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Sample records for regional phase propagation

  1. Fatigue crack propagation characteristics of ductile cast iron austempered from (. alpha. +. gamma. ) phase region. (. alpha. +. gamma. ) iki kara austemper shorishita kyujo kokuen chutetsu no hiro kiretsu shinten tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Y.; Asami, K.; Kuroiwa, H. (Musashi Institute of Technoloyg, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-15

    In order to enhance the fatigue crack propagation resistance of ductile cast iron, the effect of austempering from a ({alpha} + {gamma}) phase region was studied. As the dual phase matrix microstructure of ferrite and pearlite in as-casted iron was changed into the dual phase one of ferrite and bainite by partial austempering from 800 {degree} C, the fatigue crack propagation resistance was enhanced over the whole range of a {Delta} K region. The enhancement of the fatigue crack propagation resistance was caused by remarkable development of crack closures from higher {Delta} K regions which was induced by fracture contact and fretting because of an increase in fracture roughness and easy formation of oxide deposits. In addition, the static tensile and ductility of ductile cast iron were possibly enhanced simultaneously by partial austempering for changing pearlite into bainite superior in both tensile and ductility. 9 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Frequency-Dependent Characteristics of Regional Seismic Phases: Propagation of Pn in Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    highest portions of the Himalayas from the Indian shield to the interior of Tibet. It also has a unique combination of a dense station spacing of 3 to 8...Structure of the Crust and the Upper Mantle Beneath the Himalayas : Evidence for Eclogitization of Lower Crustal Rocks in the Indian Plate, J. Geophys. Res...pp. Baur, J. R. (2007). Seismotectonics of the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau: Moment tensor analysis of regional seismograms, M.S. thesis

  3. Regional Seismic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-31

    Baikal to the Pamirs, earthquakes occuring in the Baikal region, Sinkiang , the Gobi desert, southwest China and the Himalayas generated Lg/P ratios...data were obtained from stations within the USSR from earthquake events occuring in Baikal, Sinkiang , the Gobi desert, Southwest China and the...earthquakes originating in the Sinkiang province and recorded by seismo- graphic stations along the Pamir-Lena River profile [25] 0 - recorded by short

  4. Ground Truth, Magnitude Calibration and Regional Phase Propagation and Detection in the Middle East and Horn of Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyblade, A; Brazier, R; Adams, A; Park, Y; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-08

    In this project, we are exploiting several seismic data sets to improve U.S. operational capabilities to monitor for low yield nuclear tests across the Middle East (including the Iranian Plateau, Zagros Mountains, Arabian Peninsula, Turkish Plateau, Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Rift) and the Horn of Africa (including the northern part of the East African Rift, Afar Depression, southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden). The data sets are being used to perform three related tasks. (1) We are determining moment tensors, moment magnitudes and source depths for regional events in the magnitude 3.0 to 6.0 range. (2) These events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds, especially from events in Iran recorded at stations across the Arabian Peninsula. (3) We are collecting location ground truth at GT5 (local) and GT20 (regional) levels for seismic events with M > 2.5, including source geometry information and source depths. Towards meeting these objectives, seismograms from earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains recorded at regional distances have been inverted for moment tensors, which have then been used to create synthetic seismograms to determine the source depths of the earthquakes via waveform matching. The source depths have been confirmed by modeling teleseismic depth phases recorded on GSN and IMS stations. Early studies of the distribution of seismicity in the Zagros region found evidence for earthquakes in the upper mantle. But subsequent relocations of teleseismic earthquakes suggest that source depths are generally much shallower, lying mainly within the upper crust. All of the regional events studied so far nucleated within the upper crust, and most of the events have thrust mechanisms. The source mechanisms for these events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds for broadband seismic stations in the Arabian Peninsula, including IMS

  5. GROUND TRUTH, MAGNITUDE CALIBRATION AND REGIONAL PHASE PROPAGATION AND DETECTION IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND HORN OF AFRICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyblade, A; Adams, A; Brazier, R; Park, Y; Rodgers, A

    2006-07-10

    In this project, we are exploiting unique and open source seismic data sets to improve seismic monitoring across the Middle East (including the Iranian Plateau, Zagros Mountains, Arabian Peninsula, Turkish Plateau, Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Rift) and the Horn of Africa (including the northern part of the East African Rift, Afar Depression, southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden). The data sets are being used to perform three related tasks. (1) We are determining moment tensors, moment magnitudes and source depths for regional events in the magnitude 3.0 to 6.0 range. (2) These events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds, especially from events in Iran recorded at stations across the Arabian Peninsula. (3) We are collecting location ground truth at GT5 (local) and GT20 (regional) levels for seismic events with M > 2.5, including source geometry information and source depths. In the first phase of this project, seismograms from earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains recorded at regional distances have been inverted for moment tensors, and source depths for the earthquakes have been determined via waveform matching. Early studies of the distribution of seismicity in the Zagros region found evidence for earthquakes in the upper mantle. But subsequent relocations of teleseismic earthquakes suggest that source depths are generally much shallower, lying mainly within the upper crust. Nine events with magnitudes between 5 and 6 have been studied so far. Source depths for six of the events are within the upper crust, and three are located within the lower crust. The uncertainty in the source depths of the lower crustal events allows for the possibility that some of them may have even nucleated within the upper mantle. Eight events have thrust mechanisms and one has a strike-slip mechanism. We also report estimates of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Arabian

  6. Massive Quark Propagator in the Colour-Superconducting Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄梅; 庄鹏飞; 赵维勤

    2002-01-01

    A more general expression for the quark propagator including both chiral and diquark condensates has been derived by using energy projectors. This makes it possible to study the phase transition from the hadron phase to the colour-superconductivity phase in the moderate baryon density region by using the Feynman diagrammatic method or the Green function method.

  7. Phase changes in delay propagation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Belkoura, Seddik

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the dynamics of delays propagation is one of the major topics inside Air Transport Management research. Delays are generated by the elements of the system, but their propagation is a global process fostered by relationships inside the network. If the topology of such propagation process has been extensively studied in the literature, little attention has been devoted to the fact that such topology may have a dynamical nature. Here we differentiate between two phases of the system by applying two causality metrics, respectively describing the standard phase (i.e. propagation of normal delays) and a disrupted one (corresponding to abnormal and unexpected delays). We identify the critical point triggering the change of the topology of the system, in terms of delays magnitude, using a historical data set of flights crossing Europe in 2011. We anticipate that the proposed results will open new doors towards the understanding of the delay propagation dynamics and the mitigation of extreme events.

  8. Improvement of static strength and fatigue crack propagation resistance in ductile cast iron by austempering from (. alpha. +. gamma. ) phase region. Bubun austenpering shori ni yoru kyujo kokuen chutetsu no seiteki kyodo to hiro kiretsu shinten teiko no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Y.; Asami, K.; Matsuoka, S. (Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-15

    The spheroidal graphite cast iron is better characterized in resistivity against the abrasion and heat, and economical efficiency than the normal carbon steel. Notice being taken of treatment temperature (800 to 840 centigrade) in the ({alpha}+{gamma}) phase region for the partial austempering treatment condition, able to improve the spheroidal graphite cast iron simultaneously in both statical tensile characteristics and fatigue crack propagation resistance, the present report compared dual phase as-cast material, single phase ferrite and single phase bainite. As a result, the morphological ratio of bainite becomes about 20% to the base morphology at 800 centigrade in treatment temperature. Then with progressively heightening to 815, 830 and 840 centigrade in it, the above ratio so heightens to about 40, 80 and 90%, respectively. The fatigue crack propagation resistance in the low DeltaK (low stress intensity factor) region is heightened by the partial austempering treatment to higher than that of dual phase as-cast material, single phase ferrite and single phase bainite, and most done at 800 centigrade in temperature where the bainite becomes about 20% in morphological ratio. 830 centigrade where the bainite becomes about 80% is judged to be the most appropriate treatment temperature for both the statical tensile characteristics and fatigue crack propagation resistance. 3 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Swell Propagation over Indian Ocean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchandra A. Bhowmick

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Swells are the ocean surface gravity waves that have propagated out of their generating fetch to the distant coasts without significant attenuation. Therefore they contain a clear signature of the nature and intensity of wind at the generation location. This makes them a precursor to various atmospheric phenomena like distant storms, tropical cyclones, or even large scale sea breeze like monsoon. Since they are not affected by wind once they propagate out of their generating region, they cannot be described by regional wave models forced by local winds. However, their prediction is important, in particular, for ship routing and off shore structure designing. In the present work, the propagation of swell waves from the Southern Ocean and southern Indian Ocean to the central and northern Indian Ocean has been studied. For this purpose a spectral ocean Wave Model (WAM has been used to simulate significant wave height for 13 years from 1993–2005 using NCEP blended winds at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1°. It has been observed that Indian Ocean, with average wave height of approximately 2–3 m during July, is mostly dominated by swell waves generated predominantly under the extreme windy conditions prevailing over the Southern Ocean and southern Indian Ocean. In fact the swell waves reaching the Indian Ocean in early or mid May carry unique signatures of monsoon arriving over the Indian Subcontinent. Pre-monsoon month of April contains low swell waves ranging from 0.5–1 m. The amplitudes subsequently increase to approximately 1.5–2 meters around 7–15 days prior to the arrival of monsoon over the Indian Subcontinent. This embedded signature may be utilized as one of the important oceanographic precursor to the monsoon onset over the Indian Ocean.

  10. Propagating phase interface with intermediate interfacial phase: Phase field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-05-01

    An advanced three-phase phase field approach (PFA) is suggested for a nonequilibrium phase interface that contains an intermediate phase, in particular, a solid-solid interface with a nanometer-sized intermediate melt (IM). A thermodynamic potential in the polar order parameters is developed that satisfies all thermodynamic equilibrium and stability conditions. The special form of the gradient energy allowed us to include the interaction of two solid-melt interfaces via an intermediate melt and obtain a well-posed problem and mesh-independent solutions. It is proved that for stationary 1D solutions to two Ginzburg-Landau equations for three phases, the local energy at each point is equal to the gradient energy. Simulations are performed for β ↔δ phase transformations (PTs) via IM in an HMX energetic material. The obtained energy IM width dependence is described by generalized force-balance models for short- and long-range interaction forces between interfaces but not far from the melting temperature. A force-balance model is developed that describes phase field results even 100 K below the melting temperature. The effects of the ratios of width and energies of solid-solid and solid-melt interfaces, temperature, and the parameter characterizing interaction of two solid-melt interfaces, on the structure, width, energy of the IM and interface velocity are determined by finite element method. Depending on parameters, the IM may appear by continuous or discontinuous barrierless disordering or via critical nucleus due to thermal fluctuations. The IM may appear during heating and persist during cooling at temperatures well below than it follows from sharp-interface approach. On the other hand, for some parameters when IM is expected, it does not form, producing an IM-free gap. The developed PFA represents a quite general three-phase model and can be extended to other physical phenomena, such as martensitic PTs, surface-induced premelting and PTs, premelting

  11. Quantum dynamics via a time propagator in Wigner's phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    that the simple classical deterministic motion breaks down surprisingly fast in an anharmonic potential. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using the scheme as a useful approach to quantum dynamics in many dimensions. To that end we present a Monte Carlo integration scheme using the norm of the propagator......We derive an expression for a short-time phase space propagator. We use it in a new propagation scheme and demonstrate that it works for a Morse potential. The propagation scheme is used to propagate classical distributions which do not obey the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. It is shown...

  12. Phase extraction from fringe pattern via light propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Zhang, Rui; Han, Zhigang

    2017-01-10

    A phase demodulation method via light propagation is proposed, where one or two fringe patterns are viewed as the superposition of complex amplitudes, and then the phase is reconstructed by separating the light field via light propagation. Simulation and experimental results indicated that the proposed method can extract the phase from a single shot effectively, thereby realizing dynamic phase retrieval. In addition, the accuracy of phase reconstruction can be improved by adding another fringe pattern with an unknown phase shift. The carrier requirement is relatively low, and, thus, the proposed method can be applied to the measurements with an environment disturbance, an inaccurate phase shift, and the requirement of a high speed capture.

  13. Nonparaxial propagation of phase-flipped Gaussian beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zeng-Hui; Lü Bai-Da

    2008-01-01

    This paper derives the closed-form expressions for nonparaxial phase flipped Gaussian (PFG) beams propagating in free space, through a knife edge and an aperture, which enable us to study nonparaxial propagation properties of PFG beams and to compare nonparaxial results with paraxial ones. It is found that the f parameter, offsetting distance of the knife edge and truncation parameter affect the nonparaxial beam propagation properties. Only under certain conditions the paraxial approximation is applicable. The results are illustrated by numerical examples.

  14. Investigations of two-phase flame propagation under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Iskender

    2016-07-01

    Investigations of two-phase flame propagation under microgravity conditions R. Thimothée, C. Chauveau, F. Halter, I Gökalp Institut de Combustion, Aérothermique, Réactivité et Environnement (ICARE), CNRS, 1C Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2, France This paper presents and discusses recent results on two-phase flame propagation experiments we carried out with mono-sized ethanol droplet aerosols under microgravity conditions. Fundamental studies on the flame propagation in fuel droplet clouds or sprays are essential for a better understanding of the combustion processes in many practical applications including internal combustion engines for cars, modern aircraft and liquid rocket engines. Compared to homogeneous gas phase combustion, the presence of a liquid phase considerably complicates the physico-chemical processes that make up combustion phenomena by coupling liquid atomization, droplet vaporization, mixing and heterogeneous combustion processes giving rise to various combustion regimes where ignition problems and flame instabilities become crucial to understand and control. Almost all applications of spray combustion occur under high pressure conditions. When a high pressure two-phase flame propagation is investigated under normal gravity conditions, sedimentation effects and strong buoyancy flows complicate the picture by inducing additional phenomena and obscuring the proper effect of the presence of the liquid droplets on flame propagation compared to gas phase flame propagation. Conducting such experiments under reduced gravity conditions is therefore helpful for the fundamental understanding of two-phase combustion. We are considering spherically propagating two-phase flames where the fuel aerosol is generated from a gaseous air-fuel mixture using the condensation technique of expansion cooling, based on the Wilson cloud chamber principle. This technique is widely recognized to create well-defined mono-size droplets

  15. Phase Dependence of Few-Cycle Pulsed Laser Propagation in a Two-Level Atom Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖健; 王中阳; 徐至展

    2002-01-01

    The phase-dependent feature of few-cycle pulsed laser propagation in a resonant two-level atom medium is demonstrated by solving the full Maxwell-Bloch equations. Even in the perturbative region, the propagating carrier field and the corresponding spectra of the few-cycle pulsed laser are sensitive to the initial phase due to self-phase modulation. For the larger pulse area, the fact that the carrier-wave reshaping comes from the carrier wave Rabi flopping is also responsible for this sensitivity, and the phase-dependent feature is more evident.

  16. Transmission characteristics of evanescent Lamb waves through a tunneling region: a chance for backward propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2010-01-01

    Evanescent waves are characterized by the exponential decay of the amplitude along the propagation direction, such that no phase velocity could be properly defined and the concept of propagation itself has to be properly redefined. However, evanescent waves can carry energy beyond a tunneling region where they are produced, and their effect in the forbidden region may be properly inferred by the outgoing wave. In the present paper, evidence of evanescent Lamb waves on a plate is given, as they are produced within a forbidden region where thickness is properly reduced and the acoustic modes are above threshold of propagation. However, the coupling of modes at each line boundary between different regions makes it difficult to single out the tunneling mode alone, since all modes share the same frequency. Therefore, we resort to the propagation of the backward S1 mode, that can be properly isolated from all the others. That makes the problem of refraction/reflection of backward propagating modes at a boundary, a problem by itself to be investigated and makes it worth to perform experiments on it. This is done in the present paper, as well, by detecting the acoustic field of a backward propagating Lamb mode reflected from the end boundary of a steel plate and the focusing effect from such a boundary is put in evidence in the case that a forward propagating mode is reflected as a backward propagating one.

  17. Ionizing laser propagation and spectral phase determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Lehe, R.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Benedetti, C.; Mao, H.-S.; Daniels, J.; Dale, N.; Swanson, K. K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    Ionization-induced blueshifting is investigated through INF&RNO simulations and experimental studies at the Berkeley Laboratory Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Center. The effects of spectral phase and optical compression are explored. An in-situ method for verifying the spectral phase of an intense laser pulse at focus is presented, based on the effects of optical compression on the morphology of the blueshifted laser spectra.

  18. Phase Space Approach to Laser-driven Electronic Wavepacket Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Takemoto, Norio; Tannor, David J

    2012-01-01

    We propose a phase space method to propagate a quantum wavepacket driven by a strong external field. The method employs the so-called biorthogonal von Neumann basis recently introduced for the calculation of the energy eigenstates of time-independent quantum systems [A. Shimshovitz and D.J. Tannor, arXiv:1201.2299v1]. While the individual elements in this basis set are time-independent, a small subset is chosen in a time-dependent manner to adapt to the evolution of the wavepacket in phase space. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the present propagation method by calculating the electronic wavepacket in a one-dimensional soft-core atom interacting with a superposition of an intense, few-cycle, near-infrared laser pulse and an attosecond extreme-ultraviolet laser pulse.

  19. Tailoring Terahertz Propagation by Phase and Amplitude Control in Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Zhang, Xueqian; Liu, Lixiang; Li, Quan; Singh, Leena; Han, Jiaguang; Yan, Fengping; Zhang, Weili

    2017-09-01

    Metasurfaces have been very successful at demonstrating the ability to control the wave propagation over the broad electromagnetic spectrum in recent years. The output wavefronts can be controlled at will, by encoding specially designed abrupt changes of electromagnetic parameters into the metasurfaces, such as phase and amplitude. Constituted by a single- or few-layer of planar structures, metasurfaces are straightforward in design and fabrication, thus promising many credible applications. Moreover, such control concept can be further extended to the surface wave regime. In this review, we present our recent progress on metasurfaces capable of tailoring the propagation of both free-space and surface terahertz waves. Following an introduction of the basic concept and theory, a number of unique terahertz metasurfaces are presented, showing the ability to device ultra-thin and compact functional terahertz components.

  20. Propagation of Aberrations through Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph

    CERN Document Server

    Pueyo, Laurent; Shaklan, Stuart; 10.1364/JOSAA.28.000189

    2011-01-01

    The specification of polishing requirements for the optics in coronagraphs dedicated to exo-planet detection requires careful and accurate optical modelling. Numerical representations of the propagation of aberrations through the system as well as simulations of the broadband wavefront compensation system using multiple DMs are critical when one devises an error budget for such a class of instruments. In this communication we introduce an analytical tool that serves this purpose for Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraphs. We first start by deriving the analytical form of the propagation of a harmonic ripple through a PIAA unit. Using this result we derive the chromaticity of the field at any plane in the optical train of a telescope equipped with such a coronagraph. Finally we study the chromatic response of a sequential DM wavefront actuator correcting such a corrugated field and thus quantify the requirements on the manufacturing of PIAA mirrors

  1. Models for the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raupach, M. [Institute for Building Materials Research of Aachen University (ibac), Schinkelstr. 3, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    The deterioration of a concrete structure by reinforcement corrosion proceeds in two phases: the initiation stage and the propagation stage. The first stage describes the time to onset of corrosion due to carbonation of the concrete or chloride ingress. The second stage is the actual deterioration stage. Most methods for life time assessments refer only to the first stage, what is on the safe side with respect to design of structures, but also a model for the second stage can be of interest, e.g. if the remaining life time of an existing structure has to be estimated. This paper presents and discusses the state-of-the-art of models for the propagation stage with regard to their different approaches. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. True propagation paths of surface waves from regional and teleseismic earthquakes across AlpArray Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolínský, Petr; Fuchs, Florian; Gröschl, Gidera; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray Working Group

    2016-04-01

    We utilize array beamforming techniques to investigate deterministic surface waves from regional and teleseismic earthquakes. Because the signal is well recognized and the fundamental mode for both Love and Rayleigh waves is separated before the beamforming, instead of searching for energy of all possible signals, we identify the frequency dependence of surface wave phase velocity and the true backazimuths of propagation. Using the dense AlpArray seismic broadband network distributed in the greater Alpine region across Europe with interstation distances around 40 km, we consider each station as a centre of an array of neighboring 5 to 6 stations. This allows us to calculate the local phase velocity dispersion curves for individual regions with diameter of approximately 80 - 100 km. By the beamforming, phase velocities are corrected for the true propagation backazimuth, which is slightly frequency dependent for each event. We invert the dispersion curves for S and P wave velocity distribution with depth. Measuring the phase velocity from different events distributed around the world, azimuthal dependence of the phase velocity is estimated and thus anisotropy constrained for particular depths. Beamforming of the signals in the time window sliding along the coda after the fundamental mode allows us to detect deterministic late surface-wave signals coming from certain directions dissimilar from the direct fundamental mode backazimuths for some of the events - these can be considered as surface wave reflections from lateral heterogeneities and vertical boundaries.

  3. Regional wave propagation using the discontinuous Galerkin method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wenk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an application of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG method to regional wave propagation. The method makes use of unstructured tetrahedral meshes, combined with a time integration scheme solving the arbitrary high-order derivative (ADER Riemann problem. This ADER-DG method is high-order accurate in space and time, beneficial for reliable simulations of high-frequency wavefields over long propagation distances. Due to the ease with which tetrahedral grids can be adapted to complex geometries, undulating topography of the Earth's surface and interior interfaces can be readily implemented in the computational domain. The ADER-DG method is benchmarked for the accurate radiation of elastic waves excited by an explosive and a shear dislocation source. We compare real data measurements with synthetics of the 2009 L'Aquila event (central Italy. We take advantage of the geometrical flexibility of the approach to generate a European model composed of the 3-D EPcrust model, combined with the depth-dependent ak135 velocity model in the upper mantle. The results confirm the applicability of the ADER-DG method for regional scale earthquake simulations, which provides an alternative to existing methodologies.

  4. Regional wave propagation using the discontinuous Galerkin method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wenk

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an application of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG method to regional wave propagation. The method makes use of unstructured tetrahedral meshes, combined with a time integration scheme solving the arbitrary high-order derivative (ADER Riemann problem. The ADER-DG method is high-order accurate in space and time, beneficial for reliable simulations of high-frequency wavefields over long propagation distances. Due to the ease with which tetrahedral grids can be adapted to complex geometries, undulating topography of the Earth's surface and interior interfaces can be readily implemented in the computational domain. The ADER-DG method is benchmarked for the accurate radiation of elastic waves excited by an explosive and a shear dislocation source. We compare real data measurements with synthetics of the 2009 L'Aquila event (central Italy. We take advantage of the geometrical flexibility of the approach to generate a European model composed of the 3-D EPcrust model, combined with the depth-dependent ak135 velocity model in the upper-mantle. The results confirm the applicability of the ADER-DG method for regional scale earthquake simulations, which provides an alternative to existing methodologies.

  5. Registration of phase-contrast images in propagation-based X-ray phase tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, L; Hänsch, A; Wolfram, U; Pacureanu, A; Cloetens, P; Peyrin, F; Rit, S; Langer, M

    2017-08-16

    X-ray phase tomography aims at reconstructing the 3D electron density distribution of an object. It offers enhanced sensitivity compared to attenuation-based X-ray absorption tomography. In propagation-based methods, phase contrast is achieved by letting the beam propagate after interaction with the object. The phase shift is then retrieved at each projection angle, and subsequently used in tomographic reconstruction to obtain the refractive index decrement distribution, which is proportional to the electron density. Accurate phase retrieval is achieved by combining images at different propagation distances. For reconstructions of good quality, the phase-contrast images recorded at different distances need to be accurately aligned. In this work, we characterise the artefacts related to misalignment of the phase-contrast images, and investigate the use of different registration algorithms for aligning in-line phase-contrast images. The characterisation of artefacts is done by a simulation study and comparison with experimental data. Loss in resolution due to vibrations is found to be comparable to attenuation-based computed tomography. Further, it is shown that registration of phase-contrast images is nontrivial due to the difference in contrast between the different images, and the often periodical artefacts present in the phase-contrast images if multilayer X-ray optics are used. To address this, we compared two registration algorithms for aligning phase-contrast images acquired by magnified X-ray nanotomography: one based on cross-correlation and one based on mutual information. We found that the mutual information-based registration algorithm was more robust than a correlation-based method. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Physics based model of D-region variability related to VLF propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, S. C.

    2012-07-01

    D-region (~60-85 km) electron density profiles measured using large number of sounding rocket experiments carried out from two Indian low latitude stations show large variations with solar zenith angle, season and solar activity. Similarly the ground based multi frequency radio wave absorption technique has provided continuous data on the morphology of the hourly electron density variations. However suitable models of the D-region electron density profile variations both during quiet and disturbed solar conditions over the Indian region are lacking. The renewed interest in the study of the VLF/LF propagation anomalies taking place through perturbations in the D-region electron densities due to various geophysical phenomena requires the availability of a baseline D-region model over low latitudes. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the physical processes of D-region production and loss of free electrons, dynamical coupling due to variety of vertically propagating atmospheric waves, sudden changes brought about by the solar energetic events like CMEs and different categories of X-ray flares. Low latitude region is not likely to be affected by the PMSE or PCA type of events but the changes due to lightning induced mesospheric red sprites and LEPs need to be considered. Based on this analysis, a preliminary low latitude D-region electron density profile model development is proposed. Sample results would illustrate key requirements from such a model in terms of its effectiveness to simulate the low latitude observations of VLF/LF amplitude and phase variations using waveguide propagation models like LWPC.

  7. Differential phase measurements of D-region partial reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, D. J.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Differential phase partial reflection measurements were used to deduce D region electron density profiles. The phase difference was measured by taking sums and differences of amplitudes received on an array of crossed dipoles. The reflection model used was derived from Fresnel reflection theory. Seven profiles obtained over the period from 13 October 1971 to 5 November 1971 are presented, along with the results from simultaneous measurements of differential absorption. Some possible sources of error and error propagation are discussed. A collision frequency profile was deduced from the electron concentration calculated from differential phase and differential absorption.

  8. Diagnostics of Magnetic Field Strength in Gyrosynchrotron Radiation Regions for the Case of Transverse Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ai-Hua; WANG Xin-Dong

    2000-01-01

    A set of diagnostic formulas is, for the first time, proposed to deal with the magnetic field strength B in gy rosynchrotron radiation regions for the transverse propagation case. The diagnostic formulas of B are applied to analyze a solar limb event. The differences of diagnostic results of B are compared for the different propagation cases and it is found that the differences are rather large. So in the analysis of limb burst we should use the diagnostic formulas for the transverse propagation.

  9. Direct evidence of the molecular interaction propagation in the phase transition of liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kenji; Sato, Takahiro; Kuwahara, Shota

    2016-09-01

    The molecular interaction sometimes propagates in a collective manner, reaching for a long distance on the order of millimeters. Such interactions have been well known in the field of strongly-correlated electron systems in a beautiful crystal interleaved by donor and acceptor layers, induced by photo-stimulus. The other examples can be found in liquid crystals (LCs), which could be found in many places in nature such as bio-membrane. Different from crystals, LCs features "softness", which enables it to be a curved structure such as a cell. In LCs, even a small molecular change would trigger the overall structural change by the propagation of the molecular interaction. Here we will show, for the first time, how long and how fast the molecular interaction propagates in LCs. The patterned phase transition was induced in a LC, causing the phase transition propagation in a controlled way and the propagation was measured with an time-resolved optical technique, called the transient grating. A LC sample doped with azobenzene was put into a thermally controlled LC cell. A grating pattern of a pulse light with 355 nm was impinged to the LC cell, and the light was absorbed by the dyes, releasing heat or photomechanical motion. We could observe the fringe spacing dependence on the phase transition response, which indicates that phase transition was delayed as the fringe spacing due to the delay by the phase transition propagation. This is the first direct evidence of the molecular interaction propagation of the LC molecules.

  10. PROPAGATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE IN THE THREE PHASES SOIL MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云敏; 边学成; 陈仁朋; 梁志刚

    2003-01-01

    The fundamental parameters such as dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability are required to solve the propagation of electromagnetic wave (EM Wave) in the soil. Based on Maxwell equations, the equivalent model is proposed to calculate the dielectric permittivity of mixed soil. The results of calculation fit. the test data well and will provide solid foundation for the application of EM wave in the soil moisture testing, CT analyzing of soil and the inspecting of geoenvironment.

  11. Photon propagator, monopoles, and the thermal phase transition in three dimensional compact QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernodub, M N; Ilgenfritz, E-M; Schiller, A

    2002-06-10

    We investigate the gauge boson propagator in the three dimensional compact Abelian gauge model in the Landau gauge at finite temperature. The presence of the monopole plasma in the confinement phase leads to the appearance of an anomalous dimension in the momentum dependence of the propagator. The anomalous dimension as well as an appropriate ratio of photon wave function renormalization constants with and without monopoles is observed to be an order parameter for the deconfinement phase transition. We discuss the relation between our results and the confining properties of the gluon propagator in non-Abelian gauge theories.

  12. Initial Orbit Determination Based on Propagation of Admissible Regions with Differential Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-19

    order n with limited computational effort. In addition to basic algebraic operations, operations for differentiation and integration can be easily...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0022 Initial Orbit Determination based on propagation of admissible regions with Differential Algebra Pierluigi Di Lizia...Determination based on propagation of admissible regions with Differential Algebra 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-15-1-0244 5c

  13. Impact of phase errors at the conjugate step on the propagation of intensity and phase shaped laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available were calculated using β = 61 for: (a) a = 2w, (b) a = 2.25w, (c) a = 2.75w, and (d) a = 4w. 3. PROPAGATION RESULTS Having noted the differences in the phase of element C discussed above, we now turn our attention to the impact... of the beam in Figure 4 (b) after 0.1 m (first row), 0.25 m (second row) and 0.5 m (third row) propagation when: (a) Ideal phase correcting element is present, as calculated using the Fresnel diffraction equation, (b) the phase element calculated using Eq...

  14. The imprint of crustal density heterogeneities on regional seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płonka, Agnieszka; Blom, Nienke; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Density heterogeneities are the source of mass transport in the Earth. However, the 3-D density structure remains poorly constrained because travel times of seismic waves are only weakly sensitive to density. Inspired by recent developments in seismic waveform tomography, we investigate whether the visibility of 3-D density heterogeneities may be improved by inverting not only travel times of specific seismic phases but complete seismograms.As a first step in this direction, we perform numerical experiments to estimate the effect of 3-D crustal density heterogeneities on regional seismic wave propagation. While a finite number of numerical experiments may not capture the full range of possible scenarios, our results still indicate that realistic crustal density variations may lead to travel-time shifts of up to ˜ 1 s and amplitude variations of several tens of percent over propagation distances of ˜ 1000 km. Both amplitude and travel-time variations increase with increasing epicentral distance and increasing medium complexity, i.e. decreasing correlation length of the heterogeneities. They are practically negligible when the correlation length of the heterogeneities is much larger than the wavelength. However, when the correlation length approaches the wavelength, density-induced waveform perturbations become prominent. Recent regional-scale full-waveform inversions that resolve structure at the scale of a wavelength already reach this regime.Our numerical experiments suggest that waveform perturbations induced by realistic crustal density variations can be observed in high-quality regional seismic data. While density-induced travel-time differences will often be small, amplitude variations exceeding ±10 % are comparable to those induced by 3-D velocity structure and attenuation. While these results certainly encourage more research on the development of 3-D density tomography, they also suggest that current full-waveform inversions that use amplitude

  15. Kinetics of Propagating Phase Transformation in Compressed Bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Emig, J; Springer, P; Reisman, D

    2004-08-18

    The authors observed dynamically driven phase transitions in isentropically compressed bismuth. By changing the stress loading conditions they explored two distinct cases one in which the experimental signature of the phase transformation corresponds to phase-boundary crossings initiated at both sample interfaces, and another in which the experimental trace is due to a single advancing transformation front in the bulk of the material. They introduce a coupled kinetics-hydrodynamics model that for this second case enables them, under suitable simplifying assumptions, to directly extract characteristic transition times from the experimental measurements.

  16. Effects of phase conjugation on electromagnetic optical fields propagating in free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanseri, Bhaskar

    2017-03-01

    By using the property of phase conjugation, we demonstrate that the inverse of van Cittert–Zernike theorem holds for electromagnetic (EM) fields propagating in free space. This essentially implies that spatially incoherent partially polarized field distributions can be generated from spatially coherent partially polarized optical fields. We further utilize phase conjugation with a polarization rotator to swap the spatial coherence properties of orthogonal polarization components of EM fields on propagation, at least in free space. This study suggests that the method of phase conjugation could be potentially useful in arbitrarily manipulating spatial coherence properties of vector optical fields in the field plane.

  17. A uniqueness result for propagation-based phase contrast imaging from a single measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Maretzke, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phase contrast imaging seeks to reconstruct the complex refractive index of an unknown sample from scattering intensities, measured for example under illumination with coherent X-rays. By incorporating refraction, this method yields improved contrast compared to purely absorption-based radiography but involves a phase retrieval problem which, in general, allows for ambiguous reconstructions. In this paper, we show uniqueness of propagation-based phase contrast imaging for compactly supported objects in the near field regime, based on a description by the projection- and paraxial approximations. In this setting, propagation is governed by the Fresnel propagator and the unscattered part of the illumination function provides a known reference wave at the detector which facilitates phase reconstruction. The uniqueness theorem is derived using the theory of entire functions. Unlike previous results based on exact solution formulae, it is valid for arbitrary complex objects and requires intensity measurements only ...

  18. Light propagation with phase discontinuities: generalized laws of reflection and refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanfang; Genevet, Patrice; Kats, Mikhail A; Aieta, Francesco; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Capasso, Federico; Gaburro, Zeno

    2011-10-21

    Conventional optical components rely on gradual phase shifts accumulated during light propagation to shape light beams. New degrees of freedom are attained by introducing abrupt phase changes over the scale of the wavelength. A two-dimensional array of optical resonators with spatially varying phase response and subwavelength separation can imprint such phase discontinuities on propagating light as it traverses the interface between two media. Anomalous reflection and refraction phenomena are observed in this regime in optically thin arrays of metallic antennas on silicon with a linear phase variation along the interface, which are in excellent agreement with generalized laws derived from Fermat's principle. Phase discontinuities provide great flexibility in the design of light beams, as illustrated by the generation of optical vortices through use of planar designer metallic interfaces.

  19. Numerical Study of Void Fraction Distribution Propagation in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jianhui; LI Qing; LU Wenqiang

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic propagation model was developed for waves in two-phase flows by assuming that continuity waves and dynamic waves interact nonlinearly for certain flow conditions. The drift-flux model is solved with the one-dimensional continuity equation for gas-liquid two-phase flows as an initial-boundary value problem solved using the characteristic-curve method. The numerical results give the void fraction distribution propagation in a gas-liquid two-phase flow which shows how the flow pattern transition occurs. The numerical simulations of different flow patterns show that the void fraction distribution propagation is determined by the characteristics of the drift-flux between the liquid and gas flows and the void fraction range. Flow pattern transitions begin around a void fraction of 0.27 and end around 0.58. Flow pattern transitions do not occur for very high void concentrations.

  20. Higher-order differencing for phase-front propagation in geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-01-09

    We are testing higher-order differencing total variation diminishing schemes implemented in the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to reduce numerical dispersion of phase fronts in geothermal flow problems. The schemes are called total variation diminishing because they employ flux limiters to prevent spurious oscillations that sometimes occur with other higher-order differencing schemes near sharp fronts. Thus it appears that total variation diminishing schemes rely on an implicit assumption that the overall variability of advected quantities stays constant or diminishes with time. We use the Leonard total variation diminishing scheme in two special problems designed to test the applicability of the scheme for cases where this implicit assumption is violated. In the first problem, we investigate the isothermal propagation of a phase front in a composite porous medium where phase saturation increases as the front enters the second medium. In the second problem, we investigate the propagation of a phase front where boiling increases the saturation difference across the front as it propagates. In the composite porous medium problem, we find that spurious phase saturations can arise if the weighting scheme is based on relative permeability; for weighting based on phase saturation, no such oscillation arises. In the boiling front propagation problem, the front position is highly sensitive to weighting scheme, and the Leonard total variation diminishing scheme is more accurate than upstream weighting because it decreases numerical dispersion in the thermal energy equation.

  1. Nonlinear Propagation of Mag Waves Through the Transition Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Mahajan, S.; Tajima, T.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Una onda de gravitaci5n magneto acustica (GMA), se inicia en el regimen de alta beta cerca de la basa de fot5sfera solar y es segui- da, usando simulaciones numericas, mientras viaja radialmente a traves de la cromosfera, la regi5n de transici6n y dentro de la corona. Se ha' seleccionado parametros iniciales de manera que la beta resulte menor que uno cerca de la parte alta de la regi6n de transici6n. Nuestro interes maximo se concentra en la cantidad y forma del flujo de energia que puede ser llevada por la onda hasta la corona dados una atm6sfera inicial y amplitud de onda especificas. Segun los estudios a la fecha, el flujo de energ1a termico domina, aumentando linealmente con la ampli tud deonda y resulta de aproximadamente i05 ergs/cm2-s en una amplitud de 0.5. El flujo de energia cinetica siempre permanece despreciable, mientras que el flujo de energia magnetica depende de la orientaci5n inicial del campo. Un modo GMA rapido y casi paralelo, el cual es esen- cialmente un modo MHD en la corona se convierte a un modo rapido modificado y a uno lento, cuando la beta atmosferica disminuye a uno. ABSTRACT: A magneto-acoustic-gravity (MAG) wave is initiated in the high-beta regime near the base of the solar photosphere and followed, using numerical siriiulations, as it travels radially through the chromosphere, the transition region, and into the corona. Initial parameters are selected such that beta becomes less than one near the top of the transition region. Our primary interest is in the amount and form of energy flux that can be carried by the wave train into the corona for a specified initial atmosphere and wave amplitude. For the studies conducted to date, the thermal energy flux dominates, it about linearly with wave amplitude and becomes approximately 10 ergs/cm2-s at an amplitude of 0.5. The kinetic energy flux always remains negligible, while the magnetic energy flux depends on the inLtial field orientation. A nearly parallel fast MAG mode, which

  2. Propagation Mechanism Modeling in the Near-Region of Arbitrary Cross-Sectional Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Guan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the increase of the use of working frequencies in advanced radio communication systems, the near-region inside tunnels lengthens considerably and even occupies the whole propagation cell or the entire length of some short tunnels. This paper analytically models the propagation mechanisms and their dividing point in the near-region of arbitrary cross-sectional tunnels for the first time. To begin with, the propagation losses owing to the free space mechanism and the multimode waveguide mechanism are modeled, respectively. Then, by conjunctively employing the propagation theory and the three-dimensional solid geometry, the paper presents a general model for the dividing point between two propagation mechanisms. It is worthy to mention that this model can be applied in arbitrary cross-sectional tunnels. Furthermore, the general dividing point model is specified in rectangular, circular, and arched tunnels, respectively. Five groups of measurements are used to justify the model in different tunnels at different frequencies. Finally, in order to facilitate the use of the model, simplified analytical solutions for the dividing point in five specific application situations are derived. The results in this paper could help deepen the insight into the propagation mechanisms in tunnels.

  3. Evidence for the propagation of 2D pressure pulses in lipid monolayers near the phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Griesbauer, J; Wixforth, A; Schneider, M F

    2012-01-01

    The existence and propagation of acoustic pressure pulses on lipid monolayers at the air/water-interfaces are directly observed by simple mechanical detection. The pulses are excited by small amounts of solvents added to the monolayer from the air phase. Employing a deliberate control of the lipid interface compressibility k, we can show that the pulses propagate at velocities, which are precisely reflecting the nonlinear behavior of the interface. This is manifested by a pronounced minimum of the sound velocity in the monolayer phase transition regime, while ranging up to 1.5 m/s at high lateral pressures. Motivated by the ubiquitous presence of lipid interfaces in biology, we propose the demonstrated sound propagation as an efficient and fast way of communication and protein modulation along nerves, between cells and biological units being controlled by the physical state of the interfaces.

  4. Multiple phase screen calculation of two-way spherical wave propagation in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepp, Dennis L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution to the parabolic wave equation for spherical wave propagation in a disturbed ionosphere. The solution uses the Fourier/split step approach where the propagation medium is modeled using multiple phase-changing screens separated by free space. The phase screens can consist of deterministic or random components describing spatial scales of any size. This solution consists of realizations of the signal (i.e., the ionospheric transfer function) after two-way propagation from a transmitter, through the medium to a target, and back. The transmitter and target can be comprised of multiple, independent point scatterers. The solution is applicable to many propagation problems including synthetic aperture radar and is not subject to the small-scene limitation, where all scatterers in the scene experience identical propagation conditions. Several examples are given illustrating some features of the solution including reciprocity, relationship between one- and two-way (monostatic and bistatic) scintillation index, and reflection from a large target.

  5. Amplitude path corrections for regional phases in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.S.; Velasco, A.A.; Taylor, S.R.; Randall, G.E.

    1998-12-31

    The authors investigate the effectiveness of amplitude path corrections for regional phases on seismic event discrimination and magnitude estimation. Waveform data from digital stations in China for regional, shallow (< 50 km) events were obtained from the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) for years 1986 to 1996 using the USGS Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) and the Chinese State Seismological Bureau (SSB) catalogs. For each event, the amplitudes for each regional phase (P{sub n}, P{sub g}, S{sub n}, L{sub g}) were measured, as well as the P{sub g} and L{sub g} coda. Measured amplitudes were corrected for source scaling using estimates of m{sub b} and for distance using a power law that accounts for attenuation and spreading. The amplitude residuals were interpolated and mapped as 2-D amplitude correction surfaces. The authors employ several methods to create the amplitude correction surfaces: a waveguide method, and two interpolation methods (Baysian kriging and a circular moving window mean smoother). They explore the sensitivities of the surfaces to the method and to regional propagation, and apply these surfaces to correct amplitude data to reduce scatter in discrimination ratios and magnitude estimates.

  6. Characteristics of Zonal Propagation of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy at Equatorial Region in Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hui; CHEN Longxun; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2006-01-01

    Based on the daily NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset from 1980 to 1997, the zonal propagations of 850 hPa kinetic energy (KE) and meridional wind (v) at equatorial region are examined respectively. Results show that the strongest center of KE in the tropical Asian monsoon region is located at 75°-90°E, with the secondary over the Somalia low-level jet channel, i.e., about 50°E. East to 90°E, disturbances of both KE and v observed are mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean and propagating westward to the Bay of Bengal (BOB) passing through the South China Sea. But the propagation directions of both KE and v are rather disorderly between the BOB and the Somalia jet channel. Therefore, the East Asian summer monsoon and the Indian summer monsoon are different in the propagating features of the disturbances of KE and v. Above facts indicate that East Asian monsoon system exists undoubtedly even at the equatorial region, and quite distinct from the Indian monsoon system, it is mainly affected by the disturbances coming from the tropical western Pacific rather than from the Indian monsoon region. The boundary of the two monsoon systems is around 95°-100°E, which is more westward than the counterpart as proposed in earlier studies by 5-10 degrees in longitude.

  7. Variable phase propagation velocity for long-range lightning location system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Enno, Sven-Erik; Sugier, Jacqueline; Füllekrug, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for lightning location systems that use time of arrival (TOA) method. This velocity is normally fixed at or near the speed of light. However, this study finds that the radio waves from two submarine communication transmitters at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz exhibit phase propagation velocities that are 0.51% slower and 0.64% faster than the speed of light as a result of sky wave contributions and ground effects. Therefore, a novel technique with a variable phase propagation velocity is implemented for the first time in the TOA method and applied to electric field recordings with a long-baseline lightning location system that consists of four radio receivers in western Europe. The lightning locations inferred from variable velocities improve the accuracy of locations inferred from a fixed velocity by 0.89-1.06 km when compared to the lightning locations reported by the UK MetOffice. The normal distributions of the observed phase propagation velocities in small geographic areas are not centered at the speed of light. Consequently, representative velocities can be calculated for many small geographic areas to produce a velocity map over central France where numerous lightning discharges occurred. This map reflects the impact of sky waves and ground effects on the calculation of lightning locations as a result of the network configuration. It is concluded that the use of variable phase propagation velocities mitigates the influence of sky waves and ground effects in long-range lightning location networks.

  8. Non-Reflecting Regions for Finite Difference Methods in Modeling of Elastic Wave Propagation in Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishoni, Doron; Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    Solution of the wave equation using techniques such as finite difference or finite element methods can model elastic wave propagation in solids. This requires mapping the physical geometry into a computational domain whose size is governed by the size of the physical domain of interest and by the required resolution. This computational domain, in turn, dictates the computer memory requirements as well as the calculation time. Quite often, the physical region of interest is only a part of the whole physical body, and does not necessarily include all the physical boundaries. Reduction of the calculation domain requires positioning an artificial boundary or region where a physical boundary does not exist. It is important however that such a boundary, or region, will not affect the internal domain, i.e., it should not cause reflections that propagate back into the material. This paper concentrates on the issue of constructing such a boundary region.

  9. Influence investigation of a void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Ren, Shenghan; Qu, Xiaochao; Tian, Jie; Liang, Jimin

    2013-01-20

    A void region exists in some biological tissues, and previous studies have shown that inaccurate images would be obtained if it were not processed. A hybrid radiosity-diffusion method (HRDM) that couples the radiosity theory and the diffusion equation has been proposed to deal with the void problem and has been well demonstrated in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) simple models. However, the extent of the impact of the void region on the accuracy of modeling light propagation has not been investigated. In this paper, we first implemented and verified the HRDM in 3D models, including both the regular geometries and a digital mouse model, and then investigated the influences of the void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium. Our investigation results show that the influence of the region can be neglected when the size of the void is less than a certain range, and other cases must be taken into account.

  10. The phase of the crosspolarized signal generated by millimeter wave propagation through rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, W. P.; Bostian, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed schemes for cancelling rain-induced crosstalk in dual-polarized communications systems depend upon the phase relationships between the wanted and unwanted signals. This report investigates the phase relationship of the rain-generated crosspolarized signal relative to the copolarized signal. Theoretical results obtained from a commonly accepted propagation model are presented. Experimental data from the Communications Technology Satellite beacon and from the Comstar beacon are presented and the correlation between theory and data is discussed. An inexpensive semi-adaptive cancellation system is proposed and its performance expectations are presented. The implications of phase variations on a cancellation system are also discussed.

  11. Phase-locked solutions and their stability in the presence of propagation delays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautham C Sethia; Abhijit Sen; Fatihcan M Atay

    2011-11-01

    We investigate phase-locked solutions of a continuum field of nonlocally coupled identical phase oscillators with distance-dependent propagation delays. Equilibrium relations for both synchronous and travelling wave solutions in the parameter space characterizing the nonlocality and time delay are delineated. For the synchronous states a comprehensive stability diagram is presented that provides a heuristic synchronization condition as well as an analytic relation for the marginal stability curve. The relation yields simple stability expressions in the limiting cases of local and global coupling of phase oscillators.

  12. Toward Unified Corrections of Regional Phases for Amplitude and Travel Time Effects of Heterogeneous Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    Jabour (2000), Propagation of regional seismic phases (Lg and Sn) and Pn velocity structure along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary zone: tectonic ...77 73. The tomographic Pn velocity-gradient model and tectonic - plate boundaries...are tectonic plate boundaries (Bird, 2003). The velocity gradient is almost universally positive for the whole of Eurasia. Much of the gradient

  13. Toward Unified Correction of Regional Phases for Amplitude and Travel Time Effects of Heterogeneous Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    Jabour (2000), Propagation of regional seismic phases (Lg and Sn) and Pn velocity structure along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary zone: tectonic ...77 73. The tomographic Pn velocity-gradient model and tectonic - plate boundaries...are tectonic plate boundaries (Bird, 2003). The velocity gradient is almost universally positive for the whole of Eurasia. Much of the gradient

  14. Propagation of small disturbances in two phases, one component flow (1963); Propagation de petites perturbations dans un ecoulement double phase a un seul constituant (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boure, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    A small disturbance is, shown to give rise to two waves: a pressure (sonic) wave and a continuity wave. Their propagation velocities are calculated. These velocities are independent of the disturbance amplitude. The sonic velocity is primarily a function of that one corresponding to the same medium with no flow and of the liquid phase velocity. It is also a function of the physical properties of the phases on the saturation line, of the slip laws and of the void fraction. The continuity wave velocity is only a function of the slip laws, of the void fraction and of the velocity of either phase. It appears two kinds of critical flow rates which are calculated. The void fraction and the liquid and gas velocities variations are calculated. These results are extended to the case of a real loop and an approximative method is given for the treatment of this case. (author) [French] On montre qu'une petite perturbation donne naissance a deux ondes: une onde de pression (onde sonique) et une onde de continuite. On calcule leurs vitesses de propagation qui sont independantes de l'amplitude de la perturbation. La vitesse du son depend des proprietes physiques des phases le long de la courbe de saturation, des lois du glissement, de la fraction volumique de vapeur. Elle depend surtout de la vitesse qu'il aurait dans le milieu immobile de meme fraction volumique de vapeur, et de la vitesse de la phase liquide. La vitesse de l'onde de continuite depend des lois du glissement, de la fraction volumique de vapeur et de la vitesse d'une des phases. Il apparait deux types de debits critiques que l'on calcule. On calcule egalement les variations de la fraction volumique de vapeur et des vitesses des phases dans la perturbation. On generalise des resultats precedents dans le cas d'un circuit reel et on propose une methode approchee pour traiter le probleme dans ce cas. (auteur)

  15. Dielectric Properties and Lattice Distortion in Rhombohedral Phase Region and Phase Coexistence Region of PZT Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duan-Ming; ZHONG Zhi-Cheng; HAN Xiang-Yun; YAN Wen-Sheng; SUN Hong-Zhang; YANG Feng-Xia; ZHENG Ke-Yu; WEI Nian; LI Zhi-Hua

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between the dielectric properties and the lattice distortion in the phase coexistence region is discussed using a phase statistical distribution model, and in the rhombohedral phase region the two connection equations on the dielectric properties and the lattice distortion are established. Particularly, the relation between the dielectric properties and the lattice distortion is investigated in the phase coexistence region of PZT ceramics, and the fitting value of the volume fraction of the tetragonal phase VT to composition x in the equation is determined. Further,the fitting results are well consistent with the related experimental data. It involves more profound physical process than relation between the dielectric properties and composition x.

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region in artificially propagated Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuan; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Ouyang, Shan; Huang, Xiao-Chen; Zhan, Yang; Zhou, Ping; Rong, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-08-01

    The genetic diversity of the three major artificially propagated populations of Chinese sucker, an endangered freshwater fish species, was investigated using the sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control regions. Among the 89 individuals tested, 66 variable sites (7.26%) and 10 haplotypes were detected (Haplotype diversity Hd = 0.805, Nucleotide diversity π = 0.0287). In general, genetic diversity was lower in artificially propagated populations than in wild populations. This reduction in genetic diversity may be due to population bottlenecks, genetic drift and human selection. A stepping-stone pattern of gene flow was detected in the populations studied, showing much higher gene flow between neighbouring populations. To increase the genetic diversity, wild lineages should be introduced, and more lineages should be shared among artificially propagated populations.

  17. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  18. Continuum study on QCD phase diagram through an OPE-modified gluon propagator

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Chao; Xu, Shu-Sheng; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Within the Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) framework, a gluon propagator model incorporating quark's feedback through operator product expansion (OPE) is introduced to investigate the QCD phase diagram in the temperature--chemical-potential ($T-\\mu$) plane. Partial restoration of chiral symmetry at zero temperature and finite temperature are both studied, suggesting a first order phase transition point on the $\\mu$ axis and a critical end point at $(T_E,\\mu_E)/T_c = (0.85,1.11)$, where $T_c$ is the pseudo-critical temperature. In addition, we find the pseudo-critical line can be well parameterized with the curvature parameter $\\kappa$ and a consistent decrease in $\\kappa$ with more of gluon propagator distributed to quark's feedback.

  19. DOA and Noncircular Phase Estimation of Noncircular Signal via an Improved Noncircular Rotational Invariance Propagator Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the computationally efficient direction-of-arrival (DOA and noncircular (NC phase estimation problem of noncircular signal for uniform linear array. The key idea is to apply the noncircular propagator method (NC-PM which does not require eigenvalue decomposition (EVD of the covariance matrix or singular value decomposition (SVD of the received data. Noncircular rotational invariance propagator method (NC-RI-PM avoids spectral peak searching in PM and can obtain the closed-form solution of DOA, so it has lower computational complexity. An improved NC-RI-PM algorithm of noncircular signal for uniform linear array is proposed to estimate the elevation angles and noncircular phases with automatic pairing. We reconstruct the extended array output by combining the array output and its conjugated counterpart. Our algorithm fully uses the extended array elements in the improved propagator matrix to estimate the elevation angles and noncircular phases by utilizing the rotational invariance property between subarrays. Compared with NC-RI-PM, the proposed algorithm has better angle estimation performance and much lower computational load. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is analyzed. We also derive the variance of estimation error and Cramer-Rao bound (CRB of noncircular signal for uniform linear array. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  20. A model for wave propagation in a porous solid saturated by a three-phase fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juan E; Savioli, Gabriela B

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a model to describe the propagation of waves in a poroelastic medium saturated by a three-phase viscous, compressible fluid. Two capillary relations between the three fluid phases are included in the model by introducing Lagrange multipliers in the principle of virtual complementary work. This approach generalizes that of Biot for single-phase fluids and allows to determine the strain energy density, identify the generalized strains and stresses, and derive the constitutive relations of the system. The kinetic and dissipative energy density functions are obtained assuming that the relative flow within the pore space is of laminar type and obeys Darcy's law for three-phase flow in porous media. After deriving the equations of motion, a plane wave analysis predicts the existence of four compressional waves, denoted as type I, II, III, and IV waves, and one shear wave. Numerical examples showing the behavior of all waves as function of saturation and frequency are presented.

  1. Imbalance of group velocities for amplitude and phase pulses propagating in a resonant atomic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basalaev, M. Yu.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of light pulses with amplitude and phase modulations is investigated for a medium of resonant two-level atoms. It is shown that the pulse-like variations of the phase can be also described in terms of group velocity. It is found that in the nonlinear regime of atom-field interaction, the group velocities of amplitude and phase pulses can have a large imbalance. Namely, amplitude pulses travel at a velocity less than c , whereas the group velocity of phase pulses is greater than the velocity of light in free space or it is even negative. The predicted imbalance of the group velocities can be important in the case of chirped pulses propagating in a resonant medium.

  2. Controllable soliton propagation based on phase-front curvature in asymmetrical nonlocal media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Lü, Hua; Luo, Jianghua; Sun, Lihui

    2016-08-01

    The influence of phase-front curvature on the dynamical behavior of the fundamental mode soliton during its transmission in asymmetrical nonlocal media is studied in detail and the phase-front curvature can be imposed on the fundamental mode soliton by reshaping or phase imprinting technologies. By changing the phase-front curvature or its imposed position, controllable soliton propagation in asymmetrical nonlocal media can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11547007 and 11304024), the Innovation Personnel Training Plan for Excellent Youth of Guangdong University Project (Grant No. 2013LYM_0023), and the Yangtze Fund for Youth Teams of Science and Technology Innovation (Grant No. 2015cqt03).

  3. Propagation source wavelet phase extraction using multi-taper method coherence estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Morley, Christopher Keith

    2017-02-01

    It is possible to use statistical methods to extract the propagation source wavelet phase from seismic data without getting information from a well log. Using kurtosis as a high-order statistics can preserve the phase of the signal but it is highly sensitive to outliers. A new method is introduced here called the multi-taper method coherence estimation. Two steps are required: first, a cosine function that includes the dominant frequency and maximum amplitude of signal is chosen. Secondly, the maximum coherence in the frequency band of the signal, which shows the best phase matching between the time series is determined. To validate this new method real data sets were chosen and the extracted wavelet phases for noise free and noisy data sets were compared with data extracted from a well log. Extracted wavelets using Kurtosis were also generated for comparison, and demonstrate the improved results using the new method.

  4. Nonlinear unified equations for water waves propagating over uneven bottoms in the nearshore region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Considering the continuous characteristics for water waves propagating over complex topography in the nearshore region, the unified nonlinear equations, based on the hypothesis for a typical uneven bottom, are presented by employing the Hamiltonian variational principle for water waves. It is verified that the equations include the following special cases: the extension of Airy's nonlinear shallow-water equations, the generalized mild-slope equation, the dispersion relation for the second-order Stokes waves and the higher order Boussinesq-type equations.

  5. Control of Quantum Fluid Dynamics and Adaptive Phase Compensation for Laser Propagation in Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Jonathan; Sritharan, Sivaguru S.

    2015-11-01

    Equations of High Energy Laser propagation in a turbulent medium and the equations of quantum fluid dynamics are connected through a mathematical transformation. In this way the problem of adaptive phase compensation can be phrased as an initial velocity control problem for quantum fluid dynamics. The quantum hydrodynamics equation can be derived by applying the Madelung transformation to the time-dependent linear or nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The resulting equations are similar to incompressible Euler equations with an additional term denoted the quantum pressure term. The quantum hydrodynamics equation can thus be a good way to understand adaptive optics and laser propagation through the atmosphere. A Riemann solver within the Clawpack framework has been developed. An initial value optimization problem will be solved using adjoint methods. The initial phase can be controlled when the beam leaves the laser appartus. The control method can also be coupled to a Navier-Stokes solver in order to study thermal blooming where the laser heats the air and changes the index of refraction. The change in refractive index will in turn affect the propagation of the Laser beam. Using optimal control techniques, it is possible to adjust the beam in order to compensate for the heating.

  6. Characteristics of Small-scale Gravity Wave Propagation in the Mesopause Region over Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Murayama, Y.; Kita, K.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated characteristics of the atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) propagation using sodium airglow images obtained by an all-sky imager installed at Poker Flat Research Range (65.1N, 147.4W, MLAT 65.6) in Alaska. In this study, we developed data analysis programs which automatically derive the unambiguous 2-D power spectrum from the sodium airglow images, using a method by Coble et al. (1998). The power spectrums of the AGWs which have horizontal wavelengths between 2 - 400 km and periods up to 8 hours were obtained by these programs. Statistical study of the AGW data and mesospheric wind data by an MF radar during two winter seasons from October 2000 to April 2002 indicates the following characteristics. - During these periods, the AGW dominantly propagated westward in the zonal direction. - The meridional propagation direction frequently changed. This change seems to be explained by filtering effect by the mesospheric wind. - Total power of the AGW increased in December and January. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between these characteristics of the AGW propagation and unique phenomena in high-latitude region such as auroral precipitation. Acknowledgements This work is conducted as a part of "Alaska Project", the cooperative research project between NICT and Geophysical Institute of University of Alaska. Reference Coble, M. R., G. C. Papen, and C. S. Gardner, Computing two-dimensional unambiguous horizontal wavenumber spectra from OH airglow images, IEEE Trans. Geosci. and Remote Sens., 36, 368--382, 1998.

  7. Propagation of a radial phased-locked Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2011-11-21

    A radial phased-locked (PL) Lorentz beam array provides an appropriate theoretical model to describe a coherent diode laser array, which is an efficient radiation source for high-power beaming use. The propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and some mathematical techniques, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a radial PL Lorentz beam array are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are numerically calculated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are discussed in detail.

  8. ATLAS Transition Region Upgrade at Phase-1

    CERN Document Server

    Song, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the L1 Muon trigger transition region (1.0<|ƞ|<1.3) upgrade of ATLAS Detector at phase-1. The high fake trigger rate in the Endcap region 1.0<|ƞ|<2.4 would become a serious problem for the ATLAS L1 Muon trigger system at high luminosity. For the region 1.3<|ƞ|<2.4, covered by the Small Wheel, ATLAS is enhancing the present muon trigger by adding local fake rejection and track angle measurement capabilities. To reduce the rate in the remaining ƞ interval it has been proposed a similar enhancement by adding at the edge of the inner barrel a structure of 3-layers RPCs of a new generation. These RPCs will be based on a thinner gas gap and electrodes with respect to the ATLAS standards, a new high performance Front End, integrating fast TDC capabilities, and a new low profile and light mechanical structure allowing the installation in the tiny space available.This design effectively suppresses fake triggers by making the coincidence with both end-cap and interaction point...

  9. Experimentally enhanced model-based deconvolution of propagation-based phase-contrast data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichotka, M.; Palma, K.; Hasn, S.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years phase-contrast has become a much investigated modality in radiographic imaging. The radiographic setups employed in phase-contrast imaging are typically rather costly and complex, e.g. high performance Talbot-Laue interferometers operated at synchrotron light sources. In-line phase-contrast imaging states the most pedestrian approach towards phase-contrast enhancement. Utilizing small angle deflection within the imaged sample and the entailed interference of the deflected and un-deflected beam during spatial propagation, in-line phase-contrast imaging only requires a well collimated X-ray source with a high contrast & high resolution detector. Employing high magnification the above conditions are intrinsically fulfilled in cone-beam micro-tomography. As opposed of 2D imaging, where contrast enhancement is generally considered beneficial, in tomographic modalities the in-line phase-contrast effect can be quite a nuisance since it renders the inverse problem posed by tomographic reconstruction inconsistent, thus causing reconstruction artifacts. We present an experimentally enhanced model-based approach to disentangle absorption and in-line phase-contrast. The approach employs comparison of transmission data to a system model computed iteratively on-line. By comparison of the forward model to absorption data acquired in continuous rotation strong local deviations of the data residual are successively identified as likely candidates for in-line phase-contrast. By inducing minimal vibrations (few mrad) to the sample around the peaks of such deviations the transmission signal can be decomposed into a constant absorptive fraction and an oscillating signal caused by phase-contrast which again allows to generate separate maps for absorption and phase-contrast. The contributions of phase-contrast and the corresponding artifacts are subsequently removed from the tomographic dataset. In principle, if a 3D handling of the sample is available, this method also

  10. DO COROTATING INTERACTION REGION ASSOCIATED SHOCKS SURVIVE WHEN THEY PROPAGATE INTO THE HELIOSHEATH?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provornikova, E.; Opher, M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Izmodenov, V. [Department of Air Mechanics and Gas Dynamics, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Toth, G., E-mail: eprovorn@bu.edu, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu, E-mail: izmod@iki.rssi.ru, E-mail: gtoth@umich.edu [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    During the solar minimum at the distance of 42-52 AU from the Sun, Voyager 2 observed recurrent sharp, shock-like increases in the solar wind speed that look very much like forward shocks (Lazarus et al.). The shocks were produced by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that originated near the Sun. After the termination shock (TS) crossing in 2007, Voyager 2 entered the heliosheath and has been observing the plasma emanated during the recent solar minima. Measurements show high variable flow, but there were no shocks detected in the heliosheath. When CIR-driven shocks propagate to the outer heliosphere, their structure changes due to collision and merging processes of CIRs. In this Letter, we explore an effect of the merging of CIRs on the structure of CIR-associated shocks. We use a three-dimensional MHD model to study the outward propagation of the shocks with characteristics similar to those observed by Voyager 2 at {approx}45 AU (Lazarus et al. 1999). We show that due to merging of CIRs (1) reverse shocks disappear, (2) forward shocks become weaker due to interaction with rarefaction regions from preceding CIRs, and (3) forward shocks significantly weaken in the heliosheath. Merged CIRs produce compression regions in the heliosheath with small fluctuations of plasma parameters. Amplitudes of the fluctuations diminish as they propagate deeper in the sheath. We conclude that interaction of shocks and rarefaction regions could be one of the explanations, why shocks produced by CIRs are not observed in the heliosheath by Voyager 2 while they were frequently observed upstream the TS.

  11. 3-D elastic wave propagation on regional to global scales using an ADER-DG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, S.; Pelties, C.; Igel, H.

    2012-04-01

    The complex 3-D material property distributions inside the Earth and detailed information on the physical dynamics of an earthquake require robust numerical methods to generate accurate results in form of seismograms. Furthermore, these simulations must be highly scalable on HPC infrastructures for realistic simulations. Possible applications are regional forward modeling studies for hazard assessment or seismic tomography on a global scale to illuminate the deep Earth's interior. The Arbitrary high-order DERivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method is well suited to simulate 3-D elastic wave propagation to capture the high frequency content of the wavefield over long propagation distances. It is able to incorporate fine-scale Earth structures on a regional to global scale using flexible tetrahedral meshing and features like h-p adaptivity and local time stepping (Dumbser et al. 2007). We were able to successfully benchmark seismograms originating from simpler 1-D layered Earth models with synthetics of the well-tested spectral-element method. The verification towards 3-D models is carried out on a regional model of Europe taking the topography of the Earth's surface and Mohorovicic discontinuity into account using the EPcrust model of Molinari et al. (2011) on top of the AK135 model of Kennett et al. (1995). For the L'Aquila earthquake (Italy) in 2009 we compare synthetic seismograms of our ADER-DG solver with real data up to 20s period and can show a very good fit between the signals.

  12. Interface Propagation and Microstructure Evolution in Phase Field Models of Stress-Induced Martensitic Phase Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    between phase transformation and thermoelasticity equations has important computational con- sequences: finite element thermoelasticity codes can be...combination of four herring bone types of micro- structure is developed (Fig. 10). At some stage, the equivalence of both variants is violated-units...preceding analysis . At these high driving forces the interface motion is governed by the phonon (and at lower temperatures, by the electron) drag

  13. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenkel, Martin, E-mail: mkrenke@gwdg.de; Töpperwien, Mareike; Salditt, Tim, E-mail: tsaldit@gwdg.de [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Dullin, Christian [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Alves, Frauke [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Department of Haematology and Medical Oncology, Medical Center Göttingen, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Department of Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals, Max-Planck-Institute of Experimental Medicine, 37075 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  14. Direct observation of ultraslow hyperbolic polariton propagation with negative phase velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoxall, Edward; Schnell, Martin; Nikitin, Alexey Y.; Txoperena, Oihana; Woessner, Achim; Lundeberg, Mark B.; Casanova, Félix; Hueso, Luis E.; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Polaritons with hyperbolic dispersion are key to many emerging photonic technologies, including subdiffraction imaging, sensing and spontaneous emission engineering. Fundamental to their effective application are the lifetimes of the polaritons, as well as their phase and group velocities. Here, we combine time-domain interferometry and scattering-type near-field microscopy to visualize the propagation of hyperbolic polaritons in space and time, allowing the first direct measurement of all these quantities. In particular, we study infrared phonon polaritons in a thin hexagonal boron nitride waveguide exhibiting hyperbolic dispersion and deep subwavelength-scale field confinement. Our results reveal—in a natural material—negative phase velocity paired with a remarkably slow group velocity of 0.002c and lifetimes in the picosecond range. While these findings show the polariton's potential for mediating strong light-matter interactions and negative refraction, our imaging technique paves the way to explicit nanoimaging of polariton propagation characteristics in other two-dimensional materials, metamaterials and waveguides.

  15. Onset of ice VII phase during ps laser pulse propagation through liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V. Rakesh; Kiran, P. Prem

    2017-01-01

    Water dominantly present in liquid state on earth gets transformed to crystalline polymorphs under different dynamic loading conditions. Out of different crystalline phases discovered till date, ice VII is observed to be stable over wide pressure (2-63 GPa) and temperature (>273 K) ranges. The formation of ice VII crystalline structure has been vastly reported during high pressure static compression using diamond anvil cell and propagation of high energy (>50 mJ/pulse) nanosecond laser pulse induced dynamic high pressures through liquid water. We present the onset of ice VII phase at low threshold of 2 mJ/pulse during 30 ps (532 nm, 10 Hz) laser pulse induced shock propagating through liquid water. Role of input pulse energy on the evolution of Stoke's and anti-Stoke's Raman shift of the dominant A1g mode of ice VII, filamentation, free-electrons, plasma shielding is presented. The H-bond network rearrangement, electron ion energy transfer time coinciding with the excitation pulse duration supported by the filamentation and plasma shielding of the ps laser pulses reduced the threshold of ice VII structure formation. Filamentation and the plasma shielding have shown the localized creation and sustenance of ice VII structure in liquid water over 3 mm length and 50 μm area of cross-section.

  16. Kinematics and thermodynamics across a propagating non-stoichiometric oxidation phase front in spent fuel grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, R.B.; Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Spent fuel contains mixtures, alloy and compound, but are dominated by U and O except for some UO{sub 2} fuels with burnable poisons (gadolinia in BWR rods), the other elements evolve during reactor operation from neutron reaction and fission + fission decay events. Due to decay, chemical composition and activity of spent fuel will continue to evolve after removal from reactors. During the time interval with significant radioactivity levels relevant for a geological repository, it is important to develop models for potential chemical responses in spent fuel and potential degradation of repository. One such potential impact is the oxidation of spent fuel, which results in initial phase change of UO{sub 2} lattice to U{sub 4}O{sub 9} and the next phase change is probably to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} although it has not been observed yet below 200C. The U{sub 4}O{sub 9} lattice is nonstoichiometric with a O/U weight ratio at 2.4. Preliminary indications are that the UO{sub 2} has a O/U of 2. 4 at the time just before it transforms into the U{sub 4}O{sub 9} phase. In the oxygen weight gain versus time response, a plateau appears as the O/U approaches 2.4. Part of this plateau is due to geometrical effects of a U{sub 4}O{sub 9} phase change front propagating into UO{sub 2} grain volumes; however, this may indicate a metastable phase change delay kinetics or a diffusional related delay time until the oxygen density can satisfy stoichiometry and energy conditions for phase changes. Experimental data show a front of U{sub 4}O{sub 9} lattice structure propagating into grains of the UO{sub 2} lattice. To describe this spatially inhomogenous oxidation phase transition, as well as the expected U{sub 3}O{sub 8} phase transition from the U{sub 4}O{sub 9} lattice, lattice models are developed and spatially discontinuous kinematic and energetic expressions are derived. 9 refs.

  17. Phase-resolved pulse propagation through metallic photonic crystal slabs: plasmonic slow light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhardt, Anja; Nau, Dietmar; Bauer, Christina; Christ, André; Gräbeldinger, Hedi; Giessen, Harald

    2017-03-28

    We characterized the electromagnetic field of ultra-short laser pulses after propagation through metallic photonic crystal structures featuring photonic and plasmonic resonances. The complete pulse information, i.e. the envelope and phase of the electromagnetic field, was measured using the technique of cross-correlation frequency resolved optical gating. In good agreement, measurements and scattering matrix simulations show a dispersive behaviour of the spectral phase at the position of the resonances. Asymmetric Fano-type resonances go along with asymmetric phase characteristics. Furthermore, the spectral phase is used to calculate the dispersion of the sample and possible applications in dispersion compensation are investigated. Group refractive indices of 700 and 70 and group delay dispersion values of 90 000 fs(2) and 5000 fs(2) are achieved in transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization, respectively. The behaviour of extinction and spectral phase can be understood from an intuitive model using the complex transmission amplitude. An associated depiction in the complex plane is a useful approach in this context. This method promises to be valuable also in photonic crystal and filter design, for example, with regards to the symmetrization of the resonances.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced global propagation of transient phase resetting associated with directional information flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eKawasaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG phase synchronization analyses can reveal large-scale communication between distant brain areas. However, it is not possible to identify the directional information flow between distant areas using conventional phase synchronization analyses. In the present study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to the occipital area in subjects who were resting with their eyes closed, and analyzed the spatial propagation of transient TMS-induced phase resetting by using the transfer entropy (TE, to quantify the causal and directional flow of information. The time-frequency EEG analysis indicated that the theta (5 Hz phase locking factor (PLF reached its highest value at the distant area (the motor area in this study, with a time lag that followed the peak of the transient PLF enhancements of the TMS-targeted area at the TMS onset. PPI (phase-preservation index analyses demonstrated significant phase resetting at the TMS-targeted area and distant area. Moreover, the TE from the TMS-targeted area to the distant area increased clearly during the delay that followed TMS onset. Interestingly, the time lags were almost coincident between the PLF and TE results (152 vs. 165 ms, which provides strong evidence that the emergence of the delayed PLF reflects the causal information flow. Such tendencies were observed only in the higher-intensity TMS condition, and not in the lower-intensity or sham TMS conditions. Thus, TMS may manipulate large-scale causal relationships between brain areas in an intensity-dependent manner. We demonstrated that single-pulse TMS modulated global phase dynamics and directional information flow among synchronized brain networks. Therefore, our results suggest that single-pulse TMS can manipulate both incoming and outgoing information in the TMS-targeted area associated with functional changes.

  19. Initial-value semiclassical propagators for the Wigner phase space representation: Formulation based on the interpretation of the Moyal equation as a Schrödinger equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Shin-ichi

    2015-12-28

    We formulate various semiclassical propagators for the Wigner phase space representation from a unified point of view. As is shown in several studies, the Moyal equation, which is an equation of motion for the Wigner distribution function, can be regarded as the Schrödinger equation of an extended Hamiltonian system where its "position" and "momentum" correspond to the middle point of two points of the original phase space and the difference between them, respectively. Then we show that various phase-space semiclassical propagators can be formulated just by applying existing semiclassical propagators to the extended system. As a result, a phase space version of the Van Vleck propagator, the initial-value Van Vleck propagator, the Herman-Kluk propagator, and the thawed Gaussian approximation are obtained. In addition, we numerically compare the initial-value phase-space Van Vleck propagator, the phase-space Herman-Kluk propagator, and the classical mechanical propagation as approximation methods for the time propagation of the Wigner distribution function in terms of both accuracy and convergence speed. As a result, we find that the convergence speed of the Van Vleck propagator is far slower than others as is the case of the Hilbert space, and the Herman-Kluk propagator keeps its accuracy for a long period compared with the classical mechanical propagation while the convergence speed of the latter is faster than the former.

  20. A multiple-mode three-dimensional model of VLF propagation in the earth-ionosphere waveguide in the presence of localized D region disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, William L.; Inan, Umran S.; Bell, Timothy F.

    1993-01-01

    Transient localized D region disturbances, such as those associated with lightning discharges, affect the characteristics of VLF waves propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. In particular, both phase and amplitude changes in the subionospheric signal can be observed at receiving sites as a result of the wave scattering that takes place in the disturbed region. In the present paper we present a multiple-mode three-dimensional model of VLF propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide in the presence of localized D region disturbances. The model takes into account great circle (GC) propagation paths with realistic ground and ionospheric conductivity changes that result in mode conversion along the path. It is assumed that conductivity changes transverse to the GC paths are negligible except in the vicinity of the D region disturbance and that mode coupling is negligible within the disturbed region. This new model is applied to experimental observations and is found to be in general agreement. The diagnostics potential of the model for characterizing energetic particle precipitation events is discussed.

  1. Temporal analysis of laser beam propagation in the atmosphere using computer-generated long phase screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, Federico; Recolons, Jaume; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Batet, Oscar

    2008-02-04

    Temporal analysis of the irradiance at the detector plane is intended as the first step in the study of the mean fade time in a free optical communication system. In the present work this analysis has been performed for a Gaussian laser beam propagating in the atmospheric turbulence by means of computer simulation. To this end, we have adapted a previously known numerical method to the generation of long phase screens. The screens are displaced in a transverse direction as the wave is propagated, in order to simulate the wind effect. The amplitude of the temporal covariance and its power spectrum have been obtained at the optical axis, at the beam centroid and at a certain distance from these two points. Results have been worked out for weak, moderate and strong turbulence regimes and when possible they have been compared with theoretical models. These results show a significant contribution of beam wander to the temporal behaviour of the irradiance, even in the case of weak turbulence. We have also found that the spectral bandwidth of the covariance is hardly dependent on the Rytov variance.

  2. Phase Propagations in a Coupled Oscillator-Excitor System of FitzHugh-Nagumo Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lu-Qun; OUYANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    @@ A one-dimensional array of 2N + 1 automata with FitzHugh-Nagumo dynamics, in which one is set to be oscillatory and the others are excitable, is investigated with bi-directional interactions. We find that 1 : 1 rhythm propagation in the array depends on the appropriate couple strength and the excitability of the system. On the two sides of the 1: 1 rhythm area in parameter space, two different kinds of dynamical behaviour of the pacemaker, i.e. phase-locking phenomena and canard-like phenomena, are shown. The latter is found in company with chaotic pattern and period doubling bifurcation. When the coupling strength is larger than a critical value,the whole system ends to a steady state.

  3. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3440 S. Dearborn Street, E1-116, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  4. Generation of propagating spin waves from regions of increased dynamic demagnetising field near magnetic antidots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, C. S., E-mail: csd203@exeter.ac.uk; Kruglyak, V. V. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Sadovnikov, A. V.; Nikitov, S. A. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Kotel' nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Grishin, S. V.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P. [Laboratory “Metamaterials,” Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-19

    We have used Brillouin Light Scattering and micromagnetic simulations to demonstrate a point-like source of spin waves created by the inherently nonuniform internal magnetic field in the vicinity of an isolated antidot formed in a continuous film of yttrium-iron-garnet. The field nonuniformity ensures that only well-defined regions near the antidot respond in resonance to a continuous excitation of the entire sample with a harmonic microwave field. The resonantly excited parts of the sample then served as reconfigurable sources of spin waves propagating (across the considered sample) in the form of caustic beams. Our findings are relevant to further development of magnonic circuits, in which point-like spin wave stimuli could be required, and as a building block for interpretation of spin wave behavior in magnonic crystals formed by antidot arrays.

  5. A parametric analysis of waves propagating in a porous solid saturated by a three-phase fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juan E; Savioli, Gabriela B

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a model for the propagation of waves in a poroelastic solid saturated by a three-phase viscous, compressible fluid. The constitutive relations and the equations of motion are stated first. Then a plane wave analysis determines the phase velocities and attenuation coefficients of the four compressional waves and one shear wave that propagate in this type of medium. A procedure to compute the elastic constants in the constitutive relations is defined next. Assuming the knowledge of the shear modulus of the dry matrix, the other elastic constants in the stress-strain relations are determined by employing ideal gedanken experiments generalizing those of Biot's theory for single-phase fluids. These experiments yield expressions for the elastic constants in terms of the properties of the individual solid and fluids phases. Finally the phase velocities and attenuation coefficients of all waves are computed for a sample of Berea sandstone saturated by oil, gas, and water.

  6. Phase mixing of Alfvén waves propagating in non-reflective magnetic plasma configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Michael S.; Petrukhin, Nikolai S.

    2017-04-01

    The ability of phase mixing to provide efficient damping of Alfvén waves even in weakly dissipative plasmas made it a popular mechanism for explaining the solar coronal heating. Initially it was studied in the equilibrium configurations with the straight magnetic field lines and the Alfvén speed only varying in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. Later the analysis of the Alfvén wave phase mixing was extended in various directions. In particular it was studied in two-dimensional planar magnetic plasma equilibria. Analytical investigation was carried out under the assumption that the wavelength is much smaller than the characteristic scale of the background quantity variation. This assumption enabled using the Wentzel, Kramers, and Brillouin (WKB) method. When it is not satisfied the study was only carried out numerically. In general, even the wave propagation in a one-dimensional inhomogeneous equilibrium can be only studied numerically. However there is one important exception, so-called non-reflective equilibria. In these equilibria the wave equation with the variable phase speed reduces to the Klein-Gordon equation with constant coefficients. In this paper we apply the theory of non-reflective wave propagation to studying the Alfvén wave phase mixing in two-dimensional planar magnetic plasma equilibria. Using curvilinear coordinates we reduce the equation describing the Alfvén wave phase mixing to the equation that becomes a one-dimensional wave equation in the absence of dissipation. This equation is further reduced to the equation which is the one-dimensional Klein-Gordon equation in the absence of dissipation. Then we show that this equation has constant coefficients when a particular relation between the plasma density and magnetic field magnitude is satisfied. Using the derived Klein-Gordon-type equation we study the phase mixing in various non-reflective equilibria. We emphasise that our analysis is valid even when the wavelength is

  7. Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections Observed During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Ibrahim, M.; Manoharan, P. K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we investigate the interplanetary consequences and travel time details of 58 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the Sun-Earth distance. The CMEs considered are halo and partial halo events of width {>} 120°. These CMEs occurred during 2009 - 2013, in the ascending phase of the Solar Cycle 24. Moreover, they are Earth-directed events that originated close to the centre of the solar disk (within about ±30° from the Sun's centre) and propagated approximately along the Sun-Earth line. For each CME, the onset time and the initial speed have been estimated from the white-light images observed by the LASCO coronagraphs onboard the SOHO space mission. These CMEs cover an initial speed range of {˜} 260 - 2700 km s^{-1}. For these CMEs, the associated interplanetary shocks (IP shocks) and interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) at the near-Earth environment have been identified from in-situ solar wind measurements available at the OMNI data base. Most of these events have been associated with moderate to intense IP shocks. However, these events have caused only weak to moderate geomagnetic storms in the Earth's magnetosphere. The relationship of the travel time with the initial speed of the CME has been compared with the observations made in the previous Cycle 23, during 1996 - 2004. In the present study, for a given initial speed of the CME, the travel time and the speed at 1 AU suggest that the CME was most likely not much affected by the drag caused by the slow-speed dominated heliosphere. Additionally, the weak geomagnetic storms and moderate IP shocks associated with the current set of Earth-directed CMEs indicate magnetically weak CME events of Cycle 24. The magnetic energy that is available to propagate CME and cause geomagnetic storm could be significantly low.

  8. Gain-assisted superluminal microwave pulse propagation via four-wave mixing in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sabegh, Z Amini; Maleki, M A; Mahmoudi, M

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation and amplification of a microwave field in a four-level cascade quantum system which is realized in a superconducting phase quantum circuit. It is shown that by increasing the microwave pump tones feeding the system, the normal dispersion switches to the anomalous and the gain-assisted superluminal microwave propagation is obtained in this system. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the stimulated microwave field is generated via four-wave mixing without any inversion population in the energy levels of the system (amplification without inversion) and the group velocity of the generated pulse can be controlled by the external oscillating magnetic fluxes. We also show that in some special set of parameters, the absorption-free superluminal generated microwave propagation is obtained in superconducting phase quantum circuit system.

  9. Method for auto-alignment of digital optical phase conjugation systems based on digital propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mooseok; Ruan, Haowen; Zhou, Haojiang; Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-06-16

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC) has enabled many optical applications such as aberration correction and image transmission through fiber. In recent years, implementation of digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) has opened up the possibility of its use in biomedical optics (e.g. deep-tissue optical focusing) due to its ability to provide greater-than-unity OPC reflectivity (the power ratio of the phase conjugated beam and input beam to the OPC system) and its flexibility to accommodate additional wavefront manipulations. However, the requirement for precise (pixel-to-pixel matching) alignment of the wavefront sensor and the spatial light modulator (SLM) limits the practical usability of DOPC systems. Here, we report a method for auto-alignment of a DOPC system by which the misalignment between the sensor and the SLM is auto-corrected through digital light propagation. With this method, we were able to accomplish OPC playback with a DOPC system with gross sensor-SLM misalignment by an axial displacement of up to~1.5 cm, rotation and tip/tilt of ~5° and in-plane displacement of ~5 mm (dependent on the physical size of the sensor and the SLM). Our auto-alignment method robustly achieved a DOPC playback peak-to-background ratio (PBR) corresponding to more than ~30 % of the theoretical maximum. As an additional advantage, the auto-alignment procedure can be easily performed at will and, as such, allows us to correct for small mechanical drifts within the DOPC systems, thus overcoming a previously major DOPC system vulnerability. We believe that this reported method for implementing robust DOPC systems will broaden the practical utility of DOPC systems.

  10. Landau Theory in the Region of First Order Phase Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Medvedovskaya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For the case when the line of the first order phase transitions does not transform into the line of the second order phase transitions, i.e. not as ends with the tricritical point but not with a critical one: critical lines, limiting the region of metastable states, by using the Landau theory of phase transitions were determined.

  11. Simulation of laser beam propagation over land and sea using phase screens: a comparison with experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Henriksson, Markus; Steinvall, Ove

    2005-11-01

    Understanding and predicting laser beam propagation effects in the atmosphere is of importance for laser countermeasures and related applications. Turbulence effects cause beam wander, beam broadening and intensity scintillations reducing e.g. the power in bucket and the tracking accuracy. Modelling laser beam propagation in turbulence using successive phase screens provides an efficient tool for performance predictions. In this work phase screens are used to model laser beam propagation over land and sea. Different phase screens generators utilising the Kolmogorov or von Karman spectra were considered. Critical parameters using phase screens include the number of screen applied along the propagation path, inner- and outer scale size, variations in the structure parameter and spatial frequencies. Effects such as beam wander, angle-of-arrival fluctuations and intensity scintillations are discussed. The simulated results are compared with experimental data recorded at different ranges, various turbulence strengths and for single- and double paths. A generic example describing laser countermeasure against an infrared homing missile in a naval scenario is presented.

  12. Effect of time-varying tropospheric models on near-regional and regional infrasound propagation as constrained by observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mihan H.; Stump, Brian W.; Hayward, Chris

    2008-06-01

    The Chulwon Seismo-Acoustic Array (CHNAR) is a regional seismo-acoustic array with co-located seismometers and infrasound microphones on the Korean peninsula. Data from forty-two days over the course of a year between October 1999 and August 2000 were analyzed; 2052 infrasound-only arrivals and 23 seismo-acoustic arrivals were observed over the six week study period. A majority of the signals occur during local working hours, hour 0 to hour 9 UT and appear to be the result of cultural activity located within a 250 km radius. Atmospheric modeling is presented for four sample days during the study period, one in each of November, February, April, and August. Local meteorological data sampled at six hour intervals is needed to accurately model the observed arrivals and this data produced highly temporally variable thermal ducts that propagated infrasound signals within 250 km, matching the temporal variation in the observed arrivals. These ducts change dramatically on the order of hours, and meteorological data from the appropriate sampled time frame was necessary to interpret the observed arrivals.

  13. Ionospheric D-region temperature relaxation and its influences on radio signal propagation after solar X-flares occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajčetić Jovan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper our attention is focused on relations between radio signal propagation characteristics and temperature changes in D-region after solar X-flare occurrence. We present temperature dependencies of electron plasma frequency, the parameter that describes medium conditions for propagation of an electromagnetic wave, and the refractive index which describes how this wave propagates. As an example for quantitative calculations based on obtained theoretical equations we choose the reaction of the D-region to the solar X-flare occurred on May 5th, 2010. The ionospheric modelling is based on the experimental data obtained by low ionosphere observations using very low frequency radio signal. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III-44002, 176002, 176004 i br. TR-32030

  14. Life-times of quantum resonances through the Geometrical Phase Propagator Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlou, G. E.; Karanikas, A. I.; Diakonos, F. K.

    2016-12-01

    We employ the recently introduced Geometric Phase Propagator Approach (GPPA) (Diakonos et al., 2012) to develop an improved perturbative scheme for the calculation of life times in driven quantum systems. This incorporates a resummation of the contributions of virtual processes starting and ending at the same state in the considered time interval. The proposed procedure allows for a strict determination of the conditions leading to finite life times in a general driven quantum system by isolating the resummed terms in the perturbative expansion contributing to their generation. To illustrate how the derived conditions apply in practice, we consider the effect of driving in a system with purely discrete energy spectrum, as well as in a system for which the eigenvalue spectrum contains a continuous part. We show that in the first case, when the driving contains a dense set of frequencies acting as a noise to the system, the corresponding bound states acquire a finite life time. When the energy spectrum contains also a continuum set of eigenvalues then the bound states, due to the driving, couple to the continuum and become quasi-bound resonances. The benchmark of this change is the appearance of a Fano-type peak in the associated transmission profile. In both cases the corresponding life-time can be efficiently estimated within the reformulated GPPA approach.

  15. Propagation of Shock on NREL Phase VI Wind Turbine Airfoil under Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on numeric analysis of compressible flow around National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL phase VI wind turbine blade airfoil S809. Although wind turbine airfoils are low Reynolds number airfoils, a reasonable investigation of compressible flow under extreme condition might be helpful. A subsonic flow (mach no. M=0.8 has been considered for this analysis and the impacts of this flow under seven different angles of attack have been determined. The results show that shock takes place just after the mid span at the top surface and just before the mid span at the bottom surface at zero angle of attack. Slowly the shock waves translate their positions as angle of attack increases. A relative translation of the shock waves in upper and lower face of the airfoil are presented. Variation of Turbulent viscosity ratio and surface Y+ have also been determined. A k-ω SST turbulent model is considered and the commercial CFD code ANSYS FLUENT is used to find the pressure coefficient (Cp as well as the lift (CL and drag coefficients (CD. A graphical comparison of shock propagation has been shown with different angle of attack. Flow separation and stream function are also determined.

  16. Regional Alignment: Phase Zero Logistics Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    operations in OIF affected doctrinal language and organizational change in the shift from a regional aligned structure. 17John Sloan Brown, Kevlar ...26John Sloan Brown, Kevlar Legions: The Transformations of the United States Army 1989-2005 (Washington, DC: Center of Military History, 2011), 139...it remains the preeminent information age Army. To do this Force XXI incorporates a holistic approach to change. The innovative approach that we

  17. Particular solutions of the equation for the quark propagator in the infra-red region of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, B.A.; Davydychev, A.I.; Kurennoy, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A number of particular solutions of the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the quark propagator in the infra-red region of QCD is obtained taking account of the gauge identities. The solutions are of a nonperturbative character, some of them break the chiral invariance. The obtained solutions are analysed with the help of the effective potential method.

  18. Luminous phase of nanosecond discharge in deionized water: morphology, propagation velocity and optical emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimek, Milan; Pongrác, Branislav; Babický, Václav; Člupek, Martin; Lukeš, Petr

    2017-07-01

    We employed the techniques of time-resolved intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) microscopy and spectroscopy to register basic morphologic and emission fingerprints of micro-discharges produced in deionized water. Fast rise-time positive high-voltage pulses (full width at half maximum of ˜7 ns and amplitude of ˜100 kV) in a point-to-plane electrode geometry produced micro-discharges, either periodically or in a single-pulse regime with the energy of ˜0.1 J dissipated during a single discharge event. Time resolved ICCD images evidence typical streamer-like branched filamentary morphology. Luminous discharge filaments show very fast and approximately linear initial expansion of the length with propagation velocity of ˜2 × 105 m s-1. When the HV pulse reaches its maximum value, the length of the primary luminous filaments reaches ˜1.3 mm. After initial expansion, the length of luminous filaments collapses and can be characterised by velocity of ˜1.9 × 104 m s-1. The first collapse is followed by a second slightly slower expansion, which is driven by the arrival of a reflected HV pulse, and which can be roughly approximated by propagation velocity of ˜1.5 × 105 m s-1. The second collapse (occurring after second expansion) proceeds at a nearly identical velocity compared with the first one. By combining two ICCD based techniques, we have been able to associate, for the first time ever, characteristic emission spectra with the most important phases of the micro-discharge development. The UV-vis-NIR emission spectra show a broad-band continuum evolving during the first expansion and collapse, followed by the well-known HI/OI atomic lines occurring together with continuum emission during the second expansion and collapse. We conclude that bound-free and free-free radiative transitions are basic emission characteristics of the nanosecond discharge initiation mechanism in liquid water which does not involve the formation of vapour bubbles.

  19. HF wave propagation and induced ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-03-01

    The propagation and excitation of artificial ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region by high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves injected into the overhead ionospheric layer is examined. EM waves with ordinary (O) mode polarization reach the critical layer only if their incidence angle is within the Spitze cone. Near the critical layer the wave electric field is linearly polarized and directed parallel to the magnetic field lines. For large enough amplitudes, the O mode becomes unstable to the four-wave oscillating two-stream instability and the three-wave parametric decay instability driving large-amplitude Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. The interaction between the induced Langmuir turbulence and electrons located within the 50-100 km wide transmitter heating cone at an altitude of 230 km can potentially accelerate the electrons along the magnetic field to several tens to a few hundreds of eV, far beyond the thresholds for optical emissions and ionization of the neutral gas. It could furthermore result in generation of shear Alfvén waves such as those recently observed in laboratory experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles Large Plasma Device.

  20. Conditions Under Which Megathrust Ruptures Propagate Through Shallow Velocity-Weakening Regions to the Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, E. M.; Kozdon, J. E.; Lotto, G. C.

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted dynamic rupture simulations of the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake to identify conditions that permit megathrust ruptures to reach the trench, even when the uppermost portion of the plate interface is frictionally stable. Our models incorporate rate-and-state friction featuring depth-dependent properties that transition from velocity-weakening at depth to velocity-strengthening beneath the accretionary prism. Earthquake nucleation is thus restricted to greater depths, consistent with the lack of shallow seismicity near the trench. Despite this, we find that unless the uppermost velocity-strengthening section of the fault extends beyond about 50 km along dip, ruptures propagating upward from depth break through to the trench. Stress changes, carried by seismic waves released by deep slip, provide the necessary driving force that maintains propagation even in the absence of frictional weakening and stress drop. In our present set of simulations, we assume ideally elastic response of the off-fault material. We therefore caution that our conclusions will likely be modified by the occurrence of plastic deformation within the accretionary prism, which we are planning to explore in the near future. Our models are calibrated through comparison with seafloor deformation measurements and onshore 1-Hz GPS data. We explore the ability of these data sets to constrain frictional properties along the plate interface, particularly in the near-trench region. Our modeling efforts thus far suggest strong trade-offs between stress drop along the deeper part of the fault and the shallow frictional properties. In addition to our preferred model featuring a shallow velocity-strengthening section, we can equally well fit the data with velocity-weakening properties extending all the way to the trench, provided we decrease the average stress drop by reducing the initial effective normal stress. We are also examining the signature of extreme shallow slip in hydroacoustic

  1. The OSU self-phased array for propagation measurements using the 11.7 GHz CTS beacon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobold, D. M.; Hodge, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A self phased array was developed for propagation measurements on an earth-space path. The 11.7 GHz CTS beacon was used as the signal source. The self phased array was used to measure angle of arrival as well as attenuation and scintillation statistics. The performance of the array is described, and sample data are presented. The tracking capability of the self phased array was also studied. This technique permits fully electronic, nonmechanical satellite tracking, thus simplifying unmanned operation and eliminating severe weather tracking constraints.

  2. Lookup table-based sampling of the phase function for Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naglič, Peter; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2017-01-01

    Analytical expressions for sampling the scattering angle from a phase function in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation are available only for a limited number of phase functions. Consequently, numerical sampling methods based on tabulated values are often required instead. By using Monte Carlo simulated reflectance, we compare two existing and propose an improved numerical sampling method and show that both the number of the tabulated values and the numerical sampling method significantly influence the accuracy of the simulated reflectance. The provided results and guidelines should serve as a good starting point for conducting computationally efficient Monte Carlo simulations with numerical phase function sampling. PMID:28663872

  3. Preventing thermal runaway propagation in lithium ion battery packs using a phase change composite material: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Stephen; Schweitzer, Ben; Khateeb, Siddique; Al-Hallaj, Said

    2017-02-01

    The safety issues of lithium ion batteries pose ongoing challenges as the market for Li-ion technology continues to grow in personal electronics, electric mobility, and stationary energy storage. The severe risks posed by battery thermal runaway necessitate safeguards at every design level - from materials, to cell construction, to module and pack assembly. One promising approach to pack thermal management is the use of phase change composite materials (PCC™), which offer passive protection at low weight and cost while minimizing system complexity. We present experimental nail penetration studies on a Li-ion pack for small electric vehicles, designed with and without PCC, to investigate the effectiveness of PCC thermal management for preventing propagation when a single cell enters thermal runaway. The results show that when parallel cells short-circuit through the penetrated cell, the packs without PCC propagate fully while those equipped with PCC show no propagation. In cases where no external short circuits occur, packs without PCC sometimes propagate, but not consistently. In all test conditions, the use of PCC lowers the maximum temperature experienced by neighboring cells by 60 °C or more. We also elucidate the propagation sequence and aspects of pack failure based on cell temperature, voltage, and post-mortem data.

  4. Study of East Kazakh explosions and propagation in Central Asia using regional Chinese seismograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, H.J.; Mills, J.M. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Seismograms recorded at the Urumchi Station in northwestern China from eleven Asian events including seven presumed East Kazakh nuclear explosions were analyzed. Group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves were measured at short periods on paths through basin and fold belt terrains. At 10 sec period, the velocities on paths over sedimentary basins are 25% slower than velocities on paths over fold belts. We interpret those differences in velocities to be due to the great thicknesses of sedimentary deposits in basin terrains. Epicentral locations were estimated using differential travel times between P/sub n/ and L/sub g/ and particle motions of Rayleigh waves measured on a single three-component record. For a 1000 km path, the location errors (one standad deviation) are about +-125 km in azimuth and +-30 km in distance. In addition, systematic errors due to structural effects on surface-wave paths and on velocities of regional phases are shown to seriously bias location estimates of several events. We applied a differential phase method to Rayleigh waves from the East Kazakh explosions and found that signals of all events are in-phase with signals from the reference event on 10/12/80. Thus, there is no evidence for phase reversals or shifts at the Urumchi station in the frequency band where signal to noise ratio is good and where assumptions of the method are valid. Seismic moments of explosions were estimated using models of explosion sources with associated tectonic release. Observed amplitude spectra of Rayleigh waves were richer in high frequencies than predicted by the model. This could be a source effect related to source medium excitation (i.e., Green's functions) or a path effect caused by energy focussing and/or amplifications. We discuss the potential bias in the estimates of moment due to assumptions/limitations. 24 references, 16 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Review of critical flow rate, propagation of pressure pulse, and sonic velocity in two-phase media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y.

    1972-01-01

    For single-phase media, the critical discharge velocity, the sonic velocity, and the pressure pulse propagation velocity can be expressed in the same form by assuming isentropic, equilibria processes. In two-phase mixtures, the same concept is not valid due to the existence of interfacial transports of momentum, heat, and mass. Thus, the three velocities should be treated differently and separately for each particular condition, taking into account the various transport processes involved under that condition. Various attempts are reviewed to predict the critical discharge rate or the propagation velocities by considering slip ratio (momentum change), evaporation (mass and heat transport), flow pattern, etc. Experimental data were compared with predictions based on various theorems. The importance is stressed of the time required to achieve equilibrium as compared with the time available during the process, for example, of passing a pressure pulse.

  6. Zonal propagation of kinetic energy and convection in the South China Sea and Indian monsoon regions in boreal summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longxun; GAO Hui; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2004-01-01

    Zonal propagation of kinetic energy (KE) and convection in the South China Sea (SCS) and Indian summer monsoon areas are examined in present study. Results suggest that the SCS and Indian summer monsoon prevailed regions (5-15°N) are dominated by the southwesterly wind, however, the disturbances of KE at 850 hPa and convection are observed mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean (140-150°E), after passing through the SCS, and westward propagated into the Bay of Bengal (90-100°E). In the Indian summer monsoon domain, where the disturbances of KE are found mainly coming from the Arabian Sea (AS) and eastward propagated into the Bay of Bengal. Therefore, the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon are quite different in zonal propagation of KE and convection. The SCS summer monsoon is mainly affected by the KE and convection coming from the tropical western Pacific. The Indian summer monsoon, however, can be partly influenced by the AS and the SCS summer monsoon. The analysis also suggests that the interaction region between the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon is around 90-95°E, rather than 105°E as proposed by earlier studies.

  7. Probing geomagnetic storm-driven magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics in D-region via propagation characteristics of very low frequency radio signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Ogunmodimu, Olugbenga

    2016-07-01

    The amplitude and phase of VLF/LF radio signals are sensitive to changes in electrical conductivity of the lower ionosphere which imprints its signature on the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. This characteristic makes it useful in studying sudden ionospheric disturbances, especially those related to prompt X-ray flux output from solar flares and gamma ray bursts (GRBs). However, strong geomagnetic disturbance and storm conditions are known to produce large and global ionospheric disturbances, which can significantly affect VLF radio propagation in the D region of the ionosphere. In this paper, using the data of three propagation paths at mid-latitudes (40-54°), we analyse the trend in variation of aspects of VLF diurnal signal under varying solar and geomagnetic space environmental conditions in order to identify possible geomagnetic footprints on the D region characteristics. We found that the trend of variations generally reflected the prevailing space weather conditions in various time scales. In particular, the 'dipping' of mid-day signal amplitude peak (MDP) occurs after significant geomagnetic perturbed or storm conditions in the time scale of 1-2 days. The mean signal amplitude before sunrise (MBSR) and mean signal amplitude after sunset (MASS) also exhibit storm-induced dipping, but they appear to be influenced by event's exact occurrence time and the highly variable conditions of dusk-to-dawn ionosphere. We also observed few cases of the signals rise (e.g., MDP, MBSR or MASS) following a significant geomagnetic event. This effect may be related to storms associated phenomena or effects arising from sources other than solar origin. The magnitude of induced dipping (or rise) significantly depends on the intensity and duration of event(s), as well as the propagation path of the signal. The post-storm day signal (following a main event, with lesser or significantly reduced geomagnetic activity) exhibited a tendency of recovery to pre-storm day level. In the

  8. Correlation between the phase and the log-amplitude of a wave through the vertical atmospheric propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Molodij, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    I present expressions of the correlation between the log-amplitude and the phase of a wavefront propagating through the atmospheric turbulence. The properties of the angular correlation functions are discussed using usual synthetic turbulence profiles. The theoretical study is completed by practical implementations that can be envisioned to determine and eventually compensate the effects of the fluctuations of the intensity during the astronomical observations. The close formulation between the phase and the log-amplitude allows an analytic formulation in the Rytov approximation. Equations contain the product of an arbitrary number of hypergeometric functions that are evaluated using the Mellin transforms integration method.

  9. Propagator based formalism for optimizing in-line phase contrast imaging in laboratory X-ray setups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balles, Andreas; Zabler, Simon; Ebensperger, Thomas; Fella, Christian; Hanke, Randolf

    2016-09-01

    We derive a propagator based formalism for optimizing phase contrast imaging in laboratory setups as well as in synchrotron setups. We confirm based on five different setups the well known existence of an optimum position for the sample in terms of phase contrast by measuring two types of fibers and evaluating the fringe contrast. Furthermore, we demonstrate for these setups a correlation of our formula and the fringe contrast. Hence, an estimate of this optimum position is given by our formalism which only depends on the source size, the detector blurring, and the total distance between source and detector.

  10. Controlling of Slope of Carrier-Envelope Phase of Few-Cycle Laser Pulses on Propagation Distance near the Focus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-Heng; JIANG Hong-Bing; GONG Qi-Huang

    2007-01-01

    The effect of focusing geometry on slope of carrier-envelope (CE) phase φCE versus propagation distance from the focus in few-cycle laser pulses is investigated. The slope could be adjusted by changing the distance L between the waist of the incident beam and the lens. At the focus,(δ)φCE/(δ)(z/zR) = 0 when L = 0, and (δ)φCE/(δ)(z/zR) = -2 when L = ∞. The longer the distance L, the steeper the curve of the CE phase at the focus.

  11. Nonlinear propagation analysis of few-optical-cycle pulses for subfemtosecond compression and carrier envelope phase effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Yo; Nagasawa, Minoru; Ohtani, Morimasa; Yamashita, Mikio

    2005-12-01

    A numerical approach called Fourier direct method (FDM) is applied to nonlinear propagation of optical pulses with the central wavelength 800 nm, the width 2.67-12.00 fs, and the peak power 25-6870 kW in a fused-silica fiber. Bidirectional propagation, delayed Raman response, nonlinear dispersion (self-steepening, core dispersion), as well as correct linear dispersion are incorporated into “bidirectional propagation equations” which are derived directly from Maxwell’s equations. These equations are solved for forward and backward waves, instead of the electric-field envelope as in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). They are integrated as multidimensional simultaneous evolution equations evolved in space. We investigate, both theoretically and numerically, the validity and the limitation of assumptions and approximations used for deriving the NLSE. Also, the accuracy and the efficiency of the FDM are compared quantitatively with those of the finite-difference time-domain numerical approach. The time-domain size 500 fs and the number of grid points in time 2048 are chosen to investigate numerically intensity spectra, spectral phases, and temporal electric-field profiles up to the propagation distance 1.0 mm. On the intensity spectrum of a few-optical-cycle pulses, the self-steepening, core dispersion, and the delayed Raman response appear as dominant, middle, and slight effects, respectively. The delayed Raman response and the core dispersion reduce the effective nonlinearity. Correct linear dispersion is important since it affects the intensity spectrum sensitively. For the compression of femtosecond optical pulses by the complete phase compensation, the shortness and the pulse quality of compressed pulses are remarkably improved by the intense initial peak power rather than by the short initial pulse width or by the propagation distance longer than 0.1 mm. They will be compressed as short as 0.3 fs below the damage threshold of fused-silica fiber 6

  12. Generalized phase-shifting algorithms: error analysis and minimization of noise propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayubi, Gastón A; Perciante, César D; Di Martino, J Matías; Flores, Jorge L; Ferrari, José A

    2016-02-20

    Phase shifting is a technique for phase retrieval that requires a series of intensity measurements with certain phase steps. The purpose of the present work is threefold: first we present a new method for generating general phase-shifting algorithms with arbitrarily spaced phase steps. Second, we study the conditions for which the phase-retrieval error due to phase-shift miscalibration can be minimized. Third, we study the phase extraction from interferograms with additive random noise, and deduce the conditions to be satisfied for minimizing the phase-retrieval error. Algorithms with unevenly spaced phase steps are discussed under linear phase-shift errors and additive Gaussian noise, and simulations are presented.

  13. Stokes parameters of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammady, Sh; Ghafary, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, generalized Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the unified theory of coherence and polarization have been reported. Analytical formulas for 2  ×  2 cross-spectral density matrix elements, and consequently Stokes parameters of a phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped array beam propagating through the turbulent atmosphere have been formulated. Effects of many physical attributes such as wavelength, turbulence strength, flatness order and other source parameters on the Stokes parameters, and therefore spectral degree of polarization upon propagation have been studied thoroughly. The behaviour of the spectral degree of coherence of a delineated beam for different source conditions has been investigated. It can be shown that four generalized Stokes parameters increase by raising the flatness order at the same propagation distance. Increasing the number of beams leads to a decrease in the Stokes parameters to zero slowly. The results are of utmost importance for optical communications.

  14. Propagation of ULF waves from the upstream region to the midnight sector of the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Hartinger, Michael D.; Malaspina, David M.; Smith, Charles W.; Koga, Kiyokazu; Singer, Howard J.; Frühauff, Dennis; Baishev, Dmitry G.; Moiseev, Alexey V.; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2016-09-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves generated in the ion foreshock are a well-known source of Pc3-Pc4 waves (7-100 mHz) observed in the dayside magnetosphere. We use data acquired on 10 April 2013 by multiple spacecraft to demonstrate that ULF waves of upstream origin can propagate to the midnight sector of the inner magnetosphere. At 1130-1730 UT on the selected day, the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft and the geostationary ETS-VIII satellite detected compressional 20 to 40 mHz magnetic field oscillations between L ˜ 4 and L ˜ 7 in the midnight sector, along with other spacecraft located closer to noon. Upstream origin of the oscillations is concluded from the wave frequency that matches a theoretical model, globally coherent amplitude modulation, and duskward propagation that is consistent with expected entry of the upstream wave energy through the dawnside flank under the observed interplanetary magnetic field. The oscillations are attributed to magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves based on their propagation velocity of ˜300 km/s and the relationship between the electric and magnetic field perturbations. The magnitude of the azimuthal wave number is estimated to be ˜30. There is no evidence that the oscillations propagated to the ground in the midnight sector.

  15. Anisoplanatic image propagation along a slanted path under lower atmosphere phase turbulence in the presence of encrypted chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Mohamed, Ali A.

    2017-05-01

    In recent research, anisoplanatic electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation along a slanted path in the presence of low atmosphere phase turbulence (modified von Karman spectrum or MVKS) has been investigated assuming a Hufnagel-Valley (HV) type structure parameter. Preliminary results indicate a strong dependence on the slant angle especially for long range transmission and relatively strong turbulence. The investigation was further divided into two regimes, viz. (a) one where the EM source consisted of a plane wave modulated with a digitized image, which is propagated along the turbulent path and recovered via demodulation at the receiver; and (b) transmit the plane wave without modulation along the turbulent path through an image transparency and a thin lens designed to gather the received image in the focal plane. In this paper, we reexamine the same problem (part (a) only) in the presence of a chaotic optical carrier where the chaos is generated in the feedback loop of an acousto-optic Bragg cell. The image information is encrypted within the chaos wave, and subsequently propagated along a similar slant path and identical turbulence conditions. The recovered image extracted via heterodyning from the received chaos is compared quantitatively (through image cross-correlations and mean-squared error measures) for the non-chaotic versus the chaotic approaches. Generally, "packaging" the information in chaos improves performance through turbulent propagation, and results are discussed from this perspective. Concurrently, we will also examine the effect of a non-encrypted plane EM wave propagation through a transparency-lens combination. These results are also presented with appropriate comparisons with the cases involving lensless transmission of imagery through corresponding turbulent and non-turbulent layers.

  16. Propagating Mixed Uncertainties in Cyber Attacker Payoffs: Exploration of Two-Phase Monte Carlo Sampling and Probability Bounds Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Samrat; Tipireddy, Ramakrishna; Oster, Matthew R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2016-09-16

    Securing cyber-systems on a continual basis against a multitude of adverse events is a challenging undertaking. Game-theoretic approaches, that model actions of strategic decision-makers, are increasingly being applied to address cybersecurity resource allocation challenges. Such game-based models account for multiple player actions and represent cyber attacker payoffs mostly as point utility estimates. Since a cyber-attacker’s payoff generation mechanism is largely unknown, appropriate representation and propagation of uncertainty is a critical task. In this paper we expand on prior work and focus on operationalizing the probabilistic uncertainty quantification framework, for a notional cyber system, through: 1) representation of uncertain attacker and system-related modeling variables as probability distributions and mathematical intervals, and 2) exploration of uncertainty propagation techniques including two-phase Monte Carlo sampling and probability bounds analysis.

  17. Study of elastic wave propagation in two-phase anisotropic media by numerical modeling of pseudospectral method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    When there exists anisotropy in underground media, elastic parameters of the observed coordinate possibly do not coincide with that of the natural coordinate. According to the theory that the density of potential energy, dissipating energy is independent of the coordinate, the relationship of elastic parameters between two coordinates is derived for two-phase anisotropic media. Then, pseudospectral method to solve wave equations of two-phase anisotropic media is derived. At last, we use this method to simulate wave propagation in two-phase anisotropic media, four types of waves are observed in the snapshots, i.e., fast P wave and slow P wave, fast S wave and slow S wave. Shear wave splitting, SV wave cusps and elastic wave reflection and transmission are also observed.

  18. Unquenched Effects and Quark Mass Dependence of Lattice Gluon Propagator in Infrared Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-Bin; PING Jia-Lun; LU Xiao-Fu; ZONG Hong-Shi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the gluon propagator in Landau gauge has been studied on a lattice,including the quenched and the unquenehed one.The small geometry size of lattice we use is 163×32,and the big one is 203×64.For the quenched approximation,we fit the numerical results and give a little different fitting values.We also obtain unquenched effects by comparing the gluon propagator resulting from the quenched and unquenehed configurations,for both the two-flavor and three-flavor cases.For the unquenched configurations,an obvious quark mass dependence has not been found in the small quark mass case,but is found in the three-flavor case when the quark mass is big.

  19. High-Resolution Regional Phase Attenuation Models of the Iranian Plateau and Surrounding Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-03

    Mayeda, W. R. Walter, L. Malagnini, and W. S. Phillips, Regional Attenuation in Northern California: A Comparison of Five 1D Q Methods, Bull. Seism ...regional phase amplitude tomography, Seism . Res. Lett., 80, p. 360, 2009. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 49 Priestley, K

  20. Finite density QCD phase transition in the heavy quark region

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, H; Kanaya, K; Ohno, H; Ejiri, S; Nakagawa, Y; Hatsuda, T; Umeda, T

    2012-01-01

    We extend our previous study of the QCD phase structure in the heavy quark region to non-zero chemical potentials. To identify the critical point where the first order deconfining transition terminates, we study an effective potential defined by the probability distribution function of the plaquette and the Polyakov loop. The reweighting technique is shown to be powerful in evaluating the effective potential in a wide range of the plaquette and Polyakov loop expectation values. We adopt the cumulant expansion to overcome the sign problem in the calculation of complex phase of the quark determinant. We find that the method provides us with an intuitive and powerful way to study the phase structure. We estimate the location of the critical point at finite chemical potential in the heavy quark region.

  1. The premixing and propagation phases of fuel-coolant interactions: a review of recent experimental studies and code developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antariksawan, A.R. [Reactor Safety Technology Research Center of BATAN (Indonesia); Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun-sun; Maruyama, Yu; Yang, Yanhua; Sugimoto, Jun

    1998-09-01

    A vapor explosion (or an energetic fuel-coolant interactions, FCIs) is a process in which hot liquid (fuel) transfers its internal energy to colder, more volatile liquid (coolant); thus the coolant vaporizes at high pressure and expands and does works on its surroundings. Traditionally, the energetic fuel-coolant interactions could be distinguished in subsequent stages: premixing (or coarse mixing), triggering, propagation and expansion. Realizing that better and realistic prediction of fuel-coolant interaction consequences will be available understanding the phenomenology in the premixing and propagation stages, many experimental and analytical studies have been performed during more than two decades. A lot of important achievements are obtained during the time. However, some fundamental aspects are still not clear enough; thus the works are directed to that direction. In conjunction, the model/code development is pursuit. This is aimed to provide a scaling tool to bridge the experimental results to the real geometries, e.g. reactor pressure vessel, reactor containment. The present review intends to collect the available information on the recent works performed to study the premixing and propagation phases. (author). 97 refs.

  2. Numerical dispersion, stability, and phase-speed for 3D time-domain finite-difference seismic wave propagation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M. M.; Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations by explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) methods entails approximating temporal and spatial derivatives by discrete function differences. Thus, the solution of the difference equation will not be identical to the solution of the underlying differential equation. Solution accuracy degrades if temporal and spatial gridding intervals are too large. Overly coarse spatial gridding leads to spurious artifacts in the calculated results referred to as numerical dispersion, whereas coarse temporal sampling may produce numerical instability (manifest as unbounded growth in the calculations as FD timestepping proceeds). Quantitative conditions for minimizing dispersion and avoiding instability are developed by deriving the dispersion relation appropriate for the discrete difference equation (or coupled system of difference equations) under examination. A dispersion relation appropriate for FD solution of the 3D velocity-stress system of isotropic elastodynamics, on staggered temporal and spatial grids, is developed. The relation applies to either compressional or shear wave propagation, and reduces to the proper form for acoustic propagation in the limit of vanishing shear modulus. A stability condition and a plane-wave phase-speed formula follow as consequences of the dispersion relation. The mathematical procedure utilized for the derivation is a modern variant of classical von Neumann analysis, and involves a 4D discrete space/time Fourier transform of the nine, coupled, FD updating formulae for particle velocity vector and stress tensor components. The method is generalized to seismic wave propagation within anelastic and poroelastic media, as well as sound wave propagation within a uniformly-moving atmosphere. A significant extension of the approach yields a stability condition for wave propagation across an interface between dissimilar media with strong material contrast (e.g., the earth's surface, the seabed

  3. Design of a Ka-Band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer [2] located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation [3] receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  4. Design of a Ka-band Propagation Terminal for Atmospheric Measurements in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Jacquelynne R.; Nessel, James A.; Zemba, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a Ka-Band beacon receiver developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that will be installed alongside an existing Ka-Band Radiometer located at the east end of the Svalbard Near Earth Network (NEN) complex. The goal of this experiment is to characterize rain fade attenuation to improve the performance of existing statistical rain attenuation models. The ground terminal developed by NASA GRC utilizes an FFT-based frequency estimation receiver capable of characterizing total path attenuation effects due to gaseous absorption, clouds, rain, and scintillation by directly measuring the propagated signal from the satellite Thor 7.

  5. Propagation of uncertainty in photochemical mechanisms through urban/regional scale grid-based air pollution models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isukapalli, S.S.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Uncertainty in biogenic emission estimates and photochemical reaction rates can contribute significantly to modeling error in Photochemical Air Quality Simulation Models (PAQSMs). Uncertainties in isoprene emissions from biogenic sources, and isoprene atmospheric degradation rates have recently received considerable attention with respect to control strategy selection for the reduction of tropospheric ozone levels. This study addresses the effects of uncertainties in isoprene emissions and reaction rates on ambient ozone concentrations predicted by PAQSMs. Since PAQSMs are computationally intensive, propagation of uncertainty in reaction rate constants using traditional methods, such as Monte Carlo methods, is not computationally feasible. Here, a novel computationally efficient method of uncertainty analysis, called the Stochastic Response Surface Method (SRSM), is applied to propagate uncertainty in isoprene emissions and reaction rate parameters. Case studies include estimation of uncertainty in ozone concentrations predicted by (a) a box-model, (b) a plume trajectory model, the Reactive Plume Model (RPM), and (c) an urban-to-regional scale grid model, the Urban Airshed Model (UAM). The results of this analysis are used to characterize the relative importance of uncertainties in isoprene emissions and reaction rates on ozone levels for a wide range of conditions. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the applicability of the SRSM uncertainty propagation methodology to computationally intensive models such as the UAM.

  6. Acoustic instability in the neutral precursor region of collisionless shocks propagating into partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies about collisionless shocks in partially ionized plasmas showed that some of neutral particles leak into the shock upstream region from the downstream region. In this paper, we perform a linear analysis and show that acoustic waves are unstable in the neutral precursor region. The acoustic instability amplifies fluctuations of magnetic field and density in the upstream region. The fluctuations are indispensable for the diffusive shock acceleration and could be important for the downstream turbulence.

  7. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melli, Seyed Ali, E-mail: sem649@mail.usask.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wahid, Khan A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Babyn, Paul [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Montgomery, James [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snead, Elisabeth [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); El-Gayed, Ali [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wesolowski, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas–Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien-Chih Liu, James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  9. Phase Boundary Propagation in Li-Alloying Battery Electrodes Revealed by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, Andrew J; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Zavadil, Kevin R; Harris, Charles T

    2016-06-28

    Battery cycle life is directly influenced by the microstructural changes occurring in the electrodes during charge and discharge cycles. Here, we image in situ the nanoscale phase evolution in negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries using a fully enclosed liquid cell in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to reveal early degradation that is not evident in the charge-discharge curves. To compare the electrochemical phase transformation behavior between three model materials, thin films of amorphous Si, crystalline Al, and crystalline Au were lithiated and delithiated at controlled rates while immersed in a commercial liquid electrolyte. This method allowed for the direct observation of lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale negative electrodes, revealing that a simplistic model of a surface-to-interior lithiation front is insufficient. For the crystalline films, a lithiation front spread laterally from a few initial nucleation points, with continued grain nucleation along the growing interface. The intermediate lithiated phases were identified using electron diffraction, and high-resolution postmortem imaging revealed the details of the final microstructure. Our results show that electrochemically induced solid-solid phase transformations can lead to highly concentrated stresses at the laterally propagating phase boundary which should be considered for future designs of nanostructured electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

  10. Remarks on nonlinear relation among phases and frequencies in modulational instabilities of parallel propagating Alfven waves

    CERN Document Server

    Nariyuki, Y; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro; Hada, Tohru

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear relations among frequencies and phases in modulational instability of circularly polarized Alfven waves are discussed, within the context of one dimensional, dissipation-less, unforced fluid system. We show that generation of phase coherence is a natural consequence of the modulational instability of Alfven waves. Furthermore, we quantitatively evaluate intensity of wave-wave interaction by using bi-coherence, and also by computing energy flow among wave modes, and demonstrate that the energy flow is directly related to the phase coherence generation.

  11. Light Propagation with Phase Discontinuities: Generalized Laws of Reflection and Refraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nanfang Yu; Patrice Genevet; Mikhail A. Kats; Francesco Aieta; Jean-Philippe Tetienne; Federico Capasso; Zeno Gaburro

    2011-01-01

    ... the interface between two media. Anomalous reflection and refraction phenomena are observed in this regime in optically thin arrays of metallic antennas on silicon with a linear phase variation along the interface, which...

  12. Fourth order phase-field model for local max-ent approximants applied to crack propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo Balaguer, Marino; Silani, Mohammad; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-01-01

    We apply a fourth order phase-field model for fracture based on local maximum entropy (LME) approximants. The higher order continuity of the meshfree LME approximants allows to directly solve the fourth order phase-field equations without splitting the fourth order differential equation into two second order differential equations. We will first show that the crack surface can be captured more accurately in the fourth order model. Furthermore, less nodes are needed for the fourth order model ...

  13. Parcellation of the healthy neonatal brain into 107 regions using atlas propagation through intermediate time points in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eBlesa Cabez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimage analysis pipelines rely on parcellated atlases generated from healthy individuals to provide anatomic context to structural and diffusion MRI data. Atlases constructed using adult data introduce bias into studies of early brain development. We aimed to create a neonatal brain atlas of healthy subjects that can be applied to multi-modal MRI data. Structural and diffusion 3T MRI scans were acquired soon after birth from 33 typically developing neonates born at term (mean postmenstrual age at birth 39+5 weeks, range 37+2-41+6. An adult brain atlas (SRI24/TZO was propagated to the neonatal data using temporal registration via childhood templates with dense temporal samples (NIH Pediatric Database, with the final atlas (Edinburgh Neonatal Atlas, ENA33 constructed using the Symmetric Group Normalization method. After this step, the computed final transformations were applied to T2-weighted data, and fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tissue segmentations to provide a multi-modal atlas with 107 anatomical regions; a symmetric version was also created to facilitate studies of laterality. Volumes of each region of interest were measured to provide reference data from normal subjects. Because this atlas is generated from step-wise propagation of adult labels through intermediate time points in childhood, it may serve as a useful starting point for modelling brain growth during development.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Wave Propagation and Phase Transition of Tin under Shock-Wave Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hai-Feng; LIU Hai-Feng; ZHANG Guang-Cai; ZHAO Yan-Song

    2009-01-01

    We undertake a numerical simulation of shock experiments on tin reported in the literature,by using a multiphase equation of state (MEOS) and a multiphase Steinberg Guinan (MSG) constitutive model for tin in the β,γ and liquid phases.In the MSG model,the Bauschinger effect is considered to better describe the unloading behavior.The phase diagram and Hugoniot of tin are calculated by MEOS,and they agree well with the experimental data.Combined with the MEOS and MSG models,hydrodynamic computer simulations are successful in reproducing the measured velocity profile of the shock wave experiment.Moreover,by analyzing the mass fraction contour as well as stress and temperature profiles of each phase for tin,we further discuss the complex behavior of tin under shock-wave loading.

  15. Polarization rotation of light propagating through a medium with efficient four-wave mixing and cross-phase modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sushree S.; Bhowmick, Arup; Mohapatra, Ashok K.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied the rotation of an elliptically polarized light propagating through thermal rubidium vapor with efficient four-wave mixing (FWM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM). These nonlinear processes are enhanced by Zeeman coherence within the degenerate sub-levels of the two-level atomic system. The elliptically polarized light with small ellipticity is considered as the superposition of a strong-linearly-polarized pump beam and a weak-orthogonal-polarized probe beam. The interference of the probe and the newly generated light field due to degenerate FWM and their gain in the medium due to a large XPM induced by the pump beam leads to the rotation of the elliptical polarized light. A theoretical analysis of the probe propagation through the nonlinear medium was used to explain the experimental observation and the fitting of the experimental data gives the estimates of the third-order non-linear susceptibilities associated with FWM and XPM. Our study can provide useful parameters for the generation of efficient squeezed vacuum states and squeezed polarization states of light. Furthermore our study finds application in controlling the diffraction of a linearly-polarized light beam traversing the medium.

  16. Fast one-dimensional wave-front propagation for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Malecki, Andreas; Sperl, Jonathan; Chabior, Michael; Schüttler, Markus; Bequé, Dirk; Cozzini, Cristina; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-10-01

    Numerical wave-optical simulations of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using grating interferometry require the oversampling of gratings and object structures in the range of few micrometers. Consequently, fields of view of few millimeters already use large amounts of a computer's main memory to store the propagating wave front, limiting the scope of the investigations to only small-scale problems. In this study, we apply an approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to overcome these restrictions by dividing the two-dimensional wave front up into 1D lines, which are processed separately. The approach enables simulations with samples of clinically relevant dimensions by significantly reducing the memory footprint and the execution time and, thus, allows the qualitative comparison of different setup configurations. We analyze advantages as well as limitations and present the simulation of a virtual mammography phantom of several centimeters of size.

  17. Steering of SH wave propagation in electrorheological elastomer with a structured meta-slab by tunable phase discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanlong; Li, Yi; Cao, Liyun; Yang, Zhichun; Zhou, Xiaoling

    2017-09-01

    The generalized Snell's law (GSL) with phase discontinuity proposed based on the concept of a metasurface, which can be used to control arbitrarily the reflection and refraction of waves, attracts a growing attention in these years. The concept of abnormally deflecting the incident wave has been applied to the elastic field very recently. However, most of the studies on metasurfaces are based on passive materials, which restricts the frequency or the deflected angles always working in a single state. Here, we steer elastic SH wave propagation in an electrorheological (ER) elastomer with a structured meta-slab composed of geometrically periodic wave guides by exposing the slab to the programmed electric fields. The dependence of phase velocities of SH waves on the applied electric fields can make the phase shift under the form of a special function along the slab, which will control the refraction angles of the transmitted SH waves by the GSL. Accordingly we design the meta-slab theoretically and conduct corresponding numerical simulations. The results demonstrate that the structured meta-slab under the programmed external electric fields can deflect SH wave flexibly with tunable refraction angles and working frequencies, and can focus SH wave with tunable focal lengths. The present study will broaden the scope of applying adaptive materials to design metasurfaces with tunability.

  18. Equalization enhanced phase noise in Nyquist-spaced superchannel transmission systems using multi-channel digital back-propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Lavery, Domaniç; Thomsen, Benn C.; Savory, Seb J.; Killey, Robert I.; Bayvel, Polina

    2015-09-01

    Superchannel transmission spaced at the symbol rate, known as Nyquist spacing, has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the optical communication channel capacity and spectral efficiency. However, the achievable capacity and reach of transmission systems using advanced modulation formats are affected by fibre nonlinearities and equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). Fibre nonlinearities can be effectively compensated using digital back-propagation (DBP). However EEPN which arises from the interaction between laser phase noise and dispersion cannot be efficiently mitigated, and can significantly degrade the performance of transmission systems. Here we report the first investigation of the origin and the impact of EEPN in Nyquist-spaced superchannel system, employing electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and multi-channel DBP (MC-DBP). Analysis was carried out in a Nyquist-spaced 9-channel 32-Gbaud DP-64QAM transmission system. Results confirm that EEPN significantly degrades the performance of all sub-channels of the superchannel system and that the distortions are more severe for the outer sub-channels, both using EDC and MC-DBP. It is also found that the origin of EEPN depends on the relative position between the carrier phase recovery module and the EDC (or MC-DBP) module. Considering EEPN, diverse coding techniques and modulation formats have to be applied for optimizing different sub-channels in superchannel systems.

  19. A volume-preserving sharpening approach for the propagation of sharp phase boundaries in multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2011-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models that recover a macroscopic description of multiphase flow of immiscible liquids typically represent the boundaries between phases using a scalar function, the phase field, that varies smoothly over several grid points. Attempts to tune the model parameters to minimise the widths of these interfaces typically lead to the interfaces becoming fixed to the underlying grid instead of advecting with the fluid velocity. This phenomenon, known as lattice pinning, is strikingly similar to that associated with the numerical simulation of conservation laws coupled to stiff algebraic source terms. We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the model problem proposed by LeVeque and Yee (1990) [3] to study the latter phenomenon in the context of computational combustion, and offer a volume-conserving extension in multiple space dimensions. Inspired by the random projection method of Bao and Jin (2000) [1] we further generalise this formulation by introducing a uniformly distributed quasi-random variable into the term responsible for the sharpening of phase boundaries. This method is mass conserving, gives correct average propagation speeds over many timesteps, and is shown to significantly delay the onset of pinning as the interface width is reduced. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Equalization enhanced phase noise in Nyquist-spaced superchannel transmission systems using multi-channel digital back-propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Lavery, Domaniç; Thomsen, Benn C; Savory, Seb J; Killey, Robert I; Bayvel, Polina

    2015-09-14

    Superchannel transmission spaced at the symbol rate, known as Nyquist spacing, has been demonstrated for effectively maximizing the optical communication channel capacity and spectral efficiency. However, the achievable capacity and reach of transmission systems using advanced modulation formats are affected by fibre nonlinearities and equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). Fibre nonlinearities can be effectively compensated using digital back-propagation (DBP). However EEPN which arises from the interaction between laser phase noise and dispersion cannot be efficiently mitigated, and can significantly degrade the performance of transmission systems. Here we report the first investigation of the origin and the impact of EEPN in Nyquist-spaced superchannel system, employing electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) and multi-channel DBP (MC-DBP). Analysis was carried out in a Nyquist-spaced 9-channel 32-Gbaud DP-64QAM transmission system. Results confirm that EEPN significantly degrades the performance of all sub-channels of the superchannel system and that the distortions are more severe for the outer sub-channels, both using EDC and MC-DBP. It is also found that the origin of EEPN depends on the relative position between the carrier phase recovery module and the EDC (or MC-DBP) module. Considering EEPN, diverse coding techniques and modulation formats have to be applied for optimizing different sub-channels in superchannel systems.

  1. Kinetic description of intense beam propagation through a periodic focusing field for uniform phase-space density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The Vlasov-Maxwell equations are used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of an intense sheet beam with distribution function f_{b}\\(x,x^{′},s\\ propagating through a periodic focusing lattice κ_{x}\\(s+S\\=κ_{x}\\(s\\, where S=const is the lattice period. The analysis considers the special class of distribution functions with uniform phase-space density f_{b}\\(x,x^{′},s\\=A=const inside of the simply connected boundary curves, x_{+}^{′}\\(x,s\\ and x_{-}^{′}\\(x,s\\, in the two-dimensional phase space \\(x,x^{′}\\. Coupled nonlinear equations are derived describing the self-consistent evolution of the boundary curves, x_{+}^{′}\\(x,s\\ and x_{-}^{′}\\(x,s\\, and the self-field potential ψ\\(x,s\\=e_{b}φ\\(x,s\\/γ_{b}m_{b}β_{b}^{2}c^{2}. The resulting model is shown to be exactly equivalent to a (truncated warm-fluid description with zero heat flow and triple-adiabatic equation of state with scalar pressure P_{b}\\(x,s\\=const[n_{b}\\(x,s\\]^{3}. Such a fluid model is amenable to direct analysis by transforming to Lagrangian variables following the motion of a fluid element. Specific examples of periodically focused beam equilibria are presented, ranging from a finite-emittance beam in which the boundary curves in phase space \\(x,x^{′}\\ correspond to a pulsating parallelogram, to a cold beam in which the number density of beam particles, n_{b}\\(x,s\\, exhibits large-amplitude periodic oscillations. For the case of a sheet beam with uniform phase-space density, the present analysis clearly demonstrates the existence of periodically focused beam equilibria without the undesirable feature of an inverted population in phase space that is characteristic of the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij beam distribution.

  2. Principle of stationary phase for propagating wave packets in the unidimensional scattering problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardini, A.E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Departamento de Fisica, PO Box 676, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    We point out some incompatibilities which appear when one applies the stationary phase method for deriving phase times to obtain the spatial localization of wave packets scattered by a unidimensional potential barrier. We concentrate on the above barrier diffusion problem where the wave packet collision implies the possibility of multiple reflected and transmitted wave packets, which, depending on the boundary conditions, can overlap or stand in relative separation in space. We demonstrate that the indiscriminate use of the method for such a particular configuration leads to paradoxical results for which the correct interpretation, confirmed by analytical/numerical calculations, imposes the necessity of the appearance of multiple peaks as a consequence of multiple reflections by the barrier steps. (orig.)

  3. Technical Evaluation Report on the Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Panel Symposium on Propagation Effects on Military Systems in the High Latitude Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    considered to be of the most importance to the mission of NATO as defined by AGARD. Welcoming address by Professor Juan Roederer. Professor Roederer...the Mesosphere (85-50 km) at 69 N (Andenes, Norway) H. W. Widdell, Max Planck Institut, Lindau . FRG 1200 Lunch Session VIII - Low Frequency Propagation

  4. The appearance and propagation of filaments in the private flux region in Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J. R.; Fishpool, G. M.; Thornton, A. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Walkden, N. R. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    The transport of particles via intermittent filamentary structures in the private flux region (PFR) of plasmas in the MAST tokamak has been investigated using a fast framing camera recording visible light emission from the volume of the lower divertor, as well as Langmuir probes and IR thermography monitoring particle and power fluxes to plasma-facing surfaces in the divertor. The visible camera data suggest that, in the divertor volume, fluctuations in light emission above the X-point are strongest in the scrape-off layer (SOL). Conversely, in the region below the X-point, it is found that these fluctuations are strongest in the PFR of the inner divertor leg. Detailed analysis of the appearance of these filaments in the camera data suggests that they are approximately circular, around 1–2 cm in diameter, but appear more elongated near the divertor target. The most probable toroidal quasi-mode number is between 2 and 3. These filaments eject plasma deeper into the private flux region, sometimes by the production of secondary filaments, moving at a speed of 0.5–1.0 km/s. Probe measurements at the inner divertor target suggest that the fluctuations in the particle flux to the inner target are strongest in the private flux region, and that the amplitude and distribution of these fluctuations are insensitive to the electron density of the core plasma, auxiliary heating and whether the plasma is single-null or double-null. It is found that the e-folding width of the time-average particle flux in the PFR decreases with increasing plasma current, but the fluctuations appear to be unaffected. At the outer divertor target, the fluctuations in particle and power fluxes are strongest in the SOL.

  5. Uncertainty propagation for flood forecasting in the Alps: different views and impacts from MAP D-PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Rotach

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available D-PHASE was a Forecast Demonstration Project of the World Weather Research Programme (WWRP related to the Mesoscale Alpine Programme (MAP. Its goal was to demonstrate the reliability and quality of operational forecasting of orographically influenced (determined precipitation in the Alps and its consequences on the distribution of run-off characteristics. A special focus was, of course, on heavy-precipitation events.

    The D-PHASE Operations Period (DOP ran from June to November~2007, during which an end-to-end forecasting system was operated covering many individual catchments in the Alps, with their water authorities, civil protection organizations or other end users. The forecasting system's core piece was a Visualization Platform where precipitation and flood warnings from some 30 atmospheric and 7 hydrological models (both deterministic and probabilistic and corresponding model fields were displayed in uniform and comparable formats. Also, meteograms, nowcasting information and end user communication was made available to all the forecasters, users and end users. D-PHASE information was assessed and used by some 50 different groups ranging from atmospheric forecasters to civil protection authorities or water management bodies.

    In the present contribution, D-PHASE is briefly presented along with its outstanding scientific results and, in particular, the lessons learnt with respect to uncertainty propagation. A focus is thereby on the transfer of ensemble prediction information into the hydrological community and its use with respect to other aspects of societal impact. Objective verification of forecast quality is contrasted to subjective quality assessments during the project (end user workshops, questionnaires and some general conclusions concerning forecast demonstration projects are drawn.

  6. Vertical propagation characteristics and seasonal variability of tidal wind oscillations in the MLT region over Trivandrum (8.5° N, 77° E: first results from SKiYMET Meteor Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Sasi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Tidal activity in the Mesospheric Lower Thermosphere (MLT region over Trivandrum (8.5° N, 77° E is investigated using the observations from newly installed SKiYMET Meteor Radar. The seasonal variability and vertical propagation characteristics of atmospheric tides in the MLT region are addressed in the present communication. The observations revealed that the diurnal tide is more prominent than the semi/terdiurnal components over this latitude. It is also observed that the amplitudes of meridional components are stronger than that of zonal ones. The amplitude and phase structure shows the vertical propagation of diurnal tides with vertical wavelength of ~25 km. However, the vertical wavelength of the semidiurnal tide showed considerable variations. The vertical propagation characteristics of the terdiurnal tide showed some indications of their generating mechanisms. The observed features of tidal components are compared with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM02 values and they showed a similar amplitude and phase structure for diurnal tides. Month-to-month variations in the tidal amplitudes have shown significant seasonal variation. The observed seasonal variation is discussed in light of the variation in tidal forcing and dissipation.

  7. Theoretical modeling of propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in magnetic regions below sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E; Collados, M; Parchevsky, K; Olshevsky, V

    2008-01-01

    We use 2D numerical simulations and eikonal approximation to study properties of magneto-acoustic gravity waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from the deep interior to the chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements. Waves are excited by a sub-photospheric source located in the region beta slightly larger than 1. Time-distance diagrams and travel times are calculated for various frequency intervals and compared to the non-magnetic case. The results confirm that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) app...

  8. Determination better culture medium in the establishment phase for the in vitro propagation of banana (Musa paradisiaca L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancasi-Espejo Ruth Gabriela

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted at the Laboratory of Plant Biotechnology of the Department of Biological and Natural Sciences of the Amazonian University of Pando, in 2014. The aim of the study was to determine better culture medium in the establishment phase for propagation in vitro banana (Musa paradisiaca L., 20 were selected and characterized mother plants NTRCA (New Technology Research Center Amazonia. A completely random design (CRD with three different culture media was used. The culture media were M1 Murashige and Skoog (MS was supplemented with ascorbic acid 100 mg/L and L-cysteine 2 ml /L, M2 Murashige and Skoog (MS was supplemented charcoal 2 g/L, M3 Murashige and Skoog (MS supplement-ed with ascorbic acid 100 mg/L and cítrico100 mg/L acid. The variables evaluated were: The survival of the former Plantes, where contamination and oxidation was observed. The results showed that in the first phase of establishment, the best answer for the survival of the former Plantes banana (Musa paradisiaca, was with the culture medium 3, where a lower degree of oxidation (0.26 and pollution for all explants was obtained was 28%.

  9. Regional discrimination and propagation of local rearrangements along the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianli; Deutsch, Carol

    2014-12-12

    All proteins, from bacteria to man, are made in the ribosome and are elongated, one residue at a time, at the peptidyl transferase center. This growing peptide chain wends its way through the ribosomal tunnel to the exit port, ~100Å from the peptidyl transferase center. We have identified locations in the tunnel that sense and respond to single side chains of the nascent peptide to induce local conformational changes. Moreover, side-chain sterics and rearrangements deep in the tunnel influence the disposition of residues 45Å away at the exit port and are consistent with side-chain-induced axial retraction of the peptide backbone. These coupled responses are neither haphazard nor uniform along the tunnel. Rather, they are confined to discriminating zones in the tunnel and are sequence specific. Such discerning communication may contribute to folding events and mechanisms governing sequence-specific signaling between different regions of the tunnel during translation.

  10. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activities, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Tsap, Yuri T., E-mail: huangj@nao.cas.cn [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, 98409 Crimea, Nauchny (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  11. Propagation Measurement on Earth-Sky Signal Effects for High Speed Train Satellite Channel in Tropical Region at Ku-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajeed H. J. Al-Jumaily

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in satellite communication technologies in the tropical regions have led to significant increase in the demand for services and applications that require high channel quality for mobile satellite terminals. Determination and quantification of these requirements are important to optimize service quality, particularly in the Malaysian region. Moreover, the tests on current satellite propagation models were carried out at temperate regions whose environmental characteristics are much different from those in Malaysia. This difference renders these propagation models inapplicable and irrelevant to tropical regions in general. This paper presents the link characteristics observations and performance analysis with propagation measurements done in tropical region to provide an accurate database regarding rain and power arches supply (PAs attenuations in the tropics for mobile scenarios. Hence, an extension for improving the performance assessment and analysis of satellite/transmission has been achieved. The Malaysia propagation measurement for mobile scenario (Malaysia-PMMS enables first-hand coarse estimation and attenuation analysis, because the attenuation resulting from rain and PAs becomes easily amenable for measurement. Parallel to that, the measured attenuation has been compared with that of the simulated output at noise floor level. The underlying analytical tool is validated by measurements specific at tropical region, for dynamic model of mobile satellite links operating at higher than 10 GHz.

  12. Stepwise organization of the β-structure identifies key regions essential for the propagation and cytotoxicity of insulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatani, Eri; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kato, Minoru

    2014-04-11

    Amyloid fibrils are supramolecular assemblies, the deposition of which is associated with many serious diseases including Alzheimer, prion, and Huntington diseases. Several smaller aggregates such as oligomers and protofibrils have been proposed to play a role in early stages of the fibrillation process; however, little is known about how these species contribute to the formation of mature amyloid fibrils with a rigid cross-β structure. Here, we identified a new pathway for the formation of insulin amyloid fibrils at a high concentration of salt in which mature fibrils were formed in a stepwise manner via a prefibrillar intermediate: minute prefibrillar species initially accumulated, followed by the subsequent formation of thicker amyloid fibrils. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested the sequential formation of two types of β-sheets with different strength hydrogen bonds, one of which was developed concomitantly with the mutual assembly of the prefibrillar intermediate to form mature fibrils. Interestingly, fibril propagation and cellular toxicity appeared only after the later step of structural organization, and a comparison of β-sheet regions between the prefibrillar intermediate and mature fibrils using proteolysis led to the proposal of specific regions essential for manifestation of these properties.

  13. Regional distance shear-coupled PL propagation within the northern Altiplano, central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer L.; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    1999-12-01

    Properties of the shear-coupled P wavetrain (SPL) from regional earthquakes provide important information about the structure of the crust and upper mantle. We investigate broad-band seismic data from intermediate-depth earthquakes and develop a grid search technique using synthetic seismograms to study the sensitivity of SPL and to model the crustal structure of the northern Altiplano, central Andes. Waveforms from an earthquake that occurred on 1994 December 12 within the Nazca slab beneath the Altiplano display a clear SPL wavetrain at the temporary stations deployed during the BANJO and SEDA experiments. We relocate this event and determine the moment tensor by inverting the complete long-period waveforms. With these source parameters fixed, we perform sensitivity analyses using a reflectivity technique to compute synthetic seismograms at a distance of 313 km (BANJO station 2, SALI). We find that, at this distance, the long-period SPL wavetrain is sensitive to the following model parameters, in order of decreasing sensitivity: crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness, focal depth, distance (location), crustal Qα and Qβ, and mantle velocity. We develop a grid search method to investigate the four parameters of the crust/upper mantle model to which the synthetic seismograms are most sensitive at SALI (crustal VP/VS, mantle VP/VS, average crustal velocity, crustal thickness). Trade-offs exist among all four of the model parameters, resulting in a range of acceptable crustal models that provide excellent fits between the data and synthetic seismograms in the passband of 15-100 s at a single station. However, by using data at a range of distances (150-450 km) we find that the model that provides the best overall fit between the data and synthetic seismograms, and thus best approximates the average characteristics of the crust and upper mantle structure of the northern Altiplano, is characterized by an average crustal velocity of 6

  14. Accuracy and precision of reconstruction of complex refractive index in near-field single-distance propagation-based phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gureyev, Timur; Mohammadi, Sara; Nesterets, Yakov; Dullin, Christian; Tromba, Giuliana

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the quantitative accuracy and noise sensitivity of reconstruction of the 3D distribution of complex refractive index, n(r)=1-δ(r)+iβ(r), in samples containing materials with different refractive indices using propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PB-CT). Our present study is limited to the case of parallel-beam geometry with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, but can be readily extended to cone-beam CT and partially coherent polychromatic X-rays at least in the case of weakly absorbing samples. We demonstrate that, except for regions near the interfaces between distinct materials, the distribution of imaginary part of the refractive index, β(r), can be accurately reconstructed from a single projection image per view angle using phase retrieval based on the so-called homogeneous version of the Transport of Intensity equation (TIE-Hom) in combination with conventional CT reconstruction. In contrast, the accuracy of reconstruction of δ(r) depends strongly on the choice of the "regularization" parameter in TIE-Hom. We demonstrate by means of an instructive example that for some multi-material samples, a direct application of the TIE-Hom method in PB-CT produces qualitatively incorrect results for δ(r), which can be rectified either by collecting additional projection images at each view angle, or by utilising suitable a priori information about the sample. As a separate observation, we also show that, in agreement with previous reports, it is possible to significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the sample-to-detector distance in combination with TIE-Hom phase retrieval in PB-CT compared to conventional ("contact") CT, with the maximum achievable gain of the order of 0.3δ /β. This can lead to improved image quality and/or reduction of the X-ray dose delivered to patients in medical imaging.

  15. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-05-20

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics.

  16. Amyloid-β plaque deposition measured using propagation-based X-ray phase contrast CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfo, Alberto; Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Schneider, Bernard; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta accumulation into insoluble plaques (Aβp) is known to play a significant role in the pathological process in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The presence of Aβp is also one of the neuropathological hallmarks for the disease. AD final diagnosis is generally acknowledged after the evaluation of Aβp deposition in the brain. Insoluble Aβp accumulation may also concur to cause AD as postulated in the so-called amyloid hypothesis. Therefore, the visualization, evaluation and quantification of Aβp are nowadays the keys for a better understanding of the disease, which may point to a possible cure for AD in the near future. Synchrotron-based X-ray phase contrast (XPC) has been demonstrated as the only imaging method that can retrieve the Aβp signal with high spatial resolution (up to 10 µm), high sensitivity and three-dimensional information at the same time. Although at the moment XPC is suitable for ex vivo samples only, it may develop into an alternative to positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in Aβp imaging. In this contribution the possibility of using synchrotron-based X-ray phase propagation computed tomography to visualize and measure Aβp on mouse brains is presented. A careful setup optimization for this application leads to a significant improvement of spatial resolution (∼1 µm), data acquisition speed (five times faster), X-ray dose (five times lower) and setup complexity, without a substantial loss in sensitivity when compared with the classic implementation of grating-based X-ray interferometry. PMID:27140162

  17. Variability in the Propagation Phase of CFD-Based Noise Prediction: Summary of Results From Category 8 of the BANC-III Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Leonard; Redonnet, Stephane; Imamura, Taro; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Zawodny, Nikolas; Cunha, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    The usage of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in noise prediction typically has been a two part process: accurately predicting the flow conditions in the near-field and then propagating the noise from the near-field to the observer. Due to the increase in computing power and the cost benefit when weighed against wind tunnel testing, the usage of CFD to estimate the local flow field of complex geometrical structures has become more routine. Recently, the Benchmark problems in Airframe Noise Computation (BANC) workshops have provided a community focus on accurately simulating the local flow field near the body with various CFD approaches. However, to date, little effort has been given into assessing the impact of the propagation phase of noise prediction. This paper includes results from the BANC-III workshop which explores variability in the propagation phase of CFD-based noise prediction. This includes two test cases: an analytical solution of a quadrupole source near a sphere and a computational solution around a nose landing gear. Agreement between three codes was very good for the analytic test case, but CFD-based noise predictions indicate that the propagation phase can introduce 3dB or more of variability in noise predictions.

  18. 78 FR 8104 - First Phase of the Forest Planning Process for the Bio-Region; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Forest Service First Phase of the Forest Planning Process for the Bio-Region; Correction AGENCY: USDA...) which concerned initiating a forest planning process under the new planning rule entitled First Phase of... Southwest Region is initiating the first phase of the forest planning process pursuant to the 2012...

  19. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves through plasma in the near-field region of low-frequency loop antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, DongLin, E-mail: donglinliu@stu.xidian.edu.cn; Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei [School of Aerospace Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A high-speed vehicle flying through the atmosphere between 100 and 20 km may suffer from a “communication blackout.” In this paper, a low frequency system with an on-board loop antenna to receive signals is presented as a potential blackout mitigation method. Because the plasma sheath is in the near-field region of the loop antenna, the traditional scattering matrix method that is developed for the far-field region may overestimate the electromagnetic (EM) wave's attenuation. To estimate the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region, EM interference (EMI) shielding theory is introduced. Experiments are conducted, and the results verify the EMI shielding theory's effectiveness. Simulations are also conducted with different plasma parameters, and the results obtained show that the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region is far below than that in the far-field region. The EM wave's attenuation increases with the increase in electron density and decreases with the increase in collision frequency. The higher the frequency, the larger is the EM wave's attenuation. During the entire re-entry phase of a RAM-C module, the EM wave's attenuations are below 10 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 1 MHz and below 1 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 100 kHz. Therefore, the low frequency systems (e.g., Loran-C) may provide a way to transmit some key information to high-speed vehicles even during the communication “blackout” period.

  20. Phase transformation studies af a low alloy steel in the (α + γ phase region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayoa Alaneme

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This research work describes a thermo mechanical investigation of a low alloy steel treated in the (α + γ phase region. The aim is to develop a high tensile, ductile microstructure that could have a wide range of engineering applications. Recent advances in the area of precipitation, recrystallization mechanisms, and α / γ transformations provide strong background to this study. In a preliminary heat treatment, various microstructures (normalized and 450 °C tempered martensite structure were produced and deformed to varying degrees. Subsequently, these microstructures were subjected to various intercritical temperatures (740 and 760 °C for various times and a very high cooling rate. Light (optical microscopic investigations were carried out to study the ensuing microstructures. Mechanical testing results (tensile and hardness values were used to characterize the structures obtained. On analysis of the result, it was observed that well defined micro-duplex structures of ferritic and martensitic nature, possessing good combinations of strength and ductility were obtained.

  1. Motor patterns of the small intestine explained by phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities: the critical importance of propagation velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Jan D; Parsons, Sean P; Chen, Ji-Hong; Pawelka, Andrew; Pistilli, Marc; Li, Chunpei; Yu, Yuanjie; Ye, Pengfei; Liu, Qing; Tong, Mengting; Zhu, Yong Fang; Wei, Defei

    2015-09-15

    Phase-amplitude coupling of two pacemaker activities of the small intestine, the omnipresent slow wave activity generated by interstitial cells of Cajal of the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) and the stimulus-dependent rhythmic transient depolarizations generated by ICC of the deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP), was recently hypothesized to underlie the orchestration of the segmentation motor pattern. The aim of the present study was to increase our understanding of phase-amplitude coupling through modeling. In particular the importance of propagation velocity of the ICC-DMP component was investigated. The outcome of the modeling was compared with motor patterns recorded from the rat or mouse intestine from which propagation velocities within the different patterns were measured. The results show that the classical segmentation motor pattern occurs when the ICC-DMP component has a low propagation velocity (velocity in the same order of magnitude as that of the slow wave activity (∼1 cm/s), cluster type propulsive activity occurs which is in fact the dominant propulsive activity of the intestine. Hence, the only difference between the generation of propagating cluster contractions and the Cannon-type segmentation motor pattern is the propagation velocity of the low-frequency component, the rhythmic transient depolarizations originating from the ICC-DMP. Importantly, the proposed mechanism explains why both motor patterns have distinct rhythmic waxing and waning of the amplitude of contractions. The hypothesis is brought forward that the velocity is modulated by neural regulation of gap junction conductance within the ICC-DMP network.

  2. Properties of gamma-frequency oscillations initiated by propagating population bursts in retrohippocampal regions of rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, M; Stewart, M

    1998-07-01

    receptor antagonist picrotoxin but small (dependence of EPSPs. Bath application of thiopental lowered the frequency of gamma oscillations, confirming the involvement of GABAA receptors. 6. The GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxy-saclofen appeared to enhance the gamma activity by increasing the duration of the gamma epoch and increasing the amplitude of individual gamma cycles in field potential recordings. These saclofen-induced cycles were, however, less well synchronized across regions. 7. We show that synchronous gamma (40-100 Hz) activity follows population bursts by deep layer retrohippocampal neurons in undrugged slices from rat brain. Responses from medial entorhinal, parasubicular or presubicular cells were not distinguishable. These events can be initiated by a propagating population spike. We suggest that an NMDA receptor mediated depolarization enables the network of deep layer retrohippocampal neurons to oscillate by providing a sustained excitation, the duration of which determines the duration of the gamma episode. gamma-Frequency firing is primarily the result of GABAA receptor dependent inhibition during this period of sustained depolarization. Recurrent excitation appears to be inconsequential for principal cell firing, but may contribute to interneuron firing.

  3. The Early Neolithic phases of Beidha in a regional context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlott Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    The paper is a preliminary account of the new analyses of the Beidha material and concentrates on the earliest levels from the site: the pre-architectural levels as well as a sample of material from Phase A1 buildings. A contextual analysis of some of the phase A1 buildings is introduced and the ...... and the development from temporary shelters to stone-built architecture in the area is discussed....

  4. 78 FR 5165 - First Phase of the Forest Planning Process for the Bio-Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... Forest Service First Phase of the Forest Planning Process for the Bio-Region AGENCY: U.S.D.A. Forest... the forest planning process for the Bio-Region. SUMMARY: Come gather 'round people Wherever you roam... the Bio-Regional Assessment has begun. DATES: The Bio-Regional Assessment Report will be completed...

  5. Surface wave tomography of North America and the Caribbean using global and regional broad-band networks: Phase velocity maps and limitations of ray theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godey, S.; Snieder, R.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We present phase velocity maps of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves across the North American and Caribbean plates. Our data set consists of 1846 waveforms from 172 events recorded at 91 broad-band stations operating in North America. We compute phase velocity maps in four narrow period bands between 50 and 150 s using a non-linear waveform inversion method that solves for phase velocity perturbations relative to a reference Earth model (PREM). Our results show a strong velocity contrast between high velocities beneath the stable North American craton, and lower velocities in the tectonically active western margin, in agreement with other regional and global surface wave tomography studies. We perform detailed comparisons with global model results, which display good agreement between phase velocity maps in the location and amplitude of the anomalies. However, forward modelling shows that regional maps are more accurate for predicting waveforms. In addition, at long periods, the amplitude of the velocity anomalies imaged in our regional phase velocity maps is three time larger than in global phase velocity models. This amplitude factor is necessary to explain the data accurately, showing that regional models provide a better image of velocity structures. Synthetic tests show that the raypath coverage used in this study enables one to resolve velocity features of the order of 800-1000 km. However, only larger length-scale features are observed in the phase velocity maps. The limitation in resolution of our maps can be attributed to the wave propagation theory used in the inversion. Ray theory does not account for off-great-circle ray propagation effects, such as ray bending or scattering. For wavelengths less than 1000 km, scattering effects are significant and may need to be considered.

  6. Application of the Theory of Wave Propagation through Random Media to Phase and Amplitude Fluctuations of Seismic P-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-18

    Mantle Boundary Inferred from Short-Period Scattered PKP Waves Recorded at the Global Digital Seismograph Network KLAUS BATAILLE AND STANILY M. F...Geophys. Res., 78, Osemov, L A., Wave Propagation in a Random Medium, Mc Graw - 6009--6020, 1973. Hill, New York, 1960. Morelli, A., and A. M

  7. Analysis of the mushy region in conduction-convection problems with change of phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike O'Leary

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available where convective motion of the liquid affects the change of phase. The mushy region is the portion of the system to which temperature and enthalpy do not assign a phase, solid or liquid. In this paper we show that the enthalpy density remains constant in time almost everywhere in the mushy region.

  8. The propagation of detonation waves in non-ideal condensed-phase explosives confined by high sound-speed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikolaos; Lee, Bok Jik

    2013-08-01

    Highly non-ideal condensed-phase explosives used by the mining industry have a strong detonation velocity dependence on the charge dimension. Detonation velocities can be as low as one third of the theoretically calculated ideal detonation velocity in charge radii close to the failure radius. Under these detonation conditions the flow in the confiner can become subsonic, a flow condition under which classical shock-polar analysis is not applicable. This restriction prohibits the use of popular engineering models like detonation shock dynamics and Wood-Kirkwood type models under these confinement conditions. In addition, it has been found in the literature that subsonic flow in the confiner will increase the influence of the confining material on the detonation performance. In this work, we use a multi-phase model coupled to an elastic-plastic model (for the representation of a confiner) to explore the interaction of detonations under these confiner conditions. An ammonium nitrate based mining emulsion is investigated in aluminium and steel confinement of finite and infinite thickness representing the confiner as either a fluid or an elastic-plastic material. It is found that the presence of elastic waves is negligible close to ideal detonation conditions, but is important close to the failure radius and in detonation conditions with subsonic flow in the confiner. High sound-speed confiners support the detonation through energy transport ahead of the detonation front if desensitisation effects are negligible. The detonation front profiles are found to remain convex even in the most non-ideal detonation conditions, and the detonation front curvature only becomes concave in a localised region close to the confiner edge.

  9. Metastable Al-Sc phase diagram in aluminium rich region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drits, M.E.; Toropova, L.S.; Bykov, Yu.G.; Gushchina, F.L.; Elagin, V.I.; Filatov, Yu.A.

    1982-12-01

    An aluminium rich part of binary metastable phase diagram Al-Sc for 100 deg/s alloy cooling rate under crystallization is studied. Eutectic horizontal in the metastable diagram is 4 deg lower as compared to the equilibrium one, scandium concentration in the eutectic point makes up approximately 0.8%, the maximum solubility is 0.6%. Maximum cast grain refining in aluminium under crystallization at the rate of 100 deg/s is attained at 0.6% scandium content.

  10. Three dimensional image-based simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in polycrystalline metal using phase-field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, K; Sugahara, H; Barth, M; Köhler, B; Schubert, F

    2016-04-01

    When modeling ultrasonic wave propagation in metals, it is important to introduce mesoscopic crystalline structures because the anisotropy of the crystal structure and the heterogeneity of grains disturb ultrasonic waves. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) polycrystalline structure generated by multiphase-field modeling was introduced to ultrasonic simulation for nondestructive testing. 3D finite-element simulations of ultrasonic waves were validated and compared with visualization results obtained from laser Doppler vibrometer measurements. The simulation results and measurements showed good agreement with respect to the velocity and front shape of the pressure wave, as well as multiple scattering due to grains. This paper discussed the applicability of a transversely isotropic approach to ultrasonic wave propagation in a polycrystalline metal with columnar structures.

  11. Modeling the propagation of light in realistic tissue structures with MMC-fpf: a meshed Monte Carlo method with free phase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watté, Rodrigo; Aernouts, Ben; Van Beers, Robbe; Herremans, Els; Ho, Quang Tri; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolaï, Bart; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-06-29

    Monte Carlo methods commonly used in tissue optics are limited to a layered tissue geometry and thus provide only a very rough approximation for many complex media such as biological structures. To overcome these limitations, a Meshed Monte Carlo method with flexible phase function choice (fpf-MC) has been developed to function in a mesh. This algorithm can model the light propagation in any complexly shaped structure, by attributing optical properties to the different mesh elements. Furthermore, this code allows the use of different discretized phase functions for each tissue type, which can be simulated from the microstructural properties of the tissue, in combination with a tool for simulating the bulk optical properties of polydisperse suspensions. As a result, the scattering properties of tissues can be estimated from information on the microstructural properties of the tissue. This is important for the estimation of the bulk optical properties that can be used for the light propagation model, since many types of tissue have never been characterized in literature. The combination of these contributions, made it possible to use the MMC-fpf for modeling the light porapagation in plant tissue. The developed Meshed Monte Carlo code with flexible phase function choice (MMC-fpf) was successfully validated in simulation through comparison with the Monte Carlo code in Multi-Layered tissues (R2 > 0.9999) and experimentally by comparing the measured and simulated reflectance (RMSE = 0.015%) and transmittance (RMSE = 0.0815%) values for tomato leaves.

  12. Lg and Other Regional Phases in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-23

    90-0298, ADA232087 58 60 Centro Regional de Sismologia, CERESIS (1985). Mapa Neotect6nico Preliminar de America del Sur, Proyecto SISRA, Instituto...report is written. It is annexed to the report. 61 ATENUACION DE LAS FASES DE CORTO PERIODO P, Li, Lg y Rg A TRAVES DE PERU - BOLIV[A, REGISTRADAS EN...Peru , reyitradas in L~a Pat - 8alvla (LP9). L~a velocidad promedio (km/s) oara !as fases consideradas as: P U L9 R h!70 km 7.73±0.21 .. 4±0.0001 3.54

  13. The oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity as an indicator of atmospheric waves propagation in the mid-latitude ionosphere F2 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javakhishvili, Giorgi; Didebulidze, Goderdzi; Gudadze, Nikoloz; Toriashvili, Lexo

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of the oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity under influence of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) is considered, taking into account nightly changes of the thermosphere meridional wind by observations from Abastumani (41.75 N; 42.82 E). The vortical type perturbations, which can be in situ excited, are also considered. On the basis of theoretical model, the 630.0 nm line integral intensity variations are estimated taking into account thermosphere wind field changes and atmospheric waves propagation influence on the nighttime ionosphere F2 layer. A possibility of identification of waves propagation from polar and equatorial regions during various helio-geophysical conditions is noted. The cases of detected large scale traveling ionosphere disturbances -TIDs (mostly generated in the polar regions) and traveling atmospheric disturbances -TADs (which can be generated both in polar and equatorial regions) are demonstrated. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation Grant no. 31/56.

  14. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Fouras, Andreas [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B. [Ritchie Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  15. Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1: A Tool for Informing Regional Evaluations of Alternative Geologic Media and Decision Making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelley, Richard E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Suzanne M. [Clark Univ., Worcester, MA (United States); Lugo, Alexander Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Reported is progress in the following areas: Phase 1 and 2 websites for the regional geology GIS database; terrane maps of crystalline basement rocks; inventory of shale formations in the US; and rock properties and in-situ conditions for shale estimated from sonic velocity measurements.

  16. Seismic tomography of Yunnan region using short-period surface wave phase velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何正勤; 苏伟; 叶太兰

    2004-01-01

    The data of short-period (1~18 s) surface waves recorded by 23 stations belonging to the digital seismic network of Yunnan Province of China are used in this paper. From these data, the dispersion curves of phase velocities of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave along 209 paths are determined by using the two-station narrowband filtering cross-correlation method.Adopting tomography method, the distribution maps of phase velocities at various periods in Yunnan region are inverted. The maps of phase velocities on profiles along 24°N, 25°N, 26°N, 27°N and 100.5°E and the distribution maps of phase velocities at 3 periods in the study region are given. The results show that the phase velocity distribution in Yunnan region has strong variations in horizontal direction, and the phase velocity distribution in short-period range is closely related to the thickness of sedimentary layers in the shallow crust. The phase velocity in southern part of the Sichuan-Yunnan rhombic block encircled by the Honghe fault and Xiaojiang fault is obviously lower than that in surrounding areas. The epicentral locations of strong earthquakes in Yunnan region are mainly distributed in transitional zones between low and high phase velocities.

  17. New Phase Regions of Ir-Ru-Ti System with Eutectic-Peritectic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsyk, V.; Vorob'eva, V.

    2013-12-01

    Special surfaces, corresponding to phase transformation type changing, have been found and designed within six three-phase regions of the system Ti-Ir-Ru with a help of 3D computer model of its T-x-y diagram.

  18. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the

  19. Guangxi Shanglin Aluminum Plant cross-regional technical upgrade project(phase 1)put into operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>The project(Phase 1)of cross-regional techni- cal upgrade of the aluminum plant of Guangxi Shanglin Nannan Industrial Co.was completed and put into operation on June 8,2007.The plant is a cross-regional technical upgrade pro- ject of Nanning Aluminum Plant,featuring the integration of coal,electricity and aluminum.

  20. Formation and coalescence of strain localized regions in ferrite phase of DP600 steels under uniaxial tensile deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaie, A., E-mail: amir_alaie@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kadkhodapour, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Materials Testing, Materials Science and Strength of Materials (IMWF), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Ziaei Rad, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asadi Asadabad, M. [Materials Research School, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Schmauder, S. [Institute for Materials Testing, Materials Science and Strength of Materials (IMWF), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-01-19

    In this study the key factors in the creation and coalescence of strain localization regions in dual-phase steels were investigated. An in-situ tensile setup was used to follow the microscopic deformation of ferrite phase inside the microstructure of DP600 steel. The test was continued until the specimen was very close to final failure. The captured scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs enabled us to directly observe the evolution of deformation bands as a contour of strain distribution in the ferrite matrix. The image processing method was used to quantify the ferrite microscopic strains; the obtained strain maps were superimposed onto the SEM micrographs. The results revealed important deformational characteristics of the microstructure at the microscopic level. It was observed that despite the formation of slip bands inside the large grains during the early stages of deformation, the large ferrite grains did not contribute to the formation of high-strain bands until the final stages of severe necking. The behavior of voids and initial defects inside the localization bands was also studied. In the final stages of deformation, cracks were observed to preferentially propagate in the direction of local deformation bands and to coalescence with each other to form the final failure lines in the microstructure. It was observed that in the final stages of deformation, the defects or voids outside the deformation bands do not contribute to the final failure mechanisms and could be considered to be of minor importance.

  1. Regional Heat Sources and the Active and Break Phases of Boreal Summer Intraseasonal (30-50 Day) Variability(.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, H.; Sperber, K. R.

    2005-08-01

    The boreal summer intraseasonal variability (BSISV) associated with the 30-50-day mode is represented by the coexistence of three components: poleward propagation of convection over the Indian and tropical west Pacific longitudes and eastward propagation along the equator. The hypothesis that the three components influence each other has been investigated using observed outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, and solutions from an idealized linear model. The null hypothesis is that the three components are mutually independent. Cyclostationary EOF (CsEOF) analysis is applied on filtered OLR to extract the life cycle of the BSISV. The dominant CsEOF mode is significantly tied to the observed spatial rainfall pattern associated with the active/break phases over the Indian subcontinent. The components of the heating patterns from CsEOF analysis serve as prescribed forcings for the dry version of the linear model. This allows one to investigate the possible roles that the regional heat sources and sinks play in driving the large-scale monsoon circulation at various stages of the BSISV life cycle. To understand the interactive nature between convection and circulation, the moist version of the model is forced with intraseasonal SST anomalies.The linear models reproduce the major features of the BSISV seen in the reanalysis. The linear model suggests three new findings: (i) The circulation anomalies that develop as a Rossby wave response to suppressed convection over the equatorial Indian Ocean associated with the previous break phase of the BSISV results in low-level convergence and tropospheric moisture enhancement over the equatorial western Indian Ocean and helps trigger the next active phase of the BSISV. (ii) The development of convection over the tropical west Pacific forces descent anomalies to the west. This, in conjunction with the weakened cross-equatorial flow due to suppressed convective anomalies over the equatorial Indian Ocean, reduces

  2. Simulation of 3-D radiation beam patterns propagated through a planar interface from ultrasonic phased array transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hwan

    2002-05-01

    Phased array transducers are quite often mounted on solid wedges with specific angles in many practical ultrasonic inspections of thin plates phased array techniques with testing set-up, it is essential to have thorough understanding on the characteristics of radiation beam pattern produced in the interrogated medium. To address such a need, this paper proposes a systematic way to calculate full 3-D radiation beam patterns produced in the interrogated solid medium by phased array transducers mounted on a solid wedge. In order to investigate the characteristics of radiation beam patterns in steel, simulation is carried out for 7.5 MHz array transducers mounted on an acrylic wedge with the angle of 15.45 degrees with various of steering angles and/or focal planes.

  3. Phase II NOx controls for the Marama and Nescaum regions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This technical report discusses Phase II NOx controls for utility boilers in the Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association (MARAMA) and the Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) regions. The subject areas include: Utility boiler population profile in the MARAMA and NESCAUM regions; Discussion of RACT controls; Available NOx controls and their levels of performance; and Costs and cost effectiveness of NOx controls.

  4. Comments on ferrite phase shifter configurations for the millimeter wave region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss, M. L., Jr.

    1982-09-01

    In the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum, electronically controllable ferrite phase shifters have demonstrated their value as components and as control elements for switches and attenuators. As the need for control components operating in the lower millimeter wave region increases, it is a reasonable approach to scale successful microwave ferrite configurations into the lower millimeter wave region (30 GHz to 140 GHz). However, many problems are encountered when attempting to scale efficient microwave ferrite configurations, particularly latching ferrite configurations, into the millimeter wave region. It is the objective of this report to review several ferrite configurations with the intent that consideration of these configurations may stimulate development of practical millimeter wave configurations. Ferrite phase shifter configurations that will be the subject of comment include the toroidal (dual slab), dual mode, Bush-Reggia-Spencer, and single slab configurations. Comments are also presented on a circulator used as a phase shifter.

  5. Analyzing the propagation behavior of coherence and polarization degrees of a phase-locked partially coherent radial flat-topped array laser beam in underwater turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Fatemeh Dabbagh; Yousefi, Masoud

    2016-08-10

    In this research, based on an analytical expression for cross-spectral density (CSD) matrix elements, coherence and polarization properties of phase-locked partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) radial array laser beams propagating through weak oceanic turbulence are analyzed. Spectral degrees of coherence and polarization are analytically calculated using CSD matrix elements. Also, the effective width of spatial degree of coherence (EWSDC) is calculated numerically. The simulation is done by considering the effects of source parameters (such as radius of the array setup's circle, effective width of the spectral degree of coherence, and wavelength) and turbulent ocean factors (such as the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid and relative strength of temperature and salinity fluctuations, Kolmogorov micro-scale, and rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature) in detail. Results indicate that any change in the amount of turbulence factors that increase the turbulence power reduces the EWSDC significantly and causes the reduction in the degree of polarization, and occurs at shorter propagation distances but with smaller magnitudes. In addition, being valid for all conditions, the degradation rate of the EWSDC of Gaussian array beams are more in comparison with the PCFT ones. The simulation and calculation results are shown by graphs.

  6. A temporary immersion plant propagation bioreactor with decoupled gas and liquid flows for enhanced control of gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Sergio L; Curtis, Matthew S; Shaw, Sydney E; Hamaker, Nathaniel K; Larsen, Jeffrey S; Curtis, Wayne R

    2016-03-01

    Temporary immersion bioreactors (TIBs) are being used to propagate superior plant species on a commercial scale. We demonstrate a new TIB design, a Hydrostatic-driven TIB (Hy-TIB), where periodic raising and lowering the media reservoir maintains the advantages of temporary immersion of plant tissues without requiring large amounts of gas to move the media that is a characteristic of other TIB designs. The advantage of utilizing low volumes of gas mixtures (that are more expensive than air) is shown by a doubling of the growth rate of plant root cultures under elevated (40%) oxygen in air, and with CO2 supplementation showing improved phototrophic and photomixotrophic growth of seedless watermelon meristem cultures. The development of this bioreactor system involved overcoming contamination issues associated with utilizing very low gas flow rates and included utilizing microchip pressure sensors to diagnose unexpected changes in internal bioreactor pressure (± 20 Pa ∼0.0002 atm) caused by flexing of non-rigid plastic bag vessels. The overall design seeks to achieve versatility, scalability and minimum cost such that bioreactor technology can play an increasing role in the critical need to improve plant productivity in the face of increasing demand for food, reduced resources, and environmental degradation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:337-345, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Experimental validation of phase-only pre-compensation over 494  m free-space propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Aoife; Berlich, René; Leonhard, Nina; Kopf, Teresa; Böttner, Paul; Eberhardt, Ramona; Reinlein, Claudia

    2017-07-15

    It is anticipated that ground-to-geostationary orbit (GEO) laser communication will benefit from pre-compensation of atmospheric turbulence for laser beam propagation through the atmosphere. Theoretical simulations and laboratory experiments have determined its feasibility; extensive free-space experimental validation has, however, yet to be fulfilled. Therefore, we designed and implemented an adaptive optical (AO)-box which pre-compensates an outgoing laser beam (uplink) using the measurements of an incoming beam (downlink). The setup was designed to approximate the baseline scenario over a horizontal test range of 0.5 km and consisted of a ground terminal with the AO-box and a simplified approximation of a satellite terminal. Our results confirmed that we could focus the uplink beam on the satellite terminal using AO under a point-ahead angle of 28 μrad. Furthermore, we demonstrated a considerable increase in the intensity received at the satellite. These results are further testimony to AO pre-compensation being a viable technique to enhance Earth-to-GEO optical communication.

  8. Influence of fuel on phase formation of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared by self-propagated combustion route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesan, K.; Babu, D. Rajan, E-mail: drajanbabu@vit.ac.in [Advanced Materials Research Centre, Crystal Growth and Crystallography Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore – 632014 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Zinc iron oxide (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by self-propagated combustion route.The fuel plays a major role on the formation of structure and particle size. Here three different fuels like alanine, glycine and proline were used to synthesis the zinc iron oxide nanoparticle. Influence of combustion nature through the fuel, the phase formation, particle size, band gap and surface morphology has been modified. The prepared powder was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction method (PXRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the composition of the material was analysed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDAX).The elemental mapping was confirmed the uniform distribution of Zn, Fe and O elements in the prepared material of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  9. The fluctuational region on the phase diagram of lattice Weinberg - Salam model

    CERN Document Server

    Zubkov, M A

    2009-01-01

    The lattice Weinberg - Salam model without fermions is investigated numerically for the realistic choice of bare coupling constants correspondent to the value of the Weinberg angle $\\theta_W \\sim 30^o$, and the fine structure constant $\\alpha \\sim {1/100}$. On the phase diagram there exists the vicinity of the phase transition between the physical Higgs phase and the unphysical symmetric phase, where the fluctuations of the scalar field become strong. The classical Nambu monopole can be considered as an embryo of the unphysical symmetric phase within the physical phase. In the fluctuational region quantum Nambu monopoles are dense and, therefore, the perturbation expansion around trivial vacuum cannot be applied. The maximal value of the cutoff at the given values of coupling constants calculated using the lattices of sizes $8^3\\times 16$ and $12^3\\times 16$ is $\\Lambda_c \\sim 1.4 \\pm 0.2$ Tev.

  10. Extension of Measurable Region of Object Vibration Phasor in Phase-Modulated TV Holographic Interferometry: Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Nojima, Ken; Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we present an experiment based on the previously reported theory concerning the extension of the measurable region of object vibration phasor in phase-modulated TV holographic interferometry. This theory is based on the following facts: (1) the modulation of speckle interference image is proportional to the Bessel function, (2) its argument indicates the distance between the phasors of phase modulation and object vibration in the complex plane, and (3) the modulation increases as the Bessel function argument approaches zero. The phase modulation phasor is scanned, and at each pixel, one seeks the phase modulation phasor producing the maximum modulation. From the modulations produced by four phase modulation phasors adjacent to the sought phase modulation phasor, the object vibration phasor can be calculated. We analyzed the vibration of a phosphor-bronze rectangular plate with free sides, which were vibrated at the center by a piezoelectric transducer (PZT). Twenty-one phase modulation phasors were employed. The results of measurement were presented, and it was confirmed that the object vibration phasor can be measured in the wider region based on the theory concerning the extension of the measurable region.

  11. Gametic phase estimation over large genomic regions using an adaptive window approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Excoffier Laurent

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors present ELB, an easy to programme and computationally fast algorithm for inferring gametic phase in population samples of multilocus genotypes. Phase updates are made on the basis of a window of neighbouring loci, and the window size varies according to the local level of linkage disequilibrium. Thus, ELB is particularly well suited to problems involving many loci and/or relatively large genomic regions, including those with variable recombination rate. The authors have simulated population samples of single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with varying levels of recombination and marker density, and find that ELB provides better local estimation of gametic phase than the PHASE or HTYPER programs, while its global accuracy is broadly similar. The relative improvement in local accuracy increases both with increasing recombination and with increasing marker density. Short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite simulation studies demonstrate ELB's superiority over PHASE both globally and locally. Missing data are handled by ELB; simulations show that phase recovery is virtually unaffected by up to 2 per cent of missing data, but that phase estimation is noticeably impaired beyond this amount. The authors also applied ELB to datasets obtained from random pairings of 42 human X chromosomes typed at 97 diallelic markers in a 200 kb low-recombination region. Once again, they found ELB to have consistently better local accuracy than PHASE or HTYPER, while its global accuracy was close to the best.

  12. Regional Heat Sources and the Active and Break Phases of Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, H; Sperber, K R

    2003-12-15

    The boreal summer intraseasonal variability (BSISV) associated with the 30-50 day mode is represented by the co-existence of three components, poleward propagation of convection over the Indian and tropical west Pacific longitudes and eastward propagation along the equator. The hypothesis that the three components influence each other has been investigated using observed OLR, NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, and solutions from an idealized linear model. The null hypothesis is that the three components are mutually independent. Cyclostationary EOF (CsEOF) analysis is applied on filtered OLR to extract the life-cycle of the BSISV. The dominant mode of CsEOF is significantly tied to observed rainfall over the Indian subcontinent. The components of the heating patterns from CsEOF analysis serve as prescribed forcings for the linear model. This allows us to ascertain which heat sources and sinks are instrumental in driving the large-scale monsoon circulation during the BSISV life-cycle. We identify three new findings: (1) the circulation anomalies that develop as a Rossby wave response to suppressed convection over the equatorial Indian Ocean associated with the previous break phase of the BSISV precondition the ocean-atmosphere system in the western Indian Ocean and trigger the next active phase of the BSISV, (2) the development of convection over the tropical west Pacific forces descent anomalies to the west. This, in conjunction with the weakened cross-equatorial flow due to suppressed convective anomalies over the equatorial Indian Ocean reduce the tropospheric moisture over the Arabian Sea, and promote westerly wind anomalies that do not recurve over India. As a result the low-level cyclonic vorticity shifts from India to southeast Asia and break conditions are initiated over India, and (3) the circulation anomalies forced by equatorial Indian Ocean convective anomalies significantly influence the active/break phases over the tropical west Pacific. Our model solutions support

  13. A paradigm shift in predicting stormflow responses in an active tectonic region through a similarity analysis of pressure propagation in a hydraulic continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Tani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil layers on hillslopes acts as systems in quasi-steady states generating rainfall-stormflow responses that are controlled by pressure propagation in a hydraulic continuum established when the rainfall volume is sufficiently large. A similarity analysis for quantifying the sensitivity of the stormflow response and recession limb to topographic and soil properties in a sloping permeable domain showed that the deviation of stormflow responses in the hydraulic continuum decreases due to the macropore effect. The rapid responses seem to be naturally derived from the evolution of the soil layer with the assistance of the vegetation-root system and effective drainage systems in zero-order catchments in active tectonic regions with heavy storms. To predict stormflow responses using distributed runoff models, a paradigm shift to consider this evolution process is needed because the simple stormflow responses and complex and heterogeneous catchment properties are poorly related, but may be mainly determined by soil evolution processes.

  14. Finite element modeling of impulsive excitation and shear wave propagation in an incompressible, transversely isotropic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouze, Ned C; Wang, Michael H; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathy R

    2013-11-15

    Elastic properties of materials can be measured by observing shear wave propagation following localized, impulsive excitations and relating the propagation velocity to a model of the material. However, characterization of anisotropic materials is difficult because of the number of elasticity constants in the material model and the complex dependence of propagation velocity relative to the excitation axis, material symmetries, and propagation directions. In this study, we develop a model of wave propagation following impulsive excitation in an incompressible, transversely isotropic (TI) material such as muscle. Wave motion is described in terms of three propagation modes identified by their polarization relative to the material symmetry axis and propagation direction. Phase velocities for these propagation modes are expressed in terms of five elasticity constants needed to describe a general TI material, and also in terms of three constants after the application of two constraints that hold in the limit of an incompressible material. Group propagation velocities are derived from the phase velocities to describe the propagation of wave packets away from the excitation region following localized excitation. The theoretical model is compared to the results of finite element (FE) simulations performed using a nearly incompressible material model with the five elasticity constants chosen to preserve the essential properties of the material in the incompressible limit. Propagation velocities calculated from the FE displacement data show complex structure that agrees quantitatively with the theoretical model and demonstrates the possibility of measuring all three elasticity constants needed to characterize an incompressible, TI material.

  15. Time-Frequency Integrals and the Stationary Phase Method in Problems of Waves Propagation from Moving Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy Burlak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The time-frequency integrals and the two-dimensional stationary phase method are applied to study the electromagnetic waves radiated by moving modulated sources in dispersive media. We show that such unified approach leads to explicit expressions for the field amplitudes and simple relations for the field eigenfrequencies and the retardation time that become the coupled variables. The main features of the technique are illustrated by examples of the moving source fields in the plasma and the Cherenkov radiation. It is emphasized that the deeper insight to the wave effects in dispersive case already requires the explicit formulation of the dispersive material model. As the advanced application we have considered the Doppler frequency shift in a complex single-resonant dispersive metamaterial (Lorenz model where in some frequency ranges the negativity of the real part of the refraction index can be reached. We have demonstrated that in dispersive case the Doppler frequency shift acquires a nonlinear dependence on the modulating frequency of the radiated particle. The detailed frequency dependence of such a shift and spectral behavior of phase and group velocities (that have the opposite directions are studied numerically.

  16. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  17. Feasibility study of propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray lung imaging on the Imaging and Medical beamline at the Australian Synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrie, Rhiannon P; Stevenson, Andrew W; Morgan, Kaye S; Fouras, Andreas; Paganin, David M; Siu, Karen K W

    2014-03-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PB-PCXI) using synchrotron radiation has achieved high-resolution imaging of the lungs of small animals both in real time and in vivo. Current studies are applying such imaging techniques to lung disease models to aid in diagnosis and treatment development. At the Australian Synchrotron, the Imaging and Medical beamline (IMBL) is well equipped for PB-PCXI, combining high flux and coherence with a beam size sufficient to image large animals, such as sheep, due to a wiggler source and source-to-sample distances of over 137 m. This study aimed to measure the capabilities of PB-PCXI on IMBL for imaging small animal lungs to study lung disease. The feasibility of combining this technique with computed tomography for three-dimensional imaging and X-ray velocimetry for studies of airflow and non-invasive lung function testing was also investigated. Detailed analysis of the role of the effective source size and sample-to-detector distance on lung image contrast was undertaken as well as phase retrieval for sample volume analysis. Results showed that PB-PCXI of lung phantoms and mouse lungs produced high-contrast images, with successful computed tomography and velocimetry also being carried out, suggesting that live animal lung imaging will also be feasible at the IMBL.

  18. Shallow Water Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and...these modes decay much more slowly than leaky modes as they propagate. The initial focus is on modal phase and group velocity formulas, obtained from...acoustic quantities such as transmission loss and scintillation index. (C) Both physical understanding and reasonable estimates of

  19. Replacement of annular domain with trapezoidal domain in computational modeling of nonaqueous-phase-liquid dissolution-front propagation problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chong-bin; Thomas POULET; Klaus REGENAUER-LIEB

    2015-01-01

    In order to simulate the instability phenomenon of a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution front in a computational model, the intrinsic characteristic length is commonly used to determine the length scale at which the instability of the NAPL dissolution front can be initiated. This will require a huge number of finite elements if a whole NAPL dissolution system is simulated in the computational model. Even though modern supercomputers might be used to tackle this kind of NAPL dissolution problem, it can become prohibitive for commonly-used personal computers to do so. The main purpose of this work is to investigate whether or not the whole NAPL dissolution system of an annular domain can be replaced by a trapezoidal domain, so as to greatly reduce the requirements for computer efforts. The related simulation results have demonstrated that when the NAPL dissolution system under consideration is in a subcritical state, if the dissolution pattern around the entrance of an annulus domain is of interest, then a trapezoidal domain cannot be used to replace an annular domain in the computational simulation of the NAPL dissolution system. However, if the dissolution pattern away from the vicinity of the entrance of an annulus domain is of interest, then a trapezoidal domain can be used to replace an annular domain in the computational simulation of the NAPL dissolution system. When the NAPL dissolution system under consideration is in a supercritical state, a trapezoidal domain cannot be used to replace an annular domain in the computational simulation of the NAPL dissolution system.

  20. Phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow insulin and glucose oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, J.; Knudsen, C.; O'Meara, N.M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical investigation of the phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow oscillations in human insulin secretion and blood glucose concentration. The bifurcation structures of period 2pi and 4pi tongues are mapped out and found to be qualitatively identical to those of...

  1. Looking for phase-space structures in star-forming regions: an MST-based methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Emilio J.; González, Marta

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for analysing the phase space of star-forming regions. In particular we are searching for clumpy structures in the 3D sub-space formed by two position coordinates and radial velocity. The aim of the method is the detection of kinematic segregated radial velocity groups, that is, radial velocity intervals whose associated stars are spatially concentrated. To this end we define a kinematic segregation index, tilde{Λ }(RV), based on the Minimum Spanning Tree graph algorithm, which is estimated for a set of radial velocity intervals in the region. When tilde{Λ }(RV) is significantly greater than 1 we consider that this bin represents a grouping in the phase space. We split a star-forming region into radial velocity bins and calculate the kinematic segregation index for each bin, and then we obtain the spectrum of kinematic groupings, which enables a quick visualization of the kinematic behaviour of the region under study. We carried out numerical models of different configurations in the sub-space of the phase space formed by the coordinates and the that various case studies illustrate. The analysis of the test cases demonstrates the potential of the new methodology for detecting different kind of groupings in phase space.

  2. Phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow insulin and glucose oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturis, Jeppe; Knudsen, Carsten; O'Meara, Niall M.;

    1995-01-01

    We present a detailed numerical investigation of the phase-locking regions in a forced model of slow oscillations in human insulin secretion and blood glucose concentration. The bifurcation structures of period 2pi and 4pi tongues are mapped out and found to be qualitatively identical to those...

  3. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mearns, L. O.; Arritt, R.; Biner, S.; Bukovsky, Melissa; McGinnis, Seth; Sain, Steve; Caya, Daniel; Correia Jr., James; Flory, Dave; Gutowski, William; Takle, Gene; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; McDaniel, Larry; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun; Roads, J.; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

    2012-09-20

    The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program is an international effort designed to systematically investigate the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and produce high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) nested within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, with a common domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The program also includes an evaluation component (Phase I) wherein the participating RCMs are nested within 25 years of NCEP/DOE global reanalysis II. The grid spacing of the RCM simulations is 50 km.

  4. Geometric analysis of phase bunching in the central region of cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaki, Nobumasa, E-mail: miyawaki.nobumasa@jaea.go.jp [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsuhiro [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Arakawa, Kazuo [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, 3-39-22 Showa-Machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    An optimum condition for realizing phase bunching in the central region of a cyclotron was quantitatively clarified by a simplified geometric trajectory analysis of charged particles from the first to the second acceleration gap. The phase bunching performance was evaluated for a general case of a cyclotron. The phase difference of incident particles at the second acceleration gap depends on the combination of four parameters: the acceleration harmonic number h, the span angle θ{sub D} of the dee electrode, the span angle θ{sub F} from the first to the second acceleration gap, the ratio R{sub V} of the peak acceleration voltage between the cyclotron and ion source. Optimum values of θ{sub F} for phase bunching were limited by the relationship between h and θ{sub D}, which is 90°/h+θ{sub D}/2≤θ{sub F}≤180°/h+θ{sub D}/2, and sin θ{sub F}>0. The phase difference with respect to the reference particle at the second acceleration gap is minimized for voltage-ratios between two and four for an initial phase difference within 40 RF degrees. Although the slope of the first acceleration gap contributes to the RF phase at which the particles reach the second acceleration gap, phase bunching was not affected. An orbit simulation of the AVF cyclotron at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency verifies the evaluation based on geometric analysis.

  5. Numerical study of the generation and propagation of ultralow-frequency waves by artificial ionospheric F region modulation at different latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhou, Chen; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-09-01

    Powerful high-frequency (HF) radio waves can be used to efficiently modify the upper-ionospheric plasmas of the F region. The pressure gradient induced by modulated electron heating at ultralow-frequency (ULF) drives a local oscillating diamagnetic ring current source perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, which can act as an antenna radiating ULF waves. In this paper, utilizing the HF heating model and the model of ULF wave generation and propagation, we investigate the effects of both the background ionospheric profiles at different latitudes in the daytime and nighttime ionosphere and the modulation frequency on the process of the HF modulated heating and the subsequent generation and propagation of artificial ULF waves. Firstly, based on a relation among the radiation efficiency of the ring current source, the size of the spatial distribution of the modulated electron temperature and the wavelength of ULF waves, we discuss the possibility of the effects of the background ionospheric parameters and the modulation frequency. Then the numerical simulations with both models are performed to demonstrate the prediction. Six different background parameters are used in the simulation, and they are from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model and the neutral atmosphere model (NRLMSISE-00), including the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP; 62.39° N, 145.15° W), Wuhan (30.52° N, 114.32° E) and Jicamarca (11.95° S, 76.87° W) at 02:00 and 14:00 LT. A modulation frequency sweep is also used in the simulation. Finally, by analyzing the numerical results, we come to the following conclusions: in the nighttime ionosphere, the size of the spatial distribution of the modulated electron temperature and the ground magnitude of the magnetic field of ULF wave are larger, while the propagation loss due to Joule heating is smaller compared to the daytime ionosphere; the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillation decreases with

  6. Source and Path Calibration in Regions of Poor Crustal Propagation Using Temporary, Large-Aperture, High-Resolution Seismic Arrays (Postprint). Annual Report 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    Soc. Am., 101: 1938–1947. Jackson, J. A., and N. J. White (1989), Normal faulting in the upper continental crust : observations from regions of...dipping plane or along a listric fault near the base of the seismogenic crust , but satellite imagery does not support either scenario. Resolving the 3... processing filters to remove spurious detections and erroneous phase and event associations. Main considerations are (1) stations close to each other have

  7. Phase structure of finite temperature QCD in the heavy quark region

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, H; Aoki, S; Hatsuda, T; Kanaya, K; Maezawa, Y; Ohno, H; Umeda, T

    2011-01-01

    We study the quark mass dependence of the finite temperature QCD phase transition in the heavy quark region using an effective potential defined through the probability distribution function of the average plaquette. Performing a simulation of SU(3) pure gauge theory, we first confirm that the distribution function has two peaks indicating that the phase transition is of first order in the heavy quark limit, while the first order transition turns into a crossover as the quark mass decreases from infinity, where the mass dependence of the distribution function is evaluated by the reweighting method combined with the hopping parameter expansion. We determine the endpoint of the first order transition region for N_f=1, 2, 3 and 2+1 cases. The quark mass dependence of the latent heat is also evaluated in the first order transition region.

  8. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  9. Phase relationships in the Al-rich region of the Al-Cu-Er system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ligang, E-mail: Ligang.Zhang@vtc.tu-freiberg.de [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Lushan Street 105, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Freiberg University of Mining and Technology, Centre for Innovation Competence Virtuhcon, Fuchsmuehlenweg 9, D-09596 Freiberg (Germany); Science Center for Phase Diagram and Materials Design and Manufacture, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Masset, Patrick J. [Freiberg University of Mining and Technology, Centre for Innovation Competence Virtuhcon, Fuchsmuehlenweg 9, D-09596 Freiberg (Germany); Cao Fuyong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Lushan Street 105, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Meng Fangui [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410004 (China); Liu Libin, E-mail: PDC@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Lushan Street 105, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Science Center for Phase Diagram and Materials Design and Manufacture, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Jin Zhanpeng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Central South University, Lushan Street 105, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Science Center for Phase Diagram and Materials Design and Manufacture, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2011-03-03

    Research highlights: > One ternary phase {tau}{sub 1}-Al{sub 8}Cu{sub 4}Er in Al-rich region with a composition of 59.4-60.4 at.% Al, 32.2-33.8 at.% Cu, and 6.4-7.7 at.% Er is observed in both as-cast and annealed alloys. At 673 K, the binary Al{sub 3}Er phase dissolves about 3.51 at.% Cu. > The calculated solidification paths (based on the CALPHAD method) of as-cast alloys are in agreement with the experimental results. > It can be found that the resultant thermodynamic database can be applied to case studies of as-cast alloys, showing that the literature thermodynamic description of the Al-Cu-Er system is reliable as a working basis for computer-assisted alloy design. - Abstract: The Al-rich region of the ternary Al-Cu-Er system is investigated using the method of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase equilibria in the Al-rich region of the Al-Cu-Er system at 673 K have been obtained, and the microstructures of as-cast alloys in the Al-rich region are also investigated. One ternary phase {tau}{sub 1}-Al{sub 8}Cu{sub 4}Er with a composition of 59.4-60.4 at.% Al, 32.2-33.8 at.% Cu, and 6.4-7.7 at.% Er is observed in both as-cast and annealed alloys. At 673 K, the binary Al{sub 3}Er phase dissolves about 3.51 at.% Cu. The calculated solidification paths (based on the CALPHAD method) of as-cast alloys are in agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Phase-space structures and stellar populations in the star-forming region NGC 2264

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Marta; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we analyse the structure of a subspace of the phase space of the star-forming region NGC 2264 using the spectrum of kinematic groupings (SKG). We show that the SKG can be used to process a collection of star data to find substructure at different scales. We have found structure associated with the NGC 2264 region and also with the background area. In the NGC 2264 region, a hierarchical analysis shows substructure compatible with that found in previous specific studies of the area but with an objective, compact methodology that allows us to homogeneously compare the structure of different clusters and star-forming regions. Moreover, this structure is compatible with the different ages of the main NGC 2264 star-forming populations. The structure found in the field can be roughly associated with giant stars far in the background, dynamically decoupled from NGC 2264, which could be related either with the Outer Arm or Monoceros Ring. The results in this paper confirm the relationship between structure in the radial velocity phase-space subspace and different kinds of populations, defined by other variables not necessarily analysed with the SKG, such as age or distance, showing the importance of detecting phase-space substructure in order to trace stellar populations in the broadest sense of the word.

  11. Back propagation neural network model for predicting the performance of immobilized cell biofilters handling gas-phase hydrogen sulphide and ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene, Eldon R; López, M Estefanía; Kim, Jung Hoon; Park, Hung Suck

    2013-01-01

    Lab scale studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of two simultaneously operated immobilized cell biofilters (ICBs) for removing hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and ammonia (NH3) from gas phase. The removal efficiencies (REs) of the biofilter treating H2S varied from 50 to 100% at inlet loading rates (ILRs) varying up to 13 g H2S/m(3) ·h, while the NH3 biofilter showed REs ranging from 60 to 100% at ILRs varying between 0.5 and 5.5 g NH3/m(3) ·h. An application of the back propagation neural network (BPNN) to predict the performance parameter, namely, RE (%) using this experimental data is presented in this paper. The input parameters to the network were unit flow (per min) and inlet concentrations (ppmv), respectively. The accuracy of BPNN-based model predictions were evaluated by providing the trained network topology with a test dataset and also by calculating the regression coefficient (R (2)) values. The results from this predictive modeling work showed that BPNNs were able to predict the RE of both the ICBs efficiently.

  12. Back Propagation Neural Network Model for Predicting the Performance of Immobilized Cell Biofilters Handling Gas-Phase Hydrogen Sulphide and Ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldon R. Rene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lab scale studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of two simultaneously operated immobilized cell biofilters (ICBs for removing hydrogen sulphide (H2S and ammonia (NH3 from gas phase. The removal efficiencies (REs of the biofilter treating H2S varied from 50 to 100% at inlet loading rates (ILRs varying up to 13 g H2S/m3·h, while the NH3 biofilter showed REs ranging from 60 to 100% at ILRs varying between 0.5 and 5.5 g NH3/m3·h. An application of the back propagation neural network (BPNN to predict the performance parameter, namely, RE (% using this experimental data is presented in this paper. The input parameters to the network were unit flow (per min and inlet concentrations (ppmv, respectively. The accuracy of BPNN-based model predictions were evaluated by providing the trained network topology with a test dataset and also by calculating the regression coefficient (R2 values. The results from this predictive modeling work showed that BPNNs were able to predict the RE of both the ICBs efficiently.

  13. The United States Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program Validation Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litynski, John T; Plasynski, Sean; McIlvried, Howard G; Mahoney, Christopher; Srivastava, Rameshwar D

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the Validation Phase (Phase II) of the Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships initiative. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon sequestration in different regions of the nation. The objectives of the Characterization Phase (Phase I) were to characterize the geologic and terrestrial opportunities for carbon sequestration; to identify CO(2) point sources within the territories of the individual partnerships; to assess the transportation infrastructure needed for future deployment; to evaluate CO(2) capture technologies for existing and future power plants; and to identify the most promising sequestration opportunities that would need to be validated through a series of field projects. The Characterization Phase was highly successful, with the following achievements: established a national network of companies and professionals working to support sequestration deployment; created regional and national carbon sequestration atlases for the United States and portions of Canada; evaluated available and developing technologies for the capture of CO(2) from point sources; developed an improved understanding of the permitting requirements that future sequestration activities will need to address as well as defined the gap in permitting requirements for large scale deployment of these technologies; created a raised awareness of, and support for, carbon sequestration as a greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation option, both within industry and among the general public; identified the most promising carbon sequestration opportunities for future field tests; and established protocols for project implementation, accounting, and management. Economic evaluation was started and is continuing and will be a factor in project selection. During the

  14. Light Propagation For Accelerated Observers

    CERN Document Server

    Adewole, A I A

    2001-01-01

    We show that for an observer in translational, rotational or gravitational motion, a linearly polarized plane wave has two modes of propagation in a stationary, homogeneous and isotropic medium according to Hertz's version of Maxwell's theory. The first mode is characterized by polarization at right angles to the direction of propagation and has a phase velocity that is controlled by the material constants of the medium. The second mode is characterized by polarization along the propagation direction and has a phase velocity that is controlled by the motion of the observer. We outline some applications of the second mode in emerging technologies.

  15. Simulation of the Indian summer monsoon onset-phase rainfall using a regional model

    KAUST Repository

    Srinivas, C. V.

    2015-09-11

    This study examines the ability of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) regional model to simulate Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall climatology in different climate zones during the monsoon onset phase in the decade 2000–2009. The initial and boundary conditions for ARW are provided from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project (NNRP) global reanalysis. Seasonal onset-phase rainfall is compared with corresponding values from 0.25° IMD (India Meteorological Department) rainfall and NNRP precipitation data over seven climate zones (perhumid, humid, dry/moist, subhumid, dry/moist, semiarid and arid) of India to see whether dynamical downscaling using a regional model yields advantages over just using large-scale model predictions. Results show that the model could simulate the onset phase in terms of progression and distribution of rainfall in most zones (except over the northeast) with good correlations and low error metrics. The observed mean onset dates and their variability over different zones are well reproduced by the regional model over most climate zones. It has been found that the ARW performed similarly to the reanalysis in most zones and improves the onset time by 1 to 3 days in zones 4 and 7, in which the NNRP shows a delayed onset compared to the actual IMD onset times. The variations in the onset-phase rainfall during the below-normal onset (June negative) and above-normal onset (June positive) phases are well simulated. The slight underestimation of onset-phase rainfall in the northeast zone could be due to failure in resolving the wide extent of topographic variations and the associated multiscale interactions in that zone. Spatial comparisons showed improvement of pentad rainfall in both space and quantity in ARW simulations over NNRP data, as evident from a wider eastward distribution of pentad rainfall over the Western Ghats, central and eastern India, as in IMD observations. While NNRP under-represented the high pentad rainfall over northeast, east and

  16. Evaluation of phase bunching in the central region of a cyclotron by a radial probe with a plastic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaki, Nobumasa, E-mail: miyawaki.nobumasa@jaea.go.jp [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsuhiro [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Arakawa, Kazuo [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, 3-39-22 Showa-Machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8511 (Japan); Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-12-11

    A new technique for evaluating the phase bunching performance in the central region of a cyclotron was developed. A newly-developed radial probe with a 6-mm-wide, 5-mm-height plastic scintillator was applied to analysis of the correlation between the internal beam phase distribution and the initial beam phase, defined by adjusting the relative RF phase of the beam buncher. The phase distribution measurement system, comprising the radial probe equipped with a plastic scintillator and the signal-processing modules, had a sufficiently good time resolution of 45 ps full-width at half-maximum for the phase bunching evaluation. The correlations between the buncher phase and the measured phase distribution for the acceleration harmonic number h=1 and 2 were consistent with the calculation result of the geometric trajectory analysis. For h=1 case of a 107 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} beam, the internal beam phase region spread over 71 RF degrees full-width at quarter-maximum (FWQM) for the acceptable buncher phase region of 48 RF degrees, and no evidence of the phase bunching effect was observed. For h=2 case of a 260 MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 7+} beam, the internal beam phase region for the acceptable buncher phase region of 59 RF degrees was compressed into 21 RF degrees FWQM. The phase bunching effect was sharply evident for h=2, and contributed to increase of the acceptable beam phase region and the beam intensity per phase width.

  17. The Investigation of Haplotype Phasing Efficiency at the PAH Gene Region in Iranian Family Trios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Fazeli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The haplotype phasing is more useful than genotyping markers independently at carrier detection and prena­tal diagnosis of diseases. The PAH gene region contains several markers used in detection of PKU disease. In the present study, the efficiency of BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotype phasing in Iranian family trios was investigated. Then, this informa­tion was compared with those obtained for unrelated individuals."nMethods: Blood samples were collected from 20 healthy family trios and 60 unrelated individuals. The genomic DNA was ex­tracted by use of salting-out procedure. The two markers BglII and EcoRI were genotyped by use of PCR-RFLP. The geno­type of VNTR marker was identified by use of PCR and electrophoresis. The genotyping data obtained from family trios was used to infer haplotype phase. We also compared this data with results obtained from a widely used method for hap­lotype frequency inference from unrelated individuals, the PHASE program."nResults: The haplotype phase of all members was only ascertained at eight family trios.  The comparison of this data with the results obtained by use of PHASE program showed that eight haplotypes [211, 221, 215, 216, 214, 121, 225 and 111] were in­formative haplotypes in Iranian population."nConclusion: Since diversity of BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotypes was high in Iranian population, haplotype phasing at family trios was difficult. The results of this study showed that the genotyping data obtained from family trios could not provide enough information for BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotype phasing at Iranian PKU families and the genotyping of other family mem­bers was necessary at most cases.

  18. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepage Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  19. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Dominic; Carrier, Dominic; Jiménez, Alvaro; Beauvais, Jacques; Dubowski, Jan J

    2011-05-17

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  20. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  1. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluation of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) Nozzle Interference Fit and Weld Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mathews, Royce; Hanson, Brady D.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-07-31

    Ultrasonic phased array data were collected on a removed-from-service CRDM nozzle specimen to assess a previously reported leak path. First a mock-up CRDM specimen was evaluated that contained two 0.076-mm (3.0-mil) interference fit regions formed from an actual Inconel CRDM tube and two 152.4-mm (6.0-in.) thick carbon steel blocks. One interference fit region has a series of precision crafted electric discharge machining (EDM) notches at various lengths, widths, depths, and spatial separations for establishing probe sensitivity, resolution and calibration. The other interference fit has zones of boric acid (crystal form) spaced periodically between the tube and block to represent an actively leaking CRDM nozzle assembly in the field. Ultrasonic phased-array evaluations were conducted using an immersion 8-element annular 5.0-MHz probe from the tube inner diameter (ID). A variety of focal laws were employed to evaluate the interference fit regions and J grove weld, where applicable. Responses from the mock-up specimen were evaluated to determine detection limits and characterization ability as well as contrast the ultrasonic response differences with the presence of boric acid in the fit region. Nozzle 63, from the North Anna Unit-2 nuclear power plant, was evaluated to assess leakage path(s) and was destructively dismantled to allow a visual verification of the leak path(s).

  2. Looking for phase-space structures in star-forming regions: An MST-based methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Alfaro, Emilio J

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for analysing the phase space of star-forming regions. In particular we are searching for clumpy structures in the 3D subspace formed by two position coordinates and radial velocity. The aim of the method is the detection of kinematic segregated radial velocity groups, that is, radial velocity intervals whose associated stars are spatially concentrated. To this end we define a kinematic segregation index, $\\tilde{\\Lambda}$(RV), based on the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) graph algorithm, which is estimated for a set of radial velocity intervals in the region. When $\\tilde{\\Lambda}$(RV) is significantly greater than 1 we consider that this bin represents a grouping in the phase space. We split a star-forming region into radial velocity bins and calculate the kinematic segregation index for each bin, and then we obtain the spectrum of kinematic groupings, which enables a quick visualization of the kinematic behaviour of the region under study. We carried out numerical models of different config...

  3. Wave propagation and shock formation in different magnetic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Centeno, Rebecca; Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2008-01-01

    Velocity oscillations "measured" simultaneously at the photosphere and the chromosphere -from time series of spectropolarimetric data in the 10830 A region- of different solar magnetic features allow us to study the properties of wave propagation as a function of the magnetic flux of the structure (i.e. two different-sized sunspots, a tiny pore and a facular region). While photospheric oscillations have similar characteristics everywhere, oscillations measured at chromospheric heights show different amplitudes, frequencies and stages of shock development depending on the observed magnetic feature. The analysis of the power and the phase spectra, together with simple theoretical modeling, lead to a series of results concerning wave propagation within the range of heights of this study. We find that, while the atmospheric cut-off frequency and the propagation properties of the different oscillating modes depend on the magnetic feature, in all the cases the power that reaches the high chromosphere above the atmo...

  4. Phase relations study on the melting and crystallization regions of the Bi-2223 high temperature superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polasek Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The melting and solidification behavior of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3 O10 (Bi-2223 precursors has been studied. Nominal compositions corresponding to excess of liquid, Ca2CuO3 and CuO have been investigated. Each sample was made by packing a precursor powder into a silver crucible, in order to approximately simulate the situation found in 2223 silver-sheathed tapes. The samples were partially melted and then slow-cooled, being quenched from different temperatures and analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS. The precursors decomposed peritectically during melting, forming liquid and solid phases. Very long plates with compositions falling in the vicinity of the 2223 primary phase field formed upon slow-cooling. The 2223 phase may have been formed and the results suggest that long grains of this phase might be obtained by melting and crystallization if the exact peritectic region and the optimum processing conditions are found.

  5. H2SO4/HNO3/H2O Phase Diagram in Regions of Stratospheric Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, K. D.; Hansen, A. R.; Raddatz, N.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated the region of the H2SO4/HNO3/H2O ternary liquid/solid phase diagram bounded by ice, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. We report measurements and analysis of the eutectic melting curves in the ternary system of the hydrates mentioned as well as the temperature of the eutectics: ice/SAT/NAT, ice/sulfuric acid hemihexahydrate (SAH)/NAT, and SAT/NAT. We report for the first time an analysis of the content of the solid phase of completely frozen samples and find that sulfuric acid octahydrate (SAO) is often present in frozen ternary samples and can be a significant portion of the solid phase. We provide a description of how the melting path of a frozen ternary sample can be predicted using the ternary phase diagram. We have parameterized our melting point data and provide equations to generate the ternary melting surface. Finally, we compare our results to the historic work of Carpenter & Lehrmann (Carpenter, C. D.; Lehrman, A. Trans. AIChE 1925, 17, 35) and to other more recent work.

  6. Propagation of Tau aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2017-05-30

    Since 2009, evidence has accumulated to suggest that Tau aggregates form first in a small number of brain cells, from where they propagate to other regions, resulting in neurodegeneration and disease. Propagation of Tau aggregates is often called prion-like, which refers to the capacity of an assembled protein to induce the same abnormal conformation in a protein of the same kind, initiating a self-amplifying cascade. In addition, prion-like encompasses the release of protein aggregates from brain cells and their uptake by neighbouring cells. In mice, the intracerebral injection of Tau inclusions induced the ordered assembly of monomeric Tau, followed by its spreading to distant brain regions. Short fibrils constituted the major species of seed-competent Tau. The existence of several human Tauopathies with distinct fibril morphologies has led to the suggestion that different molecular conformers (or strains) of aggregated Tau exist.

  7. Linear algorithms for phase retrieval in the Fresnel region: validity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Gureyev, T E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the relationship between different forms of linearized expressions for the spatial distribution of intensity of X-ray projection images obtained in the Fresnel region. We prove that under the natural validity conditions some of the previously published expressions can be simplified without a loss of accuracy. We also introduce modified validity conditions which are likely to be fulfilled in many relevant practical cases, and which lead to a further significant simplification of the expression for the image-plane intensity, permitting simple non-iterative linear algorithms for the phase retrieval.

  8. Three Super Active Regions in the Descending Phase of Solar Cycle 23

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Qi Zhang; Jiang-Tao Su; Juan Guo; Xiao-Fan Wang; Ke-Liang Hu; Gang-Hua Lin; Dong-Guang Wang; Xing-Ming Bao; Yin Zhang; Ji-Hong Liu; Shu-Dong Bao; Yuan-Yong Deng; Wei Li; Jie Chen; Jin-Ping Dun

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the magnetic configurations of three super active regions,NOAA 10484, 10486 and 10488, observed by the Huairou Multi-Channel Solar Telescope (MCST) from 2003 October 18 to November 4. Many energetic phenomena,such as flares (including a X-28 flare) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), occurred during this period. We think that strong shear and fast emergence of magnetic flux are the main causes of these events. The question is also of great interest why these dramatic eruptions occurred so close together in the descending phase of the solar cycle.

  9. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  10. Propagation in Diagonal Anisotropic Chirowaveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of electromagnetic wave propagation in parallel plate chirowaveguide is presented. The waveguide is filled with a chiral material having diagonal anisotropic constitutive parameters. The propagation characterization in this medium is based on algebraic formulation of Maxwell’s equations combined with the constitutive relations. Three propagation regions are identified: the fast-fast-wave region, the fast-slow-wave region, and the slow-slow-wave region. This paper focuses completely on the propagation in the first region, where the dispersion modal equations are obtained and solved. The cut-off frequencies calculation leads to three cases of the plane wave propagation in anisotropic chiral medium. The particularity of these results is the possibility of controlling the appropriate cut-off frequencies by choosing the adequate physical parameters values. The specificity of this study lies in the bifurcation modes confirmation and the possible contribution to the design of optical devices such as high-pass filters, as well as positive and negative propagation constants. This negative constant is an important feature of metamaterials which shows the phenomena of backward waves. Original results of the biaxial anisotropic chiral metamaterial are obtained and discussed.

  11. Multi-phase structural and tectonic evolution of the Andaman Sea Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterton, Sheona; Hill, Catherine; Sagi, David Adam; Webb, Peter; Sevastjanova, Inga

    2017-04-01

    We present a new regional tectonic interpretation for Myanmar and the Andaman Sea, built within the framework of global plate motions. In our model the Present Day Andaman Sea region has been subjected to multiple phases of extension, culminating in its mid-Miocene to Present Day opening as a rhomboidal pull-apart basin. The Andaman Sea region is historically thought to have developed as a consequence of back-arc opening associated with plate convergence at the Andaman-Nicobar subduction system. We have undertaken detailed structural interpretation of potential field, Landsat and SRTM data, supported by 2-D crustal models of the Andaman Sea. From this analysis we identified several major north-south striking faults and a series of northeast-southwest striking structures across the region. We have also mapped the extent of the Andaman-Nicobar Accretionary Prism, a fore arc trough and volcanic arc, which we associate with a phase of traditional trench-parallel back-arc extension from the Paleocene to the middle Miocene. A regional tectonic event occurred during the middle Miocene that caused the cessation of back-arc extension in the Present Day Andaman Sea and an eastward shift in the locus of arc-related volcanism. At that time, N-S striking faults onshore and offshore Myanmar were reactivated with widespread right-lateral motion. This motion, accompanied by extension along new NE-SW striking faults, facilitated the opening of the Central Andaman Basin as a pull-apart basin (rhombochasm) in which a strike-slip tectonic regime has a greater impact on the mode of opening than the subduction process. The integration of our plate model solution within a global framework allows identification of major plate reorganisation events and their impact on a regional scale. We therefore attribute the onset of pull-apart opening in the Andaman Sea to ongoing clockwise rotation of the western Sundaland margin throughout the late Paleogene and early Miocene, possibly driven by the

  12. Phase-space structures and stellar populations in the star-forming region NGC~ 2264

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Marta

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyse the structure of a subspace of the phase space of the star-forming region NGC~ 2264 using the Spectrum of Kinematic Groupings (SKG). We show that the SKG can be used to process a collection of star data to find substructure at different scales. We have found structure associated with the NGC~ 2264 region and also with the background area. In the NGC~ 2264 region, a hierarchical analysis shows substructure compatible with that found in previous specific studies of the area but with an objective, compact methodology that allows us to homogeneously compare the structure of different clusters and star-forming regions. Moreover, this structure is compatible with the different ages of the main NGC~ 2264 star-forming populations. The structure found in the field can be roughly associated with giant stars far in the background, dynamically decoupled from NGC~ 2264, which could be related either with the Outer Arm or Monoceros Ring. The results in this paper confirm the relationship between str...

  13. Phase onset time estimation at regional distances using the CUSUM algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Zoltan A.; Shumway, Robert H.

    1999-06-01

    A simple approach for the estimation of onset times of regional arrivals was tested. The method consists of the computation of the cumulative sum (CUSUM) of a test statistic, in this case, the absolute value of the trace amplitude, addition of a linear trend to the result and finding minima of the resulting function by various methods. The minima are located at the times where sudden increases in the trace amplitudes occur, i.e., at the phase onsets. The method requires frequency prefiltering in order to enhance the amplitude changes at the phase onsets. It was found that this algorithm performed comparably to a human analyst in finding onset times for Pn arrivals with varying S/ N ratios. Moreover, when applied to the rest of the seismogram, it was effective in finding the onset times of the rest of the regional arrivals as long as these were clearly visible. In the rest of the cases, where there are many poorly defined arrivals, an analyst would also have difficulties in uniquely defining onset times. The method also shares with the human analyst the tendency to pick the onset times late when an emergent arrival is buried in noise.

  14. Broadcast classical-quantum capacity region of two-phase bidirectional relaying channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Minglai; Deppe, Christian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik, Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Informationstechnik (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The transmission of quantum states over long distances is essential for future applications such as quantum networks. The direct transmission is limited by unavoidable losses of the channel. A promising alternative for long distance quantum states distribution is the use of quantum repeaters. We analyze a quantum repeater protocol which takes advantage of bidirectional communication. We consider a three-node quantum network which enables bidirectional communication between two nodes with a half-duplex relay node. The message m{sub 2} element of M{sub 2} is located at node 1 and the message m{sub 1} element of M{sub 1} is located at node 2, respectively. Our goal is that the message m{sub 2} element of M{sub 2} is known at node 2 and the message m{sub 1} element of M{sub 1} is known at node 1, respectively. We simplify the problem by assuming an a priori separation of the communication into two phases. The capacity of the first phase (MAC) is known. We determine the capacity region of the second phase (broadcast).

  15. Status report of propagation models: Middle East and North Africa (S5.3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, C.A.; Patton, H.J.; Goldstein, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1995-11-01

    An improved understanding of the influence that tectonic structure has on regional seismic phases is needed to improve the current performance of regional discriminants and their transportability to the Middle East and North Africa. In the case that the crustal structure can be approximated by a flat layered laterally invariant medium, layer-cake reflectivity modeling can be used to obtain an accurate representation of regional phases. However, a laterally heterogeneous crust is just as common as a layered cake structure and in this case large variations in regional phase amplitudes are not uncommon. For instance, it has been shown that rough surface topography and undulations in the Moho can cause the transfer of energy between various surface wave modes and between surface waves and body waves greatly increasing the potential variability of seismic phases. Larger scale structure such as thickening or thinning of the crust can also greatly affect phase propagation. In some instances, changes between different tectonic regions such as that which occurs at a continental-oceanic boundary can completely block phases such as Lg rendering certain discriminants useless. In addition to structure along the path, lateral structure and free surface topography near the source and receiver can cause complex scattering effects with strong directional, frequency, and near-field effects. Given that the Middle East and North Africa cross many different tectonic boundaries, the authors are using numerical propagation models to understand how the relevant tectonic features affect the propagation of primary discriminant phases.

  16. Influence of nanomirelal phases on development processes of oil reservoirs in Volga-Ural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Victor; Sitdikova, Lyalya

    2010-05-01

    The optimisation of oil-field development by enhancing oil recovery is the most important target in further improvement of oil production processes. The resulting economic benefits often exceed those from discoveries of new fields, especially in hard-to-reach regions. Despite the wide use of enhanced oil recovery methods, their efficiency is in many cases not as high as expected. For instance, in terrigenous reservoirs of the Volga-Ural region oil recovery rarely exceeds 0.4, and in carbonate reservoirs with the complex structure, variability and high oil viscosity it can be as low as 0.15-0.20. In natural bitumen fields, the recovery factor is even lower. Analysis of the conducted EOR optimisation operations indicates that EOR methods mainly aim to change the hydrodynamic conditions in the reservoir under development or the physicochemical properties of oil, - for instance, to decrease its viscosity or to change its lyophilic behaviour. The impact of EOR methods on the reservoir's mineral component remains largely unstudied. It is generally believed that the mineral component of the reservoir, its matrix, is inert and remains unaffected by EOR methods. However, the analysis of oil-field development processes and the available studies allow the conclusion that natural hydrocarbon reservoirs are sensitive to any impact on both the near-wellbore zone and the whole reservoir. The authors' research in the reservoir's mineral phase dynamics has permitted the conclusion that the reservoir's fluid phases (including hydrocarbons) and the reservoir itself form a lithogeochemical system that remains in unstable equilibrium. Any external impact, such as the reservoir penetration or the use of EOR methods, disturbs this equilibrium and changes the filtration characteristics of the reservoir, the fluid chemistry and the reaction of the reservoir's mineral component to the impact. In order to characterise the processes in the reservoir in the course of its development, the

  17. Propagation of high frequency waves in the quiet solar atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analyzed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  18. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić, A.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analysed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  19. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Andić, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20mHz) have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences are taken using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis is performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observe the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10mHz to 13mHz. We also observe propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in regions where magnetic structures are present.

  20. Energy Deposition Studies for the LHC Insertion Region Upgrade Phase-I

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Mereghetti, A; Wildner, E

    2010-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is starting operation with beam, aiming to achieve nominal performance in the shortest term, the upgrade of the LHC interaction regions is actively pursued in order to enhance the physics reach of the machine. Its first phase, with the target of increasing the LHC luminosity to 2-3 1034cm-2s-1, relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology and is intended to maximize the use of the existing infrastructure. The impact of the increased power of the collision debris has been investigated through detailed energy deposition studies, considering the new aperture requirements for the low-ß quadrupoles and a number of other elements in the insertions. Effective solutions in terms of shielding options and design/layout optimization have been envisaged and the crucial factors have been pointed out.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of two-phases turbulent combustion: application to study of propagation and structure of flames; Simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente diphasique: application a l'etude de la propagation et de la structure des flammes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canneviere, K.

    2003-12-15

    This work is devoted to the study of the propagation and the structure of two-phases turbulent flames. To this end, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are used. First, numerical systems for two-phases flow simulations is presented along with a specific chemical model. Then, a study of laminar spray flames is carried out. An analytical study related to the dynamics of evaporation of droplets is first proposed where the influence on the equivalence ratio of the ratio between the heating delay of the droplet and the evaporation delay is detailed. The simulation of a propagating flame through a cloud of droplets is carried out and a pulsating behavior is highlighted. A study of these flames according to the topology of liquid fuel enabled us to characterize a double flame structure composed of a premixed flame and a diffusion flame. Our last study is devoted to spray turbulent flames. Two-phase combustion of turbulent jets has been simulated. By varying the spray injection parameters (density, equivalence ratio), a database has been generated. This database allowed us to describe local and global flame regimes appearing in the combustion of sprays. They have been categorized in four main structures: open and closed external regime, group combustion and mixed combustion. Eventually, a combustion diagram has been developed. It involves the spray vaporization time, the mean inter-space between droplets or group of droplets and eventually the injected equivalence ratio. (author)

  2. Staged phase separation in the I-I-N tri-phase region of platelet-sphere mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingfeng; He, Min; Lin, Pengcheng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2017-06-28

    Mixtures of colloids with different sizes or shapes are ubiquitous in nature and extensively applied in industries. Phase transition pathways and kinetics in this model system should be investigated because of the difficulty in observing tri-phase coexistence in colloidal platelet-sphere mixtures. Similar to the polymer-sphere mixtures, the phase transition pathway has three main categories. Analytical results show a staged phase transition process in which the mixture first separates into one or two metastable phases, then further separates, and subsequently reaches tri-phase equilibrium. Unique to our system, and different from the gas-liquid-crystal coexistence in colloid-polymer mixtures, the platelet-sphere mixture reached a gas-liquid-liquid crystal (nematic) coexistence. Thus, the different phases are easy to distinguish using the birefringence of the liquid crystals. In addition, the volume fraction of the liquid crystal formation in the ZrP platelet suspensions is much lower than for the crystal formation in hard spheres.

  3. On the determination of phase boundaries via thermodynamic integration across coexistence regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramo, Maria Concetta, E-mail: mcabramo@unime.it; Caccamo, Carlo, E-mail: caccamo@unime.it; Costa, Dino, E-mail: dcosta@unime.it; Giaquinta, Paolo V., E-mail: paolo.giaquinta@unime.it; Malescio, Gianpietro, E-mail: malescio@unime.it; Munaò, Gianmarco, E-mail: gmunao@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Contrada Papardo, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Prestipino, Santi, E-mail: sprestipino@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Contrada Papardo, I-98166 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno d’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy)

    2015-06-07

    Specialized Monte Carlo methods are nowadays routinely employed, in combination with thermodynamic integration (TI), to locate phase boundaries of classical many-particle systems. This is especially useful for the fluid-solid transition, where a critical point does not exist and both phases may notoriously go deeply metastable. Using the Lennard-Jones model for demonstration, we hereby investigate on the alternate possibility of tracing reasonably accurate transition lines directly by integrating the pressure equation of state computed in a canonical-ensemble simulation with local moves. The recourse to this method would become a necessity when the stable crystal structure is not known. We show that, rather counterintuitively, metastability problems can be alleviated by reducing (rather than increasing) the size of the system. In particular, the location of liquid-vapor coexistence can exactly be predicted by just TI. On the contrary, TI badly fails in the solid-liquid region, where a better assessment (to within 10% accuracy) of the coexistence pressure can be made by following the expansion, until melting, of the defective solid which has previously emerged from the decay of the metastable liquid.

  4. The regional lung deposition of thoron progeny attached to the particulate phase of environmental tobacco smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strong, J.C.; Black, A.; Knight, D.A.; Dickens, C.J.; McAughey, J. (AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma] emitting isotope of lead (([sup 212]Pb), a decay product of thoron ([sup 220]Rn)), has been used to radiolabel the particulate phase of aged and diluted sidestream tobacco smoke in situ. The radiolabelled aerosol is suitable for studies with human volunteers and as a marker for lung deposition and clearance of the attached fraction of thoron progeny, as well as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in a variety of environmental situations. Total mean deposition values for nine male volunteers varied from 22% to 59% under different breathing conditions, including nasal as against mouth breathing. These data are higher than previously reported values for environmental tobacco smoke but are consistent with models of particle deposition in the lung. Data for regional deposition and clearance show deposition principally in the pulmonary region of the lung. Preliminary studies using radon ([sup 222]Rn) to determine the degree of association of progeny in the presence of ambient particulate or environmental tobacco smoke confirm that the degree of attachment rises with increasing particle concentration, and is therefore likely to influence both the magnitude and site of deposition in the lung. (author).

  5. A study about dimers formation of formic acid in gas phase and in the valence region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, M.S. [Universidade Federal do Reconcavo da Bahia (UFRB), Amargosa, BA (Brazil); Prudente, F.V.; Marinho, R.R.T.; Nascimento, E.M. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Study of simple pre-biotic molecules takes great importance for understanding about complex organic molecules formation like amino acids, proteins and nucleobases within the DNA and RNA. A hypothesis for the appearance of nucleobases is that they could have been synthesized from simpler organic composites contained in interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites and asteroids. Lots of experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to produce complex pre-biotic molecules from simpler molecules under environments that simulate the ISM. Thus, we have performed a theoretical and experimental study about photoionization and photofragmentation processes of simple pre-biotic molecules that are important in the synthesis of complex biomolecules. In this work particularly, we performed photoionization and photofragmentation process of formic acid-D2 (CDOOD) in order to verify if some molecular fragmentations coming from dimers that could be formed before ionization region at TOF mass spectrometer. Experimentally, we measured these molecules mass spectra in gaseous phase. These spectra were got as function of pressures in experimental chamber, temperature samples and photon energy, in the vacuum ultraviolet region, between 11 and 20 eV. These data had been obtained in the Brazilian Laboratory of Synchrotron Light, by using mass spectrometer of flight time. The mass spectra had been obtained by using the photoelectron photoion coincidence technique, PEPICO. For a better understanding of experimental results, we have made a theoretical analysis of the photofragmentation by using Density Functional Theory. (author)

  6. Free Propagation of Wave in Viscoelastic Cables with Small Curvature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹宗兰

    2003-01-01

    The coupled longitudinal-transverse waves propagating freely along a viscoelastic cable was studied. The frequency-spectrum equation governing propagating waves and the formulations of the phase velocities and the group velocities characterizing propagating waves were derived. The effects of viscosity parameters on the phase velocities and the group velocities were investigated with numerical simulation. The analyses show that viscosity has a strong influence on the phase velocity and the group velocity of propagating waves and attenuation waves for longitudinal-dominant waves, but the phase velocities of propagating waves of transverse-dominant waves do not change with viscosity.

  7. Effect of poling on dielectric anomalies at phase transitions for lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate crystals in the morphotropic phase boundary region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehirlioglu, Alp; Payne, David A.; Han, Pengdi

    2006-03-01

    Dielectric measurements are reported as a function of temperature for phase transformations in the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate system (PMN-PT). Data are given for single crystal specimens in the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) region. Transition temperatures were determined from dielectric loss data. The characteristics for both poled and unpoled crystals are compared. Values of dielectric constant were found to increase after poling at room temperature, and an anomaly was induced at the lower-temperature transition. Details are reported for these properties depending upon composition within the MPB region. At room temperature, the poled crystals had high values for dielectric constant (e.g., 5000-15 000), piezoelectric coefficient (e.g., 1000-4000 pC/N), and electromechanical coupling factor (e.g., >0.9). The temperature dependence of dielectric properties is treated in terms of competing phases at transformations, with a change from continuous to discontinuous behavior with increasing PT content towards the MPB. The effect of poling on the induction of the tetragonal (T) phase, with a lowering of the low temperature to tetragonal (LT-->T) phase transformation temperature, is discussed. Piezoelectric crystals with the highest depoling temperature were farthest away from the MPB in the MPB region. This information should be useful for the application of PMN-PT piezoelectric crystals.

  8. High-Temperature Deformation Behavior of a Ti-6Al-7Nb Alloy in Dual-Phase (α + β) and Single-Phase (β) Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilehva, F.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Moemeni, S.; Khalesian, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterizing the microstructure evolution of a Ti-6Al-7Nb biomedical type titanium alloy during hot working through hot compression tests. The hot deformation cycles were conducted under the strain rate of 0.0025, 0.025, and 0.25 s-1 in the temperature range of 850-1150 °C where both dual-phase (α + β) and single-phase (β) regions could be accessible. The flow stress behavior of the material for the entire deformation regime was interpreted via microstructural observations. The results indicated that in the single-phase β region (1050-1150 °C), the dynamically recrystallized (DRX) grains were formed at the deformed and elongated beta grain boundaries as a necklace-like structure. The variations in the dynamically recrystallized grain size were determined to follow the Zener-Hollomon relationship where DRX grain size was decreased by reducing the temperature and increasing the strain rate. The alloy deformation characteristics in α + β region were somewhat different. During deformation in the upper α + β temperature range (e.g., 1000 °C), the β phase would accommodate most of the deformation, while α regions remained undeformed. In the lower α + β temperature range (e.g., 850-950 °C), the kinking/bending of α lamellae as well as the subsequent globularization of α layers were postulated to be responsible for the observed flow softening behavior.

  9. Epileptic seizure propagation from the second somatic sensory area to the fronto-medial region, by insular redistribution. A case report and a connectome description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balogh Attila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The seizure propagation phenomenon by inducing remote symptoms brings several difficulties in finding the seizure onset and delineating the epileptic network which should be taken into consideration in epilepsy surgery. By demonstrating a difficult (MRI negative epilepsy surgery case explored with invasive presurgical evaluation we highlight the importance to recognise the secondary sensory area and to explore the the parieto-opercular-insular-medial frontal network in certain cases. A further conclusion is the consideration of the redistributory role of the insula as a special structure in the cerebral connectome, having a role in epileptic network organisation.

  10. Enhanced Propagating Surface Plasmon Signal Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y.; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-12-21

    Overcoming the dissipative nature of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) is pre-requisite to realizing functional plasmonic circuitry, in which large bandwidth signals can be manipulated over length scales far-below the diffraction limit of light. To this end, we report on a novel PSP enhanced signal detection technique achieved in an all-metallic substrate. We take advantage of two strategically spatio-temporally separated phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses, incident onto lithographically patterned PSP coupling structures. We follow PSP propagation with joint femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution in a time-resolved non-linear photoemission electron microscopy scheme. Initially, a PSP signal wave packet is launched from a hole etched into the silver surface from where it propagates through an open trench structure and is decoded through the use of a timed probe pulse. FDTD calculations demonstrate that PSP signal waves may traverse open trenches in excess of 10 microns in diameter, thereby allowing remote detection even through vacuum regions. This arrangement results in a 10X enhancement in photoemission relative to readout from the bare metal surface. The enhancement is attributed to an all-optical homodyne detection technique that mixes signal and reference PSP waves in a non-linear scheme. Larger readout trenches achieve higher readout levels, however reduced transmission through the trench limits the trench size to 6 microns for maximum readout levels. However, the use of an array of trenches increases the maximum enhancement to near 30X. The attainable enhancement factor may be harnessed to achieve extended coherent PSP propagation in ultrafast plasmonic circuitry.

  11. DETERMINATION OF FORMABILITY PARAMETERS OF ERDEMİR 6114 SHEETS TEMPERED AT DUAL PHASE REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sinan KÖKSAL

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Formability versus hardening process of ERDEMİR 6114 (SAE 1005 sheet was examined for determining the convenient tempering temperature providing optimum formability. Here, the effects of factors on formability; anisotropy factor (R, deformation hardening exponent (n, stretchability (h, yield point (Re and tensile strength (Rm variation were examined considering drawing direction also. Homogenous structures of test specimens were obtained by normalization tempering such as keeping in furnace at 890 0 C for 30 minutes and cooling in air. Tempering process of the samples were done at dual phase regions at temperatures 740, 770, 800, 820 and 850 0 C for 30 minutes and quenching in water afterwards. After tensile test and Erichsen experiment at room temperature, differences in yield point (Re , tensile strength (Rm, R, n and h values were observed. As a conclusion, it has been seen that R and n values of the samples tempered at 740 and 770 0 C were increased and h value were higher than the others, so formability characteristics of these samples were better than the other samples.

  12. ROBUSTNESS TESTING OF AN OPTIMIZED REVERSED-PHASE HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHIC SYSTEM FOR THE SEPARATION OF 6 SULFONAMIDES USING THE RULES OF ERROR PROPAGATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIELING, J; COENEGRACHT, PMJ; DOORNBOS, DA; JONKMAN, JHG

    1993-01-01

    In a previous investigation, the composition of the mobile phase for the reversed-phase HPLC separation of twelve sulphonamides was optimized. The predicted chromatogram showed great similarity with a chromatogram measured under optimum conditions. For routine analysis, it is important to have robus

  13. Eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer and Indian monsoon droughts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A.K.; Goswami, B.N. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Climate and Global Modeling Division, Pune (India)

    2009-06-15

    Improved understanding of underlying mechanism responsible for Indian summer monsoon (ISM) droughts is important due to their profound socio-economic impact over the region. While some droughts are associated with 'external forcing' such as the El-Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO), many ISM droughts are not related to any known 'external forcing'. Here, we unravel a fundamental dynamic process responsible for droughts arising not only from external forcing but also those associated with internal dynamics. We show that most ISM droughts are associated with at least one very long break (VLB; breaks with duration of more than 10 days) and that the processes responsible for VLBs may also be the mechanism responsible for ISM droughts. Our analysis also reveals that all extended monsoon breaks (whether co-occurred with El-Nino or not) are associated with an eastward propagating Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial Indian Ocean and western Pacific extending to the dateline and westward propagating Rossby waves between 10 and 25 N. The divergent Rossby wave associated with the dry phase of equatorial convection propagates westward towards Indian land, couple with the northward propagating dry phase and leads to the sustenance of breaks. Thus, the propensity of eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer is largely the cause of monsoon droughts. While short breaks are not accompanied by westerly wind events (WWE) over equatorial western Pacific favorable for initiating air-sea interaction, all VLBs are accompanied by sustained WWE. The WWEs associated with all VLB during 1975-2005 initiate air-sea interaction on intraseasonal time scale, extend the warm pool eastward allowing the convectively coupled MJO to propagate further eastward and thereby sustaining the divergent circulation over India and the monsoon break. The ocean-atmosphere coupling on interannual time scale (such as El-Nino) can also produce VLB, but not necessary. (orig.)

  14. Eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer and Indian monsoon droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A. K.; Goswami, B. N.

    2009-06-01

    Improved understanding of underlying mechanism responsible for Indian summer monsoon (ISM) droughts is important due to their profound socio-economic impact over the region. While some droughts are associated with ‘external forcing’ such as the El-Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO), many ISM droughts are not related to any known ‘external forcing’. Here, we unravel a fundamental dynamic process responsible for droughts arising not only from external forcing but also those associated with internal dynamics. We show that most ISM droughts are associated with at least one very long break (VLB; breaks with duration of more than 10 days) and that the processes responsible for VLBs may also be the mechanism responsible for ISM droughts. Our analysis also reveals that all extended monsoon breaks (whether co-occurred with El-Niño or not) are associated with an eastward propagating Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial Indian Ocean and western Pacific extending to the dateline and westward propagating Rossby waves between 10° and 25°N. The divergent Rossby wave associated with the dry phase of equatorial convection propagates westward towards Indian land, couple with the northward propagating dry phase and leads to the sustenance of breaks. Thus, the propensity of eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer is largely the cause of monsoon droughts. While short breaks are not accompanied by westerly wind events (WWE) over equatorial western Pacific favorable for initiating air-sea interaction, all VLBs are accompanied by sustained WWE. The WWEs associated with all VLB during 1975-2005 initiate air-sea interaction on intraseasonal time scale, extend the warm pool eastward allowing the convectively coupled MJO to propagate further eastward and thereby sustaining the divergent circulation over India and the monsoon break. The ocean-atmosphere coupling on interannual time scale (such as El-Niño) can also produce VLB, but not necessary.

  15. How to target inter-regional phase synchronization with dual-site Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saturnino, Guilherme Bicalho; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale synchronization of neural oscillations is a key mechanism for functional information exchange among brain areas. Dual-site Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (ds-TACS) has been recently introduced as non-invasive technique to manipulate the temporal phase relationship of local...... oscillations in two connected cortical areas. While the frequency of ds-TACS is matched, the phase of stimulation is either identical (in-phase stimulation) or opposite (anti-phase stimulation) in the two cortical target areas. In-phase stimulation is thought to synchronize the endogenous oscillations...... and hereby to improve behavioral performance. Conversely, anti-phase stimulation is thought to desynchronize neural oscillations in the two areas, which is expected to decrease performance. Critically, in- and anti-phase ds-TACS should only differ with respect to temporal phase, while all other stimulation...

  16. MR imaging of hematopoietic regions in bone marrow of aplastic anemia. Diagnostic usefulness of opposed phase T1-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tanabe, Yoshihiro; Amano, Maki; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-01

    The signal intensity of hematopoietic regions in the marrow of aplastic anemia were investigated on opposed phase T1-weighted images (op-T1WI) with a 0.5-Tesla MR unit. Hematopoietic regions were classified into two groups: low intensity hematopoietic areas (LH) isointense to normal marrow and high intensity hematopoietic regions (HH) with higher intensity than normal marrow on op-T1WI. The signal intensity of LH was significantly lower than that of HH on STIR. LH converted into HH with improvement of laboratory data after therapy, whereas HH decreased with impairment of data. HH were hyperintense to cerebrospinal fluid on op-T1WI. These results indicated that the signal intensity of hematopoietic regions on op-T1WI reflected the cellularity in these regions and that aplastic anemia included hypercellular regions relative to normal marrow. (author).

  17. Quality of Spatial Entanglement Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Reichert, Matthew; Fleischer, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    We explore, both experimentally and theoretically, the propagation dynamics of spatially entangled photon pairs (biphotons). Characterization of entanglement is done via the Schmidt number, which is a universal measurement of the degree of entanglement directly related to the non-separability of the state into its subsystems. We develop expressions for the terms of the Schmidt number that depend on the amplitude and phase of the commonly used double-Gaussian approximation for the biphoton wave function, and demonstrate migration of entanglement between amplitude and phase upon propagation. We then extend this analysis to incorporate both phase curvature in the pump beam and higher spatial frequency content of more realistic non-Gaussian wave functions. Specifically, we generalize the classical beam quality parameter $M^2$ to the biphotons, allowing the description of more information-rich beams and more complex dynamics. Agreement is found with experimental measurements using direct imaging and Fourier optics...

  18. Propagation of gravity wave packet near critical level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Xianchang; YI Fan

    2005-01-01

    A couple of two-dimensional linear and fully nonlinear numerical models for compressible atmosphere are used to numerically study the propagation of the gravity wave packet into a mean wind shear. For a linear propagation wave packet, the critical level interactions are in good agreement with the linear critical level theory. The dynamically and convectively unstable regions are formed due to the critical level interaction of a finite-amplitude wave packet, but they would not break. The free exchange of potential energy with kinetic energy in the background atmosphere at rest ceases after entering the mean wind shear. However, it still goes on in the nonlinear propagation. It is shown that the nonlinear effects modify the mean flow markedly, reduce the momentum and energy propagation velocity and drop the elevation of the critical level.The gravity wave packet becomes unstable and breaks down into smaller scales in some regions. It expends much more kinetic energy than potential energy in the early phase of the breakdown. This means that the wave breakdown sets up due to the action of the shear instability rather than a convective one.

  19. Phase transformation of Ca-perovskite in MORB at D" region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, N.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Kamada, S.; Miyahara, M.; Hirao, N.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological studies indicate the presence of seismic anomalies in the Earth's deep interior. To investigate the anomaly, the physical property of the major minerals in lower mantle such as MgSiO3-perovskite, MgSiO3 post-perovskite and MgO periclase were studied well. Other candidate, CaSiO3 perovskite (Ca-perovskite) exists in peridotitic mantle and basaltic oceanic crust (mid-ocean ridge basalt; MORB). Previous studies indicate the abundance of Ca-perovskite is up to ~9 vol.% in the pyrolite mantle and ~24 vol.% in the MORB oceanic crust. However, the pressure range of previous works are still not enough to understand the D" region. In this study, natural MORB was compressed in double sided laser heated DAC. Au was used as a pressure maker and a laser absorber. NaCl was used as the thermal insulator and pressure medium. The phase relation of Ca-perovskite in MORB was investigated from 36 to 156 GPa and 300 to 2600 K by the in situ X-ray diffraction measurements at SPring-8 (BL10XU). The transition of Ca-perovskite from a tetragonal structure to a cubic structure occurred at about 1800 K up to about 100 GPa and below 1500 K at pressures above 100 GPa. This suggests that the tetragonal-cubic transition of Ca-perovskite could occur in MORB, associating with Al2O3 contents. The present results suggest that the seismic anomaly at D" layer could be caused by the transition in Ca-perovskite.

  20. Application of sensitive, high-resolution imaging at a commercial lab-based X-ray micro-CT system using propagation-based phase retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidola, P; Morgan, K; Willner, M; Fehringer, A; Allner, S; Prade, F; Pfeiffer, F; Achterhold, K

    2017-02-09

    Several dedicated commercial lab-based micro-computed tomography (μCT) systems exist, which provide high-resolution images of samples, with the capability to also deliver in-line phase contrast. X-ray phase contrast is particularly beneficial when visualizing very small features and weakly absorbing samples. The raw measured projections will include both phase and absorption effects. Extending our previous work that addressed the optimization of experimental conditions at the commercial ZEISS Xradia 500 Versa system, single-distance phase-contrast imaging is demonstrated on complex biological and material samples. From data captured at this system, we demonstrate extraction of the phase signal or the correction of the mixed image for the phase shift, and show how this procedure increases the contrast and removes artefacts. These high-quality images, measured without the use of a synchrotron X-ray source, demonstrate that highly sensitive, micrometre-resolution imaging of 3D volumes is widely accessible using commercially advanced laboratory devices.

  1. Interaction-Point Phase-Space Characterization using Single-Beam and Luminous-Region Measurements at PEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozanecki, W; /Saclay; Bevan, A.J.; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Viaud, B.F.; /Montreal U.; Cai, Y.; Fisher, A.S.; O' Grady, C.; Lindquist, B.; Roodman, A.; J.M.Thompson, M.Weaver; /SLAC

    2008-09-09

    We present an extensive experimental characterization of the e{sup {+-}} phase space at the interaction point of the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory, that combines a detailed mapping of luminous-region observables using the BABAR detector, with stored-beam measurements by accelerator techniques.

  2. Alloying propagation in nanometric Ni/Al multilayers: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlo, V.; Politano, O.; Baras, F.

    2017-02-01

    In nanometric metallic multilayers such as Ni/Al, the alloying reaction proceeds in the form of a propagating wave. We studied the different phase transformations involved in the reactive wave propagation by means of molecular dynamics. The focus was on a specific regime that involves melting of reactants, intermixing of reactants, and formation of an intermetallic compound. We found that the wave consists of two stages. The first front is associated with a dissolution process and propagates at several meters per second, while the second front is due to the crystallization of the final product and is slower, leading to a specific microstructure with alternated large grains of NiAl and liquid regions in the front propagation direction. Three main exothermic processes were identified, including grain coarsening. Their respective contributions were evaluated. We developed a new texture analysis tool that allowed us to follow the evolution of the microstructure and the dynamics of the grain orientation.

  3. Surprises from extragalactic propagation of UHECRs

    CERN Document Server

    Boncioli, Denise; Grillo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic ray experimental data are now of very good statistical significance even in the region of the expected GZK feature. The identification of their sources requires sophisticate analysis of their propagation in the extragalactic space. When looking at the details of this propagation some unforeseen features emerge. We will discuss some of these "surprises".

  4. Reduction of the harmonic propagation in three-phase systems using active compensation; Reduccion de la propagacion armonica en sistemas trifasicos empleando compensacion activa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras Ordaz, Marco Antonio

    2007-08-15

    With the development of semiconductor devices and the increase of non-linear loads based on static power converters, the power quality of transmission, distribution and consumption systems has been affected. The harmonics present in a distribution system are mainly result of the current harmonics generated by the non-linear loads and their effect on the impedance of the distribution system. There are several problems generated by the presence of current and voltage harmonics in a power distribution system. One of these problems is the harmonic propagation phenomenon, which has become important on the matter of power distribution systems. This phenomenon is manifested by the harmonic voltage amplification in distribution lines, generating levels of distortion that affect the electric facilities, and the life expectancy of equipment (CA motors, transformers, capacitor banks, etc.). There is also a reduction in the power transmission capacity of electric distribution lines. The harmonic propagation is mainly produced by the resonance between the line impedance and the power factor correction of capacitor banks installed along the distribution line and the consumers' equipment. The utilization of passive filters is not a sufficient solution, because the harmonic propagation exists even with no loads on the electric network, and the resonance frequencies do not correspond to the characteristic harmonics. This problem is solved by using active filters in radial distribution systems, mainly in low voltage. The objective of using an active filter is neither to compensate a particular load, nor a group of centralized loads; its objective is to reduce the voltage distortion and avoid the harmonic propagation by placing the filter in a branch of feeder of the electric system. This thesis presents a thorough study of the harmonic propagation phenomenon in ring networks and its damping with an active filter. An important point is to identify the location of the active

  5. Phase Transformation Stress and Its Influence for Arresting Crack Propagation Using Electro-heating Effect%电热止裂相变应力及其对止裂效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王平; 白象忠

    2011-01-01

    对含裂纹的45钢钢板进行了电热效应裂纹止裂(简称电热正裂)实验研究,发现电热止裂后的裂纹尖端附近发生了相变,并对相变组织进行了实验观察.针对裂尖处的相变区域,进行了相变应变的X射线衍射实验测定,采用Eshelby等效夹杂模型,利用等效夹杂理论进行了放电后裂尖处的相变应力场的理论分析计算.计算结果表明,在裂尖处的相变区域,形成了相变压应力场.分析了相变压应力对止裂效果的长效影响,发现相变压应力对裂纹扩展的阻碍影响是非常明显的,其对裂纹扩展速率降低的影响更是显而易见,起到了长期限制裂纹扩展的作用.研究结果表明,电热止裂技术既具有理论的可行性,也具有实际应用的实效性.%An experimental investigation of arresting crack propagation by pulse discharging to a 45 # steel plate with crack was shown herein. Through the microstructure analysis near crack tip after crack prevention by using electromagnetic heating effect, it is found that the phase transformation has been occurred. Also, the residual strain of phase transformation near crack tip has gotten by X-ray diffusion method. The theoretical calculation of the phase transformation stress was finished by Eshelby's model of imaginary cutting method. The affection of the residual stress on the crack propagation was discussed. It is found that the residual stress will have a long term effect for crack prevention. The results obtained show that the technique of arresting crack propagation by using electric magnetic heat effect has both academic feasibility and practicability.

  6. Quark Transport Properties in the Region of Coexistence of Both Hadronic and QGP Phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiang-Jun; LI Hong; WANG Gang; ZHANG Wei-Ning; HUO Lei

    2001-01-01

    The physical picture of coexistence of both hadronic and QGP phases is given by Friedberg and T.D. Lee's nontopology soliton model. The transport properties of quark in color space and spin space in a system of two-phase coexistence are investigated from both quantum and classical theories.

  7. Cerebral oxygen extraction, oxygen consumption, and regional cerebral blood flow during the aura phase of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, Jes; Lassen, N A

    1994-01-01

    The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism.......The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism....

  8. PSI Methodologies for Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation with CASMO-5M and MCNPX: Results for OECD/NEA UAM Benchmark Phase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wieselquist

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capabilities for uncertainty quantification (UQ with respect to nuclear data have been developed at PSI in the recent years and applied to the UAM benchmark. The guiding principle for the PSI UQ development has been to implement nonintrusive “black box” UQ techniques in state-of-the-art, production-quality codes used already for routine analyses. Two complimentary UQ techniques have been developed thus far: (i direct perturbation (DP and (ii stochastic sampling (SS. The DP technique is, first and foremost, a robust and versatile sensitivity coefficient calculation, applicable to all types of input and output. Using standard uncertainty propagation, the sensitivity coefficients are folded with variance/covariance matrices (VCMs leading to a local first-order UQ method. The complementary SS technique samples uncertain inputs according to their joint probability distributions and provides a global, all-order UQ method. This paper describes both DP and SS implemented in the lattice physics code CASMO-5MX (a special PSI-modified version of CASMO-5M and a preliminary SS technique implemented in MCNPX, routinely used in criticality safety and fluence analyses. Results are presented for the UAM benchmark exercises I-1 (cell and I-2 (assembly.

  9. A Causal Alternative to Feynman's Propagator

    CERN Document Server

    Koksma, Jurjen F

    2010-01-01

    The Feynman propagator used in the conventional in-out formalism in quantum field theory is not a causal propagator as wave packets are propagated virtually instantaneously outside the causal region of the initial state. We formulate a causal in-out formalism in quantum field theory by making use of the Wheeler propagator, the time ordered commutator propagator, which is manifestly causal. Only free scalar field theories and their first quantization are considered. We identify the real Klein Gordon field itself as the wave function of a neutral spinless relativistic particle. Furthermore, we derive a probability density for our relativistic wave packet using the inner product between states that live on a suitably defined Hilbert space of real quantum fields. We show that the time evolution of our probability density is governed by the Wheeler propagator, such that it behaves causally too.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy's regional carbon sequestration partnership initiative: Update on validation and development phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodosta, T.; Litynski, J.; Plasynski, S.; Spangler, L.; Finley, R.; Steadman, E.; Ball, D.; Gerald, H.; McPherson, B.; Burton, E.; Vikara, D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) are the mechanism DOE utilizes to prove the technology and to develop human capital, stakeholder networks, information for regulatory policy, best practices documents and training to work toward the commercialization of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The RCSPs are tasked with determining the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for carbon capture, transport, and storage in their respective geographic areas of responsibility. The seven partnerships include more than 400 state agencies, universities, national laboratories, private companies, and environmental organizations, spanning 43 states and four Canadian provinces. The Regional Partnerships Initiative is being implemented in three phases: Characterization, Validation, and Development. The initial Characterization Phase began in 2003 and was completed in 2005 and focused on characterization of CO2 storage potential within each region. It was followed by the Validation Phase, which began in 2005 and is nearing completion in 2011. The focus of the Validation Phase has been on small-scale field tests throughout the seven partnerships in various formation types such as saline, oil-bearing, and coal seams. The Validation Phase has characterized suitable CO2 storage reservoirs and identified the need for comprehensive legal and regulatory frameworks to enable commercial-scale CCS deployment. Finally, the Development Phase will consist of a series of large-scale, one-million-ton, injection tests throughout the United States and Canada. The objective of these large-scale tests is to identify the regulatory path or challenges in permitting CCS projects, to demonstrate the technology can inject CO2 safely, and to verify its permanence in geologic formations in preparation for the commercialization of geologic

  11. Viscothermal wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, Marten Jozef Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the accuracy, efficiency and range of applicability of various (approximate) models for viscothermal wave propagation are investigated. Models for viscothermal wave propagation describe thewave behavior of fluids including viscous and thermal effects. Cases where viscothermal effects a

  12. Finite temperature collective modes in a two phase coexistence region of asymmetric nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, R M

    2010-01-01

    The relation between collective modes and the phase transition in low density nuclear matter is examined. The dispersion relations for collective modes in a linear approach are evaluated within a Landau-Fermi liquid scheme by assuming coexisting phases in thermodynamical equilibrium. Temperature and isospin composition are taken as relevant parameters. The in-medium nuclear interaction is taken from a recently proposed density functional model. We found significative modifications in the energy spectrum, within certain range of temperatures and isospin asymmetry, due to the separation of matter into independent phases. We conclude that detailed calculations should not neglect this effect.

  13. Using W-phase for regional source inversion: An application to the data from the virtual seismic network in the Western Pacific region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, W.; Zhao, L.; Chen, P.; Yu, Y.; Liu, C.; Huang, B.; Kanamori, H.

    2009-12-01

    The W-phase inversion has been proven to be an efficient way to determine the magnitude and source mechanism of large earthquakes for tsunami warning purposes (Kanamori and Rivera, 2008). The Institute of Earth Sciences has exchanged seismic data in a real-time manner with other agencies in surrounding countries, including Japan, Vietnam, and Malaysia, to form a virtual seismic network in the western Pacific region. Any local organization may issue an earthquake report with its own data acquisition system individually. With the hypocentral information provided, we are able to apply this new technique to invert the data from this virtual regional network for the source mechanisms of large earthquakes which occurred on the major convergent plate boundary zones within 2-30 degrees. In this case, the W-phase will be completely retrieved in 1.5-12.5 minutes. To evaluate the reliability of inversion with this network geometry, we invert waveforms of scenario earthquakes synthesized by normal mode summation method. A series of examples were then studied to compare the difference between our results and the global CMT solutions. We hope this practical application will contribute to the tsunami mitigation and seismic hazard assessment in the Western Pacific and Southern Asia regions.

  14. Conference Proceedings on Propagation Effects on Military Systems in the High Altitude Region Held in Fairbanks, Alaska on 3-7 June 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    from its target, influences the electromagnetic waves in a number of ways. The medium can be a nuisance, en obstacle which causes deterioration in the...become important. In general the earth’s curvature and.’., terrain obstacles determine the diffraction, whereas troposheric turbulence cause scatter. As...the echo are found by simple trigonometry and the polarization by the relative phase in the two planes. All of the functions of the radar are

  15. Phase relationships in the Al-rich region of the Al-Y-Zr system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao X.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The phase relations in the Al-Y-Zr ternary system at 873 K have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS in backscattered electron imaging (BSE modes. Six three-phase equilibria are determined and no ternary compound is observed. In the meantime, first principle calculations are used to provide theoretical guidance to understand the experimental results.

  16. Notice to nurserymen of the naming and release for propagation of Spiers, a tung tree cultivar for tung oil production in the Gulf Coast Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS Southern Horticultural Research Unit in Poplarville, MS has released Vernicia fordii ‘Spiers’, a new tung tree for tung oil production in the Gulf Coast region. This cultivar is recommended for trial by farmers for tung nut production in USDA cold hardiness zones 8 through 10, particula...

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  19. A Seasonal Perspective on Regional Air Quality in CentralCalifornia - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.; Tonse, Shaheen R.; Jin, Ling

    2006-12-01

    Central California spans a wide variety of urban, agricultural, and natural terrain, including the San Francisco Bay area, the Central Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Population within this region is growing rapidly, and there are persistent, serious air pollution problems including fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and ozone. Summertime photochemical air pollution is the focus of the present study, which represents a first phase in the development and application of a modeling capability to assess formation and transport of ozone and its precursors within Central California over an entire summer season. This contrasts with past studies that have examined pollutant dynamics for a few selected high-ozone episodes each lasting 3-5 days. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) has been applied to predict air pollutant formation and transport in Central California for a 15-day period beginning on July 24, 2000. This period includes a 5-day intensive operating period (July 29 to August 2) from the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS). Day-specific meteorological conditions were modeled by research collaborators at NOAA using a mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). Pollutant emissions within the study domain were based on CARB emission inventory estimates, with additional efforts conducted as part of this research to capture relevant emissions variability including (1) temperature and sunlight-driven changes in biogenic VOC, (2) weekday/weekend and diurnal differences in light-duty (LD) and heavy-duty (HD) motor vehicle emissions, (3) effects of day-specific meteorological conditions on plume rise from point sources such as power plants. We also studied the effects of using cleaner pollutant inflow boundary conditions, lower than indicated during CCOS aircraft flights over the Pacific Ocean, but supported by other surface, ship-based, balloon and aircraft sampling studies along the west coast. Model predictions were compared with measured

  20. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  1. Roles of the different sub-regions of the insular cortex in various phases of the decision-making process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita eDroutman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a coherent account of the role of the insular cortex (IC in decision-making. We follow a conceptualization of decision-making that is very close to one previously proposed by Ernst and Paulus (2005: that the decision process is a progression of 4 phases: (1 re-focusing attention, (2 evaluation, (3 action, and (4 outcome processing, and we present evidence for the insula’s role in all these phases. We review the existing work on insula’s functional anatomy that subdivides the IC into posterior, dorsal anterior and ventral anterior regions. We re-map the results provided by the existing literature into these subdivisions wherever possible, to identify the components' role in each decision making phase. In addition, we identify a self-regulating quality of the IC focused on harm avoidance.

  2. Automated multimode phase speed measurements for high-resolution regional-scale tomography: application to North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, K.; Ekström, Göran

    2010-12-01

    A fully automated method for obtaining multimode phase speed measurements from a single seismogram has been developed and applied to a large data set of three-component long-period seismograms in North America, constructing high-resolution phase speed maps on a continental scale. The method of our phase speed estimation is based on a fully non-linear waveform inversion by Yoshizawa & Kennett working with a global search method (the Neighbourhood Algorithm). The entire process of waveform fitting and the evaluation of the estimated phase speed have been fully automated employing several empirical quantitative measures, assessing the quality of waveform fit and the relative contributions of each mode in a chosen time window. The measured phase speed data undergo automatic screening for quality control, comprising the threshold evaluation of their reliability and outlier detection and removal. This new automated method has been applied to a large data set recorded at North American stations, including the latest transportable stations of USArray. Using long-period three-component seismograms recorded during the past eight years, we have successfully retrieved large numbers of regional surface wave paths, including over 20000 paths for the fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves over a wide range of frequencies, and over 10000 paths for the higher mode Rayleigh as well as the fundamental-mode Love waves. The consistent results of the automated measurement procedure suggest that the method works well at regional distances, allowing us to perform a high-resolution mapping of multimode phase speeds in North America. The results of the automated waveform analysis also indicate some intrinsic limitations in the higher mode phase speed measurements from a single seismogram particularly in the short period range, mainly due to the overlapping of higher mode arrivals as well as coupling between mode branches. Despite such an innate difficulty in the higher mode dispersion measurements

  3. Thermochemical and phase structure of the D"-Region constrained by 3-D spherical mantle convection and seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B.; Olson, P.

    2011-12-01

    Results of time-dependent 3-D spherical mantle convection simulations with Newtonian rheology, solid-state phase transitions, and multiple composition as well as imposed plate motion back to 120 Ma are compared with observed lower mantle seismic heterogeneity to interpret structure in the D"-region. Synthetic seismic tomography images are created from the simulated temperature, composition, and phase change heterogeneity, which are then compared to the global seismic tomography models in terms of pattern and statistical properties. Several models are found that match the seismic tomography in terms of their RMS variation, Gaussian-like frequency distribution, and spherical harmonic degree-2 pattern for global-scale low velocity and high velocity regions. For these best-fitting models the heat flow at the CMB and the mantle heat flow at the surface are about 13.1 ~ 14.7 TW and 31 TW, respectively, and the Urey ratio is in range of 0.36 ~ 0.58. 3-D mantle convection constrained by plate motion history explains the statistics and the global pattern of lower mantle seismic heterogeneity provided that thermal, chemical and phase change heterogeneity is included in the mantle D"-region, and predicts large temporal and spatial variations in heat transport across the CMB.

  4. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swamiappan Sasikumar and Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO46 (OH2 is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye–Scherrer formula, is in the range 20–30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66.

  5. Phase diagram with a region of liquid carbon-diamond metastable states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharin, A. Yu.; Dozhdikov, V. S.; Kirillin, A. V.; Turchaninov, M. A.; Fokin, L. R.

    2010-06-01

    Metastable cubic diamond has been found in the structure of solid carbon obtained by quenching of a liquid phase at a pressure (0.012 GPa) much lower than that corresponding to the existence of stable diamond. It is suggested that this metastable diamond is formed as a result of the recalescence of supercooled liquid carbon to the melting point ( T dm) of metastable diamond due to a lower energy barrier for the formation of diamond as compared to that of graphite. A comparison between the calculated Gibbs energies of metastable phases provided an estimate of T dm = 4160 ± 50 K. For the first time, metastable continuations of the curve of diamond melting at pressures of up to 0.012 GPa are constructed on the phase diagrams of carbon (according to various published data) using analytical curves described by a two-parametric Simon equation.

  6. Relocating Seismicity on the Arctic Plate Boundary Using Teleseismic and Regional Phases and a Bayesian Multiple Event Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Kværna, Tormod; Larsen, Tine B.; Paulsen, Berit; Voss, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The tectonophysics of plate boundaries are illuminated by the pattern of seismicity - and the ability to locate seismic events accurately depends upon the number and quality of observations, the distribution of recording stations, and how well the traveltimes of seismic phases are modelled. The boundary between the Eurasian and North American plates between 70 and 84 degrees North hosts large seismic events which are well recorded teleseismically and many more events at far lower magnitudes that are well recorded only at regional distances. Existing seismic bulletins have considerable spread and bias resulting from limited station coverage and deficiencies in the velocity models applied; this is particularly acute for the lower magnitude events which may only be constrained by a small number of Pn and Sn arrivals. Over the past 15 years, there has been a significant improvement in the seismic network in the Arctic - a difficult region to instrument due to the harsh climate, a sparsity of quiet and accessible sites, and the expense and difficult logistics of deploying and maintaining stations. New deployments and upgrades to stations on Greenland, Svalbard, and the islands Jan Mayen, Hopen, and Bjørnøya have resulted in a sparse but stable regional seismic network which results in events down to magnitudes below 3 generating high quality Pn and Sn signals on multiple stations. A catalog of over 1000 events in the region since 1998 has been generated using many new phase readings on stations on both sides of the spreading ridge in addition to teleseismic P phases. The Bayesloc program, a Bayesian hierarchical multiple event location algorithm, has been used to relocate the full set of events iteratively and this has resulted in a significant reduction in the spread in hypocenter estimates for both large and small events. Whereas single event location algorithms minimize the vector of time residuals on an event-by-event basis, Bayesloc favours the hypocenters which

  7. Perfect Derived Propagators

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Christian

    2008-01-01

    When implementing a propagator for a constraint, one must decide about variants: When implementing min, should one also implement max? Should one implement linear equations both with and without coefficients? Constraint variants are ubiquitous: implementing them requires considerable (if not prohibitive) effort and decreases maintainability, but will deliver better performance. This paper shows how to use variable views, previously introduced for an implementation architecture, to derive perfect propagator variants. A model for views and derived propagators is introduced. Derived propagators are proved to be indeed perfect in that they inherit essential properties such as correctness and domain and bounds consistency. Techniques for systematically deriving propagators such as transformation, generalization, specialization, and channeling are developed for several variable domains. We evaluate the massive impact of derived propagators. Without derived propagators, Gecode would require 140000 rather than 40000 ...

  8. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km.

    For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars.

    Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  9. Perfusion Computed Tomography in the Acute Phase of Mild Head Injury : Regional Dysfunction and Prognostic Value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Rodiger, Lars A.; Stewart, Roy E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; De Keyser, Jacques; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Traumatic brain injury is a major Cause of disability and death. Most patients sustain a mild head injury with a subgroup that experiences disabling symptoms interfering with return to work. Brain imaging in the acute phase is not predictive of outcome, as 20% of noncontrast computed tomo

  10. Relative Phase with the Overlap Region of Two Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小计; 李卫东; 陈徐宗; 王义遒

    2002-01-01

    We present an expression of the relative phase for two interacting Bose-Einstein condensates released from an isotropic trapping potential. We discuss the interference condition between condensates and the visibility of the interference pattern reflecting the interaction between the condensates.

  11. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, B. W.

    1987-06-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity.

  12. Semiautomatic method to identify the best phase for gated RT in lung region by 4D-PET/CT acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Danna, Massimo; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Lobefalo, Francesca; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milano (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, 20132 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, 6504 Bellinzona (Switzerland); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milano (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Delineating tumor motion by four-dimensional positron emission tomography/computed tomography (4D-PET/CT) is a crucial step for gated radiotherapy (RT). This article quantitatively evaluates semiautomatic algorithms for tumor shift estimation in the lung region due to patient respiration by 4D-PET/CT, in order to support the selection of the best phases for gated RT, by considering the most stable phases of the breathing cycle. Methods: Three mobile spheres and ten selected lesions were included in this study. 4D-PET/CT data were reconstructed and classified into six/ten phases. The semiautomatic algorithms required the generation of single sets of images representative of the full target motion, used as masks for segmenting the phases. For 4D-CT, a pre-established HU range was used, whereas three thresholds (100%, 80%, and 40%) were evaluated for 4D-PET. By using these segmentations, the authors estimated the lesion motion from the shifting centroids, and the phases with the least motion were also deduced including the phases with a curve slope less than 2 mm/{Delta}phase. The proposed algorithms were validated by comparing the results to those generated entirely by manual contouring. Results: In the phantom study, the mean difference between the manual contour and the semiautomatic technique was 0.1{+-}0.1 mm for 4D-CT and 0.2{+-}0.1 mm for the 4D-PET based on 40% threshold. In the patients' series, the mean difference was 0.9{+-}0.6 mm for 4D-CT and 0.8{+-}0.2 mm for the 4D-PET based on 40% threshold. Conclusions: Estimation of lesion motion by the proposed semiautomatic algorithm can be used to evaluate tumor motion due to breathing.

  13. FEM Modeling of Crack Propagation in a Model Multiphase Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihe QIAN; Seishi NISHIDO; Hiroyuki TODA; Tosliro KOBAYASHI

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, several widely applied fracture criteria were first numerically examined and the crack-tip-region Jintegral criterion was confirmed to be more applicable to predict fracture angle in an elastic-plastic multiphase material. Then, the crack propagation in an idealized dendritic two-phase Al-7%Si alloy was modeled using an elastic-plastic finite element method. The variation of crack growth driving force with crack extension was also demonstrated. It is found that the crack path is significantly influenced by the presence of α-phase near the crack tip, and the crack growth driving force varies drastically from place to place. Lastly, the simulated fracture path in the two-phase model alloy was compared with the experimentally observed fracture path.

  14. Occurrence of Sporadic -E layer during the Ending Phase of Solar Cycle 23rd and Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24th over the Anomaly Crest Region Bhopal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawre, Purushottam; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Aslam A., M.; Khan, Parvaiz A.; Purohit, Pramod K.; Waheed, Malik Abdul; Khatarkar, Prakash

    Ionospheric anomaly crest regions are most challenging for scientific community to understand its mechanism and investigation, for this purpose we are investigating some inospheric result for this region. The study is based on the ionogram data recorded by IPS-71 Digital Ionosonde installed over anomaly crust region Bhopal (Geo.Lat.23.2° N, Geo. Long77.4° E, Dip latitude18.4°) over a four year period from January 2007 to December 2010, covering the ending phase of 23rd Solar Cycle and starting phase of 24th solar cycle. This particular period is felt to be very suitable for examining the sunspot number and it encompasses periods of low solar activities. Quarterly ionograms are analyzed for 24 hours during these study years and have been carefully examined to note down the presence of sporadic- E. We also note down the space weather activities along with the study. The studies are divided in mainly four parts with space and geomagnetic activities during these periods. The occurrence probability of this layer is highest in summer solstice, moderate during equinox and low during winter solstice. Remarkable occurrence peaks appear from June to July in summer and from December to January in winter. The layer occurrence showed a double peak variation with distinct layer groups, in the morning (0200 LT) and the other during evening (1800 LT).The morning layer descent was associated with layer density increase indicating the strengthening of the layer while it decreased during the evening layer descent. The result indicates the presence of semi-diurnal tide over the location while the higher descent velocities could be due to the modulation of the ionization by gravity waves along with the tides. The irregularities associated with the gradient-drift instability disappear during the counter electrojet and the current flow is reversed in westward. Keyword: ionosphere, solar cycle, sporadic - E

  15. Nonadiabatic semiclassical scattering: Atom-diatom collisions in self-consistent matrix propagator formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Michael F.; Freed, Karl F.

    1983-05-01

    The self-consistent matrix propagator method of Laing and Freed is extended to treat semiclassical nonadiabatic scattering in the collinear atom-diatom system. Applications are made to a model system in which diabatic surfaces are parallel, so the nonadiabatic transitions are not well localized in space, thereby introducing difficulties in some previous nonadiabatic semiclassical methods. In the self-consistent matrix propagator method nonadiabatic transitions occur at the boundaries of Magnus regions, and the relative phases, associated with trajectories undergoing transitions at different boundaries, must accurately be determined. This necessitates the determination of the absolute phases of the uniformized classical S matrix, a phase which is unnecessary in single potential surface semiclassical scattering. Semiclassical calculations are compared with full close coupled quantum calculations of Schmalz. The agreement is very good even at relatively low energies. The largest errors enter, as anticipated, for highly classically forbidden transitions whose overall probabilities are, however, rather small. The self-consistent matrix propagator method becomes simpler to apply and more accurate as the total energy increases, i.e., as the fully quantum calculations become prohibitively large. The method has the physical appeal that the self-consistent trajectories follow essentially adiabatic surfaces in strongly interacting regions and diabatic surfaces in weakly interacting regions, with a self-consistent interpolation between these regions.

  16. r.avaflow v1, an advanced open-source computational framework for the propagation and interaction of two-phase mass flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, Martin; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Krenn, Julia; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2017-02-01

    r.avaflow represents an innovative open-source computational tool for routing rapid mass flows, avalanches, or process chains from a defined release area down an arbitrary topography to a deposition area. In contrast to most existing computational tools, r.avaflow (i) employs a two-phase, interacting solid and fluid mixture model (Pudasaini, 2012); (ii) is suitable for modelling more or less complex process chains and interactions; (iii) explicitly considers both entrainment and stopping with deposition, i.e. the change of the basal topography; (iv) allows for the definition of multiple release masses, and/or hydrographs; and (v) serves with built-in functionalities for validation, parameter optimization, and sensitivity analysis. r.avaflow is freely available as a raster module of the GRASS GIS software, employing the programming languages Python and C along with the statistical software R. We exemplify the functionalities of r.avaflow by means of two sets of computational experiments: (1) generic process chains consisting in bulk mass and hydrograph release into a reservoir with entrainment of the dam and impact downstream; (2) the prehistoric Acheron rock avalanche, New Zealand. The simulation results are generally plausible for (1) and, after the optimization of two key parameters, reasonably in line with the corresponding observations for (2). However, we identify some potential to enhance the analytic and numerical concepts. Further, thorough parameter studies will be necessary in order to make r.avaflow fit for reliable forward simulations of possible future mass flow events.

  17. Association between left ventricular regional sympathetic denervation and mechanical dyssynchrony in phase analysis: a cardiac CZT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Giorgetti, Assuero; Kusch, Annette [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Liga, Riccardo [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy); Marzullo, Paolo [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); CNR, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the relationships among myocardial sympathetic innervation, perfusion and mechanical synchronicity assessed with cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) scintigraphy. A group of 29 patients underwent an evaluation of myocardial perfusion with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin CZT scintigraphy and adrenergic innervation with {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) CZT scintigraphy. The summed rest score (SRS), motion score (SMS) and thickening score (STS), as well as the summed {sup 123}I-MIBG defect score (SS-MIBG), were determined. Regional tracer uptake for both {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and {sup 123}I-MIBG was also calculated. Finally, the presence of significant myocardial mechanical dyssynchrony was evaluated in phase analysis on gated CZT images and the region of latest mechanical activation identified. Significant mechanical dyssynchrony was present in 17 patients (59 %) and associated with higher SRS (P = 0.030), SMS (P < 0.001), STS (P = 0.003) and early SS-MIBG (P = 0.037) as well as greater impairments in left ventricular ejection fraction (P < 0.001) and end-diastolic volume (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis a higher end-diastolic volume remained the only predictor of mechanical dyssynchrony (P = 0.047). Interestingly, while in the whole population regional myocardial perfusion and adrenergic activity were strongly correlated (R = 0.68), in patients with mechanical dyssynchrony the region of latest mechanical activation was predicted only by greater impairment in regional {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake (P = 0.012) that overwhelmed the effect of depressed regional perfusion. Left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony is associated with greater depression in contractile function and greater impairments in regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic activity. In patients with dyssynchrony, the region of latest mechanical activation is characterized by a significantly altered adrenergic tone. (orig.)

  18. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; Zahid, N. Idayu; Khyasudeen, M. Faisal; Giera, David S.; Thimm, Julian C.; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism. PMID:25731606

  19. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Zahid, N Idayu; Khyasudeen, M Faisal; Giera, David S; Thimm, Julian C; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-03-03

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism.

  20. Cartilage and soft tissue imaging using X-rays: propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography of the human knee in comparison with clinical imaging techniques and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Annie; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Geith, Tobias; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Auweter, Sigrid D; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian F; Coan, Paola

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates high-resolution tomographic x-ray phase-contrast imaging in whole human knee joints for the depiction of soft tissue with emphasis on hyaline cartilage. The method is compared with conventional computed tomography (CT), synchrotron radiation absorption-based CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After approval of the institutional review board, 2 cadaveric human knees were examined at an synchrotron institution using a monochromatic x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm field of view, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm. Images of phase-contrast imaging CT were reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Image quality and tissue contrast were evaluated and compared in all modalities and with histology. Phase-contrast imaging provides visualization of altered cartilage regions invisible in absorption CT with simultaneous high detail of the underlying bony abnormalities. The delineation of surface changes is similar to 3-T MRI using cartilage-dedicated sequences. Phase-contrast imaging CT presents soft tissue contrast surpassing that of conventional CT with a clear discrimination of ligamentous, muscular, neural, and vascular structures. In addition, phase-contrast imaging images show cartilage and meniscal calcifications that are not perceptible on conventional CT or on MRI. Phase-contrast imaging CT may facilitate a more complete evaluation of the human knee joint by providing concurrent comprehensive information about cartilage, the underlying subchondral bone, and their changes in osteoarthritic conditions.

  1. The Wheeler Propagator

    OpenAIRE

    Bollini, C. G.; Rocca, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    We study the half advanced and half retarded Wheeler Green function and its relation to Feynman propagators. First for massless equation. Then, for Klein-Gordon equations with arbitrary mass parameters; real, imaginary or complex. In all cases the Wheeler propagator lacks an on-shell free propagation. The Wheeler function has support inside the light-cone (whatever the mass). The associated vacuum is symmetric with respect to annihilation and creation operators. We show with some examples tha...

  2. Griffiths phases on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Miguel A; Juhász, Róbert; Castellano, Claudio; Odor, Géza

    2010-09-17

    Quenched disorder is known to play a relevant role in dynamical processes and phase transitions. Its effects on the dynamics of complex networks have hardly been studied. Aimed at filling this gap, we analyze the contact process, i.e., the simplest propagation model, with quenched disorder on complex networks. We find Griffiths phases and other rare-region effects, leading rather generically to anomalously slow (algebraic, logarithmic, …) relaxation, on Erdos-Rényi networks. Similar effects are predicted to exist for other topologies with a finite percolation threshold. More surprisingly, we find that Griffiths phases can also emerge in the absence of quenched disorder, as a consequence of topological heterogeneity in networks with finite topological dimension. These results have a broad spectrum of implications for propagation phenomena and other dynamical processes on networks.

  3. Spatial correlation properties and phase singularity annihilation of Gaussian Schell-model beams in the focal region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Pu-Sheng; Pan Liu-Zhan; Lü Bai-Da

    2008-01-01

    By using the generalized Debye diffraction integral,this paper studies the spatial correlation properties and phase singularity annihilation of apertured Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams in the focal region.It is shown that the width of the spectral degree of coherence can be larger,less than or equal to the corresponding width of spectral density,which depends not only on the scalar coherence length of the beams,but also on the truncation parameter.With a gradual increase of the truncation parameter,a pair of phase singularities of the spectral degree of coherence in the focal plane approaches each other,resulting in subwavelength structures.Finally,the annihilation of pairs of phase singularities takes place at a certain value of the truncation parameter.With increasing scalar coherence length,the annihilation occurs at the larger truncation parameter.However,the creation process of phase singularities outside the focal plane is not found for GSM beams.

  4. Single amino acid changes in the 6K1-CI region can promote the alternative adaptation of Prunus- and Nicotiana-propagated Plum pox virus C isolates to either host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, María; Malinowski, Tadeusz; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) C is one of the less common PPV strains and specifically infects cherry trees in nature. Making use of two PPV-C isolates that display different pathogenicity features, i.e., SwCMp, which had been adapted to Nicotiana species, and BY101, which had been isolated from cherry rootstock L2 (Prunus lannesiana) and propagated only in cherry species, we have generated two infective full-length cDNA clones in order to determine which viral factors are involved in the adaptation to each host. According to our results, the C-P3(PIPO)/6K1/N-CI (cylindrical inclusion) region contains overlapping but not coincident viral determinants involved in symptoms development, local viral amplification, and systemic movement capacity. Amino acid changes in this region promoting the adaptation to N. benthamiana or P. avium have trade-off effects in the alternative host. In both cases, adaptation can be achieved through single amino acid changes in the NIapro protease recognition motif between 6K1 and CI or in nearby sequences. Thus, we hypothesize that the potyvirus polyprotein processing could depend on specific host factors and the adaptation of PPV-C isolates to particular hosts relies on a fine regulation of the proteolytic cleavage of the 6K1-CI junction.

  5. Propagating Disturbances in Coronal Loops: A Detailed Analysis of Propagation Speeds

    CERN Document Server

    Kiddie, G; Del Zanna, G; McIntosh, S W; Whittaker, I

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-periodic disturbances have been observed in the outer solar atmosphere for many years now. Although first interpreted as upflows (Schrijver et al. (1999)), they have been widely regarded as slow magnetoacoustic waves, due to observed velocities and periods. However, recent observations have questioned this interpretation, as periodic disturbances in Doppler velocity, line width and profile asymmetry were found to be in phase with the intensity oscillations (De Pontieu et al. (2010),Tian1 et al. (2011))}, suggesting the disturbances could be quasi-periodic upflows. Here we conduct a detailed analysis of the velocities of these disturbances across several wavelengths using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We analysed 41 examples, including both sunspot and non sunspot regions of the Sun. We found that the velocities of propagating disturbances (PDs) located at sunspots are more likely to be temperature dependent, whereas the velocities of PDs at non sun...

  6. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy alone or with regional hyperthermia for localised high-risk soft-tissue sarcoma: a randomised phase 3 multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issels, Rolf D; Lindner, Lars H; Verweij, Jaap;

    2010-01-01

    The optimum treatment for high-risk soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) in adults is unclear. Regional hyperthermia concentrates the action of chemotherapy within the heated tumour region. Phase 2 studies have shown that chemotherapy with regional hyperthermia improves local control compared with chemother...

  7. Microstructure Formations in the Two-Phase Region of the Binary Peritectic Organic System TRIS-NPG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogeritsch, Johann; Ludwig, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In order to prepare for an onboard experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), systematic directional solidification experiments with transparent hypoperitectic alloys were carried out at different solidification rates around the critical velocity for morphological stability of both solid phases. The investigations were done in the peritectic region of the binary transparent organic TRIS-NPG system where the formation of layered structures is expected to occur. The transparent appearance of the liquid and solid phase enables real time observations of the dynamic of pattern formation during solidification. The investigations show that frequently occurring nucleation events govern the peritectic solidification morphology which occurs at the limit of morphological stability. As a consequence, banded structures lead to coupled growth even if the lateral growth is much faster compared to the growth in pulling direction.

  8. Dissociation of neural regions associated with anticipatory versus consummatory phases of incentive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Daniel G; Holmes, Avram J; Jahn, Allison L; Bogdan, Ryan; Wald, Lawrence L; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2008-01-01

    Incentive delay tasks implicate the striatum and medial frontal cortex in reward processing. However, prior studies delivered more rewards than penalties, possibly leading to unwanted differences in signal-to-noise ratio. Also, whether particular brain regions are specifically involved in anticipation or consumption is unclear. We used a task featuring balanced incentive delivery and an analytic strategy designed to identify activity specific to anticipation or consumption. Reaction time data in two independent samples (n=13 and n=8) confirmed motivated responding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed regions activated by anticipation (anterior cingulate) versus consumption (orbital and medial frontal cortex). Ventral striatum was active during reward anticipation but not significantly more so than during consumption. Although the study features several methodological improvements and helps clarify the neural basis of incentive processing, replications in larger samples are needed.

  9. Dissociation of neural regions associated with anticipatory versus consummatory phases of incentive processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Daniel G.; Holmes, Avram J.; Jahn, Allison L.; Bogdan, Ryan; Wald, Lawrence L.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2007-01-01

    Incentive delay tasks implicate the striatum and medial frontal cortex in reward processing. However, prior studies delivered more rewards than penalties, possibly leading to unwanted differences in signal-to-noise ratio. Also, whether particular brain regions are specifically involved in anticipation or consumption is unclear. We used a task featuring balanced incentive delivery and an analytic strategy designed to identify activity specific to anticipation or consumption. RT data in two independent samples (n=13 and n=8) confirmed motivated responding. FMRI revealed regions activated by anticipation (anterior cingulate) vs. consumption (orbital and medial frontal cortex). Ventral striatum was active during reward anticipation but not significantly more so than during consumption. While the study features several methodological improvements and helps clarify the neural basis of incentive processing, replications in larger samples are needed. PMID:17850241

  10. Source characterization of selected North Caspian events from the relative excitation of regional phases. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niazi, M.

    1981-11-01

    Seismograms of seven recent events (presumed underground nuclear explosions) which occurred during 1976-1979 in the North Caspian Sea region of the western Soviet Kazakh are compared at regional distances for their relative source excitation characteristics. The body wave magnitude estimates of these events range from 5.1 to 6.0. The data consist of analog and digital records collected at stations ranging in instrumental sophistication from temporary sites with single component smoke drum capability to those of SRO, ASRO and array (ILPA) configurations with digitally recorded down-hole observations. The amplitude and frequency measurements of the analog seismograms for the first arrival and the peak amplitude of P coda as well as for the clear S wave signals recorded for different events at the same station are compared.

  11. Composition of Short-Period Regional Phases Inferred From Fennoscandian Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Pn amplitudes are relatively large. Lateral velocity variations appear to be associated with the Lapland Granulite region and the Polmak-Pasvik...is located in the oldest, Archaean, part of the Baltic Shield (Figure 3), just west of the Proterozoic, Lapland Granulite Belt. The granulite belt is...Fennolora profile runs just west of ARCESS (Galson and Mueller, 1986; Guggisberg et al., 1991; Lund, 1987) and the Polar profile, crosses the Granulite

  12. Dissociation of neural regions associated with anticipatory versus consummatory phases of incentive processing

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Daniel G.; Holmes, Avram J.; Jahn, Allison L.; Bogdan, Ryan; Wald, Lawrence L.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2007-01-01

    Incentive delay tasks implicate the striatum and medial frontal cortex in reward processing. However, prior studies delivered more rewards than penalties, possibly leading to unwanted differences in signal-to-noise ratio. Also, whether particular brain regions are specifically involved in anticipation or consumption is unclear. We used a task featuring balanced incentive delivery and an analytic strategy designed to identify activity specific to anticipation or consumption. RT data in two ind...

  13. Propagation properties of hollow sinh-Gaussian beams in quadratic-index medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Defeng; Li, Xiaohui; Pang, Xingxing; Zheng, Hairong; Ge, Yanqi

    2017-10-01

    Based on the Collins integral formula, the analytical expression for a hollow sinh-Gaussian (HsG) beam propagating through the quadratic-index medium is derived. The propagation properties of a single HsG beam and their interactions have been studied in detail with numerical examples. The results show that inhomogeneity can support self-repeating intensity distributions of HsG beams. With high-ordered beam order n, HsG beams could maintain their initial dark hollow distributions for a longer distance. In addition, interference fringes appear at the interactional region. The central intensity is a prominent peak for two in-phase beams, which is zero for two out-of phase beams. By tuning the initial beam phase shift, the distribution of the fringes can be controlled.

  14. Propagation of kinetic uncertainties through a canonical topology of the TLR4 signaling network in different regions of biochemical reaction space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Laurent Georges

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction networks represent the information processing systems that dictate which dynamical regimes of biochemical activity can be accessible to a cell under certain circumstances. One of the major concerns in molecular systems biology is centered on the elucidation of the robustness properties and information processing capabilities of signal transduction networks. Achieving this goal requires the establishment of causal relations between the design principle of biochemical reaction systems and their emergent dynamical behaviors. Methods In this study, efforts were focused in the construction of a relatively well informed, deterministic, non-linear dynamic model, accounting for reaction mechanisms grounded on standard mass action and Hill saturation kinetics, of the canonical reaction topology underlying Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-mediated signaling events. This signaling mechanism has been shown to be deployed in macrophages during a relatively short time window in response to lypopolysaccharyde (LPS stimulation, which leads to a rapidly mounted innate immune response. An extensive computational exploration of the biochemical reaction space inhabited by this signal transduction network was performed via local and global perturbation strategies. Importantly, a broad spectrum of biologically plausible dynamical regimes accessible to the network in widely scattered regions of parameter space was reconstructed computationally. Additionally, experimentally reported transcriptional readouts of target pro-inflammatory genes, which are actively modulated by the network in response to LPS stimulation, were also simulated. This was done with the main goal of carrying out an unbiased statistical assessment of the intrinsic robustness properties of this canonical reaction topology. Results Our simulation results provide convincing numerical evidence supporting the idea that a canonical reaction mechanism of the TLR4

  15. Regional Air Quality Model Application of the Aqueous-Phase Photo Reduction of Atmospheric Oxidized Mercury by Dicarboxylic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse O. Bash

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In most ecosystems, atmospheric deposition is the primary input of mercury. The total wet deposition of mercury in atmospheric chemistry models is sensitive to parameterization of the aqueous-phase reduction of divalent oxidized mercury (Hg2+. However, most atmospheric chemistry models use a parameterization of the aqueous-phase reduction of Hg2+ that has been shown to be unlikely under normal ambient conditions or use a non mechanistic value derived to optimize wet deposition results. Recent laboratory experiments have shown that Hg2+ can be photochemically reduced to elemental mercury (Hg in the aqueous-phase by dissolved organic matter and a mechanism and the rate for Hg2+ photochemical reduction by dicarboxylic acids (DCA has been proposed. For the first time in a regional scale model, the DCA mechanism has been applied. The HO2-Hg2+ reduction mechanism, the proposed DCA reduction mechanism, and no aqueous-phase reduction (NAR of Hg2+ are evaluated against weekly wet deposition totals, concentrations and precipitation observations from the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model version 4.7.1. Regional scale simulations of mercury wet deposition using a DCA reduction mechanism evaluated well against observations, and reduced the bias in model evaluation by at least 13% over the other schemes evaluated, although summertime deposition estimates were still biased by −31.4% against observations. The use of the DCA reduction mechanism physically links Hg2+ reduction to plausible atmospheric processes relevant under typical ambient conditions.

  16. The phase transition of the first order in the critical region of the gas-liquid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R. Yukhnovskii

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a summarising investigation of the events of the phase transition of the first order that occur in the critical region below the liquid-gas critical point. The grand partition function has been completely integrated in the phase-space of the collective variables. The basic density measure is the quartic one. It has the form of the exponent function with the first, second, third and fourth degree of the collective variables. The problem has been reduced to the Ising model in an external field, the role of which is played by the generalised chemical potential μ*. The line μ*(η =0, where η is the density, is the line of the phase transition. We consider the isothermal compression of the gas till the point where the phase transition on the line μ*(η =0 is reached. When the path of the pressing reaches the line μ* =0 in the gas medium, a droplet of liquid springs up. The work for its formation is obtained, the surface-tension energy is calculated. On the line μ* =0 we have a two-phase system: the gas and the liquid (the droplet one. The equality of the gas and of the liquid chemical potentials is proved. The process of pressing is going on. But the pressure inside the system has stopped, two fixed densities have arisen: one for the gas-phase ηG=ηc(1-d/2 and the other for the liquid-phase ηL=ηc(1+d/2 (symmetrically to the rectlinear diameter, where ηc=0.13044 is the critical density. Starting from that moment the external pressure works as a latent work of pressure. Its value is obtained. As a result, the gas-phase disappears and the whole system turns into liquid. The jump of the density is equal to ηc d, where d=(D/2G1/2 ~ τν/2. D and G are coefficients of the Hamiltonian in the last cell connected with the renormalisation-group symmetry. The equation of state is written.

  17. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  18. Epitaxial growth of hexagonal tungsten bronze Cs x WO3 films in superconducting phase region exceeding bulk limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Takuto; Yoshimatsu, Kohei; Ohtomo, Akira

    2016-07-01

    We report epitaxial synthesis of superconducting Cs x WO3 (x = 0.11, 0.20, and 0.31) films on Y-stabilized ZrO2 (111) substrates. The hexagonal crystal structure was verified not only for the composition within the stable region of the bulk (x = 0.20 and 0.31), but also for the out-of-range composition (x = 0.11). The onset of the superconducting transition was recorded at 5.8 K for x = 0.11. We found a strong correlation between the superconducting transition temperature (T C) and the c-axis length, irrespective of the Cs content. These results indicated that the hidden superconducting phase region of hexagonal tungsten bronze is accessible using epitaxial synthesis of lightly doped films.

  19. Subsonic phase transition waves in bistable lattice models with small spinodal region

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Michael; Schwetlick, Hartmut; Zimmer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Phase transitions waves in atomic chains with double-well potential play a fundamental role in materials science, but very little is known about their mathematical properties. In particular, the only available results about waves with large amplitudes concern chains with piecewise-quadratic pair potential. In this paper we consider perturbations of a bi-quadratic potential and prove that the corresponding three-parameter family of waves persists as long as the perturbation is small and localised with respect to the strain variable. More precisely, we introduce an anchor-corrector ansatz, characterise the corrector as a fixed point of a nonlinear and nonlocal operator, and show that this operator is contractive in a small ball of a certain function space.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluation of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) Nozzle Interference Fit and Weld Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mathews, Royce; Hanson, Brady D.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-10-01

    In this investigation, non-destructive and destructive testing were used to evaluate potential boric acid leakage paths around an Alloy 600 CRDM penetration (Nozzle 63) from the North Anna Unit 2 reactor pressure vessel head that was removed from service in 2003. For this investigation, Nozzle 63 was examined using phased array ultrasonic testing. Prior to examining Nozzle 63, a CRDM penetration mockup with known notches and boric acid deposits was used to assess probe sensitivity, resolution and calibration. Following the non-destructive testing of Nozzle 63, the nozzle was destructively examined to visually assess the leak paths. These destructive and nondestructive results are compared and results are presented. The results of this investigation may be used by NRC to evaluate licensees’ volumetric leak path assessment methodologies and to support regulatory inspection requirements.

  1. A contribution to better understanding of structural characteristics and tectonic phases of the Boč region, Periadriatic Fault Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Žibret

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine properties of the tectonic contact between Permian/Mesozoic limestones and less competent Miocene clastites on the northeastern foothill of the Boč Mt. Because fault planes signifiantly mark the relief, this contact was studied by a detailed structural mapping, which showed that the Boč Mt. is limited by subvertical faults in its northeastern part. To ensure that mapped subvertical contact is compatible with regional geodynamics of the area, additionally paleostress analysis of fault-slip data was performed. Four individual paleostress tensor groups were documented in a wider Boč area and compared by published structural data from the border zone between Alps, Dinarides and Pannonian Basin. The oldest paleostress tensor group (Phase 1 is likely of Lower and Middle Miocene age and indicates SW-NE extension accommodated by W-E to WNW-ESE striking normal faults. Phase 2 can be correlated with Middle to Late Miocene NW-SE to WNWESE directed extension accommodated by NNE-SSW striking normal faults. Phase 3 is correlated with Late Miocene W-E directed contraction accommodated by N-S striking sinistral faults and NNE-SSW to NE-SW striking dextral faults. The youngest paleostress tensor group (Phase 4 fis well with Pliocene to Quaternary NNW-SSE to N-S directed contraction accommodated by NW-SE to W-E striking dextral faults and NE-SW striking reverse faults. Since the documented paleostress phases fis well with the geodynamic processes of the Alps-Dinarides-Carpathians territory the subvertical border in the northeastern part of Boč Mt. seems to be an acceptable structural solution. The study is important because the study area is located at interaction zone between two major Alpine fault systems: the Periadriatic and the Lavanttal faults.

  2. Range Information Propagation Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向荣; 朱志刚; 等

    1998-01-01

    A novel method of model-based object recognition is presented in this paper.Its novelty stems from the fact that the gray level image captured by a camera is merged with sparse range information in an active manner.By using a projective transform, which is determined by the sparse range data,festures(e.g.edge points)related to a single planar surface patch of figure in the scene can be assignew with their corresponding range values respectively.As a result,the shape of the very planar patch or figure can be recovered and various kinds of description in the Euclidean space can be calculated.Based on these descriptions values,the hypothesis about the identification of the object and its pose in space can be obtained with a high probability of success,and a high efficiency of hypothesis-verification process can be expected.Another advantage of this method is that the edge detection process can be navigated to the proper location hinted by the sparse range image.In consequence edge features can be extracted even in the regions with low contrast.In this paper the principle of range information propagation transform(RIPT)is explained,and some implementation issues,such as the algorithms using calibrated or uncalibrated gray level image for object recognition,are discussed.The preliminary experimental results are presented to indicate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  3. Shallow-Water Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Shallow- Water Propagation William L. Siegmann Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 110 Eighth Street Troy, New York 12180-3590 phone: (518) 276...ocean_acoustics LONG-TERM GOALS Develop methods for propagation and coherence calculations in complex shallow- water environments, determine...intensity and coherence. APPROACH (A) Develop high accuracy PE techniques for applications to shallow- water sediments, accounting for

  4. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  5. Propagation stability of self-reconstructing Bessel beams enables contrast-enhanced imaging in thick media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrbach, Florian O.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Laser beams that can self-reconstruct their initial beam profile even in the presence of massive phase perturbations are able to propagate deeper into inhomogeneous media. This ability has crucial advantages for light sheet-based microscopy in thick media, such as cell clusters, embryos, skin or brain tissue or plants, as well as scattering synthetic materials. A ring system around the central intensity maximum of a Bessel beam enables its self-reconstruction, but at the same time illuminates out-of-focus regions and deteriorates image contrast. Here we present a detection method that minimizes the negative effect of the ring system. The beam's propagation stability along one straight line enables the use of a confocal line principle, resulting in a significant increase in image contrast. The axial resolution could be improved by nearly 100% relative to the standard light-sheet techniques using scanned Gaussian beams, while demonstrating self-reconstruction also for high propagation depths.

  6. Equatorial F-region plasma density estimation with incoherent scatter radar using a transverse-mode differential-phase method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhaomei

    This dissertation presents a novel data acquisition and analysis method for the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar to measure high-precision drifts and ionospheric density simultaneously at F-region heights. Since high-precision drift measurements favor radar return signals with the narrowest possible frequency spectra, Jicamarca drifts observations are conducted using the linear-polarized transverse radar beams. Transverse-beam returns are collected using an orthogonal pair of linear-polarized antennas, and the average power as well as phase difference of the antenna outputs are fitted to appropriate data models developed based on the incoherent scatter theory and the magneto-ionic theory. The crude differential-phase model when B⃗o is characterized in terms of straight line fields is applied to the January 2000 data. The most complete differential-phase model, which takes into account the misaligned angle between the dipole axes and geomagnetic northeast and southeast directions, as well as the radar beam width and variation of magnetic fields, is applied to the January 2000 data and June 2002 data. We present and compare the inversion results obtained with different versions of the data models and conclude that the geometrical details have only a minor impact on the inversion. We also find that the differential-phase method works better for the 15-min integrated January 2000 data than 5-min integrated June 2002 data since the former has the bigger densities, larger SNR of the backscattered signals, and more usable phase data. Our inversion results show reasonable agreement with the ionosonde data. The full correlation method is formulated and applied to the June 2002 data. Compared to the differential-phase method, this method is different in the sense that it utilizes the real and imaginary parts of the cross-correlation of orthogonal antenna outputs at the high altitudes where SNR is low and the off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix of measurement

  7. Strain engineering of nonlinear boron phosphate for phase matching in the ultraviolet region: a first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinyu; Ma, Zuju; Li, Jun; He, Chao; Li, Qiaohong; Wu, Kechen

    2016-05-01

    Borophosphates, particularly BPO4 (BPO) crystals, have attracted attention in laser frequency conversion devices because of their short ultraviolet cutoff edge and relatively large second harmonic generation (SHG) response, which is almost twice as great as that of KH2PO4. However, the birefringence of BPO (approximately 0.005) is too small to satisfy the phase matching condition in the ultraviolet spectral region, restricting the laser output efficiency. Here we systematically examine the influence of mechanical strains on the atomic structure as well as the electronic and optical properties of BPO using first-principles calculations. Interestingly, we find that the birefringence of BPO can be enhanced by ~0.06 through external uniaxial strain along the c-axis. Meanwhile, compressive strain can increase the band gap and SHG coefficients effectively. Refractive-index dispersion is also emphasized in this work. Our results indicate that phase matching in the ultraviolet region (266 nm) can be achieved under  -10% strain (3.9 GPa). This investigation is helpful for understanding the structure-property relationship of BPO under strain, and it also indicates its possible use as a promising ultraviolet nonlinear optical crystal.

  8. Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacaster, A.J. (ed.)

    1985-07-01

    This report describes the financial background of the electric utility industry in VACAR, reports on the present condition of the industry and then assesses the future of this industry. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of its cooperativeness and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear, oil. It was found that the supply of future economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the present condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound, and with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Formation and Propagation of Local Traffic Jam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-sheng Qi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large scale traffic congestion often stems from local traffic jam in single road or intersection. In this paper, macroscopic method was used to explore the formation and propagation of local traffic jam. It is found that (1 the propagation of traffic jam can be seen as the propagation of traffic signal parameters, that is, virtual split and virtual green time; (2 for a road with endogenous flow, entrance location influences the jam propagation. With the same demand (upstream links flow and entrance flow, the upstream got more influence; (3 when a one-lane road is thoroughly congested, virtual signal parameters everywhere are the same as that at stop line; for a basic road, the virtual signals work in a cooperative manner; (4 phase sequence is one important parameter that influences traffic performances during peak hour where spill back of channelization takes place. The same phase plan for left-turn flow and through flow would be preferred; (5 signal coordination plays an important role in traffic jam propagation and hence effective network signal parameters should be designed to prevent jam from propagation to the whole network. These findings would serve as a basis for future network traffic congestion control.

  10. Guidelines regarding the interim use and phase out of neonicotinoid insecticides to grow agricultural crops for wildlife on NWRs in the Pacific Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum describing a phased approach in the Pacific Region to eliminate the use of neonicotinoidinsecticides (by any method) to grow agricultural crops for...

  11. Superluminal propagation: Light cone and Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugnai, D. [' Nello Carrara' Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)]. E-mail: d.mugnai@ifac.cnr.it

    2007-05-14

    Superluminal behavior has been extensively studied in recent years, especially with regard to the topic of superluminality in the propagation of a signal. Particular interest has been devoted to Bessel-X waves propagation, since some experimental results showed that these waves have both phase and group velocities greater that light velocity c. However, because of the lack of an exact definition of signal velocity, no definite answer about the signal propagation (or velocity of information) has been found. The present Letter is a short note that deals in a general way with this vexed question. By analyzing the field of existence of the Bessel X-pulse in pseudo-Euclidean spacetime, it is possible to give a general description of the propagation, and to overcome the specific question related to a definition of signal velocity.

  12. On the two-dimensional dynamical Ising model in the phase coexistence region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, F.

    1994-09-01

    We consider a Glauber dynamics reversible with respect to the two-dimensional Ising model in a finite square of side L, in the absence of an external field and at large inverse temperature β. We first consider the gap in the spectrum of the generator of the dynamics in two different cases: with plus and open boundary conditions. We prove that, when the symmetry under global spin flip is broken by the boundary conditions, the gap is much larger than the case in which the symmetry is present. For this latter we compute exactly the asymptotics of -(1/β L) log(gap) as L→∞ and show that it coincides with the surface tension along one of the coordinate axes. As a consequence we are able to study quite precisely the large deviations in time of the magnetization and to obtain an upper bound on the spin-spin time correlation in the infinite-volume plus phase. Our results establish a connection between the dynamical large deviations and those of the equilibrium Gibbs measure studied by Shlosman in the framework of the rigorous description of the Wulff shape for the Ising model. Finally we show that, in the case of open boundary conditions, it is possible to rescale the time with L in such a way that, as L→∞, the finite-dimensional distributions of the time-rescaled magnetization converge to those of a symmetric continuous-time Markov chain on the two-state space {- m *(β), m *(β)}, m *(β) being the spontaneous magnetization. Our methods rely upon a novel combination of techniques for bounding from below the gap of symmetric Markov chains on complicated graphs, developed by Jerrum and Sinclair in their Markov chain approach to hard computational problems, and the idea of introducing "block Glauber dynamics" instead of the standard single-site dynamics, in order to put in evidence more effectively the effect of the boundary conditions in the approach to equilibrium.

  13. Location capability of a sparse regional network (RSTN) using a multi-phase earthquake location algorithm (REGLOC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) was deployed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether data recorded by a regional network could be used to detect and accurately locate seismic events that might be clandestine nuclear tests. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the location capability of the RSTN. A major part of this project was the development of the location algorithm REGLOC and application of Basian a prior statistics for determining the accuracy of the location estimates. REGLOC utilizes all identifiable phases, including backazimuth, in the location. Ninty-four events, distributed throughout the network area, detected by both the RSTN and located by local networks were used in the study. The location capability of the RSTN was evaluated by estimating the location accuracy, error ellipse accuracy, and the percentage of events that could be located, as a function of magnitude. The location accuracy was verified by comparing the RSTN results for the 94 events with published locations based on data from the local networks. The error ellipse accuracy was evaluated by determining whether the error ellipse includes the actual location. The percentage of events located was assessed by combining detection capability with location capability to determine the percentage of events that could be located within the study area. Events were located with both an average crustal model for the entire region, and with regional velocity models along with station corrections obtained from master events. Most events with a magnitude <3.0 can only be located with arrivals from one station. Their average location errors are 453 and 414 km for the average- and regional-velocity model locations, respectively. Single station locations are very unreliable because they depend on accurate backazimuth estimates, and backazimuth proved to be a very unreliable computation.

  14. Propagation of shock waves through clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin Xin

    1990-10-01

    The behavior of a shock wave propagating into a cloud consisting of an inert gas, water vapor and water droplets was investigated. This has particular application to sonic bangs propagating in the atmosphere. The finite different method of MacCormack is extended to solve the one and two dimensional, two phase flow problems in which mass, momentum and energy transfers are included. The FCT (Fluid Corrected Transport) technique developed by Boris and Book was used in the basic numerical scheme as a powerful corrective procedure. The results for the transmitted shock waves propagating in a one dimensional, semi infinite cloud obtained by the finite difference approach are in good agreement with previous results by Kao using the method characteristics. The advantage of the finite difference method is its adaptability to two and three dimensional problems. Shock wave propagation through a finite cloud and into an expansion with a 90 degree corner was investigated. It was found that the transfer processes between the two phases in two dimensional flow are much more complicated than in the one dimensional flow cases. This is mainly due to the vortex and expansion wave generated at the corner. In the case considered, further complications were generated by the reflected shock wave from the floor. Good agreement with experiment was found for one phase flow but experimental data for the two phase case is not yet available to validate the two phase calculations.

  15. Wet phases in the Sahara/Sahel region and human migration patterns in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Isla S; Mulitza, Stefan; Schefuss, Enno; Lopes dos Santos, Raquel A; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Schouten, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual plant leaf waxes (a proxy for C(3) vs. C(4) vegetation) in a marine sediment core collected from beneath the plume of Sahara-derived dust in northwest Africa reveals three periods during the past 192,000 years when the central Sahara/Sahel contained C(3) plants (likely trees), indicating substantially wetter conditions than at present. Our data suggest that variability in the strength of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a main control on vegetation distribution in central North Africa, and we note expansions of C(3) vegetation during the African Humid Period (early Holocene) and within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 ( approximately 50-45 ka) and MIS 5 ( approximately 120-110 ka). The wet periods within MIS 3 and 5 coincide with major human migration events out of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results thus suggest that changes in AMOC influenced North African climate and, at times, contributed to amenable conditions in the central Sahara/Sahel, allowing humans to cross this otherwise inhospitable region.

  16. CO observations of massive star forming regions at different evolutionary phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xi; XU; Ye; SHEN; Zhiqiang; LI; Jingjing

    2006-01-01

    The 12CO (J=1-0), 13CO (J=1-0) and C18O (J=1-0) emissions in 9 massive star forming regions, which are believed to be at different stages of massive star formation,were mapped with the 13.7 m millimeter wave telescope at Qinghai Station of Purple Mountain Observatory. Of the observed 9 sources, 13CO cores were detected in seven of them, and C18O cores in five of them. And only two sources associated with C18O cores and H2O masers showed the extended structures and strong outflows. This is the first detection of outflow associated with IRAS 22566+5828 in the observing field of S152/S153.The physical parameters of cores and outflows for these sources, derived from Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) analysis, are presented. These observing results suggest that the C18O cores will only appear when the gas density is high enough and the probability to have an outflow is very high when the clumps show the C18O and H2O maser simultaneously.

  17. Magnitude Anomalies and Propagation of Local Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-31

    statistically significant variation of magnitude anomalies versus one of this above parameters. A contrario, we observed a significant dependance between...enough to demand a more detailed analysis. III - Local dependance of magnitude anomalies. A smoothing of our data on all quakes originating in the same

  18. Primary Somatosensory Cortices Contain Altered Patterns of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in the Interictal Phase of Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, Duncan J.; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Wilcox, Sophie L.; Scrivani, Steven; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is a complex integrated process that is critical for supporting healthy brain function. Studies have demonstrated a high incidence of alterations in CBF in patients suffering from migraine with and without aura during different phases of attacks. However, the CBF data collected interictally has failed to show any distinguishing features or clues as to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. In this study we used the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique—arterial spin labeling (ASL)—to non-invasively and quantitatively measure regional CBF (rCBF) in a case-controlled study of interictal migraine. We examined both the regional and global CBF differences between the groups, and found a significant increase in rCBF in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of migraine patients. The CBF values in S1 were positively correlated with the headache attack frequency, but were unrelated to the duration of illness or age of the patients. Additionally, 82% of patients reported skin hypersensitivity (cutaneous allodynia) during migraine, suggesting atypical processing of somatosensory stimuli. Our results demonstrate the presence of a disease-specific functional deficit in a known region of the trigemino-cortical pathway, which may be driven by adaptive or maladaptive functional plasticity. These findings may in part explain the altered sensory experiences reported between migraine attacks. PMID:26372461

  19. Primary Somatosensory Cortices Contain Altered Patterns of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in the Interictal Phase of Migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan J Hodkinson

    Full Text Available The regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF is a complex integrated process that is critical for supporting healthy brain function. Studies have demonstrated a high incidence of alterations in CBF in patients suffering from migraine with and without aura during different phases of attacks. However, the CBF data collected interictally has failed to show any distinguishing features or clues as to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. In this study we used the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique-arterial spin labeling (ASL-to non-invasively and quantitatively measure regional CBF (rCBF in a case-controlled study of interictal migraine. We examined both the regional and global CBF differences between the groups, and found a significant increase in rCBF in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1 of migraine patients. The CBF values in S1 were positively correlated with the headache attack frequency, but were unrelated to the duration of illness or age of the patients. Additionally, 82% of patients reported skin hypersensitivity (cutaneous allodynia during migraine, suggesting atypical processing of somatosensory stimuli. Our results demonstrate the presence of a disease-specific functional deficit in a known region of the trigemino-cortical pathway, which may be driven by adaptive or maladaptive functional plasticity. These findings may in part explain the altered sensory experiences reported between migraine attacks.

  20. The Wheeler Propagator

    CERN Document Server

    Bollini, C G

    1998-01-01

    We study the half advanced and half retarded Wheeler Green function and its relation to Feynman propagators. First for massless equation. Then, for Klein-Gordon equations with arbitrary mass parameters; real, imaginary or complex. In all cases the Wheeler propagator lacks an on-shell free propagation. The Wheeler function has support inside the light-cone (whatever the mass). The associated vacuum is symmetric with respect to annihilation and creation operators. We show with some examples that perturbative unitarity holds, whatever the mass (real or complex). Some possible applications are discussed.

  1. Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jichun; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Saikin, Anthony A.; Mello, Emily M.; Russell, Christopher T.; Torbert, Roy B.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Giles, Barbara L.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (0.1-5 Hz) play an important role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. EMIC waves are preferentially excited in regions where hot anisotropic ions and cold dense plasma populations spatially overlap. While the generation region of EMIC waves is usually on or near the magnetic equatorial plane in the inner magnetosphere, EMIC waves have both equatorial and off-equator source regions on the dayside in the compressed outer magnetosphere. Using field and plasma measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated local plasma conditions observed on 19 October 2015. From 0315 to 0810 UT, before crossing the magnetopause into the magnetosheath, all four MMS spacecraft detected long-lasting He(exp +)-band EMIC wave emissions around local noon (MLT = 12.7 - 14.0) at high L-shells (L = 8.8 - 15.2) and low magnetic latitudes (MLAT = -21.8deg - -30.3deg). Energetic (greater than 1 keV) and anisotropic ions were present throughout this event that was in the recovery phase of a weak geomagnetic storm (min. Dst = -48 nT at 1000 UT on 18 October 2015). The testing of linear theory suggests that the EMIC waves were excited locally. Although the wave event is dominated by small normal angles, its polarization is mixed with right- and left-handedness and its propagation is bi-directional with regard to the background magnetic field. The short inter-spacecraft distances (as low as 15 km) of the MMS mission make it possible to accurately determine the k vector of the waves using the phase difference technique. Preliminary analysis finds that the k vector magnitude, phase speed, and wavelength of the 0.3-Hz wave packet at 0453:55 UT are 0.005 km(exp -1), 372.9 km/s, and 1242.9 km, respectively.

  2. Propagated waves induced by gradients of physiological factors within plasmodia ofPhysarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejnowicz, Z; Wohlfarth-Bottermann, K E

    1980-01-01

    Plasmodia ofPhysarum polycephalum were analyzed with the aid of cinematography and the infrared reflection technique for characterization of the phase behavior of their oscillating contraction activity, with special emphasis placed on the effects of temperature gradients. In response to temperature gradients, phase gradients were documented cinematographically as well as by infrared registration. A quantitative evaluation of the cinematographically recorded phenomena was carried out with the aid of streak photography. The phase gradient is directed across the region of the temperature gradient with a delay in phase toward the colder side. The correspondingly generated waves are as short as 1 mm and are propagated toward the colder region. A comparison of these waves with the known "flickering" phenomena in cinematographic films reveals a common nature of both.

  3. Propagation equation for tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couairon, A; Kosareva, O G; Panov, N A; Shipilo, D E; Andreeva, V A; Jukna, V; Nesa, F

    2015-11-30

    Part of the chain in petawatt laser systems may involve extreme focusing conditions for which nonparaxial and vectorial effects have high impact on the propagation of radiation. We investigate the possibility of using propagation equations to simulate numerically the focal spot under these conditions. We derive a unidirectional propagation equation for the Hertz vector, describing linear and nonlinear propagation under situations where nonparaxial diffraction and vectorial effects become significant. By comparing our simulations to the results of vector diffraction integrals in the case of linear tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror, we establish a practical criterion for the critical f -number below which initializing a propagation equation with a parabolic input phase becomes inaccurate. We propose a method to find suitable input conditions for propagation equations beyond this limit. Extreme focusing conditions are shown to be modeled accurately by means of numerical simulations of the unidirectional Hertz-vector propagation equation initialized with suitable input conditions.

  4. The acute phase response and soman-induced status epilepticus: temporal, regional and cellular changes in rat brain cytokine concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Robert K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroinflammation occurs following brain injury, including soman (GD induced status epilepticus (SE, and may contribute to loss of neural tissue and declined behavioral function. However, little is known about this important pathological process following GD exposure. Limited transcriptional information on a small number of brain-expressed inflammatory mediators has been shown following GD-induced SE and even less information on protein upregulation has been elucidated. The purpose of this study is to further characterize the regional and temporal progression of the neuroinflammatory process following acute GD-induced SE. Methods The protein levels of 10 cytokines was quantified using bead multiplex immunoassays in damaged brain regions (i.e., piriform cortex, hippocampus and thalamus up to 72 hours following seizure onset. Those factors showing significant changes were then localized to neural cells using fluorescent IHC. Results A significant concentration increase was observed in all injured brain regions for four acute phase response (APR induction cytokines: interleukin (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. Increases in these APR cytokines corresponded both temporally and regionally to areas of known seizure damage and neuronal death. Neurotoxic cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β were primarily expressed by activated microglia whereas the potentially neuroprotective cytokine IL-6 was expressed by neurons and hypertrophic astrocytes. Conclusions Increases in neurotoxic cytokines likely play an active role in the progression of GD-induced SE neuropathology though the exact role that these and other cytokines play in this process require further study.

  5. Propagation in Polymer Parameterised Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Varadarajan, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    The Hamiltonian constraint operator in Loop Quantum Gravity acts ultralocally. Smolin has argued that this ultralocality seems incompatible with the existence of a quantum dynamics which propagates perturbations between macroscopically seperated regions of quantum geometry. We present evidence to the contrary within an LQG type `polymer' quantization of two dimensional Parameterised Field Theory (PFT). PFT is a generally covariant reformulation of free field propagation on flat spacetime. We show explicitly that while, as in LQG, the Hamiltonian constraint operator in PFT acts ultralocally, states in the joint kernel of the Hamiltonian and diffeomorphism constraints of PFT necessarily describe propagation effects. The particular structure of the finite triangulation Hamiltonian constraint operator plays a crucial role, as does the necessity of imposing (the continuum limit of) its kinematic adjoint as a constraint. Propagation is seen as a property encoded by physical states in the kernel of the constraints r...

  6. Edit Propagation via Edge-Aware Filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Zhao Dong; Guo-Dong Yuan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for efficiently propagating the stroke-based user edits to the regions with similar colors and locations in high resolution images and videos.Our framework is based on the key observation that the edit propagation intrinsically can also be achieved by utilizing recently proposed edge-preserving filters.Therefore,instead of adopting the traditional global optimization which may involve a time-consuming solution,our algorithm propagates edits with the aid of the edge-preserve filters.Such a propagation scheme has low computational complexity and supports multiple kinds of strokes for more flexible user interactions.Further,our method can be easily and efficiently implemented in GPU.The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and user-friendliness of our approach.

  7. Modelling of the spring phenological phases of the Silver birch Betula pendula and Bird cherry Padus racemosa in Baltic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvāns, Andis; Kalvāne, Gunta; Bitāne, Māra; Cepīte-Frišfelde, Daiga; Sīle, Tija; Seņņikovs, Juris

    2014-05-01

    The air temperature is the strongest driving factor of the plant development during spring time in moderate climate conditions. However other factors such as the air temperature during the dormancy period and light conditions can play a role as well. The full potential of the recent and historical phenological observation data can be utilised by modelling tools. We have calibrated seven phenological models described in scientific literature to calculate the likely dates leaf unfolding and start of flowering of the Silver birch Betula pendula and bird cherry Padus racemosa (Kalvāns at al, accepted). Phenological observations are derived from voluntary observation network for period 1960-2009 in Latvia. The number of used observations for each phase range from 149 to 172. Air temperature data measured in meteorological stations closest to the corresponding phenological observation sites are obtained from Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre. We used 33 random data subsamples for model calibration to produce a range of model coefficients enabling the estimation of the phenological model uncertainty. It is found that the best reproduction of the observational data are obtained using a simple linear degree day model considering daily minimum and maximum temperature and more complex sigmoidal model honouring the need for low temperatures for dormancy release (UniChill, Chuine, 2000). The median calibration base temperature in the degree day model for the silver birch leaf unfolding is 5.6°C and for start of the flowering 6.7°C; for the bird cherry the corresponding base temperatures are 3.2°C and 3.4°C. The calibrated models and air temperature archive data derived from the Danish Meteorological Institute is used to simulate the respective phase onset in the Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania in 2009. Significant regional differences between modelled phase onset times are observed. There is a wide regional variation of the model uncertainty as well

  8. Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Buyukcizmeci, N; Botvina, A S

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

  9. Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment distributions in liquid-gas type phase transition region

    CERN Document Server

    Buyukcizmeci, N; Botvina, A S

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment distributions during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

  10. Theoretical tools for atom-laser-beam propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Riou, Jean-Félix; Le Coq, Yann; Impens, François; Guerin, William; Bordé, Christian,; Aspect, Alain; Bouyer, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the propagation of non self-interacting atom laser beams. We start from a general propagation integral equation, and we use the same approximations as in photon optics to derive tools to calculate the atom laser beam propagation. We discuss the approximations that allow to reduce the general equation whether to a Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral calculated by using the stationary phase method, or to the eikonal. Within the paraxial approximation, we also introduce...

  11. Light propagation through random hyperbolic media: from a pile of sand to large scale structure of present day universe

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2012-01-01

    We analyze electromagnetic field propagation through a random medium which consists of hyperbolic metamaterial domains separated by regions of normal "elliptic" space. This situation may occur in a problem as common as 9 micrometer light propagation through a pile of sand, or as exotic as electromagnetic field behavior in the early universe immediately after the electro-weak phase transition. We demonstrate that spatial field distributions in random hyperbolic and random "elliptic" media look strikingly different. This effect may potentially be used to evaluate the magnitude of magnetic fields which existed in the early universe.

  12. Phase Equilibria Constraints on Relations of Ore-bearing Intrusionswith Flood Basalts in the Panxi Region, Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhaochong; HAO Yanli; AI Yu; LI Ying; ZHAO Li

    2009-01-01

    There are two types of temporally and spatially associated intrusions within the Emeishan large igneous province (LIP); namely, small uitramafic subvolcanic sills that host magmatic Cu-Ni-Platinum Group Element (PGE)-bearing sulfide deposits and large mafic layered intrusions that host giant Ti-V magnetite deposits in the Panxi region. However, except for their coeval ages, the genetic relations between the ore-bearing intrusions and extrusive rocks are poorly understood. Phase equilibria analysis (Q-PI-OI-Opx-Cpx system) has been carried out to elucidate whether ore-bearing Panzhihua, Xinjie and Limahe intrusions are co-magmatic with the picrites and flood basalts (including high-Ti, low-Ti and alkali basalts), respectively. In this system, the parental magma can be classified as silica-undersaturated olivine basalt and silica-saturated tholeiite. The equivalents of the parental magma of the Xinjie and Limahe peridotites and picrites and iow-Ti basalts are silica-undersaturated, whereas the Limahe gabbro-diorites and high-Ti basalts are silica-saturated. In contrast, the Panzhihua intrusion appears to be alkali character. Phase equilibria relations clearly show that the magmas that formed the Panzhihua intrusion and high-Ti basalts cannot be co-magmatic as there is no way to derive one liquid from another by fractional crystallization. On the other hand, the Panzhihua intrusion appears to be related to Permian alkali intrusions in the region, but does not appear to be related to the alkali basalts recognized in the Longzhoushan lava stratigraphy. Comparably, the Limabe intrusion appears to be a genetic relation to the picrites, whereas the Xinjie intrusion may be genetically related to be low-Ti basaits. Additionally, the gabbro-diorites and peridotites of the Limahe intrusion are not co-magmatic, and the former appears to be derived liquid from high-Ti basalts.

  13. FLEXURAL WAVE PROPAGATION IN NARROW MINDLIN'S PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chao; HAN Gang; FANG Xue-qian; HUANG Wen-hu

    2006-01-01

    Appling Mindlin's theory of thick plates and Hamilton system to propagation of elastic waves under free boundary condition, a solution of the problem was given.Dispersion equations of propagation mode of strip plates were deduced from eigenfunction expansion method. It was compared with the dispersion relation that was gained through solution of thick plate theory proposed by Mindlin. Based on the two kinds of theories,the dispersion curves show great difference in the region of short waves, and the cutoff frequencies are higher in Hamiltonian systems. However, the dispersion curves are almost the same in the region of long waves.

  14. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, S.S.N.; Umino, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ???30?? at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  15. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Shalaby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP regional climate model (RegCM4. Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999 with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1 an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2 a climatological analysis of a six-year simulation (2000–2005. For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  16. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  17. Measurements of anisotropic sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    The attenuation coefficient and phase velocity of plane sound waves propagating in three perpendicular directions in glass wool were measured in the frequency range 50–10 000 Hz. For glass wool of mass density 14 kg/m3 at the frequency 1000 Hz, the attenuation constant for propagation perpendicular...

  18. Effect of multiple-phase regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy on patients with resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Chen; YAO Lie; LONG Jiang; FU De-liang; YU Xian-jun; XU Jin; YANG Feng; NI Quan-xing

    2009-01-01

    Background Regional intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (RIAC) has been more valuable to improve prognosis and quality of life of patients with inoperable pancreatic adenocarcinomas, and adjuvant RIAC plays an important role in prolonging survival and reducing risk of liver metastasis after radical resection of pancreatic cancer, but the effect of preoperative or multiple-phase RIAC (preoperative combined with postoperative RIAC) for resectable pancreatic cancers has not been investigated. In this prospective study, the effect of multiple-phase RIAC for patients with resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma was evaluated, and its safety and validity comparing with postoperative RIAC were also assessed.Methods Patients with resectable pancreatic head cancer were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients in group A (n=50) were treated with new therapeutic mode of extended pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with multiple-phase RIAC, and those in group B (n=50) were treated with extended pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with postoperative RIAC in the same period. The feasibility, compliance and efficiency of the new therapeutic mode were evaluated by tumor size, serum tumor markers, clinical benefit response (CBR), surgical complications, mortality and toxicity of RIAC. The disease-free survival time, median survival time, incidence of liver metastasis, survival rate at 1, 2, 3 and 5 years were also observed. Life curves were generated by the Kaplan-Meier method.Results The pain relief rate and CBR in group A was 80% and 84% respectively. Serum tumor markers decreased obviously and tumors size decreased in 26% of patients after preoperative RIAC in group A. No more surgical complications, mortality or severe systemic side effects were observed in group A compared with group B. The incidence of liver metastasis in group A was 34% which was lower than 50% in group B. The disease-free survival time and median survival time in group A were 15.5 months and 18 months

  19. Propagation regimes and populations of internal waves in the Mediterranean Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkina, Oxana; Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Talipova, Tatiana; Soomere, Tarmo

    2017-02-01

    The geographical and seasonal distributions of kinematic and nonlinear parameters of long internal waves are derived from the Generalized Digital Environmental Model (GDEM) climatology for the Mediterranean Sea region, including the Black Sea. The considered parameters are phase speed of long internal waves and the coefficients at the dispersion, quadratic and cubic terms of the weakly-nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries-type models (in particular, the Gardner model). These parameters govern the possible polarities and shapes of solitary internal waves, their limiting amplitudes and propagation speeds. The key outcome is an express estimate of the expected parameters of internal waves for different regions of the Mediterranean basin.

  20. Flow propagation velocity is not a simple index of diastolic function in early filling. A comparative study of early diastolic strain rate and strain rate propagation, flow and flow propagation in normal and reduced diastolic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skjaerpe Terje

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strain Rate Imaging shows the filling phases of the left ventricle to consist of a wave of myocardial stretching, propagating from base to apex. The propagation velocity of the strain rate wave is reduced in delayed relaxation. This study examined the relation between the propagation velocity of strain rate in the myocardium and the propagation velocity of flow during early filling. Methods 12 normal subjects and 13 patients with treated hypertension and normal systolic function were studied. Patients and controls differed significantly in diastolic early mitral flow measurements, peak early diastolic tissue velocity and peak early diastolic strain rate, showing delayed relaxation in the patient group. There were no significant differences in EF or diastolic diameter. Results Strain rate propagation velocity was reduced in the patient group while flow propagation velocity was increased. There was a negative correlation (R = -0.57 between strain rate propagation and deceleration time of the mitral flow E-wave (R = -0.51 and between strain rate propagation and flow propagation velocity and there was a positive correlation (R = 0.67 between the ratio between peak mitral flow velocity / strain rate propagation velocity and flow propagation velocity. Conclusion The present study shows strain rate propagation to be a measure of filling time, but flow propagation to be a function of both flow velocity and strain rate propagation. Thus flow propagation is not a simple index of diastolic function in delayed relaxation.

  1. Anisotropy and sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    Sound propagation in glass wool is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical computation of attenuation and phase velocity for plane, harmonic waves will be presented. Glass wool is a highly anisotropic material, and sound waves propagating in different directions in the material...... by regarding it as a continuous medium described by its elastic moduli and mass density. The computed attenuation of sound waves, for frequencies 50–5000 Hz, will be compared with experimental results for glass wool with fiber diameters of 6.8 micrometers, mass density of 15 and 30 kg/m3, and elastic moduli...... of 2000 and 16 000 Pa (sound wave vector perpendicular to fibers)....

  2. Hierarchical Affinity Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Givoni, Inmar; Frey, Brendan J

    2012-01-01

    Affinity propagation is an exemplar-based clustering algorithm that finds a set of data-points that best exemplify the data, and associates each datapoint with one exemplar. We extend affinity propagation in a principled way to solve the hierarchical clustering problem, which arises in a variety of domains including biology, sensor networks and decision making in operational research. We derive an inference algorithm that operates by propagating information up and down the hierarchy, and is efficient despite the high-order potentials required for the graphical model formulation. We demonstrate that our method outperforms greedy techniques that cluster one layer at a time. We show that on an artificial dataset designed to mimic the HIV-strain mutation dynamics, our method outperforms related methods. For real HIV sequences, where the ground truth is not available, we show our method achieves better results, in terms of the underlying objective function, and show the results correspond meaningfully to geographi...

  3. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  4. Crack propagation in fracture mechanical graded structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schramm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The focus of manufacturing is more and more on innovative and application-oriented products considering lightweight construction. Hence, especially functional graded materials come to the fore. Due to the application-matched functional material gradation different local demands such as absorbability, abrasion and fatigue of structures are met. However, the material gradation can also have a remarkable influence on the crack propagation behavior. Therefore, this paper examines how the crack propagation behavior changes when a crack grows through regions which are characterized by different fracture mechanical material properties (e.g. different threshold values KI,th, different fracture toughness KIC. In particular, the emphasis of this paper is on the beginning of stable crack propagation, the crack velocity, the crack propagation direction as well as on the occurrence of unstable crack growth under static as well as cyclic loading. In this context, the developed TSSR-concept is presented which allows the prediction of crack propagation in fracture mechanical graded structures considering the loading situation (Mode I, Mode II and plane Mixed Mode and the material gradation. In addition, results of experimental investigations for a mode I loading situation and numerical simulations of crack growth in such graded structures confirm the theoretical findings and clarify the influence of the material gradation on the crack propagation behavior.

  5. Behavior of ultrasounds crossing perfluorocarbon liquids and random propagation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Random propagation times are able to model waves attenuation and velocity. It is true for electromagnetic waves (light, radar, guided propagation) and also for acoustics and ultrasounds (acoustics for high frequencies). About the latter, it can be shown that stable probability laws are well-fitted for frequencies up to dozens of megahertz in numerous cases. Nowadays, medical applications are performed using propagation through perfluorocarbon (PFC). Experiments were done to measure attenuations and phase changes. Using these results, this paper addresses the question to know if stable probability laws can be used to characterize the propagation of ultrasounds through PFC liquids.

  6. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  7. High resolution wavenumber analysis for investigation of arterial pulse wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Sato, Masakazu; Irie, Takasuke

    2016-07-01

    The propagation of the pulse wave along the artery is relatively fast (several m/s), and a high-temporal resolution is required to measure pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a regional segment of the artery. High-frame-rate ultrasound enables the measurement of the regional PWV. In analyses of wave propagation phenomena, the direction and propagation speed are generally identified in the frequency-wavenumber space using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. However, the wavelength of the pulse wave is very long (1 m at a propagation velocity of 10 m/s and a temporal frequency of 10 Hz) compared with a typical lateral field of view of 40 mm in ultrasound imaging. Therefore, PWV cannot be identified in the frequency-wavenumber space owing to the low resolution of the two-dimensional Fourier transform. In the present study, PWV was visualized in the wavenumber domain using phases of arterial wall acceleration waveforms measured by high-frame-rate ultrasound.

  8. 晶体相场法研究应力状态及晶体取向对微裂纹尖端扩展行为的影响∗%Study on the effect of stress state and crystal orientation on micro-crack tip propagation b ehavior in phase field crystal metho d

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    A nanometer scale mechanism for micro crack propagation under uniaxial tension in single crystals is investigated using phase field crystal (PFC) simulation. The uniaxial tensile loading is strain controlled. And three initial typical stresses of pre-existing center crack in (111) crystal plane of face centered cubic structure are chosen to study the effects of initial stress state on micro-crack propagation. Moreover, the influences of different crystal orientations, when the crystal suffers from uniaxial tension, are also investigated. Due to the influence of time scale and length scale in the PFC method, the motion of dislocations, vacancies, shear band and twinning structure should be observed and described during the propagation process of micro cracks. In addition, the free energy curves of different processes are drawn and discussed in order to explain the different behaviors of the crystal in the propagation of cracks. Simulation results show that the propagation behavior of micro cracks can be closely associated with the initial stress state. It is found that the propagation behavior mainly occurs in the ⟨0¯11⟩(111) slip system. Besides, the crystal orientation has a significant effect on the mechanism of activation and evolution. In the pre-stretching system, slip dislocation is induced near the micro-crack tip, and then its slide in [0¯11] direction will cause the cleavage of a certain crystal plane, and promote the micro cracks to extend. However, to a certain level, the propagating direction of the micro-crack tip will turn to another slip direction [10¯1]. As a result, zigzag edge appears. By contrast, in the pre-shear system, the tip of the micro crack propagates in a cleavage mode, and results in the appearance of slip dislocation [10¯1] near the micro-crack tip. Afterwards, the motion of slip dislocation promotes the production of vacancies. And owing to the aggregation and combination of vacancies, secondary cracks form and propagate in

  9. Coherence properties of light propagated through a scattering medium

    CERN Document Server

    Aruldoss, C K; Nugent, K A; Roberts, A

    2007-01-01

    Partially-coherent, quasi-monochromatic optical fields are fully described by their Mutual Optical Intensity (MOI) or the phase-space equivalent, the Generalised Radiance (GR). This paper reports on the application of a propagation-based phase-space tomographic technique for determining both the MOI and the GR of wavefields. This method is applied to the reconstruction of the MOI and the GR of an optical wavefield propagated through a suspension of \\~10micrometre diameter polystyrene spheres.

  10. Crack front propagation by kink formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, Frohmut; Trebin, Hans-Rainer [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In a brittle material a travelling crack generates an upper and a lower fracture surface, which meet at a one-dimensional crack front. From a macroscopic point of view there is no reason why this curve should deviate from a straight line, contrary to the atomistic point of view, where a crack propagates by successive rupture of cohesive bonds. We investigate fracture of the C15 NbCr{sub 2} Friauf-laves phase on an atomic level by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The numerical experiments highlight that crack fronts in general do not form a straight line and propagate by kink-pair formation at low loads (EPL 87 (2009) 66004). This mechanism should be relevant for crack propagation in any ordered brittle solid.

  11. DROMO propagator revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Peláez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Peláez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  12. Phase equilibrium modeling, fluid inclusions and origin of charnockites in the Datian region of the northeastern Cathaysia Block, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Zi-Long; Yu, Sheng-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Charnockites in the Datian region of the northeastern Cathaysia Block, South China have an assemblage of garnet, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, plagioclase, anti-perthite, K-feldspar, biotite, quartz and ilmenite. Phase equilibrium modeling indicates that the Datian charnockite was formed at T = 845-855 °C and P = 8.2-8.4 kbar with corresponding water activity lower than 0.50. Fluid inclusions in the Datian charnockite are dominated by N2 and CO2 with minor CH4. The fluids homogenized to liquid at -153.0 to -138.8 °C and 18.3-21.6 °C, respectively, showing a low-density nature. The low-density fluids could be attributed to selective leakage of water due to the affinity of water to melt and decompression-dominated retrograde process. Combined with previous studies, a two-stage formation model is proposed to interpret the petrogenesis of the Datian charnockite, viz emplaced at the Paleoproterozoic and underwent the granulite-facies metamorphism during the Phanerozoic tectonic event.

  13. Study of the top quark production in complementary phase space regions and impact on PDFs in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Krintiras, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    The first measurement of the top quark pair production cross section ($\\sigma_{\\rm{t}\\bar{\\rm{t}}}$) in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 5.02$ TeV is reviewed. The data have been collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC and analyzed considering events with at least one charged lepton. The extraction of $\\sigma_{\\rm{t}\\bar{\\rm{t}}}$ can be used to constrain the gluon distribution function (PDF) at large longitudinal parton momentum fraction and to establish experimentally the relation between the top-quark mass as implemented in Monte-Carlo generators and the Lagrangian mass parameter. The impact of the measurement on the determination of the gluon PDF is illustrated through a quantum chromodynamic analysis at next-to-next-to-leading order and the result is furthermore put in context with other top quark measurements in different phase space regions. The measurement has paved the way for the first observation of top quark production in nuclear collisions and the subsequent study of modifications induc...

  14. Prospective phase II trial of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation for numerous chemorefratory liver metastases from colerectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-03-15

    A prospective phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation (WLI) for numerous chemorefractory liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Enrolled patients had numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. Five sessions of hyperthermia and seven fractions of 3-gray WLI were planned. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was determined using the Korean version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire C-30 and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary version 4.0. Objective and pain response was evaluated. A total of 12 patients consented to the study and the 10 who received WLI and hyperthermia were analyzed. WLI was completed as planned in nine patients and hyperthermia in eight. Pain response was partial in four patients and stable in four. Partial objective response was achieved in three patients (30.0%) and stable disease was seen in four patients at the 1-month follow-up. One patient died 1 month after treatment because of respiratory failure related to pleural metastasis progression. Other grade III or higher toxicities were detected in three patients; however, all severe toxicities were related to disease progression rather than treatment. No significant difference in HRQoL was noted at the time of assessment for patients who were available for questionnaires. Combined WLI and hyperthermia were well tolerated without severe treatment-related toxicity with a promising response from numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer.

  15. Assessment of compliance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine 18 months after phasing out chloroquine in Mkuranga District, Coast region-Tanzania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen ED Nsimba; Phare G Mujinja

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To observe and assess the compliance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) one and a half years after phasing out chloroquine (CQ) in Mkuranga District, Coast region, Tanzania. Methods:A randomly controlled baseline community study was conducted in rural areas of Mkuranga district, Tanzania. Semi-structured questionnaire consisted of open-and closed-ended questions including home stocking, home use, last fever episodes and treatment of underfives with malaria using CQ or SP. Results:The prevalence of fever or reported fever rate during the last 48 hours by their mothers or guardians was high (70%). Of all 117 blood samples, only 8 children after drug analysis were found to have CQ and 13 had SP concentrations within their blood respectively. None of these blood drug levels were above therapeutic ranges. Conclusions:Community interventions are urgently needed in rural communities and should specifically target households nucleus on early malaria fever recognition and provision of recommended antimalarials for the sick underfive children. However, sadly, there was an increase in underweight and undernourishment in the study areas, probably because of malaria in the area and poverty which are associated with poor nutrition in these youngsters.

  16. Characteristic of laser diode beam propagation through a collimating lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2010-01-20

    A mathematical model of a laser diode beam propagating through a collimating lens is presented. Wave propagation beyond the paraxial approximation is studied. The phase delay of the laser diode wave in passing through the lens is analyzed in detail. The propagation optical field after the lens is obtained from the diffraction integral by the stationary phase method. The model is employed to predict the light intensity at various beam cross sections, and the computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements.

  17. Propagation of vibration caused by electrical excitation in the normal human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively detect regional dynamic myocardial damage related to action potentials and mechanical properties affected by heart disease is of great clinical importance. Though there are invaluable clinical tools for diagnosis of a broad range of cardiac conditions, such myocardial properties cannot be evaluated. We have previously shown that pulsive vibration occurs on the myocardium after electrical stimulation of an isolated heart. In this study, using a novel technique for ultrasonic measurement of the myocardial motion, we detected pulsive vibrations spontaneously caused by electrical excitation and by valve closure. Using a sparse sector scan, the vibrations were measured almost simultaneously at about 10,000 points set in the heart wall at a high temporal resolution. The consecutive spatial distributions of the phase of the vibrations revealed wave propagation along the wall in healthy subjects for the first time in vivo. At around the time of the Q-wave of the electrocardiogram, the propagation started from the interventricular septum and extended to both the base and apical sides of the heart with a speed of 1 m/s, which corresponds to the propagation of electrical excitation from the Purkinje fiber-myocyte junction in the interventricular septum. Other vibrations then propagated from the base at several m/s, although some of them had dispersion properties. These are shear waves caused by the mitral-valve closure, corresponding to the first heart sound. These phenomena have potential for detection of regional myocardial tissue damage related to propagation of the action potentials and regional myocardial viscoelasticity.

  18. Study of the conformal region of the SU(3) gauge theory with domain-wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Noaki, J; Ishikawa, K-I; Iwasaki, Y; Yoshie, T

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the phase structure of the SU(3) gauge theory with $N_f=8$ by numerical simulations employing the massless Domain-Wall fermions.Our aim is to study directly the massless quark region, since it is the most important region to clarify the properties of conformal theories. When the number of flavor is within the conformal window, it is claimed recently with Wilson quarks that there is the conformal region at the small quark mass region in the parameter space in addition to the confining phase and the deconfining phase. We study the properties of the conformal region investing the spatial Polyakov loops and the temporal meson propagators. Our data imply that there is the conformal region, and a phase transition between the confining phase and the conformal region takes place. These results are consistent with the claim that the conformal window is between $7$ and $16$. Progress reports on other related studies are also presented.

  19. 2013 Asia-Pacific Education Research Institutes Network (ERI-Net) Regional Study on Transversal Competencies in Education Policy & Practice (Phase I). Regional Synthesis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoko, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    This report provides an understanding of how transversal competencies are viewed, implemented, and adapted in education policy and curriculum across the Asia-Pacific region. The publication consolidates the results of ten country studies carried out in 2013-2014 in ten countries and economies of the Asia-Pacific region, including: Australia; China…

  20. An advanced scheme for wet scavenging and liquid-phase chemistry in a regional online-coupled chemistry transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Knote

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Clouds are reaction chambers for atmospheric trace gases and aerosols, and the associated precipitation is a major sink for atmospheric constituents. The regional chemistry-climate model COSMO-ART has been lacking a description of wet scavenging of gases and aqueous-phase chemistry. In this work we present a coupling of COSMO-ART with a wet scavenging and aqueous-phase chemistry scheme. The coupling is made consistent with the cloud microphysics scheme of the underlying meteorological model COSMO. While the choice of the aqueous-chemistry mechanism is flexible, the effects of a simple sulfur oxidation scheme are shown in the application of the coupled system in this work. We give details explaining the coupling and extensions made, then present results from idealized flow-over-hill experiments in a 2-D model setup and finally results from a full 3-D simulation. Comparison against measurement data shows that the scheme efficiently reduces SO2 trace gas concentrations by 0.3 ppbv (−30% on average, while leaving O3 and NOx unchanged. PM10 aerosol mass, which has been overestimated previously, is now in much better agreement with measured values due to a stronger scavenging of coarse particles. While total PM2.5 changes only little, chemical composition is improved notably. Overestimations of nitrate aerosols are reduced by typically 0.5–1 μg m−3 (up to −2 μg m−3 in the Po Valley while sulfate mass is increased by 1–1.5 μg m−3 on average (up to 2.5 μg m−3 in Eastern Europe. The effect of cloud processing of aerosols on its size distribution, i. e. a shift towards larger diameters, is observed. Compared against wet deposition measurements the system underestimates the total wet deposited mass for the simulated case study. We find that while evaporation of cloud droplets dominates in higher altitudes, evaporation of precipitation can

  1. An advanced scheme for wet scavenging and liquid-phase chemistry in a regional online-coupled chemistry transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knote, C.; Brunner, D.

    2012-10-01

    Clouds are reaction chambers for atmospheric trace gases and aerosols, and the associated precipitation is a major sink for atmospheric constituents. The regional chemistry-climate model COSMO-ART has been lacking a description of wet scavenging of gases and aqueous-phase chemistry. In this work we present a coupling of COSMO-ART with a wet scavenging and aqueous-phase chemistry scheme. The coupling is made consistent with the cloud microphysics scheme of the underlying meteorological model COSMO. While the choice of the aqueous-chemistry mechanism is flexible, the effects of a simple sulfur oxidation scheme are shown in the application of the coupled system in this work. We give details explaining the coupling and extensions made, then present results from idealized flow-over-hill experiments in a 2-D model setup and finally results from a full 3-D simulation. Comparison against measurement data shows that the scheme efficiently reduces SO2 trace gas concentrations by 0.3 ppbv (-30%) on average, while leaving O3 and NOx unchanged. PM10 aerosol mass, which has been overestimated previously, is now in much better agreement with measured values due to a stronger scavenging of coarse particles. While total PM2.5 changes only little, chemical composition is improved notably. Overestimations of nitrate aerosols are reduced by typically 0.5-1 μg m-3 (up to -2 μg m-3 in the Po Valley) while sulfate mass is increased by 1-1.5 μg m-3 on average (up to 2.5 μg m-3 in Eastern Europe). The effect of cloud processing of aerosols on its size distribution, i. e. a shift towards larger diameters, is observed. Compared against wet deposition measurements the system underestimates the total wet deposited mass for the simulated case study. We find that while evaporation of cloud droplets dominates in higher altitudes, evaporation of precipitation can contribute up to 50% of total evaporated mass near the surface.

  2. Maximal refraction and superluminal propagation in a gaseous nanolayer

    CERN Document Server

    Keaveney, J; Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D; Adams, C S

    2012-01-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the refractive index of high density Rb vapor in a gaseous atomic nanolayer. We use heterodyne interferometry to measure the relative phase shift between two copropagating laser beams as a function of the laser detuning and infer a peak index n = 1.26 \\pm 0.02, close to the theoretical maximum of 1.31. The large index has a concomitant large index gradient creating a region with steep anomalous dispersion where a sub-nanosecond optical pulse is advanced by >100 ps over a propagation distance of 390 nm, corresponding to a group index of -1x10^5, the largest negative group index measured to date.

  3. Can Electron Propagator Methods Be Used To Improve Polarization Propagator Methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2008-01-01

    Calculations of Rydberg excitation energies with the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) often produce results which are more in error than the random phase approximation (RPA), which formally is the first-order model. This is obviously because of cancellation of errors at ...

  4. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison phase results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Christophe; Rühaak, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    Climate change impacts in permafrost regions have received considerable attention recently due to the pronounced warming trends experienced in recent decades and which have been projected into the future. Large portions of these permafrost regions are characterized by surface water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost often generating taliks (unfrozen zones) within the permafrost that allow for hydrologic interactions between the surface water bodies and underlying aquifers and thus influence the hydrologic response of a landscape to climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model past and future evolution such units (Kurylyk et al. 2014). However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, which can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. A benchmark exercise was initialized at the end of 2014. Participants convened from USA, Canada, Europe, representing 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones (Kurylyk et al. 2014; Grenier et al. in prep.; Rühaak et al. 2015). They range from simpler, purely thermal 1D cases to more complex, coupled 2D TH cases (benchmarks TH1, TH2, and TH3). Some experimental cases conducted in a cold room complement the validation approach. A web site hosted by LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement) is an interaction platform for the participants and hosts the test case databases at the following address: https://wiki.lsce.ipsl.fr/interfrost. The results of the first stage of the benchmark exercise will be presented. We will mainly focus on the inter-comparison of participant results for the coupled cases TH2 & TH3. Both cases

  5. An unusual giant spiral arc in the polar cap region during the northward phase of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rosenqvist

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The shock arrival of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME at ~09:50 UT on 22 November 1997 resulted in the development of an intense (Dst<−100 nT geomagnetic storm at Earth. In the early, quiet phase of the storm, in the sheath region of the ICME, an unusual large spiral structure (diameter of ~1000 km was observed at very high latitudes by the Polar UVI instrument. The evolution of this structure started as a polewardly displaced auroral bulge which further developed into the spiral structure spreading across a large part of the polar cap. This study attempts to examine the cause of the chain of events that resulted in the giant auroral spiral. During this period the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF was dominantly northward (Bz>25 nT with a strong duskward component (By>15 nT resulting in a highly twisted tail plasma sheet. Geotail was located at the equatorial dawnside magnetotail flank and observed accelerated plasma flows exceeding the solar wind bulk velocity by almost 60%. These flows are observed on the magnetosheath side of the magnetopause and the acceleration mechanism is proposed to be typical for strongly northward IMF. Identified candidates to the cause of the spiral structure include a By induced twisted magnetotail configuration, the development of magnetopause surface waves due to the enhanced pressure related to the accelerated magnetosheath flows aswell as the formation of additional magnetopause deformations due to external solar wind pressure changes. The uniqeness of the event indicate that most probably a combination of the above effects resulted in a very extreme tail topology. However, the data coverage is insufficient to fully investigate the physical mechanism behind the observations.

  6. Vegetative propagation of jojoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, C.B.; Hackett, W.P.

    1981-03-01

    Development of jojoba as an economically viable crop requires improved methods of propagation and culture. Rooting experiments were performed on cutting material collected from wild jojoba plants. A striking seasonal fluctuation in rooting potential was found. Jojoba plants can be successfully propagated from stem cuttings made during spring, summer, and, to some extent, fall. Variability among jojoba plants may also play a role in rooting potential, although it is not as important as season. In general, the use of auxin (4,000 ppm indolebutyric acid) on jojoba cuttings during periods of high rooting potential promotes adventitious root formation, but during periods of low rooting potential it has no effect or is even slightly inhibitory. In the greenhouse, cutting-grown plants apparently reproductively matured sooner than those grown from seed. If this observation holds true for plants transplanted into the field, earlier fruit production by cutting--grown plants would mean earlier return of initial planting and maintenance costs.

  7. Stochastic wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Sobczyk, K

    1985-01-01

    This is a concise, unified exposition of the existing methods of analysis of linear stochastic waves with particular reference to the most recent results. Both scalar and vector waves are considered. Principal attention is concentrated on wave propagation in stochastic media and wave scattering at stochastic surfaces. However, discussion extends also to various mathematical aspects of stochastic wave equations and problems of modelling stochastic media.

  8. Bidirectional beam propagation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarski, P.; Lagasse, P. E.

    1988-05-01

    A bidirectional extension of the beam propagation method (BPM) to optical waveguides with a longitudinal discontinuity is presented. The algorithm is verified by computing a reflection of the TE(0) mode from a semiconductor laser facet. The bidirectional BPM is applicable to other configurations such as totally reflecting waveguide mirrors, an abruption transition in a waveguide, or a waveguide with many discontinuities generating multiple reflections. The method can also be adapted to TM polarization.

  9. Gauge engineering and propagators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Axel

    2017-01-01

    The dependence of the propagators on the choice of these complete gauge-fixings will then be investigated using lattice gauge theory for Yang-Mills theory. It is found that the implications for the infrared, and to some extent mid-momentum behavior, can be substantial. In going beyond the Yang-Mills case it turns out that the influence of matter can generally not be neglected. This will be briefly discussed for various types of matter.

  10. Scaling properties of the chiral phase transition in the low density region of two-flavor QCD with improved Wilson fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Umeda, T; Kanaya, K; Maezawa, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Ohno, H; Saito, H; Yoshida, S

    2013-01-01

    We study scaling behavior of a chiral order parameter in the low density region, performing a simulation of two-flavor QCD with improved Wilson quarks. The scaling behavior of the chiral order parameter defined by a Ward-Takahashi identity agrees with the scaling function of the three-dimensional O(4) spin model at zero chemical potential. We extend the scaling study to finite density QCD. Applying the reweighting method and calculating derivatives of the chiral order parameter with respect to the chemical potential, the scaling properties of the chiral phase transition are discussed in the low density region. We moreover calculate the curvature of the phase boundary of the chiral phase transition in the temperature and chemical potential plane assuming the O(4) scaling relation.

  11. Propagation in polymer parameterised field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadarajan, Madhavan

    2017-01-01

    The Hamiltonian constraint operator in loop quantum gravity acts ultralocally. Smolin has argued that this ultralocality seems incompatible with the existence of a quantum dynamics which propagates perturbations between macroscopically seperated regions of quantum geometry. We present evidence to the contrary within an LQG type ‘polymer’ quantization of two dimensional parameterised field theory (PFT). PFT is a generally covariant reformulation of free field propagation on flat spacetime. We show explicitly that while, as in LQG, the Hamiltonian constraint operator in PFT acts ultralocally, states in the joint kernel of the Hamiltonian and diffeomorphism constraints of PFT necessarily describe propagation effects. The particular structure of the finite triangulation Hamiltonian constraint operator plays a crucial role, as does the necessity of imposing (the continuum limit of) its kinematic adjoint as a constraint. Propagation is seen as a property encoded by physical states in the kernel of the constraints rather than that of repeated actions of the finite triangulation Hamiltonian constraint on kinematic states. The analysis yields robust structural lessons for putative constructions of the Hamiltonian constraint in LQG for which ultralocal action co-exists with a description of propagation effects by physical states.

  12. Multi-scale cross-correlation characteristics of void fraction wave propagation for gas-liquid two-phase flows in small diameter pip e%小管径气液两相流空隙率波传播的多尺度相关性∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟路生; 金宁德

    2016-01-01

    The void fraction wave is a special physical phenomenon in a gas-liquid two-phase flow system. Understanding the propagation of the void fraction wave is of great significance for uncovering the physical mechanisms in both flow pattern transition and the fluid velocity measurement. In this study, detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) is used to investigate the multi-scale cross-correlation characteristics of the coupled ARFIMA processes. It is found that the DCCA can effectively reveal the multi-scale cross-correlation dynamical behaviors of complex system. Then, we carry out the experimental test in a vertical gas-liquid two-phase flow pipe with small inner diameter. The DCCA is used to detect the cross-correlation characteristics of the void fraction wave on multiple time scales, and the growth rate of the cross-correlation level for the void fraction wave is observed on low time scales. Additionally, the spatial attenuation factor (SAF) of the void fraction wave is calculated to investigate the instability of the wave propagation. The SAF is close to zero under the transitional flow patterns, which means that the void fraction wave is in a stable propagating state. For bubble flows, the void fraction wave presents the attenuation characteristics, whilst the void fraction wave shows the amplification characteristics under the slug and churn flow patterns. Interestingly, the instability behaviors of the void fraction wave are always associated with its multi-scale cross-correlation characteristics. Specifically, the increasing rate of the wave cross-correlation level on low scales is much higher for transitional flow patterns, which is corresponding to the stable propagating characteristic of the void fraction wave. However, when the void fraction wave exhibits attenuation or amplification characteristics under other flow patterns, the increasing rate of the wave cross-correlation level on low scales is much lower.

  13. Differences in gravity wave drag between realistic oblique and assumed vertical propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Silvio; Preusse, Peter; Ern, Manfred; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Riese, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Gravity wave (GW) parametrizations for general circulation models (GCMs) restrict the propagation of GWs to the vertical direction. The influence of this vertical-only propagation assumption on the distribution of GW drag (GWD) has not yet been investigated. Thus, we present results of two global GW ray tracing simulations, one with full three-dimensional propagation (GWO) and a second one with vertical-only propagation (GWV) of GWs for January and July 2008. The Gravity wave Regional Or Global RAy Tracer (GROGRAT) was used to perform these simulations with a global homogeneous and isotropic launch distribution. Both simulations, GWO and GWV, are analyzed with respect to GWD in the zonal and meridional direction. The location of zonal GWD maxima changes. GWO shows in comparison to GWV a poleward shift of zonal GWD in both seasons with increased GWD at the summer stratopause. The meridional GWD is much stronger in the GWO case, spatially correlated with the zonal drag, and is generally poleward directed. These features in zonal and meridional drag are consistent with a general prevalence of poleward propagation of GWs. Additional simulations suggest that this is due to the Coriolis effect as well as wind filtering around the tropopause, allowing more GWs to propagate into the middle atmosphere. We infer how GWs of different horizontal wavelengths and phase speeds cause the main differences in GWD in the middle atmosphere. A simple test for GCMs is proposed to assess the effects of the altered meridional drag on the general circulation and the interaction with planetary waves.

  14. Chaotic ray propagation in corrugated layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bottiglieri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the effects of a corrugated wall on the behaviour of propagating rays. Different types of corrugation are considered, using different distributions of the corrugation heights: white Gaussian, power law, self-affine perturbation. In phase space, a prevalent chaotic behaviour of rays, and the presence of a lot of caustics, are observed. These results entail that the KAM theorem is not fulfilled.

  15. Shock propagation in polydisperse bubbly flows

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Keita; Colonius, Tim; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of distributed bubble size on shock propagation in homogeneous bubbly liquids is computed using a continuum two-phase model. An ensemble-averaging technique is employed to derive the statistically averaged equations and a finite-volume method is used to solve the model equations. The bubble dynamics are incorporated using a Rayleigh-Plesset-type equation which includes the effects of heat transfer, liquid viscosity and compressibility. For the case of monodispe...

  16. Contradictions between 3-phase region eutectical and peritectical fragments borders determination methods in monographs by A. Prince and D. Petrov

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Phase diagrams are very effective instrument for elaboration of new materials. Computer technologies give a possibility with their help to design microstructure of multicomponent heterogeneous materials[1].

  17. Testing Wave Propagation Properties in the Solar Chromosphere with ALMA and IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Bernard; Straus, Thomas; Wedemeyer, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Waves and oscillations are interesting not only from the point of view that they can propagate energy into the chromosphere and dissipate that energy to produce non-radiative heating, they also carry information about the structure of the atmosphere in which they propagate. Since the late 80s there is substantial evidence that the chromospheric wave field is dominated by a non-propagating component, presumably resulting from wave reflection at the transition region. Observations of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca II infrared tripet lines, Ca II K, and He 10830 all show vanishing phase lags (i.e. vanishing travel time differences) between the various lines, in particular also for frequencies above the cut-off frequency. Why is the apparent phase speed of high frequency acoustic waves in the chromosphere so high? Are these results misleading because of complex radiation transfer effects in these optically thick lines? ALMA, which acts as a linear thermometer of the solar chromosphere, will provide measurements of the local plasma conditions that should be, at least in principle, much easier to interpret. Multi-wavelength time series of ALMA observations of the temperature fluctuations of inter-network oscillations should allow travel time measurements between different heights as these disturbances propagate through the chromosphere and thus should finally settle the long-standing question about the propagation characteristics of high frequency acoustic waves in the chromosphere. We plan to combine ALMA mm-observations with high resolution IRIS observations in the Mg II h and k lines, and until ALMA observations are available, will study the expected signals using time series of mm-maps from 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations that are being prepared within the framework of the Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network (SSALMON).

  18. Electron Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal hole for obliquely propagating solitary kinetic Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, M.-H.; Dokgo, K.; Yoon, Peter H.; Lee, D.-Y.; Choi, Cheong R.

    2017-04-01

    A possible formation of an electron hole structure associated with an obliquely propagating solitary kinetic Alfvén wave (SKAW) in a strongly magnetized plasma is discussed. It is found that transverse electric field along the magnetic field plays a key role in the electron phase space hole formation. Owing to the presence of trapped electrons, SKAW can propagate in both super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes with different spatial structures. In particular, in the sub-Alfvénic case, the density perturbation possesses a dip at the center accompanied by a pair of humps at the edges. Such a feature may be relevant to satellite observation of solitary structures in the Earth's geomagnetic tail region.

  19. Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project, Phase 2: coal, hydroelectric, and energy alternatives. Volume III. Alaska's alternative energies and regional assessment inventory update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project is presented in three volumes. This volume, Vol. III, considers alternative energies and the regional assessment inventory update. The introductory chapter, Chapter 12, examines the historical background, current technological status, environmental impact, applicability to Alaska, and siting considerations for a number of alternative systems. All of the systems considered use or could use renewable energy resources. The chapters that follow are entitled: Very Small Hydropower (about 12 kW or less for rural and remote villages); Low-Temperature Geothermal Space Heating; Wind; Fuel Cells; Siting Criteria and Preliminary Screening of Communities for Alternate Energy Use; Wood Residues; Waste Heat; and Regional Assessment Invntory Update. (MCW)

  20. Variability of the mixed phase in the Arctic with a focus on the Svalbard region: a study based on spaceborne active remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mioche

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic region is known to be very sensitive to climate change. Clouds and in particular mixed phase clouds (MPC remain one of the greatest sources of uncertainties in the modeling of the Arctic response to climate change due to an inaccurate representation of their variability and their quantification. In this study, we present a characterization of the vertical, spatial and seasonal variability of Arctic clouds and MPC over the whole Arctic region based on satellite active remote sensing observations. MPC properties in the region of Svalbard archipelago (78° N, 15° E are also investigated. The occurrence frequency of clouds and MPC are determined from CALIPSO/CLOUDSAT measurements processed with the DARDAR retrieval algorithm which allows for a reliable cloud thermodynamic phase classification (warm liquid, supercooled liquid, ice, mixing of ice and supercooled liquid. Significant differences are observed between MPC variability over the whole Arctic region and over the Svalbard region. Results show that MPC are ubiquitous all along the year, with a minimum occurrence of 30% in winter and 50% during the rest of the year, in average over the whole Arctic. Over the Svalbard region, MPC occurrence is more constant with time with larger values (55% compared to the average observed in the Arctic. MPC are especially located at low altitudes, below 3000 m, where their frequency of occurrence reaches 90%, in particular during winter, spring and autumn. Moreover, results highlight that MPC statistically prevail over sea. The temporal and spatial distribution of MPC over the Svalbard region seems to be linked to the contribution of moister air and warmer water from the North Atlantic Ocean which contribute to the initiation of the liquid water phase. Over the whole Arctic, and particularly in western regions, the increase of MPC occurrence from spring to autumn could be connected to the sea ice melting. During this period, the open water transports

  1. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  2. Stochastic model in microwave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [“Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Mugnai, D., E-mail: d.mugnai@ifac.cnr.it [“Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-11-28

    Further experimental results of delay time in microwave propagation are reported in the presence of a lossy medium (wood). The measurements show that the presence of a lossy medium makes the propagation slightly superluminal. The results are interpreted on the basis of a stochastic (or path integral) model, showing how this model is able to describe each kind of physical system in which multi-path trajectories are present. -- Highlights: ► We present new experimental results on electromagnetic “anomalous” propagation. ► We apply a path integral theoretical model to wave propagation. ► Stochastic processes and multi-path trajectories in propagation are considered.

  3. Love Wave Propagation in Poro elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Rama Rao

    1978-10-01

    Full Text Available It is observed that on similar reasons as in classical theory of elasticity, SH wave propagation in a semi infinite poroelastic body is not possible and is possible when there is a layer of another poro elastic medium over it i.e., Love waves. Two particular cases are considered in one of which phase velocity can be determined for a given wave length. In the same case, equation for phase velocity is of the same form as that of the classical theory of Elasticity.

  4. Ifosfamide plus etoposide combined with regional hyperthermia in patients with locally advanced sarcomas: a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issels, R D; Prenninger, S W; Nagele, A; Boehm, E; Sauer, H; Jauch, K W; Denecke, H; Berger, H; Peter, K; Wilmanns, W

    1990-11-01

    From July 1986 to July 1989, 40 patients (92% pretreated) with deep-seated, advanced soft tissue sarcomas (STS, 25 patients), Ewing's sarcomas (ES, eight patients), osteosarcomas (OS, three patients) and chondrosarcomas (ChS, four patients) were treated at the University of Munich in a protocol involving regional hyperthermia (RHT) combined with ifosfamide plus etoposide. A total of 265 RHT treatments (mean, 6.6 RHT per patient) were applied including 33 pelvic, four extremity, and three abdominal sites. The mean tumor volume was 537 cc (range, 50 to 2,980 cc). For systemic chemotherapy, all patients received ifosfamide (1.5 g/m2, days 1 to 5), etoposide (100 mg/m2, days 1, 3, and 5), and mesna (300 mg/m2 x 4, days 1 to 5) with RHT given only on days 1 and 5 in repeated cycles every 4 weeks. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of pain (57%) combined with local discomfort within the annular phased array applicator (AA) of the BSD hyperthermia system (BSD Medical Corp, Salt Lake City, UT). The average maximum systemic temperature was 37.4 +/- 0.5 degrees C, and there was no indication of enhanced bone marrow toxicity due to the addition of RHT to the systemic chemotherapy. Detailed thermal mapping by invasive thermometry was performed in all patients. In 38 assessable patients, the overall objective response rate was 37%: six complete responses (CRs), four partial responses (PRs), and four favorable histologic responses (FHRs) (95% confidence limits, 22% to 54%). Complete responders are alive and disease-free at 40, 35, 23, 19, 19, and 8 months. Of patients with PR and FHR, two died from metastatic disease after 4 and 17 months and one died from other disease after 27 months. The remaining five patients are stable at 37, 25, 21, 13, and 8 months. Eleven patients showed no change (NC), and 13 patients showed local tumor progression (PD). The mean observation time for all patients was 11.6 months. The time-averaged temperatures (Ts) of all RHT treatments calculated as

  5. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-18

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  6. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  7. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: I. Transitions in the one-phase liquid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    The phase field theory (PFT) has been applied to predict equilibrium interfacial properties and nucleation barrier in the binary eutectic system Ag-Cu using double well and interpolation functions deduced from a Ginzburg-Landau expansion that considers fcc (face centered cubic) crystal symmetries. The temperature and composition dependent free energies of the liquid and solid phases are taken from CALculation of PHAse Diagrams-type calculations. The model parameters of PFT are fixed so as to recover an interface thickness of approximately 1 nm from molecular dynamics simulations and the interfacial free energies from the experimental dihedral angles available for the pure components. A nontrivial temperature and composition dependence for the equilibrium interfacial free energy is observed. Mapping the possible nucleation pathways, we find that the Ag and Cu rich critical fluctuations compete against each other in the neighborhood of the eutectic composition. The Tolman length is positive and shows a maximum as a function of undercooling. The PFT predictions for the critical undercooling are found to be consistent with experimental results. These results support the view that heterogeneous nucleation took place in the undercooling experiments available at present. We also present calculations using the classical droplet model [classical nucleation theory (CNT)] and a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT). While the predictions of the CNT with a purely entropic interfacial free energy underestimate the critical undercooling, the DIT results appear to be in a reasonable agreement with the PFT predictions.

  8. Validity of Parametrized Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJi-Zhen; ZHOULi-Juan; MAWei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensively study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the “rainbow”approximation, a parametrized fully dressed quark propagator is proposed in this paper. The parametrized propagator describes a confining quark propagator in hadron since it is analytic everywhere in complex p2-plane and has no Lemmann representation. The validity of the new propagator is discussed by comparing its predictions on selfenergy functions A/(p2), Bl(p2) and effective mass M$(p2) of quark with flavor f to their corresponding theoretical results produced by Dyson-Schwinger equations. Our comparison shows that the parametrized quark propagator is a good approximation to the fully dressed quark propagator given by the solutions of Dyson-Schwinger equations in the rainbow approximation and is convenient to use in any theoretical calculations.

  9. Validity of Parametrized Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ji-Zhen; ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensively study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the "rainbow" approximation, a parametrized fully dressed quark propagator is proposed in this paper. The parametrized propagator describes a confining quark propagator in hadron since it is analytic everywhere in complex p2-plane and has no Lemmann representation. The validity of the new propagator is discussed by comparing its predictions on selfenergy functions Af(p2), Bf(p2) and effective mass Mf(p2) of quark with flavor f to their corresponding theoretical results produced by Dyson-Schwinger equations. Our comparison shows that the parametrized quark propagator is a good approximation to the fully dressed quark propagator given by the solutions of Dyson-Schwinger equations in the rainbow approximation and is convenient to use in any theoretical calculations.

  10. A propagating heat wave model of skin electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe; Gusbeth, Ch; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2008-03-21

    The main barrier to transdermal drug delivery in human skin is the stratum corneum. Pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of sufficient amplitude can create new aqueous pathways across this barrier and enhance drug delivery through the skin. Here, we describe a model of pore formation between adjacent corneocytes that predicts the following sequence of events: (1) the PEF rapidly charges the stratum corneum near the electrode until the transepidermal potential difference is large enough to drive water into a small region of the stratum corneum, creating new aqueous pathways. (2) PEFs then drive a high current density through this newly created electropore to generate Joule heating that warms the pore perimeter. (3) This temperature rise at the perimeter increases the probability of further electroporation there as the local sphingolipids reach their phase transition temperature. (4) This heat-generated wave of further electroporation propagates outward until the surface area of the pore becomes so large that the reduced current density no longer generates sufficient heat to reach the phase transition temperature of the sphingolipids. (5) Cooling and partial recovery occurs after the field pulse. This process yields large, high permeability regions in the stratum corneum at which molecules can more readily cross this skin barrier. We present a model for this process that predicts that the initial radius of the first aqueous pathway is approximately 5nm for a transdermal voltage of 60V at room temperature.

  11. PIV uncertainty propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacchitano, Andrea; Wieneke, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the propagation of the instantaneous uncertainty of PIV measurements to statistical and instantaneous quantities of interest derived from the velocity field. The expression of the uncertainty of vorticity, velocity divergence, mean value and Reynolds stresses is derived. It is shown that the uncertainty of vorticity and velocity divergence requires the knowledge of the spatial correlation between the error of the x and y particle image displacement, which depends upon the measurement spatial resolution. The uncertainty of statistical quantities is often dominated by the random uncertainty due to the finite sample size and decreases with the square root of the effective number of independent samples. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to assess the accuracy of the uncertainty propagation formulae. Furthermore, three experimental assessments are carried out. In the first experiment, a turntable is used to simulate a rigid rotation flow field. The estimated uncertainty of the vorticity is compared with the actual vorticity error root-mean-square, with differences between the two quantities within 5-10% for different interrogation window sizes and overlap factors. A turbulent jet flow is investigated in the second experimental assessment. The reference velocity, which is used to compute the reference value of the instantaneous flow properties of interest, is obtained with an auxiliary PIV system, which features a higher dynamic range than the measurement system. Finally, the uncertainty quantification of statistical quantities is assessed via PIV measurements in a cavity flow. The comparison between estimated uncertainty and actual error demonstrates the accuracy of the proposed uncertainty propagation methodology.

  12. Ionospheric Radio Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-06-25

    applies Chapter 2 presents in simple form the mathe - principles which have been found to work in prac- matical theory underlying the propagation of...6.17, which was described under sec- L713 412 812.111 410.511171IS1&41&716.3 A& tion 6.5 above, and read the value of the muf for muFi .-f------ - 01...twepse, 71. mathe 1measuring virtual 6elghts, is world contour charts. 57; zero distance, 73. Se .1.. Contour chairt MCNiII, A. 0., 106 G Median value

  13. Sequential Back—Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晖; 刘大有; 等

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of sequential processing and present a sequential model based on the back-propagation algorithm.This model is intended to deal with intrinsically sequential problems,such as word recognition,speech recognition,natural language understanding.This model can be used to train a network to learn the sequence of input patterns,in a fixed order or a random order.Besides,this model is open- and partial-associative,characterized as “resognizing while accumulating”, which, as we argue, is mental cognition process oriented.

  14. Graphene-based electrically reconfigurable deep-subwavelength metamaterials for active control of THz light propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezoomandan, Sara; Yang, Kai; Sensale-Rodriguez, Berardi

    2014-08-01

    This work studies the terahertz light propagation through graphene-based reconfigurable metasurfaces where the unit cell dimensions are much smaller than the terahertz wavelength. The proposed devices, which poses deep-subwavelength unit cell and active region dimensions can operate as amplitude and/or phase modulators in certain specific frequency bands determined by the device geometry. Reconfigurability is attained via electrostatically tuning the optical conductivity of patterned graphene layers, which are strategically located in each unit cell. The ultra-small unit cell dimensions can be advantageous for beam shaping applications.

  15. Anomalous propagation of Omega VLF waves near the geomagnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Nozaki, K.; Kurihara, N.; Kuratani, Y.; Ohse, M.

    1983-09-01

    Omega HAIKU, REUNION, and LIBERIA signals were received and anomalous propagation characteristics were obtained near the geomagnetic equator. Short-period fluctuations were found in the phase of the HAIKU 10.2 kHz signal in November 1979 and in the phase and amplitude of the HAIKU 13.6 kHz signal in November 1981. These cyclic fluctuations are in close correlation with the phase cycle slippings, which occur most frequently when the receiver is located at 6 S geomagnetic latitude. On the basis of anisotropic waveguide mode theory indicating much less attenuation in WE propagation than in EW propagation at the geomagnetic equator, it is concluded that the short-period fluctuations in the phase and amplitude are due to interference between the short-path and the long-path signals.

  16. Chemical Potential Dependence of Dressed-Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONGHong-Shi; HOUFeng-Yao; SUNWei-Min; WUXiao-Hua

    2004-01-01

    A method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagator from an effective quark-quark interaction model is developed.Of particular interest here is to give a general recipe to find without arbitrariness the solution representing the “Wigner”phase at non-zero chemical potential for the purpose of studying QCD phase structure.

  17. Chemical Potential Dependence of Dressed-Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; HOU Feng-Yao; SUN Wei-Min; WU Xiao-Hua

    2004-01-01

    A method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagator from an effective quark-quark interaction model is developed. Of particular interest here is to give a generalrecipe to find without arbitrariness the solution representing the "Wigner" phase at non-zero chemical potential for the purpose of studying QCD phase structure.

  18. Achromatic metasurface optical components by dispersive phase compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Aieta, Francesco; Genevet, Patrice; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The replacement of bulk refractive elements with flat ones enables the miniaturization of optical components required for integrated optical systems. This process comes with the limitation that planar optics suffers from large chromatic aberrations due to the dispersion of the phase accumulated by light during propagation. We show that this limitation can be overcome by compensating the dispersion of the propagation phase with the wavelength-dependent phase shift imparted by a metasurface. We demonstrate dispersion-free multi-wavelength dielectric metasurface deflectors in the near-infrared and design an achromatic flat lens in the same spectral region. Our design is based on low-loss coupled dielectric resonators, which introduce a dense spectrum of modes to enable dispersive phase compensation. Achromatic metasurfaces will find applications as multi-band-pass filters, lightweight collimators, and chromatically-corrected imaging lenses.

  19. Generation and propagation of optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, David

    Optical vortices are singularities in phase fronts of laser beams. They are characterized by a dark core whose size (relative to the size of the background beam) may dramatically affect their behavior upon propagation. Previously, only large-core vortices have been extensively studied. The object of the research presented in this dissertation was to explore ways of generating small-core optical vortices (also called optical vortex filaments ), and to examine their propagation using analytical, numerical and experimental methods. Computer-generated holography enabled us to create arbitrary distributions of optical vortex filaments for experimental exploration. Hydrodynamic analogies were used to develop an heuristic model which described the dependence of vortex motion on other vortices and the background beam, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We predicted that pair of optical vortex filaments will rotate with angular rates inversely proportional to their separation distance (just like vortices in a fluid). We also reported the first experimental observation of this novel fluid-like effect. It was found, however, that upon propagation in linear media, the fluid-like rotation was not sustained owing to the overlap of diffracting vortex cores. Further numerical studies and experiments showed that rotation angle may be enhanced in nonlinear self-defocusing media. The results presented in this thesis offer us a better understanding of dynamics of propagating vortices which may result in applications in optical switching, optical data storage, manipulation of micro-particles and optical limiting for eye protection.

  20. Aircraft noise and its nearfield propagation computations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Noise generated by civil transport aircraft during take-off and approach-to-land phases of operation is an environmental problem.The aircraft noise problem is firstly reviewed in this article.The review is followed by a description and assessment of a number of sound propagation methods suitable for applications with a background mean flow field pertinent to aircraft noise.Of the three main areas of the noise problem,i.e.generation,propagation,and radiation,propagation provides a vital link between near-field noise generation and far-field radiation.Its accurate assessment ensures the overall validity of a prediction model.Of the various classes of propagation equations,linearised Euler equations are often casted in either time domain or frequency domain.The equations are often solved numerically by computational aeroacoustics techniques,bur are subject to the onset of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability modes which may ruin the solutions. Other forms of linearised equations,e.g.acoustic perturbation equations have been proposed,with differing degrees of success.

  1. Grain size dependent phase stabilities and presence of a monoclinic (Pm) phase in the morphotropic phase boundary region of (1−x)Bi(Mg{sub 1/2}Ti{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3} piezoceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Ashutosh; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar, E-mail: akhilesh-bhu@yahoo.com, E-mail: aksingh.mst@itbhu.ac.in [School of Materials Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-04-14

    Results of the room temperature structural studies on (1−x)Bi(Mg{sub 1/2}Ti{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3} ceramics using Rietveld analysis of the powder x-ray diffraction data in the composition range 0.28 ≤ x ≤ 0.45 are presented. The morphotropic phase boundary region exhibits coexistence of monoclinic (space group Pm) and tetragonal (space group P4 mm) phases in the composition range 0.33 ≤ x ≤ 0.40. The structure is nearly single phase monoclinic (space group Pm) in the composition range 0.28 ≤ x ≤ 0.32. The structure for the compositions with x ≥ 0.45 is found to be predominantly tetragonal with space group P4 mm. Rietveld refinement of the structure rules out the coexistence of rhombohedral and tetragonal phases in the morphotropic phase boundary region reported by earlier authors. The Rietveld structure analysis for the sample x = .35 calcined at various temperatures reveals that phase fraction of the coexisting phases in the morphotropic phase boundary region varies with grain size. The structural parameters of the two coexisting phases also change slightly with changing grain size.

  2. Contradictions between 3-phase region eutectical and peritectical fragments borders determination methods in monographs by A. Prince and D. Petrov

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lutsyk; V.; I.; Vorob'eva; V.; P.; Zyryanov; A.; M.

    2005-01-01

    Phase diagrams are very effective instrument for elaboration of new materials. Computer technologies give a possibility with their help to design microstructure of multicomponent heterogeneous materials[1].……

  3. Light Propagation Volumes

    OpenAIRE

    Mikulica, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Cílem diplomové práce je popsat různé metody výpočtu globálního osvětlení scény včetně techniky Light Propagation Volumes. Pro tuto metodu jsou podrobně popsány všechny tři kroky výpočtu: injekce, propagace a vykreslení. Dále je navrženo několik vlastních rozšíření zlepšující grafickou kvalitu metody. Části návrhu a implementace jsou zaměřeny na popis scény, zobrazovacího systému, tvorby stínů, implementace metody Light Propagation Volumes a navržených rozšíření. Práci uzavírá měření, porovná...

  4. Time-resolved study of laser initiated shock wave propagation in superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Allan; Buelna, Xavier; Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Intense shock waves in superfluid 4He between 1.7 and 2.1 K are generated by rapidly expanding confined plasma from laser ablation of a metal target immersed in the liquid. The resulting shock fronts in the liquid with initial velocities up to ca. Mach 10 are visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography. These high intensity shocks decay within 500 ns into less energetic shock waves traveling at Mach 2, which have their lifetime in the microsecond time scale. Based on the analysis using the classical Rankine-Hugoniot theory, the shock fronts created remain in the solid phase up to 1 μs and the associated thermodynamic state appears outside the previously studied region. The extrapolated initial shock pressure of 0.5 GPa is comparable to typical plasma pressures produced during liquid phase laser ablation. A secondary shock originating from fast heat propagation on the metal surface is also observed and a lower limit estimate for the heat propagation velocity is measured as 7 × 104 m/s. In the long-time limit, the high intensity shocks turn into liquid state waves that propagate near the speed of sound.

  5. Visual motion discrimination by propagating patterns in primate cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Rory; Solomon, Selina S; Martin, Paul R; Solomon, Samuel G; Gong, Pulin

    2017-09-14

    Visual stimuli can evoke waves of neural activity that propagate across the surface of visual cortical areas. The relevance of these waves for visual processing is unknown. Here we measured the phase and amplitude of local field potentials (LFPs) in electrode array recordings from motion-processing medial temporal area (MT) of anesthetized male marmosets. Animals viewed grating or dot-field stimuli drifting in different directions. We found that on individual trials, the direction of LFP wave propagation is sensitive to the direction of stimulus motion. Propagating LFP patterns are also detectable in trial-averaged activity, but the trial-averaged patterns exhibit different dynamics and behaviors to those in single trials and are similar across motion directions. We show that this difference arises because stimulus-sensitive propagating patterns are present in the phase of single-trial oscillations, whereas the trial-averaged signal is dominated by additive amplitude effects. Our results demonstrate that propagating LFP patterns can represent sensory inputs, at timescales relevant to visually-guided behaviors, and raise the possibility that propagating activity patterns serve neural information processing in area MT and other cortical areas.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTPropagating wave patterns are widely observed in the cortex, but their functional relevance remains unknown. We show here that visual stimuli generate propagating wave patterns in local field potentials (LFPs) in a movement-sensitive area of the primate cortex, and that the propagation direction of these patterns is sensitive to stimulus motion direction. We also show that averaging LFP signals across multiple stimulus presentations (trial-averaging) yields propagating patterns which capture different dynamic properties of the LFP response and show negligible direction sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that sensory stimuli can reliably modulate propagating wave patterns in the cortex. The relevant

  6. Detecting damaged regions of cerebral white matter in the subacute phase after carbon monoxide poisoning using voxel-based analysis with diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Shunrou; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Beppu, Takaaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Sanjo, Katsumi; Koeda, Atsuhiko [Iwate Medical University, Department of Psychiatry, Morioka (Japan); Mori, Kiyoshi [Iwate Prefectural Critical Care and Emergency Center, Department of Neurology, Morioka (Japan); Kudo, Kohsuke; Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    The present study aimed to detect the main regions of cerebral white matter (CWM) showing damage in the subacute phase for CO-poisoned patients with chronic neurological symptoms using voxel-based analysis (VBA) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Subjects comprised 22 adult CO-poisoned patients and 16 age-matched healthy volunteers as controls. Patients were classified into patients with transient acute symptoms only (group A) and patients with chronic neurological symptoms (group S). In all patients, DTI covering the whole brain was performed with a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging system at 2 weeks after CO exposure. As procedures for VBA, all fractional anisotropy (FA) maps obtained from DTI were spatially normalized, and FA values for all voxels in the whole CWM on normalized FA maps were statistically compared among the two patient groups and controls. Voxels with significant differences in FA were detected at various regions in comparisons between groups S and A and between group S and controls. In these comparisons, more voxels were detected in deep CWM, including the centrum semiovale, than in other regions. A few voxels were detected between group A and controls. Absolute FA values in the centrum semiovale were significantly lower in group S than in group A or controls. VBA demonstrated that CO-poisoned patients with chronic neurological symptoms had already suffered damage to various CWM regions in the subacute phase. In these regions, the centrum semiovale was suggested to be the main region damaged in the subacute phase after CO inhalation. (orig.)

  7. Five-component propagation model for steam explosion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, H.S.; Maruyama, Yu; Sugimoto, Jun [Severe Accident Research Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    A five-field simulation code JASMINE-pro has been developed at JAERI for the calculation of the propagation and explosion phase of steam explosions. The basic equations and the constitutive relationships specifically utilized in the propagation models in the code are introduced in this paper. Some calculations simulating the KROTOS 1D and 2D steam explosion experiments are also stated in the paper to show the present capability of the code. (author)

  8. The Propagation Characteristics of the Electron Beam with Initial Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jun(张军); Zhong Huihuang(钟辉煌)

    2003-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of the beam under various initial conditions are investigated by means of PIC method. The influences of density modulation and velocity modulation on the propagation characteristics are discussed and compared. The results reveal that by changing the amplitude of the two kinds of modulations and the phase difference between them, the distribution property of the first harmonic of the current density can be adapted along the beam propagating path, which is a feasible method to enhance the beam-wave interaction efficiency in Cerenkov HPM devices.

  9. Spatial and temporal pulse propagation for dispersive paraxial optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, G

    2016-04-04

    The formalism for pulse propagation through dispersive paraxial optical systems first presented by Kostenbauder (IEEE J. Quant. Elec.261148-1157 (1990)) using 4 × 4 ray-pulse matrices is extended to 6 × 6 matrices and includes non-separable spatial-temporal couplings in both transverse dimensions as well as temporal dispersive effects up to a quadratic phase. The eikonal in a modified Huygens integral in the Fresnell approximation is derived and can be used to propagate pulses through complicated dispersive optical systems within the paraxial approximation. In addition, a simple formula for the propagation of ultrashort pulses having a Gaussian profile both spatially and temporally is presented.

  10. Surface plasmon polariton propagation in organic nanofiber based plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Lemke, Christoph; Jauernik, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic wave packet propagation is monitored in dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides realized from para-hexaphenylene nanofibers deposited onto a 60 nm thick gold film. Using interferometric time resolved two-photon photoemission electron microscopy we are able to determine...... phase and group velocity of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waveguiding mode (0.967c and 0.85c at λLaser = 812nm) as well as the effective propagation length (39 μm) along the fiber-gold interface. We furthermore observe that the propagation properties of the SPP waveguiding mode are governed...

  11. Propagating magnetohydrodynamics waves in coronal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, I

    2006-02-15

    High cadence Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observations show that outward propagating intensity disturbances are a common feature in large, quiescent coronal loops, close to active regions. An overview is given of measured parameters of such longitudinal oscillations in coronal loops. The observed oscillations are interpreted as propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves and are unlikely to be flare-driven. A strong correlation, between the loop position and the periodicity of the oscillations, provides evidence that the underlying oscillations can propagate through the transition region and into the corona. Both a one- and a two-dimensional theoretical model of slow magnetoacoustic waves are presented to explain the very short observed damping lengths. The results of these numerical simulations are compared with the TRACE observations and show that a combination of the area divergence and thermal conduction agrees well with the observed amplitude decay. Additionally, the usefulness of wavelet analysis is discussed, showing that care has to be taken when interpreting the results of wavelet analysis, and a good knowledge of all possible factors that might influence or distort the results is a necessity.

  12. Surface wave propagation in central Asia: Observations of scattering and multipathing with the Kyrgyzstan broadband array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, Gary L.; Mahdi, Hanan

    1996-04-01

    We studied the propagation of Rayleigh waves at regional distances in central Asia using a combination of array processing techniques and surface wave analysis. We present results from the detailed analysis of three representative events recorded by a 10-station, broadband network that has been running in the central Asian country of Kyrgyzstan since 1991: an Ms = 5.1 event near Ashkhabad, Turkmenistan; an Ms = 5.8 event in south central Tibet; and the October 7, 1994, nuclear explosion at Lop Nor. We find there is a remarkable difference in the propagation characteristics of surface waves along these three paths. The path from the event in Turkmenistan is simple and is well approximated by propagation through a laterally homogeneous medium. Array processing shows the entire Rayleigh wave train stacks coherently and arrives from an azimuth close to that predicted by a great circle path. Furthermore, estimates of dispersion curves and fundamental mode signals determined for individual stations show little variation across the array. The Tibet and Lop Nor paths are completely different. We find strong evidence for complicated multipathing and scattering effects along both of these paths. We observe a three-stage pattern in the Tibet case: (1) the early, lowest-frequency part of the Rayleigh wave packet arrives as a coherent signal from close to the great circle path azimuth; (2) this is overpowered in the period range around 20 s by a strong multipath signal that propagates across the array from a much more southerly azimuth; and (3) periods below 20 s rapidly become incoherent, and the signal does not have a well-defined direction of propagation. The Lop Nor path shows similar complexity. On this path there is little dispersion for measurable periods greater than 10 s, so the low-frequency energy arrives in an Airy phase. The Airy phase stacks somewhat coherently (it stacks, but significant power is lost in the best beam), and slowness analysis shows it arrives from

  13. Fast characterization of moment magnitude and focal mechanism in the context of tsunami warning in the NEAM region : W-phase and PDFM2 algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelé, François; Roch, Julien; Duperray, Pierre; Reymond, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Over past centuries, several large earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7.5) have been reported in the North East Atlantic and Mediterranenan sea (NEAM) region. Most of the tsunami potential seismic sources in the NEAM region, however, are in a magnitude range of 6.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.5 (e.g. tsunami triggered by the earthquake of Boumerdes in 2003 of Mw = 6.9). The CENALT (CENtre d'ALerte aux Tsunamis) in operation since 2012 as the French National Tsunami Warning Centre (NTWC) and Candidate Tsunami Service Provider (CTSP) has to issue warning messages within 15 minutes of the earthquake origin time. The warning level is currently based on a decision matrix depending on the magnitude, and the location of the hypocenter. Two seismic source inversion methods are implemented at CENALT: the W-phase algorithm, based on the so-called W-phase and PDFM2 algorithm , based on the surface waves and first P wave motions. They both give accurate moment magnitude and focal magnitude respectively in 10 min and 20 min. The results of the Mw magnitude, focal depth and type of fault (reverse, normal, strike-slip) are the most relevant parameters used to issue tsunami warnings. In this context, we assess the W-phase and PDFM2 methods with 29 events of magnitude Mw ≥ 5.8 for the period 2010-2015 in the NEAM region. Results with 10 and 20 min for the W-phase algorithm and with 20 and 30 min for the PDFM2 algorithm are compared to the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog. The W-phase and PDFM2 methods gives accurate results respectively in 10 min and 20 min. This work is funded by project ASTARTE -- Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839

  14. Mathematical model of the two-phase flow in a vertical well with an electric centrifugal pump located in the permafrost region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musakaev, N. G.; Borodin, S. L.

    2016-05-01

    The mathematical model of the two-phase flow in a vertical well with an electric centrifugal pump located in the permafrost region is presented. The comparison of the calculation's results with experimental data, the results of numerical experiments by determining the flow structure, the temperature distribution in a well, influence of the temperature distribution on paraffin deposition and change in time of the radius of thawing in the frozen ground are presented.

  15. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: II. Nucleation in the metastable liquid immiscibility region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    In the second part of our paper, we address crystal nucleation in the metastable liquid miscibility region of eutectic systems that is always present, though experimentally often inaccessible. While this situation resembles the one seen in single component crystal nucleation in the presence of a metastable vapor-liquid critical point addressed in previous works, it is more complex because of the fact that here two crystal phases of significantly different compositions may nucleate. Accordingly, at a fixed temperature below the critical point, six different types of nuclei may form: two liquid-liquid nuclei: two solid-liquid nuclei; and two types of composite nuclei, in which the crystalline core has a liquid "skirt," whose composition falls in between the compositions of the solid and the initial liquid phases, in addition to nuclei with concentric alternating composition shells of prohibitively high free energy. We discuss crystalline phase selection via exploring/identifying the possible pathways for crystal nucleation.

  16. Co-variability of poleward propagating atmospheric energy with tropical and higher-latitude climate oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wan-Ru [Iowa State University, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Ames, IA (United States); City University of Hong Kong, Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre, School of Energy and Environment, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chen, Tsing-Chang [Iowa State University, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Ames, IA (United States); Wang, Shih-Yu [Utah State University, Utah Climate Center and Department of Plants, Soils and Climate, Logan, UT (United States)

    2012-10-15

    One may infer from the poleward propagation of angular momentum that energy change in tropical regions may be manifested in polar regions through a poleward propagation. This idea does not seem to be extensively addressed in the literature. It has been found that the poleward propagation of total atmospheric energy appears to connect the tropics and the polar regions on the interannual timescale. The present study explores how this poleward propagation may be linked to prominent climate oscillations such as ENSO, PNA, NAO, AO, AAO, and PSA. Analysis suggests that the poleward propagation of energy is likely a result of the atmospheric circulation change modulated by the climate patterns of ENSO, PNA, NAO, AO from tropical to Arctic regions and by the climate patterns of ENSO, PSA, AAO from tropical to Antarctic regions. The existence of the poleward energy propagation may shed light on studies exploring the linkage between topical climate and polar climate. (orig.)

  17. Quality Control of Differential Propagation Phase Shift for Dual Linear Polarization Radar%双线偏振雷达差分传播相移的质量控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜牧云; 刘黎平; 胡志群; 余蓉

    2012-01-01

    Data processing and quality control is the foundation of the application of dual-linear polarization Doppler radar. Based on the observation in field experiments by a Cband Polarization Doppler Radar on Wheel (CPDRW), the difference of differential propagation phase shift ΦDP between precipitation and ground clutter and its relationship with signal-to-noise ratio SNR are analyzed and a new data analyzing and processing methodology is suggested. According to this new method, the useless ΦDP data can be given up and the KDP data with higher accuracy can be acquired. Analysis indicates that ΦDP data are vulnerable to the influence of the non-meteorological target like ground clutter and usually appears large fluctuations. Φ DP data are also sensitive to the variability of SNR and cross-correlation coefficient ρ Hv(0) , especially the latter. It appears abnormal fluctuations with the quality of related SNR and ρ Hv(0) becomes poor and that will affect the quality of the estimation of KDP data if no appropriate quality control scheme is adopted. U-sing this kind of KDP data, obvious errors in the quantitative application of precipitation estimation and precipitation particle morphology recognition can be obtained. In this new method, the abnormal volatility of ΦDP data combining with reflectivity factor ZH and radial velocity VT information is used to isolate the ground clutter, and then improper data are eliminated in the quantitative application such as quantitative precipitation estimation or attenuation correction. According to SNR and ρHV(0), the meteorological data is divided into good, poor and bad categories. For the good data, the fluctuation is smaller, the increasing trend with distances which accords with theoretical expectations is evident, so the preprocessing algorithms and estimate KDP data can be used directly; for the poor data, although the fluctuation is more pronounced than the good data, the data continuity begins to become poor and there

  18. Climate impacts and adaptation in Germany. Phase 1. Regional climate scenarios for Germany. Final report; Klimaauswirkungen und Anpassung in Deutschland. Phase 1. Erstellung regionaler Klimaszenarien fuer Deutschland. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Daniela; Goettel, Holger; Kotlarski, Sven; Lorenz, Philip; Sieck, Kevin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie (MPI-M), Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    The regional climate scenarios were evaluated using the climate model REMO. The model calculations were actualized and compared with observed data. The validation of the modeling results was performed using data sets concerning the temporal behavior, the precipitation amounts in several altitudes and the analysis of the probability density function of the air temperature. The results of different climate scenarios are discussed for the mean monthly values of precipitation and temperature. The model allows the prediction of the temporal development and number of summer days and extremely hot days. The change of further indices due to the climatic change caused by increasing greenhouse gas emissions is discussed.

  19. Light Front Boson Model Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Henrique Sales; Alfredo Takashi Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    stract The scope and aim of this work is to describe the two-body interaction mediated by a particle (either the scalar or the gauge boson) within the light-front formulation. To do this, first of all we point out the importance of propagators and Green functions in Quantum Mechanics. Then we project the covariant quantum propagator onto the light front time to get the propagator for scalar particles in these coordinates. This operator propagates the wave function from x+ = 0 to x+ > O. It corresponds to the definition of the time ordering operation in the light front time x+. We calculate the light-front Green's function for 2 interacting bosons propagating forward in x+. We also show how to write down the light front Green's function from the Feynman propagator and finally make a generalization to N bosons.

  20. Gauge engineering and propagators

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Beyond perturbation theory gauge-fixing becomes more involved due to the Gribov-Singer ambiguity: The appearance of additional gauge copies requires to define a procedure how to handle them. For the case of Landau gauge the structure and properties of these additional gauge copies will be investigated. Based on these properties gauge conditions are constructed to account for these gauge copies. The dependence of the propagators on the choice of these complete gauge-fixings will then be investigated using lattice gauge theory for Yang-Mills theory. It is found that the implications for the infrared, and to some extent mid-momentum behavior, can be substantial. In going beyond the Yang-Mills case it turns out that the influence of matter can generally not be neglected. This will be briefly discussed for various types of matter.

  1. Gauge engineering and propagators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Axel

    2017-03-01

    Beyond perturbation theory gauge-fixing becomes more involved due to the Gribov-Singer ambiguity: The appearance of additional gauge copies requires to define a procedure how to handle them. For the case of Landau gauge the structure and properties of these additional gauge copies will be investigated. Based on these properties gauge conditions are constructed to account for these gauge copies. The dependence of the propagators on the choice of these complete gauge-fixings will then be investigated using lattice gauge theory for Yang-Mills theory. It is found that the implications for the infrared, and to some extent mid-momentum behavior, can be substantial. In going beyond the Yang-Mills case it turns out that the influence of matter can generally not be neglected. This will be briefly discussed for various types of matter.

  2. Counting Belief Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kersting, Kristian; Natarajan, Sriraam

    2012-01-01

    A major benefit of graphical models is that most knowledge is captured in the model structure. Many models, however, produce inference problems with a lot of symmetries not reflected in the graphical structure and hence not exploitable by efficient inference techniques such as belief propagation (BP). In this paper, we present a new and simple BP algorithm, called counting BP, that exploits such additional symmetries. Starting from a given factor graph, counting BP first constructs a compressed factor graph of clusternodes and clusterfactors, corresponding to sets of nodes and factors that are indistinguishable given the evidence. Then it runs a modified BP algorithm on the compressed graph that is equivalent to running BP on the original factor graph. Our experiments show that counting BP is applicable to a variety of important AI tasks such as (dynamic) relational models and boolean model counting, and that significant efficiency gains are obtainable, often by orders of magnitude.

  3. Propagators and path integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holten, J.W. van

    1995-08-22

    Path-integral expressions for one-particle propagators in scalar and fermionic field theories are derived, for arbitrary mass. This establishes a direct connection between field theory and specific classical point-particle models. The role of world-line reparametrization invariance of the classical action and the implementation of the corresponding BRST-symmetry in the quantum theory are discussed. The presence of classical world-line supersymmetry is shown to lead to an unwanted doubling of states for massive spin-1/2 particles. The origin of this phenomenon is traced to a `hidden` topological fermionic excitation. A different formulation of the pseudo-classical mechanics using a bosonic representation of {gamma}{sub 5} is shown to remove these extra states at the expense of losing manifest supersymmetry. (orig.).

  4. The Magnitude and Regional Distribution of Needs for Hydropower - Phase II Future Electric Power Supply and Demand. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    llliN015 COAPS Of INGINUaS HIL MACii’III’!"UOE AND REGIONAl OISTRi8UTION OF NEED JOR UYOROPOM:Il Til( NATIONAl ttYOfiOPOWt:R STUDY PROJECTIONS OF...AWO, IL UNO IS COaPS Of INGINIUl THE MAGNifUOl. AND REGIONAL lliSTHIBUTION Of NHO FOR HVCROPOWI:H Tttl:: NATIONAL tiVOROPOWlH STIJOY PROJECTIONS OF...RUOUICU CHICAGO, IlliNOIS coaPS Of INGINIIaJ lHl MAUNITI)(lE AkO REGIONAL OISTRI&UTION Of NEED FOR HVOROPOWt:U THE NATIONAL HVUAOPOWER STUIJV

  5. Study of the Wheeler Propagator

    OpenAIRE

    Bollini, C. G.; Rocca, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We study the half advanced and half retarded Wheeler Green function and its relation to Feynman propagators. First for massless equation. Then, for Klein-Gordon equations with arbitrary mass parameters; real, imaginary or complex. In all cases the Wheeler propagator lacks an on-shell free propagation. The Wheeler function has support inside the light-cone (whatever the mass). The associated vacuum is symmetric with respect to annihilation and creation operators.

  6. Depth dependence of westward-propagating North Atlantic features diagnosed from altimetry and a numerical 1/6° model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tailleux

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A 1/6° numerical simulation is used to investigate the vertical structure of westward propagation between 1993 and 2000 in the North Atlantic ocean. The realism of the simulated westward propagating signals, interpreted principally as the signature of first-mode baroclinic Rossby waves (RW, is first assessed by comparing the simulated amplitude and zonal phase speeds of Sea Level Anomalies (SLA against TOPEX/Poseidon-ERS satellite altimeter data. Then, the (unobserved subsurface signature of RW phase speeds is investigated from model outputs by means of the Radon Transform which was specifically adapted to focus on first-mode baroclinic RW. The analysis is performed on observed and simulated SLA and along 9 simulated isopycnal displacements spanning the 0–3250 m depth range. Simulated RW phase speeds agree well with their observed counterparts at the surface, although with a slight slow bias. Below the surface, the simulated phase speeds exhibit a systematic deceleration with increasing depth, by a factor that appears to vary geographically. Thus, while the reduction factor is about 15–18% on average at 3250 m over the region considered, it appears to be much weaker (about 5–8% in the eddy-active Azores Current, where westward propagating structures might be more coherent in the vertical. In the context of linear theories, these results question the often-made normal mode assumption of many WKB-based theories that the phase speed is independent of depth. Alternatively, these results could also suggest that the vertical structure of westward propagating signals may significantly depend on their degree of nonlinearity, with the degree of vertical coherence possibly increasing with the degree of nonlinearity.

  7. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N((h+2)/(h+1))) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N((2-d)/(h+1)d). Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s* of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss*) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set.

  8. Unidirectional reflectionless light propagation at exceptional points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of unidirectional reflectionless light propagation in photonic devices at exceptional points (EPs. EPs, which are branch point singularities of the spectrum, associated with the coalescence of both eigenvalues and corresponding eigenstates, lead to interesting phenomena, such as level repulsion and crossing, bifurcation, chaos, and phase transitions in open quantum systems described by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Recently, it was shown that judiciously designed photonic synthetic matters could mimic the complex non-Hermitian Hamiltonians in quantum mechanics and realize unidirectional reflection at optical EPs. Unidirectional reflectionlessness is of great interest for optical invisibility. Achieving unidirectional reflectionless light propagation could also be potentially important for developing optical devices, such as optical network analyzers. Here, we discuss unidirectional reflectionlessness at EPs in both parity-time (PT-symmetric and non-PT-symmetric optical systems. We also provide an outlook on possible future directions in this field.

  9. Light propagation in periodically modulated complex waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Light propagation in optical waveguides with periodically modulated index of refraction and alternating gain and loss are investigated for linear and nonlinear systems. Based on a multiscale perturbation analysis, it is shown that for many non-parity-time ($\\mathcal{PT}$) symmetric waveguides, their linear spectrum is partially complex, thus light exponentially grows or decays upon propagation, and this growth or delay is not altered by nonlinearity. However, several classes of non-$\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric waveguides are also identified to possess all-real linear spectrum. In the nonlinear regime longitudinally periodic and transversely quasi-localized modes are found for $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric waveguides both above and below phase transition. These nonlinear modes are stable under evolution and can develop from initially weak initial conditions.

  10. SBAR Panel: Phase I Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) To Reduce the Regional Transport of Ozone in the Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBAR panel on regional reductions of nitrogen oxides, with focus on the windborne transport of ozone smog and nitrogen oxides from NOx-producing sources in 22 eastern states and the District of Columbia

  11. Nonlinear and Dispersive Optical Pulse Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijaili, Sol Peter

    In this dissertation, there are basically four novel contributions to the field of picosecond pulse propagation and measurement. The first contribution is the temporal ABCD matrix which is an analog of the traditional ABCD ray matrices used in Gaussian beam propagation. The temporal ABCD matrix allows for the easy calculation of the effects of linear chirp or group velocity dispersion in the time domain. As with Gaussian beams in space, there also exists a complete Hermite-Gaussian basis in time whose propagation can be tracked with the temporal ABCD matrices. The second contribution is the timing synchronization between a colliding pulse mode-locked dye laser and a gain-switched Fabry-Perot type AlGaAs laser diode that has achieved less than 40 femtoseconds of relative timing jitter by using a pulsed optical phase lock loop (POPLL). The relative timing jitter was measured using the error voltage of the feedback loop. This method of measurement is accurate since the frequencies of all the timing fluctuations fall within the loop bandwidth. The novel element is a broad band optical cross-correlator that can resolve femtosecond time delay errors between two pulse trains. The third contribution is a novel dispersive technique of determining the nonlinear frequency sweep of a picosecond pulse with relatively good accuracy. All the measurements are made in the time domain and hence there is no time-bandwidth limitation to the accuracy. The fourth contribution is the first demonstration of cross -phase modulation in a semiconductor laser amplifier where a variable chirp was observed. A simple expression for the chirp imparted on a weak signal pulse by the action of a strong pump pulse is derived. A maximum frequency excursion of 16 GHz due to the cross-phase modulation was measured. A value of 5 was found for alpha _{xpm} which is a factor for characterizing the cross-phase modulation in a similar manner to the conventional linewidth enhancement factor, alpha.

  12. Global workspace dynamics: Cortical "binding and propagation enables conscious contents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J Baars

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A global workspace is a hub of binding and propagation in a population of loosely coupled signaling elements. Global workspace (GW architectures recruit many distributed, specialized agents to help resolve focal ambiguities. In the brain, conscious experiences may reflect a global workspace function. For animals the natural world is full of fitness-related ambiguities, suggesting a general adaptive pressure for brains to resolve focal ambiguities quickly and accurately. In humans and related species the cortico-thalamic (C-T core is believed to underlie conscious aspects of perception, thinking, learning, feelings of knowing, emotions, imagery, working memory and executive control. The C-T core has many anatomical hubs, but conscious percepts are unitary and internally consistent at any given moment. The repertoire of conscious contents is a large, open set. These points suggest that a brain-based GW capacity cannot be localized in a single anatomical hub. Rather, it should be sought in a dynamic capacity for adaptive binding and propagation of neural signals over multi-hub networks. We refer to this as dynamic global workspace theory (dGW. In this view, conscious contents can arise in any region of the C-T core when multiple signal streams settle on a winner-take-all equilibrium. The resulting bound gestalt may ignite an any-to-many broadcast, lasting ~100-200 ms, and trigger widespread adaptation in established networks. Binding and broadcasting may involve theta/gamma or alpha/gamma phase coupling. Conscious contents (qualia may reflect their sources in cortex. Sensory percepts may bind and broadcast from posterior regions, while non-sensory feelings of knowing (FOKs may be frontotemporal. The small focal capacity of conscious contents may be the biological price to pay for global access. We propose that in the intact brain the hippocampal/rhinal complex may support conscious event organization as well as episodic memory coding.

  13. The Acute Phase Response and Soman-Induced Status Epilepticus: Temporal, Regional and Cellular Changes in Rat Brain Cytokine Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    Methods: The protein levels of 10 cytokines was quantified using bead multiplex immunoassays in damaged brain regions (i.e., piriform cortex...in the piriform cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus [5,6]. Excitotoxic neural damage following GD exposure activates a neuroinflammatory...quantified using a multiplex bead immunoassay in brain tissue lysates of SE- injury susceptible regions (i.e., piriform cortex, thalamus and hippocampus

  14. Stationary Rossby wave propagation through easterly layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E. K.; Watterson, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    The zonal mean basic state sensitivity of the steady response to midlatitude mountain forcing is examined through the numerical solution of linearized shallow water equations on a sphere. The zonal mean basic state consists of meridionally varying zonal winds and meridional winds. Attention is given to cases in which the former are westerly everywhere, except within a tropical region in which they are easterly. A zonal wavenumber three mountain confined to the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes provides the forcing. It is concluded that critical latitude effects on wave propagation are sensitive to mean meridional circulation structure in the critical latitude region of the model.

  15. Spectra in the vacuum ultraviolet region of CO in gaseous and solid phases and dispersed in solid argon at 10 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H-C [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsinn-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chen, H-Ki [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsinn-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Cheng, B-M [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsinn-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Y-P [Department of Applied Chemistry, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Ogilvie, J F [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, Ciudad Universitaria Rodrigo Facio, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose 2060 (Costa Rica)

    2005-10-28

    With radiation in the region 104-170 nm from a synchrotron and dispersed with a grating monochromator at spectral resolution 0.02-0.03 nm, we measured absorption spectra of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O in the gaseous phase at 303 K and in the solid phase at 10 K, and dispersed in solid argon at molar ratios Ar:CO = 10, 50 and 250 and at 10 K. We assign observed spectral features to transitions to electronic states A {sup 1}{pi}, B {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}, C {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} and E {sup 1}{pi} from the ground state X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}. Vibrational progressions are discernible for all these systems of CO in the gaseous phase, but for only the system A-X for CO in the pure solid phase of CO or a dispersion in solid argon; for all condensed phases, multiple series of features are deducible in this vibrational structure.

  16. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  17. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  18. Focality, stochasticity and neuroanatomic propagation in ALS pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravits, John

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) phenotypes such as limb ALS, bulbar ALS, primary lateral sclerosis and primary muscular atrophy are highly heterogeneous and exist on a continuum. These are largely determined by the neuroanatomy of the underlying pathological changes, which can be clinically imputed. Deconstructing these early in disease, before temporal-spatial summation induces complexity, shows that ALS begins focally at a seemingly random location and progresses contiguously. This suggests that focality and anatomic propagation of pathology are significant parts of pathogenesis-disease propagates over space as well as progresses over time. Focality and neuroanatomic propagation can explain how dominant genetic traits manifest with heterogeneous phenotypes, since the anatomic site of outbreak is a prime determinant of phenotype. Focality and neuroanatomic propagation can also explain why frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a neurodegeneration closely related to ALS, has heterogeneous phenotypes, since here too the anatomic site of the outbreak is a prime determinant of phenotype. There are two distinct types of neuroanatomic propagation: contiguous propagation, which occurs side-to-side regionally through the extracellular matrix independent of synaptic connection; and network propagation, which occurs end-to-end dependent on synaptic connections and axonal transmission in connected neuronal networks. The molecular basis of neuroanatomic propagation is unknown, although prion-like misfolding and templating of pathogenic proteins is a compelling unifying hypothesis.

  19. Propagation characteristics of seismic waves in shallow soil with the unsaturated three-phase p oro elastic mo del%用非饱和三相孔弹模型研究浅层土壤中地震波的传播特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁卫; 吴文雯; 王驰; 吴智强

    2014-01-01

    研究浅层土壤中声波耦合的地震波的传播特性,用于声波探雷技术的机理分析。根据浅层土壤具有孔隙度和可压缩性的特点,利用非饱和三相孔隙介质中的地震波模型,研究了土壤孔隙度、含水饱和度等参数对地震波传播特性的影响。计算结果显示:在给定的参数条件下,地震波的传播速度和衰减系数均随频率的增加而增加;纵波的传播速度随孔隙度的增加而减小,横波的传播速度随孔隙度的增加而增加;地震波的传播特性随含水饱和度的增加变化比较复杂。通过对计算结果与已发表实验结果的比较分析,讨论了解析方法的可行性,为声-地震耦合机理及其在声波探雷研究中的应用提供了一定的理论基础。%In order to study the mechanism of acoustic landmine detection, the propagation characteristics of acoustically coupled seismic waves in shallow soil are investigated. Based on the porosity and compressibility of shallow soil, the influences of parameters including soil porosity and water saturation on the propagation properties of seismic wave are discussed with the model of seismic waves in unsaturated three-phase porous medium. The calculation results show that under the given parameters, the propagation velocity and attenuation coefficient of seismic wave increase with the increase of acoustic frequency. The propagation velocities of longitudinal waves and those of transverse waves respectively decrease and increase with the increase of soil porosity. In addition, the propagation characteristics of acoustically coupled seismic waves become complicated with the increase of water saturation. The feasibility of the analysis method is discussed by comparing the calculation results with the experimental data published previously. As a result, a theoretical foundation is provided for the acoustic-to-seismic coupling mechanism and its application in the study of acoustic

  20. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST 296 Action, interest lies with effects associated

    with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects are covered in this paper:

    a The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have

    been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations

    with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that

    result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that

    result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation

    of HF radiolocation systems.

    b Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly

    ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough

    and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals impinge on the

    northerly ionosphere

  1. Revisiting Chiral Extrapolation by Studying a Lattice Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-Bin; SUN Wei-Min; L(U) Xiao-Fu; ZONG Hong-Shi

    2009-01-01

    The quark propagator in the Landau gauge is studied on the lattice,including the quenched and the unquenched results.No obvious unquenched effects are found by comparing the quenched quark propagator with the dynamical one.For the quenched and unquenched configurations,the results with different quark masses have been computed.For the quark mass function,a nonlinear chiral extrapolating behavior is found in the in/tared region for both the quenched and dynamical results.

  2. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  3. Longitudinal nonlinear wave propagation through soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, M; Balachandran, B

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, wave propagation through soft tissue is investigated. A primary aim of this investigation is to gain a fundamental understanding of the influence of soft tissue nonlinear material properties on the propagation characteristics of stress waves generated by transient loadings. Here, for computational modeling purposes, the soft tissue is modeled as a nonlinear visco-hyperelastic material, the geometry is assumed to be one-dimensional rod geometry, and uniaxial propagation of longitudinal waves is considered. By using the linearized model, a basic understanding of the characteristics of wave propagation is developed through the dispersion relation and in terms of the propagation speed and attenuation. In addition, it is illustrated as to how the linear system can be used to predict brain tissue material parameters through the use of available experimental ultrasonic attenuation curves. Furthermore, frequency thresholds for wave propagation along internal structures, such as axons in the white matter of the brain, are obtained through the linear analysis. With the nonlinear material model, the authors analyze cases in which one of the ends of the rods is fixed and the other end is subjected to a loading. Two variants of the nonlinear model are analyzed and the associated predictions are compared with the predictions of the corresponding linear model. The numerical results illustrate that one of the imprints of the nonlinearity on the wave propagation phenomenon is the steepening of the wave front, leading to jump-like variations in the stress wave profiles. This phenomenon is a consequence of the dependence of the local wave speed on the local deformation of the material. As per the predictions of the nonlinear material model, compressive waves in the structure travel faster than tensile waves. Furthermore, it is found that wave pulses with large amplitudes and small elapsed times are attenuated over shorter spans. This feature is due to the elevated

  4. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communications has seen explosive growth in recent decades, in a realm that is both broad and rapidly expanding to include satellite services, navigational aids, remote sensing, telemetering, audio and video broadcasting, high-speed data communications, mobile radio systems and much more. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications deals with the basic principles of radiowaves propagation for frequency bands used in radio-communications, offering descriptions of new achievements and newly developed propagation models. The book bridges the gap between theoretical calculations and approaches, and applied procedures needed for advanced radio links design. The primary objective of this two-volume set is to demonstrate the fundamentals, and to introduce propagation phenomena and mechanisms that engineers are likely to encounter in the design and evaluation of radio links of a given type and operating frequency. Volume one covers basic principles, along with tropospheric and ionospheric propagation,...

  5. View-based Propagator Derivation

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Christian

    2009-01-01

    When implementing a propagator for a constraint, one must decide about variants: When implementing min, should one also implement max? Should one implement linear constraints both with unit and non-unit coefficients? Constraint variants are ubiquitous: implementing them requires considerable (if not prohibitive) effort and decreases maintainability, but will deliver better performance than resorting to constraint decomposition. This paper shows how to use views to derive perfect propagator variants. A model for views and derived propagators is introduced. Derived propagators are proved to be indeed perfect in that they inherit essential properties such as correctness and domain and bounds consistency. Techniques for systematically deriving propagators such as transformation, generalization, specialization, and type conversion are developed. The paper introduces an implementation architecture for views that is independent of the underlying constraint programming system. A detailed evaluation of views implement...

  6. Reflection imaging of the Moho and the aseismic Nazca slab in the Malargüe region with global-phase seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganov, D.; Nishitsuji, Y.; Ruigrok, E.; Gomez, M.; Wapenaar, C. P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A number of passive seismic methods have been developed over many decades. Still, imaging of aseismical zones of the subducting slabs is one of challenging themes in the geoscience community. Conventional seismological approaches, such as hypocentral mapping, receiver functions, and global tomography, have been providing useful imaging of the Nazca slab, which subducts under the South American plate; however, the aseismic zones remained unclear. Here, we propose to apply global-phase seismic interferometry (GloPSI) for the imaging of the aseismic zones of the Nazca slab beneath the Malargüe region (Mendoza, Argentina). GloPSI uses global phases (epicentral distances ≥ 120°) such as PKP, PKiKP, and PKIKP, recorded on the vertical component of the seismic sensors. These phases illuminate the lithosphere below the receivers with small angles of incidence, which illumination suffices for creating virtual sources that radiate primarily downwards. We then migrate the retrieved virtual responses to obtain a subsurface reflection image with high resolution (< 15 km in depth). We use data recorded in the Malargüe region using an exploration-type receiver array called MalARRgue. This array was recording continuously in 2012 for one year. In this presentation, we show the imaging results from the Moho down to the aseismic Nazca slab, including the upper mantle.

  7. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual modulated HF beams with ELF phase offset, a potential D-region ionospheric diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    GołKowski, M.; Cohen, M. B.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    Experiments at the ionospheric heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) are performed employing dual HF beams amplitude modulated at ELF/VLF with a phase offset between the two modulation waveforms. The amplitude of the observed ELF/VLF waves is strongly dependent on the imposed ELF/VLF phase offset, the modulation waveform, and the orientation of the HF beams. Data from two ground stations are interpreted using simulations of modulated heating power envelopes as well as a comprehensive model of ionospheric ELF/VLF generation. It is found that two colocated vertical beams HF beams excite a single ionospheric ELF/VLF source, but independent ELF/VLF sources can be induced in the ionospheric region above the heater if the HF beams are offset from zenith to intersect at their 3 dB points. Furthermore, the use of two vertical HF beams with ELF phase offset is found to be a potential diagnostic method for the ionospheric D region.

  8. Directed HK propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocia, Lucas; Heller, Eric J.

    2015-09-01

    We offer a more formal justification for the successes of our recently communicated "directed Heller-Herman-Kluk-Kay" (DHK) time propagator by examining its performance in one-dimensional bound systems which exhibit at least quasi-periodic motion. DHK is distinguished by its single one-dimensional integral—a vast simplification over the usual 2N-dimensional integral in full Heller-Herman-Kluk-Kay (for an N-dimensional system). We find that DHK accurately captures particular coherent state autocorrelations when its single integral is chosen to lie along these states' fastest growing manifold, as long as it is not perpendicular to their action gradient. Moreover, the larger the action gradient, the better DHK will perform. We numerically examine DHK's accuracy in a one-dimensional quartic oscillator and illustrate that these conditions are frequently satisfied such that the method performs well. This lends some explanation for why DHK frequently seems to work so well and suggests that it may be applicable to systems exhibiting quite strong anharmonicity.

  9. Exploration of the phase diagram of liquid water in the low-temperature metastable region using synthetic fluid inclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Chen; Krüger, Yves; Wilke, Max;

    2016-01-01

    We present new experimental data of the low-temperature metastable region of liquid water derived from high-density synthetic fluid inclusions (996−916 kg/m3) in quartz. Microthermometric measurements include: i) Prograde (upon heating) and retrograde (upon cooling) liquid-vapour homogenisation. ...

  10. Improved Generalized Belief Propagation for Vision Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized belief propagation (GBP is a region-based belief propagation algorithm which can get good convergence in Markov random fields. However, the computation time is too heavy to use in practical engineering applications. This paper proposes a method to accelerate the efficiency of GBP. A caching technique and chessboard passing strategy are used to speed up algorithm. Then, the direction set method which is used to reduce the complexity of computing clique messages from quadric to cubic. With such a strategy the processing speed can be greatly increased. Besides, it is the first attempt to apply GBP for solving the stereomatching problem. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm can speed up by 15+ times for typical stereo matching problem and infer a more plausible result.

  11. Generation of Optical Vortices by Linear Phase Ramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Vyas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation of optical vortices using linear phase ramps is experimentally demonstrated. When two regions of a wavefront have opposite phase gradients then along the line of phase discontinuity vortices can be generated. It is shown that vortices can evolve during propagation even with the unequal magnitude of tilt in the two regions of the wavefront. The number of vortices and their location depend upon the magnitude of tilt. vortex generation is experimentally realized by encoding phase mask on spatial light modulator and their presence is detected interferometrically. Numerical simulation has been performed to calculate the diffracted intensity distribution from the phase mask, and presence of vortices in the diffracted field is detected by computational techniques.

  12. Efficient Geometric Sound Propagation Using Visibility Culling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Anish

    2011-07-01

    Simulating propagation of sound can improve the sense of realism in interactive applications such as video games and can lead to better designs in engineering applications such as architectural acoustics. In this thesis, we present geometric sound propagation techniques which are faster than prior methods and map well to upcoming parallel multi-core CPUs. We model specular reflections by using the image-source method and model finite-edge diffraction by using the well-known Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin (BTM) model. We accelerate the computation of specular reflections by applying novel visibility algorithms, FastV and AD-Frustum, which compute visibility from a point. We accelerate finite-edge diffraction modeling by applying a novel visibility algorithm which computes visibility from a region. Our visibility algorithms are based on frustum tracing and exploit recent advances in fast ray-hierarchy intersections, data-parallel computations, and scalable, multi-core algorithms. The AD-Frustum algorithm adapts its computation to the scene complexity and allows small errors in computing specular reflection paths for higher computational efficiency. FastV and our visibility algorithm from a region are general, object-space, conservative visibility algorithms that together significantly reduce the number of image sources compared to other techniques while preserving the same accuracy. Our geometric propagation algorithms are an order of magnitude faster than prior approaches for modeling specular reflections and two to ten times faster for modeling finite-edge diffraction. Our algorithms are interactive, scale almost linearly on multi-core CPUs, and can handle large, complex, and dynamic scenes. We also compare the accuracy of our sound propagation algorithms with other methods. Once sound propagation is performed, it is desirable to listen to the propagated sound in interactive and engineering applications. We can generate smooth, artifact-free output audio signals by applying

  13. A database for propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Choung

    1993-08-01

    The NASA Propagation Program supports academic research that models various propagation phenomena in the space research frequency bands. NASA supports such research via school and institutions prominent in the field. The products of such efforts are particularly useful for researchers in the field of propagation phenomena and telecommunications systems engineers. The systems engineer usually needs a few propagation parameter values for a system design. Published literature on the subject, such as the Cunsultative Committee for International Radio (CCIR) publications, may help somewhat, but often times, the parameter values given in such publications use a particular set of conditions which may not quite include the requirements of the system design. The systems engineer must resort to programming the propagation phenomena model of interest and to obtain the parameter values to be used in the project. Furthermore, the researcher in the propagation field must then program the propagation models either to substantiate the model or to generate a new model. The researcher or the systems engineer must either be a skillful computer programmer or hire a programmer, which of course increases the cost of the effort. An increase in cost due to the inevitable programming effort may seem particularly inappropriate if the data generated by the experiment is to be used to substantiate the already well-established models, or a slight variation thereof. To help researchers and the systems engineers, it was recommended by the participants of NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) 15 held in London, Ontario, Canada on 28-29 June 1991, that propagation software should be constructed which will contain models and prediction methods of most propagation phenomenon. Moreover, the software should be flexible enough for the user to make slight changes to the models without expending a substantial effort in programming.

  14. Gluon and ghost propagator studies in lattice QCD at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouane, Rafik

    2013-04-29

    Gluon and ghost propagators in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) computed in the infrared momentum region play an important role to understand quark and gluon confinement. They are the subject of intensive research thanks to non-perturbative methods based on Dyson-Schwinger (DS) and functional renormalization group (FRG) equations. Moreover, their temperature behavior might also help to explore the chiral and deconfinement phase transition or crossover within QCD at non-zero temperature. Our prime tool is the lattice discretized QCD (LQCD) providing a unique ab-initio non-perturbative approach to deal with the computation of various observables of the hadronic world. We investigate the temperature dependence of Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators in pure gluodynamics and in full QCD. Regarding the gluon propagator, we compute its longitudinal D{sub L} as well its transversal D{sub T} components. The aim is to provide a data set in terms of fitting formulae which can be used as input for DS (or FRG) equations. We deal with full (N{sub f}=2) LQCD with the twisted mass fermion discretization. We employ gauge field configurations provided by the tmfT collaboration for temperatures in the crossover region and for three fixed pion mass values in the range [300,500] MeV. Finally, within SU(3) pure gauge theory (at T=0) we compute the Landau gauge gluon propagator according to different gauge fixing criteria. Our goal is to understand the influence of gauge copies with minimal (non-trivial) eigenvalues of the Faddeev-Popov operator.

  15. On the propagation of a coupled saturation and pressure front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid for a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity, I derive an expression for the velocity of a propagating, coupled saturation and pressure front. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing equations, the velocity of the propagating front depends upon the magnitude of the saturation and pressure changes across the front in addition to the properties of the medium. Thus, the expression must be evaluated in conjunction with numerical reservoir simulation. The propagation of the two-phase front is governed by the background saturation distribution, the saturation-dependent component of the fluid mobility, the porosity, the permeability, the capillary pressure function, the medium compressibility, and the ratio of the slopes of the relative permeability curves. Numerical simulation of water injection into a porous layer saturated with a nonaqueous phase liquid indicates that two modes of propagation are important. The fastest mode of propagation is a pressure-dominated disturbance that travels through the saturated layer. This is followed, much later, by a coupled mode with a large saturation change. These two modes are also observed in a simulation using a heterogeneous porous layer. A comparison between the propagation times estimated from the results of the numerical simulation and predictions from the asymptotic expression indicates overall agreement.

  16. Wave Damping Observed in Upwardly Propagating Sausage-mode Oscillations contained within a Magnetic Pore

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, S D T; Moreels, M G; Morton, R J; Christian, D J; Giagkiozis, I; Verth, G; Fedun, V; Keys, P H; Van Doorsselaere, T; Erdelyi, R

    2015-01-01

    We present observational evidence of compressible magnetohydrodynamic wave modes propagating from the solar photosphere through to the base of the transition region in a solar magnetic pore. High cadence images were obtained simultaneously across four wavelength bands using the Dunn Solar Telescope. Employing Fourier and wavelet techniques, sausage-mode oscillations displaying significant power were detected in both intensity and area fluctuations. The intensity and area fluctuations exhibit a range of periods from 181-412s, with an average period ~290s, consistent with the global p-mode spectrum. Intensity and area oscillations present in adjacent bandpasses were found to be out-of-phase with one another, displaying phase angles of 6.12 degrees, 5.82 degrees and 15.97 degrees between 4170 Angstrom continuum - G-band, G-band - Na I D1 and Na I D1 - Ca II K heights, respectively, reiterating the presence of upwardly-propagating sausage-mode waves. A phase relationship of ~0 degrees between same-bandpass emissi...

  17. Wave Damping Observed in Upwardly Propagating Sausage-mode Oscillations Contained within a Magnetic Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Moreels, M. G.; Morton, R. J.; Christian, D. J.; Giagkiozis, I.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Keys, P. H.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Erdélyi, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present observational evidence of compressible MHD wave modes propagating from the solar photosphere through to the base of the transition region in a solar magnetic pore. High cadence images were obtained simultaneously across four wavelength bands using the Dunn Solar Telescope. Employing Fourier and wavelet techniques, sausage-mode oscillations displaying significant power were detected in both intensity and area fluctuations. The intensity and area fluctuations exhibit a range of periods from 181 to 412 s, with an average period ˜290 s, consistent with the global p-mode spectrum. Intensity and area oscillations present in adjacent bandpasses were found to be out of phase with one another, displaying phase angles of 6.°12, 5.°82, and 15.°97 between the 4170 Å continuum-G-band, G-band-Na i D1, and Na i D1-Ca ii K heights, respectively, reiterating the presence of upwardly propagating sausage-mode waves. A phase relationship of ˜0° between same-bandpass emission and area perturbations of the pore best categorizes the waves as belonging to the “slow” regime of a dispersion diagram. Theoretical calculations reveal that the waves are surface modes, with initial photospheric energies in excess of 35,000 W m-2. The wave energetics indicate a substantial decrease in energy with atmospheric height, confirming that magnetic pores are able to transport waves that exhibit appreciable energy damping, which may release considerable energy into the local chromospheric plasma.

  18. Anisotropy of light propagation in biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, A.; Forster, F. K.; Hibst, R.

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the propagation of light in biological tissues that have aligned cylindrical microstructures (e.g., muscle, skin, bone, tooth). Because of pronounced anisotropic light scattering by cylindrical structures (e.g., myofibrils and collagen fibers) the spatially resolved reflectance exhibits a directional dependence that is different close to and far from the incident source. We applied Monte Carlo simulations, using the phase function of an infinitely long cylinder, to explain quantitatively the experimental results. These observations have consequences for noninvasive determination of the optical properties of tissue as well as for the diagnosis of early tissue alterations.

  19. Supersaturation of vertically propagating internal gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindzen, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    The usual assumption that vertically propagating internal gravity waves will cease growing with height once their amplitudes are such as to permit convective instability anywhere within the wave is reexamined. Two factors lead to amplitude limitation: (1) wave clipping associated with convective mixing, and (2) energetic constraints associated with the rate at which the wave can supply energy to the convection. It is found that these two factors limit supersaturation to about 50 percent for waves with short horizontal wavelengths and high relative phase speeds. Usually the degree of supersaturation will be much less. These factors also lead to a gradual, rather than sudden, cessation of wave growth with height.

  20. Distribution and Properties of Aerosol and Gas Phase Constituents within Biomass Burning Regional Haze in Brazil, 2012, during the Sambba (South American Biomass Burning Analysis) Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, E.; Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Trembath, J.; Szpek, K.; Langridge, J.; Brooke, J.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Johnson, B. T.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2014-12-01

    haze BBA physiochemical properties are determined at source as a function of local burn conditions (combustion phase, fuel, etc.). This work presents a synthesis of the aerosol, gas phase and thermodynamic state of the Brazilian atmosphere under the influence of biomass burning regional haze and assesses regional climate implications.

  1. Modeling of Developing Inhomogeneities in the Ferrite Microstructure and Resulting Mechanical Properties Induced by Deformation in the Two-Phase Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majta, J; Zurek, A.K.; Pietrzyk, M.

    1999-07-13

    The differences in microstructure development of hot deformed steels in the austenite and two-phase region have been effectively described using an integrated computer modeling process. In general, the complete model presented here takes into account kinetics of recrystallization, precipitation, phase transformation, recrystallized austenite grain size, ferrite grain size, and the resulting mechanical properties. The transformation submodel of niobium-microalloyed steels is based on the nucleation and grain growth theory and additivity rule. The thermomechanical part of the modeling process was effectively carried out using the finite element method. Results were obtained in different temperatures, strain rates, and range of deformation. The thermomechanical treatments are different for two grades of niobium-steels to make possible analysis of the resulting structure and properties for different histories of deformation and chemical composition.

  2. Three-phase numerical model for subsurface hydrology in permafrost-affected regions (PFLOTRAN-ICE v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, S.; Painter, S. L.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2014-10-01

    Degradation of near-surface permafrost due to changes in the climate is expected to impact the hydrological, ecological and biogeochemical responses of the Arctic tundra. From a hydrological perspective, it is important to understand the movement of the various phases of water (gas, liquid and ice) during the freezing and thawing of near-surface soils. We present a new non-isothermal, single-component (water), three-phase formulation that treats air as an inactive component. This single component model works well and produces similar results to a more complete and computationally demanding two-component (air, water) formulation, and is able to reproduce results of previously published laboratory experiments. A proof-of-concept implementation in the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport code PFLOTRAN is summarized, and parallel performance of that implementation is demonstrated. When water vapor diffusion is considered, a large effect on soil moisture dynamics is seen, which is due to dependence of thermal conductivity on ice content. A large three-dimensional simulation (with around 6 million degrees of freedom) of seasonal freezing and thawing is also presented.

  3. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  4. Comparison of magnetic resonance feature tracking with harmonic phase imaging analysis (CSPAMM) for assessment of global and regional diastolic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuetting, D.; Sprinkart, A.M.; Doerner, J.; Schild, H.; Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Feature Tracking (FT) may be employed for the detection of diastolic dysfunction. • FT regional strain analysis lacks consistent correlation to tagged results. • FT derived strain is not as reproducible as tagged derived strain. • FT based rotational analysis is not a robust alternative to tagged analysis. - Abstract: Aims: Complex post-processing is required for strain-derived assessment of diastolic dysfunction (DD) using CMR-tagging (TAG). Feature-tracking (FT), allows for rapid systolic strain assessment using conventional steady-state free precession (SSFP)-Cine sequences. Aim of this study was to investigate whether FT may be employed for the clinically applicable quantification of DD. Methods and Results: 40 individuals (20 patients with DD I-III°, 20 controls) were investigated. CSPAMM and SSFP-Cine sequences were acquired in identical short-axis locations. Global and regional early diastolic strain rate (EDSR), peak diastolic strain rate (PDSR), twist, untwist and torsion were calculated from tagged and SSFP-Cine datasets. DD indices were compared, intra- as well inter-observer variability assessed. Results: for global EDSR correlated strongly (r = 0.94), revealed good agreement and no significant differences between both methods. Correlation for regional EDSR was lower, results differed significantly in the anterior wall (p < 0.05). Correlation for PDSR was moderate (r = 0.63), results in the healthy control group differed significantly (p < 0.05). FT derived rotational indices correlated poorly with TAG (twist: r = 0.28; untwist: r = 0.02; torsion: r = 0.26), subgroup analysis revealed significant differences (p < 0.05). Intra- and inter-observer variability for FT derived global EDSR and PDSR were comparable to TAG, but significantly higher for regional EDSR and rotational indices. Conclusion: FT derived global EDSR allows for rapid clinical determination of diastolic dysfunction, revealing good agreement with TAG and low intra

  5. Phase Segregation and Superior Thermoelectric Properties of Mg2Si(1-x)Sb(x) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.025) Prepared by Ultrafast Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Su, Xianli; Yan, Yonggao; Xie, Hongyao; Liang, Tao; You, Yonghui; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2016-02-10

    A series of Sb-doped Mg2Si(1-x)Sb(x) compounds with the Sb content x within 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.025 were prepared by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) combined with plasma activated sintering (PAS) method in less than 20 min. Thermodynamic parameters of the SHS process, such as adiabatic temperature, ignition temperature, combustion temperature, and propagation speed of the combustion wave, were determined for the first time. Nanoprecipitates were observed for the samples doped with Sb. Thermoelectric properties were characterized in the temperature range of 300-875 K. With the increasing content of Sb, the electrical conductivity σ rises markedly while the Seebeck coefficient α decreases, which is attributed to the increase in carrier concentration. The carrier mobility μ(H) decreases slightly with the increasing carrier concentration but remains larger than the Sb-doped samples prepared by other methods, which is ascribed to the self-purification process associated with the SHS synthesis. In spite of the increasing electrical conductivity with the increasing Sb content x, the overall thermal conductivity κ decreases on account of a significantly falled lattice thermal conductivity κ(L) due to the strong point defect scattering on Sb impurities and possibly enhanced interface scattering on nanoprecipitates. As a result, the sample with x = 0.02 achieves the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT ∼ 0.65 at 873 K, one of the highest values for the Sb-doped binary Mg2Si compounds investigated so far. A subsequent annealing treatment on the sample with x = 0.02 at 773 K for 7 days has resulted in no noticeble changes in the thermoelectric transport properties, indicating an excellent thermal stability of the compounds prepared by the SHS method. Therefore, SHS method can serve as an effective alternative fabrication route to synthesize Mg-Si based themoelectrics and some other functional materials due to the resulting high performance, perfect thermal

  6. Road-testing the outreach best practices manual: Applicability for implementation of the development phase projects by the regional carbon sequestration partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, D.; Bradbury, J.; Garrett, G.; Greenberg, S.; Myhre, R.; Peterson, T.; Tollefson, L.; Wade, S.; Sacuta, N.

    2011-01-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage verification tests by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) provided the experience base for the Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects, a best practices manual, published in December 2009. This paper summarizes these outreach best practices; discusses their application in Aquistorc, a grcenficld CO2 storage project under way in western Canada; and reviews the implications for applying the best practices to new projects during the Development Phase of the DOE's RCSP Program. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  8. Phase behaviour of transfer functions in vibrating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jianyuan; Ohlrich, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicabilities of pole-zero models and wave propagation theory in estimating the phase characteristics of vibrating systems. The measured phase spectra are compared with the estimated reverberant phase limit and wave propagation phase. The relations between transfer...... on frequency in this band, but from the transition frequency and onwards the phase increases only with the square root of frequency. This behaviour is characteristic for free propagating waves....

  9. Connecting the X(5)-$\\beta^2$, X(5)-$\\beta^4$, and X(3) models to the shape/phase transition region of the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    McCutchan, E A; Zamfir, N V; Bonatsos, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The parameter independent (up to overall scale factors) predictions of the X(5)-$\\beta^2$, X(5)-$\\beta^4$, and X(3) models, which are variants of the X(5) critical point symmetry developed within the framework of the geometric collective model, are compared to two-parameter calculations in the framework of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model. The results show that these geometric models coincide with IBA parameters consistent with the phase/shape transition region of the IBA for boson numbers of physical interest (close to 10). Nuclei within the rare-earth region and select Os and Pt isotopes are identified as good examples of X(3), X(5)-$\\beta^2$, and X(5)-$\\beta^4$ behavior.

  10. Radial propagators and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, S; Leupold, Stefan; Weigert, Heribert

    1996-01-01

    We present a relation which connects the propagator in the radial (Fock-Schwinger) gauge with a gauge invariant Wilson loop. It is closely related to the well-known field strength formula and can be used to calculate the radial gauge propagator. The result is shown to diverge in four-dimensional space even for free fields, its singular nature is however naturally explained using the renormalization properties of Wilson loops with cusps and self-intersections. Using this observation we provide a consistent regularization scheme to facilitate loop calculations. Finally we compare our results with previous approaches to derive a propagator in Fock-Schwinger gauge.

  11. Particle propagation in cosmological backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We study the quantum propagation of particles in cosmological backgrounds, by considering a doublet of massive scalar fields propagating in an expanding universe, possibly filled with radiation. We focus on the dissipative effects related to the expansion rate. At first order, we recover the expected result that the decay rate is determined by the local temperature. Beyond linear order, the decay rate has an additional contribution governed by the expansion parameter. This latter contribution is present even for stable particles in the vacuum. Finally, we analyze the long time behaviour of the propagator and briefly discuss applications to the trans-Planckian question.

  12. TSUNAMI WAVE PROPAGATION ALONG WAVEGUIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Marchuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of tsunami wave propagation along the waveguide on a bottom ridge with flat sloping sides, using the wave rays method. During propagation along such waveguide the single tsunami wave transforms into a wave train. The expression for the guiding velocities of the fastest and slowest signals is defined. The tsunami wave behavior above the ocean bottom ridges, which have various model profiles, is investigated numerically with the help of finite difference method. Results of numerical experiments show that the highest waves are detected above a ridge with flat sloping sides. Examples of tsunami propagation along bottom ridges of the Pacific Ocean are presented.

  13. Intrinsic spontaneous emission-induced fluctuations of the output optical beam power and phase in a diode amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, A. P.; Drakin, A. E.; D'yachkov, N. V.; Gushchik, T. I.

    2016-08-01

    Output optical beam intensity and phase fluctuations are analysed in a classical approach to describing the propagation and amplification of spontaneous emission in the active region of a laser diode with a gain saturated by input monochromatic light. We find their spectral densities and dispersion and the correlation coefficient of the two-dimensional probability distribution function of the fluctuations.

  14. Scattering of relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons by obliquely propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzbekov, Bogdan; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Orlova, Ksenia

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are transverse plasma waves that are generated in the Earth magnetosphere by ring current protons with temperature anisotropy in three different bands: below the H+, He+ and O+ ion gyrofrequencies. EMIC events are enhanced during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm when intensifications in the electric field result in enhanced injections of ions and are usually confined to high-density regions just inside the plasmapause or within drainage plumes. EMIC waves are capable of scattering radiation belt electrons and thus provide an important link between the intensification of the electric field, ion populations, and radiation belt electrons. Bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients computed with the assumption of parallel wave propagation are compared to the results of the code that uses the full cold plasma dispersion relation taking into account oblique propagation of waves and higher-order resonances. We study the sensitivity of the scattering rates to a number of included higher-order resonances, wave spectral distribution parameters, wave normal angle distribution parameters, ambient plasma density, and ion composition. Inaccuracies associated with the neglect of higher-order resonances and oblique propagation of waves are compared to potential errors introduced by uncertainties in the model input parameters.

  15. The influence of time-dependent wind on gravity-wave propagation in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhong

    Full Text Available Ray-tracing techniques are used to computationally investigate the propagation of gravity waves through the middle atmosphere, as characterized by the vertically varying CIRA-86 wind and temperature models, plus a tidal wind model that varies temporally as well as vertically. For the wave parameters studied here, the background wind variation has a much stronger influence on the ray path and changes in wave characteristics than does the temperature variation. The temporal variation of the tidal component of the wind changes the observed frequency, sometimes substantially, while leaving the intrinsic frequency unaltered. It also renders temporary any critical levels that occur in the tidal region. Different starting times for the rays relative to the tidal phase provide different propagation environments, so that the temporary critical levels appear at different heights. The lateral component of the tidal wind is shown to advect propagating wave packets; the maximum lateral displacement of a packet varies inversely with its vertical group velocity. Time-dependent effects are more pronounced in local winter than in summer.

  16. Study for Reliability of Interpretation of the Three Phase Bone Scintigraphy in Patients with Post-traumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Mi [Bucheon Hospital Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jung [National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seung Hyun [National Cancer Center, Koyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Taek [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    We performed this study to evaluate reliability on interpretation of three phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) in patients with post-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome (PT-CRPS). Based on International Association for the Study of Pain guideline in 1994, 34 patients with PT-CRPS were selected for this study. Two nuclear medicine physicians evaluated identical TPBS according to the uptake pattern, extent and intensity of the lesion, and their agreements (kappa values) were analysed. The final diagnosis based on arbitrary criteria of each physician were compared with those obtained by the criteria for PT-CRPS established in this study, which are hyperactivity on all phases (criteria 1), hyperactivity of whole joints on delayed phase (criteria 2), and hyperactivity of either whole or focal joints on delayed phase (criteria 3). Intra-observer agreements were good for uptake pattern, intensity, and extent on TPBS. Inter-observer agreements were also good, except extent on blood pool phase (0.55). The inter-observer agreements on final diagnosis improved when criteria 1-3 were applied (0.77-0.88), compared to when physician's own criteria were used (0.63). Those also improved from 0.29 to 0.47-0.82 for acute stage, and from 0.37 to 1.0 for chronic stage. The sensitivities of chronic stage were relatively lower to those of acute stage. Inter-observer's variations in diagnosis of the patients with PT-CRPS using TPBS were observed. These results were attributed to different criteria set by observers. In order to improve agreement on interpretation of TPBS, common positive criteria should be established, especially considering uptake pattern and clinical stages.

  17. The Schmidt-Kennicutt Law of Matched-Age Star Forming Regions; Pa-alpha Observations of the Early-Phase Interacting Galaxy Taffy I

    CERN Document Server

    Komugi, S; Motohara, K; Takagi, T; Iono, D; Kaneko, H; Ueda, J; Saitoh, T R; Kato, N; Konishi, M; Koshida, S; Morokuma, T; Takahashi, H; Tanabe, T; Yoshii, Y

    2012-01-01

    In order to test a recent hypothesis that the dispersion in the Schmidt-Kennicutt law arises from variations in the evolutionary stage of star forming molecular clouds, we compared molecular gas and recent star formation in an early-phase merger galaxy pair, Taffy I (UGC\\ 12915/UGC\\ 12914, VV\\ 254) which went through a direct collision 20 Myr ago and whose star forming regions are expected to have similar ages. Narrow-band Pa-alpha image is obtained using the ANIR near-infrared camera on the mini-TAO 1m telescope. The image enables us to derive accurate star formation rates within the galaxy directly. The total star formation rate, 22.2 M_sun/yr, was found to be much higher than previous estimates. Ages of individual star forming blobs estimated from equivalent widths indicate that most star forming regions are ~7 Myr old, except for a giant HII region at the bridge which is much younger. Comparison between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for the regions with the same age exhibits a surprisingly...

  18. Analyses of Tsunami Events using Simple Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilvery, Ashwith Kumar; Tan, Arjun; Aggarwal, Mohan

    2012-03-01

    Tsunamis exhibit the characteristics of ``canal waves'' or ``gravity waves'' which belong to the class of ``long ocean waves on shallow water.'' The memorable tsunami events including the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Pacific Ocean tsunami off the coast of Japan are analyzed by constructing simple tsunami propagation models including the following: (1) One-dimensional propagation model; (2) Two-dimensional propagation model on flat surface; (3) Two-dimensional propagation model on spherical surface; and (4) A finite line-source model on two-dimensional surface. It is shown that Model 1 explains the basic features of the tsunami including the propagation speed, depth of the ocean, dispersion-less propagation and bending of tsunamis around obstacles. Models 2 and 3 explain the observed amplitude variations for long-distance tsunami propagation across the Pacific Ocean, including the effect of the equatorial ocean current on the arrival times. Model 3 further explains the enhancement effect on the amplitude due to the curvature of the Earth past the equatorial distance. Finally, Model 4 explains the devastating effect of superposition of tsunamis from two subduction event, which struck the Phuket region during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

  19. Propagation law of impact elastic wave based on specific materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmin CHEN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the propagation law of the impact elastic wave on the platform, the experimental platform is built by using the specific isotropic materials and anisotropic materials. The glass cloth epoxy laminated plate is used for anisotropic material, and an organic glass plate is used for isotropic material. The PVDF sensors adhered on the specific materials are utilized to collect data, and the elastic wave propagation law of different thick plates and laminated plates under impact conditions is analyzed. The Experimental results show that in anisotropic material, transverse wave propagation speed along the fiber arrangement direction is the fastest, while longitudinal wave propagation speed is the slowest. The longitudinal wave propagation speed in anisotropic laminates is much slower than that in the laminated thick plates. In the test channel arranged along a particular angle away from the central region of the material, transverse wave propagation speed is larger. Based on the experimental results, this paper proposes a material combination mode which is advantageous to elastic wave propagation and diffusion in shock-isolating materials. It is proposed to design a composite material with high acoustic velocity by adding regularly arranged fibrous materials. The overall design of the barrier material is a layered structure and a certain number of 90°zigzag structure.

  20. Two types of whistler waves in the hall reconnection region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Fu, H. S.; Yuan, Z. G.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Retino, A.; Zhou, M.; Graham, D. B.; Fujimoto, K.; Sahraoui, F.; Deng, X. H.; Ni, B.; Pang, Y.; Fu, S.; Wang, D. D.; Zhou, X.

    2016-07-01

    Whistler waves are believed to play an important role during magnetic reconnection. Here we report the near-simultaneous occurrence of two types of the whistler-mode waves in the magnetotail Hall reconnection region. The first type is observed in the magnetic pileup region of downstream and propagates away to downstream along the field lines and is possibly generated by the electron temperature anisotropy at the magnetic equator. The second type, propagating toward the X line, is found around the separatrix region and probably is generated by the electron beam-driven whistler instability or Čerenkov emission from electron phase-space holes. These observations of two different types of whistler waves are consistent with recent kinetic simulations and suggest that the observed whistler waves are a consequence of magnetic reconnection.