (2000–2002 and a monthly monitoring (2000–2001 in one of the shallowest OMZs, along with international DIC and O2 databases and climatology for other OMZs. High DIC concentrations (>2225 μmol kg−1, up to 2350 μmol kg−1 have been reported over the whole OMZ thickness, allowing the definition for all studied OMZs a Carbon Maximum Zone (CMZ. Locally off Chile, the shallow cores of the OMZ and CMZ are spatially and temporally collocated at 21° S, 30° S and 36° S despite different cross-shore, long-shore and seasonal configurations. Globally, the mean state of the main OMZs also corresponds to the largest carbon reserves of the ocean in subsurface waters. The CMZs-OMZs could then induce a positive feedback for the atmosphere during upwelling activity, as potential direct local sources of CO2. The CMZ paradoxically presents a slight "carbon deficit" in its core (~10%, meaning a DIC increase from the oxygenated ocean to the OMZ lower than the corresponding O2 decrease (assuming classical C/O molar ratios. This "carbon deficit" would be related to regional thermal mechanisms affecting faster O2 than DIC (due to the carbonate buffer effect and occurring upstream in warm waters (e.g., in the Equatorial Divergence

  12. Do Minimum Wages in Latin America and the Caribbean Matter? Evidence from 19 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai; Cunningham, Wendy

    Despite the existence of minimum wage legislation in most Latin American countries, there is little empirical evidence demonstrating its impact on the distribution of wages. In this study, cross-country data for 19 Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries is analyzed to gain an understanding ...... of the regional study "The Role of Minimum Wages in Latin America: Poverty Alleviation, Income Inequality, Employment, and Wages"....

  13. Minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Grønvall Rasmussen, J B

    2008-01-01

    To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease.......To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease....

  14. Completeness properties of the minimum uncertainty states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The completeness properties of the Schrodinger minimum uncertainty states (SMUS) and of some of their subsets are considered. The invariant measures and the resolution unity measures for the set of SMUS are constructed and the representation of squeezing and correlating operators and SMUS as superpositions of Glauber coherent states on the real line is elucidated.

  15. A Minimum Relative Entropy Principle for AGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, Antoine van de; Schouten, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the principle of minimum relative entropy (PMRE) is proposed as a fundamental principle and idea that can be used in the field of AGI. It is shown to have a very strong mathematical foundation, that it is even more fundamental then Bayes rule or MaxEnt alone and that it can be related

  16. What's Happening in Minimum Competency Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Robert; Covington, Jimmie

    An examination of the current status of minimum competency testing is presented in a series of short essays, which discuss case studies of individual school systems and state approaches. Sections are also included on the viewpoints of critics and supporters, teachers and teacher organizations, principals and students, and the federal government.…

  17. Statistical inference of Minimum Rank Factor Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, A; Ten Berge, JMF

    2002-01-01

    For any given number of factors, Minimum Rank Factor Analysis yields optimal communalities for an observed covariance matrix in the sense that the unexplained common variance with that number of factors is minimized, subject to the constraint that both the diagonal matrix of unique variances and the

  18. 44 CFR 62.6 - Minimum commissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS Issuance of Policies § 62.6 Minimum commissions. (a) The earned commission which shall be paid to any property or casualty insurance agent or broker duly licensed by a state insurance regulatory authority, with respect to each policy or renewal the agent duly procures on behalf of the...

  19. Context quantization by minimum adaptive code length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Wu, Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    Context quantization is a technique to deal with the issue of context dilution in high-order conditional entropy coding. We investigate the problem of context quantizer design under the criterion of minimum adaptive code length. A property of such context quantizers is derived for binary symbols...

  20. A Minimum Relative Entropy Principle for AGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.M. Ben Schouten; Antoine van de van de Ven

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the principle of minimum relative entropy (PMRE) is proposed as a fundamental principle and idea that can be used in the field of AGI. It is shown to have a very strong mathematical foundation, that it is even more fundamental then Bayes rule or MaxEnt alone and that it can be related

  1. Statistical inference of Minimum Rank Factor Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, A; Ten Berge, JMF

    For any given number of factors, Minimum Rank Factor Analysis yields optimal communalities for an observed covariance matrix in the sense that the unexplained common variance with that number of factors is minimized, subject to the constraint that both the diagonal matrix of unique variances and the

  2. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Faizal, Mir; Das, Saurya

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  3. Minimum impact house prototype for sustainable building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drexler, H.; Jauslin, D.

    2010-01-01

    The Minihouse is a prototupe for a sustainable townhouse. On a site of only 29 sqm it offers 154 sqm of urban life. The project 'Minimum Impact House' adresses two important questions: How do we provide living space in the cities without distroying the landscape? How to improve sustainably the ecolo

  4. ASSESSMENT OF ANNUAL MINIMUM TEMPERATURE IN SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... This work attempts investigating the pattern of minimum temperature from 19 1 to 2006, an attempt was also .... Similarly the heavy cloud cover acts as blanket for terrestrial ... within a General Circulation Model. (GCM) can be ...

  5. Minimum Competency Testing--Grading or Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Madhu Suri

    The consequences of the minimum competency testing movement may bring into question the basic assumptions, goals, and expectations of our school system. The intended use of these tests is the assessment of students; the unintended consequence may be the assessment of the school system. There are two ways in which schools may fail in the context of…

  6. Minimum intervention dentistry: periodontics and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, I B; Ngo, L

    2013-06-01

    This article will look at the role of minimum intervention dentistry in the management of periodontal disease. It will discuss the role of appropriate assessment, treatment and risk factors/indicators. In addition, the role of the patient and early intervention in the continuing care of dental implants will be discussed as well as the management of peri-implant disease.

  7. Minimum output entropy of Gaussian channels

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, S; Maccone, L; Pirandola, S; Garcia-Patron, R

    2009-01-01

    We show that the minimum output entropy for all single-mode Gaussian channels is additive and is attained for Gaussian inputs. This allows the derivation of the channel capacity for a number of Gaussian channels, including that of the channel with linear loss, thermal noise, and linear amplification.

  8. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum quantity. 35.13 Section 35.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT...

  9. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  10. The periodicity of Grand Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The sunspot number is the most used index to quantify the solar activity. Nevertheless, the sunspot is a syn- thetic index and not a physical index. Therefore, we should be careful to use the sunspot number to quantify the low (high) solar activity. One of the major problems of using sunspot to quantify solar activity is that its minimum value is zero. This zero value hinders the reconstruction of the solar cycle during the Maunder minimum. All solar indexes can be used as analog signals, which can be easily converted into digital signals. In con- trast, the conversion of a digital signal into an analog signal is not in general a simple task. The sunspot number during the Maunder minimum can be studied as a digital signal of the solar activity In 1894, Maunder published a discovery that has maintained the Solar Physics in an impasse. In his fa- mous work on "A Prolonged Sunspot Minimum" Maunder wrote: "The sequence of maximum and minimum has, in fact, been unfailing during the present century [..] and yet there [..], the ordinary solar cycle was once interrupted, and one long period of almost unbroken quiescence prevailed". The search of new historical Grand solar minima has been one of the most important questions in Solar Physics. However, the possibility of estimating a new Grand solar minimum is even more valuable. Since solar activity is the result of electromagnetic processes; we propose to employ the power to quantify solar activity: this is a fundamental physics concept in electrodynamics. Total Solar Irradiance is the primary energy source of the Earth's climate system and therefore its variations can contribute to natural climate change. In this work, we propose to consider the fluctuations in the power of the Total Solar Irradiance as a physical measure of the energy released by the solar dynamo, which contributes to understanding the nature of "profound solar magnetic field in calm". Using a new reconstruction of the Total Solar Irradiance we found the

  11. Polymorphic variant at the IL2 region is associated with type 1 diabetes and may affect serum levels of interleukin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichna, Marta; Zurawek, Magdalena; Fichna, Piotr; Ziółkowska-Suchanek, Iwona; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Nowak, Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    Polymorphic variants at the interleukin-2 (IL2) locus affect the risk of several autoimmune disorders. Our aim was to evaluate the association of the four IL2 polymorphisms (rs6822844, rs6534349, rs2069762 and rs3136534) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Polish population, and to correlate them with the serum interleukin-2 levels. 543 unrelated T1D patients and 706 healthy control subjects were enrolled. The minor T allele at rs6822844 was significantly less frequent in T1D compared to controls (p = 0.002; OR 0.71; 95 % CI 0.571-0.880). Likewise, the frequency of the TT genotype was decreased among the affected individuals (p = 0.007). In healthy subjects, stratification according to the rs6822844 genotype revealed significant differences in circulating interleukin-2 (p = 0.037) with the highest levels in TT protective genotypes. Three other IL2 polymorphisms did not display significant differences in allele and genotype distribution. In conclusion, the rs6822844 variant is associated with T1D and may play a functional role, or reflect the influence of another causative genetic variant in linkage disequilibrium.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF GEOLOGY ON BATTLEFIELD TERRAIN AND IT’S AFFECTS ON MILITARY OPERATIONS IN MOUNTAINS AND KARST REGIONS: EXAMPLES FROM WW1 AND AFGHANISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Zečević

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available During the World War I conflict between the Austrian and Italian army, Austrian engineer units constructed hallways in the karst region of Soča river. Those hallways, karst phenomena (caverns, caves and other fortifications, gave the Austrian army a tactical advantage. The construction principle of caverns is the consequence of the geological structure of the terrain. We are watching another military conflict in Afghanistan. In country where many armies in history have been defeated, where the terrain morphology condition a guerilla tactic, where the function effect of modern military technology is limited by battlefield configuration and with low military value of individual target, we are creating a "picture" of the possible view of the future battlefield. Al-Qai'da operatives in east Afghanistan take advantage of the opportunity of geological structure of the terrain and construct tunnel network across natural caves. Although the tunnel network in Afghanistan is constructed mostly in sandstones and metamorphic rocks, we may partly compare it with Austrian hallways. In that sense this work shows the influence of geological structure of the terrain on the effect of military operations in mountains and karst regions, and the analogy between military operations on the Soča river and military operations in Afghanistan.

  13. Can modular psychological concepts like affect and emotion be assigned to a distinct subset of regional neural circuits?. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Thorsten; Herrmann, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    The proposed Quartet Theory of Human Emotions by Koelsch and co-workers [11] adumbrates evidence from various scientific sources to integrate and assign the psychological concepts of 'affect' and 'emotion' to four brain circuits or to four neuronal core systems for affect-processing in the brain. The authors differentiate between affect and emotion and assign several facultative, or to say modular, psychological domains and principles of information processing, such as learning and memory, antecedents of affective activity, emotion satiation, cognitive complexity, subjective quality feelings, degree of conscious appraisal, to different affect systems. Furthermore, they relate orbito-frontal brain structures to moral affects as uniquely human, and the hippocampus to attachment-related affects. An additional feature of the theory describes 'emotional effector-systems' for motor-related processes (e.g., emotion-related actions), physiological arousal, attention and memory that are assumed to be cross-linked with the four proposed affect systems. Thus, higher principles of emotional information processing, but also modular affect-related issues, such as moral and attachment related affects, are thought to be handled by these four different physiological sub-systems that are on the other side assumed to be highly interwoven at both physiological and functional levels. The authors also state that the proposed sub-systems have many features in common, such as the selection and modulation of biological processes related to behaviour, perception, attention and memory. The latter aspect challenges an ongoing discussion about the mind-body problem: To which degree do the proposed sub-systems 'sufficiently' cover the processing of complex modular or facultative emotional/affective and/or cognitive phenomena? There are current models and scientific positions that almost completely reject the idea that modular psychological phenomena are handled by a distinct selection of

  14. Minimum detectable air velocity by thermal flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-08-19

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s.

  15. THE TSUNAMI TRANSFORMATION: HOW AGENCY FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND REHABILITATION [BRR] CONVERT DISASTER INTO AN OPPORTUNITY TO SUSTAINABLY DEVELOP TSUNAMI AFFECTED REGIONS OF ACEH AND NIAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hadi Arifin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction and rehabilitation is urgently needed by Aceh, both in terms of infrastructure and its development of the economic sector. Acehnese need to face this challenge to not only reconstruct the economics of Aceh but also to reconstruct the infrastructure and to build the social life of the Acehnese people. After the tsunami, Acehnese have lost their family member and also their property. It has been three years and the reconstruction for the transformation is still going on. The primary task of transformation projects should be further intensified and the education system, infrastructure, health, social, cultural, and economic development of Acehnese need to be reconstructed. This paper tries to elaborate the political economy related to the acute problems faced by BRR and Aceh Local Government and other agencies in the region.

  16. Reasons for Supporting the Minimum Wage: Asking Signatories of the "Raise the Minimum Wage" Statement

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In October 2006, the Economic Policy Institute released a “Raise the Minimum Wage†statement signed by more than 650 individuals. Using an open-ended, non-anonymous questionnaire, we asked the signatories to explain their thinking on the issue. The questionnaire asked about the specific mechanisms at work, possible downsides, and whether the minimum wage violates liberty. Ninety-five participated. This article reports the responses. It also summarizes findings from minimum-wage surveys sin...

  17. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Spencer M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  18. Extracellular enzyme activities in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador affected by low soil P status and land-use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Alexander; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Ute, Hamer

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the enzymatic response of microorganisms in soils having a low P status and being subjected to global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change. Along a land-use sequence (natural forest - young pasture - old pasture - abandoned pasture - shrubland) in the Andes of southern Ecuador mineral topsoils of Cambisols / Umbrisols were investigated. We tested whether the activities of the six hydrolytic enzymes (cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, α-glucosidase, xylanase, acid phosphomonoesterase) were affected by nutrient status and land-use induced alterations in soil pH (pHH2O from 3.7 to 5.2), resource quantity and quality (e.g. a SOC:N:P ratio from 182:13:1 to 1050:38:1) and microbial community structure (as monitored by phospholipid fatty acids). Microbial production of acid phosphatase responded to the low P status of the sites by a higher investment in the acquisition of P compared to C. We determined three major drivers of enzyme activities: 1.) Microbial demand for P regulated the production of acid phosphatase, provided that N and C were available. At the natural forest site the two-fold higher specific activity of acid phosphatase pointed to a high microbial P-demand, whereas the production of acid phosphatase was constrained by the availability of N and DOC after pasture abandonment. 2.) Microbial biomass that was controlled by pH and resource availability (total soil N (organic and inorganic N), organic P (Bray-fraction)) was the main driver for cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase and N-acetylglucosaminidase activities. 3.) Substrate induction due to increased litter inputs of herbaceous plant species seemed to regulate α-glucosidase and xylanase activities during secondary succession. In contrast, alterations in the abundance of microbial groups affected the variation in extracellular enzyme activities only marginally. At the level of broadly defined microbial groups (PLFA), our results

  19. Minimum Wage Laws and the Distribution of Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin

    The desirability of raising the minimum wage long revolved around just one question: the effect of higher minimum wages on the overall level of employment. An even more critical effect of the minimum wage rests on the composition of employment--who gets the minimum wage job. An examination of employment in eating and drinking establishments…

  20. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground,...

  1. 49 CFR 538.5 - Minimum driving range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum driving range. 538.5 Section 538.5... Minimum driving range. (a) The minimum driving range that a passenger automobile must have in order to be... electricity. (b) The minimum driving range that a passenger automobile using electricity as an...

  2. 12 CFR 3.6 - Minimum capital ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum capital ratios. 3.6 Section 3.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MINIMUM CAPITAL RATIOS; ISSUANCE OF DIRECTIVES Minimum Capital Ratios § 3.6 Minimum capital ratios. (a) Risk-based capital ratio....

  3. Minimum and terminal velocities in projectile motion

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, E N; Riba, R

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a projectile with horizontal initial velocity V0, moving under the action of the gravitational field and a drag force is studied analytically. As it is well known, the projectile reaches a terminal velocity Vterm. There is a curious result concerning the minimum speed Vmin; it turns out that the minimum velocity is lower than the terminal one if V0 > Vterm and is lower than the initial one if V0 < Vterm. These results show that the velocity is not a monotonous function. If the initial speed is not horizontal, there is an angle range where the velocity shows the same behavior mentioned previously. Out of that range, the volocity is a monotonous function. These results come out from numerical simulations.

  4. DETERMINING MINIMUM HIKING TIME USING DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZSOLT MAGYARI-SÁSKA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Determining minimum hiking time using DEM. Minimum hiking time calculus can be used to assess the maximum area where a lost person can be. Such area delimitation can help rescue teams to efficiently organize their missions. The two well known walking time rules was used to determine, compare and correlate the obtained result in a test area. The calculated times has a high correlation coefficient which makes possible a precise conversion between Naismith and Tobler walking times. For delimiting the rescue area a graph based modeling from a raster layer was implemented using R environment. The main challenge in such a modeling is the efficient memory management as the use of Dijkstra algorithm on directional costgraph requires high memory resources.

  5. Bistable dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Wang, Shu; McCoul, David; Xing, Zhiguang; Huang, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES) can realize large angular deformations by small voltage-induced strains, which make them an attractive candidate for use as soft actuators. If the task only needs binary action, the bistable structure will be an efficient solution and can save energy because it requires only a very short duration of voltage to switch its state. To obtain bistable DEMES, a method to realize the two stable states of traditional DEMES is provided in this paper. Based on this, a type of symmetrical bistable DEMES is proposed, and the required actuation pulse duration is shorter than 0.1 s. When a suitable mass is attached to end of the DEMES, or two layers of dielectric elastomer are affixed to both sides of the primary frame, the DEMES can realize two stable states and can be switched by a suitable pulse duration. To calculate the required minimum pulse duration, a mathematical model is provided and validated by experiment.

  6. Minimum Energy Demand Locomotion on Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Kwong Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy of a space station is a precious resource, and the minimization of energy consumption of a space manipulator is crucial to maintain its normal functionalities. This paper first presents novel gaits for space manipulators by equipping a new gripping mechanism. With the use of wheels locomotion, lower energy demand gaits can be achieved. With the use of the proposed gaits, we further develop a global path planning algorithm for space manipulators which can plan a moving path on a space station with a minimum total energy demand. Different from existing approaches, we emphasize both the use of the proposed low energy demand gaits and the gaits composition during the path planning process. To evaluate the performance of the proposed gaits and path planning algorithm, numerous simulations are performed. Results show that the energy demand of both the proposed gaits and the resultant moving path is also minimum.

  7. Insertion/deletion variant (-141C Ins/Del) in the 5' regulatory region of the dopamine D2 receptor gene: lack of association with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöber, G; Jatzke, S; Heils, A; Jungkunz, G; Knapp, M; Mössner, R; Riederer, P; Lesch, K P

    1998-01-01

    A possible dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the aetiology of schizophrenic psychoses, in particular of paranoid-hallucinatory states, and of the manic episodes of bipolar affective disorder. In the present study we analysed allelic and genotypic variations of a recently described functional deletion/insertion variant (-141C Ins/Del) in the 5' flanking region of the human dopamine D2 receptor gene. We investigated a total of 620 unrelated individuals, comprising 260 schizophrenic patients, 70 patients with bipolar affective disorder, and 290 population controls. Analysis of the -141C Ins/Del variant revealed that the schizophrenic, bipolar affective and control groups did not differ significantly regarding genotype frequencies and allele frequencies. No evidence of an allelic association with either a family history of schizophrenic psychosis or a diagnosis of schizophrenia of the paranoid type (according to ICD 10) was found. Our findings indicate that the -141C Del variant in the 5' flanking region of the human dopamine D2 receptor gene is unlikely to play a substantial role in genetic predisposition to major psychiatric disorders in Caucasians.

  8. Regional and field-specific factors affect the composition of fusarium head blight pathogens in subtropical no-till wheat agroecosystem of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ponte, Emerson M; Spolti, Piérri; Ward, Todd J; Gomes, Larissa B; Nicolli, Camila P; Kuhnem, Paulo R; Silva, Cleiltan N; Tessmann, Dauri J

    2015-02-01

    A multiyear survey of >200 wheat fields in Paraná (PR) and Rio Grande do Sul (RS) states was conducted to assess the extent and distribution of Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) diversity in the southern Brazilian wheat agroecosystem. Five species and three trichothecene genotypes were found among 671 FGSC isolates from Fusarium head blight (FHB)-infected wheat heads: F. graminearum (83%) of the 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) genotype, F. meridionale (12.8%) and F. asiaticum (0.4%) of the nivalenol (NIV) genotype, and F. cortaderiae (2.5%) and F. austroamericanum (0.9%) with either the NIV or the 3-ADON genotype. Regional differences in FGSC composition were observed, with F. meridionale and the NIV type being significantly (P28%) than in RS (≤9%). Within RS, F. graminearum was overrepresented in fields below 600 m in elevation and in fields with higher levels of FHB incidence (Pcomposition was not significantly influenced by previous crop or the stage of grain development at sampling. Habitat-specific differences in FGSC composition were evaluated in three fields by characterizing a total of 189 isolates collected from corn stubble, air above the wheat canopy, and symptomatic wheat kernels. Significant differences in FGSC composition were observed among these habitats (P96%) of isolates from corn stubble, whereas F. graminearum with the 15-ADON genotype was dominant (>84%) among isolates from diseased wheat kernels. Potential differences in pathogenic fitness on wheat were also suggested by a greenhouse competitiveness assay in which F. graminearum was recovered at much higher frequency (>90%) than F. meridionale from four wheat varieties inoculated with an equal mixture of F. graminearum and F. meridionale isolates. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that FGSC composition and, consequently, the trichothecene contamination in wheat grown in southern Brazil is influenced by host adaptation and pathogenic fitness. Evidence that F

  9. Imaging cortical activity following affective stimulation with a high temporal and spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catani Claudia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The affective and motivational relevance of a stimulus has a distinct impact on cortical processing, particularly in sensory areas. However, the spatial and temporal dynamics of this affective modulation of brain activities remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was the development of a paradigm to investigate the affective modulation of cortical networks with a high temporal and spatial resolution. We assessed cortical activity with MEG using a visual steady-state paradigm with affective pictures. A combination of a complex demodulation procedure with a minimum norm estimation was applied to assess the temporal variation of the topography of cortical activity. Results Statistical permutation analyses of the results of the complex demodulation procedure revealed increased steady-state visual evoked field amplitudes over occipital areas following presentation of affective pictures compared to neutral pictures. This differentiation shifted in the time course from occipital regions to parietal and temporal regions. Conclusion It can be shown that stimulation with affective pictures leads to an enhanced activity in occipital region as compared to neutral pictures. However, the focus of differentiation is not stable over time but shifts into temporal and parietal regions within four seconds of stimulation. Thus, it can be crucial to carefully choose regions of interests and time intervals when analyzing the affective modulation of cortical activity.

  10. DAMPAK TENAGA KERJA SEKTOR INDUSTRI TERHADAP PRODUK DOMESTIK REGIONAL BRUTO,PAJAK, INVESTASI, DAN UPAH DI KOTA BATAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Gamot Malau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Labor becomes problem without the availability of jobs. Batam is a city with high employment rate, especially in industrial sector. The purpose of this article was to observed factors that affect the employment sector, labor supply, and regional minimum wage. The model allegedly using the method of Two Stage Least Squares (2SLS. Overall the results indicated that the level of minimum wage make a significant contribution to the formation of labor supply compared to the productive population. The level of investment was very responsive in affecting labor demand sector in both the short and long term. If there is governments policy of raising the minimum wage by 20%, the impact on the labor supply will be increased by 2.1036%, the opposite will decrease the demand for labor by 0.5898% and a decrease in the minimum wage for the city of Batam by 0. 2753%. Tenaga kerja menjadi suatu masalah apabila tidak dibarengi dengan ketersediaan lapangan kerja. Salah satu kota dengan penyerapan tenaga kerja sangat tinggi adalah kota Batam, terutama pada sektor industri. Tujuan artikel ini untuk melihat faktor yang mempengaruhi penyerapan tenaga kerja sektor industri, penawaran tenaga kerja sektor industri, dan upah minimum regional Kota Batam. Model diduga dengan mengunakan metode Two Stage Least Squares (2SLS. Secara keseluruhan hasil menunjukkan bahwa tingkat upah minimum kota Batam memberikan kontribusi cukup besar kepada pembentukan penawaran tenaga kerja dibanding jumlah penduduk produktif. Tingkat investasi sangat responsif mempengaruhi permintaan tenaga kerja sektor industri baik untuk jangka pendek maupun jangka panjang. Bila pemerintah membuat kebijakan dengan menaikkan upah minimum regional sebesar 20%, hal ini akan berdampak pada peningkatan penawaran tenaga kerja sebesar 2,1036%, sebaliknya akan menurunkan tingkat permintaan tenaga kerja sebesar 0,5898 % dan berdampak pada penurunan upah minimum kota Batam sebesar 0,2753%.

  11. Minimum quality standards and international trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltzer, Kenneth Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of a non-discriminating minimum quality standard (MQS) on trade and welfare when the market is characterized by imperfect competition and asymmetric information. A simple partial equilibrium model of an international Cournot duopoly is presented in which...... prefer different levels of regulation. As a result, international trade disputes are likely to arise even when regulation is non-discriminating....

  12. Proposed production test for reducing minimum downtime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaklevick, J.F.

    1961-11-29

    The object of the production test described in this report is to evaluate the operational aspects of a proposed method for reducing minimum downtime. The excess xenon poisoning, which occurs during the first 32--38 hours after the shutdown of a reactor from present equilibrium levels, will be partially overridden by a central enriched zone whose added reactivity contribution would be compensated during normal operation by means of poison splines.

  13. Minimum Description Length Shape and Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling is reviewed. It solves the point correspondence problem of selecting points on shapes defined as curves so that the points correspond across a data set. An efficient numerical implementation is presented and made available as open s...... source Matlab code. The problems with the early MDL approaches are discussed. Finally the MDL approach is extended to an MDL Appearance Model, which is proposed as a means to perform unsupervised image segmentation....

  14. Minimum degree and density of binary sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Müttel, J.; Rautenbach, D.

    2010-01-01

    For d,k∈N with k ≤ 2d, let g(d,k) denote the infimum density of binary sequences (x)∈{0,1} which satisfy the minimum degree condition σ(x+) ≥ k for all i∈Z with xi=1. We reduce the problem of computing g(d,k) to a combinatorial problem related to the generalized k-girth of a graph G which...

  15. Time crystals from minimum time uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal, Mir; Khalil, Mohammed M.; Das, Saurya

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal. As an application of our formalism, we analyze the effect of such a deformation on the rate of spontaneous emission in a hydrogen atom.

  16. Time crystals from minimum time uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir [University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Khalil, Mohammed M. [Alexandria University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Alexandria (Egypt); Das, Saurya [University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal. As an application of our formalism, we analyze the effect of such a deformation on the rate of spontaneous emission in a hydrogen atom. (orig.)

  17. Prion protein gene heterogeneity in free-ranging white-tailed deer within the chronic wasting disease affected region of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad; Johnson, Jody; Clayton, Murray; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd

    2003-07-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) was first identified in Wisconsin (USA) in whitetailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in February 2002. To determine if prion protein gene (Prnp) allelic variability was associated with CWD in white-tailed deer from Wisconsin, we sequenced Prnp from 26 CWD-positive and 100 CWD-negative deer. Sequence analysis of Prnp suggests that at least 86-96% of the white-tailed deer in this region have Prnp allelic combinations that will support CWD infection. Four Prnp alleles were identified in the deer population, one of which, resulting in a glutamine to histidine change at codon 95, has not been previously reported. The predominant allele in the population encodes for glutamine at codon 95, glycine at codon 96, and serine at codon 138 (QGS). Less abundant alleles encoded QSS, QGN, and HGS at the three variable positions. Comparison of CWD-positive with CWD-negative deer suggested a trend towards an over-representation of the QGS allele and an under-representation of the QSS allele.

  18. Regional thermal specialisation in a mammal: temperature affects power output of core muscle more than that of peripheral muscle in adult mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Rob S; Tallis, Jason; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    In endotherms, such as mammals and birds, internal organs can specialise to function within a narrow thermal range. Consequently, these organs should become more sensitive to changes in body temperature. Yet, organs at the periphery of the body still experience considerable fluctuations in temperature, which could select for lower thermal sensitivity. We hypothesised that the performance of soleus muscle taken from the leg would depend less on temperature than would the performance of diaphragm muscle taken from the body core. Soleus and diaphragm muscles were isolated from mice and subjected to isometric and work-loop studies to analyse mechanical performance at temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Across this thermal range, soleus muscle took longer to generate isometric force and longer to relax, and tended to produce greater normalised maximal force (stress) than did diaphragm muscle. The time required to produce half of maximal force during isometric tetanus and the time required to relax half of maximal force were both more sensitive to temperature in soleus than they were in diaphragm. However, thermal sensitivities of maximal force during isometric tetani were similar for both muscles. Consistent with our hypothesis, power output (the product of speed and force) was greater in magnitude and more thermally sensitive in diaphragm than it was in soleus. Our findings, when combined with previous observations of muscles from regionally endothermic fish, suggest that endothermy influences the thermal sensitivities of power output in core and peripheral muscles.

  19. Factors Affecting Elevated Arsenic and Methyl Mercury Concentrations in Small Shield Lakes Surrounding Gold Mines near the Yellowknife, NT, (Canada) Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Adam James; D'Onofrio, Rebecca; Kokelj, Steven V; Blais, Jules M

    2016-01-01

    Gold mines in the Yellowknife, NT, region--in particular, the Giant Mine--operated from 1949-99, releasing 237,000 tonnes of waste arsenic trioxide (As2O3) dust, among other compounds, from gold ore extraction and roasting processes. For the first time, we show the geospatial distribution of roaster-derived emissions of several chemical species beyond the mine property on otherwise undisturbed taiga shield lakes within a 25 km radius of the mine, 11 years after its closing. Additionally, we demonstrate that underlying bedrock is not a significant source for the elevated concentrations in overlying surface waters. Aquatic arsenic (As) concentrations are well above guidelines for drinking water (10 μg/L) and protection for aquatic life (5 μg/L), ranging up to 136 μg/L in lakes within 4 km from the mine, to 2.0 μg/L in lakes 24 km away. High conversion ratios of methyl mercury were shown in lakes near the roaster stack as well, with MeHg concentrations reaching 44% of total mercury. The risk of elevated exposures by these metals is significant, as many lakes used for recreation and fishing near the City of Yellowknife are within this radius of elevated As and methyl Hg concentrations.

  20. Factors Affecting Elevated Arsenic and Methyl Mercury Concentrations in Small Shield Lakes Surrounding Gold Mines near the Yellowknife, NT, (Canada Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam James Houben

    Full Text Available Gold mines in the Yellowknife, NT, region--in particular, the Giant Mine--operated from 1949-99, releasing 237,000 tonnes of waste arsenic trioxide (As2O3 dust, among other compounds, from gold ore extraction and roasting processes. For the first time, we show the geospatial distribution of roaster-derived emissions of several chemical species beyond the mine property on otherwise undisturbed taiga shield lakes within a 25 km radius of the mine, 11 years after its closing. Additionally, we demonstrate that underlying bedrock is not a significant source for the elevated concentrations in overlying surface waters. Aquatic arsenic (As concentrations are well above guidelines for drinking water (10 μg/L and protection for aquatic life (5 μg/L, ranging up to 136 μg/L in lakes within 4 km from the mine, to 2.0 μg/L in lakes 24 km away. High conversion ratios of methyl mercury were shown in lakes near the roaster stack as well, with MeHg concentrations reaching 44% of total mercury. The risk of elevated exposures by these metals is significant, as many lakes used for recreation and fishing near the City of Yellowknife are within this radius of elevated As and methyl Hg concentrations.

  1. Regional probabilistic risk assessment of heavy metals in different environmental media and land uses: An urbanization-affected drinking water supply area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chi; Cai, Yimin; Wang, Tieyu; Xiao, Rongbo; Chen, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we proposed a Regional Probabilistic Risk Assessment (RPRA) to estimate the health risks of exposing residents to heavy metals in different environmental media and land uses. The mean and ranges of heavy metal concentrations were measured in water, sediments, soil profiles and surface soils under four land uses along the Shunde Waterway, a drinking water supply area in China. Hazard quotients (HQs) were estimated for various exposure routes and heavy metal species. Riverbank vegetable plots and private vegetable plots had 95th percentiles of total HQs greater than 3 and 1, respectively, indicating high risks of cultivation on the flooded riverbank. Vegetable uptake and leaching to groundwater were the two transfer routes of soil metals causing high health risks. Exposure risks during outdoor recreation, farming and swimming along the Shunde Waterway are theoretically safe. Arsenic and cadmium were identified as the priority pollutants that contribute the most risk among the heavy metals. Sensitivity analysis showed that the exposure route, variations in exposure parameters, mobility of heavy metals in soil, and metal concentrations all influenced the risk estimates.

  2. Leaf age affects the quality of DNA extracted from Dimorphandra mollis (Fabaceae), a tropical tree species from the Cerrado region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, P A; Oliveira, D A

    2011-03-01

    Isolation of high-quality DNA from plants, especially plants from the Cerrado, is notoriously difficult because of polysaccharides and secondary compounds produced by plants from this biome. DNA isolation and its quality may be compromised by chemical defenses such as tannins and phenols. Quantitative plant defenses tend to have a cumulative effect, increasing in concentration during leaf development, reducing DNA quality extracted in mature compared to young leaves. We report the effect of leaf age on DNA extraction of Dimorphandra mollis. Our working hypothesis was that the young leaves have more DNA than old leaves of the same individual because chemical defenses accumulate in older leaves. Young and old leaves were sampled from eight mature trees as well as leaves from eight seedlings in the north region of Minas Gerais State. Genomic DNA extraction followed the standard CTAB procedure. DNA isolation was very successful from young leaves of 16 individuals of D. mollis. The extracted DNA exhibited high quality and the DNA quantity was also high, with an A(260)/A(280) ratio above 1.8, which is within the optimal sample range. In contrast, DNA isolation from old leaves was not successful. When the DNA was extracted from old leaves, the DNA was brownish, indicating contamination by phenolic compounds. These metabolites oxidize the DNA irreversibly, which hinders amplification of DNA by PCR by inhibiting the action of enzymes such as Taq polymerase. PCR performed with DNA from young leaves of D. mollis was successful and produced strong bands for RAPD markers.

  3. Morphology and physical properties of soil material in cryogenic cracks of permafrost-affected meadow-chernozemic soils of the Trans-Baikal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybenov, Yu. B.; Chimitdorzhieva, G. D.; Chimitdorzhieva, E. O.; Egorova, R. A.; Mil'kheev, E. Yu.; Davydova, T. V.; Korsunova, Ts. D.-Ts.

    2016-08-01

    Meadow-chernozemic soils (Turbic Chernozems Molliglossic) in the western Trans-Baikal Region are dissected by large cryogenic cracks penetrating to the depth of 100-120 cm and filled with humified material. The depth of humus pockets is 50-80 cm, and their width in the upper part is 50-90 cm. The lower boundary of most of the humus pockets lies at the depth of 60-70 cm. The development of cryogenic cracks proceeded due to their penetration into the frozen ground, which is evidenced by their sharply narrowing lower part. The fraction of physical clay (humus content in this material. The contents of humus and adsorbed bases sharply decrease down through the soil profile in the soil mass between the cracks and remain relatively stable in the material filling the cracks. The soil mass in humus pockets is less compact that that in the background soil mass at the same depth, which is explained by the higher humus content in the pockets. Humified soil material in the pockets is also characterized by a higher porosity and, hence, higher water permeability than the surrounding soil mass.

  4. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  5. What causes geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, Boian; Georgieva, Katya; Obridko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The average geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum has been continuously decreasing in the last four cycles. The geomagnetic activity is caused by both interplanetary disturbances - coronal mass ejections and high speed solar wind streams, and the background solar wind over which these disturbances ride. We show that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum does not depend on the number and parameters of coronal mass ejections or high speed solar wind streams, but on the background solar wind. The background solar wind has two components: slower and faster. The source of the slower component is the heliospheric current sheet, and of the faster one the polar coronal holes. It is supposed that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum is determined by the thickness of the heliospheric current sheet which is related to the portions of time the Earth spends in slow and in fast solar wind. We demonstrate that it is also determined by the parameters of these two components of the background solar wind which v...

  6. The minimum entropy principle and task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Gorin, Hillary; Huschen, Samuel; Peters, Natalie E; Fabisch, Megan; Poston, Kirsten; Weinberger, Kelsey

    2013-07-01

    According to the minimum entropy principle, efficient cognitive performance is produced with a neurocognitive strategy that involves a minimum of degrees of freedom. Although high performance is often regarded as consistent performance as well, some variability in performance still remains which allows the person to adapt to changing goal conditions or fatigue. The present study investigated the connection between performance, entropy in performance, and four task-switching strategies. Fifty-one undergraduates performed 7 different computer-based cognitive tasks producing sets of 49 responses under instructional conditions requiring task quotas or no quotas. The temporal patterns of performance were analyzed using orbital decomposition to extract pattern types and lengths, which were then compared with regard to Shannon entropy, topological entropy, and overall performance. Task switching strategies from a previous study were available for the same participants as well. Results indicated that both topological entropy and Shannon entropy were negatively correlated with performance. Some task-switching strategies produced lower entropy in performance than others. Stepwise regression showed that the top three predictors of performance were Shannon entropy and arithmetic and spatial abilities. Additional implications for the prediction of work performance with cognitive ability measurements and the applicability of the minimum entropy principle to multidimensional performance criteria and team work are discussed.

  7. Optimizing Reactors Selection and Sequencing:Minimum Cost versus Minimum Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachid Chebbi

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation targets minimum cost of reactors in series for the case of one single chemical reaction, considering plug flow and stirred tank reactor(s) in the sequence of flow reactors. Using Guthrie’s cost correlations three typical cases were considered based on the profile of the reaction rate reciprocal versus conversion. Significant differences were found compared to the classical approach targeting minimum total reactor volume.

  8. Asymmetric variability between maximum and minimum temperatures in Northeastern Tibetan Plateau: Evidence from tree rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Ecological systems in the headwaters of the Yellow River, characterized by hash natural environmental conditions, are very vulnerable to climatic change. In the most recent decades, this area greatly attracted the public's attention for its more and more deteriorating environmental conditions. Based on tree-ring samples from the Xiqing Mountain and A'nyêmagên Mountains at the headwaters of the Yellow River in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau, we reconstructed the minimum temperatures in the winter half year over the last 425 years and the maximum temperatures in the summer half year over the past 700 years in this region. The variation of minimum temperature in the winter half year during the time span of 1578-1940 was a relatively stable trend, which was followed by an abrupt warming trend since 1941. However, there is no significant warming trend for the maximum temperature in the summer half year over the 20th century. The asymmetric variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures were observed in this study over the past 425 years. During the past 425 years, there are similar variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures; however, the minimum temperatures vary about 25 years earlier compared to the maximum temperatures. If such a trend of variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures over the past 425 years continues in the future 30 years, the maximum temperature in this region will increase significantly.

  9. Asymmetric variability between maximum and minimum temperatures in Northeastern Tibetan Plateau:Evidence from tree rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacoby; GORDON

    2008-01-01

    Ecological systems in the headwaters of the Yellow River, characterized by hash natural environmental conditions, are very vulnerable to climatic change. In the most recent decades, this area greatly attracted the public’s attention for its more and more deteriorating environmental conditions. Based on tree-ring samples from the Xiqing Mountain and A’nyêmagên Mountains at the headwaters of the Yellow River in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau, we reconstructed the minimum temperatures in the winter half year over the last 425 years and the maximum temperatures in the summer half year over the past 700 years in this region. The variation of minimum temperature in the winter half year during the time span of 1578―1940 was a relatively stable trend, which was followed by an abrupt warming trend since 1941. However, there is no significant warming trend for the maximum temperature in the summer half year over the 20th century. The asymmetric variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures were observed in this study over the past 425 years. During the past 425 years, there are similar variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures; however, the minimum temperatures vary about 25 years earlier compared to the maximum temperatures. If such a trend of variation patterns between the minimum and maximum temperatures over the past 425 years continues in the future 30 years, the maximum temperature in this region will increase significantly.

  10. Stand, tree and crown variables affecting cone crop and seed yield of Aleppo pine forests in different bio climatic regions of Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayari, A.; Zubizarreta-Gerendiain, A.; Tome, M.; Gaqrchi, S.; Henchi, B.

    2012-11-01

    In Tunisia, the Aleppo pine seed has a great importance, since in the last decades human consumption has risen considerable. Thus its regeneration and seed production capacities are important factors to take into account to reach the necessities of the country. To study the production of cones and seeds of Aleppo pine, Tunisias native Aleppo pine forests were surveyed in summer 2006, using 79 plots (40 × 25 m: 1,000 m²) spread over four bioclimatic zones. Stand and tree characteristics, crown dimensions and cone/seed variables were measured from an average tree of each plot (i.e. a total of 79 trees). Recorded data were submitted to simple and multiple regression analyses for explaining the variability in crown volume and crown surface, cone number and seed yield per average tree. Results showed a negative correlation between the stand density, crown characteristics and number of cones and seeds harvested from the average tree. For crown volume and surface, age, stand density, tree height, diameter at breast height, crown diameter and crown height were important explanatory variables under multiple regression analyses. For cone number per tree, only the age, stand density and total height were the most determinant variables. Matures cone number per tree and cone mass per tree were the most informative parameters for the total seed yields per tree. Finally, forest managers should know that crown size affects cone and seed crop of the Aleppo pine individual tree grown in Tunisia, but has no effects on seed number per cone and seed mass per cone. (Author) 50 refs.

  11. Regionalism, Regionalization and Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu C. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained development is a concept associating other concepts, in its turn, in the EU practice, e.g. regionalism, regionalizing and afferent policies, here including structural policies. This below text, dedicated to integration concepts, will limit on the other hand to regionalizing, otherwise an aspect typical to Europe and to the EU. On the other hand, two aspects come up to strengthen this field of ideas, i.e. the region (al-regionalism-(regional development triplet has either its own history or precise individual outline of terms.

  12. The Wage and Employment Dynamics of Minimum Wage Workers

    OpenAIRE

    William E. Even; Macpherson, David A.

    2004-01-01

    This study uses 20 years of short panel data sets on minimum wage workers to examine the wage and employment dynamics of minimum wage workers. Compared to workers earning above the minimum wage, minimum wage workers differ substantially in several ways. First, minimum wage workers are much more likely to be new entrants and much more likely to exit the labor market. Second, changes in industry and occupation and access to job training are particularly important to improving the wages of minim...

  13. Determination of optimum minimum flow from a dam by using energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James B.; McKellar, Henry N.

    1984-07-01

    The proposed restoration of an abandoned hydroelectric dam on the Quinebaug River, Connecticut, is studied using energy analysis. The analysis considers the effects of alternative minimum flow releases, ranging from 0 to 34 cubic meters per second (cms), on the total energy flow of the affected system. The principal system components affected by differing minimum flows are hydroelectric power generation, aquatic habitat, and gross aquatic ecosystem productivity. The minimum flow alternative resulting in the highest annual energy flow in the affected system is considered optimal. From this purely analytical point of view, the optimum minimum flow is 0 cms, due to the short length and low productivity of the regulated reach, and the lack of floodplain interactions. Simulations of longer and more productive river reaches were conducted. For very short, unproductive reaches, in the absence of a floodplain, the contribution of aquatic community productivity to total system energy flow is negligible compared to hydroelectric generation. Optimum minimum flows are higher for longer and more productive reaches. For such cases the operation of hydroelectric dams could reduce total system energy flow because the energy supplied by hydroelectric generation may be offset by losses in aquatic productivity due to diminished riverine habitat.

  14. Polymorphisms in the promoter region of the human class II alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4) gene affect both transcriptional activity and ethanol metabolism in Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yukiko; Nishimura, Fusae T; Abe, Shuntaro; Fukunaga, Tatsushige; Tanii, Hideji; Saijoh, Kiyofumi

    2009-02-01

    Class II alcohol dehydrogenase (pi-ADH), encoded by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4), is considered to contribute to ethanol (EtOH) oxidation in the liver at high concentration. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in the promoter region of this gene. Analysis of genotype distribution in 102 unrelated Japanese subjects revealed that four loci were in strong linkage disequilibrium and could be classified into three haplotypes. The effects of these polymorphisms on transcriptional activity were investigated in HepG2 cells. Transcriptional activity was significantly higher in cells with the -136A allele than in those with the -136C allele. To investigate whether this difference in transcriptional activity caused a difference in EtOH elimination, previous data on blood EtOH changes after 0.4 g/kg body weight alcohol ingestion were analyzed. When analyzed based on aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 gene (ALDH2) (487)Glu/Lys genotype, the significantly lower level of EtOH at peak in subjects with -136C/A and -136A/A genotype compared with subjects with -136C/C genotype indicated that -136 bp was a suggestive locus for differences in EtOH oxidation. This effect was observed only in subjects with ALDH2 (487)Glu/Glu. These results suggested that the SNP at -136bp in the ADH4 promoter had an effect on transcriptional regulation, and that the higher activity of the -136A allele compared with the -136C allele caused a lower level of blood EtOH after alcohol ingestion; that is, individuals with the -136A allele may consume more EtOH and might have a higher risk for development of alcohol dependence than those without the -136A allele.

  15. Developmental exposure to PBDE 99 and PCB affects estrogen sensitivity of target genes in rat brain regions and female sexual behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtensteiger, W.; Faass, O.; Ceccatelli, R.; Schlumpf, M. [Zurich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Pharmacology and Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    We recently reported effects of PBDE99 (2,2',4,4'5-pentabromoBDE) on sexual differentiation processes in rat reproductive organs and central nervous system. These studies were prompted by reports on an increase of PBDE levels in human milk, an indicator of the body burden of pregnant women and of potential exposure of the nursing infant, during the last decade. Even higher human adipose tissue and milk levels were reported for North America. PBDE99 is present in human and animal samples and exhibits developmental neurotoxicity in mice. The developing brain is subject to the organizing action of estradiol locally formed from circulating testosterone, and thus represents a target for endocrine active chemicals. One molecular mechanism by which chemicals may interfere with sexual brain differentiation, may be a change in the expression of sex hormone (estrogen)-regulated genes. Such effects may manifest themselves in mRNA expression levels, or in the sensitivity of the genes to estrogen. In order to detect alterations of the latter, more subtle parameter, we have conducted experiments in developmentally chemical-exposed rat offspring that were gonadectomized in adulthood and injected with a challenge dose of estradiol. Effects of PBDE99 were compared with those of a commercial PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254, which had previously been found to influence sexual brain differentiation. We analyzed the expression of estrogen-regulated genes in ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO), two brain regions that are part of a network involved in the integration of environmental cues, sexual behavior and gonadal function. Since prominent changes were observed in VMH which is particularly important for female sexual behavior, the study was completed by a behavioral analysis.

  16. Factors affecting adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability of the Redesigned Community Health Fund in Tanzania: a mixed methods protocol for process evaluation in the Dodoma region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Kalolo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the implementation of various initiatives to address low enrollment in voluntary micro health insurance (MHI schemes in sub-Saharan Africa, the problem of low enrollment remains unresolved. The lack of process evaluations of such interventions makes it difficult to ascertain whether their poor results are because of design failures or implementation weaknesses. Objective: In this paper, we describe a process evaluation protocol aimed at opening the ‘black box’ to evaluate the implementation processes of the Redesigned Community Health Fund (CHF program in the Dodoma region of Tanzania. Design: The study employs a cross-sectional mixed methods design and is being carried out 3 years after the launch of the Redesigned CHF program. The study is grounded in a conceptual framework which rests on the Diffusion of Innovation Theory and the Implementation Fidelity Framework. The study utilizes a mixture of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools (questionnaires, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and document review, and aligns the evaluation to the Theory of Intervention developed by our team. Quantitative data will be used to measure program adoption, implementation fidelity, and their moderating factors. Qualitative data will be used to explore the responses of stakeholders to the intervention, contextual factors, and moderators of adoption, implementation fidelity, and sustainability. Discussion: This protocol describes a systematic process evaluation in relation to the implementation of a reformed MHI. We trust that the theoretical approaches and methodologies described in our protocol may be useful to inform the design of future process evaluations focused on the assessment of complex interventions, such as MHI schemes.

  17. Alanine Mutagenesis in the Complementarity Determining Region 3 of the MTB and HIV-1 Peptide-Bispecific T Cell Receptor Beta Chain Affects Ligand Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ying Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis/human immunodeficiency virus (MTB/HIV coinfection presents a special challenge to the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. Adoptive transfer of high-affinity T cell receptor (TCR gene-modified T cells against MTB and HIV antigens is a promising approach to treating MTB/HIV coinfected patients whose cellular immunity is obviously disordered. We have previously successfully identified that a bispecific TCR screened out from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a HLA-A*0201+ healthy individual using the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3 spectratype analysis recognizes both MTB Ag85B199–207 and HIV-1 Env120–128 peptide. However, it has not been known how residues on CDR3 loops, which have been shown to play a leading role in antigen binding and specificity contribute to the bispecific TCR contact with the peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC complexes. In this study, we provided an extensive investigation of residues in the predicted CDR3 of the bispecific TCR beta (β chain using alanine scanning mutagenesis. Our data showed that three of the five substituted residues (G115A, T116A, A117G in CDR3β of the bispecific TCR caused a significantly diminished T cell response to antigen, whereas the remaining two substituted residues (D114A, S118A resulted in completely eliminated response, thus identifying the two residues that were particularly critical for the recognition of peptide–MHC in the bispecific TCR. These findings will provide an imperative foundation for generating an improved high-affinity bispecific TCR for use in T cell adoptive immunotherapy for MTB/HIV coinfected individuals.

  18. Factors affecting the component community structure of haemoparasites in bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) from the Mazury Lake District region of Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, A; Pawelczyk, A; Behnke, J M; Gilbert, F S; Sinski, E

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence and abundance of infections with haemoparasites were studied over a 3 year period in Clethrionomys glareolus (bank vole, n = 420) sampled from forests in the NE of Poland. Total species richness was 5 (Prevalence = Haemobartonella sp. 63.1%, Bartonella grahamii 27.4%, Hepatozoon erhardovae 31.4%, Trypanosoma evotomys 15% and Babesia microti 1.0%) with 81.9% of the voles carrying at least 1 species and a mean infracommunity species richness of 1.4. Variation in species richness was determined primarily by season and year, and the interaction of these factors. The observed frequency distribution of infracommunity species richness did not differ from that predicted by a null model, suggesting that there were no marked associations between the species. Analyses of prevalence and abundance of infection with each species in turn, revealed that overall the principal causes of variation were temporal and seasonal and their interaction, intrinsic factors such as age and sex playing only a minor role. However, the relative importance of specific extrinsic, and rarely intrinsic, factors varied and was distinct for each of the species in the study. Prevalence data revealed 4 sets of 2-way associations between species, mostly varyingly dependent on combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Analysis of quantitative associations suggested 4 sets of positive 2-way interactions, 3 of which remained after controlling for the effect of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on the abundance of each species, but only one could be unequivocally accepted (Haemobartonella sp. +B. grahamii) after correction for multiple comparisons. These data are discussed in the context of the changing ecological profiles in this region of Eastern Europe and, in a wider context, in relation to current understanding of the factors which shape component community structures of haemoparasites in wild rodents.

  19. Threat Perception and Attitudes of Adolescents Towards Re-Introduced Wild Animals: A qualitative study of young learners from affected regions in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Nadin; Menzel, Susanne

    2013-12-01

    Conservation efforts such as the restoration of European bison or the support of wolf immigration into Germany are often socio-scientifically controversial. In many cases, disputes are based on individuals' threat perception and attitudes towards the animal involved. The herewith reported study provides qualitative insights into German adolescents' (n = 31, Mage = 16.6 years) attitudes towards animal reintroduction, their threat and coping appraisal about wildlife and their knowledge of local endangered species. We found that students had rather limited knowledge of local endangered species. After Kellert's categories of animal attitudes, the adolescents showed a strong moralistic view on wildlife return. Naturalistic, ecologistic and utilitarian views were also strongly apparent. According to the Protection Motivation Theory, perceived threats could be identified as threats to animals on the one hand and threats to human interests on the other. Such threat perceptions often lead to a dilemma, which made it difficult to decide upon the priorities of wildlife protection versus protection of human interests. Coping mechanism to reduce threats to human interests as mentioned by the participants included restrictions of the animal as well as strategies that focused on responsibility by humans. Regarding coping mechanism to prevent the species' extinction, participants showed a relatively superficial understanding. Furthermore, we found that participants from regions where wolves are currently immigrating or European bison are being reintroduced showed a more positive understanding of the respective animal. Our findings are discussed in the light of this topic's potential as an example of a real-life socio-scientific issue in classroom discussions.

  20. Land use and climate affect Black Tern, Northern Harrier, and Marsh Wren abundance in the Prairie Pothole Region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcey, Greg M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Linz, George M.; McKann, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Bird populations are influenced by many environmental factors at both large and small scales. Our study evaluated the influences of regional climate and land-use variables on the Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus), Black Tern (Childonias niger), and Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris) in the prairie potholes of the upper Midwest of the United States. These species were chosen because their diverse habitat preference represent the spectrum of habitat conditions present in the Prairie Potholes, ranging from open prairies to dense cattail marshes. We evaluated land-use covariates at three logarithmic spatial scales (1,000 ha, 10,000 ha, and 100,000 ha) and constructed models a priori using information from published habitat associations and climatic influences. The strongest influences on the abundance of each of the three species were the percentage of wetland area across all three spatial scales and precipitation in the year preceding that when bird surveys were conducted. Even among scales ranging over three orders of magnitude the influence of spatial scale was small, as models with the same variables expressed at different scales were often in the best model subset. Examination of the effects of large-scale environmental variables on wetland birds elucidated relationships overlooked in many smaller-scale studies, such as the influences of climate and habitat variables at landscape scales. Given the spatial variation in the abundance of our focal species within the prairie potholes, our model predictions are especially useful for targeting locations, such as northeastern South Dakota and central North Dakota, where management and conservation efforts would be optimally beneficial. This modeling approach can also be applied to other species and geographic areas to focus landscape conservation efforts and subsequent small-scale studies, especially in constrained economic climates.

  1. 29 CFR 516.2 - Employees subject to minimum wage or minimum wage and overtime provisions pursuant to section 6...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees subject to minimum wage or minimum wage and... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS RECORDS TO BE KEPT BY EMPLOYERS General Requirements § 516.2 Employees subject to minimum wage or minimum wage...

  2. A Minimum-energy Path-preserving Topology Control Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Zhao Lin; Xian Zhou; Yun Li

    2009-01-01

    The topology control strategies of wireless sensor networks are very important for reducing the energy consumption of sensor nodes and prolonging the life-span of networks. In this paper, we put forward a minimum-energy path-preserving topology control (MPTC) algorithm based on a concept of none k-redundant edges. MPTC not only resolves the problem of excessive energy consumption because of the unclosed region in small minimum-energy communication network (SMECN), but also preserves at least one minimum-energy path between every pair of nodes in a wireless sensor network. We also propose an energy-efficient reconfiguration protocol that maintains the minimum-energy path property in the case where the network topology changes dynamically. Finally, we demonstrate the performance improvements of our algorithm through simulation.

  3. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet G; Petrie, Gordon; Riley, Pete

    2013-05-01

    The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is 'typical' solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  4. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet G. Luhmann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is ‘typical’ solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  5. Assisted Reproductive Technology affects developmental kinetics, H19 Imprinting Control Region methylation and H19 gene expression in individual mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandolo Luisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last few years, an increase in imprinting anomalies has been reported in children born from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART. Various clinical and experimental studies also suggest alterations of embryo development after ART. Therefore, there is a need for studying early epigenetic anomalies which could result from ART manipulations, especially on single embryos. In this study, we evaluated the impact of superovulation, in vitro fertilization (IVF and embryo culture conditions on proper genomic imprinting and blastocyst development in single mouse embryos. In this study, different experimental groups were established to obtain embryos from superovulated and non-superovulated females, either from in vivo or in vitro fertilized oocytes, themselves grown in vitro or not. The embryos were cultured either in M16 medium or in G1.2/G2.2 sequential medium. The methylation status of H19 Imprinting Control Region (ICR and H19 promoter was assessed, as well as the gene expression level of H19, in individual blastocysts. In parallel, we have evaluated embryo cleavage kinetics and recorded morphological data. Results We show that: 1. The culture medium influences early embryo development with faster cleavage kinetics for culture in G1.2/G2.2 medium compared to M16 medium. 2. Epigenetic alterations of the H19 ICR and H19 PP are influenced by the fertilization method since methylation anomalies were observed only in the in vitro fertilized subgroup, however to different degrees according to the culture medium. 3. Superovulation clearly disrupted H19 gene expression in individual blastocysts. Moreover, when embryos were cultured in vitro after either in vivo or in vitro fertilization, the percentage of blastocysts which expressed H19 was higher in G1.2/G2.2 medium compared to M16. Conclusion Compared to previous reports utilizing pools of embryos, our study enables us to emphasize a high individual variability of blastocysts in

  6. Environmental stress affects DNA methylation of a CpG rich promoter region of serotonin transporter gene in a nurse cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka S Alasaari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shift-working nurses are exposed to a stressful work environment, which puts them at an increased risk for burnout and depression. We explored the effect of environmental stress on serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 promoter methylation among nurses from high and low work stress environments. METHODOLOGY: Using bisulfite sequencing, we investigated the methylation status of five CpG residues of a CpG-rich region in the promoter of SLC6A4 by comparing female shift working nurses from a high work stress environment (n = 24 to low work stress environment (n = 25. We also analyzed the association of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism at 5' end of SLC6A4. Work stress was assessed by the Karasek's Model and possible signs of burnout or depression were measured by the Maslach Burnout Index General Survey and Beck Depression Index. Methylation levels were assessed by bisulfite sequencing of DNA extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. Restriction enzyme treatment followed by standard PCR was used to identify 5-HTTLPR genotypes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that nurses in the high stress environment had significantly lower promoter methylation levels at all five CpG residues compared to nurses in the low stress environment (p<0.01. There was no significant interaction of 5-HTTLPR genotype and work stress with methylation (p = 0.58. In unadjusted (bivariate analysis, burnout was not significantly associated to methylation levels. However, when mutually adjusted for both, burnout and work stress were significant contributors (p = 0.038 and p<0.0001 respectively to methylation levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that environmental stress is concurrent with decreased methylation of the SLC6A4 promoter. This may lead to increased transcriptional activity of the gene, increased reuptake of serotonin from synaptic clefts, and termination of the activity of serotonin. This could present a possible coping mechanism for environmental stress in humans that

  7. XMM-Newton Observations of the 2003 X-Ray Minimum of Eta Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Corcoran, M. F.; White, N. E.; Damineli, A.; Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.

    2004-01-01

    The XMM-Newton X-ray observatory took part in the multi-wavelength observing campaign of the massive, evolved star Eta Carinae in 2003 during its recent X-ray minimum in June 2003. This paper reports on the first results of these observations, which were performed (1) before the minimum (five times in January, 2003), (2) near the X-ray maximum just before the minimum (two times in June) and (3) during the minimum (four times in July-August). Hard X-ray emission from the point source of Eta Carinae was detected even during the minimum. The observed flux above 3 keV was approx. 3x10(exp -12) ergs cm(exp -2)/s, which is about one percent of the flux before the minimum. Light curves from the individual observations show no time variability on the scale of a few kilo-seconds. Changes in the spectral shape occurred, but these changes were smaller than expected if the minimum is produced solely by an increase of hydrogen column density. Fits of the hard X-Ray source by an absorbed 1T model show a constant plasma temperature at around 5 keV and an increase of column density from 5x10(exp 22) cm(exp -2) to 2x10(exp 23) cm(exp -2). The spectra below 6 keV significantly deviate from the models that fit the higher energy emission. The X-ray minimum seems to be dominated by an apparent decrease of the emission measure, suggesting that the brightest part of the X-ray emitting region is completely obscured during the minimum in the form of an eclipse. Partial covering plasma emission models might be considered for the spectral variation. The spectra also showed strong iron K line emission from both hot and cold gases, and weak line emission from Ni, Ca, Ar, S and Si.

  8. Do minimum wages improve early life health? Evidence from developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Muhammad Farhan; Mendoza Rodríguez, José M; Harper, Sam; Frank, John; Nandi, Arijit

    2016-06-01

    The impact of legislated minimum wages on the early-life health of children living in low and middle-income countries has not been examined. For our analyses, we used data from the Demographic and Household Surveys (DHS) from 57 countries conducted between 1999 and 2013. Our analyses focus on height-for-age z scores (HAZ) for children under 5 years of age who were surveyed as part of the DHS. To identify the causal effect of minimum wages, we utilized plausibly exogenous variation in the legislated minimum wages during each child's year of birth, the identifying assumption being that mothers do not time their births around changes in the minimum wage. As a sensitivity exercise, we also made within family comparisons (mother fixed effect models). Our final analysis on 49 countries reveal that a 1% increase in minimum wages was associated with 0.1% (95% CI = -0.2, 0) decrease in HAZ scores. Adverse effects of an increase in the minimum wage were observed among girls and for children of fathers who were less than 35 years old, mothers aged 20-29, parents who were married, parents who were less educated, and parents involved in manual work. We also explored heterogeneity by region and GDP per capita at baseline (1999). Adverse effects were concentrated in lower-income countries and were most pronounced in South Asia. By contrast, increases in the minimum wage improved children's HAZ in Latin America, and among children of parents working in a skilled sector. Our findings are inconsistent with the hypothesis that increases in the minimum wage unconditionally improve child health in lower-income countries, and highlight heterogeneity in the impact of minimum wages around the globe. Future work should involve country and occupation specific studies which can explore not only different outcomes such as infant mortality rates, but also explore the role of parental investments in shaping these effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of the core-halo structure of the neutron-rich nuclei {sup 6}He and {sup 8}He by intermediate-energy elastic proton scattering at high momentum transfer; Etude de la structure coeur-halo des noyaux riches en neutron {sup 6}He et {sup 8}He par la diffusion elastique de protons aux energies intermediaires etendue a la region du premier minimum de diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksouh, F

    2002-12-01

    The elastic proton scattering from the halo nuclei {sup 6}He and {sup 8}He was investigated in inverse kinematics at energies around 700 MeV/u with the aim to deduce the differential cross sections for the region of high momentum transfer, covering the first diffraction minimum. For this purpose, a liquid-hydrogen target was specially developed and used for the first time allowing to obtain low-background data as compared to commonly used targets made from C-H compounds. Previous data taken in the region of small momentum transfer were sensitive to the size and the peripheral shape of the total nuclear matter density distribution but not to the inner part. The present data allow for a more detailed insight in the structure of the alike core in {sup 6,8}He through a better determination of the matter density distributions. Several density distributions calculated from different microscopic models were used to derive elastic scattering cross sections which are compared with the obtained data. (author)

  10. Climate changes affecting regional landscape patterns at Xanadu%气候变化对元上都遗址区景观格局的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武录义; 岳永杰; 刘果厚; 高润宏; 苏志成

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of climate change on landscape patterns at sites in Xanadu, wavelet transforma-tion and remote sensing were used to analyze the climate change rules from 1981-2010 for landscape pattern dynamics in three different periods: 1990, 2000, and 2010. Results showed that the annual temperature had a rising tendency over the nearly 30 years with an interannual variation of 0.065·a-1 years. Zone temperature changes alternated between a low frequency of 30 years and high frequency of 10 years. Annual precipitation declined slightly with interannual variation of 0.07mm·a-1 . The low frequency of 25 years experienced drought;whereas, the low frequency of 10 years alternated between wet and dry. Dominance of the grass landscape de-clined on this site. Structural landscape changes included a decrease in grasslands, water areas, wetlands, and swamps; while farmland, woodland, residential places, and sandy areas increased. For instance, sandy areas in-creased 9.55 km2 in nearly 20 years. Over this 30 year period, climate change was not the dominant factor that changed the landscape pattern; climate change associated with sandy and grassland areas were greatest. As re-gional development and relevant eco-engineering being the main factors contributing to reduce stability of these landscape sites.%为了研究气候变化对内蒙古元上都遗址区景观格局的影响,运用小波分析、遥感技术等方法,分析了1981-2010年元上都遗址区气候变化规律和1990年、2000年、2010年3个不同时期的景观格局动态。结果表明:元上都遗址区近30 a年均气温呈上升趋势,年际变率为0.065℃·a-1,在30 a低频区和10 a中频区呈明显冷暖交替期。年降水量呈下降趋势,但变化趋势不显著,在25 a的低频区呈明显干旱期,而10 a的中频区呈干湿交替,受气候暖干化的影响仍将持续;元上都遗址区草地景观优势度在降低,景观结构变化较大。其中

  11. Cirugía transnasal transesfenoidal endoscópica en afecciones de región selar Endoscopic transsphenoidal transnasal surgery in affections of the sellar region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justo Luis González González

    2005-08-01

    aleatorizados y controlados, en busca de información más consistente en relación con el valor real de la técnica, a estas alturas del desarrollo de la cirugía hipofisaria.For a great number of pitituary tumors surgery is the first-line treatment and the microsurgical transsphenoidal approach is the most used. At present, it is performed by microscopic and endoscopic way. Recently, the endoscopic transnasal approach has emerged as an option under development that could predominate in a near future. The aim of the present paper was to evaluate by analyzing the results if it was possible to perform in our setting the endoscopic transsphenoidal transnasal approach for the lesions of the sellar region with surgical results similar at least to those obtained with the traditional microsurgical method. A limited strictly controlled and prospective cohort research of 10 patients selected according to the inclusion criteria that underwent transnasal endoscopic surgery between August 2002 and August 2003 at the Neurosurgery service of “Hermanos Ameijeiras” Hospital, was conducted. 6 cases with hypophyseal macroadenomas were operated on (3 GH-releasing, 1 PRL-secreting and 2 non-releasing hypophyseal macroadenomas. The other 4 were diagnosed LCR fistula through the sellar floor. Total exeresis of the tumor was performed in 5 of the 6 macroadenomas, whereas subtotal exeresis was attained in the other one. Rhinorrhea disappeared in 2 patients with LCR fistula and it was maintained in the other 2. Of the complications observed in 30 % of the cases, only in one (10 %, they were beyond the transoperative. It was concluded that the results obtained by using the endoscopic transnasal method make the procedure in our setting safe enough to justify its implementation and to carry out further randomized and controlled studies searching for more consistent information in relation to the real value of the technique at this level of development of the hypophyseal surgery.

  12. Minimum QOS Parameter Set in Transport Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪芸; 顾冠群

    1997-01-01

    QOS(Quality Of Service)parameter definitions are the basis of further QOS control.But QOS parameters defined by organizations such as ISO and ITU are incoherent and incompatible.It leads to the imefficiency of QOS controls.Based on the analysis of QOS parameters defined by ISO and ITU,this paper first promotes Minimum QOS Parameter Set in transport layer.It demonstrates that the parameters defined by ISO and ITU can be represented b parameters or a combination of parameters of the Set.The paper also expounds that the Set is open and manageable and it can be the potential unified base for QOS parameters.

  13. Quantization of conductance minimum and index theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shu-Ichiro; Tanaka, Yukio; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the minimum value of the zero-bias differential conductance Gmin in a junction consisting of a normal metal and a nodal superconductor preserving time-reversal symmetry. Using the quasiclassical Green function method, we show that Gmin is quantized at (4 e2/h ) NZES in the limit of strong impurity scatterings in the normal metal at the zero temperature. The integer NZES represents the number of perfect transmission channels through the junction. An analysis of the chiral symmetry of the Hamiltonian indicates that NZES corresponds to the Atiyah-Singer index in mathematics.

  14. Decentralized Pricing in Minimum Cost Spanning Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moulin, Hervé; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    In the minimum cost spanning tree model we consider decentralized pricing rules, i.e. rules that cover at least the ecient cost while the price charged to each user only depends upon his own connection costs. We de ne a canonical pricing rule and provide two axiomatic characterizations. First......, the canonical pricing rule is the smallest among those that improve upon the Stand Alone bound, and are either superadditive or piece-wise linear in connection costs. Our second, direct characterization relies on two simple properties highlighting the special role of the source cost....

  15. Iterative Regularization with Minimum-Residual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Hansen, Per Christian

    2007-01-01

    We study the regularization properties of iterative minimum-residual methods applied to discrete ill-posed problems. In these methods, the projection onto the underlying Krylov subspace acts as a regularizer, and the emphasis of this work is on the role played by the basis vectors of these Krylov...... subspaces. We provide a combination of theory and numerical examples, and our analysis confirms the experience that MINRES and MR-II can work as general regularization methods. We also demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the same is not true, in general, for GMRES and RRGMRES their success...... as regularization methods is highly problem dependent....

  16. First minimum bias physics results at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Dettori, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first measurements of the LHCb experiment, as obtained from $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV recorded using a minimum bias trigger. In particular measurements of the absolute $K_S^0$ production cross section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 TeV and of the $\\overline{\\Lambda/}\\Lambda$ ratio both at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV are discussed and preliminary results are presented

  17. Iterative regularization with minimum-residual methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Hansen, Per Christian

    2006-01-01

    We study the regularization properties of iterative minimum-residual methods applied to discrete ill-posed problems. In these methods, the projection onto the underlying Krylov subspace acts as a regularizer, and the emphasis of this work is on the role played by the basis vectors of these Krylov...... subspaces. We provide a combination of theory and numerical examples, and our analysis confirms the experience that MINRES and MR-II can work as general regularization methods. We also demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the same is not true, in general, for GMRES and RRGMRES - their success...... as regularization methods is highly problem dependent....

  18. Aerobrake assembly with minimum Space Station accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Steven J.; Butler, David H.; Doggett, William R.; Russell, James W.; Hurban, Theresa

    1991-01-01

    The minimum Space Station Freedom accommodations required for initial assembly, repair, and refurbishment of the Lunar aerobrake were investigated. Baseline Space Station Freedom support services were assumed, as well as reasonable earth-to-orbit possibilities. A set of three aerobrake configurations representative of the major themes in aerobraking were developed. Structural assembly concepts, along with on-orbit assembly and refurbishment scenarios were created. The scenarios were exercised to identify required Space Station Freedom accommodations. Finally, important areas for follow-on study were also identified.

  19. Minimum Reservoir Water Level in Hydropower Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkardeh, Hamed

    2017-07-01

    Vortex formation over the intakes is an undesirable phenomenon within the water withdrawal process from a dam reservoir. Calculating the minimum operating water level in power intakes by empirical equations is not a safe way and sometimes contains some errors. Therefore, current method to calculate the critical submergence of a power intake is construction of a scaled physical model in parallel with numerical model. In this research some proposed empirical relations for prediction of submergence depth in power intakes were validated with experimental data of different physical and numerical models of power intakes. Results showed that, equations which involved the geometry of intake have better correspondence with the experimental and numerical data.

  20. Iterative Regularization with Minimum-Residual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Hansen, Per Christian

    2007-01-01

    We study the regularization properties of iterative minimum-residual methods applied to discrete ill-posed problems. In these methods, the projection onto the underlying Krylov subspace acts as a regularizer, and the emphasis of this work is on the role played by the basis vectors of these Krylov...... subspaces. We provide a combination of theory and numerical examples, and our analysis confirms the experience that MINRES and MR-II can work as general regularization methods. We also demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the same is not true, in general, for GMRES and RRGMRES their success...

  1. Defining a Minimum End Mill Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Dreval'

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial observations show that the standard mill designs in many cases do not provide a complete diversity of manufacturing operations, and a lot of enterprises are forced to design and manufacture special (original designs of tools. The information search has revealed a lack of end mill diameter calculations in publications. There is a proposal to calculate the end mill diameter either by empirical formulas [2, 3], or by selection from the tables [4].To estimate a minimum diameter of the end mill to perform the specified manufacturing operations based on the mill body strength the formulas are obtained. The initial data for calculation are the flow sheet of milling operation and properties of processed and tool materials. The end mill is regarded, as a cantilevered beam of the circular cross section having Dс diameter (mill core diameter with overhang Lв from rigid fixing and loaded by the maximum bending force and torque.In deriving the formulas were used the following well-reasoned assumptions based on the analysed sizes of the structural elements of the standard mills: a diameter of mill core is linearly dependent on the mill diameter and the overhang; the 4τ 2 to σ 2 4τ2 ratio is constant and equal to 0.065 for contour milling and 0.17 for slot milling.The formulas for calculating the minimum diameter are as follows:  3 обр в 1 121 1.1  K S L L D m C z    for contour milling;  3 обр в 1 207 1.1  K S L L D m C z    for slot milling.Obtained dependences that allow defining a minimum diameter of the end mill in terms of ensuring its strength can be used to design mills for contour milling with radius transition sections, holes of different diameters in the body parts and other cases when for processing a singlemill is preferable.Using the proposed dependencies for calculating a feed of the maximum tolerable strength is reasonable in designing the mills for slots.Assumptions used in deriving

  2. The Risk Management of Minimum Return Guarantees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Mahayni

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Contracts paying a guaranteed minimum rate of return and a fraction of a positive excess rate, which is specified relative to a benchmark portfolio, are closely related to unit-linked life-insurance products and can be considered as alternatives to direct investment in the underlying benchmark. They contain an embedded power option, and the key issue is the tractable and realistic hedging of this option, in order to rigorously justify valuation by arbitrage arguments and prevent the guarantees from becoming uncontrollable liabilities to the issuer. We show how to determine the contract parameters conservatively and implement robust risk-management strategies.

  3. Implications of the Deep Minimum for Slow Solar Wind Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V. S.; Linker, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of the Deep Minimum, affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at the Deep Minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests. This work has been supported by the NASA HTP, SR&T, and LWS programs.

  4. Fast food prices, obesity, and the minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Chad; Tefft, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    Recent proposals argue that a fast food tax may be an effective policy lever for reducing population weight. Although there is growing evidence for a negative association between fast food prices and weight among adolescents, less is known about adults. That any measured relationship to date is causal is unclear because there has been no attempt to separate variation in prices on the demand side from that on the supply side. We argue that the minimum wage is an exogenous source of variation in fast food prices, conditional on income and employment. In two-stage least-squares analyses, we find little evidence that fast food price changes affect adult BMI or obesity prevalence. Results are robust to including controls for area and time fixed effects, area time trends, demographic characteristics, substitute prices, numbers of establishments and employment in related industries, and other potentially related factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Would a Higher Minimum Wage Help Poor Families Headed by Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Linda R.; Giannaros, Demetrios

    1990-01-01

    Studies suggest negative employment consequences if the minimum wage is increased. This may not affect poverty among households headed by women because the unemployment rate does not seem to play a statistically significant role in determining the poverty rate for this cohort. (Author)

  6. 76 FR 22802 - Interim Enforcement Policy for Minimum Days Off Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 26 RIN 3150-AI94 Interim Enforcement Policy for Minimum Days Off Requirements AGENCY... for managing worker fatigue at operating nuclear power plants. This interim policy affects licensees... adopt this interim alternative approach has the potential for introducing adverse consequences if...

  7. The Impact of a City-Level Minimum-Wage Policy on Supermarket Food Prices in Seattle-King County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Jennifer J; Buszkiewicz, James; Tang, Wesley; Aggarwal, Anju; Long, Mark; Vigdor, Jacob; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-09-09

    Background: Many states and localities throughout the U.S. have adopted higher minimum wages. Higher labor costs among low-wage food system workers could result in higher food prices. Methods: Using a market basket of 106 foods, food prices were collected at affected chain supermarket stores in Seattle and same-chain unaffected stores in King County (n = 12 total, six per location). Prices were collected at 1 month pre- (March 2015) and 1-month post-policy enactment (May 2015), then again 1-year post-policy enactment (May 2016). Unpaired t-tests were used to detect price differences by location at fixed time while paired t-tests were used to detect price difference across time with fixed store chain. A multi-level, linear differences-in-differences model, was used to detect the changes in the average market basket item food prices over time across regions, overall and by food group. Results: There were no significant differences in overall market basket or item-level costs at one-month (-$0.01, SE = 0.05, p = 0.884) or one-year post-policy enactment (-$0.02, SE = 0.08, p = 0.772). No significant increases were observed by food group. Conclusions: There is no evidence of change in supermarket food prices by market basket or increase in prices by food group in response to the implementation of Seattle's minimum wage ordinance.

  8. Disasters And Minimum Health Standards In Disaster Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel GOGEN

    Full Text Available Millions of people are affected by natural or man made disasters all over the world. The number of people affected by disasters increase globally, due to global climate changes, increasing poverty, low life standards, inappropriate infrastructure, lack of early response systems, abuse of natural sources, and beside these, nuclear weapons, wars and conflicts, terrorist actions, migration, displacement and population movements. 95 % of life loss due to disasters are in the underdeveloped or developing countries. Turkey is a developing country, highly affected by disasters. For coping with disasters, not only national action plans, but also International Action Plans and cooperations are needed. Since all the disasters have direct and indirect effects on health, applications of minimal health standarts in disaster response, will reduce the morbidity and mortality rates. In this paper, water supplies and sanitation, vector control, waste control, burial of corpses, nutrition and minimum health standards in disaster response, are reviewed. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(12.000: 296-306

  9. Optimal Succinctness for Range Minimum Queries

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    For an array A of n objects from a totally ordered universe, a range minimum query (RMQ) asks for the position of the minimum element in the sub-array A[i,j]. We focus on the setting where the array $A$ is static and known in advance, and can hence be preprocessed into a scheme in order to answer future queries faster. We make the further assumption that the input array A cannot be used at query time. Under this assumption, a natural lower bound of 2n bits for RMQ-schemes exists. We give the first truly succinct preprocessing scheme for O(1)-RMQs. Its final space consumption is 2n+o(n) bits, thus being asymptotically optimal. We also give a simple linear-time construction algorithm for this scheme that needs only n+o(n) bits of space in addition to the 2n+o(n) bits needed for the final data structure, thereby lowering the peak space consumption of previous schemes from O(n\\log n) to O(n) bits. We also improve on LCA-computation in BPS- and DFUDS-encoded trees.

  10. Minimum Cost Homomorphisms to Reflexive Digraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Arvind; Karimi, Mehdi; Rafiey, Arash

    2007-01-01

    For digraphs $G$ and $H$, a homomorphism of $G$ to $H$ is a mapping $f:\\ V(G)\\dom V(H)$ such that $uv\\in A(G)$ implies $f(u)f(v)\\in A(H)$. If moreover each vertex $u \\in V(G)$ is associated with costs $c_i(u), i \\in V(H)$, then the cost of a homomorphism $f$ is $\\sum_{u\\in V(G)}c_{f(u)}(u)$. For each fixed digraph $H$, the {\\em minimum cost homomorphism problem} for $H$, denoted MinHOM($H$), is the following problem. Given an input digraph $G$, together with costs $c_i(u)$, $u\\in V(G)$, $i\\in V(H)$, and an integer $k$, decide if $G$ admits a homomorphism to $H$ of cost not exceeding $k$. We focus on the minimum cost homomorphism problem for {\\em reflexive} digraphs $H$ (every vertex of $H$ has a loop). It is known that the problem MinHOM($H$) is polynomial time solvable if the digraph $H$ has a {\\em Min-Max ordering}, i.e., if its vertices can be linearly ordered by $<$ so that $i

  11. The minimum jet power and equipartition

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A

    2014-01-01

    We derive the minimum power of jets and their magnetic field strength based on their observed non-thermal synchrotron emission. The correct form of this method takes into account both the internal energy in the jet and the ion rest-mass energy associated with the bulk motion. The latter was neglected in a number of papers, which instead adopted the well-known energy-content minimization method. That method was developed for static sources, for which there is no bulk-motion component of the energy. In the case of electron power-law spectra with index >2 in ion-electron jets, the rest-mass component dominates. The minimization method for the jet power taking it into account was considered in some other work, but only based on either an assumption of a constant total synchrotron flux or a fixed range of the Lorentz factors. Instead, we base our method on an observed optically-thin synchrotron spectrum. We find the minimum jet power is independent of its radius when the rest-mass power dominates, which becomes th...

  12. The Maunder minimum (1645--1715) was indeed a Grand minimum: A reassessment of multiple datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Usoskin, Ilya G; Asvestari, Eleanna; Hawkins, Ed; Käpylä, Maarit; Kovaltsov, Gennady A; Krivova, Natalie; Lockwood, Michael; Mursula, Kalevi; O'Reilly, Jezebel; Owens, Matthew; Scott, Chris J; Sokoloff, Dmitry D; Solanki, Sami K; Soon, Willie; Vaquero, José M

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Although the time of the Maunder minimum (1645--1715) is widely known as a period of extremely low solar activity, claims are still debated that solar activity during that period might still have been moderate, even higher than the current solar cycle #24. We have revisited all the existing pieces of evidence and datasets, both direct and indirect, to assess the level of solar activity during the Maunder minimum. Methods: We discuss the East Asian naked-eye sunspot observations, the telescopic solar observations, the fraction of sunspot active days, the latitudinal extent of sunspot positions, auroral sightings at high latitudes, cosmogenic radionuclide data as well as solar eclipse observations for that period. We also consider peculiar features of the Sun (very strong hemispheric asymmetry of sunspot location, unusual differential rotation and the lack of the K-corona) that imply a special mode of solar activity during the Maunder minimum. Results: The level of solar activity during the Maunder minimu...

  13. A surface hopping algorithm for nonadiabatic minimum energy path calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, Igor; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Lindh, Roland; Olivucci, Massimo

    2015-02-15

    The article introduces a robust algorithm for the computation of minimum energy paths transiting along regions of near-to or degeneracy of adiabatic states. The method facilitates studies of excited state reactivity involving weakly avoided crossings and conical intersections. Based on the analysis of the change in the multiconfigurational wave function the algorithm takes the decision whether the optimization should continue following the same electronic state or switch to a different state. This algorithm helps to overcome convergence difficulties near degeneracies. The implementation in the MOLCAS quantum chemistry package is discussed. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed procedure four examples of application are provided: thymine, asulam, 1,2-dioxetane, and a three-double-bond model of the 11-cis-retinal protonated Schiff base.

  14. Study of the minimum refrigeration temperature of regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangming; Chen, Guobang; Yu, Jianping

    Based on the principles of thermodynamics, the relation between the isentropic expansion coefficient μs and the isobaric specific heat Cp has been found. The values of μs at different temperatures and pressures are calculated. From theoretical and experimental values of Cp of helium in the supercritical area, the minimum refrigeration temperature which may be reached by traditional regenerative cryocoolers is theoretically demonstrated. It is pointed out that this boundary is just the lambda line of helium. In order to obtain temperatures lower than the lambda line, a new type of regenerative cryocooler which can work in the helium II region is proposed. The working principle, schematic diagram and theoretical refrigeration temperature of this new cryocooler are discussed.

  15. Radiation-belt dynamics during solar minimum. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G.; Holeman, E.

    1989-12-01

    Two types of temporal variation in the radiation belts are studied using low altitude data taken onboard the DMSP F7 satellite: those associated with the solar cycle and those associated with large magnetic storm effects. Over a three-year period from 1984 to 1987 and encompassing solar minimum, the protons in the heart of the inner belt increased at a rate of approximately 6% per year. Over the same period, outer zone electron enhancements declined both in number and peak intensity. During the large magnetic storm of February 1986, following the period of peak ring current intensity, a second proton belt with energies up to 50 MeV was found at magnetic latitudes between 45 deg. and 55 deg. The belt lasted for more than 100 days. The slot region between the inner and outer electron belts collapsed by the merging of the two populations and did not reform for 40 days.

  16. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Urban design and architecture are increasingly used as material and affective strategies for setting the scene, for manipulation and the production of urban life: The orchestration of atmospheres, the framing and staging of urban actions, the programming for contemplation, involvement, play, expe...... affects can be choreographed and designed intentionally or whether it arises from unpredictable circumstances within urbanity itself....

  17. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  18. Does winter cooling lead to the subsurface salinity minimum off Saurashtra, India?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Gouveia, A.D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    in this region, particularly during cold outbreaks, increases the density of shelf waters sufficiently to form a water mass which sinks and spreads at a depth of about 150 m and is characterizEd. by a weak salinity minimum with sigma-theta in the range of 25...

  19. A superconducting magnet mandrel with minimum symmetry laminations for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, S.; Arbelaez, D.; Brouwer, L.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, R.; Prestemon, S.; Robin, D.; Sun, C.; Wan, W.

    2013-08-01

    The size and weight of ion-beam cancer therapy gantries are frequently determined by a large aperture, curved, ninety degree, dipole magnet. The higher fields achievable with superconducting technology promise to greatly reduce the size and weight of this magnet and therefore also the gantry as a whole. This paper reports advances in the design of winding mandrels for curved, canted cosine-theta (CCT) magnets in the context of a preliminary magnet design for a proton gantry. The winding mandrel is integral to the CCT design and significantly affects the construction cost, stress management, winding feasibility, eddy current power losses, and field quality of the magnet. A laminated mandrel design using a minimum symmetry in the winding path is introduced and its feasibility demonstrated by a rapid prototype model. Piecewise construction of the mandrel using this laminated approach allows for increased manufacturing techniques and material choices. Sectioning the mandrel also reduces eddy currents produced during field changes accommodating the scan of beam energies during treatment. This symmetry concept can also greatly reduce the computational resources needed for 3D finite element calculations. It is shown that the small region of symmetry forming the laminations combined with periodic boundary conditions can model the entire magnet geometry disregarding the ends.

  20. Minimum dV for Targeted Spacecraft Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, John

    2017-01-01

    The density scale height of the Earth's atmosphere undergoes significant reduction in the final phases of a natural decay. It can be shown that for most realistic ballistic numbers, it is possible to exploit this effect to amplify available spacecraft dV by using it at the penultimate perigee to penetrate into higher drag regions at final apogee. The drag at this lower pass can more effectively propel a spacecraft towards the final target region than applying the same dV direct Hohmann transfer at that final apogee. This study analyzes the potential use of this effect-- in combination with small phasing burns--to calculate the absolute minimum delta-V that would be required to reliably guide a spacecraft to any specified safe unoccupied ocean region as a function of ballistic number, orbit inclination, and initial eccentricity. This calculation is made for controllable spacecraft in several orbit inclinations and eccentricities with arbitrary initial LAN and ArgP one week before final entry, under three-sigma atmospheric perturbations. The study analyzes the dV required under varying levels of final controllable altitude at which dV may be imparted, and various definitions of the length and location of a "safe" disposal area. The goal of such research is to improve public safety by creating assured safe disposal strategies for low-dV and/or low-thrust spacecraft that under more traditional strategies would need to be abandoned to a fully random decay.

  1. How do GCMs represent daily maximum and minimum temperatures in La Plata Basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettolli, M. L.; Penalba, O. C.; Krieger, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    This work focuses on southern La Plata Basin region which is one of the most important agriculture and hydropower producing regions worldwide. Extreme climate events such as cold and heat waves and frost events have a significant socio-economic impact. It is a big challenge for global climate models (GCMs) to simulate regional patterns, temporal variations and distribution of temperature in a daily basis. Taking into account the present and future relevance of the region for the economy of the countries involved, it is very important to analyze maximum and minimum temperatures for model evaluation and development. This kind of study is aslo the basis for a great deal of the statistical downscaling methods in a climate change context. The aim of this study is to analyze the ability of the GCMs to reproduce the observed daily maximum and minimum temperatures in the southern La Plata Basin region. To this end, daily fields of maximum and minimum temperatures from a set of 15 GCMs were used. The outputs corresponding to the historical experiment for the reference period 1979-1999 were obtained from the WCRP CMIP5 (World Climate Research Programme Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5). In order to compare daily temperature values in the southern La Plata Basin region as generated by GCMs to those derived from observations, daily maximum and minimum temperatures were used from the gridded dataset generated by the Claris LPB Project ("A Europe-South America Network for Climate Change Assessment and Impact Studies in La Plata Basin"). Additionally, reference station data was included in the study. The analysis was focused on austral winter (June, July, August) and summer (December, January, February). The study was carried out by analyzing the performance of the 15 GCMs , as well as their ensemble mean, in simulating the probability distribution function (pdf) of maximum and minimum temperatures which include mean values, variability, skewness, et c, and regional

  2. Increasing the weight of minimum spanning trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederickson, G.N.; Solis-Oba, R. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Given an undirected connected graph G and a cost function for increasing edge weights, the problem of determining the maximum increase in the weight of the minimum spanning trees of G subject to a budget constraint is investigated. Two versions of the problem are considered. In the first, each edge has a cost function that is linear in the weight increase. An algorithm is presented that solves this problem in strongly polynomial time. In the second version, the edge weights are fixed but an edge can be removed from G at a unit cost. This version is shown to be NP-hard. An {Omega}(1/ log k)-approximation algorithm is presented for it, where k is the number of edges to be removed.

  3. Duality of Maximum Entropy and Minimum Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinto Eguchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a special class of generalized divergence measures by the use of generator functions. Any divergence measure in the class is separated into the difference between cross and diagonal entropy. The diagonal entropy measure in the class associates with a model of maximum entropy distributions; the divergence measure leads to statistical estimation via minimization, for arbitrarily giving a statistical model. The dualistic relationship between the maximum entropy model and the minimum divergence estimation is explored in the framework of information geometry. The model of maximum entropy distributions is characterized to be totally geodesic with respect to the linear connection associated with the divergence. A natural extension for the classical theory for the maximum likelihood method under the maximum entropy model in terms of the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy is given. We discuss the duality in detail for Tsallis entropy as a typical example.

  4. Galactic Archaeology and Minimum Spanning Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Macfarlane, B A; Flynn, C M L

    2015-01-01

    Chemical tagging of stellar debris from disrupted open clusters and associations underpins the science cases for next-generation multi-object spectroscopic surveys. As part of the Galactic Archaeology project TraCD (Tracking Cluster Debris), a preliminary attempt at reconstructing the birth clouds of now phase-mixed thin disk debris is undertaken using a parametric minimum spanning tree (MST) approach. Empirically-motivated chemical abundance pattern uncertainties (for a 10-dimensional chemistry-space) are applied to NBODY6-realised stellar associations dissolved into a background sea of field stars, all evolving in a Milky Way potential. We demonstrate that significant population reconstruction degeneracies appear when the abundance uncertainties approach 0.1 dex and the parameterised MST approach is employed; more sophisticated methodologies will be required to ameliorate these degeneracies.

  5. Attosecond pulse shaping around a Cooper minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Schoun, S B; Wheeler, J; Roedig, C; Agostini, P; DiMauro, L F; Schafer, K J; Gaarde, M B

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is used to measure the spectral phase of the recombination dipole matrix element (RDM) in argon over a broad frequency range that includes the 3p Cooper minimum (CM). The measured RDM phase agrees well with predictions based on the scattering phases and amplitudes of the interfering s- and d-channel contributions to the complementary photoionization process. The reconstructed attosecond bursts that underlie the HHG process show that the derivative of the RDM spectral phase, the group delay, does not have a straight-forward interpretation as an emission time, in contrast to the usual attochirp group delay. Instead, the rapid RDM phase variation caused by the CM reshapes the attosecond bursts.

  6. A transcribed emergency record at minimum cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R; Becker, S; Fox, B S; Ensminger, F

    1983-09-01

    We have developed a new method of implementing a transcribed emergency record at minimum cost. Dictated emergency records are typed immediately by a transcriber located in the emergency department. This member of the medical record transcriber pool is given other non-urgent medical record material to type when there are no emergency records to type. The costs are reduced to the same level as routine medical records transcription. In 1982, 19,892 of the total 28,000 emergency records were transcribed by adding only 1.35 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to the transcriber pool. The remaining charts were handwritten because insufficient funds had been allocated to type all emergency records. The transcriber is capable of typing a maximum of 64 charts, averaging 13 lines (156 words) each, per 8-hour shift. The service can be phased in gradually as funds for transcribing the emergency record are allocated to the central transcriber pool.

  7. 30 CFR 75.1431 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Hoisting and Mantrips Wire Ropes § 75.1431 Minimum rope... used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values obtained by the following formulas in...) For rope lengths 3,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For...

  8. 30 CFR 77.1431 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hoisting Wire Ropes § 77.1431 Minimum rope strength. At installation, the nominal strength (manufacturer's published catalog strength) of wire ropes used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values...=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load...

  9. 30 CFR 57.19021 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hoisting Wire Ropes § 57.19021 Minimum rope strength. At installation, the nominal strength (manufacturer's published catalog strength) of wire ropes used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values...=Static Load×4.0. (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static...

  10. Minimum Wages and Skill Acquisition: Another Look at Schooling Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Wascher, William

    2003-01-01

    Examines the effects of minimum wage on schooling, seeking to reconcile some of the contradictory results in recent research using Current Population Survey data from the late 1970s through the 1980s. Findings point to negative effects of minimum wages on school enrollment, bolstering the findings of negative effects of minimum wages on enrollment…

  11. Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages. Recent Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David

    Using a specially constructed panel data set on state minimum wage laws and labor market conditions, Neumark and Wascher (1992) presented evidence that countered the claim that minimum wages could be raised with no cost to employment. They concluded that estimates indicating that minimum wages reduced employment on the order of 1-2 percent for a…

  12. 29 CFR 783.43 - Computation of seaman's minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of seaman's minimum wage. 783.43 Section 783.43...'s minimum wage. Section 6(b) requires, under paragraph (2) of the subsection, that an employee...'s minimum wage requirements by reason of the 1961 Amendments (see §§ 783.23 and 783.26). Although...

  13. 41 CFR 50-201.1101 - Minimum wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Minimum wages. 50-201... Contracts PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 201-GENERAL REGULATIONS § 50-201.1101 Minimum wages. Determinations of prevailing minimum wages or changes therein will be published in the Federal Register by the...

  14. 29 CFR 4.159 - General minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true General minimum wage. 4.159 Section 4.159 Labor Office of... General minimum wage. The Act, in section 2(b)(1), provides generally that no contractor or subcontractor... a contract less than the minimum wage specified under section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards...

  15. Minimum Wage Effects on Educational Enrollments in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail A.; Cruickshank, Amy A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of minimum wages on educational enrollments in New Zealand. A significant reform to the youth minimum wage since 2000 has resulted in some age groups undergoing a 91% rise in their real minimum wage over the last 10 years. Three panel least squares multivariate models are estimated from a national sample…

  16. 14 CFR 23.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 23.1513 Section 23.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC, determined under § 23.149,...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1513 - Minimum control speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.1513 Section 25.1513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Limitations § 25.1513 Minimum control speed. The minimum control speed V MC determined under § 25.149 must...

  18. 14 CFR 29.49 - Performance at minimum operating speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance at minimum operating speed. 29... minimum operating speed. (a) For each Category A helicopter, the hovering performance must be determined... than helicopters, the steady rate of climb at the minimum operating speed must be determined over...

  19. 14 CFR 27.49 - Performance at minimum operating speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance at minimum operating speed. 27... minimum operating speed. (a) For helicopters— (1) The hovering ceiling must be determined over the ranges... climb at the minimum operating speed must be determined over the ranges of weight, altitude,...

  20. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3... CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a) A Bank shall require each member to maintain a minimum investment in the capital stock of the Bank,...

  1. 24 CFR 891.145 - Owner deposit (Minimum Capital Investment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... General Program Requirements § 891.145 Owner deposit (Minimum Capital Investment). As a Minimum Capital... Investment shall be one-half of one percent (0.5%) of the HUD-approved capital advance, not to exceed $25,000. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Owner deposit (Minimum...

  2. 12 CFR 263.82 - Establishment of minimum capital levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Maintain Adequate Capital § 263.82 Establishment of minimum capital levels. The Board has established minimum capital levels for state member banks and bank holding companies in its Capital Adequacy... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of minimum capital levels....

  3. The generalized minimum spanning tree polytope and related polytopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Generalized Minimum Spanning Tree problem denoted by GMST is a variant of the classical Minimum Spanning Tree problem in which nodes are partitioned into clusters and the problem calls for a minimum cost tree spanning at least one node from each cluster. A different version of the problem, calle

  4. 29 CFR 505.3 - Prevailing minimum compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prevailing minimum compensation. 505.3 Section 505.3 Labor... HUMANITIES § 505.3 Prevailing minimum compensation. (a)(1) In the absence of an alternative determination...)(2) of this section, the prevailing minimum compensation required to be paid under the Act to...

  5. 7 CFR 953.43 - Minimum standards of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum standards of quality. 953.43 Section 953.43... SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 953.43 Minimum standards of quality. (a) Recommendation. Whenever the committee deems it advisable to establish and maintain minimum standards of...

  6. 27 CFR 40.256 - Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum manufacturing and... Provisions Relating to Operations § 40.256 Minimum manufacturing and activity requirements. The minimum manufacturing and activity requirement prescribed in § 40.61(b) of this part is a continuing condition of...

  7. The generalized minimum spanning tree polytope and related polytopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    The Generalized Minimum Spanning Tree problem denoted by GMST is a variant of the classical Minimum Spanning Tree problem in which nodes are partitioned into clusters and the problem calls for a minimum cost tree spanning at least one node from each cluster. A different version of the problem, calle

  8. A unified model-free controller for switching minimum phase, non-minimum phase and time-delay systems

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Loïc

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary work presents a simple derivation of the standard model-free control in order to control switching minimum phase, non-minimum phase and time-delay systems. The robustness of the proposed method is studied in simulation.

  9. Local and regional factors affecting the chemistry of precipitation in the spanish basque country. L'influence des facteurs regionaux et locaux sur la chimie des precipitations au pays basque espagnol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezcurra, A.; Durana, N.; Casado, H. (Universidad Politecnica de Vitoria (ES)); Lacaux, J.P. (Universite Paul Sabatier, 65 - Lannemezan (FR)); Pham Van Dinh; Garcia, C.

    The study deals with near 300 rain events sampled by means of a network of five automatic devices operating from January 1986 to November 1988. The results show that, on a local-scale, the rain chemistry is affected by the marine source of gases and particles. On a regional-scale, values of pH ranging from 5.5 to 4.8 are noticed. The acidity of rain has an anthropogenic origin that is mainly linked to the NO{sub 3}- content. The acidity is reinforced by air flow from continental Europe. By contrast, rain water with a basic character is related to the air fluxes from Southern Spain that increase the rain content in Ca{sup 2+}.

  10. Wage discrimination and partial compliance with the minimum wage law

    OpenAIRE

    Yang-Ming Chang; Bhavneet Walia

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a simple model to characterize the discriminatory behavior of a non-complying firm in a minimum-wage economy. In the analysis, the violating firm pays one “favored†group of workers the statutory minimum and the other “non-favored†group of workers a sub-minimum. We find conditions under which law enforcement is ineffective in improving the between-group wage differentials. We show that an increase in the minimum wage raises the sub-minimum wage and employment of wor...

  11. Minimum-energy wavelet frame on the interval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO XiePing; CAO ChunHong

    2008-01-01

    The construction and properties of interval minimum-energy wavelet frame are systematically studied in this paper.They are as follows:1) give the definition of interval minimum-energy wavelet frame;2) give the necessary and sufficient conditions for the minimum-energy frames for L2[0,1];3) present the construction algorithm for minimum-energy wavelet frame associated with refinable functions on the interval with any support γ;4) give the decomposition and reconstruction formulas of the minimum-energy frame on the interval [0,1].

  12. Urban-rural migration: uncertainty and the effect of a change in the minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingene, C A; Yu, E S

    1989-01-01

    "This paper extends the neoclassical, Harris-Todaro model of urban-rural migration to the case of production uncertainty in the agricultural sector. A unique feature of the Harris-Todaro model is an exogenously determined minimum wage in the urban sector that exceeds the rural wage. Migration occurs until the rural wage equals the expected urban wage ('expected' due to employment uncertainty). The effects of a change in the minimum wage upon regional outputs, resource allocation, factor rewards, expected profits, and expected national income are explored, and the influence of production uncertainty upon the obtained results are delineated." The geographical focus is on developing countries. excerpt

  13. A topology control algorithm for preserving minimum-energy paths in wireless ad hoc networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhong; CHANG Yilin; CUI Can; ZHANG Xin

    2007-01-01

    In this Paper,a distributed topology control algorithm is proposed.By adjusting the transmission power of each node,this algorithm constructs a wireless network topology with minimum-energy property,i.e.,it preserves a minimum-energy path between every pair of nodes.Moreover,the proposed algorithm can be used in both homogenous and heterogeneous wireless networks.and it can also work without an explicit propagation channel model or the position information of nodes.Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has advantages over the topology control algorithm based on direct-transmission region in terms of average node degree and power efficiency.

  14. Rock climbing: A local-global algorithm to compute minimum energy and minimum free energy pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Clark; Chen, Szu-Hua; Fathizadeh, Arman; Elber, Ron

    2017-10-01

    The calculation of minimum energy or minimum free energy paths is an important step in the quantitative and qualitative studies of chemical and physical processes. The computations of these coordinates present a significant challenge and have attracted considerable theoretical and computational interest. Here we present a new local-global approach to study reaction coordinates, based on a gradual optimization of an action. Like other global algorithms, it provides a path between known reactants and products, but it uses a local algorithm to extend the current path in small steps. The local-global approach does not require an initial guess to the path, a major challenge for global pathway finders. Finally, it provides an exact answer (the steepest descent path) at the end of the calculations. Numerical examples are provided for the Mueller potential and for a conformational transition in a solvated ring system.

  15. ON THE INVERSE MINIMUM SPANNING TREE PROBLEM WITH MINIMUM NUMBER OF PERTURBED EDGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bangyi LI; Zhaohan SHENG

    2003-01-01

    Let G= be a network with the vertex set V, the edge set E and the length vector L, andlet T* be a prior determined spanning tree of G. The inverse minimum spanning tree problem withminimum number of perturbed edges is to perturb the length vector L to L+ δ, such that T* is one ofminimum spanning trees under the length vector L+ δ and the number of perturbed edges is minimum.This paper establishes a mathematical model for this problem and transforms it into a minimumvertex covering problem in a bipartite graph Go, a path-graph. Thus a strongly polynomial algorithmwith time complexity O(mn2) can be designed by using Hungarian method.

  16. CVs Around the Minimum Orbital Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zharikov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We discussed features of Cataclysmic Variables at the period minimum. In general, most of them must be WZ Sge-type objects. Main characteristics of the prototype star (WZ Sge are discussed. A part of WZ Sge-type objects has evolved past the period limit and formed the bounce back systems. We also explore conditions and structure of accretion disks in such systems. We show that the accretion disk in a system with extreme mass ratio grows in size reaching a 2:1 resonance radius and are relatively cool. They also become largely optically thin in the continuum, contributing to the total flux less than the stellar components of the system. In contrast, the viscosity and the temperature in spiral arms formed at the outer edge of the disk are higher and their contribution in continuum plays an increasingly important role. We model such disks and generate light curves which successfully simulate the observed double-humped light curves in the quiescence.

  17. Minimum degree condition forcing complete graph immersion

    CERN Document Server

    DeVos, Matt; Fox, Jacob; McDonald, Jessica; Mohar, Bojan; Scheide, Diego

    2011-01-01

    An immersion of a graph $H$ into a graph $G$ is a one-to-one mapping $f:V(H) \\to V(G)$ and a collection of edge-disjoint paths in $G$, one for each edge of $H$, such that the path $P_{uv}$ corresponding to edge $uv$ has endpoints $f(u)$ and $f(v)$. The immersion is strong if the paths $P_{uv}$ are internally disjoint from $f(V(H))$. It is proved that for every positive integer $t$, every simple graph of minimum degree at least $200t$ contains a strong immersion of the complete graph $K_t$. For dense graphs one can say even more. If the graph has order $n$ and has $2cn^2$ edges, then there is a strong immersion of the complete graph on at least $c^2 n$ vertices in $G$ in which each path $P_{uv}$ is of length 2. As an application of these results, we resolve a problem raised by Paul Seymour by proving that the line graph of every simple graph with average degree $d$ has a clique minor of order at least $cd^{3/2}$, where $c>0$ is an absolute constant. For small values of $t$, $1\\le t\\le 7$, every simple graph of...

  18. A minimum mass nebula for M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, E.

    2017-09-01

    Recently revealed differences in planets around M dwarf versus solar-type stars could arise from differences in their primordial discs and surveys of T Tauri stars find a correlation between stellar mass and disc mass. 'Minimum' discs have been reconstructed for the Solar system and solar-type stars and here this exercise is performed for M dwarfs using Kepler-detected planets. Distribution of planet mass between current orbits produces a disc with total mass of ≈0.009 M⊙ and a power-law profile with index α = 2.2. Disc reconstruction from the output of a forward model of planet formation indicates that the effect of detection bias on disc profile is slight and that the observed scatter in planet masses and semimajor axes are consistent with a universal disc profile. This nominal M dwarf disc is more centrally concentrated than those inferred around the solar-type stars observed by Kepler, and the mass surface density beyond 0.02 au is sufficient for in situ accretion of planets as single embryos. The mass of refractory solids within 0.5 au is 5.6 M⊕ compared to 4 M⊕ for solar-type stars in contrast with the trend with total disc mass. The total solid beyond 0.5 au is sufficient for the core of at least one giant planet.

  19. Topside measurements at Jicamarca during solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-pulse topside radar data acquired at Jicamarca and processed using full-profile analysis are compared to data processed using more conventional, range-gated approaches and with analytic and computational models. The salient features of the topside observations include a dramatic increase in the Te/Ti temperature ratio above the F peak at dawn and a local minimum in the topside plasma temperature in the afternoon. The hydrogen ion fraction was found to exhibit hyperbolic tangent-shaped profiles that become shallow (gradually changing above the O+-H+ transition height during the day. The profile shapes are generally consistent with diffusive equilibrium, although shallowing to the point of changes in inflection can only be accounted for by taking the effects of E×B drifts and meridional winds into account. The SAMI2 model demonstrates this as well as the substantial effect that drifts and winds can have on topside temperatures. Significant quiet-time variability in the topside composition and temperatures may be due to variability in the mechanical forcing. Correlations between topside measurements and magnetometer data at Jicamarca support this hypothesis.

  20. Minimum information about a bioactive entity (MIABE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Sandra; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Bryant, Steve; Clark, Dominic; Calder, Elizabeth; Dix, Ian; Engkvist, Ola; Forster, Mark; Gaulton, Anna; Gilson, Michael; Glen, Robert; Grigorov, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim; Harland, Lee; Hopkins, Andrew; Larminie, Christopher; Lynch, Nick; Mann, Romeena K; Murray-Rust, Peter; Lo Piparo, Elena; Southan, Christopher; Steinbeck, Christoph; Wishart, David; Hermjakob, Henning; Overington, John; Thornton, Janet

    2011-08-31

    Bioactive molecules such as drugs, pesticides and food additives are produced in large numbers by many commercial and academic groups around the world. Enormous quantities of data are generated on the biological properties and quality of these molecules. Access to such data - both on licensed and commercially available compounds, and also on those that fail during development - is crucial for understanding how improved molecules could be developed. For example, computational analysis of aggregated data on molecules that are investigated in drug discovery programmes has led to a greater understanding of the properties of successful drugs. However, the information required to perform these analyses is rarely published, and when it is made available it is often missing crucial data or is in a format that is inappropriate for efficient data-mining. Here, we propose a solution: the definition of reporting guidelines for bioactive entities - the Minimum Information About a Bioactive Entity (MIABE) - which has been developed by representatives of pharmaceutical companies, data resource providers and academic groups.

  1. Attosecond delay of xenon $4d$ photoionization at the giant resonance and Cooper minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Chakraborty, Himadri S

    2016-01-01

    A Kohn-Sham time-dependent local-density-functional scheme is utilized to predict attosecond time delays of xenon 4d photoionization that involves the 4d giant dipole resonance and Cooper minimum. The fundamental effect of electron correlations to uniquely determine the delay at both regions is demonstrated. In particular, for the giant dipole resonance, the delay underpins strong collective effect, emulating the recent prediction at C60 giant plasmon resonance [T. Barillot et al, Phys. Rev. A 91, 033413 (2015)]. For the Cooper minimum, a qualitative similarity with a photorecombination experiment near argon 3p minimum [S. B. Schoun et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 153001 (2014)] is found. The result should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe 4d photoemission.

  2. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parental...

  3. Conditions of Minimum Wage Indexation in Czech and Slovak Legislation in the Context of Business Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernica Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to assess – on the basis of a comparison of Czech and Slovak legislation relating to the conditions of the minimum wage indexation – whether it would be appropriate to use certain aspects of Slovak legislation in the Czech legislation and vice versa. When elaborating the article, some logical methods were used. In order to collect data, important employers were addressed in the South-Moravian Region. A carrying method used during the work was a comparison. Analyses were processed using the data of the Czech Statistical Office, the European Statistical Office and the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs of the Czech Republic. To evaluate the research, the percentage representation of positive and negative responses and Pearson’s Chi-square test were used. The paper presents the results of research whose aim was to get the views of entrepreneurs regarding the minimum wage level and conditions of its indexation. Employers supported the idea of maintaining the institution of the minimum wage. A predominant portion of companies would welcome it if the minimum wage were derived on the basis of an average wage, and the vast majority of companies would welcome the annual indexation of the minimum wage by inflation.

  4. PENYERAPAN TENAGA KERJA PADA SEKTOR PERTANIAN DAN SEKTOR JASA PASCAKEBIJAKAN UPAH MINIMUM DI PROVINSI BANTEN (PERIODE TAHUN 2001–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Findi Alexandi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to analyze the conditions of employment and the factors that affect employment in agriculture and services in the province of Banten. The method used was descriptive analysis and regression analysis of panel data. The estimation results showed that all variable of the minimum wage in districts/ cities, consumption, investment, and gross regional domestic product (GDP significantly affect employment in agriculture and services in the province of Banten. Factors affecting employment in agriculture and the service sector in the province of Banten are as follow: First, the agricultural sector model estimation results indicate that UMK variable, consumption, investment, and GDP have significant effect on employment in the agricultural sector. Second, the service sector model estimation results indicate that UMK variable, consumption, investment, and GDP have significant effect on employment in the agricultural sector. Therefore, the Government of Banten Province is expected to increase the growth rate and GDP contribution of the agricultural sector and the service sector, taking into account the level of wages and observing conditions of employment in that sector.Keywords: agriculture sector, labor, employment, GDP, Banten ABSTRAKTujuan  dari penelitian ini adalah menganalisis kondisi ketenagakerjaan dan faktor-faktor yang memengaruhi penyerapan tenaga kerja di sektor pertanian dan jasa di Provinsi Banten. Metode yang digunakan analisis deskriptif dan analisis regresi data panel. Hasil estimasi semua variabel upah minimimum kabupaten/kota, konsumsi, investasi, dan Produk Domestik Regional Bruto (PDRB berpengaruh nyata terhadap penyerapan tenaga kerja di sektor pertanian dan jasa di Provinsi Banten. Faktor-faktor yang memengaruhi penyerapan tenaga kerja sektor pertanian dan sektor jasa di Provinsi Banten adalah sebagai berikut. Pertama, hasil estimasi model sektor pertanian menunjukan bahwa variabel UMK, konsumsi

  5. How Does Definition of Minimum Break Length Affect Objective Measures of Sitting Outcomes Among Office Workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloster, Stine; Danquah, Ida Høgstedt; Holtermann, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: Data were collected from 317 office workers. Thigh position was assessed with an ActiGraph GT3x+ fixed on the right thigh. Data were exported with varying bout length of breaks. Afterwards, sitting outcomes were calculated for the respective break lengths. RESULTS: Absolute numbers of sit...

  6. Redefining the limit dates for the Maunder Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Vaquero, J M

    2014-01-01

    The Maunder Minimum corresponds to a prolonged minimum of solar activity a phenomenon that is of particular interest to many branches of natural and social sciences commonly considered to extend from 1645 until 1715. However, our knowledge of past solar activity has improved significantly in recent years and, thus, more precise dates for the onset and termination of this particularly episode of our Sun can be established. Based on the simultaneous analysis of distinct proxies we propose a redefinition of the Maunder Minimum period with the core "Deep Maunder Minimum" spanning from 1645 to 1700 (that corresponds to the Grand Minimum state) and a wider "Extended Maunder Minimum" for the longer period 1618-1723 that includes the transition periods.

  7. Affective Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Dean

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out the idea of affective networks as a constitutive feature of communicative capitalism. It explores the circulation of intensities in contemporary information and communication networks, arguing that this circulation should be theorized in terms of the psychoanalytic notion of the drive. The article includes critical engagements with theorists such as Guy Debord, Jacques Lacan, Tiziana Terranova, and Slavoj Zizek.

  8. A Computable Plug-In Estimator of Minimum Volume Sets for Novelty Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Chiwoo

    2010-10-01

    A minimum volume set of a probability density is a region of minimum size among the regions covering a given probability mass of the density. Effective methods for finding the minimum volume sets are very useful for detecting failures or anomalies in commercial and security applications-a problem known as novelty detection. One theoretical approach of estimating the minimum volume set is to use a density level set where a kernel density estimator is plugged into the optimization problem that yields the appropriate level. Such a plug-in estimator is not of practical use because solving the corresponding minimization problem is usually intractable. A modified plug-in estimator was proposed by Hyndman in 1996 to overcome the computation difficulty of the theoretical approach but is not well studied in the literature. In this paper, we provide theoretical support to this estimator by showing its asymptotic consistency. We also show that this estimator is very competitive to other existing novelty detection methods through an extensive empirical study. ©2010 INFORMS.

  9. Annual minimum temperature variations in early 21st century in Punjab, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, Misbah; Maria Ali, Syeda; Khalid, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a key emerging threat to the global environment. It imposes long lasting impacts both at regional and national level. In the recent era, global warming and extreme temperatures have drawn great interest to the scientific community. As in a past century considerable increase in global surface temperatures have been observed and predictions revealed that it will continue in the future. In this regard, current study mainly focused on analysis of regional climatic change (annual minimum temperature trends and its correlation with land surface temperatures in the early 21st century in Punjab) for a period of 1979-2013. The projected model data European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) has been used for eight Tehsils of Punjab i.e., annual minimum temperatures and annual seasonal temperatures. Trend analysis of annual minimum and annual seasonal temperature in (Khushab, Noorpur, Sargodha, Bhalwal, Sahiwal, Shahpur, Sillanwali and Chinoit) tehsils of Punjab was carried out by Regression analysis and Mann-Kendall test. Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data was used in comparison with Model data for the month of May from the years 2000, 2009 and 2010. Results showed that no significant trends were observed in annual minimum temperature. A significant change was observed in Noorpur, Bhalwal, Shahpur, Sillanwali, Sahiwal, Chinoit and Sargodha tehsils during spring season, which indicated that this particular season was a transient period of time.

  10. Minimum-cost quantum measurements for quantum information

    OpenAIRE

    Wallden, Petros; Dunjko, Vedran; Andersson, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Knowing about optimal quantum measurements is important for many applications in quantum information and quantum communication. However, deriving optimal quantum measurements is often difficult. We present a collection of results for minimum-cost quantum measurements, and give examples of how they can be used. Among other results, we show that a minimum-cost measurement for a set of given pure states is formally equivalent to a minimum-error measurement for certain mixed states of those same ...

  11. The impact of minimum wage on female employment in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    KAWAGUCHI, Daiji; Yamada, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The statutory minimum wage in Japan is revised every year and increases by almost the same amount across prefectures, regardless of the disparity in the wage distribution across prefectures. Due to this feature of minimum wagesetting, the minimum wage cuts into the wage distribution deeply in rural Japan. We examine the impact of the minimum wage on employment, focus-ing on middle-aged women, who are known to be typical, low-wage workers in Japan. The results, based on a panel estimation, sug...

  12. Decision trees with minimum average depth for sorting eight elements

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan

    2015-11-19

    We prove that the minimum average depth of a decision tree for sorting 8 pairwise different elements is equal to 620160/8!. We show also that each decision tree for sorting 8 elements, which has minimum average depth (the number of such trees is approximately equal to 8.548×10^326365), has also minimum depth. Both problems were considered by Knuth (1998). To obtain these results, we use tools based on extensions of dynamic programming which allow us to make sequential optimization of decision trees relative to depth and average depth, and to count the number of decision trees with minimum average depth.

  13. Minimum Wages and Anti-Poverty Policies (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtake, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of minimum wages as an anti-poverty policy based on the textbook labor market model and recent empirical research. In a competitive labor market, it is well known that minimum wages either have a negative or no effect on employment. In a monopsony labor market, a rise in the minimum wage rate may increase both wages and employment. Although most of the empirical research on this topic overseas show that an increase in minimum wages decreases employment, s...

  14. On the Smoothed Minimum Error Entropy Criterion 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badong Chen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that the minimum error entropy (MEE criterion can outperform the traditional mean square error criterion in supervised machine learning, especially in nonlinear and non-Gaussian situations. In practice, however, one has to estimate the error entropy from the samples since in general the analytical evaluation of error entropy is not possible. By the Parzen windowing approach, the estimated error entropy converges asymptotically to the entropy of the error plus an independent random variable whose probability density function (PDF corresponds to the kernel function in the Parzen method. This quantity of entropy is called the smoothed error entropy, and the corresponding optimality criterion is named the smoothed MEE (SMEE criterion. In this paper, we study theoretically the SMEE criterion in supervised machine learning where the learning machine is assumed to be nonparametric and universal. Some basic properties are presented. In particular, we show that when the smoothing factor is very small, the smoothed error entropy equals approximately the true error entropy plus a scaled version of the Fisher information of error. We also investigate how the smoothing factor affects the optimal solution. In some special situations, the optimal solution under the SMEE criterion does not change with increasing smoothing factor. In general cases, when the smoothing factor tends to infinity, minimizing the smoothed error entropy will be approximately equivalent to minimizing error variance, regardless of the conditional PDF and the kernel.

  15. Calculating minimum perforating depth with consideration of plastic deformation around well-hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yong

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain the perforation depth, the three zones with different permeability because of plastic deformation and fluid invasion were studied based on related theories. The study shows that the calculation of perforation depth should take account of not only damaged zone, but also plastic zone, because the plastic zone has much lower permeability. The required minimum perforation depth was obtained by making the solution of elastic/plastic equations, and the factors affecting perforation depth were analyzed accordingly.

  16. Factors Affecting Loan Utilization And Repayment Patterns By Small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Affecting Loan Utilization And Repayment Patterns By Small Holder Farmers ... 61.3% of the respondents had a minimum of secondary school education. ... Also, it can be inferred that effective utilization of loan is directly influenced by ...

  17. Wind adaptive modeling of transmission lines using minimum description length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaw, Yoonseok; Sohn, Gunho

    2017-03-01

    The transmission lines are moving objects, which positions are dynamically affected by wind-induced conductor motion while they are acquired by airborne laser scanners. This wind effect results in a noisy distribution of laser points, which often hinders accurate representation of transmission lines and thus, leads to various types of modeling errors. This paper presents a new method for complete 3D transmission line model reconstruction in the framework of inner and across span analysis. The highlighted fact is that the proposed method is capable of indirectly estimating noise scales, which corrupts the quality of laser observations affected by different wind speeds through a linear regression analysis. In the inner span analysis, individual transmission line models of each span are evaluated based on the Minimum Description Length theory and erroneous transmission line segments are subsequently replaced by precise transmission line models with wind-adaptive noise scale estimated. In the subsequent step of across span analysis, detecting the precise start and end positions of the transmission line models, known as the Point of Attachment, is the key issue for correcting partial modeling errors, as well as refining transmission line models. Finally, the geometric and topological completion of transmission line models are achieved over the entire network. A performance evaluation was conducted over 138.5 km long corridor data. In a modest wind condition, the results demonstrates that the proposed method can improve the accuracy of non-wind-adaptive initial models on an average of 48% success rate to produce complete transmission line models in the range between 85% and 99.5% with the positional accuracy of 9.55 cm transmission line models and 28 cm Point of Attachment in the root-mean-square error.

  18. Do Low-Income Families Benefit from Minimum Wage Increases? Evidence from State-Level Minimum Wage Laws

    OpenAIRE

    Partridge, Mark D.; Partridge, Jamie S.

    1999-01-01

    Several recent studies contend that falling real minimum wage rates are an important factor behind rising wage inequality and increasing poverty rates. Other studies find the more conventional result that they have very little influence on poverty and inequality, but these studies are generally based on simulated labor market responses. This study examines the influence of minimum wage rates on poverty rates and family income inequality using state-level minimum wages. The methodology has the...

  19. Effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and simulated heat-affected zones of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangho; Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Hu-Chul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2004-07-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of alloying elements on fracture toughness in the transition temperature region of base metals and heat-affected zones (HAZs) of Mn-Mo-Ni low-alloy steels. Three kinds of steels whose compositions were varied from the composition specification of SA 508 steel (grade 3) were fabricated by vacuum-induction melting and heat treatment, and their fracture toughness was examined using an ASTM E1921 standard test method. In the steels that have decreased C and increased Mo and Ni content, the number of fine M2C carbides was greatly increased and the number of coarse M3C carbides was decreased, thereby leading to the simultaneous improvement of tensile properties and fracture toughness. Brittle martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents were also formed in these steels during cooling, but did not deteriorate fracture toughness because they were decomposed to ferrite and fine carbides after tempering. Their simulated HAZs also had sufficient impact toughness after postweld heat treatment. These findings indicated that the reduction in C content to inhibit the formation of coarse cementite and to improve toughness and the increase in Mo and Ni to prevent the reduction in hardenability and to precipitate fine M2C carbides were useful ways to improve simultaneously the tensile and fracture properties of the HAZs as well as the base metals.

  20. Characterization and Study of Edaphic Landscape in Areas Affected of Mining Activities in the Region of El Bierzo; Caracterizacion y Estudio de Escenarios Edafopaisajisticos en Zonas Afectadas por las Actividades Mineras en la Comarca de El Bierzo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejuto, M.; Millan, R.; Garcia, A.; Schmid, T.; Martinez, P. E.

    2008-08-06

    This scientific c-technical report forms part of an ongoing research work carried out by Marcos Mejuto Mendieta to obtain the Diploma of Advanced Studies, a degree related to his doctoral studies. This work has been developed in collaboration with the Faculty of Geological Sciences at the Complutense University of Madrid and the Department of Environment at CIEMAT. The objective of this work is to develop a methodological basis for characterizing and assessing edaphic landscapes degraded by mining activities and overlaying mine tailings in the upper river basin of Rodrigatos (Leon, Spain). This combines the work carried out in the fi eld and lab as well as on a regional scale implementing satellite images and remote sensing techniques. Eight zones representing the spatial variability within the upper basin of the river Rodrigatos were chosen, which include reference areas not affected by mining activities or other anthropogenic influences Furthermore, three scenarios outside of the study area are included as case studies of the variability of restoration processes that are not present within the research zone. (Author) 32 refs.

  1. Effects of interspecific competition between two urban ant species, Linepithema humile and Monomorium minimum, on toxic bait performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Patricia; Silverman, Jules

    2005-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of interspecific competition on ant bait performance with two urban pest ants, the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), and the little black ant, Monomorium minimum (Buckley). In a laboratory study, the impact of a solid sulfluramid bait on M. minimum was diminished when L. humile were present, whereas the presence of M. minimum reduced the performance of a liquid fipronil bait against L. humile. Argentine ants were not adversely affected by sulfluramid bait at any time, whereas M. minimum was unaffected by fipronil bait until 14 d of exposure. In field studies measuring diel foraging activity, M. minimum seemed to delay L. humile foraging to food stations by approximately 30 min during summer 2001. However, L. humile subsequently recruited to food stations in very high numbers, thereby displacing M. minimum. L. humile visited food stations over an entire 24-h period, whereas M. minimum was only observed visiting food stations during daylight hours. Adjusting the timing of bait placement in the field may minimize any negative effects of interspecific competition between these two species on toxic bait performance.

  2. The 2008 August 1 Eclipse Solar-Minimum Corona Unraveled

    CERN Document Server

    Pasachoff, Jay M; Druckmuller, Miloslav; Aniol, Peter; Saniga, Metod; Minarovjech, Milan

    2009-01-01

    We discuss results stemming from observations of the white-light and [Fe XIV] emission corona during the total eclipse of the Sun of 2008 August 1, in Mongolia (Altaj region) and in Russia (Akademgorodok, Novosibirsk, Siberia). Corresponding to the current extreme solar minimum, the white-light corona, visible up to 20 solar radii, was of a transient type with well-pronounced helmet streamers situated above a chain of prominences at position angles 48, 130, 241 and 322 degrees. A variety of coronal holes, filled with a number of thin polar plumes, were seen around the poles. Furthering an original method of image processing, stars up to 12 magnitude, a Kreutz-group comet (C/2008 O1), and a coronal mass ejection (CME) were also detected, with the smallest resolvable structures being of, and at some places even less than, 1 arcsec. Differences, presumably motions, in the corona and prominences are seen even with the 19-min time difference between our sites. In addition to the high-resolution coronal images, whi...

  3. A Possible Cause of the Diminished Solar Wind During the Solar Cycle 23 - 24 Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Wu, Chin-Chun

    2016-12-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma density observed at 1 AU during Solar Cycle 23 - 24 (SC-23/24) minimum were significantly smaller than those during its previous solar cycle (SC-22/23) minimum. Because the Earth's orbit is embedded in the slow wind during solar minimum, changes in the geometry and/or content of the slow wind region (SWR) can have a direct influence on the solar wind parameters near the Earth. In this study, we analyze solar wind plasma and magnetic field data of hourly values acquired by Ulysses. It is found that the solar wind, when averaging over the first (1995.6 - 1995.8) and third (2006.9 - 2008.2) Ulysses' perihelion ({˜} 1.4 AU) crossings, was about the same speed, but significantly less dense ({˜} 34 %) and cooler ({˜} 20 %), and the total magnetic field was {˜} 30 % weaker during the third compared to the first crossing. It is also found that the SWR was {˜} 50 % wider in the third ({˜} 68.5^deg; in heliographic latitude) than in the first ({˜} 44.8°) solar orbit. The observed latitudinal increase in the SWR is sufficient to explain the excessive decline in the near-Earth solar wind density during the recent solar minimum without speculating that the total solar output may have been decreasing. The observed SWR inflation is also consistent with a cooler solar wind in the SC-23/24 than in the SC-22/23 minimum. Furthermore, the ratio of the high-to-low latitude photospheric magnetic field (or equatorward magnetic pressure force), as observed by the Mountain Wilson Observatory, is smaller during the third than the first Ulysses' perihelion orbit. These findings suggest that the smaller equatorward magnetic pressure at the Sun may have led to the latitudinally-wider SRW observed by Ulysses in SC-23/24 minimum.

  4. 雅鲁藏布江源头区居民点分布的影响因素%Affect on the Distribution of Residential Points in the Source Region of the Yarlung Tsangpo River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵卫; 沈渭寿; 邹长新; 李海东

    2012-01-01

    针对雅鲁藏布江源区重要的生态服务功能、不断加剧的生态退化问题、以畜牧业为主的产业结构及其对生态状况的依赖性,分析了源区居民点分布与地貌、生态状况、水文条件、交通条件的空间关系,评价了地貌等因素对该区居民点分布的影响.结果表明,2008年雅江源区居民点分布呈显著的地形聚集特征,大部分居民点聚集在4 600~5 000 m高程带、0°~5°缓坡区和没有坡向的平坦地带.雅鲁藏布江源区居民点分布与生态状况具有较强的空间趋同性.小嵩草草甸、紫花针茅草原和固沙草草原是居民点分布的主要植被类型;与1990年相比,2008年源区及其居民点分布区的NDVI较低,草地盖度及其生产能力有所降低,风沙化土地渐趋扩张,极少数居民点分布于风沙化土地,以固定沙地为主.源区居民点分布还具有明显的河流指向性和交通指向性.超过83%的居民点分布在距离雅鲁藏布江水系1.5 km范围内和道路两侧2.0 km范围内,特别是500 m范围内;距离雅鲁藏布江水系和交通线路越远,居民点分布越稀疏.究其原因,以草原放养为主畜牧业生产及其对牧草和水分的依赖性是影响居民点分布的关键因素.%In view of its important ecological service functions, growing ecological degradation, industrial structure based on animal husbandry and a strong dependence on ecological status, affect on the distribution of residential points in the source region of the Yarlung Tsangpo River (called ' the source region' for short) was studied, the relationship between the distribution of residential points and four environmental elements, including topography, ecological status, hydrological condition and traffic lines were analyzed. Results showed that most residential points in the source region located in the elevation zone from 4 600 to 5 000, gentle slope from 0° to 5° and flat area without aspect, which was

  5. Minimum extreme temperature in the gulf of mexico: is there a connection with solar activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravilla, D.; Mendoza, B.; Jauregui, E.

    Minimum extreme temperature ( MET) series from several meteorological stations of the Gulf of Mexico are spectrally analyzed using the Maximum Entrophy Method. We obtained periodicities similar to those found in the sunspot number, the magnetic solar cycle, comic ray fluxes and geomagnetic activity which are modulated by solar activity. We suggested that the solar signal is perhaps present in the MET record of this region of Mexico.

  6. 14 CFR 93.311 - Minimum terrain clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum terrain clearance. 93.311 Section 93.311 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.311 Minimum terrain clearance. Except in an emergency,...

  7. 33 CFR 157.455 - Minimum under-keel clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum under-keel clearance. 157... § 157.455 Minimum under-keel clearance. (a) The owner or operator of a tankship, that is not fitted with... written under-keel clearance guidance that includes— (1) Factors to consider when calculating the...

  8. Solution of the Schroedinger equation for a double minimum potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorvitch, D.; Galant, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    We apply Richardson's extrapolation to zero mesh size to calculate the dissociation energies and wavefunctions of a double minimum potential curve for the E,F1Sigma(+)g state of H2. We demonstrate that a double minimum potential presents no difficulties and that this extrapolation method is to be preferred over a quadratic extrapolation or the use of a basis expansion.

  9. 46 CFR 111.60-4 - Minimum cable conductor size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum cable conductor size. 111.60-4 Section 111.60-4...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-4 Minimum cable conductor size. Each cable conductor must be #18 AWG (0.82 mm2) or larger except— (a) Each power and lighting cable conductor must...

  10. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year... subject to its child labor provisions, with certain exceptions not applicable here. (b) 18-year minimum... occupation found and declared by the Secretary of Labor to be particularly hazardous for the employment...

  11. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped... commercial designation of the respirator it contains and all appropriate approval labels....

  12. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided...

  13. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped... commercial designation of the respirator it contains, and all appropriate approval labels....

  14. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section each respirator shall be equipped with a...

  15. 30 CFR 56.19021 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting... published catalog strength) of wire ropes used for hoisting shall meet the minimum rope strength values...=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load...

  16. Theoretical minimum energies to produce steel for selected conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruehan, R. J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Fortini, O. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Paxton, H. W. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Brindle, R. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    An ITP study has determined the theoretical minimum energy requirements for producing steel from ore, scrap, and direct reduced iron. Dr. Richard Fruehan's report, Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, provides insight into the potential energy savings (and associated reductions in carbon dioxide emissions) for ironmaking, steelmaking, and rolling processes (PDF 459 KB).

  17. 47 CFR 22.951 - Minimum coverage requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.951 Minimum coverage requirement. Applications for... toward the minimum coverage requirement. Applications for authority to operate a new cellular system in... reefs only), except for unserved areas in the Gulf of Mexico MSA....

  18. The impact of minimum wages on youth employment in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Pereira

    2003-01-01

    textabstractFrom January 1, 1987, the legal minimum wage for workers aged 18 and 19 in Portugal was uprated to the full adult rate, generating a 49.3% increase between 1986 and 1987 in the legal minimum wage for this age group. This shock is used as a ?natural experiment? to evaluate the impact of t

  19. 12 CFR 932.8 - Minimum liquidity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum liquidity requirements. 932.8 Section... CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS § 932.8 Minimum liquidity requirements. In addition to meeting the deposit liquidity requirements contained in § 965.3 of this chapter, each...

  20. The Minimum Wage, Restaurant Prices, and Labor Market Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, Daniel; French, Eric; MacDonald, James

    2008-01-01

    Using store-level and aggregated Consumer Price Index data, we show that restaurant prices rise in response to minimum wage increases under several sources of identifying variation. We introduce a general model of employment determination that implies minimum wage hikes cause prices to rise in competitive labor markets but potentially fall in…