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Sample records for regional glucose utilization

  1. Stress-induced decreases in local cerebral glucose utilization in specific regions of the mouse brain

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    Warnock Geoff I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restraint stress in rodents has been reported to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis and to increase c-fos expression in regions that express components of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF system. We have previously reported that acute central administration of CRF increased a measure of relative local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU, a measure of neuronal activity in specific brain regions, and activated the HPA axis in mice. It was hypothesized that the involvement of the CRF system in the stress response would lead to similar changes in relative LCGU after restraint stress. In the present studies the effect of restraint stress on relative LCGU and on the HPA axis in C57BL/6N mice were examined. Findings Restraint stress activated the HPA axis in a restraint-duration dependent manner, but in contrast to the reported effects of CRF, significantly decreased relative LCGU in frontal cortical, thalamic, hippocampal and temporal dissected regions. These findings support evidence that stressors enforcing limited physical activity reduce relative LCGU, in contrast to high activity stressors such as swim stress. Conclusions In conclusion, the present studies do not support the hypothesis that stress-induced changes in relative LCGU are largely mediated by the CRF system. Further studies will help to delineate the role of the CRF system in the early phases of the relative LCGU response to stress and investigate the role of other neurotransmitter systems in this response.

  2. Stress-induced decreases in local cerebral glucose utilization in specific regions of the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Geoff I; Steckler, Thomas

    2011-03-31

    Restraint stress in rodents has been reported to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and to increase c-fos expression in regions that express components of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system. We have previously reported that acute central administration of CRF increased a measure of relative local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU), a measure of neuronal activity in specific brain regions, and activated the HPA axis in mice. It was hypothesized that the involvement of the CRF system in the stress response would lead to similar changes in relative LCGU after restraint stress. In the present studies the effect of restraint stress on relative LCGU and on the HPA axis in C57BL/6N mice were examined. Restraint stress activated the HPA axis in a restraint-duration dependent manner, but in contrast to the reported effects of CRF, significantly decreased relative LCGU in frontal cortical, thalamic, hippocampal and temporal dissected regions. These findings support evidence that stressors enforcing limited physical activity reduce relative LCGU, in contrast to high activity stressors such as swim stress. In conclusion, the present studies do not support the hypothesis that stress-induced changes in relative LCGU are largely mediated by the CRF system. Further studies will help to delineate the role of the CRF system in the early phases of the relative LCGU response to stress and investigate the role of other neurotransmitter systems in this response.

  3. Regionally selective alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization evoked by charybdotoxin, a blocker of central voltage-activated K+-channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, S M; Harvey, A L; Pratt, J A

    2001-11-01

    The quantitative [14C]-2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic technique was employed to investigate the effect of charybdotoxin, a blocker of certain voltage-activated K+ channels, on functional activity, as reflected by changes in local rates of cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain. Intracerebroventricular administration of charybdotoxin, at doses below those producing seizure activity, produced a heterogeneous effect on glucose utilization throughout the brain. Out of the 75 brain regions investigated, 24 displayed alterations in glucose utilization. The majority of these changes were observed with the intermediate dose of charybdotoxin administered (12.5 pmol), with the lower (6.25 pmol) and higher (25 pmol) doses of charybdotoxin producing a much more restricted pattern of change in glucose utilization. In brain regions which displayed alterations in glucose at all doses of charybdotoxin administered, no dose dependency in terms of the magnitude of change was observed. The 21 brain regions which displayed altered functional activity after administration of 12.5 pmol charybdotoxin were predominantly limited to the hippocampus, limbic and motor structures. In particular, glucose utilization was altered within three pathways implicated within learning and memory processes, the septohippocampal pathway, Schaffer collaterals within the hippocampus and the Papez circuit. The nigrostriatal pathway also displayed altered local cerebral glucose utilization. These data indicate that charybdotoxin produces alterations in functional activity within selected pathways in the brain. Furthermore the results raise the possibility that manipulation of particular subtypes of Kv1 channels in the hippocampus and related structures may be a means of altering cognitive processes without causing global changes in neural activity throughout the brain.

  4. Altered quinpirole-induced local cerebral glucose utilization in anterior cortical regions in rats after sensitization to quinpirole.

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    Richards, Toni L; Pazdernik, Thomas L; Levant, Beth

    2005-04-25

    Dopaminergic psychostimulants produce behavioral responses of greater magnitude with repeated, intermittent administration, than a single, acute dose, a phenomenon known as "sensitization." Most studies of sensitization have focused on the "motive circuit"; however, some additional anterior cortical regions also appear to be affected. In this study, alterations in regional neuronal activity in anterior cortical brain areas produced by quinpirole, a D(2)/D(3) agonist, were assessed on the basis of local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) using the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method. Adult, male Long-Evans rats (180-200 g, n = 7-9/group) were subjected to ten injections of quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) administered every third day; controls and drug-naive rats received saline. Locomotor activity was quantitated after injections one and ten to confirm sensitization. The 2-DG procedure was initiated 60 min after an 11th injection in freely moving rats. LCGU was determined in 11 anterior cortical brain regions by quantitative autoradiography. In drug-naive rats, quinpirole decreased LCGU in the cingulate cortex-area 3 (-16%) and infralimbic cortex (-16%). In sensitized rats, quinpirole decreased LCGU in the cingulate cortex-area 1 (-19%), frontal cortex-area 3 (-19%), lateral orbital cortex (-18%), medial/ventral orbital cortex (-17%), and parietal cortex (-17%) as well as in the cingulate cortex-area 3 (-19%) and infralimbic cortex (-20%); (all P < 0.05 v. control). This suggests that decreased neuronal activity in the cingulate cortex-area 1, frontal cortex-area 3, lateral orbital cortex, medial/ventral orbital cortex, and parietal cortex, in addition to altered activity in the motive circuit, may underlie the augmented behavioral response to quinpirole in sensitized animals.

  5. Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifan; Kuang, Youzhi; Xu, Kui; Harris, Donald; Lee, Zhenghong; LaManna, Joseph; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2013-08-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRglc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMRglc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde-Patlak analysis. The average CMRglc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMRglc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9% for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMRglc with ketosis.

  6. Acute ethanol effects on local cerebral glucose utilization in select central nervous system regions of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strother, Wendy N; Lumeng, Lawrence; McBride, William J

    2008-11-01

    Alcohol abuse among adolescents is a major health and developmental problem. The 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique allows for the in vivo quantification of local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) as a measure of functional neuronal activity. Local cerebral glucose utilization rates were examined after acute ethanol administration within selected brain regions of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) and -nonpreferring (NP) rats. Postnatal day 45 male P and NP rats were injected with saline or 1.0 g/kg ethanol, i.p., 10 minutes prior to an intravenous bolus of [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (125 microCi/kg). Image densities were determined using quantitative autoradiography and LCGU values calculated. Acute ethanol injection significantly decreased LCGU rates in select brain regions including the olfactory tubercles, the frontal cortex (Fr), and subregions of the posterior hippocampus (pCA1 and pCA3). Acute ethanol had no significant effects on LCGU rates in any region of the adolescent NP rats. Significant basal LCGU rate differences were apparent between the rat lines in a nearly global fashion with adolescent P rats having much higher basal LCGU rates compared with adolescent NP rats. These findings suggest that the adolescent P and NP rats are less sensitive to the effects of acute ethanol than their adult counterparts. The adolescent P rat is relatively more sensitive to the initial effects of acute ethanol in select brain regions as compared with the adolescent NP rat. Additionally, the innate hyper-excited state of the adolescent P central nervous system is a likely factor in the development of their high alcohol drinking behaviors.

  7. Acute challenge with d-fenfluramine decreases regional cerebral glucose utilization in Sham, but not in OBX, rats: an autoradiographic study.

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    Skelin, Ivan; Sato, Hiroki; Diksic, Mirko

    2010-01-15

    The olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) rat is an animal model of depression with neurochemical, neuroendocrinological and behavioral features resembling some human depression. d-Fenfluramine is a 5-HT releasing drug, frequently used in the study of the responsivity of the 5-HT system in subjects with psychiatric disorders, including depression. The aim of the study is to assess the influence of the serotonin-releaser, d-fenfluramine, in the OBX rat model of depression, as measured by the change in the regional cerebral glucose utilization rCGU) following d-fenfluramine injection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (160-180 g) were used. The rats were divided into OBX and Sham groups. Two weeks following the olfactory bulbectomy or the sham surgery, six rats (randomly assigned) from each group received an i.p. injection of d-fenfluramine with a dose of 5 mg/kg or the same volume of saline. Twenty minutes later, the rCGU rates were measured using 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose autoradiography. The general linear model statistical analysis has shown that the rCGU in the sham-operated rats treated with d-fenfluramine, compared to the sham-operated rats treated with saline, was lower in 14 (36%) out of 39 examined brain regions. There was no significant difference in the rCGU between the OBX rats treated with d-fenfluramine and OBX rats treated with saline. The results suggest the blunted capacity of the 5-HT system in OBX rats to respond to the challenge by the 5-HT releasing compound, d-fenfluramine. This resembles similar findings in clinical studies on depressed patients. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization in mice by 18F-FDG small animal PET scanning and 2-14C-DG autoradiography.

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    Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Modell, Kendra J; Vines, Douglass C; Esaki, Takanori; Cook, Michelle; Seidel, Jurgen; Sokoloff, Louis; Green, Michael V; Innis, Robert B

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCMR(glc)) in mice by use of (18)F-FDG and a small animal PET scanner. rCMR(glc) determined with (18)F-FDG PET was compared with values determined simultaneously by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method. In addition, we compared the rCMR(glc) values under isoflurane, ketamine and xylazine anesthesia, and awake states. Immediately after injection of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG into mice, timed arterial samples were drawn over 45 min to determine the time courses of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG. Animals were euthanized at 45 min and their brain was imaged with the PET scanner. The brains were then processed for 2-(14)C-DG autoradiography. Regions of interest were manually placed over cortical regions on corresponding coronal (18)F-FDG PET and 2-(14)C-DG autoradiographic images. rCMR(glc) values were calculated for both tracers by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method with modifications for the different rate and lumped constants for the 2 tracers. Average rCMR(glc) values in cerebral cortex with (18)F-FDG PET under normoglycemic conditions (isoflurane and awake) were generally lower (by 8.3%) but strongly correlated with those of 2-(14)C-DG (r(2) = 0.95). On the other hand, under hyperglycemic conditions (ketamine/xylazine) average cortical rCMR(glc) values with (18)F-FDG PET were higher (by 17.3%) than those with 2-(14)C-DG. Values for rCMR(glc) and uptake (percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g]) with (18)F-FDG PET were significantly lower under both isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine anesthesia than in the awake mice. However, the reductions of rCMR(glc) were markedly greater under isoflurane (by 57%) than under ketamine and xylazine (by 19%), whereas more marked reductions of %ID/g were observed with ketamine/xylazine (by 54%) than with isoflurane (by 37%). These reverse differences between isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine may be due to

  9. Glucose And Hydrocarbon Utilization By Bacteria Isolated From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of the bacterial isolates to utilize glucose and hydrocarbon as substrates for energy and carbon has beneficial application in bioremediation technology in the Niger Delta. KEY WORDS: Hydrocarbon utilization, glucose metabolism, bioremediation technology. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ...

  10. Effect of anesthesia on glucose production and utilization in rats

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    Penicaud, L.; Ferre, P.; Kande, J.; Leturque, A.; Issad, T.; Girard, J.

    1987-03-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia (50 mg/kg ip) on glucose kinetics and individual tissue glucose utilization in vivo, in chronically catheterized rats. Glucose turnover studies were carried out using (3-/sup 3/H) glucose as tracer. A transient hyperglycemia and an increased glucose production were observed 3 min after induction of anesthesia. However, 40 min after induction of anesthesia, glycemia returned to the level observed in awake animals, whereas glucose turnover was decreased by 30% as compared with unanesthetized rats. These results are discussed with regard to the variations observed in plasma insulin, glucagon, and catecholamine levels. Glucose utilization by individual tissues was studied by the 2-(1-/sup 3/H) deoxyglucose technique. A four- to fivefold decrease in glucose utilization was observed in postural muscles (soleus and adductor longus), while in other nonpostural muscles (epitrochlearis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm) and other tissues (white and brown adipose tissues) anesthesia did not modify the rate of glucose utilization. A decrease in glucose utilization was also observed in the brain.

  11. Glucose utilization rates regulate intake levels of artificial sweeteners

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    Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Han, Wenfei; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that animals including humans attribute greater reinforcing value to glucose-containing sugars compared to their non-caloric counterparts, generally termed ‘artificial sweeteners’. However, much remains to be determined regarding the physiological signals and brain systems mediating the attribution of greater reinforcing value to sweet solutions that contain glucose. Here we show that disruption of glucose utilization in mice produces an enduring inhibitory effect on artificial sweetener intake, an effect that did not depend on sweetness perception or aversion. Indeed, such an effect was not observed in mice presented with a less palatable, yet caloric, glucose solution. Consistently, hungry mice shifted their preferences away from artificial sweeteners and in favour of glucose after experiencing glucose in a hungry state. Glucose intake was found to produce significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppressed dorsal striatum dopamine efflux. Conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent gluco-deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by modulating extracellular dopamine levels in dorsal striatum, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake. PMID:24060992

  12. Cerebral glucose utilization in pediatric neurological disorders determined by positron emission tomography

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    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Iinuma, Kazuie; Miyabayashi, Shigeaki; Narisawa, Kuniaki; Tada, Keiya; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Ito, Masatoshi; Yamada, Kenji

    1987-09-01

    We measured local cerebral glucose utilization in 19 patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LG), partial seizures (PS), atypical and classical phenylketonuria (PKU), Leigh disease, and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), using positron emission tomography (PET). The mean values of regional glucose utilization in interictal scans of LG were significantly reduced in all brain regions when compared with that of PS (P<0.005). PET studies of glucose utilization in LG revealed more widespread hypometabolism than in PS. Two sibling with dihydropteridine reductase deficiency, a patient with classical PKU, and a boy with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency showed reduced glucose utilization in the caudate and putamen. A marked decrease in glucose utilization was found in the cortical gray matter of a patient with rapidly progressive SSPE, despite relatively preserved utilization in the caudate and putamen. The PET study of a patient with slowly progressive SSPE revealed patterns and values of glucose utilization similar to those of the control. Thus, PET provided a useful clue toward understanding brain dysfunction in LG, PS, PKU, Leigh disease, and SSPE.

  13. Changes in local cerebral glucose utilization during rewarding brain stimulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, R U; Porrino, L J; Seeger, T F; Crane, A M; Everist, H D; Pert, A

    1984-01-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy[14C]glucose method was used to determine local cerebral glucose utilization in unrestrained rats responding (lever-press) for rewarding electrical stimulation to area A10 (ventral tegmental area) and in similarly implanted inactive controls. Self-stimulation was associated with significant increases in metabolic activity, highly circumscribed in the ventral tegmental area, that continued rostrally within a rather compact zone of activity through the medial forebrain b...

  14. Changes in cerebral glucose utilization in patients with panic disorder treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy.

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    Sakai, Yojiro; Kumano, Hiroaki; Nishikawa, Masami; Sakano, Yuji; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Ohnishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Asako; Sato, Atsushi; Diksic, Mirko; Kuboki, Tomifusa

    2006-10-15

    Several neuroanatomical hypotheses of panic disorder have been proposed focusing on the significant role of the amygdala and PAG-related "panic neurocircuitry." Although cognitive-behavioral therapy is effective in patients with panic disorder, its therapeutic mechanism of action in the brain remains unclear. The present study was performed to investigate regional brain glucose metabolic changes associated with successful completion of cognitive-behavioral therapy in panic disorder patients. The regional glucose utilization in patients with panic disorder was compared before and after cognitive-behavioral therapy using positron emission tomography with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose. In 11 of 12 patients who showed improvement after cognitive-behavioral therapy, decreased glucose utilization was detected in the right hippocampus, left anterior cingulate, left cerebellum, and pons, whereas increased glucose utilization was seen in the bilateral medial prefrontal cortices. Significant correlations were found between the percent change relative to the pretreatment value of glucose utilization in the left medial prefrontal cortex and those of anxiety and agoraphobia-related subscale of the Panic Disorder Severity Scale, and between that of the midbrain and that of the number of panic attacks during the 4 weeks before each scan in all 12 patients. The completion of successful cognitive-behavioral therapy involved not only reduction of the baseline hyperactivity in several brain areas but also adaptive metabolic changes of the bilateral medial prefrontal cortices in panic disorder patients.

  15. Pituitary adenoma with seizures: PET demonstration of reduced glucose utilization in the medial temporal lobe

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    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Blume, H.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1986-05-01

    A patient with a benign chromophobe adenoma, who had incomplete surgical removal followed by radiotherapy, continued to have epileptic seizures up to two or three times a day. She was studied with positron emission tomography using /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). This technique showed a high level of glucose utilization in the area of the operated tumor but also clear reduction of glucose utilization in the left medial temporal region adjacent to the sella and the scar tissue from the neoplasm. This area of reduced glucose utilization corresponded well to the same finding observed in other patients with complex partial epilepsy. A left temporal anterior lobectomy was carried out followed by improved control of the epilepsy. Positron emission tomography using FDG, together with electrophysiological examinations, may assist in the management of epilepsy related to pituitary tumors.

  16. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

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    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  17. Diminished brain glucose metabolism is a significant determinant for falling rates of systemic glucose utilization during sleep in normal humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, P. J.; J. C. Scott; Krentz, A J; Nagy, R J; Comstock, E; Hoffman, C

    1994-01-01

    Systemic glucose utilization declines during sleep in man. We tested the hypothesis that this decline in utilization is largely accounted for by reduced brain glucose metabolism. 10 normal subjects underwent internal jugular and radial artery cannulation to determine cerebral blood flow by N2O equilibrium technique and to quantitate cross-brain glucose and oxygen differences before and every 3 h during sleep. Sleep stage was graded by continuous electroencephalogram, and systemic glucose turn...

  18. Factor analysis of regional cerebral glucose metabolic rates in healthy men

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    Szabo, Z.; Camargo, E.E.; Sostre, S.; Shafique, I.; Sadzot, B.; Links, J.M.; Dannals, R.F.; Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MA (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MA (United States). Div. of Radiation Health Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Cerebral glucose utilization measured with fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose is characterized by considerable variability both among different persons and for the same person examined on different occasions. The goal of this study was to explore whether some regions of the brain were more variable than others with respect to glucose utilization and whether there was a pattern in their covariance. The global and regional cerebral utilization of glucose was measured in 12 healthy young volunteers on 3 or 4 occasions. In all, 24 regions were examined. The interrelation of the glucose utilization rates of the brain regions was investigated by factor analysis of the metabolic rates. Some 70% of the total variance was attributable to only 1 factor, while 80% of the total variance could be attributed to 2 factors. Regions making up the first factor were the frontal and temporal cortex, cingulate gyrus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and putamen. These regions are functionally related to the limbic system. Regions of the second factor were the parietal cortex, occipital cortex and cerebellum, regions more clearly related to sensory and motor functions. The 2-factor pattern was highly reproducible, being found with different algorithms for factor extraction and rotation. Under resting conditions, the variance of cerebral metabolism seems to be primarily related to regions which are closely involved with the limbic system. Cortical regions involved primarily in motor and sensory functions have less influence on the variance. (orig.).

  19. Simultaneous measurement of glucose transport and utilization in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Uzay E. Emir; Kumar, Anjali; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary fuel for brain function, and determining the kinetics of cerebral glucose transport and utilization is critical for quantifying cerebral energy metabolism. The kinetic parameters of cerebral glucose transport, KMt and Vmaxt, in humans have so far been obtained by measuring steady-state brain glucose levels by proton (1H) NMR as a function of plasma glucose levels and fitting steady-state models to these data. Extraction of the kinetic parameters for cerebral glucose tra...

  20. Chloramphenicol decreases brain glucose utilization and modifies the sleep-wake cycle architecture in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin-Sallanon, Marcelle; Millet, Philippe; Rousset, Colette; Zimmer, Luc; Debilly, Gabriel; Petit, Jean-Marie; Cespuglio, Raymond; Magistretti, Pierre; Ibáñez, Vicente

    2005-06-01

    We studied the effects of chloramphenicol on brain glucose utilization and sleep-wake cycles in rat. After slightly anaesthetized animals were injected with [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, we acquired time-concentration curves from three radiosensitive beta microprobes inserted into the right and left frontal cortices and the cerebellum, and applied a three-compartment model to calculate the cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. The sleep-wake cycle architecture was analysed in anaesthetic-free rats by recording electroencephalographic and electromyographic signals. Although chloramphenicol is a well-established inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation, no compensatory increase in glucose utilization was detected in frontal cortex. Instead, chloramphenicol induced a significant 23% decrease in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. Such a metabolic response indicates a potential mismatch between energy supply and neuronal activity induced by chloramphenicol administration. Regarding sleep-wake states, chloramphenicol treatment was followed by a 64% increase in waking, a 20% decrease in slow-wave sleep, and a marked 59% loss in paradoxical sleep. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram indicates that chloramphenicol induces long-lasting modifications of delta-band power during slow-wave sleep.

  1. Brain glucose utilization in mice with a targeted mutation in the thyroid hormone α or β receptor gene

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    Itoh, Yoshiaki; Esaki, Takanori; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hideyo; Cook, Michelle; Sokoloff, Louis; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Nunez, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Brain glucose utilization is markedly depressed in adult rats made cretinous after birth. To ascertain which subtype of thyroid hormone (TH) receptors, TRα1 or TRβ, is involved in the regulation of glucose utilization during brain development, we used the 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method in mice with a mutation in either their TRα or TRβ gene. A C insertion produced a frameshift mutation in their carboxyl terminus. These mutants lacked TH binding and transactivation activities and exhibited potent dominant negative activity. Glucose utilization in the homozygous TRβPV mutant mice and their wild-type siblings was almost identical in 19 brain regions, whereas it was markedly reduced in all brain regions of the heterozygous TRα1PV mice. These suggest that the α1 receptor mediates the TH effects in brain. Inasmuch as local cerebral glucose utilization is closely related to local synaptic activity, we also examined which thyroid hormone receptor is involved in the expression of synaptotagmin-related gene 1 (Srg1), a TH-positively regulated gene involved in the formation and function of synapses [Thompson, C. C. (1996) J. Neurosci. 16, 7832–7840]. Northern analysis showed that Srg1 expression was markedly reduced in the cerebellum of TRαPV/+ mice but not TRβPV/PV mice. These results show that the same receptor, TRα1, is involved in the regulation by TH of both glucose utilization and Srg1 expression. PMID:11481455

  2. Brain glucose utilization in mice with a targeted mutation in the thyroid hormone alpha or beta receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y; Esaki, T; Kaneshige, M; Suzuki, H; Cook, M; Sokoloff, L; Cheng, S Y; Nunez, J

    2001-08-14

    Brain glucose utilization is markedly depressed in adult rats made cretinous after birth. To ascertain which subtype of thyroid hormone (TH) receptors, TRalpha1 or TRbeta, is involved in the regulation of glucose utilization during brain development, we used the 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose method in mice with a mutation in either their TRalpha or TRbeta gene. A C insertion produced a frameshift mutation in their carboxyl terminus. These mutants lacked TH binding and transactivation activities and exhibited potent dominant negative activity. Glucose utilization in the homozygous TRbetaPV mutant mice and their wild-type siblings was almost identical in 19 brain regions, whereas it was markedly reduced in all brain regions of the heterozygous TRalpha1PV mice. These suggest that the alpha1 receptor mediates the TH effects in brain. Inasmuch as local cerebral glucose utilization is closely related to local synaptic activity, we also examined which thyroid hormone receptor is involved in the expression of synaptotagmin-related gene 1 (Srg1), a TH-positively regulated gene involved in the formation and function of synapses [Thompson, C. C. (1996) J. Neurosci. 16, 7832-7840]. Northern analysis showed that Srg1 expression was markedly reduced in the cerebellum of TRalpha(PV/+) mice but not TRbeta(PV/PV) mice. These results show that the same receptor, TRalpha1, is involved in the regulation by TH of both glucose utilization and Srg1 expression.

  3. Increased regional cerebral glucose uptake in an APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisnel, Géraldine; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; El Tannir El Tayara, Nadine; Bourrin, Emmanuel; Volk, Andreas; Kober, Frank; Delatour, Benoit; Delzescaux, Thierry; Debeir, Thomas; Rooney, Thomas; Benavides, Jésus; Hantraye, Philippe; Dhenain, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the invariant cerebral accumulation of β-amyloid peptide. This event occurs early in the disease process. In humans, [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is largely used to follow-up in vivo cerebral glucose utilization (CGU) and brain metabolism modifications associated with the Alzheimer's disease pathology. Here, [18F]-FDG positron emission tomography was used to study age-related changes of cerebral glucose utilization under resting conditions in 3-, 6-, and 12-month-old APP(SweLon)/PS1(M146L), a mouse model of amyloidosis. We showed an age-dependent increase of glucose uptake in several brain regions of APP/PS1 mice but not in control animals and a higher [18F]-FDG uptake in the cortex and the hippocampus of 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice as compared with age-matched control mice. We then developed a method of 3-D microscopic autoradiography to evaluate glucose uptake at the level of amyloid plaques and showed an increased glucose uptake close to the plaques rather than in amyloid-free cerebral tissues. These data suggest a macroscopic and microscopic reorganization of glucose uptake in relation to cerebral amyloidosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of glucose transport and utilization in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Emir, Uzay E.; Kumar, Anjali; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary fuel for brain function, and determining the kinetics of cerebral glucose transport and utilization is critical for quantifying cerebral energy metabolism. The kinetic parameters of cerebral glucose transport, KMt and Vmaxt, in humans have so far been obtained by measuring steady-state brain glucose levels by proton (1H) NMR as a function of plasma glucose levels and fitting steady-state models to these data. Extraction of the kinetic parameters for cerebral glucose transport necessitated assuming a constant cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) obtained from other tracer studies, such as 13C NMR. Here we present new methodology to simultaneously obtain kinetic parameters for glucose transport and utilization in the human brain by fitting both dynamic and steady-state 1H NMR data with a reversible, non-steady-state Michaelis-Menten model. Dynamic data were obtained by measuring brain and plasma glucose time courses during glucose infusions to raise and maintain plasma concentration at ∼17 mmol/l for ∼2 h in five healthy volunteers. Steady-state brain vs. plasma glucose concentrations were taken from literature and the steady-state portions of data from the five volunteers. In addition to providing simultaneous measurements of glucose transport and utilization and obviating assumptions for constant CMRglc, this methodology does not necessitate infusions of expensive or radioactive tracers. Using this new methodology, we found that the maximum transport capacity for glucose through the blood-brain barrier was nearly twofold higher than maximum cerebral glucose utilization. The glucose transport and utilization parameters were consistent with previously published values for human brain. PMID:21791622

  5. Simultaneous measurement of glucose transport and utilization in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestov, Alexander A; Emir, Uzay E; Kumar, Anjali; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Öz, Gülin

    2011-11-01

    Glucose is the primary fuel for brain function, and determining the kinetics of cerebral glucose transport and utilization is critical for quantifying cerebral energy metabolism. The kinetic parameters of cerebral glucose transport, K(M)(t) and V(max)(t), in humans have so far been obtained by measuring steady-state brain glucose levels by proton ((1)H) NMR as a function of plasma glucose levels and fitting steady-state models to these data. Extraction of the kinetic parameters for cerebral glucose transport necessitated assuming a constant cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR(glc)) obtained from other tracer studies, such as (13)C NMR. Here we present new methodology to simultaneously obtain kinetic parameters for glucose transport and utilization in the human brain by fitting both dynamic and steady-state (1)H NMR data with a reversible, non-steady-state Michaelis-Menten model. Dynamic data were obtained by measuring brain and plasma glucose time courses during glucose infusions to raise and maintain plasma concentration at ∼17 mmol/l for ∼2 h in five healthy volunteers. Steady-state brain vs. plasma glucose concentrations were taken from literature and the steady-state portions of data from the five volunteers. In addition to providing simultaneous measurements of glucose transport and utilization and obviating assumptions for constant CMR(glc), this methodology does not necessitate infusions of expensive or radioactive tracers. Using this new methodology, we found that the maximum transport capacity for glucose through the blood-brain barrier was nearly twofold higher than maximum cerebral glucose utilization. The glucose transport and utilization parameters were consistent with previously published values for human brain.

  6. Study of potential utility of new radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeltchan, R., E-mail: r.zelchan@yandex.ru; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V. [Tomsk Cancer Research Institute, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il’ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with {sup 99m}Tc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with {sup 99m}Tc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. The radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 min. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3 ± 0.15 MBq and 1.07 ± 0.6 MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  7. Study of potential utility of new radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. The radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25 MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 min. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3 ± 0.15 MBq and 1.07 ± 0.6 MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  8. Characterization of human cortical gene expression in relation to glucose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Kirstin N; McGowen, Michael R; Chugani, Harry T; Tarca, Adi L; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Boddy, Amy M; Raaum, Ryan L; Weckle, Amy; Lipovich, Leonard; Grossman, Lawrence I; Uddin, Monica; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E

    2013-01-01

    Human brain development follows a unique pattern characterized by a prolonged period of postnatal growth and reorganization, and a postnatal peak in glucose utilization. The molecular processes underlying these developmental changes are poorly characterized. The objectives of this study were to determine developmental trajectories of gene expression and to examine the evolutionary history of genes differentially expressed as a function of age. We used microarrays to determine age-related patterns of mRNA expression in human cerebral cortical samples ranging from infancy to adulthood. In contrast to previous developmental gene expression studies of human neocortex that relied on postmortem tissue, we measured mRNA expression from the nondiseased margins of surgically resected tissue. We used regression models designed to identify transcripts that followed significant linear or curvilinear functions of age and used population genetics techniques to examine the evolution of these genes. We identified 40 transcripts with significant age-related trajectories in expression. Ten genes have documented roles in nervous system development and energy metabolism, others are novel candidates in brain development. Sixteen transcripts showed similar patterns of expression, characterized by decreasing expression during childhood. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that the regulatory regions of three genes have evidence of adaptive evolution in recent human evolution. These findings provide evidence that a subset of genes expressed in the human cerebral cortex broadly mirror developmental patterns of cortical glucose consumption. Whether there is a causal relationship between gene expression and glucose utilization remains to be determined. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Local cerebral glucose utilization in rats exposed to an enriched environment: a comparison to impoverishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läck, A K; Gill, K E; Porrino, L J

    2010-10-01

    Environmental enrichment and environmental impoverishment have been shown to differentially alter brain function. Here, we investigate the effects of enrichment vs. impoverishment on cerebral use of glucose in rodents. Rats were housed from postnatal day 28 to day 58 in either a socially and environmentally enriched environment or an impoverished environment devoid of other rats or environmental stimuli. Locomotor activity was measured at the end of the enrichment/impoverishment period. Following the duration of the exposure to these environments, cerebral metabolic rate of glucose utilization was determined using quantitative 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose autoradiography in 37 brain regions in the cerebral cortex, forebrain, brain stem and thalamus. There were no differences in locomotor activity between the conditions. The nucleus accumbens core and shell had significantly higher rates of glucose utilization in enriched compared to impoverished animals. These data suggest that environment has a significant effect on brain function which may help to explain the beneficial and protective effects of enrichment against drug abuse and addiction. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of glucose utilization and lipogenesis in adipose tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An insulin-mimetic effect of manganese was observed in the adipose tissue in the controls and an additive effect of insulin and manganese on glucose oxidation was seen when Mn2+ was added in vitro. The flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis was significantly decreased in high fat fed ...

  11. Glucose utilization and anti-oxidative mechanisms of the aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    recorded in this study suggest that the glycemic control achieved by HU was probably mediated via decreased release of glucose from hepatic tissue glycogen and increased hepatic glycogen deposition/storage due to decreased glucose-6- phosphatase activity through inhibition of glycolysis. Also, literature has it that an ...

  12. Elevated glycemia and brain glucose utilization predict BDNF lowering since early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Sanguinetti, Elena; Bartoli, Antonietta; Kemeny, Alessandra; Panetta, Daniele; Salvadori, Piero A; Burchielli, Silvia; Iozzo, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes associate with neurodegeneration. Brain glucose and BDNF are fundamental in perinatal development. BDNF is related to brain health, food intake and glucose metabolism. We characterized the relationship between glycemia and/or brain glucose utilization (by 18FDG-PET during fasting and glucose loading), obesity and BDNF in 4-weeks old (pre-obese) and 12-weeks old (obese) Zucker fa/fa rats, and their age-matched fa/+ controls. In 75 human infants, we assessed cord blood BDNF and glucose levels, appetite regulating hormones, body weight and maternal factors. Young and adult fa/fa rats showed glucose intolerance and brain hyper-utilization compared to controls. Glycemia and age were positively related to brain glucose utilization, and were negative predictors of BDNF levels. In humans, fetal glycemia was dependent on maternal glycemia at term, and negatively predicted BDNF levels. Leptin levels were associated with higher body weight and lower BDNF levels. Glucose intolerance and elevated brain glucose utilization already occur in young, pre-obese rats, suggesting that they precede obesity onset in Zucker fatty rats. Glycemic elevation and brain glucose overexposure predict circulating BDNF deficiency since perinatal and early life. Future studies should evaluate whether the control of maternal and fetal glycemia during late intrauterine development can prevent these unfavorable interactions.

  13. Utilization of dietary glucose in the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemany Marià

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review is focused on the fate of dietary glucose under conditions of chronically high energy (largely fat intake, evolving into the metabolic syndrome. We are adapted to carbohydrate-rich diets similar to those of our ancestors. Glucose is the main energy staple, but fats are our main energy reserves. Starvation drastically reduces glucose availability, forcing the body to shift to fatty acids as main energy substrate, sparing glucose and amino acids. We are not prepared for excess dietary energy, our main defenses being decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure, largely enhanced metabolic activity and thermogenesis. High lipid availability is a powerful factor decreasing glucose and amino acid oxidation. Present-day diets are often hyperenergetic, high on lipids, with abundant protein and limited amounts of starchy carbohydrates. Dietary lipids favor their metabolic processing, saving glucose, which additionally spares amino acids. The glucose excess elicits hyperinsulinemia, which may derive, in the end, into insulin resistance. The available systems of energy disposal could not cope with the excess of substrates, since they are geared for saving not for spendthrift, which results in an unbearable overload of the storage mechanisms. Adipose tissue is the last energy sink, it has to store the energy that cannot be used otherwise. However, adipose tissue growth also has limits, and the excess of energy induces inflammation, helped by the ineffective intervention of the immune system. However, even under this acute situation, the excess of glucose remains, favoring its final conversion to fat. The sum of inflammatory signals and deranged substrate handling induce most of the metabolic syndrome traits: insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, liver steatosis, hyperlipidemia and their compounded combined effects. Thus, a maintained excess of energy in the diet may result in difficulties in the disposal of glucose, eliciting

  14. Cerebral glucose utilization during sleep-wake cycle in man determined by positron emission tomography and [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquet, P; Dive, D; Salmon, E; Sadzot, B; Franco, G; Poirrier, R; von Frenckell, R; Franck, G

    1990-04-09

    Using the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we studied cerebral glucose utilization during sleep and wakefulness in 11 young normal subjects. Each of them was studied at least thrice: during wakefulness, slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), at 1 week intervals. Four stage 3-4 SWS and 4 REMS fulfilled the steady state conditions of the model. The control population consisted of 9 normal age-matched subjects studied twice during wakefulness at, at least, 1 week intervals. Under these conditions, the average difference between the first and the second cerebral glucose metabolic rates (CMRGlu was: -7.91 +/- 15.46%, which does not differ significantly from zero (P = 0.13). During SWS, a significant decrease in CMRGlu was observed as compared to wakefulness (mean difference: -43.80 +/- 14.10%, P less than 0.01). All brain regions were equally affected but thalamic nuclei had significantly lower glucose utilization than the average cortex. During REMS, the CMRGlu were as high as during wakefulness (mean difference: 4.30 +/- 7.40%, P = 0.35). The metabolic pattern during REMS appeared more heterogeneous than at wake. An activation of left temporal and occipital areas is suggested. It is hypothetized that energy requirements for maintaining membrane polarity are reduced during SWS because of a decreased rate of synaptic events. During REMS, cerebral glucose utilization is similar to that of wakefulness, presumably because of reactivated neurotransmission and increased need for ion gradients maintenance.

  15. Olfactory bulbectomy reduces cerebral glucose utilization: 2-[14C]deoxyglucose autoradiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelin, Ivan; Sato, Hiroki; Diksic, Mirko

    2008-07-30

    The olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) rat is an extensively investigated animal model of depression. In the present study the effects of olfactory bulbectomy in drug-naive adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-240 g) on global (gCGU) and regional cerebral glucose (rCGU) utilization was evaluated. Two weeks following surgery, the autoradiographic measurement of CGU using [14C]-2-deoxyglucose was employed. The levels of CGU in the OBX and sham-operated rats were compared in 40 brain regions. Statistical methods indicate significantly lower levels of global (overall) CGU in the OBX group than in the sham group. Discriminant analysis was done on the z-scores to remove animal to animal variability. The following thirteen regions were identified by the stepwise discriminant analysis of the z-scores as significantly contributing to the differences between the sham and OBX: amygdala, cingulate cortex, caudate putamen at the level of globus pallidus, caudate putamen-lateral part, dorsal subiculum, dorsal thalamus, hypothalamus, median raphe, somatosensory cortex, substantia nigra, ventral hippocampus, ventral tegmental area and the ventral thalamus. The pattern of changes in the rCGU following OBX does not completely correlate with the pattern of connectivity of the olfactory bulbs, however, many regions with direct connection to the olfactory bulbs (e.g., amygdala, hypothalamus, ventral hippocampus, and ventral tegmental area) were found to be important for differentiation. No left to right asymmetries in the rCGU were found. The data suggest that there are very important regional differences in glucose utilization between the OBX and sham operated rats, which points to the need to study antidepressants in an animal model of depression rather than in normal animals.

  16. The AMPA receptor potentiator LY404187 increases cerebral glucose utilization and c-fos expression in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jill H; Whalley, Katherine; Murray, Tracey; O'neill, Michael J; McCulloch, James

    2004-10-01

    AMPA receptor potentiators enhance AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission and may have therapeutic potential as cognitive enhancers or antidepressants. The anatomical basis for the action of AMPA receptor potentiators is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the biarylpropylsulfonamide AMPA receptor potentiator, LY404187 (0.05 to 5 mg/kg subcutaneously), upon cerebral glucose utilization and c-fos expression using 14C-2-deoxglucose autoradiography and c-fos immunocytochemistry. LY404187 (0.5 mg/kg) produced significant elevations in glucose utilization in 28 of the 52 anatomical regions analyzed, which included rostral neocortical areas and the hippocampus, as well the dorsal raphe nucleus, lateral habenula, and locus coeruleus. No significant decreases in glucose utilization were observed in any region after LY404187 administration. The increases in glucose utilization with LY404187 (0.5 mg/kg) were blocked by pretreatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist LY293558 (25 mg/kg), indicating that LY404187 acts through AMPA receptor-mediated mechanisms. LY404187 (0.5 mg/kg) also produced increases in c-fos immunoreactivity in the cortex, locus coeruleus, and the dorsal raphe nucleus. These studies demonstrate neuronal activation in key brain areas that are associated with memory processes and thus provide an anatomical basis for the cognitive enhancing effects of AMPA receptor potentiators.

  17. Coordination of glucose and glutamine utilization by an expanded Myc network

    OpenAIRE

    Kaadige, Mohan R; Elgort, Marc G; Ayer, Donald E

    2010-01-01

    Glucose and glutamine are the most abundant circulating nutrients and support the growth and proliferation of all cells, in particular rapidly growing and dividing cancer cells. Several recent studies implicate an expanded Myc network in how cells sense and utilize both glucose and glutamine. These studies reveal an unappreciated coordination between glycolysis and glutaminolysis, potentially providing new targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer.

  18. Effects of hyperglycemia on glucose production and utilization in humans. Measurement with (3H)-2-, (3H)-3-, and (14C)-6-glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P.M.; Firth, R.G.; Rizza, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    Studies with tritiated isotopes of glucose have demonstrated that hyperglycemia per se stimulates glucose utilization and suppresses glucose production in humans. These conclusions rely on the assumption that tritiated glucose provides an accurate measure of glucose turnover. However, if in the presence of hyperglycemia the isotope either loses its label during futile cycling or retains its label during cycling through glycogen, then this assumption is not valid. To examine this question, glucose utilization and glucose production rates were measured in nine normal subjects with a simultaneous infusion of (/sup 3/H)-2-glucose, an isotope that may undergo futile cycling but does not cycle through glycogen; (/sup 14/C)-6-glucose, an isotope that may cycle through glycogen but does not futile cycle; and (/sup 3/H)-3-glucose, an isotope that can both undergo futile cycling and cycle through glycogen. In the postabsorptive state at plasma glucose concentration of 95 mg X dl-1, glucose turnover determined with (/sup 14/C)-6-glucose (2.3 +/- 0.1 mg X kg-1 X min-1) was greater than that determined with (3/sup 3/H)glucose (2.1 +/- 0.1 mg X kg-1 X min-1, P = 0.002) and slightly less than that determined with (/sup 3/H)-2-glucose (2.7 +/- 0.2 mg X kg-1 X min-1, P = 0.08). Plasma glucose was then raised from 95 to 135 to 175 mg X dl-1 while insulin secretion was inhibited, and circulating insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone concentrations were maintained constant by infusion of these hormones and somatostatin. Glucose production and utilization rates determined with (/sup 14/C)-6-glucose continued to be less than those determined with (/sup 3/H)-2-glucose and greater than those seen with (/sup 3/H)-3-glucose.

  19. Effects of chronic cocaine self-administration on cognition and cerebral glucose utilization in Rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert W; Gage, H Donald; Nader, Michael A

    2012-11-15

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with neurobiological and cognitive deficits that persist into abstinence, hindering success of behavioral treatment strategies and perhaps increasing likelihood of relapse. The effects of current cocaine use and abstinence on neurobiology and cognition are not well characterized. Adult male rhesus monkeys with an extensive cocaine self-administration history (∼ 5 years) and age-matched control animals (n = 4/group) performed cognitive tasks in morning sessions and self-administered cocaine or food in afternoon sessions. Positron emission tomography and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose were employed to assess cerebral metabolic rates of glucose utilization during cognitive testing. Cocaine-experienced monkeys required significantly more trials and committed more errors on reversal learning and multidimensional discriminations, compared with control animals. Cocaine-naive, but not cocaine-experienced, monkeys showed greater metabolic rates of glucose utilization during a multidimensional discrimination task in the caudate nucleus, hippocampus, anterior and posterior cingulate, and regions associated with attention, error detection, memory, and reward. Using a delayed match-to-sample task, there were no differences in baseline working memory performance between groups. High-dose cocaine self-administration disrupted delayed match-to-sample performance but tolerance developed. Acute abstinence from cocaine did not affect performance, but by day 30 of abstinence, accuracy increased significantly, while performance of cocaine-naive monkeys was unchanged. These data document direct effects of cocaine self-administration on cognition and neurobiological sequelae underlying cognitive deficits. Improvements in working memory can occur in abstinence, albeit across an extended period critical for treatment seekers, suggesting pharmacotherapies designed to enhance cognition may improve success of current behavioral modification strategies

  20. Ethanol-induced alterations in sup 14 C-glucose utilization: Modulation by brain adenosine in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwer, J.; Dar, M.S. (East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States))

    1992-02-26

    The possible role of brain adenosine (Ado) in acute ethanol-induced alteration in glucose utilization in the cerebellum and brain stem was investigated. The slices were incubated for 100 min in a glucose medium in Warburg flasks using {sup 14}C-glucose as a tracer. Trapped {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was counted to estimate glucose utilization. Ethanol markedly increased the glucose utilization in both areas of brain. Theophylline, an Ado antagonist, significantly reduced ethanol-induced increase in glucose utilization in both brain areas. Ado agonist CHA significantly accentuated ethanol-induced increase in glucose utilization in both motor areas. Ado agonist CHA significantly accentuated ethanol-induced increase in glucose utilization in both motor areas. Ethanol was still able to produce a smaller but significant increase in glucose utilization in both brain areas when theophylline and CHA were given together, suggesting an additional mechanism. Collectively, the data indicate that ethanol-induced glucose utilization in the cerebellum and brain stem is modulated by brain Ado receptor and by non-adenosinergic mechanism.

  1. Cerebral glucose utilization in transgenic mice overexpressing heat shock protein 70 is altered by dizocilpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stephen; Bieneman, Alison; Uney, James B; McCulloch, James

    2002-03-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP70), a member of the 70 kDa HSP superfamily, has been widely implicated in the cellular stress response to numerous insults. HSP70 may be a significant factor in cell survival following stresses such as cerebral ischaemia. The precise mechanisms by which HSP70 facilitates cell survival remain unclear. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether any differences in local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) existed between transgenic mice overexpressing HSP70 (HSP70 Tg) and wild- type littermate (WT) mice. LCGU was assessed using (14)C-2-deoxyglucose in HSP70 Tg and WT mice under basal conditions (intraperitoneal injection of saline) and during metabolic activation produced by NMDA receptor blockade (intraperitoneal injection of dizocilpine, 1 mg/kg). No significant alterations in LCGU were observed between saline injected HSP70 Tg and WT mice in any of the 35 brain regions analyzed. Dizocilpine injection produced significant heterogeneous alterations in LCGU in HSP70 Tg mice (24 of 35 brain regions) and in WT mice (22 of 35 brain regions) compared with saline injected mice. The distribution of altered LCGU produced by dizocilpine was similar in HSP70 Tg and WT mice. However in five brain regions, dizocilpine injected HSP70 Tg mice displayed significantly altered LCGU compared to dizocilpine injected WT mice (anterior thalamic nucleus +27%, dorsal CA1 stratum lacunosum molecularae +22%, dorsal CA1 stratum oriens + 14%, superior olivary body -26%, and the nucleus of the lateral lemniscus -16%). These data highlight that while overexpression of HSP70 transgene does not significantly alter LCGU in the basal state, mice overexpressing the HSP70 transgene respond differently to metabolic stress produced by NMDA receptor blockade in some important brain regions.

  2. Simple noninvasive quantification method for measuring myocardial glucose utilization in humans employing positron emission tomography and fluorine-18 deoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambhir, S.S.; Schwaiger, M.; Huang, S.C.; Krivokapich, J.; Schelbert, H.R.; Nienaber, C.A.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-03-01

    To estimate regional myocardial glucose utilization (rMGU) with positron emission tomography (PET) and 2-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in humans, we studied a method which simplifies the experimental procedure and is computationally efficient. This imaging approach uses a blood time-activity curve derived from a region of interest (ROI) drawn over dynamic PET images of the left ventricle (LV), and a Patlak graphic analysis. The spillover of radioactivity from the cardiac chambers to the myocardium is automatically removed by this analysis. Estimates of rMGU were obtained from FDG PET cardiac studies of six normal human subjects. Results from this study indicate that the FDG time-activity curve obtained from the LV ROI matched well with the arterial plasma curve. The rMGU obtained by Patlak graphic analysis was in good agreement with direct curve fitting results (r = 0.90). The average standard error of the estimate of the Patlak rMGU was low (3%). These results demonstrate the practical usefulness of a simplified method for the estimation of rMGU in humans by PET. This approach is noninvasive, computationally fast, and highly suited for developing parametric images of myocardial glucose utilization rate.

  3. Simultaneous utilization of glucose and xylose for lipid production by Trichosporon cutaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Guojie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical conversion of lignocellulose hydrolysates remains challenging, largely because most microbial processes have markedly reduced efficiency in the presence of both hexoses and pentoses. Thus, identification of microorganisms capable of efficient and simultaneous utilization of both glucose and xylose is pivotal to improving this process. Results In this study, we found that the oleaginous yeast strain Trichosporon cutaneum AS 2.571 assimilated glucose and xylose simultaneously, and accumulated intracellular lipid up to 59 wt% with a lipid coefficient up to 0.17 g/g sugar, upon cultivation on a 2:1 glucose/xylose mixture in a 3-liter stirred-tank bioreactor. In addition, no classic pattern of diauxic growth behavior was seen; the microbial cell mass increased during the whole culture process without any lag periods. In shake-flask cultures with different initial glucose:xylose ratios, glucose and xylose were consumed simultaneously at rates roughly proportional to their individual concentrations in the medium, leading to complete utilization of both sugars at the same time. Simultaneous utilization of glucose and xylose was also seen during fermentation of corn-stover hydrolysate with a lipid content and coefficient of 39.2% and 0.15 g/g sugar, respectively. The lipid produced had a fatty-acid compositional profile similar to those of conventional vegetable oil, indicating that it could have potential as a raw material for biodiesel production. Conclusion Efficient lipid production with simultaneous consumption of glucose and xylose was achieved in this study. This process provides an exciting opportunity to transform lignocellulosic materials into biofuel molecules, and should also encourage further study to elucidate this unique sugar-assimilation mechanism.

  4. Adaptively evolved yeast mutants on galactose show trade-offs in carbon utilization on glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Kuk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive evolution offers many opportunities in metabolic engineering; however, several constraints still exist as evolutionary trade-offs may impose collateral cost to obtain new traits. The application of adaptive evolution for strains development could be further improved by elucidating...... the molecular mechanisms. In this study, adaptively evolved yeast mutants with improved galactose utilization ability showed impaired glucose utilization. The molecular genetic basis of this trade-off was investigated using a systems biology approach. Transcriptional and metabolic changes resulting from...

  5. Effect of Mangiferin and Mahanimbine on Glucose Utilization in 3T3-L1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Dinesh; Krishnakumar, K; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stem barks of Mangifera indica contain a rich content of mangiferin (xanthone glucoside), whereas Murraya koenigii leaves contain rich sources of mahanimbine (carbazole alkaloid) and used traditionally for the treatment of diabetes. Objective: To investigate the effects of mangiferin (xanthone glucoside) and mahanimbine (carbazole alkaloid) on glucose utilization in 3T3-L1 cells. Materials and Methods: Mangiferin was isolated from stem barks of Mangifera indica and mahanimbine was isolated from Murraya koenigii leaves. These isolated compounds were subjected to MTT assay and glucose utilization test with 3T3-L1 cells. Results: Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with mangiferin and mahanimbine increased the glucose utilization in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 1 mM, mangniferin showed 2-fold increase in glucose utilization compared with untreated control. In case of mahanimbine, the observed effect at 1 mM was almost equivalent to positive control (insulin at 1 μM). Moreover, MTT assay showed that both of these compounds were less toxic at a concentration of 1 mM (nearly 75% cells are viable). Conclusion: The present results indicated that these natural products (mangiferin and mahanimbine) exhibited potential ethnomedical uses in management of diabetes. PMID:23661997

  6. miR-182 Regulates Metabolic Homeostasis by Modulating Glucose Utilization in Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the fiber-type specification and metabolic switch in skeletal muscle provides insights into energy metabolism in physiology and diseases. Here, we show that miR-182 is highly expressed in fast-twitch muscle and negatively correlates with blood glucose level. miR-182 knockout mice display muscle loss, fast-to-slow fiber-type switching, and impaired glucose metabolism. Mechanistic studies reveal that miR-182 modulates glucose utilization in muscle by targeting FoxO1 and PDK4, which control fuel selection via the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC. Short-term high-fat diet (HFD feeding reduces muscle miR-182 levels by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, which contributes to the upregulation of FoxO1/PDK4. Restoration of miR-182 expression in HFD-fed mice induces a faster muscle phenotype, decreases muscle FoxO1/PDK4 levels, and improves glucose metabolism. Together, our work establishes miR-182 as a critical regulator that confers robust and precise controls on fuel usage and glucose homeostasis. Our study suggests that a metabolic shift toward a faster and more glycolytic phenotype is beneficial for glucose control.

  7. Basal local cerebral glucose utilization is not altered after behavioral sensitization to quinpirole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Toni L; Pazdernik, Thomas L; Levant, Beth

    2007-12-18

    Sensitization to psychostimulants results in a behavioral response of a greater magnitude than that produced by a given single dose. Previously, we have shown that sensitization to the D(2)/D(3) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole produces alterations in quinpirole-stimulated local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) in ventral striatal and limbic cortical regions. To determine whether basal neuronal activity is altered in the sensitized animal, this study examined the effects of a sensitizing course of quinpirole on basal neuronal activity using the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method in rats with verified sensitization. Adult, male Long-Evans rats (n = 7 or 10/group) were subjected to 10 injections of quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline administered every 3rd day. Sensitization was verified on the basis of locomotor activity. The 2-DG procedure was performed in freely moving rats 3 days after the last quinpirole injection. LCGU was determined by quantitative autoradiography. No alterations in basal LCGU were detected in quinpirole-sensitized rats compared to those treated with saline. The present finding suggests that either the basal activity of very discrete populations of neurons is affected by sensitization to quinpirole that are not likely to be detected by the 2-DG method, or that the neurobiological changes that result in the sensitized behavioral response affect only stimulated, but not basal, neuronal activity.

  8. Regionalization strategies of European Union electric utilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Lindeque, J.; van den Buuse, D.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the debate about globalization and regionalization, this paper adds a perspective that has so far remained underexposed, that of (formerly state-owned) firms in (previously) regulated industries, in order to better understand the (changing) role of the home country/region in

  9. In vivo mapping of temporospatial changes in glucose utilization in rat brain during epileptogenesis: an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-small animal positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Gao, F; Wang, S; Ding, Y; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Ding, M-P

    2009-09-15

    Cerebral glucose hypometabolism is common in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The temporospatial evolution of these metabolic changes during epileptogenesis remains to be determined. We measured the regional normalized cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (nCMRglc) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-small animal positron emission tomography (microPET) in animals receiving systemic pilocarpine application. The microPET scan was performed on day 2 (early), day 7 (latent) and 42 days (chronic phase) after the initial status epilepticus. We found specific temporospatial changes in glucose utilization in rats during the course of epileptogenesis. In the early phase, the limbic structures underwent the largest decrease in glucose utilization. Most brain structures were still hypometabolic in the latent phase and recovered in the chronic phase. Conversely, the hippocampus and thalamus presented with persistent hypometabolism during epileptogenesis. The cerebellum and pons maintained normal glucose utilization during this process. We also found that severe glucose hypometabolism in the entorhinal cortex during the early phase was correlated with epileptogenesis, indicating the critical role of the entorhinal cortex in the early stages of TLE.

  10. Determination of Glucose Utilization Rates in Cultured Astrocytes and Neurons with [14C]deoxyglucose: Progress, Pitfalls, and Discovery of Intracellular Glucose Compartmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F; Sokoloff, Louis; Driscoll, Bernard F

    2017-01-01

    2-Deoxy-D-[ 14 C]glucose ([ 14 C]DG) is commonly used to determine local glucose utilization rates (CMR glc ) in living brain and to estimate CMR glc in cultured brain cells as rates of [ 14 C]DG phosphorylation. Phosphorylation rates of [ 14 C]DG and its metabolizable fluorescent analog, 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG), however, do not take into account differences in the kinetics of transport and metabolism of [ 14 C]DG or 2-NBDG and glucose in neuronal and astrocytic cells in cultures or in single cells in brain tissue, and conclusions drawn from these data may, therefore, not be correct. As a first step toward the goal of quantitative determination of CMR glc in astrocytes and neurons in cultures, the steady-state intracellular-to-extracellular concentration ratios (distribution spaces) for glucose and [ 14 C]DG were determined in cultured striatal neurons and astrocytes as functions of extracellular glucose concentration. Unexpectedly, the glucose distribution spaces rose during extreme hypoglycemia, exceeding 1.0 in astrocytes, whereas the [ 14 C]DG distribution space fell at the lowest glucose levels. Calculated CMR glc was greatly overestimated in hypoglycemic and normoglycemic cells because the intracellular glucose concentrations were too high. Determination of the distribution space for [ 14 C]glucose revealed compartmentation of intracellular glucose in astrocytes, and probably, also in neurons. A smaller metabolic pool is readily accessible to hexokinase and communicates with extracellular glucose, whereas the larger pool is sequestered from hexokinase activity. A new experimental approach using double-labeled assays with DG and glucose is suggested to avoid the limitations imposed by glucose compartmentation on metabolic assays.

  11. Regional glucose metabolism using PETT in normal and psychiatric populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Volkow, N.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism of /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (/sup 18/FDG) in 150 subjects including normals, schizophrenics, senile dementias, and primary affective disorders was studied. Some of the data analyzed to date are discussed.

  12. Determination of patterns of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in normal aging and dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, A.; Chawluk, J.; Hurtig, H.; Dann, R.; Rosen, M.; Kushner, M.; Silver, F.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (rCMRGlc) were measured using 18F-FDG and positron emission tomography (PET) in 14 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (age=64), 9 elderly controls (age=61), and 9 young controls (age=28). PET studies were performed without sensory stimulation or deprivation. Metabolic rates in individual brain regions were determined using an atlas overlay. Relative metabolic rates (rCMRGl c/global CMRGlc) were determined for all subjects. Comparison of young and elderly controls demonstrated significant decreases in frontal metabolism (rho<0.005) and right inferior parietal (IP) metabolism (rho<0.02) with normal aging. Patients with mild-moderate AD (NMAD) (n=8) when compared to age-matched controls, showed further reduction in right IP metabolism (rho<0.02). SAD patients also demonstrated metabolic decrements in left hemisphere language areas (rho<0.01). This latter finding is consistent with language disturbance observed late in the course of the disease. Out data reveal progressive changes in patterns of cerebral glucose utilization with aging and demential with reflect salient clinical features of these processes.

  13. Directed evolution of xylose specific transporters to facilitate glucose-xylose co-utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Yu, Chenzhao; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-03-01

    A highly active xylose specific transporter without glucose inhibition is highly desirable in cost-effective production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. However, currently available xylose specific transporters suffer from low overall activity and most are inhibited by glucose. In this study, we applied a directed evolution strategy to engineer the xylose specific transporter AN25 from Neurospora crassa with improved xylose transportation capacity. After four rounds of directed evolution using two different strategies, we obtained an AN25 mutant AN25-R4.18 with 43-fold improvement in terms of xylose transportation capacity while maintaining its high xylose specificity. In addition, glucose inhibition was almost completely eliminated in the final evolved mutant. We demonstrated that improved xylose transportation of AN25 mutants in the exponential growth phase led to significant improvement of xylose consumption in high cell-density fermentation. Finally, we showed that AN25 mutant AN25-R4.18 can enable relatively efficient glucose-xylose co-utilization in high concentrations of mixed sugars. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Long-chain n-3 PUFAs from fish oil enhance resting state brain glucose utilization and reduce anxiety in an adult nonhuman primate, the grey mouse lemur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Fabien; Dorieux, Olène; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Croteau, Etienne; Masson, Marie; Guillermier, Martine; Van Camp, Nadja; Guesnet, Philippe; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen; Dhenain, Marc; Aujard, Fabienne

    2015-08-01

    Decreased brain content of DHA, the most abundant long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LCPUFA) in the brain, is accompanied by severe neurosensorial impairments linked to impaired neurotransmission and impaired brain glucose utilization. In the present study, we hypothesized that increasing n-3 LCPUFA intake at an early age may help to prevent or correct the glucose hypometabolism observed during aging and age-related cognitive decline. The effects of 12 months' supplementation with n-3 LCPUFA on brain glucose utilization assessed by positron emission tomography was tested in young adult mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus). Cognitive function was tested in parallel in the same animals. Lemurs supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA had higher brain glucose uptake and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose compared with controls in all brain regions. The n-3 LCPUFA-supplemented animals also had higher exploratory activity in an open-field task and lower evidence of anxiety in the Barnes maze. Our results demonstrate for the first time in a nonhuman primate that n-3 LCPUFA supplementation increases brain glucose uptake and metabolism and concomitantly reduces anxiety. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

  16. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors enhance object memory independent of cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Kris; Van Donkelaar, Eva L; Ferrington, Linda; Blokland, Arjan; Bollen, Eva; Steinbusch, Harry Wm; Kelly, Paul At; Prickaerts, Jos Hhj

    2009-07-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors prevent the breakdown of the second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), and are currently studied as possible targets for cognitive enhancement. Earlier studies indicated beneficial effects of PDE inhibitors in object recognition. In this study we tested the effects of three PDE inhibitors on spatial memory as assessed in a place and object recognition task. Furthermore, as both cAMP and cGMP are known vasodilators, the effects of PDE inhibition on cognitive functions could be explained by enhancement of cerebrovascular function. We examined this possibility by measuring the effects of PDE5 and PDE4 inhibitor treatment on local cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization in rats using [14C]-iodoantipyrine and [14C]-2-deoxyglucose quantitative autoradiography, respectively. In the spatial location task, PDE5 inhibition (cGMP) with vardenafil enhanced only early phase consolidation, PDE4 inhibition (cAMP) with rolipram enhanced only late phase consolidation, and PDE2 inhibition (cAMP and cGMP) with Bay 60-7550 enhanced both consolidation processes. Furthermore, PDE5 inhibition had no cerebrovascular effects in hippocampal or rhinal areas. PDE4 inhibition increased rhinal, but not hippocampal blood flow, whereas it decreased glucose utilization in both areas. In general, PDE5 inhibition decreased the ratio between blood flow and glucose utilization, indicative of general oligaemia; whereas PDE4 inhibition increased this ratio, indicative of general hyperemia. Both oligaemic and hyperemic conditions are detrimental for brain function and do not explain memory enhancement. These results underscore the specific effects of cAMP and cGMP on memory consolidation (object and spatial memory) and provide evidence that the underlying mechanisms of PDE inhibition on cognition are independent of cerebrovascular effects.

  17. Effects of acute administration of ethanol on cerebral glucose utilization in adult alcohol-preferring and alcohol-nonpreferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strother, Wendy N; McBride, William J; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai

    2005-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rates, as determined by the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique, were examined after acute ethanol administration within selected brain regions of alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats. Adult male P and NP rats were injected with saline, 0.25 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg ethanol, intraperitoneally (ip), 10 min before an intravenous bolus of [(14)C]2-DG (125 microCi/kg). Timed arterial blood samples were collected over 45 min and assayed for plasma glucose, ethanol, and [(14)C]2-DG levels. Image densities were determined using quantitative autoradiography and LCGU values calculated. Data were collected from several key limbic, basal ganglionic, cortical, and subcortical structures. Low-dose ethanol (0.25 g/kg) significantly decreased LCGU rates in several brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, and the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus of P rats. Low-dose ethanol had no significant effects on LCGU rates in the NP rats. Moderate-dose ethanol (1.0 g/kg) also significantly lowered LCGU rates in many brain regions of P rats, including key limbic structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, ventral tegmental area, basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, lateral septum, and ventral pallidum. Moderate-dose ethanol also significantly lowered LCGU rates in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the habenula of NP rats. All other regions were unaffected in the NP rats. These findings support the suggestion that certain central nervous system regions of P rats may be more sensitive than those of NP rats to the effects of low to intermediate doses of ethanol.

  18. Modifications of local cerebral glucose utilization during circadian food-anticipatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, A Pereira; Bartol-Munier, I; Feillet, C A; Gourmelen, S; Pevet, P; Challet, E

    2006-05-12

    Food-anticipatory activity that animals express before a daily timed meal is considered as the behavioral output of a feeding-entrainable oscillator whose functional neuroanatomy is still unknown. In order to identify the possible brain areas involved in that timing mechanism, we investigated local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during food-anticipatory activity produced either by a 4-h daily access to food starting 4 h after light onset or by a hypocaloric feeding provided at the same time. Local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose measured by the labeled 2-[(14)C]-deoxyglucose technique was quantified in 40 structures. In both groups of food-restricted rats, three brain regions (the nucleus of the solitary tract, the cerebellar cortex and the medial preoptic area) showed a decrease in local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, compared with control ad libitum animals. In addition, only one structure, the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, was affected by temporal restricted feeding, and not by hypocaloric feeding, compared with ad libitum rats. By contrast, three brain regions, i.e. the intergeniculate leaflets, the paraventricular hypothalamic and the arcuate nuclei, showed specifically metabolic decreases during anticipation of hypocaloric feeding, and not during anticipation of temporal restricted feeding, compared with the ad libitum group. Expression of food-anticipatory activity appears to be regulated by an integrated neural circuit of brainstem and hypothalamic pathways, with hypocaloric feeding involving more extensive forebrain areas than temporal restricted feeding.

  19. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Nakagawa

    Full Text Available In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  20. Taurine depresses cardiac contractility and enhances systemic heart glucose utilization in the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCormack, Tyson J; Callaghan, N I; Sykes, A V; Driedzic, W R

    2016-02-01

    Taurine is the most abundant amino acid in the blood of the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, where levels can exceed 200 mmol L(-1). In mammals, intracellular taurine modulates cardiac Ca(2+) handling and carbohydrate metabolism at much lower concentrations but it is not clear if it exerts similar actions in cephalopods. Blood Ca(2+) levels are high in cephalopods and we hypothesized that taurine would depress cardiac Ca(2+) flux and modulate contractility in systemic and branchial hearts of cuttlefish. Heart performance was assessed with an in situ perfused systemic heart preparation and contractility was evaluated using isometrically contracting systemic and branchial heart muscle rings. Stroke volume, cardiac output, and Ca(2+) sensitivity were significantly lower in systemic hearts perfused with supplemental taurine (100 mmol L(-1)) than in controls. In muscle ring preparations, taurine impaired relaxation at high contraction frequencies, an effect abolished by supra-physiological Ca(2+) levels. Taurine did not affect oxygen consumption in non-contracting systemic heart muscle, but extracellular glucose utilization was twice that of control preparations. Collectively, our results suggest that extracellular taurine depresses cardiac Ca(2+) flux and potentiates glucose utilization in cuttlefish. Variations in taurine levels may represent an important mechanism for regulating cardiovascular function and metabolism in cephalopods.

  1. Assessment of regional glucose metabolism in aging brain and dementia with positron-emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Ferris, S.; Christman, D.; Fowler, J.; MacGregor, R.; Farkas, T.; Greenberg, J.; Dann, R.; Wolf, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper explores the alterations in regional glucose metabolism that occur in elderly subjects and those with senile dementia compared to normal young volunteers. Results showed a tendency for the frontal regions to have a lower metabolic rate in patients with dementia although this did not reach the level of significance when compared to the elderly control subjects. The changes in glucose metabolism were symmetrical in both the left and right hemispheres. There was a lack of correlation between the mean cortical metabolic rates for glucose and the global mental function in the patients with senile dementia. This is at variance with most of the regional cerebral blood flow data that has been collected. This may be partly related to the use of substrates other than glucose by the brain in elderly and demented subjects. (PSB)

  2. Evaluation of blood glucose concentration measurement using photoacoustic spectroscopy in near-infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namita, Takeshi; Sato, Mitsuki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes, a typical lifestyle-related disease, is an important disease presenting risks of various complications such as retinopathy, kidney failure, and nervous neuropathy. To treat diabetes, regular and continual self-measurement of blood glucose concentrations is necessary to maintain blood glucose levels and to prevent complications. Usually, daily measurements are taken using invasive methods such as finger-prick blood sampling. Some non-invasive optical techniques have been proposed to reduce pain and infection risk, however, few practical techniques exist today. To realize highly accurate and practical measurement of blood glucose concentrations, the feasibility of a photoacoustic method using near-infrared light was evaluated. A photoacoustic signal from a solution of glucose in water (+0-5 g/dl) or equine blood (+0-400 mg/dl) was measured using a hydrophone (9 mm diameter) at 800-1800 nm wavelengths. We investigated the relation between the glucose solution concentration and the photoacoustic signal intensity or peak position of the received photoacoustic signal (i.e. speed of sound in solutions). Results show that the signal intensity and sound speed of the glucose solution increase with increased glucose concentration for wavelengths at which light absorbance of glucose is high. For quantitative estimation of the glucose solution concentration, the photoacoustic signal intensity ratio between two wavelengths, at which dependence of the signal intensity on glucose concentration is high and low, was calculated. Results confirmed that the signal intensity ratios increase linearly with the glucose concentration. These analyses verified the feasibility of glucose level estimation using photoacoustic measurement in the near-infrared region.

  3. Cerebral glucose utilization measured with high resolution positron emission tomography in epileptic Finnish Spitz dogs and healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitmaa, Ranno; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Snellman, Marjatta; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Orro, Toomas; Kuusela, Erja; Johansson, Jarkko; Viljanen, Tapio; Jokinen, Tarja S; Bergamasco, Luciana; Metsähonkala, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    In human epileptic patients, changes in cerebral glucose utilization can be detected 2-deoxy-2-[(18) F] fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). The purpose of this prospective study was to determine whether epileptic dogs might show similar findings. Eleven Finnish Spitz dogs with focal idiopathic epilepsy and six healthy dogs were included. Dogs were examined using electroencephalography (EEG) and FDG-PET, with epileptic dogs being evaluated during the interictal period. Visual and semi-quantitative assessment methods of FDG-PET were compared and contrasted with EEG findings. Three independent observers, unaware of dog clinical status, detected FDG-PET uptake abnormalities in 9/11 epileptic (82%), and 4/8 healthy dogs (50%). Occipital cortex findings were significantly associated with epileptic status (P = 0.013). Epileptic dogs had significantly lower standardized uptake values (SUVs) in numerous cortical regions, the cerebellum, and the hippocampus compared to the control dogs. The lowest SUVs were found in the occipital lobe. White matter normalized and left-right asymmetry index values for all pairs of homologous regions did not differ between groups. Visual evaluation of the EEGs was less sensitive (36%) than FDG-PET. Both diagnostic tests were consensual and specific (100%) for occipital findings, but EEG had a lower sensitivity for detecting lateralized foci than FDG-PET. Findings supported the use of FDG-PET as a diagnostic test for dogs with suspected idiopathic epilepsy. Visual and semiquantitative analyses of FDG-PET scans provided complementary information. Findings also supported the theory that epileptogenesis may occur in multiple brain regions in Finnish Spitz dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. Rapid selection of glucose-utilizing variants of the polyhydroxyalkanoate producer Ralstonia eutropha H16 by incubation with high substrate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, A; Rehner, R; Kienle, A; Grammel, H

    2012-01-01

    The application of Ralstonia eutropha H16 for producing polyhydroxyalkanoates as bioplastics is limited by the incapability of the bacterium to utilize glucose as a growth substrate. This study aims in characterizing glucose-utilizing strains that arose after incubation with high glucose levels, in comparison with previously published mutants, generated either by mutagenesis or by metabolic engineering. Cultivations on solid and liquid media showed that the application of high substrate concentrations rapidly induced a glucose-positive phenotype. The time span until the onset of growth and the frequency of glucose-utilizing colonies were correlated to the initial glucose concentration. All mutants exhibited elevated activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The glucose-positive phenotype was abolished after deleting genes for the N-acetylglucosamine phosphotransferase system. A procedure is provided for selecting glucose-utilizing R. eutropha H16 in an unprecedented short time period and without any mutagenic treatment. An altered N-acetylglucosamine phosphotransferase system appears to be a common motif in all glucose-utilizing mutants examined so far. The correlation of the applied glucose concentration and the appearance of glucose-utilizing mutants poses questions about the randomness or the specificity of adaptive mutations in general. Furthermore, glucose-adapted strains of R. eutropha H16 could be useful for the production of bioplastics. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology ©2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism in the eucalyptus globulus-pisolithus tinctorius ectomycorrhiza during glucose utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin; Boiffin; Pfeffer

    1998-10-01

    The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose in Pisolithus tinctorius cv Coker & Couch, in uninoculated seedlings of Eucalyptus globulus bicostata ex Maiden cv Kirkp., and in the E. globulus-P. tinctorius ectomycorrhiza was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In roots of uninoculated seedlings, the 13C label was mainly incorporated into sucrose and glutamine. The ratio (13C3 + 13C2)/13C4 of glutamine was approximately 1.0 during the time-course experiment, indicating equivalent contributions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase to the production of alpha-ketoglutarate used for synthesis of this amino acid. In free-living P. tinctorius, most of the 13C label was incorporated into mannitol, trehalose, glutamine, and alanine, whereas arabitol, erythritol, and glutamate were weakly labeled. Amino acid biosynthesis was an important sink of assimilated 13C (43%), and anaplerotic CO2 fixation contributed 42% of the C flux entering the Krebs cycle. In ectomycorrhizae, sucrose accumulation was decreased in the colonized roots compared with uninoculated control plants, whereas 13C incorporation into arabitol and erythritol was nearly 4-fold higher in the symbiotic mycelium than in the free-living fungus. It appears that fungal utilization of glucose in the symbiotic state is altered and oriented toward the synthesis of short-chain polyols.

  6. Glucose metabolism in the idiopathic blepharoptosis: utility of the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) and of the Insulin Resistance Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Domenico; Costa, Raffaele; Plastino, Massimiliano; Branca, Damiano; Cotronei, Piero; Sperlì, Teresa; Santacroce, Nicola; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Consoli, Domenico; Ceccotti, Claudio; Mungari, Pasquale; Fava, Antonietta

    2009-09-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), neuromuscular, hereditary or immunological disorders are the most common identified causes of blepharoptosis. However, in about 15-25% they remained uncertain. To determined the role of glucose metabolism abnormality in idiopathic blepharoptosis. We identified 162 patients with unilateral idiopathic blepharoptosis and 128 control subjects. In all we evaluated a glucose and insulin levels at fasting and after 2 h-OGTT. In addition we determined insulin resistance (IR), by HOMA-index. Following a 2 h-OGTT the prevalence of undiagnosed glucose metabolism abnormality was significantly higher in blepharoptosis patients vs. control group (P<.001). The IR was documented in 129 patients (78%), of whom 55 (34%) had Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT), 36 (22%) newly diagnosed DM (NDDM) and 38 (30%) only IR. The Body Mass Index, blood pressure, serum lipids, triglycerides and smoking were not associated with an increased risk of developing ptosis. Conversely, waist circumference were significantly increased in blepharoptosis patients (P=.003). In this study we focused on emerging evidence that prediabetic status may represent a risk factor for developing blepharoptosis. We propose that 2 h-OGTT and mainly HOMA-index should be determined as a rule in all patients with idiopathic blepharoptosis.

  7. Correlates of Maternal Health Care Utilization in Rohilkhand Region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health. Greater support from families, friends, communities and. Correlates of Maternal Health Care Utilization in. Rohilkhand Region, India. Srivastava A, Mahmood SE1, Mishra P, Shrotriya VP2. Departments of Community Medicine, Teerthanker Mahaveer Medical College and Research Center, Teerthanker Mahaveer.

  8. Uniform distributions of glucose oxidation and oxygen extraction in gray matter of normal human brain: No evidence of regional differences of aerobic glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Peter; Bailey, Christopher J; Møller, Arne; Globinsky, Ronen; Fulbright, Robert K; Rothman, Douglas L; Gjedde, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Regionally variable rates of aerobic glycolysis in brain networks identified by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) imply regionally variable adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration. When regional glucose utilization is not matched to oxygen delivery, affected regions have correspondingly variable rates of ATP and lactate production. We tested the extent to which aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation power R-fMRI networks by measuring quantitative differences between the oxygen to glucose index (OGI) and the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) as measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in normal human brain (resting awake, eyes closed). Regionally uniform and correlated OEF and OGI estimates prevailed, with network values that matched the gray matter means, regardless of size, location, and origin. The spatial agreement between oxygen delivery (OEF≈0.4) and glucose oxidation (OGI ≈ 5.3) suggests that no specific regions have preferentially high aerobic glycolysis and low oxidative phosphorylation rates, with globally optimal maximum ATP turnover rates (VATP ≈ 9.4 µmol/g/min), in good agreement with 31P and 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements. These results imply that the intrinsic network activity in healthy human brain powers the entire gray matter with ubiquitously high rates of glucose oxidation. Reports of departures from normal brain-wide homogeny of oxygen extraction fraction and oxygen to glucose index may be due to normalization artefacts from relative PET measurements. PMID:26755443

  9. Uniform distributions of glucose oxidation and oxygen extraction in gray matter of normal human brain: No evidence of regional differences of aerobic glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Herman, Peter; Bailey, Christopher J; Møller, Arne; Globinsky, Ronen; Fulbright, Robert K; Rothman, Douglas L; Gjedde, Albert

    2016-05-01

    Regionally variable rates of aerobic glycolysis in brain networks identified by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) imply regionally variable adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration. When regional glucose utilization is not matched to oxygen delivery, affected regions have correspondingly variable rates of ATP and lactate production. We tested the extent to which aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation power R-fMRI networks by measuring quantitative differences between the oxygen to glucose index (OGI) and the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) as measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in normal human brain (resting awake, eyes closed). Regionally uniform and correlated OEF and OGI estimates prevailed, with network values that matched the gray matter means, regardless of size, location, and origin. The spatial agreement between oxygen delivery (OEF≈0.4) and glucose oxidation (OGI ≈ 5.3) suggests that no specific regions have preferentially high aerobic glycolysis and low oxidative phosphorylation rates, with globally optimal maximum ATP turnover rates (VATP ≈ 9.4 µmol/g/min), in good agreement with (31)P and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements. These results imply that the intrinsic network activity in healthy human brain powers the entire gray matter with ubiquitously high rates of glucose oxidation. Reports of departures from normal brain-wide homogeny of oxygen extraction fraction and oxygen to glucose index may be due to normalization artefacts from relative PET measurements. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the substantial metabolic engineering effort previously devoted to the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting both the hexose and pentose sugars present in lignocellulose hydrolysates, the productivity of reported strains for conversion of the naturally most abundant pentose, xylose, is still a major issue of process efficiency. Protein engineering for targeted alteration of the nicotinamide cofactor specificity of enzymes catalyzing the first steps in the metabolic pathway for xylose was a successful approach of reducing xylitol by-product formation and improving ethanol yield from xylose. The previously reported yeast strain BP10001, which expresses heterologous xylose reductase from Candida tenuis in mutated (NADH-preferring form, stands for a series of other yeast strains designed with similar rational. Using 20 g/L xylose as sole source of carbon, BP10001 displayed a low specific uptake rate qxylose (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h of 0.08. The study presented herein was performed with the aim of analysing (external factors that limit qxylose of BP10001 under xylose-only and mixed glucose-xylose substrate conditions. We also carried out a comprehensive investigation on the currently unclear role of coenzyme utilization, NADPH compared to NADH, for xylose reduction during co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. Results BP10001 and BP000, expressing C. tenuis xylose reductase in NADPH-preferring wild-type form, were used. Glucose and xylose (each at 10 g/L were converted sequentially, the corresponding qsubstrate values being similar for each strain (glucose: 3.0; xylose: 0.05. The distribution of fermentation products from glucose was identical for both strains whereas when using xylose, BP10001 showed enhanced ethanol yield (BP10001 0.30 g/g; BP000 0.23 g/g and decreased yields of xylitol (BP10001 0.26 g/g; BP000 0.36 g/g and glycerol (BP10001 0.023 g/g; BP000 0.072 g/g as compared

  11. Effect of Strain, Region, and Tissue Composition on Glucose Partitioning in Meniscus Fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Kelsey L; Jackson, Alicia R

    2017-03-01

    A nearly avascular tissue, the knee meniscus relies on diffusive transport for nutritional supply to cells. Nutrient transport depends on solute partitioning in the tissue, which governs the amount of nutrients that can enter a tissue. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of mechanical strain, tissue region, and tissue composition on the partition coefficient of glucose in meniscus fibrocartilage. A simple partitioning experiment was employed to measure glucose partitioning in porcine meniscus tissues from two regions (horn and central), from both meniscal components (medial and lateral), and at three levels of compression (0%, 10%, and 20%). Partition coefficient values were correlated to strain level, water volume fraction, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of tissue specimens. Partition coefficient values ranged from 0.47 to 0.91 (n = 48). Results show that glucose partition coefficient is significantly (p medial versus lateral (p = 0.181) or when comparing central and horn regions (p = 0.837). There were significant positive correlations between tissue water volume fraction and glucose partitioning for all groups. However, the correlation between GAG content and partitioning was only significant in the lateral horn group. Determining how glucose partitioning is affected by tissue composition and loading is necessary for understanding nutrient availability and related tissue health and/or degeneration. Therefore, this study is important for better understanding the transport and nutrition-related mechanisms of meniscal degeneration.

  12. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, R.M.; Parker, E.S.; Clark, C.M.; Martin, P.R.; George, D.T.; Weingartner, H.; Sokoloff, L.; Ebert, M.H.; Mishkin, M.

    1985-05-01

    Seven alcoholic male subjects diagnosed as having Korsakoff's syndrome and eight age-matched male normal volunteers were studied with /sup 18/F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2/sup 18/FDG). All subjects were examined at rest with eyes covered in a quiet, darkened room. Serial plasma samples were obtained following injection of 4 to 5 mCi of 2/sup 18/FDG. Tomographic slices spaced at 10mm axial increments were obtained (in-plane resolution = 1.75 cm, axial resolution = 1.78 cm). Four planes were selected from each subject, and a total of 46 regions of interest were sampled and glucose metabolic rates for each region calculated. The mean glucose metalbolic rate for the 46 regions in the Korsakoff subjects was significantly lower than that in the normal controls (5.17 +- .43 versus 6.6 +- 1.31). A Q-component analysis, which examined each subject's regional rates relative to his mean rate, revealed two distinct patterns in the Korsakoff group. Glucose metabolism was significantly reduced in 37 of the 46 regions sampled. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in a nondemented group of subjects has not previously been reported. The reduction in cortical metabolism may be the result of damage to sub-cortical projecting systems. The differing patterns of cerebral metabolism in Korsakoff's syndrome suggests subgroups with differing neuropathology. Regions implicated in memory function, medial temporal, thalamic and medial prefrontal were among the regions reduced in metabolism.

  13. Regional Utilization of the Union Catalog of Medical Periodicals System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Michael D.

    1969-01-01

    This paper describes regional utilization of the Union Catalog of Medical Periodicals system and data base in producing union lists outside Metropolitan New York, the area served by the Union Catalog. A basic introduction to the Medical Library Center of New York's UCMP system is set forth, demonstrating the system's value in the production of such medical and paramedical union lists throughout the country. Several applications are then described, showing how these union lists were produced. PMID:5789816

  14. Improved plasma glucose control, whole-body glucose utilization, and lipid profile on a low-glycemic index diet in type 2 diabetic men: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkalla, Salwa W; Taghrid, Laika; Laromiguiere, Muriel; Huet, Dorothée; Boillot, Josette; Rigoir, Aude; Elgrably, Fabienne; Slama, Gerard

    2004-08-01

    To determine whether a chronic low-glycemic index (LGI) diet, compared with a high-glycemic index (HGI) diet, has beneficial effects on plasma glucose control, lipid metabolism, total fat mass, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients. Twelve type 2 diabetic men were randomly allocated to two periods of 4 weeks of an LGI or HGI carbohydrate diet separated by a 4-week washout interval, in a crossover design. The LGI diet induced lower postprandial plasma glucose and insulin profiles and areas under the curve than after the HGI diet. At the end of the two dietary periods, the 7-day dietary records demonstrated equal daily total energy and macronutrient intake. Body weight and total fat mass were comparable. Four-week LGI versus HGI diet induced improvement of fasting plasma glucose (P glycemic control, glucose utilization, some lipid profiles, and the capacity for fibrinolysis in type 2 diabetes. Even if changes in glycemic control were modest during the 4-week period, the use of an LGI diet in a longer-term manner might play an important role in the treatment and prevention of diabetes and related disorders.

  15. Brain glucose utilization in systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric symptoms: a controlled positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, A. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Weiner, S.M. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Peter, H.H. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Mueller-Brand, J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Goetze, M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Moser, E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Gutfleisch, J. [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Hoegerle, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Juengling, F.D. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Nitzsche, E.U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    In contrast to morphological imaging [such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography], functional imaging may be of advantage in the detection of brain abnormalities in cases of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, we studied 13 patients (aged 40{+-}14 years, 11 female, 2 male) with neuropsychiatric SLE who met four of the American Rheumatism Association criteria for the classification of SLE. Ten clinically and neurologically healthy volunteers served as controls (aged 40{+-}12 years, 5 female, 5 male). Both groups were investigated using fluorine-18-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography (PET) and cranial MRI. The normal controls and 11 of the 13 patients showed normal MRI scans. However, PET scan was abnormal in all 13 SLE patients. Significant group-to-group differences in the glucose metabolic index (GMI=region of interest uptake/global uptake at the level of the basal ganglia and thalamus) were found in the parieto-occipital region on both sides: the GMI of the parieto-occipital region on the right side was 0.922{+-}0.045 in patients and 1.066{+-}0.081 in controls (P<0.0001, Mann Whitney U test), while on the left side it was 0.892{+-}0.060 in patients and 1.034{+-}0.051 in controls (P=0.0002). Parieto-occipital hypometabolism is a conspicuous finding in mainly MRI-negative neuropsychiatric SLE. As the parieto-occipital region is located at the boundary of blood supply of all three major arteries, it could be the most vulnerable zone of the cerebrum and may be affected at an early stage of the cerebrovascular disease. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Effect of feeding garlic leaves on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics, and nitrogen utilization in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Arvinda; Matsuno, Ayana; Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Sano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Garlic and its constituents are reported to have been effective in reducing methane emission and also influence glucose metabolism in body; however, studies in ruminants using garlic leaves are scarce. Garlic leaves contain similar compounds as garlic bulbs, but are discarded in field after garlic bulb harvest. We speculate that feeding garlic leaves might show similar effect as garlic constituents in sheep and could be potential animal feed supplement. Thus, we examined the effect of freeze dried garlic leaves (FDGL) on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics and nitrogen utilization in sheep. Six sheep were fed Control diet (mixed hay and concentrate (60:40)) or FDGL diet (Control diet supplemented with FDGL at 2.5 g/kg BW 0.75 of sheep) using a crossover design. Methane gas emission was measured using open-circuit respiratory chamber. Plasma glucose turnover rate was measured using isotope dilution technique of [U- 13 C]glucose. Rumen fluid, feces and urine were collected to measure rumen fermentation characteristics and nitrogen utilization. No significant difference in rumen fermentation parameters was noticed except for rumen ammonia tended to be higher (0.05 Methane emission per kg dry matter ingested and methane emission per kg dry matter digested were lower ( P  methane emission, glucose turnover rate and microbial nitrogen supply, further studies at higher dose would be necessary to conclude the merit of FDGL as supplement in ruminant feedstuff.

  17. Cerebral glucose utilization and platelet mitochondrial complex I activity in schizophrenia: A FDG-PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Bonne, Omer; Chisin, Roland; Klein, Ehud; Lester, Hava; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Yona, Ilan; Freedman, Nanette

    2007-05-09

    Altered cerebral energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction in periphery and in brain are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This study investigated whether cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) abnormalities are linked to altered mitochondrial complex I activity in the periphery, in schizophrenia. Sixteen schizophrenic patients, 8 with total positive PANSS score >or=20 (high positive schizophrenics; HPS), and 8 with total positive score regions implicated in schizophrenia, could be a pathological factor that is differentially expressed in subgroups of schizophrenic patients.

  18. Regional glucose metabolic reduction in dementia with Lewy bodies is independent of amyloid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazunari; Hosokawa, Chisa; Hyodo, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Kenta; Usami, Kimio; Shimamoto, Kenji; Hosono, Makoto; Yamazoe, Yuzuru; Murakami, Takamichi

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that some cases of patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) can demonstrate Alzheimer disease (AD) like reduced glucose metabolism without amyloid deposition. The aim of this study was to clarify whether regional hypometabolism is related to amyloid deposits in the DLB brain and measure the degree of regional hypometabolism. Ten consecutive subjects with DLB and 10 AD patients who underwent both Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET and (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET were included in this study. Regional standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR)s normalised to cerebellar cortices were calculated in the FDG- and PiB-PET images. All AD patients and five DLB patients showed amyloid deposits (PiB positive). In the DLB group the parietotemporal and occipital metabolism were significantly lower than those in the AD group but there was no difference between the posterior cingulate hypometabolism between DLB and AD groups. There were no differences in regional glucose metabolism between PiB positive and negative DLB patients. In the DLB brain, it is suggested that decreased regional glucose metabolism is unrelated to amyloid deposits, although the hypometabolic area overlaps with the AD hypometabolic area and the degree of parietotemporal and occipital hypometabolism in DLB brain is much larger than that in AD brain.

  19. Modeling multiple experiments using regularized optimization: A case study on bacterial glucose utilization dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, András; Lemos, João M; Vinga, Susana

    2015-08-01

    The aim of inverse modeling is to capture the systems׳ dynamics through a set of parameterized Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). Parameters are often required to fit multiple repeated measurements or different experimental conditions. This typically leads to a multi-objective optimization problem that can be formulated as a non-convex optimization problem. Modeling of glucose utilization of Lactococcus lactis bacteria is considered using in vivo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements in perturbation experiments. We propose an ODE model based on a modified time-varying exponential decay that is flexible enough to model several different experimental conditions. The starting point is an over-parameterized non-linear model that will be further simplified through an optimization procedure with regularization penalties. For the parameter estimation, a stochastic global optimization method, particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used. A regularization is introduced to the identification, imposing that parameters should be the same across several experiments in order to identify a general model. On the remaining parameter that varies across the experiments a function is fit in order to be able to predict new experiments for any initial condition. The method is cross-validated by fitting the model to two experiments and validating the third one. Finally, the proposed model is integrated with existing models of glycolysis in order to reconstruct the remaining metabolites. The method was found useful as a general procedure to reduce the number of parameters of unidentifiable and over-parameterized models, thus supporting feature selection methods for parametric models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the prefrontal regions in adults' with internet game addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Bang, Soong Ae; Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Hee; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Internet Game Addiction (IGA) is known to be associated with poor decision-making and diminished impulse control; however, the underlying neural substrates of IGA have not been identified. To investigate the neural substrates of IGA, we compared regional cerebral glucose metabolism between adults with and without IGA, primarily in the prefrontal brain regions, which have been implicated in inhibitory control. We studied 10 right-handed participants (5 controls: male, 23.8{+-}0.75 y, 5 IGAs: male, 22.6{+-}2.42 y) with FDG PET. A standardized questionnaire was used to assess the severity of IGA. Before scanning, all subjects carried out a computerized version of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), as measures of behavioral inhibitory control. Statistical Parametric Mapping 2 (SPM2) was used to analyze differences in regional brain glucose metabolism between adults with and without IGA. Consistent with our predictions, compared to controls, significant reductions in FDG uptake in individuals with IGA were found in the bilateral orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 11, 47), bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44, 48), cingulate cortex (BA 24), and bilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) (BA 6); whereas increases were found in the bilateral hippocampus. Correlation analyses within the IGA group further showed that the level of glucose metabolism in the right orbitofrontal gyrus was marginally positively correlated with task scores in BART. Our results showed that IGA is associated with reduced glucose metabolism in the prefrontal regions involved in inhibitory control. This finding highlights dysfunctional inhibitory brain systems in individuals with IGA and offers implications for the development for therapeutic paradigms for IGA.

  1. Effect of Black Soybean Koji Extract on Glucose Utilization and Adipocyte Differentiation in 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Adipocyte differentiation and the extent of subsequent fat accumulation are closely related to the occurrence and progression of diseases such as insulin resistance and obesity. Black soybean koji (BSK is produced by the fermentation of black soybean with Aspergilllus awamori. Previous study indicated that BSK extract has antioxidative and multifunctional bioactivities, however, the role of BSK in the regulation of energy metabolism is still unclear. We aimed to investigate the effect of glucose utilization on insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and adipogenesis-related protein expression in differentiated adipocytes with BSK treatment. Cytoxicity assay revealed that BSK did not adversely affect cell viability at levels up to 200 µg/mL. The potential for glucose utilization was increased by increased glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1, GLUT4 and protein kinase B (AKT protein expression in insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 cells in response to BSK treatment. Simultaneously, BSK inhibited lipid droplet accumulation in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. The inhibitory effect of adipogenesis was associated with downregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g (PPARγ level and upregulated Acrp30 protein expression. Our results suggest that BSK extract could improve glucose uptake by modulating GLUT1 and GLUT4 expression in a 3T3-L1 insulin-resistance cell model. In addition, BSK suppressed differentiation and lipid accumulation in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which may suggest its potential for food supplementation to prevent obesity and related metabolic abnormalities.

  2. Growth hormone and IGF-I modulate local cerebral glucose utilization and ATP levels in a model of adult-onset growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, William E; Bennett, Colleen; Ingram, Rhonda; Donahue, Ashley; Ingraham, Jeremy; Chen, Haiying; Moore, Tracy; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K; Riddle, David

    2006-09-01

    Decreases in plasma IGF-I levels that occur with age have been hypothesized to contribute to the genesis of brain aging. However, support for this hypothesis would be strengthened by evidence that growth hormone (GH)/IGF-I deficiency in young animals produces a phenotype similar to that found in aged animals. As a result, we developed a unique model of adult-onset GH/IGF-I deficiency by using dwarf rats specifically deficient in GH and IGF-I. The deficiency in plasma IGF-I is similar to that observed with age (e.g., 50% decrease), and replacement of GH restores levels of IGF-I to that found in young animals with normal GH levels. The present study employs this model to investigate the effects of circulating GH and IGF-I on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU). Analysis of LCGU indicated that GH/IGF-I-deficient animals exhibit a 29% decrease in glucose metabolism in many brain regions, especially those involved in hippocampally dependent processes of learning and memory. Similarly, a high correlation between plasma IGF-I levels and glucose metabolism was found in these areas. The deficiency in LCGU was not associated with alterations in GLUT1, GLUT3, or hexokinase activity. A 15% decrease in ATP levels was also found in hippocampus of GH-deficient animals, providing compelling data that circulating GH and IGF-I have significant effects on the regulation of glucose utilization and energy metabolism in the brain. Furthermore, our results provide important data to support the conclusion that deficiencies in circulating GH/IGF-I contribute to the genesis of brain aging.

  3. Maltose and maltodextrin utilization by Listeria monocytogenes depend on an inducible ABC transporter which is repressed by glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Gopal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the environment as well as in the vertebrate intestine, Listeriae have access to complex carbohydrates like maltodextrins. Bacterial exploitation of such compounds requires specific uptake and utilization systems.We could show that Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species contain genes/gene products with high homology to the maltodextrin ABC transporter and utilization system of B. subtilis. Mutant construction and growth tests revealed that the L. monocytogenes gene cluster was required for the efficient utilization of maltodextrins as well as maltose. The gene for the ATP binding protein of the transporter was located distant from the cluster. Transcription analyses demonstrated that the system was induced by maltose/maltodextrins and repressed by glucose. Its induction was dependent on a LacI type transcriptional regulator. Repression by glucose was independent of the catabolite control protein CcpA, but was relieved in a mutant defective for Hpr kinase/phosphorylase.The data obtained show that in L. monocytogenes the uptake of maltodextrin and, in contrast to B. subtilis, also maltose is exclusively mediated by an ABC transporter. Furthermore, the results suggest that glucose repression of the uptake system possibly is by inducer exclusion, a mechanism not described so far in this organism.

  4. Compliance Patterns and Utilization of e-Health for Glucose Monitoring: Standalone Internet Gateway and Tablet Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Mi Jung; Kim, Hun-Sung; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Choi, In Young

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge regarding compliance patterns and service utilization in e-health is important for the development of effective services. To develop proper e-health, the characteristics of compliance patterns and utilization of e-health should be studied. We studied these for glucose monitoring of diabetic patients from primary clinics. Data were collected from 160 outpatients who participated in e-health for glucose monitoring funded by the Korean government. Specifically, this study focused on two device types: a standalone Internet gateway and a tablet device. The SPSS 18.0 software was used for statistical analyses of demographic characteristics, survival data, and Cox proportional hazards regression model. Standalone Internet gateway users demonstrated a more stable compliance pattern than did tablet device users. The compliance rate differed according to the device type. Typically, compliance decreases considerably around 8 months. In these results, standalone Internet gateway users utilized the service for longer periods than tablet device users. Gateway type and location also influenced utilization (p < 0.05). The service should be designed according to the device type to develop appropriate service models. Thus, service designers should understand the different characteristics of service devices. This study provides insight into compliance patterns and utilization to develop appropriate service models and service interventions depending on the device.

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment attenuated the decrease in regional glucose metabolism of rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia: a high resolution positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, M; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Wen, S-Q; Tang, Z-Q; Chen, Y-Z; Yan, W-Q; Ding, M-P

    2007-05-11

    Cerebral hypoxia may be the main component of cell damage caused by ischemia. Previous studies demonstrated a neuroprotective effect of early hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment in various animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. Neuropathologic study showed that exposure of HBO may prevent cell death in ischemic cortex. In the present study, we aimed to assess cellular function of ischemic rat brain after HBO treatment by means of a high-resolution positron emission tomography scanner (microPET) used specifically for small animal imaging. The male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), with the regional cerebral blood flow monitored in vivo by laser Doppler flowmetry. One hour after ischemia, HBO therapy (3 atm absolute, 1 h) was initiated. Local cerebral glucose utilization in the ischemic area was measured before, 1 h and 3 h after ischemia, with 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) as a tracer. Neurological deficits and infarct volumes were assessed at 24 h after ischemia. Our study showed that early HBO therapy significantly reduced infarct volume of brain 24 h after ischemia. Moreover, glucose utilization in the ischemic area underwent a severe decrease during 1-3 h after MCAO, while the early HBO treatment significantly attenuated the decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in the ischemic core of the cortex compared with controls. We report for the first time the application of microPET to quantify the rates of glucose metabolism in the ischemic core of rats exposed to HBO. Our results suggest that the early exposure of HBO can partially reverse the downward trend for glucose utilization in the ischemic core, which might contribute to the reported beneficial effects of early HBO therapy on permanent cerebral ischemia.

  6. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism during sevoflurane anaesthesia in healthy subjects studied with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlünzen, L; Juul, N; Hansen, K V

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism by which sevoflurane exerts its effects in the human brain remains unknown. In the present study, we quantified the effects of sevoflurane on regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rGMR) in the human brain measured with positron emission tomography. METHODS: Eight...... monitored and bispectral index responses were registered. Statistical parametric maps and conventional regions of interest analysis were used to determine rGMR differences. RESULTS: All subjects were unconsciousness at 1.0 MAC sevoflurane. Cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were constant over time...

  7. Regional changes in renal cortical glucose, lactate and urea during acute unilateral ureteral obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Stolle, Lars B; Rawashdeh, Yazan F

    2007-01-01

    . Furthermore, we investigated regional variations in renal interstitial fluid (RIF) glucose, lactate and urea during acute UUO. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight anesthetized pigs were used. Microdialysis probes were inserted in the upper, middle and lower thirds of the left renal cortex and perfused with Ringer...... third. RIF lactate did not change. Interstitial urea increased in all regions of the kidney, but most markedly in the upper and lower poles. CONCLUSIONS: Microdialysis is of potential value for assessing the renal interstitial milieu under different pathophysiological conditions. Ureteral obstruction...

  8. Effect of feeding garlic leaves on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics, and nitrogen utilization in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvinda Panthee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Garlic and its constituents are reported to have been effective in reducing methane emission and also influence glucose metabolism in body; however, studies in ruminants using garlic leaves are scarce. Garlic leaves contain similar compounds as garlic bulbs, but are discarded in field after garlic bulb harvest. We speculate that feeding garlic leaves might show similar effect as garlic constituents in sheep and could be potential animal feed supplement. Thus, we examined the effect of freeze dried garlic leaves (FDGL on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics and nitrogen utilization in sheep. Methods Six sheep were fed Control diet (mixed hay and concentrate (60:40 or FDGL diet (Control diet supplemented with FDGL at 2.5 g/kg BW0.75 of sheep using a crossover design. Methane gas emission was measured using open-circuit respiratory chamber. Plasma glucose turnover rate was measured using isotope dilution technique of [U-13C]glucose. Rumen fluid, feces and urine were collected to measure rumen fermentation characteristics and nitrogen utilization. Result No significant difference in rumen fermentation parameters was noticed except for rumen ammonia tended to be higher (0.05 < P < 0.1 in FDGL diet. Methane emission per kg dry matter ingested and methane emission per kg dry matter digested were lower (P < 0.05 in FDGL diet. Plasma glucose concentration was similar between diets and plasma glucose turnover rate tended to be higher in FDGL diet (0.05 < P < 0.1. Nitrogen retention was higher (P < 0.05 and microbial nitrogen supply tended to be higher (0.05 < P < 0.1 in FDGL diet. Conclusion FDGL diet did not impair rumen fermentation, improved nitrogen retention; while absence of significant results in reduction of methane emission, glucose turnover rate and microbial nitrogen supply, further studies at higher dose would be necessary to conclude the merit of FDGL as supplement in ruminant

  9. Dynamic changes in genes related to glucose uptake and utilization during pig skeletal and cardiac muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanqin; Jin, Long; Wang, Fengjiao; He, Mengnan; Liu, Rui; Li, Mingzhou; Shuai, Surong

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal and cardiac muscle have important roles in glucose uptake and utilization. However, changes in expression of protein coding genes and miRNAs that participate in glucose metabolism during development are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the expression of genes related to glucose metabolism during muscle development. We found an age-dependent increase in gene expression in cardiac muscle, with enrichment in heart development- and energy-related metabolic processes. A subset of genes that were up-regulated until 30 or 180 days postnatally, and then down-regulated in psoas major muscle was significantly enriched in mitochondrial oxidative-related processes, while genes that up-regulated in longissimus doris muscle was significantly enriched in glycolysis-related processes. Meanwhile, expression of energy-related microRNAs decreased with increasing age. In addition, we investigated the correlation between microRNAs and mRNAs in three muscle types across different stages of development and found many potential microRNA-mRNA pairs involved in regulating glucose metabolism.

  10. Increasing protein at the expense of carbohydrate in the diet down-regulates glucose utilization as glucose sparing effect in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Stepien

    Full Text Available High protein (HP diet could serve as a good strategy against obesity, provoking the changes in energy metabolic pathways. However, those modifications differ during a dietary adaptation. To better understand the mechanisms involved in effect of high protein diet (HP on limiting adiposity in rats we studied in parallel the gene expression of enzymes involved in protein and energy metabolism and the profiles of nutrients oxidation. Eighty male Wistar rats were fed a normal protein diet (NP, 14% of protein for one week, then either maintained on NP diet or assigned to a HP diet (50% of protein for 1, 3, 6 and 14 days. mRNA levels of genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were measured in liver, adipose tissues, kidney and muscles by real time PCR. Energy expenditure (EE and substrate oxidation were measured by indirect calorimetry. Liver glycogen and plasma glucose and hormones were assayed. In liver, HP feeding 1 decreased mRNA encoding glycolysis enzymes (GK, L-PK and lipogenesis enzymes(ACC, FAS, 2 increased mRNA encoding gluconeogenesis enzymes (PEPCK, 3 first lowered, then restored mRNA encoding glycogen synthesis enzyme (GS, 4 did not change mRNA encoding β-oxidation enzymes (CPT1, ACOX1, βHAD. Few changes were seen in other organs. In parallel, indirect calorimetry confirmed that following HP feeding, glucose oxidation was reduced and fat oxidation was stable, except during the 1(st day of adaptation where lipid oxidation was increased. Finally, this study showed that plasma insulin was lowered and hepatic glucose uptake was decreased. Taken together, these results demonstrate that following HP feeding, CHO utilization was increased above the increase in carbohydrate intake while lipogenesis was decreased thus giving a potential explanation for the fat lowering effect of HP diets.

  11. Enzyme-free monitoring of glucose utilization in stimulated macrophages using carbon nanotube-decorated electrochemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhurantakam, Sasya; Karnam, Jayanth Babu; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2017-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been extensively explored for a diverse range of applications due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNT-incorporated electrochemical sensors have exhibited enhanced sensitivity towards the analyte molecule due to the excellent electron transfer properties of CNTs. In addition, CNTs possess a large surface area-to-volume ratio that favours the adhesion of analyte molecules as well as enhances the electroactive area. Most of the electrochemical sensors have employed CNTs as a nano-interface to promote electron transfer and as an immobilization matrix for enzymes. The present work explores the potential of CNTs to serve as a catalytic interface for the enzymeless quantification of glucose. The figure of merits for the enzymeless sensor was comparable to the performance of several enzyme-based sensors reported in literature. The developed sensor was successfully employed to determine the glucose utilization of unstimulated and stimulated macrophages. The significant difference in the glucose utilization levels in activated macrophages and quiescent cells observed in the present investigation opens up the possibilities of new avenues for effective medical diagnosis of inflammatory disorders.

  12. Enzyme-free monitoring of glucose utilization in stimulated macrophages using carbon nanotube-decorated electrochemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhurantakam, Sasya; Karnam, Jayanth Babu; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been extensively explored for a diverse range of applications due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNT-incorporated electrochemical sensors have exhibited enhanced sensitivity towards the analyte molecule due to the excellent electron transfer properties of CNTs. In addition, CNTs possess a large surface area-to-volume ratio that favours the adhesion of analyte molecules as well as enhances the electroactive area. Most of the electrochemical sensors have employed CNTs as a nano-interface to promote electron transfer and as an immobilization matrix for enzymes. The present work explores the potential of CNTs to serve as a catalytic interface for the enzymeless quantification of glucose. The figure of merits for the enzymeless sensor was comparable to the performance of several enzyme-based sensors reported in literature. The developed sensor was successfully employed to determine the glucose utilization of unstimulated and stimulated macrophages. The significant difference in the glucose utilization levels in activated macrophages and quiescent cells observed in the present investigation opens up the possibilities of new avenues for effective medical diagnosis of inflammatory disorders.

  13. Forecasting drug utilization and expenditure in a metropolitan health region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz Seher

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New pharmacological therapies are challenging the healthcare systems, and there is an increasing need to assess their therapeutic value in relation to existing alternatives as well as their potential budget impact. Consequently, new models to introduce drugs in healthcare are urgently needed. In the metropolitan health region of Stockholm, Sweden, a model has been developed including early warning (horizon scanning, forecasting of drug utilization and expenditure, critical drug evaluation as well as structured programs for the introduction and follow-up of new drugs. The aim of this paper is to present the forecasting model and the predicted growth in all therapeutic areas in 2010 and 2011. Methods Linear regression analysis was applied to aggregate sales data on hospital sales and dispensed drugs in ambulatory care, including both reimbursed expenditure and patient co-payment. The linear regression was applied on each pharmacological group based on four observations 2006-2009, and the crude predictions estimated for the coming two years 2010-2011. The crude predictions were then adjusted for factors likely to increase or decrease future utilization and expenditure, such as patent expiries, new drugs to be launched or new guidelines from national bodies or the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee. The assessment included a close collaboration with clinical, clinical pharmacological and pharmaceutical experts from the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee. Results The annual increase in total expenditure for prescription and hospital drugs was predicted to be 2.0% in 2010 and 4.0% in 2011. Expenditures will increase in most therapeutic areas, but most predominantly for antineoplastic and immune modulating agents as well as drugs for the nervous system, infectious diseases, and blood and blood-forming organs. Conclusions The utilisation and expenditure of drugs is difficult to forecast due to uncertainties about the rate

  14. Blood flow, flow reserve, and glucose utilization in viable and nonviable myocardium in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Schindler, Thomas H.; Prior, John O.; Sayre, James; Dahlbom, Magnus; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to determine whether glucose uptake in viable myocardium of ischemic cardiomyopathy patients depends on rest myocardial blood flow (MBF) and the residual myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Methods Thirty-six patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (left ventricular ejection fraction 25±10 %) were studied with 13N-ammonia and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Twenty age-matched normals served as controls. Regional MBF was determined at rest and during dipyridamole hyperemia and regional FDG extraction was estimated from regional FDG to 13N-ammonia activity ratios. Results Rest MBF was reduced in viable (0.42±0.18 ml/min per g) and nonviable regions (0.32±0.09 ml/min per g) relative to remote regions (0.68±0.23 ml/min per g, p0.05). Compared to MFR in remote myocardium, MFRs in viable regions were similar (1.39±0.56 vs 1.70±0.45, p>0.05) but were significantly lower in nonviable regions (1.23±0.43, pmyocardium are associated with increasing glucose extraction that likely reflects a metabolic adaptation of remodeling hibernating myocytes. PMID:23287994

  15. The PPARα/γ Agonist, Tesaglitazar, Improves Insulin Mediated Switching of Tissue Glucose and Free Fatty Acid Utilization In Vivo in the Obese Zucker Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Wallenius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flexibility was assessed in male Zucker rats: lean controls, obese controls, and obese rats treated with the dual peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR agonist, tesaglitazar, 3 μmol/kg/day for 3 weeks. Whole body glucose disposal rate ( and hepatic glucose output (HGO were assessed under basal fasting and hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic clamp conditions using [3,3H]glucose. Indices of tissue specific glucose utilization ( were measured at basal, physiological, and supraphysiological levels of insulinemia using 2-deoxy-D-[2,6-3H]glucose. Finally, whole body and tissue specific FFA and glucose utilization and metabolic fate were evaluated under basal and hyperinsulinemic conditions using a combination of [U-13C]glucose, 2-deoxy-D-[U-14C]glucose, [U-14C]palmitate, and [9,10-3H]-(R-bromopalmitate. Tesaglitazar improved whole body insulin action by greater suppression of HGO and stimulation of compared to obese controls. This involved increased insulin stimulation of in fat and skeletal muscle as well as increased glycogen synthesis. Tesaglitazar dramatically improved insulin mediated suppression of plasma FFA level, whole body turnover (, and muscle, liver, and fat utilization. At basal insulin levels, tesaglitazar failed to lower HGO or compared to obese controls. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that tesaglitazar has a remarkable ability to improve insulin mediated control of glucose and FFA fluxes in obese Zucker rats.

  16. Nitrogen source and concentration affect utilization of glucose by mixed ruminal microbes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M B

    2017-04-01

    The availability of rumen-degradable protein (RDP) changes the use of carbohydrates by ruminal microbes. However, the effects of RDP on the simultaneous use of carbohydrate and formation of microbial products are not well described, although such information is needed to understand the potential effect on nutrient supplies for ruminants. The objective of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of different levels of RDP (0.15, 0.31, 0.46 g of N/L) from tryptone (Tryp) or urea (Ur) on product formation from glucose in fermentations with mixed ruminal microbes. The study had a randomized complete block design with 2 replicated fermentation runs and destructive sampling at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 h. All rates given are first-order rate constants. Glucose disappearance rates and organic acid carbon (C) production rates tended to be or were greater for Tryp (0.64 and 0.58 h(-1)) than for Ur (0.51 and 0.22 h(-1)), respectively, but did not differ by N level. Maximum detected microbial N production was 67% greater for Tryp (2.35 mg) than for Ur (1.41 mg), which did not differ from the basal medium (1.47 mg). The pattern of glycogen accumulation over time tended to differ between Tryp and Ur: glycogen peaked and declined earlier in the fermentations with Tryp, resulting in less glycogen remaining at 5 h with Tryp (7.2 mg) than with Ur (11.0 mg). At the point of maximum microbial N accumulation, Tryp and Ur did not differ in the amount of glucose C used (29.4 and 28.9 mg), but did differ in the amounts of cell C (10.1 and 6.0 mg), organic acid C (17.4 and 13.8 mg), glycogen C (3.81 and 6.07 mg), and total microbial product C (35.4 and 29.6 mg) present. This resulted in increased efficiency for Tryp compared with Ur for cell C produced per used glucose C, corrected for glycogen C (0.40 and 0.27 mg/mg), and it resulted in a tendency for increased yield of cell C per organic acid C (0.59 and 0.44 mg/mg). Total product C exceeded used glucose C for Tryp, likely because

  17. Insights into the simultaneous utilization of glucose and glycerol by Streptomyces albulus M-Z18 for high ε-poly-L-lysine productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xin; Zhao, Junjie; Chen, Xusheng; Mao, Zhonggui; Miao, Wenyun

    2017-12-01

    The simultaneous consumption of glucose and glycerol led to remarkably higher productivity of both biomass and ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL), which was of great significance in industrial microbial fermentation. To further understand the superior fermentation performances, transcriptional analysis and exogenous substrates addition were carried out to study the simultaneous utilization of glucose and glycerol by Streptomyces albulus M-Z18. Transcriptome analysis revealed that there was no mutual transcriptional suppression between the utilization of glucose and glycerol, which was quite different from typical "glucose effect". In addition, microorganisms cultivated with single glycerol showed significant demand for ribose-5-phosphate, which resulted in potential demand for glucose and xylitol. The above demand could be relieved by glucose (in the mixed carbon source) or xylitol addition, leading to improvement of biomass production. It indicated that glucose in the mixed carbon source was more important for biomass production. Besides, transcriptional analysis and exogenous citrate addition proved that single carbon sources could not afford enough carbon skeletons for Embden Meyerhof pathway (EMP) while a glucose-glycerol combination could provided sufficient carbon skeletons to saturate the metabolic capability of EMP, which contributed to the replenishment of precursors and energy consumed in ε-PL production. This study offered insight into the simultaneous consumption of glucose and glycerol in the ε-PL batch fermentation, which deepened our comprehension on the high ε-PL productivity in the mixed carbon source.

  18. Quantitative metabolomics of a xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylose isomerase on glucose and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, M J; Rose, S H; la Grange, D C; Bamba, T; Hasunuma, T; Kondo, A; van Zyl, W H

    2017-10-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot utilize xylose, but the introduction of a xylose isomerase that functions well in yeast will help overcome the limitations of the fungal oxido-reductive pathway. In this study, a diploid S. cerevisiae S288c[2n YMX12] strain was constructed expressing the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron xylA (XI) and the Scheffersomyces stipitis xyl3 (XK) and the changes in the metabolite pools monitored over time. Cultivation on xylose generally resulted in gradual changes in metabolite pool size over time, whereas more dramatic fluctuations were observed with cultivation on glucose due to the diauxic growth pattern. The low G6P and F1,6P levels observed with cultivation on xylose resulted in the incomplete activation of the Crabtree effect, whereas the high PEP levels is indicative of carbon starvation. The high UDP-D-glucose levels with cultivation on xylose indicated that the carbon was channeled toward biomass production. The adenylate and guanylate energy charges were tightly regulated by the cultures, while the catabolic and anabolic reduction charges fluctuated between metabolic states. This study helped elucidate the metabolite distribution that takes place under Crabtree-positive and Crabtree-negative conditions when cultivating S. cerevisiae on glucose and xylose, respectively.

  19. Production of Acetoin through Simultaneous Utilization of Glucose, Xylose, and Arabinose by Engineered Bacillus subtilis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Xin-Li; Fu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Zhiwen; Tang, Ya-Jie; Chen, Tao

    2016-01-01

    .... In our previous study, the recombinant Bacillus subtilis 168ARSRCPΔacoAΔbdhA strain was already shown to efficiently utilize xylose for production of acetoin, with a yield of 0.36 g/g xylose...

  20. Neuroscience of glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Fleur, S E; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations are homeostatically regulated and maintained within strict boundaries. Several mechanisms are in place to increase glucose output when glucose levels in the circulation drop as a result of glucose utilization, or to decrease glucose output and increase tissue glucose

  1. Latrepirdine increases cerebral glucose utilization in aged mice as measured by [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M; Chandran, P; Luo, F; Rustay, N R; Markosyan, S; LeBlond, D; Fox, G B

    2011-08-25

    Latrepirdine is hypothesized to exert a unique mechanism of action involving stabilization of mitochondria that may have utility in treating Alzheimer's disease. However, the ability of latrepirdine to improve cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is controversial due to a discrepancy between the positive signal reported in the multi-site phase II clinical trial where latrepirdine met all primary and secondary endpoints [Doody et al. (2008) Lancet 372:207-215], and the subsequent null effect observed in a multicenter, phase III trial. While dysfunction of mitochondria and abnormal energy metabolism has been linked to AD pathology, no studies have been reported that investigate latrepirdine's effect on cerebral glucose utilization (CGU). Glucose metabolism, following acute latrepirdine administration, can be used to help dose selection in Phase I dose-ranging studies. The aim of the current study was to assess changes in CGU in young and aged mice in vivo using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) after acute treatment with latrepirdine. Two ages of B6SJLF2 mice (5 and 20 months old) were tested. Three test-retest FDG-PET baseline scans were assessed across all subjects. As CGU was heterogeneous in aged mice, compared to young mice, aged subjects were rank ordered and then counterbalanced into two CGU homogenous groups. In Studies 1 and 2, latrepirdine (1.0 mg/kg) significantly enhanced CGU in aged mice. In contrast, Study 3 revealed that latrepirdine did not modulate CGU in young mice. Monitoring changes in CGU in response to acute drug administration may represent an imaging biomarker for dose selection in AD. Further studies that would establish the translation from mice to non-human primates to humans need to be investigated to confirm the utility of FDG-PET in dose-selection for mitochondrial modulators. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates by engineered Clostridium tyrobutyricum overexpressing xylose catabolism genes for glucose and xylose co-utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongxin; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Minqi; Wang, Jufang; Tang, I-Ching

    2017-06-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum can utilize glucose and xylose as carbon source for butyric acid production. However, xylose catabolism is inhibited by glucose, hampering butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates containing both glucose and xylose. In this study, an engineered strain of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA overexpressing heterologous xylose catabolism genes (xylT, xylA, and xylB) was investigated for co-utilizing glucose and xylose present in hydrolysates of plant biomass, including soybean hull, corn fiber, wheat straw, rice straw, and sugarcane bagasse. Compared to the wild-type strain, Ct-pTBA showed higher xylose utilization without significant glucose catabolite repression, achieving near 100% utilization of glucose and xylose present in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates in bioreactor at pH 6. About 42.6g/L butyrate at a productivity of 0.56g/L·h and yield of 0.36g/g was obtained in batch fermentation, demonstrating the potential of C. tyrobutyricum Ct-pTBA for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose among residents in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Feng, Liangui; Ding, Xianbin; Mao, Deqiang; Wang, Yulin; Xiong, Hongyan

    2014-11-06

    The Three Gorges Dam in China is the world's largest hydro-electric scheme in the contemporary world. After the construction of the Dam, great changes took place on the residents' lifestyles characterized by reduced physical activity due to the loss of arable land and a series of psychological problems caused by resettlement, which might be regarded as contributing factors to the development of diabetes in Three Gorges Reservoir Region (TGRR). However, there is no study that has been conducted targeting large population samples with the aim of determining the prevalence of diabetes in TGRR. This study purposed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in the adult population ≥18 years in TGRR and to evaluate the associated risk factors. A total of 3721 randomly selected adults, aged ≥18 years and having lived in TGRR for at least one year, participated in questionnaire-based interview from April to May 2013 and had their physical examinations and standard glucose taken. 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted on the subjects with fasting glucose levels being ≥ 5.6 mmol/L. Diabetes and IFG were defined according to WHO 1999 criteria. The age-standardized prevalence of diabetes and IFG were 7.6% (7.9% among men and 7.4% among women) and 9.0% (9.1% among men and 8.9% among women), respectively. Among the identified cases of diabetes in this study, 54.46% (171/314) were newly diagnosed. The prevalence of diabetes cases rose with age (4.0%, 4.5%, 8.1%, 11.2%, 12.4% and 12.9% among persons who were 18 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, 50 to 59, 60 to 69 and ≥ 70 years of age, respectively). The results of multivariate logistic-regression analyses showed that the diabetes was significantly linked to age, family history of diabetes, central obesity, educational level and hypertension for both men and women. In addition, smoking was significantly associated with diabetes in men. Diabetes has become a major public

  4. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Kazuhiko; Miyabayashi, Shigeaki; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tada, Keiya; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masatoshi; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1987-06-01

    Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites were measured in two cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) with different clinical courses. A marked decrease in rCMRglu was found in the cortical gray matter of a patient with rapidly developing SSPE (3.6 - 4.2 mg/100 g brain tissue/min). However, the rCMRglu was preserved in the caudate and lenticular nuclei of the patient (7.7 mg/100 g/min). The rCMRglu in a patient with slowly developing SSPE revealed patterns and values similar to those of the control. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites ; homovanilic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in both rapidly and slowly developing SSPE. These data indicated that rCMRglu correlated better with the neurological and psychological status and that dopaminergic and serotonergic abnormalities have been implicated in pathophysiology of SSPE.

  5. Pharmacological vasodilation improves insulin-stimulated muscle protein anabolism but not glucose utilization in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Kyle L; Lee, Jessica L; Fujita, Satoshi; Dhanani, Shaheen; Dreyer, Hans C; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Rasmussen, Blake B; Volpi, Elena

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal muscle protein metabolism is resistant to the anabolic action of insulin in healthy, nondiabetic older adults. This defect is associated with impaired insulin-induced vasodilation and mTORC1 signaling. We hypothesized that, in older subjects, pharmacological restoration of insulin-induced capillary recruitment would improve the response of muscle protein synthesis and anabolism to insulin. Twelve healthy, nondiabetic older subjects (71 ± 2 years) were randomized to two groups. Subjects were studied at baseline and during local infusion in one leg of insulin alone (Control) or insulin plus sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at variable rate to double leg blood flow. We measured leg blood flow by dye dilution; muscle microvascular perfusion with contrast enhanced ultrasound; Akt/mTORC1 signaling by Western blotting; and muscle protein synthesis, amino acid, and glucose kinetics using stable isotope methodologies. There were no baseline differences between groups. Blood flow, muscle perfusion, phenylalanine delivery to the leg, and intracellular availability of phenylalanine increased significantly (P anabolic effect of insulin in older adults.

  6. Patterns of glucose lowering drugs utilization in Portugal and in the Netherlands. Trends over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Carla; Guerreiro, José; de Oliveira Martins, Sofia; Raposo, João Filipe; Martins, Ana Paula; Leufkens, Hubert

    2015-12-01

    To compare the temporal trends in the consumption patterns of glucose lowering drugs (GLD) between Portugal and the Netherlands from 2004 to 2013 and to examine possible reasons behind the cross-national variation found. All GLD (ATC pharmacological subgroup A10B) were selected for analysis. Consumption data were obtained for the 10-year period. Portuguese and Dutch drug estimates were obtained from nationwide databases. The consumption of GLD increased in Portugal from 52.9 defined daily dose per 1000 inhabitants per day (DHD) in 2004 to 70.0 DHD in 2013 and in the Netherlands from 44.9 DHD in 2004 to 50.7 DHD in 2013. In Portugal, the use of fixed-dose combinations, especially with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4) increased remarkably and in 2013 represented almost a quarter of total GLD consumption. In the Netherlands, the use of combinations was residual. The consumption of GLD rose over the 10-year period in both countries. However, Portuguese overall consumption and costs of GLD were higher. The differentially rapid uptake of DPP-4 inhibitors in Portugal was the main driver of the cost difference. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbohydrate and Amino Acid Metabolism in the Eucalyptus globulus-Pisolithus tinctorius Ectomycorrhiza during Glucose Utilization1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Francis; Boiffin, Vincent; Pfeffer, Philip E.

    1998-01-01

    The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose in Pisolithus tinctorius cv Coker & Couch, in uninoculated seedlings of Eucalyptus globulus bicostata ex Maiden cv Kirkp., and in the E. globulus-P. tinctorius ectomycorrhiza was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In roots of uninoculated seedlings, the 13C label was mainly incorporated into sucrose and glutamine. The ratio (13C3 + 13C2)/13C4 of glutamine was approximately 1.0 during the time-course experiment, indicating equivalent contributions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase to the production of α-ketoglutarate used for synthesis of this amino acid. In free-living P. tinctorius, most of the 13C label was incorporated into mannitol, trehalose, glutamine, and alanine, whereas arabitol, erythritol, and glutamate were weakly labeled. Amino acid biosynthesis was an important sink of assimilated 13C (43%), and anaplerotic CO2 fixation contributed 42% of the C flux entering the Krebs cycle. In ectomycorrhizae, sucrose accumulation was decreased in the colonized roots compared with uninoculated control plants, whereas 13C incorporation into arabitol and erythritol was nearly 4-fold higher in the symbiotic mycelium than in the free-living fungus. It appears that fungal utilization of glucose in the symbiotic state is altered and oriented toward the synthesis of short-chain polyols. PMID:9765549

  8. Relationship between salivary cortisol levels and regional cerebral glucose metabolism in nondemented elderly subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Young Bin; Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Ha; Chey, Jean Yung; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Cortisol is a primary stress hormone for flight-or-fight response in human. Increased levels of cortisol have been associated with memory and learning impairments. However, little is known about the role of cortisol on brain/cognitive functions in older adults. We compared regional cerebral glucose metabolism between elderly subjects with high and low cortisol levels using FDG PET. Salivary cortisol levels were measured four times during a day, and an average of the four measurements was used as the standard cortisol level for the analyses. From a population of 120 nondemented elderly subjects, 19 (mean age, 70.1{+-}4.9 y: 2 males and 17 females) were identified as the high (> mean + 1 SD of the total population) cortisol subjects (mean cortisol, 0.69{+-}0.09 {mu} g/dL), while 14 (mean age, 67.2{+-}4.5 y: all females) as the low (< mean 1 SD) cortisol (mean cortisol, 0.27{+-}0.03 {mu} g/dL). A voxel-wise comparison of FDG PET images from the high and low cortisol subjects was performed using SPM99. When compared with the low cortisol group, the high cortisol group had significant hypometabolism in the right middle temporal gyrus, left precuneus, right parahippocampal gyrus, right inferior temporal and superior temporal gyri (P < 0.01 uncorrected, k = 100). There was no significant increase of glucose metabolism in the high cortisol group compared with the low cortisol group (P < 0.01 uncorrected, k = 100). The high cortisol elderly subjects had hypometabolism in the parahippocampal and temporal gyri and precuneus, regions involved in memory and other cognitive functions. This may represent the preclinical metabolic correlates of forthcoming cognitive dysfunction associated with stress in the elderly. Longitudinal studies of brain metabolism and cognitive function are warranted.

  9. Correlates of maternal health care utilization in Rohilkhand region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 28.5% (110/343) of women received ANC from a private doctor. Maternal health care service utilization from health personnel was significantly associated with age at marriage ≥18 years, family size ≤3, birth order ≤2, nuclear family and higher socio‑economic status. Most of the pregnancy related complications were ...

  10. Impaired glucose regulation in a Sherpa indigenous population living in the Everest region of Nepal and in Kathmandu Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhamo, Sherpa Y; Supamai, Soonthornpun; Virasakdi, Chongsuvivatwong

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impaired glucose regulation status in Sherpa adults living in the Everest area and in Kathmandu valley. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Chaurikharka village (Everest area) and Kathmandu city on 119 and 121 randomly selected individuals, aged 30-70 years. They were assessed on conventional risk factors for diabetes, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Based on the 2003 American Diabetes Association criteria, the prevalence in the Kathmandu city and Everest region of any impaired glucose regulation (IGR), isolated impaired fasting plasma glucose (isolated IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (isolated IGT), and combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT were 55.4% vs. 23.5%, 42.1% vs. 14.3%, 1.7% vs. 0.8%, 11.6 vs. 8.4%, respectively. Using the subjects with normal glucose tolerance as the referent group and after adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, calories, and waist circumference, the odds ratios for isolated IFG and combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT of living in the highland region were 0.19 (0.08-0.44) and 0.33 (0.09-1.18), respectively. Isolated IFG was more common among the lowland Sherpas. Unlike combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT, this isolated IFG difference could not be explained by the difference of conventional diabetes mellitus risk factors.

  11. Health Service Utilization in Amhara Region of Ethiopia | Fantahun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... bought drugs from drug vendors (27.2) and visited traditional healers (20.2%). In multivariate analysis urban residence (OR= 2.8, 95%CI 1.8, 4.5) and educational status of head of household (OR =3.4 95%CI 2.1,5.5) were significantly related to utilization of modern health institutions. Teenagers and persons above the ...

  12. In vivo evidence for ligand-specific receptor activation in the central CRF system, as measured by local cerebral glucose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Geoff; Moechars, Dieder; Langlois, Xavier; Steckler, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is well known for its role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and its involvement in stress and anxiety. CRF acts via two main receptor subtypes, CRF(1) and CRF(2). Other endogenous CRF-related peptide ligands are the Urocortins 1 and 2 and Stresscopin. While CRF is thought to mediate its anxiogenic-like properties through CRF(1), the role of CRF(2) and its endogenous ligands Urocortin 2 and Stresscopin are less clear, with a suggested role in mediating the delayed effects of stress. Measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) provides an estimate of neuronal activity, and is of potential use as a translational tool in comparison to FDG PET. We hypothesized that comparison of the patterns of metabolic changes induced by CRF-related peptides could provide further information on their role in the brain. The present studies examined the effects of CRF-related peptides on LCGU, and the role of CRF(1) and CRF(2) in the CRF-induced LCGU response. CRF induced increases in LCGU in hypothalamic, thalamic, cerebellar and hippocampal regions, and further studies using antagonists or mutant mice lacking a functional CRF(1) receptor clearly suggested a role for CRF(2) in this effect. Urocortin 1 increased LCGU in a dissected hindbrain region. However, central administration of the CRF(2)-selective agonists Urocortin 2 and Stresscopin failed to affect LCGU, which may suggest ligand-dependent receptor activation within the CRF system. The present data supports a role for CRF(2) in the regulation of neuronal glucose metabolism.

  13. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in frontotemporal dementia: a study with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. S.; Jeong, J.; Kang, S. J.; Na, D. L.; Choe, Y. S.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a common cause of presenile dementia. We investigated the regional cerebral glucose metabolic impairments in patients with FTD using FDG PET. We analysed the regional metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 30 patients with FTD and age- and sex-matched 15 patients with Alzheimers disease (AD) and 11 healthy subjects using SPM99. We also compared the inter-hemispheric metabolic asymmetry among the three groups by counting the total metabolic activity of each hemisphere and computing asymmetry index (AL) between hemispheres. The hypometabolic brain regions in FTD patients compared with healthy controls were as follows: superior middle and medial frontal lobules, superior and middle temporal lobules, anterior and posterior cingulate gyri, uncus, insula, lateral globus pallidus and thalamus. The regions with decreased metabolism in FTD patients compared with AD patients were as follows: superior, inferior and medial frontal lobules, anterior cingulate gyrus, and caudate nucleus. Twenty-five (83%) out of the 30 FTD patients had AI values that was beyond the 95% confidence interval of the AI values obtained from healthy controls; 10 patients had hypometabolism more severe on the right and 15 patients had the opposite pattern. In comparison, 10 (67%) out of the 15 AD patients had asymmetric metabolism. Our SPM analysis of FDG PET revealed additional areas of decreased metabolism in FTD patients compared with prior studies using the ROI method, involving frontal, temporal, cingulate gyrus, corpus callosum, uncus, insula, and some subcortical areas. The inter-hemispheric metabolic asymmetry was common in FTD patients, which can be another metabolic feature that helps differentiate FTD from AD.

  14. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes in oculopalatal myoclonus: implication for neural pathways, underlying the disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Moon, So Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is characterized by rhythmic involuntary jerky movements of the soft palate of the throat. When associated with eye movements, it is called oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM). Ordinary PM is characterized by hypertrophic olivary degeneration, a trans-synaptic degeneration following loss of neuronal input to the inferior olivary nucleus due to an interruption of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle usually by a hemorrhage. However, the neural pathways underlying the disorder are uncertain. In an attempt to understand the pathologic neural pathways, we examined the metabolic correlates of this tremulous condition. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 patients with OPM (age, 49.9{+-}4.6 y: all males: 7 with pontine hemorrhage, 1 with diffuse brainstem infarction) and age-matched 50 healthy males (age, 50.7{+-} 9.0) and the regional glucose metabolism compared using SPM99. For group analysis, the hemispheres containing lesions were assigned to the right side of the brain. Patients with OPM had significant hypometabolism in the ipsilateral (to the lesion) brainstem and superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri (P < 0.05 corrected, k = 100). By contrast, there was significant hypermetabolism in the contralateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, thalamus, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus (P < 0.05 corrected, k=l00). Our data demonstrate the distinct metabolic changes between several ipsilateral and contralateral brain regions (hypometabolism vs. hypermetabolism) in patients with OPM. This may provide clues for understanding the neural pathways underlying the disorder.

  15. Opportunity Cost and Policy: A Utilization Review of Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwylo, Olena; Friesen, Kevin; Falk, Jamie; Bugden, Shawn

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been a re-evaluation of the frequency, benefits, and costs associated with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Based on little evidence of the benefit of frequent SMBG in patients with diabetes not using insulin, new guidelines and test strip limit policies have been suggested and implemented in various Canadian jurisdictions to promote a more selective practice of SMBG. The objective of this study was to assess the overall utilization and cost associated with test strips and lancets for SMBG in Manitoba from 2000 to 2013 as well as to explore the policy implications of the implementation of test strip quantity limits and its impact on overall and government costs. An analysis of prescription claims for blood glucose test strips (BGTSs) and lancets for all patients with diabetes in Manitoba from 2000 to 2013 was conducted. In each year, patients were stratified into 4 mutually exclusive hierarchical groups according to most intensive diabetes treatment. Test strip and lancet utilization and cost were assessed for each group in each year, and the potential cost savings associated with implementation of a BGTS limit policy was projected using autoregressive integrated moving average models. In the year 2000, 8 million test strips were dispensed in Manitoba, increasing by 170% to 21.7 million test strips in 2013. Insulin users accounted for the majority of test strip use. However, based on potential implementation of test strip limit policies, 95% of the reduction of test strip use is predicted to occur in the groups not using insulin. Based on current trends, the 5-year predicted additional cost associated with not implementing a test strip limit policy similar to that implemented in other Canadian provinces was estimated to be a total of $12.35 million. Implementation of the guideline-based policy limits is predicted to produce considerable savings, with 95% of potential savings occurring in patients not using insulin. There is, therefore, a

  16. The effect of education on regional brain metabolism and its functional connectivity in an aged population utilizing positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeik; Chey, Jeanyung; Kim, Sang-Eun; Kim, Hoyoung

    2015-05-01

    Education involves learning new information and acquiring cognitive skills. These require various cognitive processes including learning, memory, and language. Since cognitive processes activate associated brain areas, we proposed that the brains of elderly people with longer education periods would show traces of repeated activation as increased synaptic connectivity and capillary in brain areas involved in learning, memory, and language. Utilizing positron emission topography (PET), this study examined the effect of education in the human brain utilizing the regional cerebral glucose metabolism rates (rCMRglcs). 26 elderly women with high-level education (HEG) and 26 with low-level education (LEG) were compared with regard to their regional brain activation and association between the regions. Further, graphical theoretical analysis using rCMRglcs was applied to examine differences in the functional network properties of the brain. The results showed that the HEG had higher rCMRglc in the ventral cerebral regions that are mainly involved in memory, language, and neurogenesis, while the LEG had higher rCMRglc in apical areas of the cerebrum mainly involved in motor and somatosensory functions. Functional connectivity investigated with graph theoretical analysis illustrated that the brain of the HEG compared to those of the LEG were overall more efficient, more resilient, and characterized by small-worldness. This may be one of the brain's mechanisms mediating the reserve effects found in people with higher education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating the performance and utility of regional climate models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens H.; Carter, Timothy R.; Rummukainen, Markku

    2007-01-01

    This special issue of Climatic Change contains a series of research articles documenting co-ordinated work carried out within a 3-year European Union project 'Prediction of Regional scenarios and Uncertainties for Defining European Climate change risks and Effects' (PRUDENCE). The main objective...... of the PRUDENCE project was to provide high resolution climate change scenarios for Europe at the end of the twenty-first century by means of dynamical downscaling (regional climate modelling) of global climate simulations. The first part of the issue comprises seven overarching PRUDENCE papers on: (1) the design...... of the model simulations and analyses of climate model performance, (2 and 3) evaluation and intercomparison of simulated climate changes, (4 and 5) specialised analyses of impacts on water resources and on other sectors including agriculture, ecosystems, energy, and transport, (6) investigation of extreme...

  18. Clorgyline-induced modification of behavioral sensitization to quinpirole: effects on local cerebral glucose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Toni L; Pazdernik, Thomas L; Levant, Beth

    2007-07-30

    Sensitization refers to augmented behavioral responses produced by repeated, intermittent injections of dopaminergic psychostimulants. The locomotor manifestations observed after a sensitizing course of quinpirole, a D(2)/D(3) dopamine agonist, can be modified by the MAO(A) inhibitor clorgyline, by a mechanism apparently unrelated to its actions on MAO(A). Alterations in regional neuronal activity produced by quinpirole in quinpirole-sensitized rats with or without clorgyline pretreatment were assessed based on LCGU using the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method. Adult, male Long-Evans rats (180-200 g, n=9-10/group) were subjected to an injection of either clorgyline (1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline 90 min prior to an injection of quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline, 1 set of injections administered every 3rd day for 10 sets. The 2-DG procedure was initiated 60 min after an 11th set of injections in freely moving rats. LCGU was determined by quantitative autoradiography. LCGU was decreased in a number of limbic (nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum) and cortical (medial/ventral orbital and infralimbic) regions and in the raphe magnus nucleus in quinpirole-sensitized rats (P<0.05 vs. saline-saline). Quinpirole-sensitized rats pretreated with clorgyline had similar alterations in LCGU, but LCGU was higher in the locus coeruleus compared to quinpirole alone (P<0.05), was not decreased in the raphe magnus nucleus, and was decreased in the piriform cortex and septum. This implicates altered activity of the noradrenergic, serotonergic, olfactory, and limbic systems in the modified behavioral response to quinpirole with clorgyline pretreatment.

  19. Fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars to ethanol: selection of mutants of Pichia stipitis affected for D-glucose utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laplace, J.M.; Delgenes, J.P.; Moletta, R. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Lab. de Biotechnologie de l' Environnement des IAA, Station d' Oenologie et de Technologie des Produits Vegetaux, Narbonne (FR)); Navarro, J.M. (Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France))

    1992-08-01

    Mutants of the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis exhibiting a decreased ability to convert glucose to ethanol were obtained by mutagenesis with UV light. Mutants were isolated by replica-plating onto complete medium containing either D-galactose or D-glucose as carbon source. Mutants showing a reduction of growth on glucose were further tested for their ability to still use xylose. Finally, the kinetic behaviour of six mutant strains grown on glucose and xylose is presented. (author).

  20. Short-term effects of a standardized glucose load on region-specific aortic pulse wave velocity assessed by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jacqueline T.; Tjeerdema, Nathanja; Hensen, Liselotte C. R.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; de Roos, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the short-term effects of a standardized oral glucose load on regional aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) using two-directional in-plane velocity encoded MRI. Materials and Methods A randomized, controlled intervention was performed in 16 male subjects (mean +/- standard deviation:

  1. Tumor glucose utilization with FDG-PET and cell kinetic measurements with IUdR in primary rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiepers, C.; Haustermans, K.; Penninckx, F. [U.Z. Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Rectal cancer is a common disease. Viable tumor cells show increased FDG uptake, which can be used to monitor radiotherapy (RT). Patients were studied in the fasting state (>6 hrs). 400-555 MBq F-18 FDG was administered i.v. and dynamic imaging started. Arterial blood was withdrawn to determine the plasma input function. A bladder catheter was flushed to clear tracer. Tumor glucose utilization (TuGluc) was calculated with a 3 compartment model, assuming a lumped constant of 1. Cell kinetics were measured with flow cytometry 6-8 hrs after in vivo labeling with iodo-deoxy-uridine (IUdR). Potential doubling time (Tpot) was determined. Two groups were investigated: (1) surgery only (n=9) and (2) before and 2-3 weeks after 30 Gy RT (n=9). For group 2 at baseline, a PET was done and tumor biopsies taken on the same day. The other PET studies were performed 1-2 days before surgery. Consecutive patients with a cT3 tumor without metastasis and over 50 yr were selected and randomized. The protocol was approved by the Human Studied Committee. At baseline TuGluc for group 1 was 222 {plus_minus} 104 nmol/min/ml (mean {plus_minus} 1 sd), and for group 2: 215 {plus_minus} 126 (p=Ns). After RT TuGluc decreased to 77 {plus_minus} 39 (p<.01). Tpot was 3.4 {plus_minus} 1.2 days for group 1 and 2.6 {plus_minus} 2.0 for group 2 at baseline (p=NS). After RT, Tpot slowed down to 5.5 {plus_minus} 3.5 days (p=0.06). A weak negative correlation of -0.2 was found between TuGluc and Tpot, a tendency for increased glucose utilization of faster dividing cells. Tpot is not clearly affected by RT suggesting undisturbed proliferation of viable cells 2-3 weeks after RT. However, TuGluc decreased indicating cell loss and histology revealed down staging in about half of patients. In conclusion: tumor FDG uptake and cell kinetics do not show a strong correlation in rectal cancer. RT results in overall loss of tumor cells and down staging, while proliferation of viable cells is maintained.

  2. Intensive insulin therapy reduces microdialysis glucose values without altering glucose utilization or improving the lactate/pyruvate ratio after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespa, Paul; Boonyaputthikul, Robert; McArthur, David L; Miller, Chad; Etchepare, Maria; Bergsneider, Marvin; Glenn, Thomas; Martin, Neil; Hovda, David

    2006-03-01

    To determine that intensive glycemic control does not reduce microdialysis glucose concentration brain metabolism of glucose. Prospective monitoring followed by retrospective data analysis of cerebral microdialysis and global brain metabolism. Single center, academic neurointensive care unit. Forty-seven moderate to severe traumatic brain injury patients. A nonrandomized, consecutive design was used for glycemic control with loose insulin (n=33) for the initial 2 yrs or intensive insulin therapy (n=14) for the last year. In 14 patients treated with intensive insulin therapy, there was a reduction in microdialysis glucose by 70% of baseline concentration compared with a 15% reduction in 33 patients treated with a loose insulin protocol. Despite this reduction in microdialysis glucose, the global metabolic rate of glucose did not change. However, intensive insulin therapy was associated with increased incidence of microdialysis markers of cellular distress, namely elevated glutamate (38+/-37% vs. 10+/-17%, pglucose (26+/-17% vs. 11+/-15%, pglucose and an increase in microdialysis glutamate and lactate/pyruvate without conveying a functional outcome advantage.

  3. [Effects of an ergot derivative, lisuride, on the central nervous system -- stimulatory effect on local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, H; Miyazawa, T; Ishikawa, T; Oshino, N

    1982-07-01

    Effects of lisuride, a central dopamine and serotonin agonist of the ergot type, on local cerebral glucose utilization were studied in conscious, anesthetized, and substantia nigra-lesioned rats using the autoradiographic 2-deoxyglucose method. In the conscious rat, lisuride produced dose-dependent (0.05-0.5 mg/kg s.c.) increases of glucose utilization in the cerebellar gray structures (lobule of culmen, vermian lobule, uvula, cerebellar hemisphere) and the lateral nucleus of the thalamus. Although some other gray structures including cerebral cortex were also slightly stimulated, no change was observe in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, amygdala, mammillary body, superior colliculus, pons, and any of the white structure. The stimulatory effect of lisuride was abolished almost completely by the pretreatment with sulpiride or haloperidol. Pentobarbital and gamma-butyrolactone produced marked reduction in the glucose utilization all over the brain, and these effects were not affected by the pretreatment of lisuride. A unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion at the substantia nigra caused a reduction of glucose utilization in the ipsilateral auditory cortex that was reversed by the administration of lisuride. These results indicate that lisuride modulates the motion coordination function of the cerebellum through the cerebral cortex.

  4. Visual and SPM analysis of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in adult patients with neurofibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee; An, Young Sil; Hong, Seon Pyo; Joh, Chul Woo; Yoon, Seok Nam [Ajou University, School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We evaluated the regional cerebral glucose metabolism in adult patients with neurofibromatosis (NF) using visual and SPM analysis, and compared with MRI findings. A total of 11 adult patients with NF type I were prospectively included in the study. All patients underwent F-18 FDG PET and brain MRI within 2 month of each other. All hypometabolic areas on PET were determined visually by 2 nuclear medicine physician and compared with MRI findings. SPM analysis was done using 42 normal controls with p = 0.005. Seven of 11 PET images showed 10 hypometabolic areas and 4 of 11 MRIs showed 6 areas of signal change brain parenchyma. Hypometabolic areas were bilateral thalamus (n=5), left temporal cortex (n=4) and dentate nucleus (n=1). In only 2 lesions (thalamus and dentate nucleus), hypometabolic foci were consistently related to signal change on MRI. SPM analysis revealed significantly decreased area in bilateral thalamus and left temporal cortex. F-18 FDG PET revealed significant hypometabolism in bilateral thalamus and left temporal cortex in adult patients with NF, and it might be helpful in understanding developmental abnormality of NF.

  5. Region-specific study of the electric utility industry: financial history and future power requirements for the VACAR region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochan, M.J.

    1985-07-01

    Financial data for the period 1966 to 1981 are presented for the four investor-owned electric utilities in the VACAR (Virginia-Carolinas) region. This region was selected as representative for the purpose of assessing the availability, reliability, and cost of electric power for the future in the United States. The estimated demand for power and planned additions to generating capacity for the region through the year 2000 are also given.

  6. Altered local cerebral glucose utilization induced by electrical stimulations of the thalamic sensory and parafascicular nuclei in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiko, Y; Shima, F; Hosokawa, S; Kato, M; Kitamura, K

    1987-04-07

    Alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) induced by electrical stimulation of the sensory relay nucleus (VPL) or parafascicular nucleus (Pf) of the thalamus in conscious rats were measured by the [14C]2-deoxyglucose method, the objective being to assess the mechanism of analgesia induced by electrical stimulations of these structures. Stimulation of the VPL induced an ipsilateral increase in LCGU in the sensory thalamic nucleus itself, the sensory cortex and substantia nigra. Stimulation of the Pf induced bilateral increases in LCGU in the Pf and central medial nucleus of the thalamus, sensory cortex, ventral areas of the striatum and substantia nigra, and ipsilateral increase in LCGU in the periaqueductal gray, parabrachial pontine nucleus and deep layers of the superior colliculus. No significant change in LCGU was detected in the raphe dorsalis, raphe magnus and spinal dorsal horn, in both groups. Our observations coincide with clinical findings that unilateral electrical stimulation of the Pf leads to amelioration of intractable pain bilaterally, while that of the VPL induces an analgesia restricted to the contralateral side.

  7. Regional Brain Glucose Hypometabolism in Young Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Possible Link to Mild Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Nugent, Scott; Tremblay, Sébastien; Fortier, Mélanie; Imbeault, Hélène; Duval, Julie; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglu) is altered in normal weight young women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) who exhibit mild insulin resistance. Seven women with PCOS were compared to eleven healthy female controls of similar age, education and body mass index. Regional brain glucose uptake was quantified using FDG with dynamic positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and its potential relationship with insulin resistance assessed using the updated homeostasis model assessment (HOMA2-IR). A battery of cognitive tests was administered to evaluate working memory, attention and executive function. The PCOS group had 10% higher fasting glucose and 40% higher HOMA2-IR (p ≤ 0.035) compared to the Controls. The PCOS group had 9-14% lower CMRglu in specific regions of the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices (p ≤ 0.018). A significant negative relation was found between the CMRglu and HOMA2-IR mainly in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices as well as in the hippocampus and the amygdala (p ≤ 0.05). Globally, cognitive performance was normal in both groups but scores on the PASAT test of working memory tended to be low in the PCOS group. The PCOS group exhibited a pattern of low regional CMRglu that correlated inversely with HOMA2-IR in several brain regions and which resembled the pattern seen in aging and early Alzheimer's disease. These results suggest that a direct association between mild insulin resistance and brain glucose hypometabolism independent of overweight or obesity can exist in young adults in their 20s. Further investigation of the influence of insulin resistance on brain glucose metabolism and cognition in younger and middle-aged adults is warranted.

  8. Regional Brain Glucose Hypometabolism in Young Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Possible Link to Mild Insulin Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian-Alexandre Castellano

    Full Text Available To investigate whether cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglu is altered in normal weight young women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS who exhibit mild insulin resistance.Seven women with PCOS were compared to eleven healthy female controls of similar age, education and body mass index. Regional brain glucose uptake was quantified using FDG with dynamic positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and its potential relationship with insulin resistance assessed using the updated homeostasis model assessment (HOMA2-IR. A battery of cognitive tests was administered to evaluate working memory, attention and executive function.The PCOS group had 10% higher fasting glucose and 40% higher HOMA2-IR (p ≤ 0.035 compared to the Controls. The PCOS group had 9-14% lower CMRglu in specific regions of the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices (p ≤ 0.018. A significant negative relation was found between the CMRglu and HOMA2-IR mainly in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices as well as in the hippocampus and the amygdala (p ≤ 0.05. Globally, cognitive performance was normal in both groups but scores on the PASAT test of working memory tended to be low in the PCOS group.The PCOS group exhibited a pattern of low regional CMRglu that correlated inversely with HOMA2-IR in several brain regions and which resembled the pattern seen in aging and early Alzheimer's disease. These results suggest that a direct association between mild insulin resistance and brain glucose hypometabolism independent of overweight or obesity can exist in young adults in their 20s. Further investigation of the influence of insulin resistance on brain glucose metabolism and cognition in younger and middle-aged adults is warranted.

  9. In Vitro Study on Glucose Utilization Capacity of Bioactive Fractions of Houttuynia cordata in Isolated Rat Hemidiaphragm and Its Major Phytoconstituent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The whole plant of Houttuynia cordata has been reported to have potent antihyperglycemic activity. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the glucose utilization capacity of bioactive fractions of ethanol extract of Houttuynia cordata (HC in isolated rat hemidiaphragm. Methods. All the fractions, that is, aqueous (AQ, hexane (HEX, chloroform (CHL, and ethyl acetate (EA, obtained from ethanol extract of H. cordata were subjected to phytochemical standardization use in quercetin as a marker with the help of HPTLC. Further, glucose utilization capacity by rat hemidiaphragm was evaluated in 12 different sets of in vitro experiments. In the study, different fractions from H. cordata as mentioned above were evaluated, where insulin was used as standard and quercetin as a biological standard. Results. Among all the tested fractions, AQ and EA significantly increased glucose uptake by isolated rat hemidiaphragm compared to negative control. Moreover, AQ fractions enhanced the uptake of glucose significantly (p<0.05 and was found to be more effective than insulin. Conclusions. The augmentation in glucose uptake by hemidiaphragm in presence of AQ and EA fractions may be attributed to the presence of quercetin, which was found to be 7.1 and 3.2% w/w, respectively, in both the fractions.

  10. Evaluation of glucose utilization capacity of bioactivity-guided fractions of Barleria prionitis Linn and Hyptis suaveolens (L.) Poit in isolated rat hemidiaphragm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Azmath Unnisa; Venkatesh, Sama; Prakash, Jaya; Alvala, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels due to absolute or relative circulating insulin levels. Plants represent a major potential source of drugs for treating diabetes. The study of plants having antidiabetic activity may give a new approach in the treatment of DM. Aim: This study was aimed to investigate the glucose utilization capacity of bioactivity-guided fractions of Barleria prionitis and Hyptis suaveolens. Materials and Methods: The dried coarse powdered plant material was extracted in aqueous ethanol by cold maceration; further, ethanolic extracts were fractionated using solvents of varying polarity and were investigated in isolated rat hemidiaphragm using 0.1% and 0.2% concentrations of plant extracts. Results: The tested fractions of both plants showed significant and dose-dependent increased glucose uptake capacity and was found to be maximum with petroleum ether and aqueous ethanolic extracts of both plants; 0.2% concentration of both plant extracts is superior in activity when compared to 0.1% of the test extracts. H. suaveolens has produced more glucose utilization capacity when compared to B. prionitis. Conclusion: The activity of H. suaveolens is comparable to standard insulin (P < 0.01). Both the plant materials have some extra pancreatic mechanism like glucose uptake by peripheral tissue. PMID:29200754

  11. Change in hexose distribution volume and fractional utilization of ( sup 18 F)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose in brain during acute hypoglycemia in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, E.T.; Cooper, M.; Chen, C.T.; Given, B.D.; Polonsky, K.S. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) to study the effects of mild hypoglycemia on cerebral glucose uptake and metabolism. Nine healthy men were studied under basal saline-infusion conditions, and during euglycemic and hypoglycemic clamp studies. Insulin was infused at the same rate (1 mU.kg-1.min-1) in both clamp studies. In euglycemic clamp studies, glucose was infused at a rate sufficient to maintain the basal plasma glucose concentration, whereas in hypoglycemic clamp studies, the glucose infusion rate was reduced to maintain the plasma glucose at 3.1 mM. Each study lasted 3 h and included a 30-min baseline period and a subsequent 150-min period in which insulin or glucose was administered. Blood samples for measurement of insulin, glucose, cortisol, growth hormone, and glucagon were obtained at 20- to 30-min intervals. A bolus injection of 5-10 mCi (18F)-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (2-DFG) was administered 120 min after initiation of the study, and plasma radioactivity and dynamic PET scans were obtained at frequent intervals for the remaining 40-60 min of the study. Cerebral regions of interest were defined, and concentrations of radioactivity were calculated and used in the three-compartment model of 2-DFG distribution described by Sokoloff. Glucose levels were similar during saline-infusion (4.9 +/- 0.1 mM) and euglycemic clamp (4.8 +/- 0.1 mM) studies, whereas the desired degree of mild hypoglycemia was achieved during the hypoglycemic clamp study (3.1 +/- 0.1 mM, P less than 0.05). The insulin level during saline infusion was 41 +/- 7 pM.

  12. Positron emission tomography assessment of effects of benzodiazepines on regional glucose metabolic rate in patients with anxiety disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Haier, R.; Hazlett, E.; Ball, R.; Katz, M.; Sokolski, K.; Lagunas-Solar, M.; Langer, D.

    1987-06-22

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 18) entered a 21-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled random assignment trial of clorazepate. Positron emission tomography with YF-deoxyglucose was carried out before and after treatment. Decreases in glucose metabolic rate in visual cortex and relative increases in the basal ganglia and thalamus were found. A correlation between regional changes in metabolic rate and regional benzodiazepine receptor binding density from other human autopsy studies was observed; brain regions highest in receptor density showed the greatest decrease in rate.

  13. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer’s Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1 transgenic (Tg mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr. Morris water maze (MWM was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD. By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD. Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer’s cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  14. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer's Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Yuan; Men, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Hua; Lei, Jian-Feng; Zuo, Fu-Xing; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhu, Zhao-Hui; Bao, Xin-Jie; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr). Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD). By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD). Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer's cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  15. Utilizing distributional analytics and electronic records to assess timeliness of inpatient blood glucose monitoring in non-critical care wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular and timely monitoring of blood glucose (BG levels in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus is crucial to optimizing inpatient glycaemic control. However, methods to quantify timeliness as a measurement of quality of care are lacking. We propose an analytical approach that utilizes BG measurements from electronic records to assess adherence to an inpatient BG monitoring protocol in hospital wards. Methods We applied our proposed analytical approach to electronic records obtained from 24 non-critical care wards in November and December 2013 from a tertiary care hospital in Singapore. We applied distributional analytics to evaluate daily adherence to BG monitoring timings. A one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (1S-KS test was performed to test daily BG timings against non-adherence represented by the uniform distribution. This test was performed among wards with high power, determined through simulation. The 1S-KS test was coupled with visualization via the cumulative distribution function (cdf plot and a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (2S-KS test, enabling comparison of the BG timing distributions between two consecutive days. We also applied mixture modelling to identify the key features in daily BG timings. Results We found that 11 out of the 24 wards had high power. Among these wards, 1S-KS test with cdf plots indicated adherence to BG monitoring protocols. Integrating both 1S-KS and 2S-KS information within a moving window consisting of two consecutive days did not suggest frequent potential change from or towards non-adherence to protocol. From mixture modelling among wards with high power, we consistently identified four components with high concentration of BG measurements taken before mealtimes and around bedtime. This agnostic analysis provided additional evidence that the wards were adherent to BG monitoring protocols. Conclusions We demonstrated the utility of our proposed analytical approach as a monitoring

  16. A metabolic core model elucidates how enhanced utilization of glucose and glutamine, with enhanced glutamine-dependent lactate production, promotes cancer cell growth: The WarburQ effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Chiara; Colombo, Riccardo; Gaglio, Daniela; Mastroianni, Fabrizia; Pescini, Dario; Westerhoff, Hans Victor; Mauri, Giancarlo; Vanoni, Marco; Alberghina, Lilia

    2017-09-01

    Cancer cells share several metabolic traits, including aerobic production of lactate from glucose (Warburg effect), extensive glutamine utilization and impaired mitochondrial electron flow. It is still unclear how these metabolic rearrangements, which may involve different molecular events in different cells, contribute to a selective advantage for cancer cell proliferation. To ascertain which metabolic pathways are used to convert glucose and glutamine to balanced energy and biomass production, we performed systematic constraint-based simulations of a model of human central metabolism. Sampling of the feasible flux space allowed us to obtain a large number of randomly mutated cells simulated at different glutamine and glucose uptake rates. We observed that, in the limited subset of proliferating cells, most displayed fermentation of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen. At high utilization rates of glutamine, oxidative utilization of glucose was decreased, while the production of lactate from glutamine was enhanced. This emergent phenotype was observed only when the available carbon exceeded the amount that could be fully oxidized by the available oxygen. Under the latter conditions, standard Flux Balance Analysis indicated that: this metabolic pattern is optimal to maximize biomass and ATP production; it requires the activity of a branched TCA cycle, in which glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation cooperates to the production of lipids and proteins; it is sustained by a variety of redox-controlled metabolic reactions. In a K-ras transformed cell line we experimentally assessed glutamine-induced metabolic changes. We validated computational results through an extension of Flux Balance Analysis that allows prediction of metabolite variations. Taken together these findings offer new understanding of the logic of the metabolic reprogramming that underlies cancer cell growth.

  17. In Vitro Study on Glucose Utilization Capacity of Bioactive Fractions of Houttuynia cordata in Isolated Rat Hemidiaphragm and Its Major Phytoconstituent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Prasad, Satyendra K; Hemalatha, Siva

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The whole plant of Houttuynia cordata has been reported to have potent antihyperglycemic activity. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the glucose utilization capacity of bioactive fractions of ethanol extract of Houttuynia cordata (HC) in isolated rat hemidiaphragm. Methods. All the fractions, that is, aqueous (AQ), hexane (HEX), chloroform (CHL), and ethyl acetate (EA), obtained from ethanol extract of H. cordata were subjected to phytochemical standardization use in quercetin as a marker with the help of HPTLC. Further, glucose utilization capacity by rat hemidiaphragm was evaluated in 12 different sets of in vitro experiments. In the study, different fractions from H. cordata as mentioned above were evaluated, where insulin was used as standard and quercetin as a biological standard. Results. Among all the tested fractions, AQ and EA significantly increased glucose uptake by isolated rat hemidiaphragm compared to negative control. Moreover, AQ fractions enhanced the uptake of glucose significantly (p fractions may be attributed to the presence of quercetin, which was found to be 7.1 and 3.2% w/w, respectively, in both the fractions.

  18. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in patients with decompensated cirrhosis being evaluated for liver transplantation: the utility of oral glucose tolerance test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Costa Bragança

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and protein calorie malnutrition are important issues in cirrhotic patients because they can increase the progression of liver disease and worsen its prognosis. OBJECTIVE:To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in cirrhotic patients being evaluated for liver transplantation and their impacts on a 3-month follow-up, and to compare fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance test. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in consecutively included adult patients. Diabetes mellitus was established through fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance test in diagnosing diabetes mellitus in this population. HOMA-IR and HOMA-β indexes were calculated, and nutritional assessment was performed by subjective global assessment, anthropometry and handgrip strength through dynamometry. RESULTS: Diabetes mellitus was found in 40 patients (64.5%, 9 (22.5% of them by fasting glycemia and 31 (77.5% of them by oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin resistance was found in 40 (69% of the patients. There was no relationship between diabetes mellitus and the etiology of cirrhosis. Protein calorie malnutrition was diagnosed in a range from 3.22% to 45.2% by anthropometry, 58.1% by subjective global assessment and 88.7% by handgrip strength. Diabetes mellitus identified by oral glucose tolerance test was related significantly to a higher prevalence of infectious complications and deaths in a 3-month period (P = 0.017. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and protein calorie malnutrition is high in cirrhotic patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. There were more infectious complications and/or deaths in a 3-month follow-up period in patients with diabetes mellitus diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance test. Oral glucose tolerance test seems to be

  19. Comparing fludeoxyglucose F18-PET assessment of regional cerebral glucose metabolism and [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine-PET in evaluation of early dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Roger L; Koeppe, Robert A; Burke, James F; Giordani, Bruno; Kilbourn, Michael R; Gilman, Sid; Frey, Kirk A

    2010-04-01

    To compare assessment of regional cerebral metabolic changes with [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ)-positron emission tomography (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (K(1)) and fludeoxyglucose F18 (FDG)-PET measurement of regional cerebral glucose uptake (CMR(glc)) in a clinically representative sample of subjects with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). [(11)C]Dihydrotetrabenazine-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were performed. University-based cognitive disorders clinic. Fifty subjects with either mild dementia (Mini-Mental State Examination score > or = 18) or MCI. Their results were compared with those of 80 normal control subjects. The DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were compared with standard correlation analysis. The overall patterns of DTBZ-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) deficits were assessed with stereotaxic surface projections (SSPs) of parametric images. The DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were highly correlated, both within and between subjects. The SSP maps of deficits in DTBZ-PET regional K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements were markedly similar. The DTBZ-PET K(1) SSP maps exhibited a mild decrease in sensitivity relative to FDG-PET CMR(glc) maps. Both DTBZ-PET K(1) and FDG-PET CMR(glc) measurements provide comparable information in assessment of regional cerebral metabolic deficits in mild dementia and MCI. Blood flow measures can assess regional cerebral metabolism deficits accurately in mild dementia and MCI. Blood flow assessments of regional cerebral metabolic deficits can be combined with tracer binding results to improve utility of PET imaging in mild dementia and MCI.

  20. Cluster approach to the development of housing services and public utilities in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Ivanovich Bazhenov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing crisis in the housing services and public utilities sphere determines the need to accelerate its integration into the market space. The author proposes to apply the cluster initiatives, which, in his opinion, provide the solution of housing services and public utilities problems in terms of their broader vision. This paper attempts to highlight the benefits of the cluster approach to the development of housing services and public utilities, and identifies the main provisions in the process of its implementation. The essence of the concept of «housing services and social cluster of the region» in terms of housing services and public utilities development is revealed, members of cluster unification are designated, its components are identified, the purpose of introducing the cluster model of housing services and public utilities reform management is determined, which essence is to change the mentality of the producers and consumers of housing services and public utilities in the direction of increasing responsibilities and respect for mutual interests in the market of housing services and public utilities. The main provisions and principles of formation of housing services and social cluster of the region are reviewed, as well as the characteristics and trends of its development. An authorial approach to the development of a strategy of forming a housing services and social cluster in the region in accordance with modern trends is presented. The leading role of several factors in establishing the basic prerequisites for sustainable operation of housing services and social cluster of the region is justified. These factors include governmental regulation of pricing and forms of support to small entrepreneurship development, creation of financial security system, development of public-private partnerships and implementation of innovative technologies. The role of non-governmental organizations and public associations in the formation of

  1. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N.; Bunney, W.E. Jr. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA)); Gillin, J.C. (Univ. of California, San Diego (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increase in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep.

  2. Multiplex growth rate phenotyping of synthetic mutants in selection to engineer glucose and xylose co-utilization in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Joost; Cepress-Mclean, Sidney C; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2017-04-01

    Engineering the simultaneous consumption of glucose and xylose sugars is critical to enable the sustainable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. In most major industrial microorganisms glucose completely inhibits the uptake of xylose, limiting efficient sugar mixture conversion. In E. coli removal of the major glucose transporter PTS allows for glucose and xylose co-consumption but only after prolonged adaptation, which is an effective process but hard to control and prone to co-evolving undesired traits. Here we synthetically engineer mutants to target sugar co-consumption properties; we subject a PTS- mutant to a short adaptive step and subsequently either delete or overexpress key genes previously suggested to affect sugar consumption. Screening the co-consumption properties of these mutants individually is very laborious. We show we can evaluate sugar co-consumption properties in parallel by culturing the mutants in selection and applying a novel approach that computes mutant growth rates in selection using chromosomal barcode counts obtained from Next-Generation Sequencing. We validate this multiplex growth rate phenotyping approach with individual mutant pure cultures, identify new instances of mutants cross-feeding on metabolic byproducts, and, importantly, find that the rates of glucose and xylose co-consumption can be tuned by altering glucokinase expression in our PTS- background. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 885-893. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dissociation of glucose tracer uptake and glucose transporter distribution in the regionally ischaemic isolated rat heart: application of a new autoradiographic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, Richard; Medina, Rodolfo A.; Garlick, Pamela B. [Department of Radiological Sciences, Guy' s, King' s and St Thomas' School of Medicine, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Dearling, Jason L.J.; Flynn, Aiden A.; Pedley, Barbara R. [Cancer Research UK Targeting and Imaging Group, Academic Department of Oncology, University College London, Royal Free Campus, London, NW3 2PF (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) and carbon-14 2-deoxyglucose ({sup 14}C-2-DG) are both widely used tracers of myocardial glucose uptake and phosphorylation. We have recently shown, using positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance, that ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R) causes differential changes in their uptake. We describe here the novel application of an autoradiographic technique allowing the investigation of this phenomenon at high resolution, using tracer concentrations of both analogues in the dual-perfused isolated rat heart. We also investigate the importance of glucose transporter (GLUT 1 and GLUT 4) distribution in governing the observed phosphorylated analogue accumulation. Hearts (n=5) were perfused with Krebs buffer for 40 min, made regionally zero-flow ischaemic for 40 min and reperfused for 60 min with Krebs containing tracer {sup 18}FDG (200 MBq) and tracer {sup 14}C-2-DG (0.37 MBq). Hearts were then frozen and five sections (10 {mu}m) were cut per heart, fixed and exposed on phosphor storage plates for 18 h (for {sup 18}FDG) and then for a further 9 days (for {sup 14}C-2-DG). Quantitative digital images of tracer accumulation were obtained using a phosphor plate reader. The protocol was repeated in a second group of hearts and GLUT 1 and GLUT 4 distribution analysed. Post-ischaemic accumulation of {sup 18}FDG-6-P was inhibited by 38.2%{+-}1.7% and {sup 14}C-DG-6-P by 19.0%{+-}2.2%, compared with control (P<0.05). After placing seven ''lines of interrogation'' across each heart section and analysing the phosphorylated tracer accumulation along them, a transmural gradient of both tracers was observed; this was highest at the endocardium and lowest at the epicardium. GLUT 4 translocated to the sarcolemma in the ischaemic/reperfused region (from 24%{+-}3% to 59%{+-}5%), while there was no cellular redistribution of GLUT 1. We conclude that since decreased phosphorylated tracer accumulation occurs

  4. Effects of acute caffeinated coffee consumption on energy utilization related to glucose and lipid oxidation from short submaximal treadmill exercise in sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Sallepan, Maliwan; Charoenwattana, Sukanya

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the short term effect of coffee drinking on energy utilization in sedentary men. This study was performed in healthy sedentary men, who were randomized into three groups, control (n = 6), decaffeinated (n = 10), and caffeine (n = 10). The caffeine dose in coffee was rechecked and calculated for individual volunteers at 5 mg/kg. Baseline before drinking, complete blood count (CBC), glucose, antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxide, and caffeine in blood was evaluated. After drinking coffee for 1 hr, the submaximal exercise test with a modified Bruce protocol was carried out, and the VO2 and RER were analyzed individually at 80% maximal heart rate, then the blood was repeat evaluated. Three groups showed a nonsignificant difference in CBC results and physical characteristics. The caffeine group showed significant changes in all parameters; higher VO2 levels, (P = 0.037) and lower RER (P = 0.047), when compared to the baseline. Furthermore, the glucose level after exercise test increased significantly (P = 0.033) as well as lipid peroxide levels (P = 0.005), whereas antioxidant capacity did not change significantly (P = 0.759), when compared to the before exercise testing. In addition, the blood caffeine level also increased only in the caffeine group (P = 0.008). Short consumption of caffeinated coffee (5 mg/kg of caffeine), improves energy utilization and relates to glucose derivation and lipid oxidation.

  5. Altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in internet game overusers: a 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Hee; Bang, Seong Ae; Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2010-03-01

    Internet game overuse is an emerging disorder and features diminished impulse control and poor reward-processing. In an attempt to understand the neurobiological bases of Internet game overuse, we investigated the differences in regional cerebral glucose metabolism at resting state between young individuals with Internet game overuse and those with normal use using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study. Twenty right-handed male participants (9 normal users: 24.7+/-2.4 years of age, 11 overusers: 23.5+/-2.9 years of age) participated. A trait measure of impulsivity was also completed after scanning. Internet game overusers showed greater impulsiveness than the normal users and there was a positive correlation between the severity of Internet game overuse and impulsiveness. Imaging data showed that the overusers had increased glucose metabolism in the right middle orbitofrontal gyrus, left caudate nucleus, and right insula, and decreased metabolism in the bilateral postcentral gyrus, left precentral gyrus, and bilateral occipital regions compared to normal users. Internet game overuse may be associated with abnormal neurobiological mechanisms in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, and sensory regions, which are implicated in impulse control, reward processing, and somatic representation of previous experiences. Our results support the idea that Internet game overuse shares psychological and neural mechanisms with other types of impulse control disorders and substance/non-substance-related addiction.

  6. 6-Paradol and 6-Shogaol, the Pungent Compounds of Ginger, Promote Glucose Utilization in Adipocytes and Myotubes, and 6-Paradol Reduces Blood Glucose in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Kei Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-diabetic activity of ginger powder (Zingiber officinale has been recently promoted, with the recommendation to be included as one of the dietary supplements for diabetic patients. However, previous studies presented different results, which may be caused by degradation and metabolic changes of ginger components, gingerols, shogaols and paradols. Therefore, we prepared 10 ginger active components, namely 6-, 8-, 10-paradols, 6-, 8-, 10-shogaols, 6-, 8-, 10-gingerols and zingerone, and evaluated their anti-hyperglycemic activity. Among the tested compounds, 6-paradol and 6-shogaol showed potent activity in stimulating glucose utilization by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes. The effects were attributed to the increase in 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. 6-Paradol, the major metabolite of 6-shogaol, was utilized in an in vivo assay and significantly reduced blood glucose, cholesterol and body weight in high-fat diet-fed mice.

  7. Detection by voxel-wise statistical analysis of significant changes in regional cerebral glucose uptake in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Albertine; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; Delatour, Benoît; Hantraye, Philippe; Bonvento, Gilles; Dhenain, Marc; Delzescaux, Thierry

    2010-06-01

    Biomarkers and technologies similar to those used in humans are essential for the follow-up of Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal models, particularly for the clarification of mechanisms and the screening and validation of new candidate treatments. In humans, changes in brain metabolism can be detected by 1-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose PET (FDG-PET) and assessed in a user-independent manner with dedicated software, such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). FDG-PET can be carried out in small animals, but its resolution is low as compared to the size of rodent brain structures. In mouse models of AD, changes in cerebral glucose utilization are usually detected by [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2DG) autoradiography, but this requires prior manual outlining of regions of interest (ROI) on selected sections. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of applying the SPM method to 3D autoradiographic data sets mapping brain metabolic activity in a transgenic mouse model of AD. We report the preliminary results obtained with 4 APP/PS1 (64+/-1 weeks) and 3 PS1 (65+/-2 weeks) mice. We also describe new procedures for the acquisition and use of "blockface" photographs and provide the first demonstration of their value for the 3D reconstruction and spatial normalization of post mortem mouse brain volumes. Despite this limited sample size, our results appear to be meaningful, consistent, and more comprehensive than findings from previously published studies based on conventional ROI-based methods. The establishment of statistical significance at the voxel level, rather than with a user-defined ROI, makes it possible to detect more reliably subtle differences in geometrically complex regions, such as the hippocampus. Our approach is generic and could be easily applied to other biomarkers and extended to other species and applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of overexpressing NADH kinase on glucose and xylose metabolism in recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Vemuri, G. N.; Bao, X. M.

    2009-01-01

    During growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose, the redox cofactors NADH and NADPH are predominantly involved in catabolism and biosynthesis, respectively. A deviation from the optimal level of these cofactors often results in major changes in the substrate uptake and biomass formation....... However, the metabolism of xylose by recombinant S. cerevisiae carrying xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the fungal pathway requires both NADH and NADPH and creates cofactor imbalance during growth on xylose. As one possible solution to overcoming this imbalance, the effect...... of overexpressing the native NADH kinase (encoded by the POS5 gene) in xylose-consuming recombinant S. cerevisiae directed either into the cytosol or to the mitochondria was evaluated. The physiology of the NADH kinase containing strains was also evaluated during growth on glucose. Overexpressing NADH kinase...

  9. Noninvasive imaging oral absorption of insulin delivered by nanoparticles and its stimulated glucose utilization in controlling postprandial hyperglycemia during OGTT in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Kun-Ju; Su, Fang-Yi; Mi, Fwu-Long; Maiti, Barnali; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2013-12-10

    This work examined the feasibility of preparing a pH-responsive nanoparticle (NP) system composed of chitosan and poly(γ-glutamic acid) conjugated with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (γPGA-EGTA) for oral insulin delivery in diabetic rats during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). OGTT has been used largely as a model to mimic the period that comprises and follows a meal, which is often associated with postprandial hyperglycemia. Based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), this work also demonstrated the ability of γPGA-EGTA to protect insulin from an intestinal proteolytic attack in living rats, owing to its ability to deprive the environmental calcium. Additionally, EGTA-conjugated NPs were effective in disrupting the epithelial tight junctions, consequently facilitating the paracellular permeation of insulin throughout the entire small intestine. Moreover, results of positron emission tomography and computer tomography demonstrated the effective absorption of the permeated insulin into the systemic circulation as well as promotion of the glucose utilization in the myocardium, and skeletal muscles of the chest wall, forelimbs and hindlimbs, resulting in a significant glucose-lowering effect. Above results indicate that as-prepared EGTA-conjugated NPs are a promising oral insulin delivery system to control postprandial hyperglycemia and thus may potentially prevent the related diabetic complications. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

  11. FBC utilization prospects in decentralized cogeneration units in Caucasus region countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skodras George

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Great differences are encountered among Caucasus region countries with respect to energy resources reserves and economic conditions. Thermal power plants consist of obsolete and inefficient units, while the Soviet-type large heating systems in the area collapsed after 1992 and their reconstruction is considered uneconomic. Renovation needs of the power and heat sector, and the potential of Fluidised Bed Combustion implementations in decentralized cogeneration units were investigated, since operating oil and gas power plants exhibit high fuel consumption, low efficiency and poor environmental performance. Results showed significant prospects of Fluidised Bed Combustion utilization in decentralized cogeneration units in the Caucausus region heat and power sector. Their introduction constitutes an economically attractive way to cover power and heat demands and promotes utilization of domestic energy resources in all of three countries, provided that financial difficulties could be confronted.

  12. Alterations in regional cerebral glucose metabolism across waking and non-rapid eye movement sleep in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Miewald, Jean M; Kupfer, David J

    2005-04-01

    Depression is associated with sleep disturbances, including alterations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Non-rapid eye movement sleep is associated with decreases in frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex metabolic activity compared with wakefulness. To show that depressed patients would have less of a decrease than controls in frontal metabolism between waking and NREM sleep and to show that during NREM sleep, they would have increased activity in structures that promote arousal. Subjects completed electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral glucose metabolism assessments during both waking and NREM sleep using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography. General clinical research center. The study included 29 unmedicated patients who met the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV criteria for current major depression and who had a score of 15 or greater on a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and 28 medically healthy subjects of comparable age and sex who were free of mental disorders. Electroencephalographic sleep and regional cerebral metabolism during waking and NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed smaller decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in broad regions of the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex from waking to NREM sleep. Depressed patients showed larger decreases than healthy subjects in relative metabolism in the left amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, cerebellum, parahippocampal cortex, fusiform gyrus, and occipital cortex. However, in post hoc analyses, depressed patients showed hypermetabolism in these areas during both waking and NREM sleep. The smaller decrease in frontal metabolism from waking to NREM sleep in depressed patients is further evidence for a dynamic sleep-wake alteration in prefrontal cortex function in depression. Hypermetabolism in a ventral emotional neural system during waking in depressed patients persists into NREM sleep.

  13. Glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of anticonvulsants: effect of methyl ethyl ketone in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Akifumi [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: yamaaki@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Momosaki, Sotaro; Hosoi, Rie [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Abe, Kohji [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Developmental Research Laboratories, Shionogi and Co., Ltd., Toyonaka, Osaka, 561-0825 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masatoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Johnan, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Enhancement of glucose utilization in the brain has been well known during acute seizure in various kinds of animal model of epilepsy. This enhancement of glucose utilization might be related to neural damage in these animal models. Recently, we found that methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) had both anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects in lithium-pilocapine (Li-pilo) status epilepticus (SE) rat. In this article, we measured the uptake of [{sup 14}C]2-deoxyglucose ([{sup 14}C]DG) in the Li-pilo SE and Li-pilo SE with MEK rat brain in order to assess whether the glucose utilization was a useful biomarker for the detection of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds. Significant increase of [{sup 14}C]DG uptake (45 min after the injection) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus during acute seizure induced by Li-pilo were observed. On the other hand, the initial uptake of [{sup 14}C]DG (1 min after the injection) in the Li-pilo SE rats was not different from the control rats. Therefore, the enhancement of glucose metabolism during acute seizure was due to the facilitation of the rate of phosphorylation process of [{sup 14}C]DG in the brain. Pretreatment with MEK (8 mmol/kg) completely abolished the enhancement of glucose utilization in the Li-pilo SE rats. The present results indicated that glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure might be a useful biomarker for the evaluation of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds.

  14. Glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of anticonvulsants: effect of methyl ethyl ketone in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akifumi; Momosaki, Sotaro; Hosoi, Rie; Abe, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Inoue, Osamu

    2009-11-01

    Enhancement of glucose utilization in the brain has been well known during acute seizure in various kinds of animal model of epilepsy. This enhancement of glucose utilization might be related to neural damage in these animal models. Recently, we found that methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) had both anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects in lithium-pilocapine (Li-pilo) status epilepticus (SE) rat. In this article, we measured the uptake of [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose ([(14)C]DG) in the Li-pilo SE and Li-pilo SE with MEK rat brain in order to assess whether the glucose utilization was a useful biomarker for the detection of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds. Significant increase of [(14)C]DG uptake (45 min after the injection) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus during acute seizure induced by Li-pilo were observed. On the other hand, the initial uptake of [(14)C]DG (1 min after the injection) in the Li-pilo SE rats was not different from the control rats. Therefore, the enhancement of glucose metabolism during acute seizure was due to the facilitation of the rate of phosphorylation process of [(14)C]DG in the brain. Pretreatment with MEK (8 mmol/kg) completely abolished the enhancement of glucose utilization in the Li-pilo SE rats. The present results indicated that glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure might be a useful biomarker for the evaluation of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds.

  15. Individual and Regional Determinants for Physical Therapy Utilization in Germany: Multilevel Analysis of National Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Alexander; Kroll, Lars Eric

    2017-05-01

    Physical therapy is included in many clinical guidelines and is a commonly used health service. However, access to its benefits should not strongly depend on social or demographic factors. The present study used the Andersen model to explain to what extent physical therapy utilization in Germany depends on factors beyond medical need. The German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS, 2008-2011; target population, 18-79 years) is part of the German health-monitoring system. Two-stage stratified cluster sampling resulted in a sample of 8152 participants. Data were matched with district-related information on social structures and service supply. Following Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, this study identified predisposing, enabling, and need factors for physical therapy utilization using multilevel logistic regression analyses. Physical therapy was used by 23.4% (95% CI: 22.0-24.8) of the German population within one year, with a higher proportion of females (26.8%; 95% CI: 25.1-28.6) than males (19.9%; 95% CI: 18.1-21.8) and an increase with age. Beyond medical need, physical therapy utilization depended on higher education, migrant background, nonsmoking (predisposing), social support, higher income, private health insurance, and gatekeeping service contact (enabling). Variation among districts partly reflected regional supply. Because the present study was cross-sectional, its findings provide representative information on physical therapy use but do not establish final causal links or identify whether utilization or supply in certain districts or population groups is adequate. Whether certain regions are under- or overserved and whether further regulations are needed is of political interest. Physicians and therapists should develop strategies to improve both adherence of hard-to-reach groups and supply in low-supply regions.

  16. Regional health care planning: a methodology to cluster facilities using community utilization patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Paul L; Shortridge, Ashton M; Messina, Joseph P

    2013-08-22

    Community-based health care planning and regulation necessitates grouping facilities and areal units into regions of similar health care use. Limited research has explored the methodologies used in creating these regions. We offer a new methodology that clusters facilities based on similarities in patient utilization patterns and geographic location. Our case study focused on Hospital Groups in Michigan, the allocation units used for predicting future inpatient hospital bed demand in the state's Bed Need Methodology. The scientific, practical, and political concerns that were considered throughout the formulation and development of the methodology are detailed. The clustering methodology employs a 2-step K-means + Ward's clustering algorithm to group hospitals. The final number of clusters is selected using a heuristic that integrates both a statistical-based measure of cluster fit and characteristics of the resulting Hospital Groups. Using recent hospital utilization data, the clustering methodology identified 33 Hospital Groups in Michigan. Despite being developed within the politically charged climate of Certificate of Need regulation, we have provided an objective, replicable, and sustainable methodology to create Hospital Groups. Because the methodology is built upon theoretically sound principles of clustering analysis and health care service utilization, it is highly transferable across applications and suitable for grouping facilities or areal units.

  17. Reorganization of water utilities - regionalization, an opportunity to increase their efficiency A comparative literature - Albania Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Naqellari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the study and analysis of factors affecting the need for reorganization of entities engaged in water supply services. From this perspective, the research seeks to identify international practices made in this regard and how they can be adapted to water utilities in Albania. The objective of this paper is to show that regionalization of water utilities is a successful development direction not only of studied literature but also practice in Albania. The study is based on sources of information taken from primary and secondary sources. The selected method for collecting and processing information from primary sources is the empirical method through direct surveys and questionnaires, whereas from secondary sources is descriptive and analytical method. As secondary sources, we are consulted and referred to academic resources, such as articles, books, studies and reports carried out and published by national organizations, local and foreign companies in this field.

  18. Adaptive Control of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Operating in Region 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.; Wright, Alan D.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive control techniques are well suited to nonlinear applications, such as wind turbines, which are difficult to accurately model and which have effects from poorly known operating environments. The turbulent and unpredictable conditions in which wind turbines operate create many challenges for their operation. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller in Region 3 is to regulate generator speed and reject step disturbances. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. We use an extension of the Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control (DMRAC) approach to track a reference point and to reject persistent disturbances. The turbine simulation models the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine which has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a bas celliansesical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the baseline PI pitch controller and it demonstrated robustness to modeling errors.

  19. National decline in donor heart utilization with regional variability: 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khush, K K; Zaroff, J G; Nguyen, J; Menza, R; Goldstein, B A

    2015-03-01

    The severe shortage of donor hearts limits the availability of transplantation for the growing population of patients with end-stage heart disease. We examined national trends in donor heart acceptance for transplant. OPTN data were analyzed for all potential adult cardiac organ donors between 1995 and 2010. Donor heart disposition was categorized as transplanted, declined for transplant or other. We studied changes in the probability of donor heart acceptance according to demographic and clinical characteristics, nationwide and by UNOS region. Of 82 053 potential donor hearts, 34% were accepted and 48% were declined (18% used for other purposes). There was a significant decrease in donor heart acceptance from 44% in 1995 to 29% in 2006, and subsequent increase to 32% in 2010. Older donor age, female sex and medical co-morbidities predicted non-acceptance. Donor age and co-morbidities increased during the study period, with a concomitant decrease in acceptance of hearts from donors with undesirable characteristics. Overall, predictors of heart non-use were similar across UNOS regions, although utilization varied between regions. Regional variation suggests a potential to improve heart acceptance rates in under-performing regions, and supports research and policy efforts aimed at establishing evidence-based criteria for donor heart evaluation and acceptance for transplantation. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Transplantation Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Modern contraceptive utilization and associated factors among married pastoralist women in Bale eco-region, Bale Zone, South East Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Belda, Semere Sileshi; Haile, Mekonnen Tegegne; Melku, Abulie Takele; Tololu, Abdurehaman Kalu

    2017-01-01

    Background Women who live in remote rural areas encounter different challenges against contraception and often deny the use of modern contraceptive methods. The predictors of modern contraceptive utilization by pastoralist women in the Bale eco-region could be specific and are not well known. Therefore, this study aims to assess modern contraceptive utilization and its determinants among married pastoralist women in Bale eco-region, Oromia regional state, South East Ethiopia. Methods A commun...

  1. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg{sup -1} protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg{sup -1} protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg{sup -1} protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg{sup -1} protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg{sup -1} protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions.

  2. Region-specific study of the electric utility industry: problem identification, analysis, and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochan, M.J.

    1985-07-01

    A number of problems were identified that could stand in the way of maintaining an adequate, reliable and economic supply of electric power for the United States in the future. The problems were analyzed by studying a specific region, VACAR (Virginia-Carolinas), in some detail. It was concluded that the future power supply is in jeopardy, but that drastic changes in the present system of investor-owned utilities, specifically, deregulation or government ownership, were not justified. It was recommended that the present electric system be modified and strengthened to meet future needs. 2 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Comparison of the Five Danish Regions Regarding Demographic Characteristics, Healthcare Utilization, and Medication Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Rasmussen, Lotte; Hansen, Morten Rix

    2015-01-01

    nationwide registers: The Danish National Patient Register, The Danish Civil Registration System, The Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, and The Danish National Health Service Register for Primary Care. We compared the Danish regions regarding demographic and socioeconomic characteristics......, health care utilization, and use of medication. For each characteristic, one-year prevalence was obtained and analyses were performed for 2013 and 2008 to account for possible change over time. RESULTS: In 2013, 5,602,628 persons were living in Denmark. The mean age was 40.7 years in the entire Danish...

  4. Drug utilization in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebede M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mengistu Kebede, Dereje Kebebe Borga, Eshetu Mulisa Bobasa Department of Pharmacy, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia Background: Sustaining the availability and rational use of safe and effective drugs is a major problem in developing countries. Irrational drug use affects quality of health care more than accessibility of drugs. Objective: To assess drug utilization in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in selected health facilities of South West Shoa Zone from January 21–28, 2012 by using structured questionnaires. Results: Of 50 prescribers and 30 dispensers, 58% and 83.3% were males, respectively. The result showed that majority of prescribers agreed on availability of essential drugs (72% and had access to up-to-date drug information (76%. However, 43.3% of dispensers didn't get access to up-to-date drug information. 86% and 88% of prescribers note cost of drugs and stick to standard treatment guidelines of Ethiopia during prescription, respectively. All drug dispensers check the name of the drug (100%, age of the patient (90%, the dosage form of drug (96.7%, the route of administration (90%, the duration of therapy (86.7%, and frequency of administration (86.7% for prescription papers. Conclusion: In general, drug utilization at the study sites was found to be good, although there are major deviations from the concept of rational drug use. Keywords: drug utilizations, rational drug use, health facilities

  5. Program evaluation of remote heart failure monitoring: healthcare utilization analysis in a rural regional medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A Susana; Carroll, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. "Care Beyond Walls and Wires," a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems.

  6. Explaining regional variations in health care utilization between Swiss cantons using panel econometric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenzind, Paul A

    2012-03-13

    In spite of a detailed and nation-wide legislation frame, there exist large cantonal disparities in consumed quantities of health care services in Switzerland. In this study, the most important factors of influence causing these regional disparities are determined. The findings can also be productive for discussing the containment of health care consumption in other countries. Based on the literature, relevant factors that cause geographic disparities of quantities and costs in western health care systems are identified. Using a selected set of these factors, individual panel econometric models are calculated to explain the variation of the utilization in each of the six largest health care service groups (general practitioners, specialist doctors, hospital inpatient, hospital outpatient, medication, and nursing homes) in Swiss mandatory health insurance (MHI). The main data source is 'Datenpool santésuisse', a database of Swiss health insurers. For all six health care service groups, significant factors influencing the utilization frequency over time and across cantons are found. A greater supply of service providers tends to have strong interrelations with per capita consumption of MHI services. On the demand side, older populations and higher population densities represent the clearest driving factors. Strategies to contain consumption and costs in health care should include several elements. In the federalist Swiss system, the structure of regional health care supply seems to generate significant effects. However, the extent of driving factors on the demand side (e.g., social deprivation) or financing instruments (e.g., high deductibles) should also be considered.

  7. Enhanced apoptotic reaction correlates with suppressed tumor glucose utilization after cytotoxic chemotherapy: use of 99mTc-Annexin V, 18F-FDG, and histologic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Toshiki; Kuge, Yuji; Zhao, Songji; Sato, Masayuki; Strauss, H William; Blankenberg, Francis G; Tait, Jonathan F; Tamaki, Nagara

    2005-05-01

    Cancer chemotherapy enhances the apoptosis, whereas apoptosis is a suicidal mechanism requiring energy. We determined the relationship between apoptosis and glucose utilization during cancer chemotherapy using (99m)Tc-annexin V ((99m)Tc-annexin A5) and (18)F-FDG and compared their uptake with histologic findings in a rat tumor model. Allogenic hepatoma cells (KDH-8) were inoculated into the left calf muscle of male Wistar rats (WKA). Eleven days after the inoculation, the rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: The first group (n = 7) received a single dose of gemcitabine (90 mg/kg, intravenously), the second group (n = 8) received cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), and the third group (n = 7) was untreated and served as the control group. We injected (99m)Tc-annexin V 48 h after the chemotherapy and then injected (18)F-FDG to all rats 1 h before sacrifice. Six hours after (99m)Tc-annexin V injection, the rats were sacrificed and the organs, including the tumor, were removed and radioactivity was counted. The radioactivities of (18)F and (99m)Tc in the organs were determined using normalization by tissue weight. Histologic evaluation by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method and the immunostaining of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) were also performed to obtain the indices of apoptosis and glucose utilization, respectively. The rate of positively stained cells was calculated and analyzed statistically. After chemotherapy using gemcitabine and cyclophosphamide, the (99m)Tc-annexin V uptake (percentage injected dose per gram x kg [(%ID/g) x kg]; mean +/- SD) in tumor increased significantly (0.062 +/- 0.012 (%ID/g) x kg in the gemcitabine-treated group and 0.050 +/- 0.012 (%ID/g) x kg in the cyclophosphamide group vs. 0.031 +/- 0.005 (%ID/g) x kg in the control group; P chemotherapy as determined using radiotracers and histologic evaluation. The increase in (99m)Tc-annexin V and the

  8. Scenario-based water resources planning for utilities in the Lake Victoria region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, V. K.; Aslam, O.; Dale, L.; Miller, N.; Purkey, D.

    2010-12-01

    Cities in the Lake Victoria (LV) region are experiencing the highest growth rates in Africa, at the same time that their water resource is threatened by domestic waste and industrial pollution. Urban centers use local springs, wetlands and Lake Victoria as source waters. As efforts to meet increasing demand accelerate, integrated water resources management (IWRM) tools provide opportunities for utilities and other stakeholders to develop a planning framework comprehensive enough to include short term (e.g. landuse change), as well as longer term (e.g. climate change) scenarios. This paper presents IWRM models built using the Water Evaluation And Planning (WEAP) decision support system, for three pilot towns in the LV region - Bukoba (Tanzania), Masaka (Uganda), and Kisii (Kenya). Their current populations are 100,000, 70,000 and 200,000 respectively. Demand coverage is ~70% in Masaka and Bukoba, and less than 50% in Kisii. IWRM models for each town were calibrated under current system performance based on site visits, utility reporting and interviews. Projected water supply, demand, revenues and costs were then evaluated against a combination of climate, demographic and infrastructure scenarios upto 2050. In Masaka, flow and climate data were available to calibrate a runoff model to simulate streamflow at water intake. In Masaka, without considering climate change, the system is infrastructure-limited and not water availability (hydrology) limited until 2035, under projected population growth of 2.17%. Under a wet climate scenario as projected by GCM’s for the LV region, the current wetland source could supply all expected demands until 2050. Even under a drought scenario, the wetland could supply all demand until 2032, if the supply infrastructure is updated at an estimated cost of USD 10.8 million. However, demand targets can only be met at the expense of almost no water returning to the wetland downstream of the intake by 2035, unless substantial investments

  9. Quantitation, regional vulnerability, and kinetic modeling of brain glucose metabolism in mild Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, Lisa; Rusinek, Henry; De Santi, Susan; Li, Yi [New York University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL 400, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Tsui, Wai H.; De Leon, Mony J. [New York University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL 400, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Pupi, Alberto [University of Florence, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Florence (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    To examine CMRglc measures and corresponding glucose transport (K{sub 1} and k{sub 2}) and phosphorylation (k{sub 3}) rates in the medial temporal lobe (MTL, comprising the hippocampus and amygdala) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dynamic FDG PET with arterial blood sampling was performed in seven mild AD patients (age 68 {+-} 8 years, four females, median MMSE 23) and six normal (NL) elderly (age 69 {+-} 9 years, three females, median MMSE 30). Absolute CMRglc ({mu}mol/100 g/min) was calculated from MRI-defined regions of interest using multiparametric analysis with individually fitted kinetic rate constants, Gjedde-Patlak plot, and Sokoloff's autoradiographic method with population-based rate constants. Relative ROI/pons CMRglc (unitless) was also examined. With all methods, AD patients showed significant CMRglc reductions in the hippocampus and PCC, and a trend towards reduced parietotemporal CMRglc, as compared with NL. Significant k{sub 3} reductions were found in the hippocampus, PCC and amygdala. K{sub 1} reductions were restricted to the hippocampus. Relative CMRglc had the largest effect sizes in separating AD from NL. However, the magnitude of CMRglc reductions was 1.2- to 1.9-fold greater with absolute than with relative measures. CMRglc reductions are most prominent in the MTL and PCC in mild AD, as detected with both absolute and relative CMRglc measures. Results are discussed in terms of clinical and pharmaceutical applicability. (orig.)

  10. Variations in the G6PC2/ABCB11 genomic region are associated with fasting glucose levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Min; Erdos, Michael R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Saxena, Richa; Sanna, Serena; Silver, Kristi D.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Hansen, Torben; Orrù, Marco; Grazia Piras, Maria; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Willer, Cristen J.; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Shen, Haiqing; Kuusisto, Johanna; Ebrahim, Shah; Sestu, Natascia; Duren, William L.; Spada, Maria Cristina; Stringham, Heather M.; Scott, Laura J.; Olla, Nazario; Swift, Amy J.; Najjar, Samer; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Andersen, Gitte; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Jørgensen, Torben; Saramies, Jouko; Valle, Timo T.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Lakatta, Edward; Bergman, Richard N.; Uda, Manuela; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pedersen, Oluf; Cao, Antonio; Groop, Leif; Mohlke, Karen L.; Laakso, Markku; Schlessinger, David; Collins, Francis S.; Altshuler, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Boehnke, Michael; Scuteri, Angelo; Watanabe, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Identifying the genetic variants that regulate fasting glucose concentrations may further our understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes. We therefore investigated the association of fasting glucose levels with SNPs in 2 genome-wide scans including a total of 5,088 nondiabetic individuals from Finland and Sardinia. We found a significant association between the SNP rs563694 and fasting glucose concentrations (P = 3.5 × 10–7). This association was further investigated in an additional 18,436 nondiabetic individuals of mixed European descent from 7 different studies. The combined P value for association in these follow-up samples was 6.9 × 10–26, and combining results from all studies resulted in an overall P value for association of 6.4 × 10–33. Across these studies, fasting glucose concentrations increased 0.01–0.16 mM with each copy of the major allele, accounting for approximately 1% of the total variation in fasting glucose. The rs563694 SNP is located between the genes glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit 2 (G6PC2) and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B (MDR/TAP), member 11 (ABCB11). Our results in combination with data reported in the literature suggest that G6PC2, a glucose-6-phosphatase almost exclusively expressed in pancreatic islet cells, may underlie variation in fasting glucose, though it is possible that ABCB11, which is expressed primarily in liver, may also contribute to such variation. PMID:18521185

  11. Determinants of institutional delivery service utilization among pastorals of Liben Zone, Somali Regional State, Ethiopia, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zepro NB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nejimu Biza Zepro,1 Ahmed Tahir Ahmed2 1College of Health Sciences, Samara University, Samara, Afar, Ethiopia; 2College of Health Science, Jigjiga University, Jigjiga, Somali, Ethiopia Abstract: Maternal health service utilizations are poorly equipped, inaccessible, negligible, and not well documented in the pastoral society. This research describes a quantitative and qualitative study on the determinants of institutional delivery among pastoralists of Liben Zone with special emphasis on Filtu and Deka Suftu woredas of Somali Region, Ethiopia. The study was funded by the project “Fostering health care for refugees and pastoral communities in Somali Region, Ethiopia”. This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted during November 2015. Interviews through a questionnaire and focus group discussions were used to collect the data. Proportional to size allocation followed by systematic sampling technique was used to identify the study units. The major determinants of institutional delivery in the study area were as follows: being apparently healthy, lack of knowledge, long waiting time, poor quality services, cultural beliefs, religious misconception, partner decision, and long travel. Around one-third (133, 34.5% of the women had visited at least once for their pregnancy. More than half (78, 58.6% of the women had visited health facilities due to health problems and only 27 (19.9% women had attended the recommended four antenatal care visits. Majority (268, 69.6% of the pregnant women preferred to give birth at home. Women who attended antenatal care were two times more likely to deliver at health facilities (AOR, 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.38, 1.065–4.96. Women whose family members preferred health facilities had 14 times more probability to give birth in health institutions (AOR, 95% CI =13.79, 5.28–35.8. Women living in proximity to a health facility were 13 times more likely to give birth at health facilities than women

  12. Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacaster, A.J. (ed.)

    1985-07-01

    This report describes the financial background of the electric utility industry in VACAR, reports on the present condition of the industry and then assesses the future of this industry. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of its cooperativeness and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear, oil. It was found that the supply of future economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the present condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound, and with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Access to transportation and health care utilization in a rural region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A; Preisser, John S; Gesler, Wilbert M; Powers, James M

    2005-01-01

    Access to transportation to transverse the large distances between residences and health services in rural settings is a necessity. However, little research has examined directly access to transportation in analyses of rural health care utilization. This analysis addresses the association of transportation and health care utilization in a rural region. Using survey data from a sample of 1,059 households located in 12 western North Carolina counties, this analysis tests the relationship of different transportation measures to health care utilization while adjusting for the effects of personal characteristics, health characteristics, and distance. Those who had a driver's license had 2.29 times more health care visits for chronic care and 1.92 times more visits for regular checkup care than those who did not. Respondents who had family or friends who could provide transportation had 1.58 times more visits for chronic care than those who did not. While not significant in the multivariate analysis, the small number who used public transportation had 4 more chronic care visits per year than those who did not. Age and lower health status were also associated with increased health care visits. The transportation variables that were significantly associated with health care visits suggest that the underlying conceptual frameworks, the Health Behavior Model and Hagerstrand's time geography, are useful for understanding transportation behavior. Further research must address the transportation behavior related to health care and the factors that influence this behavior. This information will inform policy alternatives to address geographic barriers to health care in rural communities.

  14. Regional Supplier Associations as the Producers of Transnational Club Goods in Latin American and Caribbean Utility Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Horrall

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing the consensus that regional regulatory agencies provide regional club goods, however; there is little evidence of the impact of the collaborations of the utility providers themselves in the literature. Our study analyzes whether regional networks such as the Caribbean Electric Utility corporation contribute to solving energy issues in Latin America and the Caribbean. Networks of operators provide cross -border services, and operating as a single entity improves the lobbying opportunities of operators to influence policy. Results suggest that utilities that formed linkages or cooperation regionally are likely to benefit from such collaborations, but a comprehensive approach to capacity building and reform is needed to address the regions energy issues.

  15. Determining optimal threshold for glucose control in organ donors after neurologic determination of death: a United Network for Organ Sharing Region 5 Donor Management Goals Workgroup prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally, Mitchell B; Ewing, Tyler; Crutchfield, Megan; Patel, Madhukar S; Raza, Shariq; De La Cruz, Salvador; Zatarain, John; Malinoski, Darren Jay

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate level of glucose control in organ donors after neurologic determination of death (DNDD) remains uncertain. We hypothesized that a glucose target of 180 mg/dL would be appropriate for optimizing organ transplantation rates and outcomes. Demographic, critical care, organ transplantation, and graft outcome data were prospectively collected on all DNDDs in United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Region 5 from 2010 to 2012. Glucose levels were assessed at four time points in the organ donation process. The primary outcome measure was having four or more organs transplanted per donor (OTPD). Univariate analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between glucose levels and OTPD, organ transplantation rates, and graft function. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine independent predictors of four or more OTPDs. Glucose levels were analyzed at the following cutoff points: 150 or less, 180, and 200 mg/dL. Results with a p Glucose levels of 150 mg/dL or less were not associated with differences in organ use. Levels of 180 mg/dL or less were associated with more OTPDs (3.5 vs. 3.2), a higher rate of four or more OTPDs (42% vs. 34%), and more heart (34% vs. 28%), pancreas (18% vs. 11%), and kidney (85% vs. 81%) use. Levels of 200 mg/dL or less revealed similar results. However, only a level of 180 mg/dL or less was an independent predictor of four or more OTPDs (odds ratio, 1.4). All three levels were associated with higher kidney graft survival after a mean (SD) of 10 (6.0) months of follow-up (97% vs. 95%). Hyperglycemia is common in DNDDs and is associated with lower organ transplantation rates and worse graft outcomes. Targeting a glucose level of 180 mg/dL or less seems to preserve outcomes and is consistent with general critical care guidelines. Therapeutic study, level II.

  16. Alterations in blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations during deep brain stimulation in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Eggels, Leslie; Rijnsburger, Merel; Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Kalsbeek, Andries; Denys, Damiaan; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is an effective therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and is currently under investigation as a treatment for eating disorders. DBS of this area is associated with altered food intake and pharmacological treatment of OCD is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Therefore we examined if DBS of the NAc-shell (sNAc) influences glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to DBS, or sham stimulation, for a period of 1 h. To assess the effects of stimulation on blood glucose and glucoregulatory hormones, blood samples were drawn before, during and after stimulation. Subsequently, all animals were used for quantitative assessment of Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) using computerized image analysis. DBS of the sNAc rapidly increased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucose while sham stimulation and DBS outside the sNAc were ineffective. In addition, the increase in glucose was dependent on DBS intensity. In contrast, the DBS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentrations was independent of intensity and region, indicating that the observed DBS-induced metabolic changes were not due to corticosterone release. Stimulation of the sNAc with 200 μA increased Fos immunoreactivity in the LHA compared to sham or 100 μA stimulated animals. These data show that DBS of the sNAc alters glucose metabolism in a region- and intensity- dependent manner in association with neuronal activation in the LHA. Moreover, these data illustrate the need to monitor changes in glucose metabolism during DBS-treatment of OCD patients.

  17. Alterations in blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations during deep brain stimulation in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene eDiepenbroek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc is an effective therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD and is currently under investigation as a treatment for eating disorders. DBS of this area is associated with altered food intake and pharmacological treatment of OCD is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Therefore we examined if DBS of the NAc-shell (sNAc influences glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to DBS, or sham stimulation, for a period of one hour. To assess the effects of stimulation on blood glucose and glucoregulatory hormones, blood samples were drawn before, during and after stimulation. Subsequently, all animals were used for quantitative assessment of Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA using computerized image analysis. DBS of the sNAc rapidly increased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucose while sham stimulation and DBS outside the sNAc were ineffective. In addition, the increase in glucose was dependent on DBS intensity. In contrast, the DBS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentrations was independent of intensity and region, indicating that the observed DBS-induced metabolic changes were not due to corticosterone release. Stimulation of the sNAc with 200 μA increased Fos immunoreactivity in the LHA compared to sham or 100 μA stimulated animals. These data show that DBS of the sNAc alters glucose metabolism in a region- and intensity dependent manner in association with neuronal activation in the LHA. Moreover, these data illustrate the need to monitor changes in glucose metabolism during DBS-treatment of OCD patients.

  18. Quantification of the local glucose utilization and local blood flow in the heart of the awake rat using the /sup 14/C-2-deoxyglucose and /sup 14/C-iodoantipyrine methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschinsky, W.; Bunger, R.; Schroeck, H.; Suda, S.; Sokoloff, L.

    1986-03-05

    Local cardiac glucose utilization (LCarGU) was quantified in the rat heart according to the Sokoloff model and local cardiac blood flow (LCarBF) according to the /sup 14/C-iodoantipyrine method. For quantitative autoradiography calibration curves for heart slices were performed. They differed from the brain calibration curves by 8%. The lumped constant was 0.377 in isolated working hearts. LCarGU and LCarBF could then be quantified in awake rats. At different locations mean LCarGU of different hearts varied from 85 to 200 ..mu..moles/100g/min and mean LCarBF from 390 to 831 ml/100g/min. The ratio subendocardial/subepicardial glucose utilization or blood flow was not systematically different from 1. The results indicate that glucose can be an important fuel in the heart of the awake rat, although its contribution to overall metabolism varies from animal to animal.

  19. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ˜1.5-2 mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies.

  20. Intragenic controls utilizing radiation-induced alternative transcript regions improves gene expression biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Helen B; Sprung, Carl N

    2014-03-01

    Ionizing-radiation exposure can be life threatening if given to the whole body. In addition, whole body radiation exposure can affect large numbers of people such as after a nuclear reactor accident, a nuclear explosion or a radiological terrorist attack. In these cases, an accurate biodosimeter is essential for triage management. One of the problems for biodosimetry in general is the interindividual variation before and after exposure, which can make it challenging to assign an accurate dose. To begin to address this challenge, lymphocyte cell lines were exposed to 0, 1, 2 and 5 Gy ionizing radiation from a ¹³⁷Cs source at a dose rate of 0.6 Gy/min. Alternative transcripts with regions showing large differential responses to ionizing radiation were determined from exon array data. Gene expression analysis was then performed on isolated mRNA using qRT-PCR with normalization to intergenic (PGK1, GAPDH) and novel intragenic regions for candidate radiation-responsive genes, PPM1D and MDM2. Our studies show that the use of a cis-associated expression reference improved the potential dose prediction approximately 2.3-8.3 fold and provided an advantage for dose prediction compared to distantly or trans-located control ionizing radiation nonresponsive genes. This approach also provides an alternative gene expression normalization method to potentially reduce interindividual variations when untreated basal gene expression levels are unavailable. Using associated noninduced regions of ionizing radiation-induced genes provides a way to estimate basal gene expression in the irradiated sample. This strategy can be utilized as a biodosimeter on its own or to enhance other gene expression candidates for biodosimetry. This normalization strategy may also be generally applicable for other quantitative PCR strategies where normalization is required for a particular response.

  1. Variations in the G6PC2/ABCB11 genomic region are associated with fasting glucose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wei-Min; Erdos, Michael R; Jackson, Anne U

    2008-01-01

    Identifying the genetic variants that regulate fasting glucose concentrations may further our understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes. We therefore investigated the association of fasting glucose levels with SNPs in 2 genome-wide scans including a total of 5,088 nondiabetic individuals from...... Finland and Sardinia. We found a significant association between the SNP rs563694 and fasting glucose concentrations (P = 3.5 x 10(-7)). This association was further investigated in an additional 18,436 nondiabetic individuals of mixed European descent from 7 different studies. The combined P value...... for association in these follow-up samples was 6.9 x 10(-26), and combining results from all studies resulted in an overall P value for association of 6.4 x 10(-33). Across these studies, fasting glucose concentrations increased 0.01-0.16 mM with each copy of the major allele, accounting for approximately 1...

  2. Nonresearch Industry Payments to Radiologists: Characteristics and Associations With Regional Medical Imaging Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabi, Nima; Junn, Jacqueline C; Xing, Minzhi; Hemingway, Jennifer; Hughes, Danny R; Duszak, Richard

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate characteristics of nonresearch industry payments to radiologists and associations with regional diagnostic imaging utilization. Using 2014 CMS Open Payment data, all disclosed nonresearch-related industry payments to radiologists were identified. Health Resources and Services Administration Area Health Resources Files were used to identify actual and population-weighted numbers of radiologists by state. Utilizing the 5% random beneficiary sample CMS Research Identifiable Files from 2014, average Medicare imaging spending per beneficiary in each state was calculated. Average frequency and dollar amounts of nonresearch nonroyalty payments to radiologists were calculated at the state level. Using the Pearson correlation coefficient, the relationship between frequency and amounts of nonresearch payments to radiologists versus per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending was evaluated at the state level. Overall, 2,008 radiologists (1,670 diagnostic, 338 interventional) received nonresearch nonroyalty payments from industry, representing 5.2% of all 38,857 radiologists nationwide. A total of 4,975 individual transfers translated to 2.5 ± 1.3 discrete payments per receiving radiologist with a mean of $432 ± $1,976 (median $26; range $1-$34,050). Food and beverage expenses constituted the vast majority of disclosed transfers (4,111; 83%), followed by travel and lodging (444; 9%), consulting fees (279; 6%), and educational expenses (51; 1%). Considerable geographic variation in payments was observed, ranging from 0% of radiologists in Vermont to 12.9% in the District of Columbia. No correlation was identified between average per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending and the proportion of nonresearch-funded radiologists in each state (r = 0.06). Similarly, no correlation was identified between average per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending and the average nonresearch transfer amount to radiologists in each state (r = -0.08). In 2014, only a small minority of

  3. Determinants of institutional delivery service utilization among pastorals of Liben Zone, Somali Regional State, Ethiopia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepro, Nejimu Biza; Ahmed, Ahmed Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Maternal health service utilizations are poorly equipped, inaccessible, negligible, and not well documented in the pastoral society. This research describes a quantitative and qualitative study on the determinants of institutional delivery among pastoralists of Liben Zone with special emphasis on Filtu and Deka Suftu woredas of Somali Region, Ethiopia. The study was funded by the project "Fostering health care for refugees and pastoral communities in Somali Region, Ethiopia". This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted during November 2015. Interviews through a questionnaire and focus group discussions were used to collect the data. Proportional to size allocation followed by systematic sampling technique was used to identify the study units. The major determinants of institutional delivery in the study area were as follows: being apparently healthy, lack of knowledge, long waiting time, poor quality services, cultural beliefs, religious misconception, partner decision, and long travel. Around one-third (133, 34.5%) of the women had visited at least once for their pregnancy. More than half (78, 58.6%) of the women had visited health facilities due to health problems and only 27 (19.9%) women had attended the recommended four antenatal care visits. Majority (268, 69.6%) of the pregnant women preferred to give birth at home. Women who attended antenatal care were two times more likely to deliver at health facilities (AOR, 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.38, 1.065-4.96). Women whose family members preferred health facilities had 14 times more probability to give birth in health institutions (AOR, 95% CI =13.79, 5.28-35.8). Women living in proximity to a health facility were 13 times more likely to give birth at health facilities than women living far away (AOR, 95% CI =13.37, 5.9-29.85). Nomadic way of life, service inaccessibility, and sociodemographic and cultural obstacles have an effect on the utilization of delivery services. Increasing access

  4. Barriers to mental health services utilization in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria: service users' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack-Ide, Izibeloko Omi; Uys, Leana

    2013-01-01

    There is only one neuro-psychiatric hospital for over four million people in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Low-income groups in urban and rural areas who access care through public mental health clinics are at greater risk of not accessing the needed mental health care. This study aimed to explored barriers that prevent people from utilizing mental health services, and to identifies key factors to increase access and improved service delivery. A qualitative study was conducted among 20 service users attending the outpatient clinic of Rumuigbo neuropsychiatric hospital. Ten participants were caregivers and 10 were clients, both having accessed services for at least one year. The mean age was 37.7 years, 60% were males, 40% were unemployed and only 15% had a regular monthly income, while 65% live in rural areas. Barriers observed in mental health services use were physical, financial and cultural. These include absence of service in rural communities, poor knowledge of mental health services, stigma, transportation problems, waiting time at the facility and cost of service. Stigma remains a strong barrier to accessing mental health services, and extensive efforts need to be made to overcome ignorance and discrimination. Mental health services need to be provided throughout the health care system to enable people to access them locally and affordably, preventing the need to travel and promoting service uptake and treatment continuation.

  5. Barriers to mental health services utilization in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria: service users’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack-Ide, Izibeloko Omi; Uys, Leana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is only one neuro-psychiatric hospital for over four million people in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Low-income groups in urban and rural areas who access care through public mental health clinics are at greater risk of not accessing the needed mental health care. This study aimed to explored barriers that prevent people from utilizing mental health services, and to identifies key factors to increase access and improved service delivery. Methods A qualitative study was conducted among 20 service users attending the outpatient clinic of Rumuigbo neuropsychiatric hospital. Ten participants were caregivers and 10 were clients, both having accessed services for at least one year. Results The mean age was 37.7 years, 60% were males, 40% were unemployed and only 15% had a regular monthly income, while 65% live in rural areas. Barriers observed in mental health services use were physical, financial and cultural. These include absence of service in rural communities, poor knowledge of mental health services, stigma, transportation problems, waiting time at the facility and cost of service. Conclusion Stigma remains a strong barrier to accessing mental health services, and extensive efforts need to be made to overcome ignorance and discrimination. Mental health services need to be provided throughout the health care system to enable people to access them locally and affordably, preventing the need to travel and promoting service uptake and treatment continuation. PMID:23785564

  6. PS2-17: Diabetes Social Support Feasibility Pilot Study: Utilizing Mobile Technology and Self-Identified Supporters to Enhance Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Brandi; Roblin, Douglas; Hipkens, James; Vupputuri, Suma; McMahon, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is associated with improved glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes, however, the practice of daily self-monitoring is not optimal. Telecommunications technology may improve adherence to recommended self-management practices by remotely transmitting automated reminders to motivate patients, and utilizing social networking for peer support. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate the feasibility and usability of mobile technology and the potential added value of social support to improve SMBG frequency and glycemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Adults 25–74 years of age with type 2 DM and an average HbA1c > 8.0% were recruited from Kaiser Permanente Georgia (KPGA) and Oakhurst Medical Center (OMC, a community health clinic) to participate in a 3-month study using wireless technology. Enrollment sessions with presentations on SMBG techniques, use of the wireless technology, and motivational coaching to enhance social support were conducted in November 2009. During the subsequent 3-months, both diabetes patients and their self-selected supporters will receive text messages to their cell phones summarizing a patient’s SMBG frequency and levels. Participants and their supporters will attend a disenrollment session in February 2010 when feasibility and usability will be assessed in focus groups. Results: 6 of 161 eligible diabetes patients at KPGA and 9 of 28 eligible diabetes patients at OMC, and their self-selected supporters, consented to participate. The average age of diabetes patients was 49.3 years. 86.7% (N=13) were African-American; and 33.3% (N=5) were male. Five days after enrollment, 60% (N=9) of patients had connected their wireless transmitters and had current blood glucose data. Follow-up phone calls will be made to ensure that all participants are connected to the wireless technology within 10 days of the enrollment session. Conclusion

  7. Brain regions involved in voluntary movements as revealed by radioisotopic mapping of CBF or CMR-glucose changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Ingvar, D H

    1990-01-01

    area SMA on both sides increase in CBF/CMR-glucose and even internally ("mentally") going through the trained movements, causes such changes; complex purposeful movements also activate the premotor cortex, a response that is bilateral with greatest response contralaterally. Studies in patients...

  8. Mutational Analysis of Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Highlights Regions Required for Alpha-Dystroglycan Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciani, Marissa; Alston, Jacob T; Zhao, Guohui; Reynolds, Hayley; Ali, Afroze M; Xu, Brian; Brindley, Melinda A

    2017-09-15

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an enveloped RNA virus endemic to West Africa and responsible for severe cases of hemorrhagic fever. Virus entry is mediated by the glycoprotein complex consisting of a stable-signal peptide, a receptor-binding subunit, GP1, and a viral-host membrane fusion subunit, GP2. Several cellular receptors can interact with the GP1 subunit and mediate viral entry, including alpha-dystroglycan (αDG) and lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1). In order to define the regions within GP1 that interact with the cellular receptors, we implemented insertional mutagenesis, carbohydrate shielding, and alanine scanning mutagenesis. Eighty GP constructs were engineered and evaluated for GP1-GP2 processing, surface expression, and the ability to mediate cell-to-cell fusion after low-pH exposure. To examine virus-to-cell entry, 49 constructs were incorporated onto vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudoparticles and transduction efficiencies were monitored in HAP1 and HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells that differentially produce the αDG cell surface receptor. Seven constructs retained efficient transduction in HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells yet poorly transduced HAP1 cells, suggesting that they are involved in αDG utilization. Residues H141, N146, F147, and Y150 cluster at the predicted central core of the trimeric interface and are important for GP-αDG interaction. Additionally, H92A-H93A, 150HA, 172HA, and 230HA displayed reduced transduction in both HAP1 and HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells, despite efficient cell-to-cell fusion activity. These mutations may interfere with interactions with the endosomal receptor LAMP1 or interfere at another stage in entry that is common to both cell lines. Insight gained from these data can aid in the development of more-effective entry inhibitors by blocking receptor interactions. IMPORTANCE Countries in which Lassa virus is endemic, such as Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia, usually experience a seasonal outbreak of the virus from December to March

  9. Utilization of post-abortion care services in three regional states of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Ethiopia, utilization of post-abortion care service is minimal and it seems that the expanding services are underutilized. The purpose of this study was to assess factors which influence decisions for utilization of abortion related services at community level. Methodology: The study was carried out in six ...

  10. Utilizing a Low-Cost, Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS) to Improve Learning in Developing Rural Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an innovation Laser-Driven Interactive System (LaDIS), utilizing general IWBs (Interactive Whiteboard) didactics, to support student learning for rural and developing regions. LaDIS is a system made to support traditional classroom practices between an instructor and a group of students. This invention effectively transforms a…

  11. Modern contraceptive utilization and associated factors among married pastoralist women in Bale eco-region, Bale Zone, South East Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Semere Sileshi; Haile, Mekonnen Tegegne; Melku, Abulie Takele; Tololu, Abdurehaman Kalu

    2017-03-14

    Women who live in remote rural areas encounter different challenges against contraception and often deny the use of modern contraceptive methods. The predictors of modern contraceptive utilization by pastoralist women in the Bale eco-region could be specific and are not well known. Therefore, this study aims to assess modern contraceptive utilization and its determinants among married pastoralist women in Bale eco-region, Oromia regional state, South East Ethiopia. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted from 20th November 2015 to 30th February 2016. A structured questionnaire was used to interview 549 married pastoralist women who were selected by multistage sampling technique. The data were analyzed by SPSS - 21 software, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of modern contraceptive use at (P-value eco-region. The study identified lower modern contraceptive method utilization by pastoralist women, and the majority of the contraceptive users rely on short- acting contraceptive methods. The uncomplimentary perceptions towards religious and cultural acceptability of modern contraceptive method were among the major reasons for lesser utilization of the methods. Family planning programs should be tailored to actively involve pastoralist women, husbands, and religious leaders in pastoralist communities.

  12. Glucose turnover during pregnancy in anaesthetized post-absorptive rats

    OpenAIRE

    Leturque, Armelle; Gilbert, Marc; Girard, Jean

    1981-01-01

    During pregnancy the decline in blood [glucose] does not result from the increased distribution space of glucose. The absolute rate of glucose turnover increases in late pregnancy in parallel with the rise in the mass of the conceptus. Nevertheless, glucose turnover per kg body wt. is not increased in late pregnancy, since the lower blood [glucose] decreases glucose utilization by maternal tissues.

  13. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  14. A systematic approach for the accurate non-invasive estimation of blood glucose utilizing a novel light-tissue interaction adaptive modelling scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybynok, V. O.; Kyriacou, P. A.

    2007-10-01

    Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges of the 21st century. The obesity epidemic, sedentary lifestyles and an ageing population mean prevalence of the condition is currently doubling every generation. Diabetes is associated with serious chronic ill health, disability and premature mortality. Long-term complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations, make the greatest contribution to the costs of diabetes care. Many of these long-term effects could be avoided with earlier, more effective monitoring and treatment. Currently, blood glucose can only be monitored through the use of invasive techniques. To date there is no widely accepted and readily available non-invasive monitoring technique to measure blood glucose despite the many attempts. This paper challenges one of the most difficult non-invasive monitoring techniques, that of blood glucose, and proposes a new novel approach that will enable the accurate, and calibration free estimation of glucose concentration in blood. This approach is based on spectroscopic techniques and a new adaptive modelling scheme. The theoretical implementation and the effectiveness of the adaptive modelling scheme for this application has been described and a detailed mathematical evaluation has been employed to prove that such a scheme has the capability of extracting accurately the concentration of glucose from a complex biological media.

  15. A systematic approach for the accurate non-invasive estimation of blood glucose utilizing a novel light-tissue interaction adaptive modelling scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybynok, V O; Kyriacou, P A [City University, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges of the 21st century. The obesity epidemic, sedentary lifestyles and an ageing population mean prevalence of the condition is currently doubling every generation. Diabetes is associated with serious chronic ill health, disability and premature mortality. Long-term complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations, make the greatest contribution to the costs of diabetes care. Many of these long-term effects could be avoided with earlier, more effective monitoring and treatment. Currently, blood glucose can only be monitored through the use of invasive techniques. To date there is no widely accepted and readily available non-invasive monitoring technique to measure blood glucose despite the many attempts. This paper challenges one of the most difficult non-invasive monitoring techniques, that of blood glucose, and proposes a new novel approach that will enable the accurate, and calibration free estimation of glucose concentration in blood. This approach is based on spectroscopic techniques and a new adaptive modelling scheme. The theoretical implementation and the effectiveness of the adaptive modelling scheme for this application has been described and a detailed mathematical evaluation has been employed to prove that such a scheme has the capability of extracting accurately the concentration of glucose from a complex biological media.

  16. Regional difference of glucose metabolism reduction in equivocal Alzheimer's disease and elderly depressed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. S.; Kang, E. J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, K. U.; Chung, J. K.; Woo, J. I.; Lee, M. C. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in cerebral glucose metabolism between patients with equivocal Alzheimer's disease (eAD) and those with elderly major depression (DEP). 31 patients with eAD, 7 patients with DEP, and 15 age matched normal controls were scanned with FDG-PET. Each FDG-PET images was normalized to the cerebellar activity before voxel-voxel analysis using SPM99. In comparison with normal controls, the eAD patents showed the most significant reduction of glucose metabolism (hypometabolism) in anterior inferior temporal gyrus in left, followed by bilateral posterior cingulate, left thalamus, and inferior parietal lobe. Patients with DEP showed hypometabolism in precuneus, inferior and middle frontal gyri in left, and right angular gyrus. Significantly lower activity was found in left inferior temporal gyrus in DEP in comparison to the eAD. Patients with eAD and DEP showed different pattern of hypometabolism, especially in inferior temporal gyrus. FDG brain PET may be useful in differential diagnosis between equivocal Alzheimer's disease and elderly depression.

  17. HIV Viral Load Trends in Six Eastern Caribbean Countries Utilizing a Regional Laboratory Referral Service: Implications for Treatment as Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    R Clive Landis; Kelly Carmichael-Simmons; Hambleton, Ian R; Anton Best

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since 2009, seven countries in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, have been utilizing a laboratory referral service for HIV-1 viral load (VL) offered by The Ladymeade Reference Unit (LRU) Laboratory, Barbados. The objective of this study was to evaluate 5 year VL trends in the six larger OECS countries participating in this regional referral service. ...

  18. Assessing the Efficient Utilization of Electricity by Domestic Consumers in the Agona District in Central Region

    OpenAIRE

    Enock A. Duodu; Owusu-Sekyere, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the efficient utilization of electricity by domestic consumers in the Agona District. Descriptive survey design was employed in the study. Purposive and simple random sampling techniques were used in selecting five (5) towns and 100 respondents, respectively. A questionnaire as well as interview and observation methods were used in data collection. The data obtained from respondents were analyzed using frequencies and percentages. The study revealed that almost two-thirds (...

  19. Managing female urinary incontinence: A regional prospective analysis of cost-utility ratios (curs and effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Costantini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To evaluate the cost-utility of incontinence treatments, particularly anticholinergic therapy, by examining costs and quality-adjusted life years. Materials and methods: A prospective cohort study of women who were consecutively referred by general practitioners (GPs to the Urology Department because of urinary incontinence. The primary outcome was evaluation of the cost-utility of incontinence treatments (surgery, medical therapy and physiotherapy for stress and/or urgency incontinence by examining costs and quality-adjusted life years. Results: 137 consecutive female patients (mean age 60.6 ± 11.6; range 36-81 were enrolled and stratified according to pathologies: SUI and UUI. Group A: SUI grade II-III: 43 patients who underwent mid-urethral sling (MUS; Group B: SUI grade I-II 57 patients who underwent pelvic floor muscle exercise and Group C: UUI: 37 patients who underwent antimuscarinic treatment with 5 mg solifenacin daily. The cost utility ratio (CUR was estimated as saving more than €1200 per QALY for surgery and physiotherapy and as costing under € 100 per QALY for drug therapy. Conclusions: This study shows that appropriate diagnosis and treatment of a patient with incontinence lowers National Health Service costs and improves the benefits of treatment and quality of life.

  20. Blast overpressure waves induce transient anxiety and regional changes in cerebral glucose metabolism and delayed hyperarousal in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibah Omar Awwad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiological alterations, anxiety and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p<0.05; n=8-11. Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed hyperactivity and increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p<0.05; n=4-6 and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p<0.05; n=5-6.

  1. HIGHER SERUM TOTAL CHOLESTEROL LEVELS IN LATE MIDDLE AGE ARE ASSOCIATED WITH GLUCOSE HYPOMETABOLISM IN BRAIN REGIONS AFFECTED BY ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND NORMAL AGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Lee, Wendy; Reschke, Cole; Bandy, Daniel; Alexander, Gene E.; Caselli, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that higher midlife serum total cholesterol levels are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) in the study of cognitively normal late-middle-aged people, we demonstrated an association between apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 gene dose, the major genetic risk factor for late-onset AD, and lower measurements of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) in AD-affected brain regions, we proposed using PET as a presymptomatic endophenotype to evaluate other putative AD risk modifiers, and we then used it to support an aggregate cholesterol-related genetic risk score in the risk of AD. In the present study, we used PET to investigate the association between serum total cholesterol levels and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose metabolism (CMRgl) in 117 cognitively normal late middle-aged APOE ε4 homozygotes, heterozygotes and noncarriers. Higher serum total cholesterol levels were associated with lower CMRgl bilaterally in precuneus, parietotemporal and prefrontal regions previously found to be preferentially affected by AD, and in additional frontal regions previously found to be preferentially affected by normal aging. The associations were greater in APOE ε4 carriers than non-carriers in some of the AD-affected brain regions. We postulate the higher midlife serum total cholesterol levels accelerate brain processes associated with normal aging and conspire with other risk factors in the predisposition to AD. We propose using PET in proof-of-concept randomized controlled trials to rapidly evaluate the effects of midlife cholesterol-lowering treatments on the brain changes associated with normal aging and AD. PMID:19631758

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-alpha-Null Mice Have Increased White Adipose Tissue Glucose Utilization, GLUT4, and Fat Mass: Role in Liver and Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knauf, C.; Rieusset, J.; Foretz, M.; Cani, P.D.; Uldry, M.; Hosokawa, M.; Martinez, E.; Bringart, M.; Waget, A.; Kersten, A.H.; Desvergne, B.; Gremlich, S.; Wahli, W.; Seydoux, J.; Delzenne, N.M.; Thorens, B.; Burcelin, R.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-¿ increases lipid catabolism and lowers the concentration of circulating lipid, but its role in the control of glucose metabolism is not as clearly established. Here we compared PPAR¿ knockout mice with wild type and confirmed that

  3. Donor Heart Utilization following Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation: Influence of Donor Characteristics and Wait Times in Transplant Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Quader

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Procurement of hearts from cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitated (CPR donors for transplantation is suboptimal. We studied the influences of donor factors and regional wait times on CPR donor heart utilization. Methods. From UNOS database (1998 to 2012, we identified 44,744 heart donors, of which 4,964 (11% received CPR. Based on procurement of heart for transplantation, CPR donors were divided into hearts procured (HP and hearts not procured (HNP groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of heart procurement. Results. Of the 4,964 CPR donors, 1,427 (28.8% were in the HP group. Donor characteristics that favored heart procurement include younger age (25.5 ± 15 yrs versus 39 ± 18 yrs, P≤0.0001, male gender (34% versus 23%, P≤0.0001, shorter CPR duration (30 min, P≤0.0001, and head trauma (60% versus 15%. Among the 11 UNOS regions, the highest procurement was in Region 1 (37% and the lowest in Region 3 (24%. Regional transplant volumes and median waiting times did not influence heart procurement rates. Conclusions. Only 28.8% of CPR donor hearts were procured for transplantation. Factors favoring heart procurement include younger age, male gender, short CPR duration, and traumatic head injury. Heart procurement varied by region but not by transplant volumes or wait times.

  4. Differential regional cerebral glucose metabolism in clinical syndromes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a study with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. M.; Cho, S. S.; Na, D. L.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E. [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration( FTLD) is the third most common dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neurobehavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patient with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. We analysed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral premotor are was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical features of FTLD syndromes. These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD.

  5. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gray matter (GM damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS. The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2* in 10 each relapsing–remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2* values from healthy controls (HCs of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2* values – age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2* values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2* values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2* values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05 correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2* values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  6. Great Lakes O shore Wind Project: Utility and Regional Integration Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajadi, Amirhossein [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Loparo, Kenneth A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); D' Aquila, Robert [General Electric (GE), Albany, NY (United States); Clark, Kara [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Waligorski, Joseph G. [FirstEnergy, Akron, OH (United States); Baker, Scott [PJM Interconnection, Audubon, PA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This project aims to identify transmission system upgrades needed to facilitate offshore wind projects as well as operational impacts of offshore generation on operation of the regional transmission system in the Great Lakes region. A simulation model of the US Eastern Interconnection was used as the test system as a case study for investigating the impact of the integration of a 1000MW offshore wind farm operating in Lake Erie into FirstEnergy/PJM service territory. The findings of this research provide recommendations on offshore wind integration scenarios, the locations of points of interconnection, wind profile modeling and simulation, and computational methods to quantify performance, along with operating changes and equipment upgrades needed to mitigate system performance issues introduced by an offshore wind project.

  7. In situ conversion process systems utilizing wellbores in at least two regions of a formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Hsu, Chia-Fu [Granada Hills, CA

    2011-09-27

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of elongated heaters located in a plurality of openings in the formation. At least two of the heaters are substantially parallel to each other for at least a portion of the lengths of the heaters. At least two of the heaters have first end portions in a first region of the formation and second end portions in a second region of the formation. A source of time-varying current is configured to apply time-varying current to at least two of the heaters. The first end portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them. The second portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them.

  8. Detection of regional air pollution episodes utilizing satellite data in the visual range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowley, C. J.; Burke, H. K.; Barnes, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative analysis of satellite-observed haze patterns and ground-based aerosol measurements is carried out for July 20-23, 1978. During this period, a significant regional air pollution episode existed across the northeastern United States, accompanied by widespread haze, reduced surface visibility, and elevated sulfate levels measured by the Sulfate Regional Experiment (SURE) network. The results show that the satellite-observed haze patterns correlate closely with the area of reported low surface visibility (less than 4 mi) and high sulfate levels. Quantitative information on total aerosol loading derived from the satellite-digitized data, using an atmospheric radiative transfer model, agrees well with the results obtained from the ground-based measurements.

  9. Minimally invasive research of presigmoidal approach for exposure of jugular foramen region utilizing virtual reality system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke TANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss minimally invasive tactics for exposure of jugular foramen region in transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach based on virtual reality image model. Methods CT and MRI scans were performed to 15 adult cadaver heads (30 sides, and image data was inputted into Vitrea virtual reality system to establish three-dimensional anatomical model of jugular foramen region. The transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach was simulated with selecting osseous landmark points to draw a cylinder. Minimally invasive simulation was performed by reducing the diameter of cylinder. Anatomic exposures in surgical trajectory following minimally invasive design were observed, measured and compared.  Results Spacial sequence of nerves and vessels of jugular foramen region was exposured clearly with the route simulating transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach. Route before and after minimally invasive design passed through the interval between vertical segment of facial nerve and sigmoid sinus. There was a part of sigmoid sinus in the route. Cerebellar hemisphere was not included in the route. Data measurement and comparative analysis showed that volume of route, petrosal osseous structure and venous sinus involved in route before minimally invasive design was more than that after minimally invasive design. The differences reached statistical significance (P = 0.000. The volumes of lower cranial nerves between routes before and after minimally invasive design did not show significant differences (P = 0.552.  Conclusions Minimally invasive route of transpetrosal-presigmoidal approach is helpful to reduce surgical injury of vital structures in effective exposure for target structures of jugular foramen region. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.011

  10. Can Innovation Enhance Entrepreneurial Activities of a Region? An Analysis Utilizing the Entrepreneurial Remedy Model (EREM).

    OpenAIRE

    Abouzeedan, Adli; Edgar, Boo; Hedner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the Entrepreneurial Recycling Model (EREC), the Entrepreneurial Remedy Model (EREM) demands an active role of innovation to create an environment where small and medium size companies (SMEs) are developed. The EREM may provide a conceptual platform which may explain why developed regions have succeeded in maintaining a healthy entrepreneurial environment, while the less developed have failed to do that. Further, the Open Innovation concept is brought into the discussion connect...

  11. [Association between the level of fasting blood glucose over 35-year-old and carotid intima-media thickness in Han, Uygur and Kazak population from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region from 2007 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomei; Li, Haixia; Liu, Fen; Chen, Bangdang; Yang, Yining; Ma, Yitong

    2014-10-01

    To analyze the relationship between different levels of fasting blood glucose over 35-year old and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in Han, Uygur and Kazak adult population from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. From October 2007 to April 2010, the present study was performed in 13 935 inhabitants among Han, Uygur and Kazak adult population of aged 35 years old and over by multi-stage stratified cluster random sampling principles from 7 regions in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous and we excluded the IMT over 0.9 millimeter, long-term out and the floating population. All subjects were measured fasting blood glucose and IMT values of carotid artery. The subjects were divided into three groups according to different fasting blood glucose levels: normal, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes mellitus (DM) and we used the analysis of variance to compare the differences among groups of IMT. Multiple linear regression model was used to explore factors of carotid IMT. The IMT of males of Han, Uygur and Kazak were (0.81 ± 0.29), (0.71 ± 0.27) and (0.79 ± 0.21) mm respectively, the differences were significant (F = 88.50, P fasting blood glucose (β = 0.023, P = 0.009) were independent risk factors of IMT. The level of fasting blood glucose was an independent influence factor of carotid IMT and had a positive correlation in Han, Uygur and Kazak population of Xinjiang Autonomous Region.

  12. Metabolic engineering of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain capable of simultaneously utilizing glucose and galactose to produce enantiopure (2R,3R)-butanediol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jiazhang; Chao, Ran; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-05-01

    2,3-Butanediol (BDO) is an important chemical with broad industrial applications and can be naturally produced by many bacteria at high levels. However, the pathogenicity of these native producers is a major obstacle for large scale production. Here we report the engineering of an industrially friendly host, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce BDO at high titer and yield. By inactivation of pyruvate decarboxylases (PDCs) followed by overexpression of MTH1 and adaptive evolution, the resultant yeast grew on glucose as the sole carbon source with ethanol production completely eliminated. Moreover, the pdc- strain consumed glucose and galactose simultaneously, which to our knowledge is unprecedented in S. cerevisiae strains. Subsequent introduction of a BDO biosynthetic pathway consisting of the cytosolic acetolactate synthase (cytoILV2), Bacillus subtilis acetolactate decarboxylase (BsAlsD), and the endogenous butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1) resulted in the production of enantiopure (2R,3R)-butanediol (R-BDO). In shake flask fermentation, a yield over 70% of the theoretical value was achieved. Using fed-batch fermentation, more than 100g/L R-BDO (1100mM) was synthesized from a mixture of glucose and galactose, two major carbohydrate components in red algae. The high titer and yield of the enantiopure R-BDO produced as well as the ability to co-ferment glucose and galactose make our engineered yeast strain a superior host for cost-effective production of bio-based BDO from renewable resources. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Health Seeking Behavior and Utilization of Health Care Services in Eastern Hilly Region of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailesh Bhattarai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available noBackground & Objectives: Preventive, promotive, curative, and rehabilitative health care services depend not only in availability & accessibility of it but also on awareness and attitude of the people and various inter-woven social structure that determines in making choice. The objective of this study was to explore health seeking behavior and utilization of health care services in the rural places in VDCs of Ilam district of Eastern Nepal.Materials & Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in between period of March 25th 2013 to April 10th 2013 Fikkal and Pashupatinagar VDCs in Ilam district with sample of 300 people. Data was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire.Results: One fifth of the populations were found to be seeking traditional healers’ service and 80 percent among modern treatment system were relying on private treatment facility for treating sickness. People who had lived more than 20 years in that place and who felt modern health services were costly were likely to use service of traditional healers. Similarly people suffering from chronic illness, having health facility more than 30 minutes and using stretcher or walking as means of transportation were using government health centers more compared to private services.Conclusion: Significant people still use traditional healers’ service and the government health facility utilization was low as compared to private. The people living for longer period in that place and having the concept that modern health centers are costly were primary user of traditional healing system. Health facility nearby or people who could afford for automobile travel facilities were using costly private health centers.JCMS Nepal. 2015; 11(2:8-16

  14. Utilization of highly purified single wall carbon nanotubes dispersed in polymer thin films for an improved performance of an electrochemical glucose sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goornavar, Virupaxi [Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, 555 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Jeffers, Robert [Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Luna Innovations, Inc., 706 Forest St., Suite A, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Biradar, Santoshkumar [RICE University, 6100 Main St, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Ramesh, Govindarajan T., E-mail: gtramesh@nsu.edu [Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States); Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, 555 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In this work we report the improved performance an electrochemical glucose sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) that has been modified with highly purified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersed in polyethyleneimine (PEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polypyrrole (PPy). The single wall carbon nanotubes were purified by both thermal and chemical oxidation to achieve maximum purity of ∼ 98% with no damage to the tubes. The SWCNTs were then dispersed by sonication in three different organic polymers (1.0 mg/ml SWCNT in 1.0 mg/ml of organic polymer). The stable suspension was coated onto the GCE and electrochemical characterization was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Amperometry. The electroactive enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized on the surface of the GCE/(organic polymer–SWCNT) electrode. The amperometric detection of glucose was carried out at 0.7 V versus Ag/AgCl. The GCE/(SWCNT–PEI, PEG, PPY) gave a detection limit of 0.2633 μM, 0.434 μM, and 0.9617 μM, and sensitivities of 0.2411 ± 0.0033 μA mM{sup −1}, r{sup 2} = 0.9984, 0.08164 ± 0.001129 μA mM{sup −1}, r{sup 2} = 0.9975, 0.04189 ± 0.00087 μA mM{sup −1}, and r{sup 2} = 0.9944 respectively and a response time of less than 5 s. The use of purified SWCNTs has several advantages, including fast electron transfer rate and stability in the immobilized enzyme. The significant enhancement of the SWCNT modified electrode as a glucose sensor can be attributed to the superior conductivity and large surface area of the well dispersed purified SWCNTs. - Highlights: • Purification method employed here use cheap and green oxidants. • The method does not disrupt the electronic structure of nanotubes. • This method removes nearly < 2% metallic impurities. • Increases the sensitivity and performance of glassy carbon electrode • This system can detect as low as 0.066 μM of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 0.2633 μM of glucose.

  15. Standing Height and its Estimation Utilizing Foot Length Measurements in Adolescents from Western Region in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevo Popović

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to examine standing height in both Kosovan genders in the Western Region as well as its association with foot length, as an alternative to estimating standing height. A total of 664 individuals (338 male and 326 female participated in this research. The anthropometric measurements were taken according to the protocol of ISAK. The relationships between body height and foot length were determined using simple correlation coefficients at a ninety-five percent confidence interval. A comparison of means of standing height and foot length between genders was performed using a t-test. After that a linear regression analysis were carried out to examine extent to which foot length can reliably predict standing height. Results displayed that Western Kosovan male are 179.71±6.00cm tall and have a foot length of 26.73±1.20cm, while Western Kosovan female are 166.26±5.23cm tall and have a foot length of 23.66±1.06cm. The results have shown that both genders made Western-Kosovans a tall group, a little bit taller that general Kosovan population. Moreover, the foot length reliably predicts standing height in both genders; but, not reliably enough as arm span. This study also confirms the necessity for developing separate height models for each region in Kosovo as the results from Western-Kosovans don’t correspond to the general values.

  16. Energy reduction in buildings in temperate and tropic regions utilizing a heat loss measuring device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    2012-01-01

    for heating up, and cooling down our houses. There is a huge energy saving potential on this area reducing both the World climate problems and economy challenges as well. Heating of buildings in Denmark counts for approximately 40% of the entire national energy consume. Of this reason a reduction of heat...... losses from building envelopes are of great impor­tance in order to reach the Bologna CO2-emission reduction goals. Energy renovation of buildings is a topic of huge focus around the world these years. Not only expenses for heating in the tempered and arctic regions are of importance, but also expenses...... to ACMV in the "warm countries" contribute to an enormous energy consumption and corresponding CO2 emission. In order to establish the best basis for energy renovation, it is important to have measures of the heat losses on a building façade, for optimizing the energy renovation. This paper will present...

  17. A brain-region-based meta-analysis method utilizing the Apriori algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhendong; Nie, Yaoxin; Zhou, Qian; Zhu, Linlin; Wei, Jieyao

    2016-05-18

    Brain network connectivity modeling is a crucial method for studying the brain's cognitive functions. Meta-analyses can unearth reliable results from individual studies. Meta-analytic connectivity modeling is a connectivity analysis method based on regions of interest (ROIs) which showed that meta-analyses could be used to discover brain network connectivity. In this paper, we propose a new meta-analysis method that can be used to find network connectivity models based on the Apriori algorithm, which has the potential to derive brain network connectivity models from activation information in the literature, without requiring ROIs. This method first extracts activation information from experimental studies that use cognitive tasks of the same category, and then maps the activation information to corresponding brain areas by using the automatic anatomical label atlas, after which the activation rate of these brain areas is calculated. Finally, using these brain areas, a potential brain network connectivity model is calculated based on the Apriori algorithm. The present study used this method to conduct a mining analysis on the citations in a language review article by Price (Neuroimage 62(2):816-847, 2012). The results showed that the obtained network connectivity model was consistent with that reported by Price. The proposed method is helpful to find brain network connectivity by mining the co-activation relationships among brain regions. Furthermore, results of the co-activation relationship analysis can be used as a priori knowledge for the corresponding dynamic causal modeling analysis, possibly achieving a significant dimension-reducing effect, thus increasing the efficiency of the dynamic causal modeling analysis.

  18. Beta particle dosimetry of the trabecular region of a thoracic vertebra utilizing NMR microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokisch, Derek William

    Radiation damage to the hematopoietic bone marrow represents the primary limiting factor to the further development of internal emitter therapies such as radioimmunotherapy and the use of incorporated radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. Improvements in radiation dosimetry of bone marrow are believed to be a prerequisite to accurate predictions of myelotoxicity for these radionuclide therapies. Current radiation dosimetry models for the prediction of marrow dose utilize a scheme in which separate calculations of cumulated activity and dose per transition (radionuclide S value) must be made. The selection of an appropriate S value is generally limited to one of only three sources, all of which use as input the trabecular microstructure of an individual measured 20 years ago, and the tissue masses derived from different individuals measured 70 years ago. This work improves on previously developed methods, which may be used to expand the microstructural database (particularly for non-Reference Man patients). Techniques were developed to avoid voxel effects that arise when taking microstructural measurements across a digitized image. In addition, this work developed a basis for comparison of the existing dosimetry models to an accurate methodology allowing for radiation transport in a voxelized image. The images used are obtained using NMR microscopy methods. This work will be the first of its kind in skeletal dosimetry in that it will allow for S- value calculation using microstructural and mass data from the same source. A new method for performing skeletal dosimetry was developed, and absorbed fraction results are found to be consistent in shape with other models. At electron energies less than 100 keV, all models studied were found to be consistent for all source and target combinations. Finally, a dose example comparing accepted methodologies with the one developed in this study illustrated the variance and importance of skeletal tissue masses used in

  19. Regional brain glucose metabolism and neurocognitive function in adult survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Kevin R; Minoshima, Satoshi; Edelmann, Michelle; Morris, Brannon; Sabin, Noah D; Brinkman, Tara M; Armstrong, Gregory T; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Shulkin, Barry

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between regional brain metabolism, as measured by (18)F-FDG PET, and neurocognitive outcomes in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with cranial radiation. Thirty-eight adult survivors of ALL were randomly selected from a large cohort treated with cranial radiation therapy (19 with 18 Gy and 19 with 24 Gy of exposure). At a mean age of 26.4 (range, 22.3-37.4) years, and 23.5 (range, 20.4-32.8) years since diagnosis, patients underwent comprehensive neurocognitive evaluations and brain (18)F-FDG PET imaging during a resting condition. (18)F-FDG PET images were analyzed stereotactically, and pixel values were normalized to global activity. Predefined region-of-interest and voxel-based correlation analyses were performed. Compared with national norms, survivors demonstrated lower vocabulary (P working memory (P < 0.001), oral naming speed (P < 0.001), and cognitive flexibility (P < 0.001). Metabolic activity was higher in basal gangliar structures for those treated with 24 Gy of cranial radiation therapy (P = 0.04). Metabolic activity was positively correlated with oral naming speed in both lateral frontal lobes (ρ = 0.48 and 0.47 for right and left frontal regions, respectively, P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with cognitive flexibility in the sections of the basal ganglia (P < 0.01 for both caudate and putamen). Neurocognitive impairment in long-term survivors of ALL treated with cranial radiation appears to be associated with increased metabolic activity in frontal cerebral cortical and subcortical regions in the basal ganglia, suggesting decreased efficiency of the frontostriatal brain circuit. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. Value and utility of self-monitoring of blood glucose in non-insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) levels provides important information regarding glycemic control for patients with diabetes, and is recommended by European and American diabetes organizations as an essential adjunct to periodic glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level monitoring. The benefits of SMBG in improving glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who are being treated with insulin are well recognized. In contrast, the potential role of SMBG in patients with T2DM not treated with insulin remains controversial, which may lead to underutilization of SMBG in this population. Structured SMBG, introduced as part of a treatment intervention, has been associated with modest but significant improvements in HbA1c levels in patients with T2DM who are not taking insulin as part of their management plan. Patient-obtained readings provide valuable real-time feedback on glucose responses to meals and exercise, and provide the patient with guidance on the day-to-day management of their diabetes. Studies have shown that when patients perform self-monitoring as part of their treatment interventions, support through appropriate educational initiatives is critical to ensure that patients understand the rationale for SMBG. Patients should be trained in correct testing technique and data recording for SMBG, as well as target blood glucose and goal HbA1c levels so that they will know when their SMBG readings are out of range. Technology has a potential role in facilitating SMBG-based interventions by improving patient-physician communication and optimizing glycemic control through the use of remote data uploading, data analysis tools, and, perhaps, even text messaging. This review outlines the benefits of SMBG in the management of patients with T2DM not treated with insulin, and highlights strategies for improving the effectiveness of SMBG-based treatment interventions in this population.

  1. Seismic and Infrasound Characteristics of North Korean Nuclear Explosions Utilizing Regional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, B. W.; Park, J.; Che, I. Y.; Hayward, C.

    2016-12-01

    This work analyzes seismic and infrasound signals from four underground nuclear tests by North Korea in 2006, 2009, 2013, and 2016. Regional data from eight seismo-acoustic arrays, operated by Southern Methodist University (SMU) and Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) located in the Korean peninsula, a seismic station in China (MDJ), and two nearby International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound arrays in Russia (IS45) and Japan (IS30) are used. Infrasound signals at the arrays are detected using the progressive multi-channel correlation (PMCC; Cansi, 1995) followed by analyst review and compared to model predictions based on the method of Blom and Waxler (2012) using Ground-to-Space (G2S) specifications (Drob et al., 2003). This comparison documents that infrasound detection and event locations are dependent on the atmospheric conditions and local noise levels at the time of each explosion. Based on empirical yield-scaling relation of Whitaker et al. (2003), infrasound source energies are estimated at the closest array (KSGAR) to be 0.6, 23.5, and 8.2 tons of TNT for 2009, 2013, and 2016, respectively (no clear observations from 2006). The relative seismic source scaling of the four explosions is assessed using Mueller and Murphy source model (1971) based upon regional seismic station spectral ratios of Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg. Using a grid search method, we explore the range of acceptable source models in terms of depth of burial and yields for 2009/2006, 2013/2006, 2016/2006, 2013/2009, 2016/2009, and 2013/2016. Using this methodology the 2013/2016-yield ratio is from 1.05-1.30 with an estimated depth range from 0.71-1.15. The small infrasound yield is a reflection of the fact that the infrasound signal is a result of coupling from strong ground motion directly above the explosion and the atmosphere. Differences in relative yield ratios for seismic and infrasound provide constraints on source depth as well as free surface interactions.

  2. Utilizing ERTS-A imagery for tectonic analysis through study of Big Horn Mountains region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppin, R. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. MSS scene 1085-17294 of the Big Horn region has been subjected to detailed structural analysis. Band 7 is particularly good for revealing structural and drainage patterns because of enhance topographic detail and the subdued vegetational contrasts. Considerable stereo coverage through sidelap with adjoining scenes adds to the effectiveness of the study and has been used on both positive transparencies and enlarged prints. Negative prints of Band 7 positive transparencies have proven to be much more useful than positive prints because the higher resolution of the positive transparencies can be maintained. The Bighorn Mountains are crisscrossed by a number of prominent topographic linears, most of which can be correlated with known fault and shear zones in the Precambrian crystalline core. Many of these do not appear to continue into the flanking sedimentary rocks and a few that do (Tensleep, Tongue River lineaments) are very difficult to trace farther out into the basins. The Tongue River lineament, long a source of speculation and uncertainty as to its existence, appears as a very prominent discontinuity in the imagery.

  3. Generalized decrease in brain glucose metabolism during fasting in humans studied by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redies, C.; Hoffer, L.J.; Beil, C.; Marliss, E.B.; Evans, A.C.; Lariviere, F.; Marrett, S.; Meyer, E.; Diksic, M.; Gjedde, A.

    1989-06-01

    In prolonged fasting, the brain derives a large portion of its oxidative energy from the ketone bodies, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, thereby reducing whole body glucose consumption. Energy substrate utilization differs regionally in the brain of fasting rat, but comparable information has hitherto been unavailable in humans. We used positron emission tomography (PET) to study regional brain glucose and oxygen metabolism, blood flow, and blood volume in four obese subjects before and after a 3-wk total fast. Whole brain glucose utilization fell to 54% of control (postabsorptive) values (P less than 0.002). The whole brain rate constant for glucose tracer phosphorylation fell to 51% of control values (P less than 0.002). Both parameters decreased uniformly throughout the brain. The 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose lumped constant decreased from a control value of 0.57 to 0.43 (P less than 0.01). Regional blood-brain barrier transfer coefficients for glucose tracer, regional oxygen utilization, blood flow, and blood volume were unchanged.

  4. Deforestation in Gola Forest Region, Sierra Leone: Geospatial Evidence and a Rice Farmer's Expected Utility Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Kpawoh, John Christian

    Global land cover change constitutes the single major threat to ecological systems (Dale, 1997). These changes result from burning (Lavorel et al, 2007), agricultural expansion (Angelsen and Kaimowitz, 1999) and other activities triggered by socio-economic wants. Gola Rainforest National Park (GRNP) in Sierra Leone is under such threat from rice farmers. A 1926-gazetted demarcation established the park boundaries using stone landmarks, which was re-drawn in 1956 due to conflicting interests between the local communities and the British Colonial government. The increasing pressure from arable land-insecure population today has caused these gazetted landmarks to be overrun, compromising the efforts of the government and international organizations to protect the largest tract of forest in Sierra Leone. The incentive-driven interaction of competing land uses lead to inevitable land use change decisions in and around the park (Barbier, 1997), where the park is contextually a tract of forest cover surrounded by agricultural land. Evidence to date shows that land uses around the park have compromised the park's quality as a sustainable forest reserve in the last twenty-five years (1991 - 2016). A major conservation problem relates to forest-edge communities need for arable land to practice their dominant slash-and-burn agriculture. We conduct geospatial analysis from Landsat images and show that there is land cover conversion in the region for the period 1991 - 2016. We hypothesize that rice farmers have driven this conversion. These farmers are risking penalties stipulated in the 2012 NPAA Act to convert forests to agricultural land. Using Erdas Imagine and ArcGIS Pro, we classify two Landsat images (January 1991 and April 2016). We obtain overall accuracy of 88% and 95% for the 1991 and 2016 classifications respectively, which contains four land cover classes, including water, forest, other vegetation/secondary vegetation, and bare land. The quantitative result of this

  5. Relative Seismic Source Scaling of North Korean Nuclear Explosions Utilizing Regional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Che, I.; Hayward, C.; Stump, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    The relative source scaling of the 2006, 2009, and 2013 North Korean nuclear explosions is assessed using a Mueller and Murphy (1971) source model based interpretation of regional seismic station spectral ratios. Analyzing the regional phases, Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg, separately provides source model estimates. Data from the KSRS seismic array in South Korea, MDJ seismic station in China, and the seismo-acoustic arrays: BRDAR, CHNAR, and KSGAR, cooperatively operated by KIGAM and SMU were used. Spectral levels of the second test are 3-4 times more energetic than the first test at low frequencies and become more equal in the 6-9 Hz frequency band as a result of source corner frequency effects. The third explosion is approximately 3 times more energetic than the second test at long periods, and 7-10 times more energetic than the first. A grid search method is used to explore the range of acceptable source models for each explosion resulting in estimates of yield and depth. Explosions that occurred in 2009 and 2013 are analyzed first because they are near one another (~450 m). The search space spanned from 10 to 1010 m at 50 m intervals and from 1.0 to 15.0 kt at 0.5 kt intervals. Summary results from the range of acceptable models are presented in terms of depth and yield ratios for the third to second test. The range of acceptable depth ratios for a goodness-of-fit (GOF) value of less than 10 was from 0.6-2.0 for Pn, 0.6-1.5 for Pg and 0.5-1.3 for both Sn and Lg. The best value (BV), with the smallest GOF, for depth ratios were approximately 1.0 for Pn, 0.9 for Pg, and 0.8 for Sn and Lg. The range estimates for the yield ratios were 2.2-4.0 (BV of 2.7) for Pn, 2.0-3.8 (BV of 2.3) for Pg, and 2.0-3.8 (BV of 2.6) for Sn and Lg. In the case of 2009/2006 explosions, the depth ratios are 0.5-2.8 (BV of 1.2) for Pn and 0.8 - 1.8 (BV of 1.1) for Pg, and the yield ratios are 3.0-6.0 (BV of 4.2) for Pn and 3.3-5.0 (BV of 4.0) for Pg, consistent with result by Kim et al. (2009

  6. The utilization rate of the regional health information exchange: how it impacts on health care delivery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Tiina; Asikainen, Paula; Gissler, Mika; Siponen, Kimmo; Maass, Marianne; Saranto, Kaija; Suominen, Tarja

    2012-01-01

    Interest in improving quality and effectiveness is the primary driver for health information exchange efforts across a health care system to improve the provision of public health care services. The aim here was to describe and identify the impact of a regional health information exchange (HIE) using quantitative statistics for 2004-2008 in one hospital district in Finland. We conducted a comparative, longitudinal 5-year follow-up study to evaluate the utilization rates of HIE, and the impact on health care delivery outcomes. The selected outcomes were total laboratory tests, radiology examinations, appointments, emergency visits, and referrals. The HIE utilization rates increased annually in all 10 federations of municipalities, and the viewing of reference information increased steadily in each professional group over the 5-year study period. In these federations, a significant connection was found to the number of laboratory tests and radiology examinations, with a statistically significant increase in the number of viewed references and use of HIE. The higher the numbers of emergency visits and appointments, the higher the numbers of emergency referrals to specialized care, viewed references, and HIE usage among the groups of different health care professionals. There is increasing interest in HIE usage through regional health information system among health professionals to improve health care delivery regionally and bring information on the patient directly to care delivery. It will be important to study which changes in working methods in the service system are explained by RHIS. Also, the experiences of the change that has taken place should be studied among the different stakeholders, administrative representatives, and patients.

  7. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...... individuals with normal glucose tolerance, normoglycemia can always be maintained by compensatorily increasing AIR in response to decreasing M (and vice versa). This has been mathematically described by the hyperbolic relationship between AIR and M and referred to as glucose homeostasis, with glucose...... concentration assumed to remain constant along the hyperbola. Conceivably, glucose is one of the signals stimulating AIR in response to decreasing M. Hypothetically, as with any normally functioning feed-forward system, AIR should not fully compensate for worsening M, since this would remove the stimulus...

  8. A genetic variant in the seed region of miR-4513 shows pleiotropic effects on lipid and glucose homeostasis, blood pressure, and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Mohsen; de Vries, Paul S; de Looper, Hans; Peters, Marjolein J; Schurmann, Claudia; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Dörr, Marcus; Frayling, Timothy M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Erkeland, Stefan J; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes by post-transcriptional modulation of gene expression. Genetic polymorphisms in miRNA-related genes can potentially contribute to a wide range of phenotypes. The effect of such variants on cardiometabolic diseases has not yet been defined. We systematically investigated the association of genetic variants in the seed region of miRNAs with cardiometabolic phenotypes, using the thus far largest genome-wide association studies on 17 cardiometabolic traits/diseases. We found that rs2168518:G>A, a seed region variant of miR-4513, associates with fasting glucose, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, total cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and risk of coronary artery disease. We experimentally showed that miR-4513 expression is significantly reduced in the presence of the rs2168518 mutant allele. We sought to identify miR-4513 target genes that may mediate these associations and revealed five genes (PCSK1, BNC2, MTMR3, ANK3, and GOSR2) through which these effects might be taking place. Using luciferase reporter assays, we validated GOSR2 as a target of miR-4513 and further demonstrated that the miRNA-mediated regulation of this gene is changed by rs2168518. Our findings indicate a pleiotropic effect of miR-4513 on cardiometabolic phenotypes and may improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiometabolic diseases. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  9. D-galactose/D-glucose-binding Protein from Escherichia coli as Probe for a Non-consuming Glucose Implantable Fluorescence Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabato D’Auria

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available D-Galactose/D-glucose-binding protein from E. coli (GGBP is a monomer thatbinds glucose with high affinity. The protein structure of GGBP is organized in twoprincipal domains linked by a hinge region that form the sugar-binding site. In this workwe show that the mutant form of GGBP at the amino acid position 182 can be utilized as aprobe for the development of a non-consuming analyte fluorescence biosensor to monitorthe glucose level in diabetes health care.

  10. Characterization of combined cross-linked enzyme aggregates from laccase, versatile peroxidase and glucose oxidase, and their utilization for the elimination of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touahar, Imad E; Haroune, Lounès; Ba, Sidy; Bellenger, Jean-Phillipe; Cabana, Hubert

    2014-05-15

    In order to transform a wide range of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), the three oxidative enzymes laccase (Lac) from Trametes versicolor, versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta and glucose oxidase (GOD) from Aspergillus niger were concomitantly cross-linked after aggregation, thus, making a combined cross-linked enzyme aggregate (combi-CLEA) that was versatile and involved in an enzymatic cascade reaction. From the initial enzymes about 30% of initial laccase activity was recovered along with 40% for each of VP and GOD. The combi-CLEA showed good results in conditions close to those of real wastewater (neutral pH and medium temperature) as well as a good ability to resist to denaturing conditions such as high temperature (60°C) and low pH (3). Batch experiments were realized to test the free enzyme's ability to degrade, a PhACs cocktail, mainly in a synthetic wastewater containing acetaminophen, naproxen, mefenamic acid, indometacin, diclofenac, ketoprofen, caffeine, diazepam, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim, fenofibrate and bezafibrate, carbamazepine and its by-product 10-11 epoxy-carbamazepine. High removal was achieved (more than 80%) for the five first compounds. Then, the elimination ability of the combi-CLEA with or without hydrogen peroxide, glucose or manganese sulfate was determined. Globally, our results demonstrated that VP has a wider removal spectrum than Lac. These removal features are enhanced under more specific conditions, whereas the combi-CLEA combined advantages of both VP and laccase. Finally, the elimination of PhACs in a municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent using the combi-CLEA was marginally investigated. Concentrations of most of the selected PhACs were below the limit of quantification (lower than 20 ng/L) except for acetaminophen. Its combi-CLEA-mediated removal reached up to 25%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Project GeoPower: Basic subsurface information for the utilization of geothermal energy in the Danish-German border region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, Reinhard; Balling, Niels; Fuchs, Sven

    and require reliable cross-border management and planning tools. In the framework of the Interreg4a GeoPower project, fundamental geological and geophysical information of importance for the planning of geothermal energy utilization in the Danish-German border region was compiled and analyzed. A 3D geological...... on potential geothermal reservoirs, and a new 3D structural geological model was developed. The interpretation of petrophysical data (core data and well logs) allows to evaluate the hydraulic and thermal rock properties of geothermal formations and to develop a parameterized 3D thermal conductive subsurface...... constant depth intervals (1 km, 2 km, etc.) were compiled. As an example, modelled temperatures for the Middle Buntsandstein geothermal reservoir are shown with temperatures ranging between 24 and 192 °C for depths of interest....

  12. Cell-based land use screening procedure for regional siting analysis. [Utilizing spatial analysis procedures and computer graphics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalbert, J.S.; Dobson, J.E.

    1976-10-03

    An energy facility site-screening methodology which permits the land resource planner to identify candidate siting areas was developed. Through the use of spatial analysis procedures and computer graphics, a selection of candidate areas is obtained. Specific sites then may be selected from among candidate areas for environmental impact analysis. The computerized methodology utilizes a cell-based geographic information system for specifying the suitability of candidate areas for an energy facility. The criteria to be considered may be specified by the user and weighted in terms of importance. Three primary computer programs have been developed. These programs produce thematic maps, proximity calculations, and suitability calculations. Programs are written so as to be transferrable to regional planning or regulatory agencies to assist in rational and comprehensive power plant site identification and analysis.

  13. Novel Signs and Their Clinical Utility in Diagnosing Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS): A Prospective Observational Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttikat, Anoop; Shaikh, Maliha; Oomatia, Amin; Parker, Richard; Shenker, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Delays in diagnosis occur with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). We define and prospectively demonstrate that novel bedside tests measuring body perception disruption can identify patients with CRPS postfracture. The objectives of our study were to define and validate 4 bedside tests, to identify the prevalence of positive tests in patients with CRPS and other chronic pain conditions, and to assess the clinical utility (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value) for identifying CRPS within a Fracture cohort. This was a single UK teaching hospital prospective cohort study with 313 recruits from pain-free volunteers and patients with chronic pain conditions.Four novel tests were Finger Perception (FP), Hand Laterality identification (HL), Astereognosis (AS), and Body Scheme (BS) report. Five questionnaires (Brief Pain Inventory, Upper Extremity Functional Index, Lower Extremity Functional Index, Neglect-like Symptom Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score) assessed the multidimensional pain experience. FP and BS were the best performing tests. Prospective monitoring of fracture patients showed that out of 7 fracture patients (total n=47) who had both finger misperception and abnormal BS report at initial testing, 3 developed persistent pain with 1 having a formal diagnosis of CRPS. Novel signs are reliable, easy to perform, and present in chronic pain patients. FP and BS have significant clinical utility in predicting persistent pain in a fracture group thereby allowing targeted early intervention.

  14. Project GeoPower: Basic subsurface information for the utilization of geothermal energy in the Danish-German border region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Reinhard; Balling, Niels; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Fuchs, Sven; Hese, Fabian; Mathiesen, Anders; Møller Nielsen, Carsten; Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Offermann, Petra; Poulsen, Niels Erik; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Thomsen, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Information on both hydraulic and thermal conditions of the subsurface is fundamental for the planning and use of hydrothermal energy. This is paramount in particular for densely populated international border regions, where different subsurface applications may introduce conflicts of use and require reliable cross-border management and planning tools. In the framework of the Interreg4a GeoPower project, fundamental geological and geophysical information of importance for the planning of geothermal energy utilization in the Danish-German border region was compiled and analyzed. A 3D geological model was developed and used as structural basis for the set-up of a regional temperature model. In that frame, new reflection seismic data were obtained to close local data gaps in the border region. The analyses and reinterpretation of available relevant data (old and new seismic profiles, core and well-log data, borehole data, literature data) and a new time-depth conversion (new velocity model) allowed correlation of seismic profiles across the border. On this basis, new topologically consistent depth and thickness maps for 12 geological/lithological units were drawn, with special emphasis on potential geothermal reservoirs, and a new 3D structural geological model was developed. The interpretation of petrophysical data (core data and well logs) allows to evaluate the hydraulic and thermal rock properties of geothermal formations and to develop a parameterized 3D thermal conductive subsurface temperature model. New local surface heat-flow values (range: 72-84 mW/m²) were determined and predicted temperature were calibrated and validated by borehole temperature observations. Finally, new temperature maps for major geological sections (e.g. Rhaetian/Gassum, Middle Buntsandstein) and selected constant depth intervals (1 km, 2 km, etc.) were compiled. As an example, modelled temperatures for the Middle Buntsandstein geothermal reservoir are shown with temperatures ranging

  15. Red cell glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the northern region of Turkey: is G6PD deficiency exclusively a male disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut

    2015-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive genetic defect that can cause hemolytic crisis. However, this disease affects both males and females. In Turkey, the frequency of this enzyme deficiency was reported to vary, from 0.25 to 18%, by the geographical area. Its prevalence in the northern Black Sea region of Turkey is unknown. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the northern region Turkey in children and adults with hyperbilirubinemia and hemolytic anemia. This report included a total of 976 G6PD enzyme results that were analyzed between May 2005 and January 2014. G6PD deficiency was detected in 5.0% of all patients. G6PD deficiency was significantly less frequent in females (1.9%, 6/323) than in males (6.6%, 43/653). G6PD deficiency was detected in 3.7% of infants with hyperbilirubinemia, 9.2% of children, and 4.5% of adults with hemolytic anemia. In both the newborn group and the group of children, G6PD deficiency was significantly more frequent in males. In the combined group of children (groups I and II), the proportion of males was 74% and 67% in all groups (P = .0008). In conclusion, in northern region of Turkey, G6PD deficiency is an important cause of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and hemolytic crisis in children and adults. This study suggests that most pediatricians thought that G6PD deficiency is exclusively a male disease. For this reason, some female patients may have been undiagnosed.

  16. Spirastrellolide B: the synthesis of southern (C9-C25) region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Srivari; Rambabu, Chegondi; Reddy, Annareddy Syamprasad

    2008-10-02

    A combination of "chiron" and "asymmetric" approaches is utilized to construct the southern (C 9-C 25) region of marine natural product spirastrellolide B. The key functionalities are derived from d-glucose and Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation and dihydroxylation.

  17. Utilization of glucose, blood pressure, and lipid lowering medications among people with type II diabetes in the United States, 1999-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hoi Kin; Ong, Kwok Leung; Cheung, Ching-Lung; Cheung, Bernard M Y

    2014-07-01

    Changes in relation to drug treatment to various control targets for diabetes were studied using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2010. Data on 3094 participants aged 20 years or older with diagnosed type II diabetes were analyzed. Use of medications for lowering glucose, blood pressure, and lipids in the past month was assessed by questionnaire. Data from two survey cycles were combined together to produce estimates for each 4-year period. Usage of metformin increased from 34.8% to 53.8% and was the most prevalent medications during this period (P beta-blockers increased significantly from 7.4% to 21.4% and from 15.3% to 31.8%, respectively from 1999 to 2010 (P ≤ .001). A total of 64.7% of participants could attain blood pressure control by 2007-2010. Usage of statins doubled in 1999-2010 and 52.2% of subjects took statins by 2007-2010 (P diabetes while dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors started to be used since 2007. Blood pressure control improved in 1999-2010 partly due to increased drug prescriptions. Although statins were widely used about half of the participants did not take them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HIV Viral Load Trends in Six Eastern Caribbean Countries Utilizing a Regional Laboratory Referral Service: Implications for Treatment as Prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Clive Landis

    Full Text Available Since 2009, seven countries in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS, Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, have been utilizing a laboratory referral service for HIV-1 viral load (VL offered by The Ladymeade Reference Unit (LRU Laboratory, Barbados. The objective of this study was to evaluate 5 year VL trends in the six larger OECS countries participating in this regional referral service.Blood samples were collected in source countries and transported to Barbados as frozen plasma according to a standardized protocol. Plasma specimens were amplified by RT PCR on a Roche TaqMan 48 analyser (Roche Diagnostics, Panama City, Panama. VL was considered optimally suppressed below a threshold level of < 200 HIV-1 copies/mL of blood. The same threshold was used as a binary indicator in an analysis of the secular change in VL suppression. Montserrat was excluded due to insufficient number of samples.A steady rise in VL referrals from OECS countries was recorded, rising from 312 samples in 2009 to 1,060 samples in 2013. A total of 3,543 samples were tested, with a sample rejection rate (9.2% mostly due to breaks in the cold chain. Aggregate VL data showed the odds of VL suppression in the Eastern Caribbean improved by 66% for each additional year after 2009 (Odds Ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.46 to 1.88]; p<0.001.We demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a regional laboratory referral service for HIV VL monitoring in the Eastern Caribbean. Aggregate VL trends showed a significant year-on-year improvement in VL suppression, implying public health benefits through treatment as prevention in the OECS. VL provides a powerful monitoring & evaluation tool for strengthening HIV programs at country level among the small island states participating in this regional referral network.

  19. HIV Viral Load Trends in Six Eastern Caribbean Countries Utilizing a Regional Laboratory Referral Service: Implications for Treatment as Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, R Clive; Carmichael-Simmons, Kelly; Hambleton, Ian R; Best, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Since 2009, seven countries in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, have been utilizing a laboratory referral service for HIV-1 viral load (VL) offered by The Ladymeade Reference Unit (LRU) Laboratory, Barbados. The objective of this study was to evaluate 5 year VL trends in the six larger OECS countries participating in this regional referral service. Blood samples were collected in source countries and transported to Barbados as frozen plasma according to a standardized protocol. Plasma specimens were amplified by RT PCR on a Roche TaqMan 48 analyser (Roche Diagnostics, Panama City, Panama). VL was considered optimally suppressed below a threshold level of < 200 HIV-1 copies/mL of blood. The same threshold was used as a binary indicator in an analysis of the secular change in VL suppression. Montserrat was excluded due to insufficient number of samples. A steady rise in VL referrals from OECS countries was recorded, rising from 312 samples in 2009 to 1,060 samples in 2013. A total of 3,543 samples were tested, with a sample rejection rate (9.2%) mostly due to breaks in the cold chain. Aggregate VL data showed the odds of VL suppression in the Eastern Caribbean improved by 66% for each additional year after 2009 (Odds Ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.46 to 1.88]; p<0.001). We demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a regional laboratory referral service for HIV VL monitoring in the Eastern Caribbean. Aggregate VL trends showed a significant year-on-year improvement in VL suppression, implying public health benefits through treatment as prevention in the OECS. VL provides a powerful monitoring & evaluation tool for strengthening HIV programs at country level among the small island states participating in this regional referral network.

  20. First evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in vivax malaria endemic regions in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Ji, So-Young; Shin, Hyun-Il; Moon, Jun-Hye; Cho, Shin-Hyung; Lee, Won-Ja; Kim, Jung-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect and affects more than 400 million people worldwide. This deficiency is believed to protect against malaria because its global distribution is similar. However, this genetic disorder may be associated with potential hemolytic anemia after treatment with anti-malarials, primaquine or other 8-aminoquinolines. Although primaquine is used for malaria prevention, no study has previously investigated the prevalence of G6PD variants and G6PD deficiency in the Republic of Korea (ROK). Two commercialized test kits (Trinity G-6-PDH and CareStart G6PD test) were used for G6PD deficiency screening. The seven common G6PD variants were investigated by DiaPlexC kit in blood samples obtained living in vivax malaria endemic regions in the ROK. Of 1,044 blood samples tested using the CareStart G6PD test, none were positive for G6PD deficiency. However, a slightly elevated level of G6PD activity was observed in 14 of 1,031 samples tested with the Trinity G-6-PDH test. Forty-nine of the 298 samples with non-specific amplification by DiaPlexC kit were confirmed by sequencing to be negative for the G6PD variants. No G6PD deficiency was observed using phenotypic- or genetic-based tests in individuals residing in vivax malaria endemic regions in the ROK. Because massive chemoprophylaxis using primaquine has been performed in the ROK military to kill hypnozoites responsible for relapse and latent stage vivax malaria, further regular monitoring is essential for the safe administration of primaquine.

  1. First evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency in vivax malaria endemic regions in the Republic of Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Kyoung Goo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect and affects more than 400 million people worldwide. This deficiency is believed to protect against malaria because its global distribution is similar. However, this genetic disorder may be associated with potential hemolytic anemia after treatment with anti-malarials, primaquine or other 8-aminoquinolines. Although primaquine is used for malaria prevention, no study has previously investigated the prevalence of G6PD variants and G6PD deficiency in the Republic of Korea (ROK. METHODS: Two commercialized test kits (Trinity G-6-PDH and CareStart G6PD test were used for G6PD deficiency screening. The seven common G6PD variants were investigated by DiaPlexC kit in blood samples obtained living in vivax malaria endemic regions in the ROK. RESULTS: Of 1,044 blood samples tested using the CareStart G6PD test, none were positive for G6PD deficiency. However, a slightly elevated level of G6PD activity was observed in 14 of 1,031 samples tested with the Trinity G-6-PDH test. Forty-nine of the 298 samples with non-specific amplification by DiaPlexC kit were confirmed by sequencing to be negative for the G6PD variants. CONCLUSIONS: No G6PD deficiency was observed using phenotypic- or genetic-based tests in individuals residing in vivax malaria endemic regions in the ROK. Because massive chemoprophylaxis using primaquine has been performed in the ROK military to kill hypnozoites responsible for relapse and latent stage vivax malaria, further regular monitoring is essential for the safe administration of primaquine.

  2. Blood Test: Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Glucose What's in ... liver or kidneys) is working. What Is a Glucose Test? A glucose test measures how much glucose ...

  3. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Vitro Diagnostics Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... care settings to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is ...

  4. Glucose Binding Protein as a Novel Optical Glucose Nanobiosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed DWEIK

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of an in vivo optical sensor requires the utilization of Near Infra Red (NIR fluorophores due to their ability to operate within the biological tissue window. Alexa Fluor 750 (AF750 and Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680 were examined as potential NIR fluorophores for an in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET glucose biosensor. AF680 and AF750 found to be a FRET pair and percent energy transfer was calculated. Next, the tested dye pair was utilized in a competitive binding assay in order to detect glucose. Concanavalin A (Con A and dextran have binding affinity, but in the presence of glucose, glucose displaces dextran due to its higher affinity to Con A than dextran. Finally, the percent signal transfer through porcine skin was examined. The results showed with approximately 4.0 mm porcine skin thickness, 1.98 % of the fluorescence was transmitted and captured by the detector.

  5. Double-tracer autoradiographic study of protein synthesis and glucose consumption in rats with focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Balchen, T; Bruhn, T

    1999-01-01

    A double-tracer autoradiographic method for simultaneous measurement of regional glucose utilization (rCMRglc) and regional protein synthesis (PS) in consecutive brain sections is described and applied to study the metabolism of the ischemic penumbra 2 h after occlusion of the middle cerebral....... Neighboring brain sections exposed an X-ray film (3H-insensitive), and a 3H-sensitive for determination of rCMRglc and PS, respectively. Sections for PS determination were washed in trichloroacetic acid (TCA) prior to film exposure in order to remove 14C-deoxyglucose and unincorporated 3H-leucine. Regional...... rates of PS and glucose utilization were measured by densitometric image analysis. Normal rates of metabolism were defined as mean +/- 2 SD of values in the non-ischemic cortex. The volumes of ischemic cortex displaying normal rates of PS and glucose utilization, respectively, were measured...

  6. Hydrological Utility and Uncertainty of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Products in the Mountainous Region of South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Pil Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-derived precipitation can be a potential source of forcing data for assessing water availability and managing water supply in mountainous regions of East Asia. This study investigates the hydrological utility of satellite-derived precipitation and uncertainties attributed to error propagation of satellite products in hydrological modeling. To this end, four satellite precipitation products (tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA version 6 (TMPAv6 and version 7 (TMPAv7, the global satellite mapping of precipitation (GSMaP, and the climate prediction center (CPC morphing technique (CMORPH were integrated into a physically-based hydrologic model for the mountainous region of South Korea. The satellite precipitation products displayed different levels of accuracy when compared to the intra- and inter-annual variations of ground-gauged precipitation. As compared to the GSMaP and CMORPH products, superior performances were seen when the TMPA products were used within streamflow simulations. Significant dry (negative biases in the GSMaP and CMORPH products led to large underestimates of streamflow during wet-summer seasons. Although the TMPA products displayed a good level of performance for hydrologic modeling, there were some over/underestimates of precipitation by satellites during the winter season that were induced by snow accumulation and snowmelt processes. These differences resulted in streamflow simulation uncertainties during the winter and spring seasons. This study highlights the crucial need to understand hydrological uncertainties from satellite-derived precipitation for improved water resource management and planning in mountainous basins. Furthermore, it is suggested that a reliable snowfall detection algorithm is necessary for the new global precipitation measurement (GPM mission.

  7. Integrating Traditional Chinese Medicine Services in Community Health Centers: Insights into Utilization Patterns in the Pearl River Region of China

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    Vincent C. H. Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In China's healthcare reform, community health centers (CHCs are designed to take a pivotal role in providing primary care. Whilst about 20% of all outpatient care in China is delivered by the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM sector, hospitals, instead of CHCs, are major providers. Using current patterns of patient utilization this study aims to inform CHCs on how they may strengthen access to TCM services. Three thousand three hundred and sixty CHC patients from six cities within the urban Pearl Delta Region were enumerated using multistage cluster sampling. Fifty-two percent had visited herbalists within three months with a mean visit frequency of 1.50 times. Herbal treatments, which are cheaper than western medicines, were more popular amongst those who needed to pay out of pocket including the uninsured. Herbal medicines appeared to be an alternative for those who are underinsured. Acupuncturists and massage therapists were visited by smaller proportions, 6.58% and 5.98%, respectively, with a mean three-month visit of 0.27 and 0.26 times. Access was restricted by lack of social insurance coverage. Whilst increasing provision of TCM in CHCs might respond to patient demand, increasing insurance coverage for TCM needs to be evaluated using current evidence on safety and effectiveness.

  8. Chow fed UC Davis strain female Lepr fatty Zucker rats exhibit mild glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, and increased urine volume, all reduced by a Brown Norway strain chromosome 1 congenic donor region.

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    Craig H Warden

    Full Text Available Our objective is to identify genes that influence the development of any phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (T2D or kidney disease in obese animals. We use the reproductively isolated UC Davis fatty Zucker strain rat model in which the defective chromosome 4 leptin receptor (LeprfaSte/faSte results in fatty obesity. We previously produced a congenic strain with the distal half of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway strain (BN on a Zucker (ZUC background (BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90. Previously published studies in males showed that the BN congenic donor region protects from some phenotypes of renal dysfunction and T2D. We now expand our studies to include females and expand phenotyping to gene expression. We performed diabetes and kidney disease phenotyping in chow-fed females of the BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90 congenic strain to determine the specific characteristics of the UC Davis model. Fatty LeprfaSte/faSte animals of both BN and ZUC genotype in the congenic donor region had prediabetic levels of fasting blood glucose and blood glucose 2 hours after a glucose tolerance test. We observed significant congenic strain chromosome 1 genotype effects of the BN donor region in fatty females that resulted in decreased food intake, urine volume, glucose area under the curve during glucose tolerance test, plasma triglyceride levels, and urine glucose excretion per day. In fatty females, there were significant congenic strain BN genotype effects on non-fasted plasma urea nitrogen, triglyceride, and creatinine. Congenic region genotype effects were observed by quantitative PCR of mRNA from the kidney for six genes, all located in the chromosome 1 BN donor region, with potential effects on T2D or kidney function. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the BN genotype chromosome 1 congenic region influences traits of both type 2 diabetes and kidney function in fatty UC Davis ZUC females and that there are many positional candidate genes.

  9. [Effects of acupuncture intervention on expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and C/EBP homologous protein in hippocampal CA 1 region in rats with hyperspasmia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Ma, Yun; Ang, Wen-Ping; Chen, Hao; Du, Wei-Dong; Wu, Sheng-Bing; Lü, Lei; Zhang, Dao-Qin

    2014-08-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture intervention on expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp 78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in the hippocampus in epilepsy rats so as to explore its mechanism underlying improvement of hyperspasmia-induced brain injury. Forty-two SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group (n = 6), model group (n = 18), and acupuncture group (n = 18). The epileptic seizure model was established by intraperitonel injection of Pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg, 2 mL). Manual acupuncture stimulation of "Baihui" (GV 20) and "Dazhui" (GV 14) was conducted for rats of the acupuncture group for 30 min. Two hours (h), 12 h and 48 h after acupuncture intervention, the hippocampal tissue was sampled (6 rats at each time-point). The expression levels of Grp 78 and CHOP proteins in the hippocampal CA 1 region were detected by immunohistochemistry. Compared with the normal group, the expression levels of Grp 78 protein at time-points of 2 h and 12 h, and those of CHOP protein at 2 h, 12 h and 48 h after epilpeptic seizure were significantly increased in the model group (P acupuncture treatment, the expression levels of Grp 78 at 12 and 48 h were significantly increased, and those of CHOP protein at 2 h, 12 h and 24 h in the acupuncture group were considerably downregulated (P Acupuncture treatment can up-regulate Grp 78 protein expression and down-regulate CHOP protein expression level in epilepsy rats , which may contribute to its protective effect on seizure-induced brain injury.

  10. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD defiiency in malaria endemic region of Iran (Sistan and Baluchestan Province: Epidemiological profie and trends over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency in a malarious region of Sistan and Baluchestan Province in south-east of Iran. Methods: A total of 2 997 subjects were selected through a multistage random sampling method from 14 districts of the province. Data were collected by trained interviewers and blood samples taken on filter papers by lab technicians. Filter papers were examined for deficiency of G6PD using the fluorescent spot test. Results: The combined prevalence rate of partial or severe G6PD deficiency was 12% (95% CI: 10.9–13.3 among participants. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency differed by sex, age and residency of participants. Ratio of male to female with G6PD deficiency was 1.4. Age-groups of 40–49 years [13.4% (95% CI: 10.3–17.1] and 50–59 years [13.8% (95% CI: 10.7–17.5] had the highest prevalence of G6PD deficiency in comparison to newborns with prevalence lower than 10% [8.40% (95% CI: 4.4–14.3]. The prevalence rates of G6PD deficiency varied from 3.30% (95% CI: 1.4–6.7 in Zahedan to 17.9% (95% CI: 13.8–22.4 in Chabahar. Conclusions: The present study provided valuable data for health policy makers and those who are involved in malaria elimination program.

  11. Regional glucose hypometabolic spread within the primary motor cortex is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease progression: A fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Endo

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: In patients with ALS, glucose metabolism decreased in the impaired side of the primary motor cortex depending on the clinical symptom progression in the corresponding extremities, regardless of the presence of clinical UMN signs. A decrement in glucose metabolism on FDG-PET corresponding to symptoms in the primary motor cortex might be an indicator of the time-dependent course of ALS neurodegeneration.

  12. A novel N-terminal domain may dictate the glucose response of Mondo proteins.

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    Lisa G McFerrin

    Full Text Available Glucose is a fundamental energy source for both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The balance between glucose utilization and storage is integral for proper energy homeostasis, and defects are associated with several diseases, e.g. type II diabetes. In vertebrates, the transcription factor ChREBP is a major component in glucose metabolism, while its ortholog MondoA is involved in glucose uptake. Both MondoA and ChREBP contain five Mondo conserved regions (MCRI-V that affect their cellular localization and transactivation ability. While phosphorylation has been shown to affect ChREBP function, the mechanisms controlling glucose response of both ChREBP and MondoA remain elusive. By incorporating sequence analysis techniques, structure predictions, and functional annotations, we synthesized data surrounding Mondo family proteins into a cohesive, accurate, and general model involving the MCRs and two additional domains that determine ChREBP and MondoA glucose response. Paramount, we identified a conserved motif within the transactivation region of Mondo family proteins and propose that this motif interacts with the phosphorylated form of glucose. In addition, we discovered a putative nuclear receptor box in non-vertebrate Mondo and vertebrate ChREBP sequences that reveals a potentially novel interaction with nuclear receptors. These interactions are likely involved in altering ChREBP and MondoA conformation to form an active complex and induce transcription of genes involved in glucose metabolism and lipogenesis.

  13. Visualization and quantification of cerebral metabolic fluxes of glucose in awake mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yuki; Honda, Kurara; Kajimura, Mayumi; Suematsu, Makoto

    2014-04-01

    Biotransformation of glucose in organs includes multiple pathways, while quantitative evaluation of percentages of its utilization for individual pathways and their spatial heterogeneity in vivo remain unknown. Imaging MS (IMS) and metabolomics combined with a focused microwave irradiation for rapidly fixing tissue metabolism allowed us to quantify and visualize metabolic fluxes of glucose-derived metabolites in the mouse brain in vivo. At 15 min after the intraperitoneal injection of (13) C6 -labeled glucose, the mouse brain was exposed to focused microwave irradiation, which can stop brain metabolism within 1 s. Quantification of metabolic intermediates containing (13) C atoms revealed that a majority of the (13) C6 -glucose was diverted into syntheses of glutamate, lactate, and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose. IMS showed that regions rich in glutaminergic neurons exhibited a large signal of (13) C2 -labeled glutamate. On the other hand, the midbrain region was enriched with an intensive (13) C6 -labeled UDP-glucose signal, suggesting an active glycogen synthesis. Collectively, application of the current method makes it possible to examine the fluxes of glucose metabolism in a region-specific manner. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Utilizing remote sensing data for modeling water and heat regimes of the Black Earth Region territory of the European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Startseva, Zoya; Uspensky, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Uspensky, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    At present physical-mathematical modeling processes of water and heat exchange between vegetation covered land surfaces and atmosphere is the most appropriate method to describe peculiarities of water and heat regime formation for large territories. The developed model of such processes (Land Surface Model, LSM) is intended for calculation evaporation, transpiration by vegetation, soil water content and other water and heat regime characteristics, as well as distributions of the soil temperature and humidity in depth utilizing remote sensing data from satellites on land surface and meteorological conditions. The model parameters and input variables are the soil and vegetation characteristics and the meteorological characteristics, correspondingly. Their values have been determined from ground-based observations or satellite-based measurements by radiometers AVHRR/NOAA, MODIS/EOS Terra and Aqua, SEVIRI/Meteosat-9, -10. The case study has been carried out for the part of the agricultural Central Black Earth region with coordinates 49.5 deg. - 54 deg. N, 31 deg. - 43 deg. E and a total area of 227,300 km2 located in the steppe-forest zone of the European Russia for years 2009-2012 vegetation seasons. From AVHRR data there have been derived the estimates of three types of land surface temperature (LST): land surface skin temperature Tsg, air-foliage temperature Ta and efficient radiation temperature Ts.eff, emissivity E, normalized vegetation index NDVI, vegetation cover fraction B, leaf area index LAI, cloudiness and precipitation. From MODIS data the estimates of LST Tls, E, NDVI and LAI have been obtained. The SEVIRI data have been used to build the estimates of Tls, Ta, E, LAI and precipitation. Previously developed method and technology of above AVHRR-derived estimates have been improved and adapted to the study area. To check the reliability of the Ts.eff and Ta estimations for named seasons the error statistics of their definitions has been analyzed through

  15. Assessing the influence of forest ownership type and location on roundwood utilization at the stump and top in a region with small-diameter markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Bumgardner; Scott Bowe; Janice. Wiedenbeck

    2013-01-01

    Research conducted in a variety of hardwood regions across the United States has indicated that utilization of small-diameter roundwood is hindered by a lack of markets. Efficient removal of such material could enable silvicultural practices to improve stand conditions and economic return for landowners. However, evidence from other studies has suggested that markets...

  16. An economy-ralated equity analysis of health service utilization by women in economically underdeveloped regions of western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuyan; Zhou, Zhongliang; Yan, Ju'e; Gao, Jianmin; Wang, Yuping; Yang, Xiaowei; Xu, Yongjian; Li, Yanli

    2017-10-27

    The Chinese government has long been committed to eliminating the inequality in the utilization of health services; however, it still lacks an analysis or measurement of the economy-related inequality in the utilization of women's health services. The economy-related utilization of health services in women aged 15 years and above was assessed by the horizontal inequity index of a two-week outpatient rate and annual inpatient rate from the 5th National Health Service Survey of Shaanxi Province. The concentration index of each factor was decomposed into the contribution of each factor to the economic-related inequality of health service utilization based on the Probit regression model. The horizontal inequity indexes of the two-week outpatient rate was 0.0493, and the horizontal inequity indexes of the annual impatient rate was 0.0869. The contributions of economic status to the two indexes were 190.71% and 115.80%, respectively. Economic status, age, basic medical insurance, educational status, marital status, urban/rural area, and self-rated health were the main impact factors that affected the inequality in women's health services utilization in Shaanxi. Health service utilization was different between women with different social demographic characteristics, and unequal health service utilization is evident among women in Shaanxi.

  17. Utilization of remote sensing data on meteorological and vegetation characteristics for modeling water and heat regimes of large agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Startseva, Zoya; Uspensky, Alexander; Volkova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    region. In the frame of this approach the transition from the rainfall intensity estimation to the calculation of their daily sums has been fulfilled at that two variants of this calculation have been realized which focusing on climate researches and operational monitoring. Such transition has required verifying the accuracy of the estimates obtained in both variants at each time step. This verification has included comparison of area distributions of satellite-derived precipitation estimates and analogous estimates obtained by the interpolation of ground-based observation data. The probability of correct precipitation zone detection from satellite data when comparing with ground-based meteorological observations has amounted 75-85 %. In both variants of calculating precipitation for the region of interest in addition to the fields of daily rainfall the fields of their monthly and annual sums have been built. All three sums are consistent with each other and with a ground-based observation data although the satellite-derived estimates are more "smooth" in comparison with ground-based ones. Their discrepancies are in the range of the rainfall estimation errors using the MTM and they are peculiar to the local maxima for which satellite-derived rainfall is less than ground-measured values. This may be due to different scales of space-averaged satellite and point-wise ground-based estimates. To utilize satellite-derived estimates of meteorological and vegetation characteristics in the SVAT model the procedures of replacing the ground-based values of precipitation, LST, LAI and B by corresponding satellite-derived values have been developed taking into account spatial heterogeneity of their fields. The correctness of such replacement has been confirmed by the results of comparing the values of soil water content W and evapotranspiration Ev modeled and measured at agricultural meteorological stations. In particular, when the difference of precipitation sums for the vegetation

  18. Influence of temperature on water and aqueous glucose absorption spectra in the near- and mid-infrared regions at physiologically relevant temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P.S.; Bak, J.; Andersson-Engels, S.

    2003-01-01

    Near- and mid-infrared absorption spectra of pure water and aqueous 1.0 g/dL glucose solutions in the wavenumber range 8000-950 cm(-1) were measured in the temperature range 30-42 C in steps of 2 degreesC. Measurements were carried out with an FT-IR spectrometer and a variable pathlength transmis...

  19. Glucose Transporters in Cardiac Metabolism and Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dan; Tian, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The heart is adapted to utilize all classes of substrates to meet the high-energy demand, and it tightly regulates its substrate utilization in response to environmental changes. Although fatty acids are known as the predominant fuel for the adult heart at resting stage, the heart switches its substrate preference toward glucose during stress conditions such as ischemia and pathological hypertrophy. Notably, increasing evidence suggests that the loss of metabolic flexibility associated with increased reliance on glucose utilization contribute to the development of cardiac dysfunction. The changes in glucose metabolism in hypertrophied hearts include altered glucose transport and increased glycolysis. Despite the role of glucose as an energy source, changes in other nonenergy producing pathways related to glucose metabolism, such as hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and pentose phosphate pathway, are also observed in the diseased hearts. This article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the regulation of glucose transporter expression and translocation in the heart during physiological and pathological conditions. It also discusses the signaling mechanisms governing glucose uptake in cardiomyocytes, as well as the changes of cardiac glucose metabolism under disease conditions. PMID:26756635

  20. Acurácia, utilidade e complicações da monitorização subcutânea contínua da glicose (CGMS em pacientes pediátricos com diabetes tipo 1 Accuracy, utility and complications of continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico F. R. Maia

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a acurácia, utilidade e complicações da monitorização subcutânea contínua da glicemia em crianças e adolescentes com diabetes melito tipo 1 (DM1. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados retrospectivamente 16 pacientes (16,12±4,41 anos, submetidos à monitorização subcutânea contínua da glicemia (Medtronic; Northridge, CA, EUA por 72 horas. Foram analisados os valores de glicemia capilar média e pelo sensor monitorização subcutânea contínua da glicemia; excursões glicêmicas (monitorização subcutânea contínua da glicemia versus. glicemia capilar; hiperglicemia pós-prandial (OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy, utility and complications of continuous glucose monitoring system in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: This retrospective study assessed 16 type 1 diabetic patients (16.12±4.41 years submitted to continuous glucose monitoring system (Medtronic; Northridge, CA for 72 hours. The following parameters were analyzed: mean capillary glucose level and mean glucose value measured by the continuous glucose monitoring system; glucose excursions (continuous glucose monitoring system vs. capillary glucose measurement, postprandial hyperglycemia (NR < 140 mg/dl, nocturnal hypoglycemia, complications (trauma, local infection, disconnection and therapeutic management after continuous glucose monitoring. A1c levels were measured at the beginning and after 3 months of the study. RESULTS: The mean capillary glucose values were 214.3±66.5 mg/dl vs. 207.6±54.6 mg/dl by continuous glucose monitoring system, with a significant correlation (p = 0.001. The correlation coefficient and mean absolute error were 0.86±0.21 and 12.6% of the median, respectively. The continuous glucose monitoring system was significantly more efficient in detecting glucose excursion than fingerstick capillary blood sampling (p = 0.04; W = 74, and postprandial hyperglycemia was identified in 60% of type 1 diabetic patients with a

  1. Regional glucose hypometabolic spread within the primary motor cortex is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease progression: A fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography study

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Hironobu; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Ueda, Takehiro; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Here we investigate the process of neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relationship between the cortical field spreading of glucose metabolic decreases in the primary motor cortex (PMC) and the progression of corresponding extremity dysfunction was evaluated using [18F] fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Patients with ALS underwent [18F] FDG-PET and the resulting datasets were individually contrasted against healthy c...

  2. Pasture utilization in the East Planning Region in Republic of Macedonia and the necessity for determination of their grass composition

    OpenAIRE

    Markova Ruzdik, Natalija; Hristova, Emilija; Zlatkovski, Vasko; Ilieva, Verica; Mitrev, Sasa

    2011-01-01

    East Planning region is established by the Low of Equal Regional Development. It is composed of 11 municipalities and spreads over 3537 km2. There are 217 populated areas out of which 209 are characterized as rural settlements. According to the data by PE of Pasture management gross area under pastures in this Planning region is at level of 86,050 ha, on which 167,958 animals are grazing. Of this figure 25,415 (15,14%) are cattle and 142,513 (84,86%) sheep and goats. Based upon da...

  3. The glucose signaling network in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Ho; Roy, Adhiraj; Jouandot, David; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Most cells possess a sophisticated mechanism for sensing glucose and responsing to it appropriately. Glucose sensing and signaling in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an important paradigm for understanding how extracellular signals lead to changes in the gene expression program in eukaryotes. Scope of review This review focuses on the yeast glucose sensing and signaling pathways that operate in a highly regulated and cooperative manner to bring about glucose-induction of HXT gene expression. Major conclusions The yeast cells possess a family of glucose transporters (HXTs), with different kinetic properties. They employ three major glucose signaling pathways— Rgt2/Snf3, AMPK, and cAMP-PKA—to express only those transporters best suited for the amounts of glucose available. We discuss the current understanding of how these pathways are integrated into a regulatory network to ensure efficient uptake and utilization of glucose. General significance Elucidating the role of multiple glucose signals and pathways involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in yeast may reveal the molecular basis of glucose homeostasis in humans, especially under pathological conditions, such as hyperglycemia in diabetics and the elevated rate of glycolysis observed in many solid tumors. PMID:23911748

  4. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  5. Glucose and cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Mudde, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association and the World Health Organisation have recently redefined the spectrum of abnormal glucose tolerance. The criteria for diabetes mellitus were sharpened and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were classified as intermediate stages

  6. Assessment of the potential utility of different regions of Streptococcus uberis adhesion molecule (SUAM) for mastitis subunit vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrig, Melina Soledad; Veaute, Carolina; Renna, María Sol; Pujato, Nazarena; Calvinho, Luis; Marcipar, Iván; Barbagelata, María Sol

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus uberis is one of the most prevalent pathogens causing clinical and subclinical mastitis worldwide. Among bacterial factors involved in intramammary infections caused by this organism, S. uberis adhesion molecule (SUAM) is one of the main virulence factors identified. This molecule is involved in S. uberis internalization to mammary epithelial cells through lactoferrin (Lf) binding. The objective of this study was to evaluate SUAM properties as a potential subunit vaccine component for prevention of S. uberis mastitis. B epitope prediction analysis of SUAM sequence was used to identify potentially immunogenic regions. Since these regions were detected all along the gene, this criterion did not allow selecting a specific region as a potential immunogen. Hence, four fractions of SUAM (-1fr, 2fr, 3fr and 4fr), comprising most of the protein, were cloned and expressed. Every fraction elicited a humoral immune response in mice as predicted by bioinformatics analysis. SUAM-1fr generated antibodies with the highest recognition ability towards SUAM native protein. Moreover, antibodies against SUAM-1fr produced the highest proportion of internalization inhibition of S. uberis to mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, SUAM immunogenic and functionally relevant regions were identified and allowed to propose SUAM-1fr as a potential candidate for a subunit vaccine for S. uberis mastitis prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Analysis of the Association between Regional Deprivation and Utilization: An Assessment of Need for Physicians in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopetsch, T; Maier, W

    2018-01-01

    A new strategy for planning outpatient medical care needs to be developed. The social and morbidity structure of the population should be considered in the planning of needs-based provision of medical care. This paper aims to examine the extent to which the degree of regional deprivation can be incorporated in the calculation of the regional requirements for specialists in Germany. To measure regional deprivation status at district level, we used the "German Index of Multiple Deprivation" (GIMD) developed in the Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health. Scores were calculated for the deprivation status of each rural and urban district in Germany. The methods used to compute the deprivation-adjusted medical need are linear regression analyses. The analyses were based on regionalized data for the number of office-based physicians and their billing data. The analyses were carried out with the SPSS software package, version 20. The analyses showed a clear positive correlation between regional deprivation and the utilisation of medical services both for outpatients and in-patients, on the one hand, and mortality and morbidity, as measured by the risk adjustment factor (RSA), on the other. At the district level, the analyses also revealed varying associations between the degree of deprivation and the utilisation of the 12 groups of specialists included in the needs assessment. On this basis, an algorithm was developed by which deprivation at district level can be used to calculate an increase or a decrease in the relative number of specialists needed. Using the GIMD and various determinants of medical utilisation, the model showed that medical need increased with the level of regional deprivation. However, regarding SHI medical specialist groups, the associations found in this analysis were statistically (R 2 ) insufficient to suggest a needs assessment planning system based only on the factors analysed, thereby restricting physicians

  8. Body Height and its Estimation Utilizing Arm Span Measurements in Female Adolescents from Southern Region in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajko Milašinović

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the body height in Montenegrin female adolescents from southern region as well as the relationship between arm span as an alternative to estimating the body height, which would vary from region to region in Montenegro. Our investigation analyses 139 female adolescents from the southern region in Montenegro. The anthropometric measurements were taken according to the protocol of the ISAK. Means and standard deviations regarding the anthropometric measurements were obtained. A comparison of means of body heights and arm spans within this gender group were carried out using a t-test. The relationships between body height and arm span were determined using simple correlation coefficients and their 95% confidence interval. Then a linear regression analysis was performed to examine the extent to which the arm span can reliably predict body height. The results displayed that female Southern-Montenegrins are 168.73±6.79 cm tall and have an arm span of 167.23±7.79 cm. Compared to other studies, the results of this study have shown that this gender made Southern- Montenegrins the tall population, taller than female population across the Europe and the rest of World. On the other hand, expectably, the arm span reliably predicts body height in this gender. However, the estimation equations which have been obtained in Southern-Montenegrins are, different alike in general population, since arm span was shorter than the body heights (1.50±1.00 centimetres, much more than in general population. This study also confirms the necessity for developing separate height models for each region in Montenegro.

  9. Body Height and its Estimation Utilizing Arm Span Measurements in Male Adolescents from Southern Region in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajko Milašinović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the body height in Montenegrin male adolescents from southern region as well as the relationship between arm span as an alternative to estimating the body height, which would vary from region to region in Montenegro. Our investigation analyses 87 male adolescents from the southern region in Montenegro. The anthropometric measurements were taken according to the protocol of the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK. Means and standard deviations regarding the anthropometric measurements were obtained. The relationships between body height and arm span were determined using simple correlation coefficients and their 95% confidence interval. Then a linear regression analysis was performed to examine the extent to which the arm span can reliably predict body height. The results displayed that male Southern-Montenegrins are 182.53±7.53 cm tall and have an arm span of 184.55±9.03 cm. Compared to other studies, the results of this study have shown that this gender made Southern- Montenegrins the tall population, taller than most of nation around the Europe. On the other hand, expectably, the arm span reliably predicts body height in this gender. However, the estimation equations which have been obtained in Southern-Montenegrins are, different alike in general population, since arm span was closer to body heights (2.03±1.50 cm, more than in general population. Hence, this study also confirms the necessity for developing separate height models for each region in Montenegro.

  10. Body Height and Its Estimation Utilizing Arm Span Measurements of both Gender Adolescents from Central Region in Kosovo

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    Fitim Arifi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on measurements of Central region Kosovar adolescents. The aim of this study was to examine the Body Height of adolescents from Central region as well relationship between arm span and Body Height in both Kosovar genders. A total measured subject participated in this research was 193 out of which (93 girls and 100 boys, females average of age is 18.15±0.35 years old (range 18-20 years and for male 18.26±0.44 years old (range 18-20 years. The anthropometric measurements were done by trained people and were taken according to the ISAK manual. Relationship between Body Height and arm span has been analyzed by the simple correlation coefficient at a 95% confidence interval. The linear regression analysis was carried out to examine extent to which arm span can reliably predict of Body Height. Statistical importance was placed at level p<0.05. As a result anthropometric measurements for both sexes showed that the average of Body Height for boys adolescents from Central region are 180.62±5.88 centimeters and have the arm span average of 181.36±7.08 centimeters, while girls from Central 166.77±4.71 centimeters tall, and have the arm span average of 167.08±5.03 centimeters. The results have shown that the arm span was estimated as a reliable indicator of Body Height assessment to the both genders adolescents from Central region of Kosovo population. This study also confirms the necessity for developing separate height models for each region in Kosovo.

  11. Predictive Utility of Marketed Volumetric Software Tools in Subjects at Risk for Alzheimer Disease: Do Regions Outside the Hippocampus Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpitukpongse, T P; Mazurowski, M A; Ikhena, J; Petrella, J R

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease. Computer assessment of brain atrophy patterns can help predict conversion to Alzheimer disease. Our aim was to assess the prognostic efficacy of individual-versus-combined regional volumetrics in 2 commercially available brain volumetric software packages for predicting conversion of patients with mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease. Data were obtained through the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. One hundred ninety-two subjects (mean age, 74.8 years; 39% female) diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment at baseline were studied. All had T1-weighted MR imaging sequences at baseline and 3-year clinical follow-up. Analysis was performed with NeuroQuant and Neuroreader. Receiver operating characteristic curves assessing the prognostic efficacy of each software package were generated by using a univariable approach using individual regional brain volumes and 2 multivariable approaches (multiple regression and random forest), combining multiple volumes. On univariable analysis of 11 NeuroQuant and 11 Neuroreader regional volumes, hippocampal volume had the highest area under the curve for both software packages (0.69, NeuroQuant; 0.68, Neuroreader) and was not significantly different ( P > .05) between packages. Multivariable analysis did not increase the area under the curve for either package (0.63, logistic regression; 0.60, random forest NeuroQuant; 0.65, logistic regression; 0.62, random forest Neuroreader). Of the multiple regional volume measures available in FDA-cleared brain volumetric software packages, hippocampal volume remains the best single predictor of conversion of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease at 3-year follow-up. Combining volumetrics did not add additional prognostic efficacy. Therefore, future prognostic studies in mild cognitive impairment, combining such tools with demographic and other biomarker measures, are justified in using hippocampal volume as

  12. Utilizing Vegetation Indices as a Proxy to Characterize the Stability of a Railway Embankment in a Permafrost Region

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    Priscilla Addison

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Degrading permafrost conditions around the world are posing stability issues for infrastructure constructed on them. Railway lines have exceptionally low tolerances for differential settlements associated with permafrost degradation due to the potential for train derailments. Railway owners with tracks in permafrost regions therefore make it a priority to identify potential settlement locations so that proper maintenance or embankment stabilization measures can be applied to ensure smooth and safe operations. The extensive discontinuous permafrost zone along the Hudson Bay Railway (HBR in Northern Manitoba, Canada, has been experiencing accelerated deterioration, resulting in differential settlements that necessitate continuous annual maintenance to avoid slow orders and operational interruptions. This paper seeks to characterize the different permafrost degradation susceptibilities present at the study site. Track geometry exceptions were compared against remotely sensed vegetation indices to establish a relationship between track quality and vegetation density. This relationship was used as a proxy for subsurface condition verified by electrical resistivity tomography. The established relationship was then used to develop a three-level degradation susceptibility chart to indicate low, moderate and high susceptibility regions. The defined susceptibility regions can be used to better allocate the limited maintenance resources and also help inform potentially long-term stabilization measures for the severely affected sections.

  13. CSF glucose test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 ... Abnormal results include higher and lower glucose levels. Abnormal ... or fungus) Inflammation of the central nervous system Tumor

  14. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know ... Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C and eAG Hypoglycemia (Low blood glucose) Hyperglycemia (High blood glucose) Dawn Phenomenon Checking for Ketones Tight ...

  15. Determinants of modern contraceptive utilization among married women of reproductive age group in North Shoa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdurahman; Woldeyohannes, Desalegn; Feleke, Amsalu; Megabiaw, Berihun

    2014-02-03

    Ethiopia is the second most populous country in Africa with high fertility and fast population growth rate. It is also one of the countries with high maternal and child mortality rate in sub-Saharan Africa Family planning is a crucial strategy to halt the fast population growth, to reduce child mortality and improve maternal health (Millennium Development Goal 4 and 5). Therefore, this study aimed to assess the prevalence and determinants of modern contraceptive utilization among married women of reproductive age group. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from August 15 to September 1, 2010 among married women aged 15-49 years in Debre Birhan District. Multistage sampling technique was used to select a total of 851 study participants. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used for gathering data. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed using SPSS version 16.0 statistical package. Modern contraceptive prevalence rate among currently married women was 46.9%. Injectable contraceptives were the most frequently used methods (62.9%), followed by intrauterine device (16.8%), pills (14%), norplant (4.3%), male condom (1.2%) and female sterilization (0.8%). Multiple logistic regression model revealed that the need for more children (AOR 9.27, 95% CI 5.43-15.84), husband approve (AOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.67-4.80), couple's discussion about family planning issues (AOR 7.32, 95% CI 3.60-14.86). Similarly, monthly family income and number of living children were significantly associated with the use of modern contraceptives. Modern contraceptive use was high in the district. Couple's discussion and husband approval of contraceptives use were significantly associated with the use of modern contraceptives. Therefore, district health office and concerned stakeholders should focus on couples to encourage communication and male involvement for family planning.

  16. Determinants of modern contraceptive utilization among married women of reproductive age group in North Shoa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethiopia is the second most populous country in Africa with high fertility and fast population growth rate. It is also one of the countries with high maternal and child mortality rate in sub-Saharan Africa Family planning is a crucial strategy to halt the fast population growth, to reduce child mortality and improve maternal health (Millennium Development Goal 4 and 5). Therefore, this study aimed to assess the prevalence and determinants of modern contraceptive utilization among married women of reproductive age group. Methods A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from August 15 to September 1, 2010 among married women aged 15–49 years in Debre Birhan District. Multistage sampling technique was used to select a total of 851 study participants. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used for gathering data. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed using SPSS version 16.0 statistical package. Results Modern contraceptive prevalence rate among currently married women was 46.9%. Injectable contraceptives were the most frequently used methods (62.9%), followed by intrauterine device (16.8%), pills (14%), norplant (4.3%), male condom (1.2%) and female sterilization (0.8%). Multiple logistic regression model revealed that the need for more children (AOR 9.27, 95% CI 5.43-15.84), husband approve (AOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.67-4.80), couple’s discussion about family planning issues (AOR 7.32, 95% CI 3.60-14.86). Similarly, monthly family income and number of living children were significantly associated with the use of modern contraceptives. Conclusion Modern contraceptive use was high in the district. Couple’s discussion and husband approval of contraceptives use were significantly associated with the use of modern contraceptives. Therefore, district health office and concerned stakeholders should focus on couples to encourage communication and male involvement for family planning. PMID:24490810

  17. The complete control of glucose level utilizing the composition of ketogenic diet with the gluconeogenesis inhibitor, the anti-diabetic drug metformin, as a potential anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksyszyn, Józef

    2011-08-01

    In the animal models of glucose dependent cancer growth, the growth is decreased 15-30% through the use of low-carbohydrate, calorically restricted and/or ketogenic diet. The remaining growth depends on glucose formed by the liver-kidney gluconeogenesis as is the case in the cancer cachexia. It is hypothesized that a new treatment for cancer diseases should be explored which includes the ketogenic diet combined with the inhibition of gluconeogenesis by the anti-diabetic drug metformin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Specific Mutation in the Promoter Region of the Silent cel Cluster Accounts for the Appearance of Lactose-Utilizing Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solopova, Ana; Bachmann, Herwig; Teusink, Bas; Kok, Jan; Neves, Ana Rute

    2012-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis laboratory strain MG1363 has been described to be unable to utilize lactose. However, in a rich medium supplemented with lactose as the sole carbon source, it starts to grow after prolonged incubation periods. Transcriptome analyses showed that L. lactis MG1363 Lac+ cells expressed celB, encoding a putative cellobiose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS) IIC component, which is normally silent in MG1363 Lac− cells. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the cel cluster of a Lac+ isolate revealed a change from one of the guanines to adenine in the promoter region. We showed here that one particular mutation, taking place at increased frequency, accounts for the lactose-utilizing phenotype occurring in MG1363 cultures. The G-to-A transition creates a −10 element at an optimal distance from the −35 element. Thus, a fully active promoter is created, allowing transcription of the otherwise cryptic cluster. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy results show that MG1363 Lac+ uses a novel pathway of lactose utilization. PMID:22660716

  19. Perlites from East Mediterranean region: a comparative study of perlite quality characteristics and their utilization in the construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasatou, Marianthi; Stamatakis, Michael; Ipsilanti, Elena

    2014-05-01

    A comparative study of perlite deposits of the East Mediterranean Region is performed, in order to identify the factors that control their expansion capacity, and hence their suitability for certain industrial and environmental applications. Perlite deposits are methodically studied worldwide because of the unique characteristics each particular deposit has and the impact that perlite has to the global economy of industrial minerals. More than 100 perlite-based products exist in the Market. Perlite is a volcanic glass-rich rock, mainly used in its expanded state. It is characterized as a lightweight aggregate with significant thermal and acoustic insulation properties. For the purposes of our study, perlite bulk samples originated from quarries in Milos Island, Greece, Sardinia Island, Italy, Kardjali region, Bulgaria, and Bergama region, Turkey were characterized and tested. The geological age of the deposits varies from Oligocene (Kardjali and Bergama) through Plio-Pleistocene (Milos). From the locations above, fourteen representative bulk samples of 10kg each were studied: Mineralogically by light microscopy [LM], XRD and SEM analysis, and TG/DTA analysis. Chemically (major and trace elements analysis) by XRF and ICP-MS methods. In addition, moisture, Loss on Ignition [LOI], pH and soluble substances (Na, K, Cl) were measured. The XRD analysis revealed that the main phase in all samples is the volcanic glass, distinguished by the broad hump at 19-26 degrees in the XRD pattern. However, some glasses contain embryonic opal-CT phase. Other mineral phases identified are feldspars, quartz and mafic minerals. LM studies revealed that the Kardjali perlite has de-vitrification texture, whereas Milos perlite is almost fresh. Milos samples are richer in Si, Ca, Na, Li and poorer in Th, U, K, Rb and LOI than the other samples. Furthermore, Sardinia samples are richer in REE than the rest of the samples. Tests on the expansion capacity of perlite grains 0.5-1.2mm in size

  20. Environmental effects of shifts in a regional heating mix through variations in the utilization of solid biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Christian; Klein, Daniel; Richter, Klaus; Weber-Blaschke, Gabriele

    2016-07-15

    Solid Biofuels, i.e. wood, play an important role in present and future national and global climate change mitigation policies. Wood energy, while displaying favorable properties for the mitigation of climate change also exhibits several drawbacks, such as potentially high emission of particulate matter. To assess the environmental effects of shifts in the heating mix, emission factors of the comprising energy carriers and the Bavarian heating mix were determined. Through the application of regionalized substitution percentiles the environmental effects caused by shifts in the amount of final energy provided by solid biofuels could be identified. For this purpose, four scenarios, based on political and scientific specifications were assessed. In 2011 a total amount of 663.715 TJ of final energy was used for the provision of heat in Bavaria, with solid biofuels exhibiting the third largest share of 12.6% (83% of renewable heat). Environmental effects were evaluated through life cycle assessments assessing the impact categories of Global Warming (GW), Particulate Matter emissions (PM), Freshwater Eutrophication (ET) and Acidification (AC). Additionally, the non-renewable primary energy consumption (PE) was analyzed. The heating mix in Bavaria (Baseline) causes emissions of 49.6 Mt CO2-eq. * yr(-1)(GW), 14.555 t of PM2.5-eq. * yr(-1) (PM), 873.4 t P-eq. * yr(-1) (ET), and 82.299 kmol H(+) eq. * yr(-1) (AC), for which 721,745 TJ of primary energy were expended. Current policies entail a GHG reduction potential of approximately 1 Mt CO2-eq. * yr(-1) while increasing the amount of energy wood by 15%. The maximum, hypothetical share of solid biofuels of the heating mix cannot surpass 25%, while the climate change mitigation performance of the current use of solid biofuels is approximately 6.4 Mt CO2-eq. * yr(-1). GHG-emissions would be 13% higher and PM emissions 77% lower without this energetic use of wood. Furthermore, our calculations allow for new specified

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Saskatchewan, Canada: utility of NG-MAST in predicting antimicrobial susceptibility regionally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Sidharath D; Levett, Paul N; Horsman, Gregory B; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiology of isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from Saskatchewan, Canada, using Neisseria gonorrhoeae multi antigen sequence typing (NG-MAST), and to assess associations between antimicrobial susceptibility (AMS) and specific strain types (STs). 320 consecutive gonococcal isolates, collected between 2003 and 2008, were typed by NG-MAST. STs were grouped if one of their alleles was common and the other differed by ≤1% in DNA sequence. AMS was determined by agar dilution (CLSI) to seven antibiotics. N gonorrhoeae isolates were resolved into 82 individual NG-MAST STs and 18 NG-MAST ST groups with groups 25, 3655, 921, 3654, 3657 and 3656 comprising 53.4% (171/320) of the isolates. N gonorrhoeae isolates susceptible to all the tested antimicrobials were significantly (pgonorrhoeae AMS and NG-MAST STs were identified and may be useful in predicting AMS regionally. Because STs in different countries vary considerably, the use of NG-MAST for the prediction of AMS globally requires further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Factors Affecting Farmers’ Decision to Enter Agricultural Cooperatives Using Random Utility Model in the South Eastern Anatolian Region of Turkey

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    Bahri Karlı

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Farmers’ decision and perceptions to be a member of agricultural cooperatives in the South Eastern Anatolian Region were investigated. Factors affecting the probability of joining the agricultural cooperatives were determined using binary logit model. The model released that most of variables such as education, high communication, log of gross income, farm size, medium and high technology variables play important roles in determining the probability of entrance. Small farmers are likely expected to join the agricultural cooperatives than the wealthier farmers are. Small farmers may wish to benefit cash at hand, input subsidies, and services provided by the agricultural cooperatives since the risks associated with intensive high-returning crops are high. Some important factors playing pole role in abstention of farmers towards agricultural cooperatives are gross income and some social status variables. In addition, conservative or orthodox farmers are less likely to join agricultural cooperatives than moderate farmers are. We also found that the direct government farm credit programs mainly should be objected to providing farmers to better access to capital markets and creating the opportunity to use with allocation of capital inputs via using modern technology.

  3. Utility of mtDNA-COI Barcode Region for Phylogenetic Relationship and Diagnosis of Five Common Pest Cockroaches

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    Saedeh Sadat Hashemi-Aghdam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cockroaches are of vital importance medically and hygienically as they can disperse human patho­genic agents and are especially responsible for food contamination and spreading of food borne pathogens. In this study, part of mtDNA-COI gene of five common pest cockroaches was tested for diagnostic and phylogenetic pur­poses.Methods: We have described barcode region of mtDNA-COI gene of five cockroach species: Blattella germanica, Blatta orientalis, Periplaneta americana, Shelfordella lateralis, and Supella longipalpa, along with the development of a PCR-RFLP method for rapid detection and differentiation of these health pest species.Results: The PCR generates a single 710 bp-sized amplicon in all cockroach specimens, followed by direct se­quencing. AluI predicted from the sequencing data provided different RFLP profiles among five species. There was a significant intra-species variation within the American cockroach populations, but no genetic variation within other species. Accordingly, phylogenetic analysis demonstrates common monophyly for cockroach families in agreement with conventional taxonomy. However S. longipalpa (Ectobiidae diverged as an early ancestor of other cockroaches and was not associated with other Ectobiidae.Conclusion: The PCR-RFLP protocol might be useful when the conventional taxonomic methods are not able to identify specimens, particularly when only small body parts of specimens are available or they are in a decaying condition. mtDNA-COI gene shows potentially useful for studying phylogenetic relationships of Blattodea order.

  4. Utility of mtDNA-COI Barcode Region for Phylogenetic Relationship and Diagnosis of Five Common Pest Cockroaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi-Aghdam, Saedeh Sadat; Rafie, Golnaz; Akbari, Sanaz; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-06-01

    Cockroaches are of vital importance medically and hygienically as they can disperse human pathogenic agents and are especially responsible for food contamination and spreading of food borne pathogens. In this study, part of mtDNA-COI gene of five common pest cockroaches was tested for diagnostic and phylogenetic purposes. We have described barcode region of mtDNA-COI gene of five cockroach species: Blattella germanica, Blatta orientalis, Periplaneta americana, Shelfordella lateralis, and Supella longipalpa, along with the development of a PCR-RFLP method for rapid detection and differentiation of these health pest species. The PCR generates a single 710 bp-sized amplicon in all cockroach specimens, followed by direct sequencing. AluI predicted from the sequencing data provided different RFLP profiles among five species. There was a significant intra-species variation within the American cockroach populations, but no genetic variation within other species. Accordingly, phylogenetic analysis demonstrates common monophyly for cockroach families in agreement with conventional taxonomy. However S. longipalpa (Ectobiidae) diverged as an early ancestor of other cockroaches and was not associated with other Ectobiidae. The PCR-RFLP protocol might be useful when the conventional taxonomic methods are not able to identify specimens, particularly when only small body parts of specimens are available or they are in a decaying condition. mtDNA-COI gene shows potentially useful for studying phylogenetic relationships of Blattodea order.

  5. Health Extension Workers' and Mothers' Attitudes to Maternal Health Service Utilization and Acceptance in Adwa Woreda, Tigray Region, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Jackson

    Full Text Available The maternal health system in Ethiopia links health posts in rural communities (kebeles with district (woreda health centres, and health centres with primary hospitals. At each health post two Health Extension Workers (HEWs assist women with birth preparedness, complication readiness, and mobilize communities to facilitate timely referral to mid-level service providers. This study explored HEWs' and mother's attitudes to maternal health services in Adwa Woreda, Tigray Region.In this qualitative study, we trained 16 HEWs to interview 45 women to gain a better understanding of the social context of maternal health related behaviours. Themes included barriers to health services; women's social status and mobility; and women's perceptions of skilled birth attendant's care. All data were analyzed thematically.There have been substantial efforts to improve maternal health and reduce maternal mortality in Adwa Woreda. Women identified barriers to healthcare including distance and lack of transportation due to geographical factors; the absence of many husbands due to off-woreda farming; traditional factors such as zwar (some pregnant women are afraid of meeting other pregnant women, and discouragement from mothers and mothers-in-law who delivered their children at home. Some women experienced disrespectful care at the hospital. Facilitators to skilled birth attendance included: identification of pregnant women through Women's Development Groups (WDGs, and referral by ambulance to health facilities either before a woman's Expected Due Date (EDD or if labour started at home.With the support of WDGs, HEWs have increased the rate of skilled birth attendance by calling ambulances to transfer women to health centres either before their EDD or when labour starts at home. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that health workers at the community level can work with women's groups to improve maternal health, thus reducing the need for emergency

  6. Climate change effects on extreme flows of water supply area in Istanbul: utility of regional climate models and downscaling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Fatih; Yucel, Ismail

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the climate change impact on the changes of mean and extreme flows under current and future climate conditions in the Omerli Basin of Istanbul, Turkey. The 15 regional climate model output from the EU-ENSEMBLES project and a downscaling method based on local implications from geophysical variables were used for the comparative analyses. Automated calibration algorithm is used to optimize the parameters of Hydrologiska Byråns Vattenbalansavdel-ning (HBV) model for the study catchment using observed daily temperature and precipitation. The calibrated HBV model was implemented to simulate daily flows using precipitation and temperature data from climate models with and without downscaling method for reference (1960-1990) and scenario (2071-2100) periods. Flood indices were derived from daily flows, and their changes throughout the four seasons and year were evaluated by comparing their values derived from simulations corresponding to the current and future climate. All climate models strongly underestimate precipitation while downscaling improves their underestimation feature particularly for extreme events. Depending on precipitation input from climate models with and without downscaling the HBV also significantly underestimates daily mean and extreme flows through all seasons. However, this underestimation feature is importantly improved for all seasons especially for spring and winter through the use of downscaled inputs. Changes in extreme flows from reference to future increased for the winter and spring and decreased for the fall and summer seasons. These changes were more significant with downscaling inputs. With respect to current time, higher flow magnitudes for given return periods will be experienced in the future and hence, in the planning of the Omerli reservoir, the effective storage and water use should be sustained.

  7. Characterization of corn landraces planted grown in the campos gerais region (Paraná, Brazil for industrial utilization

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    Alessandra Teixeira Barbosa Pinto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This work has the objective of characterizing twenty corn landraces grown in the Campos Gerais region (Paraná State in relation to its chemical composition (moisture, ash, protein, ether extract, dietary fiber and starch and physical properties (weight of 1000 grains, real density, flotation index, granulometry and color. In addition, also the lab scale processing of the kernels from the varieties was carried out for producing starch; starch purity was evaluated by measuring its protein contamination. Amylose contents and viscoamylograph profile were also evaluated. The results showed that the evaluated landraces have differences in chemical composition as well as in pericarp/endosperm/germ proportions and consequently it should have different industrial applications and interest for plant breeding.Esse trabalho teve o objetivo de caracterizar vinte variedades de milho crioulo cultivadas na região dos Campos Gerais (Estado do Paraná em relação a sua composição química (umidade, cinzas, proteína, extrato etéreo, fibra alimentar e amido e propriedades físicas (peso de 1000 grãos, densidade real, índice de flotação, granulometria e cor Além disso, foi feito o processamento dos grãos em escala de laboratório para a extração do amido, sendo mensurado o teor de proteína. Foram avaliados os conteúdos de amilose e o perfil viscoamilográfico. Os resultados mostraram que os milhos apresentaram diferentes composições químicas e proporções pericarpo/endosperma/ gérmen e consequentemente podem ter diferentes aplicações industriais e interesse ao melhoramento de plantas.

  8. Utility of Tru-Cut Biopsy of Breast Lesions - An Experience in a Regional Cancer Center of a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samantaray, Sagarika; Panda, Niharika; Besra, Kusumabati; Pattanayak, Lucy; Samantara, Subrat; Dash, Sashibhusan

    2017-03-01

    Tru-cut Needle Biopsy (TCB) is an integral part of triple assessment of breast cancer, which includes clinical assessment, mammography and TCB or Core Needle Biopsy (CNB). The technique is reliable, simple, and reproducible, and inexpensive, which can be adapted even for low-income group of patients and in developing countries. This study was done to establish the efficacy of TCB of palpable breast lesions in a developing country where mammography is not possible in all cases. A retrospective analysis of 892 TCBs was done in AH Regional Cancer Centre, Cuttack, Odisha, India where TCBs were performed in patients presenting to outpatient department with palpable breast lesions. The H&E stained sections were interpreted by pathologists of the same centre. Diagnosis was classified into different categories. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Estrogen Receptor (ER), Progesterone Receptor (PR) and Her-2/neu was done and interpreted by Allred scoring system. A total 892 TCBs were analysed with 23 repeat TCBs. There were 13 (1.4%) male patients. A total of 747 cases (83.6%) were diagnosed as malignant, including 735 carcinomas, nine malignant phyllodes tumour, two angiosarcoma and one case of Non-Hodgkin' Lymphoma (NHL). It was possible to diagnose special histological types such as lobular carcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma and mucinous carcinoma on TCB. A total of 21 cases were diagnosed as carcinoma on repeat biopsy. Eight of the 735 TCBs diagnosed as carcinoma were bilateral breast cancers, hence actual number of carcinoma cases were 727. IHC was done successfully on the paraffin blocks in 260 cases. In this series out of 727 patients of carcinomas 30% were in young, i.e., below 40 years of age, including four cases of carcinoma below 20 years. There were no false positive case in this study giving a specificity of 100% and sensitivity was 97%. TCBs are well tolerated by patients, can be done in OPDs and reduce cost. It is possible to give histological diagnosis of carcinoma

  9. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GAB2 HAPLOTYPE AND HIGHER GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE-AFFECTED BRAIN REGIONS IN COGNITIVELY NORMAL APOEε4 CARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Winnie S.; Chen, Kewei; Lee, Wendy; Sidhar, Kunal; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Allen, April N.; Myers, Amanda; Villa, Stephen; Meechoovet, Bessie; Pruzin, Jeremy; Bandy, Daniel; Fleisher, Adam S.; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Jensen, Kendall; Dunckley, Travis; Caselli, Richard J.; Kaib, Susan; Reiman, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), we found an association between common haplotypes of the GAB2 gene and AD risk in carriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, the major late-onset AD susceptibility gene. We previously proposed the use of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measurements as a quantitative presymptomatic endophenotype, more closely related to disease risk than the clinical syndrome itself, to help evaluate putative genetic and non-genetic modifiers of AD risk. In this study, we examined the relationship between the presence or absence of the relatively protective GAB2 haplotype and PET measurements of regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in several AD-affected brain regions in 158 cognitively normal late-middle-aged APOEε4 homozygotes, heterozygotes, and non-carriers. GAB2 haplotypes were characterized using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array data from each of these subjects. As predicted, the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype was associated with higher regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in AD-affected brain regions in APOEε4 carriers. While additional studies are needed, this study supports the association between the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype and the risk of late-onset AD in APOEε4 carriers. It also supports the use of brain-imaging endophenotypes to help assess possible modifiers of AD risk. PMID:20888920

  10. Lactobacillus oligofermentans glucose, ribose and xylose transcriptomes show higher similarity between glucose and xylose catabolism-induced responses in the early exponential growth phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Rämö, Tanja; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Björkroth, Johanna; Auvinen, Petri

    2016-08-03

    Lactobacillus oligofermentans has been mostly isolated from cold-stored packaged meat products in connection with their spoilage, but its precise role in meat spoilage is unknown. It belongs to the L. vaccinostercus group of obligate heterofermentative lactobacilli that generally ferment pentoses (e.g. xylose and ribose) more efficiently than hexoses (e.g. glucose). However, more efficient hexose utilization can be induced. The regulation mechanisms of the carbohydrate catabolism in such bacteria have been scarcely studied. To address this question, we provided the complete genome sequence of L. oligofermentans LMG 22743(T) and generated time course transcriptomes during its growth on glucose, ribose and xylose. The genome was manually annotated and its main functional features were examined. L. oligofermentans was confirmed to be able to efficiently utilize several hexoses and maltose, which is, presumably, induced by its repeated cultivation with glucose in vitro. Unexpectedly, in the beginning of the exponential growth phase, glucose- and xylose-induced transcriptome responses were more similar, whereas toward the end of the growth phase xylose and ribose transcriptomes became more alike. The promoter regions of genes simultaneously upregulated both on glucose and xylose in comparison with ribose (particularly, hexose and xylose utilization genes) were found to be enriched in the CcpA- binding site. Transcriptionally, no glucose-induced carbon catabolite repression was detected. The catabolism of glucose, which requires initial oxidation, led to significant overexpression of the NAD(P)H re-oxidation genes, the upstream regions of which were found to contain a motif, which was highly similar to a Rex repressor binding site. This paper presents the second complete genome and the first study of carbohydrate catabolism-dependent transcriptome response for a member of the L. vaccinostercus group. The transcriptomic changes detected in L. oligofermentans for growth

  11. Depressed glucose consumption at reperfusion following brain ischemia does not correlate with mitochondrial dysfunction and development of infarction: an in vivo positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Abraham; Rojas, Santiago; Pareto, Deborah; Santalucia, Tomàs; Millán, Olga; Abasolo, Ibane; Gómez, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi; Gispert, Joan D; Falcon, Carles; Bargalló, Núria; Planas, Anna M

    2009-05-01

    Glucose consumption is severely depressed in the ischemic core, whereas it is maintained or even increased in penumbral regions during ischemia. Conversely, glucose utilization is severely reduced early after reperfusion in spite that glucose and oxygen are available. Experimental studies suggest that glucose hypometabolism might be an early predictor of brain infarction. However, the relationship between early glucose hypometabolism with later development of infarction remains to be further studied in the same subjects. Here, glucose consumption was assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion. Perfusion was evaluated by PET with (13)NH(3) during and after 2-hour (h) middle cerebral artery occlusion, and (18)F-FDG was given after 2h of reperfusion. Brain infarction was evaluated at 24h. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was examined ex vivo using a biochemical method. Cortical (18)F-FDG uptake was reduced by 45% and 25% in the ischemic core and periphery, respectively. However, substantial alteration of mitochondrial respiration was not apparent until 24h, suggesting that mitochondria retained the ability to consume oxygen early after reperfusion. These results show reduced glucose use at early reperfusion in regions that will later develop infarction and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent regions. Depressed glucose metabolism in the ischemic core might be attributable to reduced metabolic requirement due to irreversible cellular injury. However, reduced glucose metabolism in peripheral regions suggests either an impairment of glycolysis or reduced glucose demand. Thus, our study supports that glycolytic depression early after reperfusion is not always related to subsequent development of infarction.

  12. Increased pregenual anterior cingulate glucose and lactate concentrations in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, J; Hock, A; Henning, A; Seifritz, E; Boeker, H; Grimm, S

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that glucose metabolism in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC) is increased in major depressive disorder (MDD), whereas it is still unknown whether glucose levels per se are also elevated. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate concentrations in MDD patients might indicate that increased glycolytical metabolization of glucose to lactate in astrocytes either alone or in conjunction with mitochondrial dysfunction results in an accumulation of lactate and contributes to pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD. However, until now, no study investigated in vivo PACC glucose and lactate levels in MDD. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was therefore used to test the hypothesis that patients with MDD have increased PACC glucose and lactate levels. In 40 healthy and depressed participants, spectra were acquired from the PACC using a maximum echo J-resolved spectroscopy protocol. Results show significant increases of glucose and lactate in patients, which are also associated with depression severity. These findings indicate impaired brain energy metabolism in MDD with increased fraction of energy utilization via glycolysis and reduced mitochondrial oxidative clearance of lactate. Targeting these metabolic disturbances might affect the balance of metabolic pathways regulating neuronal energetics and result in an attenuation of the elevated basal activity of brain regions within the neural circuitry of depression.

  13. Comparison of the Five Danish Regions Regarding Demographic Characteristics, Healthcare Utilization, and Medication Use--A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Rasmussen, Lotte; Hansen, Morten Rix; Hallas, Jesper; Pottegård, Anton

    2015-01-01

    While Denmark is well known for its plethora of registers. Many studies are conducted on research databases that only cover parts of Denmark, and regional differences could potentially threaten these studies' external validity. The aim of this study was to assess sociodemographic and health related homogeneity of the five Danish regions. We obtained descriptive data for the five Danish regions, using publicly available data sources: Statbank Denmark, the Danish Ministry of Economic Affairs, and Medstat.dk. These data sources comprise aggregate data from four different nationwide registers: The Danish National Patient Register, The Danish Civil Registration System, The Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, and The Danish National Health Service Register for Primary Care. We compared the Danish regions regarding demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health care utilization, and use of medication. For each characteristic, one-year prevalence was obtained and analyses were performed for 2013 and 2008 to account for possible change over time. In 2013, 5,602,628 persons were living in Denmark. The mean age was 40.7 years in the entire Danish population and ranged between 39.6 to 42.4 years in the five regions (coefficient of variation between regions [CV] = 0.028). The proportion of women in Denmark was 50.4% (CV = 0.009). The proportion of residents with low education level was 28.7% (CV = 0.051). The annual number of GP contacts was 7.1 (range: 6.7-7.4, CV = 0.040), and 114 per 1,000 residents were admitted to the hospital (range: 101-131, CV = 0.107). The annual number of persons redeeming a prescription of any medication was 723 per 1,000 residents (range: 718-743, CV = 0.016). Analyses for 2008 showed comparable levels of homogeneity as for 2013. We found substantial homogeneity between all of the five Danish regions with regard to sociodemographic and health related characteristics. Epidemiologic studies conducted on regional subsets of Danish

  14. A glucose oxidase-coupled DNAzyme sensor for glucose detection in tears and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Feng, Junkui; Wang, Shijin; Zhang, Jin; Xu, Jiacui; Jiang, Dazhi

    2015-08-15

    Biosensors have been widely investigated and utilized in a variety of fields ranging from environmental monitoring to clinical diagnostics. Glucose biosensors have triggered great interest and have been widely exploited since glucose determination is essential for diabetes diagnosis. In here, we designed a novel dual-enzyme biosensor composed of glucose oxidase (GOx) and pistol-like DNAzyme (PLDz) to detect glucose levels in tears and saliva. First, GOx, as a molecular recognition element, catalyzes the oxidation of glucose forming H2O2; then PLDz recognizes the produced H2O2 as a secondary signal and performs a self-cleavage reaction promoted by Mn(2+), Co(2+) and Cu(2+). Thus, detection of glucose could be realized by monitoring the cleavage rate of PLDz. The slope of the cleavage rate of PLDz versus glucose concentration curve was fitted with a Double Boltzmann equation, with a range of glucose from 100 nM to 10mM and a detection limit of 5 μM. We further applied the GOx-PLDz 1.0 biosensor for glucose detection in tears and saliva, glucose levels in which are 720±81 μM and 405±56 μM respectively. Therefore, the GOx-PLDz 1.0 biosensor is able to determine glucose levels in tears and saliva as a noninvasive glucose biosensor, which is important for diabetic patients with frequent/continuous glucose monitoring requirements. In addition, induction of DNAzyme provides a new approach in the development of glucose biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Four grams of glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Wasserman, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Four grams of glucose circulates in the blood of a person weighing 70 kg. This glucose is critical for normal function in many cell types. In accordance with the importance of these 4 g of glucose, a sophisticated control system is in place to maintain blood glucose constant. Our focus has been on the mechanisms by which the flux of glucose from liver to blood and from blood to skeletal muscle is regulated. The body has a remarkable capacity to satisfy the nutritional need for glucose, while ...

  16. Co-inheritance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency mutations and hemoglobin E in a Kachin population in a malaria-endemic region of Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zeshuai; Yang, Fang; Bai, Yao; He, Lijun; Li, Qing; Wu, Yanrui; Luo, Lan; Li, Hong; Ma, Limei; Yang, Zhaoqing; He, Yongshu; Cui, Liwang

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and hemoglobin E (HbE, β26 Glu-Lys) are two common red cell disorders in Southeast Asia. G6PD deficiency produces hemolytic anemia, which can be triggered by certain drugs or infections. HbE is asymptomatic or is manifested as microcytic, minimally hemolytic anemia. The association between G6PD deficiency and HbE is little understood. This study aimed to investigate G6PD deficiency and HbE in a Kachin ethnic group in the China-Myanmar border area. G6PD enzyme activity was measured using a quantitative G6PD assay, G6PD variants genotyped by the SNaPshot assay, and an HbE gene mutation identified by an amplification refractory mutation system and subsequently confirmed by using a reverse dot blot hybridization assay from 100 unrelated individuals in the study area. G6PD enzyme activity ranged from 0.4 to 24.7 U/g Hb, and six males had severe G6PD deficiency (1.2-4.5 U/g Hb). Among the 24 G6PD-deficient subjects, 22 (92%) had the Mahidol 487G>A mutation (12 male hemizygotes, one female homozygote, and nine female heterozygotes), while the G6PD genotypes in two female subjects were unknown. HbE was identified in 39 subjects (20 males and 19 females), including 15 HbEE (seven males and eight females) and 24 HbAE (13 males and 11 females). Twenty-three subjects co-inherited both G6PD deficiency and HbE (22 with HbAE and one with HbEE). Whereas mean Hb levels were not significantly different between the HbA and HbE groups, G6PD-deficient males had significantly lower Hb levels than G6PD-normal males (P A and HbAE in males leading to severe anemia. The presence of 6% males with severe G6PD deficiency raised a major concern in the use of primaquine for radical cure of vivax malaria.

  17. Co-inheritance of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency mutations and hemoglobin E in a Kachin population in a malaria-endemic region of Southeast Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshuai Deng

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency and hemoglobin E (HbE, β26 Glu-Lys are two common red cell disorders in Southeast Asia. G6PD deficiency produces hemolytic anemia, which can be triggered by certain drugs or infections. HbE is asymptomatic or is manifested as microcytic, minimally hemolytic anemia. The association between G6PD deficiency and HbE is little understood. This study aimed to investigate G6PD deficiency and HbE in a Kachin ethnic group in the China-Myanmar border area. G6PD enzyme activity was measured using a quantitative G6PD assay, G6PD variants genotyped by the SNaPshot assay, and an HbE gene mutation identified by an amplification refractory mutation system and subsequently confirmed by using a reverse dot blot hybridization assay from 100 unrelated individuals in the study area. G6PD enzyme activity ranged from 0.4 to 24.7 U/g Hb, and six males had severe G6PD deficiency (1.2-4.5 U/g Hb. Among the 24 G6PD-deficient subjects, 22 (92% had the Mahidol 487G>A mutation (12 male hemizygotes, one female homozygote, and nine female heterozygotes, while the G6PD genotypes in two female subjects were unknown. HbE was identified in 39 subjects (20 males and 19 females, including 15 HbEE (seven males and eight females and 24 HbAE (13 males and 11 females. Twenty-three subjects co-inherited both G6PD deficiency and HbE (22 with HbAE and one with HbEE. Whereas mean Hb levels were not significantly different between the HbA and HbE groups, G6PD-deficient males had significantly lower Hb levels than G6PD-normal males (P A and HbAE in males leading to severe anemia. The presence of 6% males with severe G6PD deficiency raised a major concern in the use of primaquine for radical cure of vivax malaria.

  18. Lactose-over-Glucose Preference in Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705: glcP, Encoding a Glucose Transporter, Is Subject to Lactose Repression†

    OpenAIRE

    Parche, Stephan; Beleut, Manfred; Rezzonico, Enea; Jacobs, Doris; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Titgemeyer, Fritz; Jankovic, Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of culture supernatants obtained from Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 grown on glucose and lactose revealed that glucose utilization is impaired until depletion of lactose. Thus, unlike many other bacteria, B. longum preferentially uses lactose rather than glucose as the primary carbon source. Glucose uptake experiments with B. longum cells showed that glucose transport was repressed in the presence of lactose. A comparative analysis of global gene expression profiling using DNA array...

  19. Targeting glucose metabolism in cancer: new class of agents for loco-regional and systemic therapy of liver cancer and beyond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Chapiro, Julius; Duwe, Gregor; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In patients with unresectable disease, loco-regional catheter-based intra-arterial therapies (IAT) can achieve selective tumor control while minimizing systemic toxicity. As molecular features of tumor growth and microenvironment are better understood, new targets arise for selective anticancer therapy. Particularly, antiglycolytic drugs that exploit the hyperglycolytic cancer cell metabolism - also known as the 'Warburg effect' - have emerged as promising therapeutic options. Thus, future developments will combine the selective character of loco-regional drug delivery platforms with highly specific molecular targeted antiglycolytic agents. This review will exemplify literature on antiglycolytic approaches and particularly focus on intra-arterial delivery methods.

  20. To Count Heads or to Count Services? Comparing Population-to-Physician Methods with Utilization-Based Methods for Physician Workforce Planning: A Case Study in a Remote Rural Administrative Region of British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Lorne; Forrest, Christopher B; McFadden, Mike

    2007-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a population-based measure of physician services utilization by type of service as a tool for physician workforce planning. The Northern Health Region of British Columbia. Retrospective descriptive statistics are compiled about the regional population's physician services utilization by the specialty of the service, irrespective of the specialty or location of the provider. These are compared to norms based on provincial average utilization, adjusted for age and sex, and norms based on population-to-physician ratio recommendations. METRICS: By specialty type of service: actual utilization; age-sex expected utilization; in-region, out-of-region and out-of-province utilization; full-time equivalency (FTE) values of actual and expected utilization; and FTE requirement to meet a set of recommended population-to-physician targets. Specialty substitution by general practitioners (GPs) is also quantified. The overall estimated deficit in physician numbers is similar between the two methods (51 versus 54), but the magnitude of surplus or deficit by specialty is greater with the population-to-physician method. The method targets an equitable distribution, rather than normative ideal physician supply. The magnitude of estimated surplus or deficit at the level of each specialty is greater with the population-to-physician ratio approach. The latter fails to consider interregional flow and specialty substitution. A population-based utilization approach is demonstrated to be a feasible, and in many ways superior, tool for physician resource planning.

  1. Glucose, memory, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, D L; Gold, P E

    1998-04-01

    Circulating glucose concentrations regulate many brain functions, including learning and memory. Much of the evidence for this view comes from experiments assessing stress-related release of epinephrine with subsequent increases in blood glucose concentrations. One application of this work has been to investigate whether age-related memory impairments result from dysfunctions in the neuroendocrine regulation of the brain processes responsible for memory. Like humans, aged rodents exhibit some memory impairments that can be reversed by administration of epinephrine or glucose. In elderly humans, ingestion of glucose enhances some cognitive functions, with effects best documented thus far on tests of verbal contextual and noncontextual information. Glucose also effectively enhances cognition in persons with Alzheimer disease or Down syndrome. Although earlier evidence suggested that glucose does not enhance cognitive function in healthy young adults, more recent findings suggest that glucose is effective in this population, provided the tests are sufficiently difficult. In college students, glucose consumption significantly enhanced memory of material in a paragraph. Glucose also appeared to enhance attentional processes in these students. Neither face and word recognition nor working memory was influenced by treatment with glucose. The neurobiological mechanisms by which glucose acts are under current investigation. Initial evidence suggests that glucose or a metabolite may activate release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in rats when they are engaged in learning. Consequently, the issue of nutrition and cognition becomes increasingly important in light of evidence that circulating glucose concentrations have substantial effects on brain and cognitive functions.

  2. Insulin modulates hippocampally-mediated spatial working memory via glucose transporter-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-Leary, J; Jahagirdar, V; Sage, J; McNay, E C

    2018-02-15

    The insulin-regulated glucose transporter, GluT4, is a key molecule in peripheral insulin signaling. Although GluT4 is abundantly expressed in neurons of specific brain regions such as the hippocampus, the functional role of neuronal GluT4 is unclear. Here, we used pharmacological inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose uptake to determine whether GluT4 mediates insulin-mediated glucose uptake in the hippocampus. Consistent with previous reports, we found that glucose utilization increased in the dorsal hippocampus of male rats during spontaneous alternation (SA), a hippocampally-mediated spatial working memory task. We previously showed that insulin signaling within the hippocampus is required for processing this task, and that administration of exogenous insulin enhances performance. At baseline levels of hippocampal insulin, inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose uptake did not affect SA performance. However, inhibition of an upstream regulator of GluT4, Akt, did impair SA performance. Conversely, when a memory-enhancing dose of insulin was delivered to the hippocampus prior to SA-testing, inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose transport prevented cognitive enhancement. These data suggest that baseline hippocampal cognitive processing does not require functional hippocampal GluT4, but that cognitive enhancement by supra-baseline insulin does. Consistent with these findings, we found that in neuronal cell culture, insulin increases glucose utilization in a GluT4-dependent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrate a key role for GluT4 in transducing the procognitive effects of elevated hippocampal insulin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A regional approach to the Co-Production of climate information for water utilities- Managing Messages, Approaches, Benefits, and Lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, D. N.; Kaatz, L.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, water utility managers across Colorado have joined together to advance their understanding of the role of climate information in their planning process. In an unprecedented step, managers from 5 different organizations and agencies pooled their resources and worked collaboratively to better understand the ever evolving role of science in helping understand risks, uncertainties, and opportunities that climate uncertainty and change might bring to this semi-arid region. The group developed an ongoing educational process to better understand climate projections (Scale); cohesively communicate with customers and the media (Communication); provided institutional coverage to an often contentious topic (Safety); and helped coordinate with other investigations and participants to facilitate education and training (Collaboration); and pooled finances, staff, and expert resources (Resources). We will share this experience and give examples of concrete outcomes.

  4. Distributed land surface modeling with utilization of multi-sensor satellite data: application for the vast agricultural terrain in cold region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, E.; Uspensky, A.; Gelfan, A.; Startseva, Z.; Volkova, E.; Kukharsky, A.; Romanov, P.; Alexandrovich, M.

    2012-04-01

    A technique for satellite-data-based modeling water and heat regimes of a large scale area has been developed and applied for the 227,300 km2 agricultural region in the European Russia. The core component of the technique is the physically based distributed Remote Sensing Based Land Surface Model (RSBLSM) intended for simulating transpiration by vegetation and evaporation from bare soil, vertical transfer of water and heat within soil and vegetation covers during a vegetation season as well as hydrothermal processes in soil and snow covers during a cold season, including snow accumulation and melt, dynamics of soil moisture and temperature during soil freezing and thawing, infiltration into frozen soil. Processes in the "atmosphere-snow-frozen soil" system are critical for cold region agriculture, as they control crop development in early spring before the vegetation season beginning. For assigning the model parameters as well as for preliminary calibrating and validating the model, available multi-year data sets of soil moisture/temperature profiles, evaporation, snow and soil freezing depth measured at the meteorological stations located within the study region have been utilized. To provide an appropriate parametrization of the model for the areas where ground-based measurements are unavailable, estimates have been utilized for vegetation, meteorological and snow characteristics derived from the multispectral measurements of AVHRR/NOAA (1999-2010), MODIS/EOS Terra & Aqua (2002-2010), AMSR-E/Aqua (2003-2004; 2008-2010), and SEVIRI/Meteosat-9 (2009-2010). The technologies of thematic processing the listed satellite data have been developed and applied to estimate the land surface and snow cover characteristics for the study area. The developed technologies of AVHRR data processing have been adapted to retrieve land surface temperature (LST) and emissivity (E), surface-air temperature at a level of vegetation cover (TA), normalized vegetation index (NDVI), leaf

  5. Validation of the diagnostic utility of salivary interleukin 8 in the differentiation of potentially malignant oral lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma in a region with high endemicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, K; Nandhini, G; Ramya, R; Rajashree, P; Kumar, A Ramesh; Anandan, S Nirmala

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of salivary interleukin 8 (IL-8) in the differential diagnosis of potentially malignant lesions (PMLs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in a region with high oral cancer prevalence. Saliva and blood samples were collected from 100 participants in each group (OSCC, PMLs, and healthy controls). Serum and salivary IL-8 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The data were subjected to appropriate statistical analysis. A significant increase in levels of serum and salivary IL-8 was found in OSCC compared with PMLs and healthy controls. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis found salivary IL-8 to have superior sensitivity in detecting OSCC. A significant increase in IL-8 levels based on the histologic grading of OSCC was also observed. This study confirms that salivary IL-8 can be a potent marker that can be used as a tool in the differential diagnosis of PMLs and OSCC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucose test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. Following your health ...

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that ...

  8. Your Glucose Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Your Glucose Meter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Your Blood Sugar and Caring for Your Meter Glucose meters test and record how much sugar (called ...

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... high blood glucose (blood sugar). High blood glucose happens when the body has too little insulin or ... give 5% back to the Association. » « Connect With Us Register for diabetes news, research and food & fitness ...

  10. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women ... Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  12. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor about how to handle this condition. Medical IDs Many people with diabetes, particularly those who ... In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C ...

  13. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term for high blood glucose (blood sugar). High ... called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get ...

  14. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you to lower your blood glucose level. Cutting down on the amount of food you eat might ... use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body ...

  15. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose ...

  16. Utilization of folic acid and iron supplementation services by pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic at a regional referral hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina-Gathigi, L; Omolo, J; Wanzala, P; Lindan, C; Makokha, A

    2013-09-01

    To determine utilization of iron and folic acid supplementation services among pregnant women in Kenya. A cross sectional study was conducted at Nyeri Hospital, a regional referral hospital in central Kenya. Women attending the antenatal clinic were selected through systematic sampling. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to collect information on utilization of folic acid and iron supplementation services. Women who ingested folic acid or iron supplements for >4 days in a week were considered "highly compliant". The health worker in-charge of the antenatal clinic was interviewed about the frequency of supplement stock-outs during the past year. Haemoglobin concentration was measured directly from one drop of capillary blood and measured using portable HEMOCUE B-Hb photometer. Of the 381 women interviewed, only 23.6 % obtained antenatal care in the first trimester; 69.3 and 51.2 % received folic acid and iron supplements, respectively. However, only half (45-58 %) received any information about supplementation. Most women were initiated on folic acid (80.7 %) or iron (67.7 %) after 12 and 16 weeks of gestation, respectively, well after the recommended time period. However, more than 80 % of those who received folic acid and iron were highly compliant. Stock-outs were common at the facility. Of 361 women tested for Hb level, the prevalence of anaemia (Hb levels Problems with supply chain management exacerbate the problem.

  17. [Blood glucose self monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wascher, Thomas C; Stechemesser, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Self monitoring of blood glucose contributes to the integrated management of diabetes mellitus. It, thus, should be available for all patients with diabetes mellitus type-1 and type-2. Self monitoring of blood glucose improves patients safety, quality of life and glucose control. The current article represents the recommendations of the Austrian Diabetes Association for the use of blood glucose self monitoring according to current scientific evidence.

  18. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: ... and-how-tos, . In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C ...

  19. Glucose screening tests during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening ... During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare ...

  20. Inhibition of renal glucose reabsorption as a novel treatment for diabetes patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cersosimo, Eugenio; Solis-Herrera, Carolina; Triplitt, Curtis

    2014-01-01

    ... for the treatment of diabetes. The enormous capacity of the proximal tubular cells to reabsorb the filtered glucose load entirely, utilizing the sodium-glucose co-transporter system (primarily SGLT-2...

  1. Glucose enhancement of human memory: a comprehensive research review of the glucose memory facilitation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Riby, Leigh M; Eekelen, J Anke M van; Foster, Jonathan K

    2011-01-01

    The brain relies upon glucose as its primary fuel. In recent years, a rich literature has developed from both human and animal studies indicating that increases in circulating blood glucose can facilitate cognitive functioning. This phenomenon has been termed the 'glucose memory facilitation effect'. The purpose of this review is to discuss a number of salient studies which have investigated the influence of glucose ingestion on neurocognitive performance in individuals with (a) compromised neurocognitive capacity, as well as (b) normally functioning individuals (with a focus on research conducted with human participants). The proposed neurocognitive mechanisms purported to underlie the modulatory effect of glucose on neurocognitive performance will also be considered. Many theories have focussed upon the hippocampus, given that this brain region is heavily implicated in learning and memory. Further, it will be suggested that glucose is a possible mechanism underlying the phenomenon that enhanced memory performance is typically observed for emotionally laden stimuli. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [A study on the cerebral glucose metabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ai-jun; Guo, Xiao-jun; Li, Da-cheng; Zhang, Ben-shu; Pan, Xu-dong

    2012-11-01

    To study the regional cerebral glucose utilization with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET and to investigate the correlation between cerebral glucose metabolism and the clinical characteristic of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). A total of 13 patients with PSP and 30 matched healthy controls were performed (18)F-FDG PET imaging at rest state. Visual inspection and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) were used to investigate regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc). Based on the visual inspection, PET imaging in the PSP patients showed that the focal hypometabolic areas mainly included the bilateral frontal cortex, midbrain and subcortical structures. Compared to the controls, voxel-based analysis showed that the regional glucose metabolism decreased in bilateral superior, middle frontal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, midbrain and subcortical structures including basal ganglion and thalamus, which were consisted with the clinical characteristics, such as vertical gaze palsy, pseudobulbar palsy, postural instability, axial rigidity, dementia and so on. (18)F-FDG PET imaging is helpful for the early diagnosis of PSP.

  3. Quantifying the Contribution of the Liver to Glucose Homeostasis: A Detailed Kinetic Model of Human Hepatic Glucose Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Matthias; Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of the liver in glucose homeostasis, a detailed mathematical model of human hepatic glucose metabolism is lacking so far. Here we present a detailed kinetic model of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in human hepatocytes integrated with the hormonal control of these pathways by insulin, glucagon and epinephrine. Model simulations are in good agreement with experimental data on (i) the quantitative contributions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization under varying physiological states. (ii) the time courses of postprandial glycogen storage as well as glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting (iii) the switch from net hepatic glucose production under hypoglycemia to net hepatic glucose utilization under hyperglycemia essential for glucose homeostasis (iv) hormone perturbations of hepatic glucose metabolism. Response analysis reveals an extra high capacity of the liver to counteract changes of plasma glucose level below 5 mM (hypoglycemia) and above 7.5 mM (hyperglycemia). Our model may serve as an important module of a whole-body model of human glucose metabolism and as a valuable tool for understanding the role of the liver in glucose homeostasis under normal conditions and in diseases like diabetes or glycogen storage diseases. PMID:22761565

  4. Opportunities to increase the utilization of biofuels in small scale district heating plants in Lahti region; Biopolttoaineiden lisaeaemismahdollisuudet kaukolaemmoen tuotannossa pienen kokoluokan tuotantolaitoksissa Lahden seudulla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurmiainen, M.

    2010-07-01

    This research is a part of IMMU-project, which examines concrete methods to restrain climate change in Lahti region. This study examines possibilities to increase the utilization of biofuels in district heating production in small scale plants. Biofuel increasing scenarios in Nastola and Vaeaeksy (Asikkala) are created based on theory of this thesis. The affects on greenhouse gas and dust emissions by increasing biofuels in the scenarios are examined by using life cycle assessment method. Economical points are considered by calculating the repayment periods with present value method for the different bioplant investments. The greenhouse gases in Nastola and Vaeaeksy are decreasing the most by producing district heating basic production in CHP-plant by combusting wood chips. However the biggest dust emissions are caused by using solid biofuels, which has an influence on attractive living environment in the vicinity of the plant. The investment cost is the biggest and the repayment period is longest for the bio-CHP-plant investment. Consumption based emissions can be reduced the most, 6,4 %, in Nastola by investing in bio-CHP-plant or bio heating plant. Lahti Energia Ltd's emissions from the district heating production could be most reduced 1,6 %. This research concludes there is possibility to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by investing district heating plants which are using biofuels. Other technology solutions are more expensive than the others. In addition some characteristics of combustion are degrading by using solid biofuels for example compared to combustion of natural gas. However by utilizing biofuels we can get rid of from dependence on imported fossil fuels e.g. oil or natural gas. It is difficult to say directly which way is the best to produce district heat. The production characteristics, which are weighted most in decision-making process, have a critical influence on the final decision of the investment. (orig.)

  5. Exercising Tactically for Taming Postmeal Glucose Surges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsamma Chacko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review seeks to synthesize data on the timing, intensity, and duration of exercise found scattered over some 39 studies spanning 3+ decades into optimal exercise conditions for controlling postmeal glucose surges. The results show that a light aerobic exercise for 60 min or moderate activity for 20–30 min starting 30 min after meal can efficiently blunt the glucose surge, with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. Exercising at other times could lead to glucose elevation caused by counterregulation. Adding a short bout of resistance exercise of moderate intensity (60%–80%  VO2max to the aerobic activity, 2 or 3 times a week as recommended by the current guidelines, may also help with the lowering of glucose surges. On the other hand, high-intensity exercise (>80%  VO2max causes wide glucose fluctuations and its feasibility and efficacy for glucose regulation remain to be ascertained. Promoting the kind of physical activity that best counters postmeal hyperglycemia is crucial because hundreds of millions of diabetes patients living in developing countries and in the pockets of poverty in the West must do without medicines, supplies, and special diets. Physical activity is the one tool they may readily utilize to tame postmeal glucose surges. Exercising in this manner does not violate any of the current guidelines, which encourage exercise any time.

  6. Direct muscarinic cholinergic inhibition of hepatic glucose production in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, P. J.; Liggett, S B; Shah, S D; Cryer, P E

    1988-01-01

    To explore the potential role of the parasympathetic nervous system in human glucoregulatory physiology, responses to the muscarinic cholinergic agonist bethanechol (5.0 mg s.c.) and antagonist atropine (1.0 mg i.v.) were measured in normal humans. There were no changes in the plasma glucose concentration or rates of glucose production or utilization following atropine administration. After bethanechol administration there were no changes in the plasma glucose concentration or fluxes despite ...

  7. Fluorescence glucose detection: advances toward the ideal in vivo biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Elizabeth A; Sharma, Bethel V; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-09-01

    The importance of glucose monitoring for in vivo as well as for ex vivo applications has driven a vast number of scientific groups to pursue the development of an advanced glucose sensor. Such a sensor must be robust, versatile, and capable of the long-term, accurate and reproducible detection of glucose levels in various testing media. Among the different configurations and signal transduction mechanisms used, fluorescence-based glucose sensors constitute a growing class of glucose sensors represented by an increasing number of significant contributions to the field over the last few years. This manuscript reviews the progress in the development of fluorescence based glucose sensors resulting from the advances in the design of new receptor systems for glucose recognition and the utilization of new fluorescence transduction schemes.

  8. The Coupling of Cerebral Metabolic Rate of Glucose and Cerebral Blood Flow In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Steen; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    and metabolism was originally performed using the Kety-Schmidt method and this method still represent the gold standard by which subsequent methods have been evaluated. However, in its classical setting, the method overestimates cerebral blood flow. Studies of metabolic changes during activation must take......The energy supplied to the brain by metabolic substrate is largely utilized for maintaining synaptic transmission. In this regulation cerebral blood flow and glucose consumption is tightly coupled as well in the resting condition as during activation. Quantification of cerebral blood flow...... this into account, and subsequent methods for measurement of regional glucose metabolism must be corrected accordingly in order to allow reliable quantitative comparisons of metabolite changes in activation studies. For studies of regional metabolic changes during activation quantification poses further...

  9. Regional concepts for the energetic utilization of biogenic residual materials exemplified by the county Holzminden; Regionale Konzepte zur energetische Nutzung biogener Reststoffe am Beispiel Landkreis Holzminden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, Thomas [IGLUX Witzenhausen GmbH (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Biomass is one of the most valuable sources of renewable energy since it can be stored and used as a fuel for a variety of conversion technologies. So far mainly renewable raw materials were in the focus of attention in the District of Holzminden, but recently the use of organic residues gained importance since these resources do not compete for land with food production. During the preparation of the climate protection concept of the district, where the regional waste management authority was involved, the relevance of organic residues was clearly determined. Against this background the District of Holzminden contracted an inventory of all organic residues that accrue on a regular basis. This should document the existing material flows in the district and help to initiate a targeted material flow management. The essential public and private players working with these materials should be identified and the quantities they handle should be recorded. Special attention was given to biowaste and green wastes - the treatment of these fractions is only contracted up to 2013 - and residues from countryside preservation from various sources. In addition to the inventory results presented in this paper, first technical and economical assessments to utilize these materials were made.(orig.)

  10. Developing a foundation for eco-epidemiological assessment of aquatic ecological status over large geographic regions utilizing existing data resources and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapo, Katherine E; Holmes, Christopher M; Dyer, Scott D; de Zwart, Dick; Posthuma, Leo

    2014-07-01

    Eco-epidemiological studies utilizing existing monitoring program data provide a cost-effective means to bridge the gap between the ecological status and chemical status of watersheds and to develop hypotheses of stressor attribution that can influence the design of higher-tier assessments and subsequent management. The present study describes the process of combining existing data and models to develop a robust starting point for eco-epidemiological analyses of watersheds over large geographic scales. Data resources from multiple federal and local agencies representing a range of biological, chemical, physical, toxicological, and other landscape factors across the state of Ohio, USA (2000-2007), were integrated with the National Hydrography Dataset Plus hydrologic model (US Environmental Protection Agency and US Geological Survey). A variety of variable reduction, selection, and optimization strategies were applied to develop eco-epidemiological data sets for fish and macroinvertebrate communities. The relative importance of landscape variables was compared across spatial scales (local catchment, watershed, near-stream) using conditional inference forests to determine the scales most relevant to variation in biological community condition. Conditional inference forest analysis applied to a holistic set of environmental variables yielded stressor-response hypotheses at the statewide and eco-regional levels. The analysis confirmed the dominant influence of state-level stressors such as physical habitat condition, while highlighting differences in predictive strength of other stressors based on ecoregional and land-use characteristics. This exercise lays the groundwork for subsequent work designed to move closer to causal inference. © 2014 SETAC.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide-1 decreases intracerebral glucose content by activating hexokinase and changing glucose clearance during hyperglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Egefjord, Lærke; Lerche, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    and stroke: Although the mechanism is unclear, glucose homeostasis appears to be important. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study in nine healthy males. Positron emission tomography was used to determine the effect of GLP-1 on cerebral glucose transport and metabolism......Type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia with the resulting increase of glucose concentrations in the brain impair the outcome of ischemic stroke, and may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reports indicate that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) may be neuroprotective in models of AD...... during a hyperglycemic clamp with (18)fluoro-deoxy-glucose as tracer. Glucagon-like peptide-1 lowered brain glucose (P=0.023) in all regions. The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was increased everywhere (P=0.039) but not to the same extent in all regions (P=0.022). The unidirectional glucose transfer...

  12. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Revisted | Mshelia | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The present review was undertaken to create the required utilization of oral glucose tolerance test in a developing country with a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Sources of data: This review is primarily based on available literature on local and international studies on oral glucose ...

  13. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  14. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Neuropathy Foot Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  15. Blood Glucose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Estela

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish a mathematical model which can be used to estimate glucose levels in the blood over time. The equations governing this process were manipulated with the use of techniques such as separation of variables and integration of first order differential equations, which resulted in a function that described the glucose concentration in terms of time. This function was then plotted, which allowed us to find when glucose concentration was at its highest. The model was then used to analyze two cases where the maximum glucose level could not exceed a certain level while the amount of carbohydrates and glycemic index were varied, independently.

  16. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy ...

  17. Glucose as substrate and signal in priming: Results from experiments with non-metabolizable glucose analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason-Jones, Kyle; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Priming of soil organic matter remains the subject of intense research, but a mechanistic explanation of the phenomenon remains to be demonstrated. This is largely due to the multiple effects of easily available carbon on the soil microbial community, and the challenge of separating these influences from one another. Several glucose analogues can be taken up by microbial glucose transporters and have similar regulatory effects on metabolism. These substances are, however, not easily catabolized by the common glycolytic pathway, limiting their energy value. Therefore, they can be used to distinguish between the action of glucose as a metabolic signal, and its influence as an energy source. We incubated an agricultural Haplic Luvisol under controlled conditions for 24 days after addition of: 1) glucose, 2) 3-O-methyl-glucose, 3) α-methylglucoside or 4) 2-deoxyglucose, at three concentration levels, along with a control treatment of water addition. CO2 efflux from soil was monitored by trapping evolved CO2 in NaOH and back-titration with HCl. On the first day after amendment, CO2 efflux from soil increased strongly for glucose and much less for the analogues, relative to the control. Only glucose caused a peak in efflux within the first two days. Peak mineralization of 2-deoxyglucose and α-methylglucoside was delayed until the third day, while CO2 from 3-O-methyl-glucose increased gradually, with a peak delayed by approximately a week. For glucose, the immediate increase in respiration was strongly dependent on the amount of glucose added, but this was not the case for the analogues, indicating that the catabolic potential for these substances was saturated. This is consistent with only a small part of the microbial community being capable of utilizing these carbon sources. In a subsequent experiment, 14C-labelled glucose or 14C-labelled 3-O-methyl-glucose were added to the same soil, enabling quantification of the priming effect. For 3-O-methyl-glucose, priming was

  18. Methylphenidate decreased the amount of glucose needed by the brain to perform a cognitive task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora D Volkow

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of stimulants (methylphenidate and amphetamine as cognitive enhancers by the general public is increasing and is controversial. It is still unclear how they work or why they improve performance in some individuals but impair it in others. To test the hypothesis that stimulants enhance signal to noise ratio of neuronal activity and thereby reduce cerebral activity by increasing efficiency, we measured the effects of methylphenidate on brain glucose utilization in healthy adults. We measured brain glucose metabolism (using Positron Emission Tomography and 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose in 23 healthy adults who were tested at baseline and while performing an accuracy-controlled cognitive task (numerical calculations given with and without methylphenidate (20 mg, oral. Sixteen subjects underwent a fourth scan with methylphenidate but without cognitive stimulation. Compared to placebo methylphenidate significantly reduced the amount of glucose utilized by the brain when performing the cognitive task but methylphenidate did not affect brain metabolism when given without cognitive stimulation. Whole brain metabolism when the cognitive task was given with placebo increased 21% whereas with methylphenidate it increased 11% (50% less. This reflected both a decrease in magnitude of activation and in the regions activated by the task. Methylphenidate's reduction of the metabolic increases in regions from the default network (implicated in mind-wandering was associated with improvement in performance only in subjects who activated these regions when the cognitive task was given with placebo. These results corroborate prior findings that stimulant medications reduced the magnitude of regional activation to a task and in addition document a "focusing" of the activation. This effect may be beneficial when neuronal resources are diverted (i.e., mind-wandering or impaired (i.e., attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but it could be detrimental when

  19. Glucose-dependent turnover of the mRNAs encoding succinate dehydrogenase peptides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: sequence elements in the 5' untranslated region of the Ip mRNA play a dominant role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereghino, G P; Atencio, D P; Saghbini, M; Beiner, J; Scheffler, I E

    1995-09-01

    We have demonstrated previously that glucose repression of mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves the control of the turnover of mRNAs for the iron protein (Ip) and flavoprotein (Fp) subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). Their half-lives are > 60 min in the presence of a nonfermentable carbon source (YPG medium) and YPD medium). This is a rare example in yeast in which the half-lives are > 60 min in the presence of a nonfermentable carbon source (YPG medium) and YPD medium). This is a rare example in yeast in which the half-life of an mRNA can be controlled by manipulating external conditions. In our current studies, a series of Ip transcripts with internal deletions as well as chimeric transcripts with heterologous sequences (internally or at the ends) have been examined, and we established that the 5'-untranslated region (5' UTR) of the Ip mRNA contains a major determinant controlling its differential turnover in YPG and YPD. Furthermore, the 5' exonuclease encoded by the XRN1 gene is required for the rapid degradation of the Ip and Fp mRNAs upon the addition of glucose. In the presence of cycloheximide the nucleolytic degradation of the Ip mRNA can be slowed down by stalled ribosomes to allow the identification of intermediates. Such intermediates have lost their 5' ends but still retain their 3' UTRs. If protein synthesis is inhibited at an early initiation step by the use of a prt1 mutation (affecting the initiation factor eIF3), the Ip and Fp mRNAs are very rapidly degraded even in YPG. Significantly, the arrest of translation by the introduction of a stable hairpin loop just upstream of the initiation codon does not alter the differential stability of the transcript in YPG and YPD. These observations suggest that a signaling pathway exists in which the external carbon source can control the turnover of mRNAs of specific mitochondrial proteins. Factors must be present that control either the activity or more likely the access of a

  20. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Thomas E; Richter, Erik A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract  Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity...

  1. Insecticide-treated net ownership and utilization and factors that influence their use in Itang, Gambella region, Ethiopia: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watiro AH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aklilu Habte Watiro,1 Worku Awoke,2 1Médecins Sans Frontières OCA (MSF Holland Ethiopia Mission, Addis Ababa, 2Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Background: Malaria remains a major public health problem in Ethiopia. Consequently, Ethiopia designed the 2011–2015, Malaria Prevention and Control Strategic Plan to fight the vector. It was discovered that most of the studies conducted on the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs were not in line with the strategic plan of the country. This study aimed to assess ITN ownership and utilization, and includes barriers related to its use among the target-area population at household (HH level. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional design was employed in Itang for this study. Data were collected by trained nurses through face-to-face interview and observation. A total of 845 participants were selected through multistage sampling, and the size was determined by using a single-population proportion formula. EPI Info and SPSS was used for analysis, and all necessary statistical association was computed in order to explain the outcome variable through explanatory variables of this study. Results: Among 845 HHs interviewed, 81.7% (690 had at least one ITN, while 52.3% (361 had used the ITN the night preceding the data-collection day. HH awareness of malaria prevention, number of ITNs, family size, number of family members sharing sleeping area/beds, sleeping patterns of adolescents, HH-head age, and inconvenience of using ITNs were found to be barriers to the use of ITNs in this study. Conclusion and recommendation: The study concluded that very few HHs owned ITNs and there was very low usage of ITNs. In recommendation, the regional health bureau and district health office should consider bigger nets that can accommodate family members who share the same sleeping area/bed in the area. Keywords: consistent

  2. Increased resource utilization and overall morbidity are associated with general versus regional anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy in data collected by the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ahmad S; Mullard, Andrew; Oppat, William F; Nolan, Kevin D

    2017-09-01

    Advocates for performing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) under regional anesthesia (RA) cite reduction in hemodynamic instability and the ability for neurologic monitoring, but many still prefer general anesthesia (GA) as benefits of RA have not been clearly demonstrated, reliable RA may not be available in all centers, and a certain amount of movement by the patient during the procedure may not be uniformly tolerated. We evaluated the association of anesthesia type and perioperative morbidity and mortality as well as resource utilization in patients undergoing CEA using the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (MSQC) database. Between 2012 and 2014, 4558 patients underwent CEA among the MSQC participating hospitals. Of these patients, 4008 underwent CEA under GA and 550 underwent CEA under RA. Data points were collected for each procedure, and a review of 30-day perioperative outcomes was conducted using the χ2 test. Propensity score regression adjusted for case mix preoperative conditions as fixed effects, and a mixed model adjusted for site as a random effect. The two groups were similar in gender and incidence of hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, and smoking history. The RA group tended to be of better functional status. After GA, there was a greater than twofold higher percentage of any morbidity (8.7% vs 4.2%). Further analysis demonstrated that patients undergoing GA had higher unadjusted rates for mortality (1.0% vs 0.0%), unplanned intubations (2.1% vs 0.6%), pneumonia (1.3% vs 0.0%), sepsis (0.8% vs 0.0%), and readmissions (9.2% vs 6.1%). Adjusting for case mix and random effect, there was statistically significantly higher overall morbidity (P = .0002), unplanned intubation (P = .0196), extended length of stay (P = .0007), emergency department visits (P = .0379), and readmissions (P = .0149) in the GA group. There was no statistically significant difference in incidence of myocardial infarction or cerebrovascular accident. Based on

  3. Plastic changes in the astrocyte GLUT1 glucose transporter and beta-tubulin microtubule protein following voluntary exercise in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Angela; Messier, Claude

    2013-03-01

    Glucose, the predominant energy substrate of the central and peripheral nervous system, is delivered to neurons via a family of facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT). The majority of glucose is transported to the brain via glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) located on epithelial cells of capillaries and on the astrocytes that wrap around them. Changes in neuronal activity are linked to increases in glucose demand and local cerebral glucose utilization. Current research has indicated a corresponding change in GLUT1 expression in response to increased metabolic demand in operant tasks. The purpose of this study was to examine, in the mouse brain, the effects of neuronal activation induced by voluntary running on the plastic expression of vascular GLUT1 and neuronal plasticity as measured by the microtubule protein beta-tubulin III (Tuj). The results showed that access to a running wheel for 48h induced plastic changes in the expression of GLUT1, Tuj and GLUT1-associated estimate of astrocyte vascular endfeet in motor regions. The results tend to support the plastic association between mechanisms of energy supply and plastic reorganization of neurons following a new training experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  5. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when ketones are present may make your blood glucose level go even higher. You'll need to work with your doctor to find the safest way for you to lower your blood glucose level. Cutting down on the amount of food you eat might also help. Work with your dietitian to make changes in your ...

  6. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood ...

  7. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Carbs Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And Stay Fit Types ... the following: High blood glucose High levels of sugar in the ... Part of managing your diabetes is checking your blood glucose often. Ask your ...

  8. Blood Glucose Determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Nybo, Mads; Cadamuro, Janne

    2018-01-01

    The measurement of fasting plasma glucose may be biased by a time-dependent decrease of glucose in blood tubes, mainly attributable to blood cell metabolism when glycolysis is not rapidly inhibited or blood cells cannot be rapidly separated from plasma. Although glycolysis inhibitors such as sodium...

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... June 7, 2013 Last Edited: September 16, 2014 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: bg-and-a1c-hyperglycemia,tips-and-how-tos, . In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C ...

  10. Nanomaterials in glucose sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Burugapalli, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    The smartness of nano-materials is attributed to their nanoscale and subsequently unique physicochemical properties and their use in glucose sensing has been aimed at improving performance, reducing cost and miniaturizing the sensor and its associated instrumentation. So far, portable (handheld) glucose analysers were introduced for hospital wards, emergency rooms and physicians' offices; single-use strip systems achieved nanolitre sampling for painless and accurate home glucose monitoring; advanced continuous monitoring devices having 2 to 7 days operating life are in clinical and home use; and continued research efforts are being made to develop and introduce increasingly advanced glucose monitoring systems for health as well as food, biotechnology, cell and tissue culture industries. Nanomaterials have touched every aspect of biosensor design and this chapter reviews their role in the development of advanced technologies for glucose sensing, and especially for diabetes. Research shows that overall, nanomat...

  11. Brain Glucose Metabolism Controls Hepatic Glucose and Lipid Production

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Tony K.T.

    2007-01-01

    Brain glucose-sensing mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of feeding behavior and hypoglycemic-induced hormonal counter-regulation. This commentary discusses recent findings indicating that the brain senses glucose to regulate both hepatic glucose and lipid production.

  12. Resolving futile glucose cycling and glycogenolytic contributions to plasma glucose levels following a glucose load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, P.M.; Jarak, I.; Heerschap, A.; Jones, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: After a glucose load, futile glucose/glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) cycling (FGC) generates [2-(2) H]glucose from (2) H2 O thereby mimicking a paradoxical glycogenolytic contribution to plasma glucose levels. Contributions of load and G6P derived from gluconeogenesis, FGC, and glycogenolysis to

  13. Exogenous amino acids suppress glucose oxidation and potentiate hepatic glucose production in late gestation fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura D; Kohn, Jaden R; Rozance, Paul J; Hay, William W; Wesolowski, Stephanie R

    2017-05-01

    Acute amino acid (AA) infusion increases AA oxidation rates in normal late gestation fetal sheep. Because the fetal oxygen consumption rate does not change with increased AA oxidation, we hypothesized that AA infusion would suppress glucose oxidation pathways and that the additional carbon supply from AA would activate hepatic glucose production. To test this, late gestation fetal sheep were infused intravenously for 3 h with saline or exogenous AA (AA). Glucose tracer metabolic studies were performed and skeletal muscle and liver tissues samples were collected. AA infusion increased fetal arterial plasma branched chain AA, cortisol, and glucagon concentrations. Fetal glucose utilization rates were similar between basal and AA periods, yet the fraction of glucose oxidized and the glucose oxidation rate were decreased by 40% in the AA period. AA infusion increased expression of PDK4 , an inhibitor of glucose oxidation, nearly twofold in muscle and liver. In liver, AA infusion tended to increase PCK1 gluconeogenic gene and PCK1 correlated with plasma cortisol concentrations. AA infusion also increased liver mRNA expression of the lactate transporter gene ( MCT1) , protein expression of GLUT2 and LDHA, and phosphorylation of AMPK, 4EBP1, and S6 proteins. In isolated fetal hepatocytes, AA supplementation increased glucose production and PCK1 , LDHA , and MCT1 gene expression. These results demonstrate that AA infusion into fetal sheep competitively suppresses glucose oxidation and potentiates hepatic glucose production. These metabolic patterns support flexibility in fetal metabolism in response to increased nutrient substrate supply while maintaining a relatively stable rate of oxidative metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Contraceptive utilization and associated factors among HIV positive women on chronic follow up care in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Adama Melaku

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In sub-Sahara Africa, more than 60% of all new HIV infections are occurring in women, infants and young children. Maternal to child transmission is responsible for 90% of childhood HIV infection. Preventing unwanted pregnancy among HIV positive women is imperative to reduce maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 964 HIV positive women in selected 12 health centers of Tigray region. In this paper, analysis was restricted only for 847 women who were sexually active and non-pregnant. In each health center the number of study participants was allocated proportionally to the load of HIV positive women in chronic care clinics. The data were entered into EpiData version 3.1, and cleaned and analyzed using Stata version 11.1. Descriptive summary of data and logistic regression were used to identify possible predictors using odds ratio with 95% confidence interval and P-value of 0.05. FINDINGS: Three hundred ninety four (46.5% of all HIV positive women had intension to have more children. Three hundred seventy five (44.3% were using contraceptive methods at time of survey. Injectable (70.7% and male condom (47.6% were most commonly used type of contraceptives. In the multivariable analysis, women who were urban dwellers (AOR = 2.55; 95% CI: 1.27, 5.02, completed primary education (AOR = 2.27; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.86 and those openly discussed about contraceptive methods with their husbands or sexual partners (AOR = 6.3; 95% CI: 3.42, 11.76 were more likely to use contraceptive. Women who have one or more living children were also more likely to use contraceptive compared with women with no child. CONCLUSION: Less than half of women used contraceptive methods. The use of condoms could impact unintended pregnancies and reduced risks of vertical and sexual transmission. Efforts to increase contraceptive utilization focusing on the barrier methods should be strengthen in HIV

  15. Monitoring and management of lung cancer patients following curative-intent treatment: clinical utility of 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shigeki Sawada, Hiroshi Suehisa, Tsuyoshi Ueno, Ryujiro Sugimoto, Motohiro Yamashita Department of Thoracic Surgery, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama, Japan Abstract: A large number of studies have demonstrated that 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT is superior to conventional modalities for the diagnosis of lung cancer and the evaluation of the extent of the disease. However, the efficacy of PET/CT in a follow-up surveillance setting following curative-intent treatments for lung cancer has not yet been established. We reviewed previous papers and evaluated the potential efficacy of PET-CT in the setting of follow-up surveillance. The following are our findings: 1 PET/CT is considered to be superior or equivalent to conventional modalities for the detection of local recurrence. However, inflammatory changes and fibrosis after treatments in local areas often result in false-positive findings; 2 the detection of asymptomatic distant metastasis is considered to be an advantage of PET/CT in a follow-up setting. However, it should be noted that detection of brain metastasis with PET/CT has some limitation, similar to its use in pretreatment staging; 3 additional radiation exposure and higher medical cost arising from the use of PET/CT should be taken into consideration, particularly in patients who might not have cancer after curative-intent treatment and are expected to have a long lifespan. The absence of any data regarding survival benefits and/or improvements in quality of life is another critical issue. In summary, PET/CT is considered to be more accurate and sensitive than conventional modalities for the detection of asymptomatic recurrence after curative-intent treatments. These advantages could modify subsequent management in patients with suspected recurrence and might contribute to the selection of appropriate treatments for recurrence

  16. Glucose uptake and its effect on gene expression in prochlorococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Gómez-Baena

    Full Text Available The marine cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus have been considered photoautotrophic microorganisms, although the utilization of exogenous sugars has never been specifically addressed in them. We studied glucose uptake in different high irradiance- and low irradiance-adapted Prochlorococcus strains, as well as the effect of glucose addition on the expression of several glucose-related genes. Glucose uptake was measured by adding radiolabelled glucose to Prochlorococcus cultures, followed by flow cytometry coupled with cell sorting in order to separate Prochlorococcus cells from bacterial contaminants. Sorted cells were recovered by filtration and their radioactivity measured. The expression, after glucose addition, of several genes (involved in glucose metabolism, and in nitrogen assimilation and its regulation was determined in the low irradiance-adapted Prochlorococcus SS120 strain by semi-quantitative real time RT-PCR, using the rnpB gene as internal control. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the Prochlorococcus strains studied in this work take up glucose at significant rates even at concentrations close to those found in the oceans, and also exclude the possibility of this uptake being carried out by eventual bacterial contaminants, since only Prochlorococcus cells were used for radioactivity measurements. Besides, we show that the expression of a number of genes involved in glucose utilization (namely zwf, gnd and dld, encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, respectively is strongly increased upon glucose addition to cultures of the SS120 strain. This fact, taken together with the magnitude of the glucose uptake, clearly indicates the physiological importance of the phenomenon. Given the significant contribution of Prochlorococcus to the global primary production, these findings have strong implications for the understanding of the phytoplankton role in the carbon

  17. Glucose Transporters in Brain: In Health and in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Neurons need a continuous supply of glucose, the major source of energy for mammalian brain metabolism. The central nervous system is protected by three main physiological cell barriers. Cell membranes are impermeable for glucose, therefore glucose is transferred across the cell membranes by specific transport proteins: sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUTs), encoded by SLC2 genes, and sodium-dependent glucose transporters (for example SGLTs), encoded by SLC5 genes. Human brain expresses 10 GLUT proteins and 10 proteins encoded by SLC5 genes. In patients with brain diseases, particularly Alzheimer's (AD) and Huntington's diseases, abnormalities in neuronal glucose metabolism have been showed. The levels of GLUT1 and GLUT3, the major brain glucose transporters, are decreased, especially in the cerebral cortex. Therefore, in AD, hypometabolism of glucose and deficits in energy are observed. Production of ATP from glucose metabolism in sporadic AD declines to 50% and the tendency to decline continues throughout the progression of the disease. This decrease is correlated with O-GlcAcetylation and tau hyperphosphorylation, as the compensatory mechanisms in AD are the utilization of endogenous brain substances and drastic increase in GLUT2 levels. The present review focuses on the changes in the expression of glucose transporters due to AD.

  18. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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    ... medicines • infection or other illness • changes in hormone levels,such as during menstrual periods • stress What can make blood glucose fall? • missing a meal or snack,or having a meal or snack with less ...

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  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

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  13. Optimizing cerebral glucose in severe traumatic brain injury: still some way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahed, Cameron; Gupta, Arun K

    2009-01-01

    This commentary considers some of the factors that affect cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with traumatic brain injury. A study recently reported in Critical Care suggested a blood glucose range that may optimize cerebral glucose utilization; the findings of this study are evaluated and discussed. Some of the mechanisms of cerebral glucose control are explored, including the impact of intensive insulin therapy on cerebral metabolism.

  14. Optimizing cerebral glucose in severe traumatic brain injury: still some way to go

    OpenAIRE

    Zahed, Cameron; Gupta, Arun K.

    2009-01-01

    This commentary considers some of the factors that affect cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with traumatic brain injury. A study recently reported in Critical Care suggested a blood glucose range that may optimize cerebral glucose utilization; the findings of this study are evaluated and discussed. Some of the mechanisms of cerebral glucose control are explored, including the impact of intensive insulin therapy on cerebral metabolism.

  15. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  16. Cerebral oxygen and glucose metabolism in patients with mitochondrial m.3243A>G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, Markus M; Borra, Ronald J; Parkkola, Riitta; Virtanen, Sami M; Lepomäki, Virva; Bucci, Marco; Virta, Jere R; Rinne, Juha O; Nuutila, Pirjo; Majamaa, Kari

    2009-12-01

    The m.3243A>G mutation is the most common pathogenic mutation in mitochondrial DNA. It leads to defective oxidative phosphorylation, decreased oxygen consumption and increased glucose utilization and lactate production in vitro. However, oxygen and glucose metabolism has not been studied in the brain of patients harbouring the m.3243A>G mutation. Therefore, 14 patients with the m.3243A>G mutation, not experiencing acute stroke-like episodes and 14 age-matched controls underwent positron emission tomography using 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose, [(15)O]H(2)O and [(15)O]O(2) as the tracers during normoglycaemia. The metabolic rate of oxygen and glucose were determined using a quantitative region of interest analysis. Metabolites in unaffected periventricular tissue were measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We found that the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was decreased by 26% (range 18%-29%) in the grey as well as the white matter of patients with the m.3243A>G mutation. A decrease in the metabolic rate of glucose was found with predilection to the posterior part of the brain. No major changes were detected in cerebral blood flow or the number of white matter lesions. Our results show that the m.3243A>G mutation leads to a global decrease in oxygen consumption in the grey matter including areas where no other signs of disease were present.

  17. Malaria Protection In Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency gene in malaria endemic regions is believed to be due to the enzyme deficiency advantage against fatal malaria. However, the mechanism of this protection is not well understood and therefore was investigated by comparing differences in ...

  18. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase in the pr......Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase...... in the presence of insulin is found. To determine whether these alterations and in particular those mediated by insulin are due to local or systemic factors, one hindlimb of an anesthetized rat was electrically stimulated, and both hindlimbs were perfused immediately thereafter. Glucose and glycogen metabolism...... in the stimulated leg closely mimicked that observed previously after voluntary exercise on a treadmill. With no insulin added to the perfusate, glucose incorporation into glycogen was markedly enhanced in muscles that were glycogen depleted as were the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose. Likewise...

  19. Factors associated with utilization of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods among married women of reproductive age in Mekelle town, Tigray region, north Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemayehu Mussie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethiopia is the second most populous country in Sub-Saharan Africa. Total Fertility Rate of Ethiopia is 5.4 children per women, population growth rate is estimated to be 2.7% per year and contraceptive prevalence rate is only 15% while the unmet need for family planning is 34%. Overall awareness of Family Planning methods is high, at 87%. The prevalence of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods (LAPMs in Tigray region was very low which accounts for 0.1% for implants and no users for intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUCD and female sterilization. Moreover almost all modern contraceptive use in Ethiopia is dependent on short acting contraceptive methods. The objective of this study was to assess factors associated with utilization of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods (LAPM among married women of reproductive age group in Mekelle town. Methods A cross sectional community based survey was conducted from March 9-20, 2011. Multistage sample technique was used to select the participants for the quantitative methods whereas purposive sampling was used for the qualitative part of the study. Binary descriptive statistics and multiple variable regressions were done. Results The study consisted of quantitative and qualitative data. From the quantitative part of the study the response rate of the study was 95.6%. Of the qualitative part two FGDs were conducted for each married women and married men. 64% of the married women heard about LAPMs. More than half (53.6% of the married women had negative attitude towards practicing of LAPMs. The overall prevalence of LAPMs use was 12.3% however; there were no users for female or male sterilization. The main reason cited by the majority of the married women for not using LAPMs was using another method of contraception 360 (93.3%. Mothers who had high knowledge were 8 times more likely to use LAPMs as compared with those who had low knowledge (AOR = 7.9, 95% CI of (3

  20. Effects of MDMA on blood glucose levels and brain glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Montenegro, M.L.; Vaquero, J.J.; Garcia-Barreno, P.; Desco, M. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Laboratorio de Imagen, Medicina Experimental, Madrid (Spain); Arango, C. [Hospital General Gregorio Maranon, Departamento de Psiquiatria, Madrid (Spain); Ricaurte, G. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    This study was designed to assess changes in glucose metabolism in rats administered single or repeated doses of MDMA. Two different experiments were performed: (1) A single-dose study with four groups receiving 20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg, saline or heat, and (2) a repeated-dose study with two groups receiving three doses, at intervals of 2 h, of 5 mg/kg or saline. Rats were imaged using a dedicated small-animal PET scanner 1 h after single-dose administration or 7 days after repeated doses. Glucose metabolism was measured in 12 cerebral regions of interest. Rectal temperature and blood glucose were monitored. Peak body temperature was reached 1 h after MDMA administration. Blood glucose levels decreased significantly after MDMA administration. In the single-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism showed hyperactivation in cerebellum and hypo-activation in the hippocampus, amygdala and auditory cortex. In the repeated-dose experiment, brain glucose metabolism did not show any significant change at day 7. These results are the first to indicate that MDMA has the potential to produce significant hypoglycaemia. In addition, they show that MDMA alters glucose metabolism in components of the motor, limbic and somatosensory systems acutely but not on a long-term basis. (orig.)

  1. Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect the fate of glucose in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Linda R; Herrero, Pilar; Coggan, Andrew R; Kisrieva-Ware, Zulia; Saeed, Ibrahim; Dence, Carmen; Koudelis, Deborah; McGill, Janet B; Lyons, Matthew R; Novak, Eric; Dávila-Román, Víctor G; Waggoner, Alan D; Gropler, Robert J

    2015-06-15

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect myocardial glucose uptake and utilization. However, their effect on the intramyocellular fate of glucose in humans has been unknown. How the heart uses glucose is important, because it affects energy production and oxygen efficiency, which in turn affect heart function and adaptability. We hypothesized that type 2 diabetes, sex difference, and obesity affect myocardial glucose oxidation, glycolysis, and glycogen production. In a first-in-human study, we measured intramyocardiocellular glucose metabolism from time-activity curves generated from previously obtained positron emission tomography scans of 110 subjects in 3 groups: nonobese, obese, and diabetes. Group and sex difference interacted in the prediction of all glucose uptake, utilization, and metabolism rates. Group independently predicted fractional glucose uptake and its components: glycolysis, glycogen deposition, and glucose oxidation rates. Sex difference predicted glycolysis rates. However, there were fewer differences in glucose metabolism between diabetic patients and others when plasma glucose levels were included in the modeling. The potentially detrimental effects of obesity and diabetes on myocardial glucose metabolism are more pronounced in men than women. This sex difference dimorphism needs to be taken into account in the design, trials, and application of metabolic modulator therapy. Slightly higher plasma glucose levels improve depressed glucose oxidation and glycogen deposition rates in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Glucose-dependent turnover of the mRNAs encoding succinate dehydrogenase peptides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: sequence elements in the 5' untranslated region of the Ip mRNA play a dominant role.

    OpenAIRE

    Cereghino, G P; Atencio, D P; Saghbini, M; Beiner, J; Scheffler, I E

    1995-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that glucose repression of mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves the control of the turnover of mRNAs for the iron protein (Ip) and flavoprotein (Fp) subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). Their half-lives are > 60 min in the presence of a nonfermentable carbon source (YPG medium) and 60 min in the presence of a nonfermentable carbon source...

  3. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system.

  4. Brain Glucose Transporter (Glut3) Haploinsufficiency Does Not Impair Mouse Brain Glucose Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A.; Ross, Ian R.; Howell, Mary E. A.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Wood, Thomas G.; Ceci, Jeffrey D.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Mouse brain expresses three principle glucose transporters. Glut1 is an endothelial marker and is the principal glucose transporter of the blood-brain barrier. Glut3 and Glut6 are expressed in glial cells and neural cells. A mouse line with a null allele for Glut3 has been developed. The Glut3−/− genotype is intrauterine lethal by seven days post-coitis, but the heterozygous (Glut3+/−) littermate survives, exhibiting rapid post-natal weight gain, but no seizures or other behavioral aberrations. At twelve weeks of age, brain uptake of tail vein-injected 3H-2-deoxy glucose in Glut3+/− mice was not different from Glut3+/+ littermates, despite 50% less Glut3 protein expression in the brain. The brain uptake of injected 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy glucose was similarly not different from Glut3+/− littermates in the total amount, time course, or brain imaging in the Glut3+/− mice. Glut1 and Glut6 protein expressions evaluated by immunoblots were not affected by the diminished Glut3 expression in the Glut3+/− mice. We conclude that a 50% decrease in Glut3 is not limiting for the uptake of glucose into the mouse brain, since Glut3 haploinsufficiency does not impair brain glucose uptake or utilization. PMID:21316350

  5. Nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Christiane; Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: A reliable method to detect biochemical nocturnal hypoglycemia is highly needed, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycemia. We evaluated reliability of nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in patients with type 1 diabetes at high risk of severe...... from 23:00 to 07:00 h for plasma glucose (PG) measurements (gold standard). Results: Valid data were obtained in 217 nights. The sensitivity of CGM was 65% (95% confidence interval, 53-77%) below 4 mmol/L, 40% (24-56%) below 3 mmol/L, and 17% (0-47%) below 2.2 mmol/L. PG and CGM readings correlated...

  6. Glucose effectiveness in nondiabetic relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egede, M B; Henriksen, J-E; Durck, T T

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Reduced glucose effectiveness is a predictor of future glucose tolerance in individuals with a family history of type 2 diabetes. We examined retrospectively at 10 years in normoglycemic relatives of diabetic subjects (RELs) the pathophysiological role of glucose effectiveness...... in the development of isolated impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and acute insulin release. METHODS: At 0 years, 19 RELs and 18 matched control subjects had glucose effectiveness (GE), insulin sensitivity, acute insulin release (AIR)IVGTT, and disposition index measured during an iv glucose tolerance...... test (IVGTT), using the minimal model analysis. At 0 and 10 years, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) and AIROGTT were determined. RESULTS: At 0 years, fasting glucose (FG) and GE were raised in RELs, but insulin sensitivity and AIROGTT were reduced (P ≤ .05) compared with controls. At 10 years, RELs...

  7. NIR FRET Fluorophores for Use as an Implantable Glucose Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed DWEIK

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of an in vivo optical sensor requires the utilization of Near Infra Red (NIR fluorophores due to their ability to operate within the biological tissue window. Alexa Fluor 750 (AF750 and Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680 were examined as potential NIR fluorophores for an in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET glucose biosensor. AF680 and AF750 found to be a FRET pair and percent energy transfer was calculated. Next, the tested dye pair was utilized in a competitive binding assay in order to detect glucose. Concanavalin A (Con A and dextran have binding affinity, but in the presence of glucose, glucose displaces dextran due to its higher affinity to Con A than dextran. Finally, the percent signal transfer through porcine skin was examined. The results showed with approximately 4.0 mm porcine skin thickness, 1.98 % of the fluorescence was transmitted and captured by the detector.

  8. Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: A potential utility for the evaluation of regional liver function impairment following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu-Dong; Paudel, Ramchandra; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Bin; Ma, Cong; Zhou, Shun-Ke

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate regional liver function impairment following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA). Additionally, this study evaluated the associations between signal intensity and various clinical factors. A prospective study was conducted between March 2012 and May 2013 with a total of 35 patients. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was performed 3-5 days after TACE therapy. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was subsequently calculated for healthy liver tissue regions and peritumoral regions, prior to and 20 min after Gd-EOB-DTPA administration. The correlation between clinical factors and relative SNR was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient or Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Prior to Gd-EOB-DTPA administration, the SNR values showed no significant difference (t=1.341, P=0.191) in healthy liver tissue regions (50.53±15.99; range, 11.25-83.46) compared with peritumoral regions (49.81±15.85; range, 12.34-81.53). On measuring at 20 min following Gd-EOB-DTPA administration, the SNR in healthy liver tissue regions (82.55±33.33; range, 31.45-153.02) was significantly higher (t=3.732, Pquantity of iodized oil used during TACE therapy (r=0.528, P=0.003); the age, gender, diameter and blood supply of the tumor, or Child-Pugh class of the patient did not correlate with relative SNR. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI may be an effective way to evaluate regional liver function impairment following TACE therapy.

  9. Labview utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  10. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term ... body can't use insulin properly. What Causes Hyperglycemia? A number of things can cause hyperglycemia: If ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To ... to make changes in your meal plan. If exercise and changes in your diet don't work, your doctor may change the ...

  12. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to 5:00 a.m.). What are the Symptoms of Hyperglycemia? The signs and symptoms include the following: High blood glucose High levels ... Ketoacidosis is life-threatening and needs immediate treatment. Symptoms include: Shortness of breath Breath that smells fruity ...

  13. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical ...

  14. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body can't use insulin properly. What Causes Hyperglycemia? A number of things can cause hyperglycemia: If you have type 1, you may ... treating high blood glucose early will help you avoid problems associated with hyperglycemia. How Do I Treat ...

  15. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know ... Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Can I Drink? Fruit Dairy Food ...

  16. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may make your blood glucose level go even higher. You'll need to work with your doctor ... Online Chat Closed engagement en -- Free Type 2 Education Series - 2017-06-free-type-2-education-series. ...

  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... Medicare Medicaid & CHIP For Parents & Kids Safe at School Everyday ... Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers ...

  18. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My Community Advocacy Research & Practice Ways to Give Close Are You at Risk? Home Prevention Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor ...

  19. Continuous glucose monitoring: current use and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Daniel; Buckingham, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is an emerging technology that provides a continuous measure of interstitial glucose levels. In addition to providing a more complete pattern of glucose excursions, CGMs utilize real-time alarms for thresholds and predictions of hypo- and hyperglycemia, as well as rate of change alarms for rapid glycemic excursions. CGM users have been able to improve glycemic control without increasing their risk of hypoglycemia. Sensor accuracy, reliability, and wearability are important challenges to CGM success and are critical to the development of an artificial pancreas (or closed-loop system).

  20. Muscle glucose metabolism following exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1982-01-01

    both, the concentration of insulin that half-maximally stimulated glucose utilization (exercise, 150 muU/ml; control, 480 muU/ml) and modestly increased its maximum effect. The increase in insulin sensitivity persisted for 4 h following exercise, but was not present after 24 h. The rate-limiting step...... diminished synthase activity in situ. The possibility that exercise enhanced the ability of insulin to convert glycogen synthase D to an intermediate form of the enzyme, more sensitive to glucose-6-phosphate, remains to be explored. These results suggest that following exercise, glucose transport...

  1. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Richter, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity. This review gives an update on the molecular signals by which glucose transport...... is increased in the contracting muscle followed by a discussion of glycogen mobilization and synthesis by the action of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase, respectively. Finally, this review deals with the signalling relaying the well-described increased sensitivity of glucose transport to insulin...... in the post-exercise period which can result in an overshoot of intramuscular glycogen resynthesis post exercise (glycogen supercompensation)....

  2. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in rural population of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, M A; Azad Khan, A K; Nahar, Quamrun; Ali, S M K; Hussain, Akhtar

    2010-08-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rapidly rising all over the world at an alarming rate. Over the past 30 years, the increase in prevalence is rising exponentially in South Asian region, data suggest a three fold increase (from 2.0 to 7.0%) in the urbanizing population of Bangladesh within 5 years. However, the prevalence of various degrees of glucose intolerance, i.e., type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose considered vital for prevention are still unknown in this population. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) with their demographic and anthropometric characteristics in a reasonable large sample compare to other studies conducted in Bangladesh. A random sample of 5000 rural population aged > or =20 years was included in this cross sectional study. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) level was measured from 3981 individuals and 2-hr blood glucose (BG) was done on 3954 subjects, excluding known diabetic cases (n= 27). Height, weight, waist and hip circumference including blood pressure and demographic information was also collected. The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and newly detected type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were 1.3%, 2.0% and 7.0% respectively. IFG, IGT, IFG+IGT were more prevalent in females than males. Age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were higher in glucose-intolerant subjects than in normal glucose tolerant (NGT) group. FBG and 2-hr BG values were correlated in NGT and DM subjects. Our data suggest that estimation of FBG value identifies more people with diabetes compared to 2-hr BG estimation. These findings need to be further examined in other settings with urban and rural populations for the justification of FBG for screening of diabetes in Bangladeshi population for development of intervention strategy for the

  3. Cellobiose Consumption Uncouples Extracellular Glucose Sensing and Glucose Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulika Chomvong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycolysis is central to energy metabolism in most organisms and is highly regulated to enable optimal growth. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, feedback mechanisms that control flux through glycolysis span transcriptional control to metabolite levels in the cell. Using a cellobiose consumption pathway, we decoupled glucose sensing from carbon utilization, revealing new modular layers of control that induce ATP consumption to drive rapid carbon fermentation. Alterations of the beta subunit of phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK2, H+-plasma membrane ATPase (PMA1, and glucose sensors (SNF3 and RGT2 revealed the importance of coupling extracellular glucose sensing to manage ATP levels in the cell. Controlling the upper bound of cellular ATP levels may be a general mechanism used to regulate energy levels in cells, via a regulatory network that can be uncoupled from ATP concentrations under perceived starvation conditions.

  4. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially...

  5. Television Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosh, O.; Wright, E. N.

    The utilization of educational television (ETV) in schools can be ascertained by considering the teacher training in ETV, the extent of access to ETV, the student reaction, and the programing. Using a questionnaire survey method combined with detailed ETV logs, this study was able to analyze both ETV and film utilization in 13 elementary and…

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  7. [Dermatology service utilization and reasons for consultation by Spanish and immigrant patients in the region served by Hospital Son Llàtzer, Palma de Majorca, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberner, R; Nadal, C; Llambrich, A; Vila e I Torné, A

    2010-05-01

    Spain has come to be one of the main European destinations for immigrants from countries with low per capita incomes. The Balearic Islands have the second largest proportion of immigrants in a Spanish autonomous community. The aim of this study was to describe the dermatology service utilization by immigrant and Spanish populations at Hospital Son Llàtzer in Palma de Majorca, Spain. A longitudinal, descriptive study was undertaken to analyze first visits to the dermatology department of Hospital Son Llàtzer between July 10, 2007 and July 9, 2008. Of the 6699 first visits, 13. 2% were by non-Spanish patients, originating from 64 different countries, with Argentina, Ecuador, and Columbia the most common. Spanish patients consulted more frequently than non-Spanish patients. Patients from outside the European Union consulted most often for inflammatory conditions, whereas patients from Spain and other countries of the European Union mainly consulted for benign tumors. Consultations were for sexually transmitted disease in 2% of visits. The reason for the visit was classified as cosmetic in 14. 1% of patients. The dermatology service utilization by the immigrant population was lower than by Spanish patients, although with differences according to the country of origin.

  8. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  9. Practical approaches for self-monitoring of blood glucose: an Asia-Pacific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subhankar; Ji, Linong; Suwanwalaikorn, Sompongse; Yu, Neng-Chun; Tan, Eng Kiat

    2015-03-01

    Comprehensive glycemic control is necessary to improve outcomes and avoid complications in individuals with diabetes. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is a key enabler of glycemic assessment, providing real-time information that complements HbA1c monitoring and supports treatment optimization. However, SMBG is under-utilized by patients and physicians within the Asia-Pacific region, because of barriers such as the cost of monitoring supplies, lack of diabetes self-management skills, or concerns about the reliability of blood glucose readings. Practice recommendations in international and regional guidelines vary widely, and may not be detailed or specific enough to guide SMBG use effectively. This contributes to uncertainty among patients and physicians about how best to utilize this tool: when and how often to test, and what action(s) to take in response to high or low readings. In developing a practical SMBG regimen, the first step is to determine the recommended SMBG frequency and intensity needed to support the chosen treatment regimen. If there are practical obstacles to monitoring, such as affordability or access, physicians should identify the most important aspects of glycemic control to target for individual patients, and modify monitoring patterns accordingly. This consensus paper proposes a selection of structured, flexible SMBG patterns that can be tailored to the clinical, educational, behavioral, and financial requirements of individuals with diabetes.

  10. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gukhan [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Won [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seon [Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung-Whan, E-mail: swkim7@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Bio-Medical Institute of Technology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  11. Fabrication of Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Buckypaper Electrodes for Application in Glucose Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Papa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive glucose detection method was developed using functionalized carbon nanotube buckypaper as a free standing electrode in an electrochemical biosensor. Glucose oxidase was immobilized onto various buckypaper samples in order to oxidize glucose resulting in a measureable current/voltage signal output of the biosensor. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and amperometry were utilized to determine the sensitivity of these buckypaper electrodes. Sensors of three different types of buckypaper were prepared and compared. These modified buckypaper electrode-based sensors showed much higher sensitivity to glucose compared to other electrochemical glucose sensors.

  12. ORAL GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST REVISITED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0 Abnormal previous glucose result of either impaired fasting plasma glucose ... Population studies for epidemiological data are known indications for oral ... Table I : Factors other than diabetes that may influence oral glucose tolerance test 1. Patient's preparation. 0 Duration of fast. Prior carbohydrate intake. Medications.

  13. The GLUT4 Glucose Transporter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Shaohui; Czech, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    ... protein that mediates this uptake is one isoform (Gene name, SLC2A4; protein name: GLUT4) of a family of sugar transporter proteins containing 12-transmembrane domains ( Figure 1 ). The GLUT4 glucose transporter is thus a major mediator of glucose removal from the circulation and a key regulator of whole-body glucose homeostasis. Here, we discus...

  14. Survey report on the development/utilization of petroleum substitution energy in the Pacific region; Taiheiyo chiiki sekiyu daitai energy kaihatsu riyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The paper collected/analyzed data on petroleum substitution energy in the Pacific region. In fiscal 1996, in addition to collection of the existing energy data, conducted were collection of energy data made retroactive from 1971, and time-series collection of the energy related expanded data including energy related production statistics/social statistics, energy consumption amount by industry, power generation facilities, oil production facilities, and environmental data. As to petroleum substitution energy, the paper took up new energy such as hydroelectric, nuclear, geothermal, photovoltaic, and wind power generation, and commercial-base renewable energy. As a result of the analysis, the supply of petroleum substitution energy in the whole Pacific region has been stable, 6.6% during 1980-1990, 7.4% in the first half of the 1990s, largely over the primary energy supply. The supply of nuclear power was overwhelmingly large, followed by hydroelectric energy and geothermal/new energy. 15 figs., 23 tabs.

  15. Glucose utilization and anti-oxidative mechanisms of the aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    estimated to reach 366 million by the year 2030. (Wild et al., 2004) with the estimated global cost of. $1 trillion incurred yearly for treating it and its ...... 78 albumin and bromocresol green. Clinica Chimica. Acta 31: 131-137. Ezekwesili, C.N., Ogbunugafor, H.A., Ezekwesili-. Ofili, J.O. (2012). Antidiabetic activity of aqueous.

  16. Regulation of glucose utilization and lipogenesis in adipose tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    phatase in the effectiveness of insulin action, is held to be a central regulatory feature of the insulinomimetic action of manganese. Acknowledgements. NZB is greateful to Prof. T W Rademacher, Department of Molecular Pathology, UCMS, London, UK for subsis- tence during her sabbatical from JNU. UCSY is a recipi-.

  17. Regulation of Glucose Utilization by Estradiol in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    membranes (Milli- pore). The membranes were blocked with 5% nonfat milk in TBS-T (0.1%Tween 20) and immunoblotted with the indicated antibodies...from the following ChIP grade antibodies: anti-ER (HC-20), anti- ER (H-150) from Santa Cruz Biotechnology , or normal rabbit IgG (Cell Signaling

  18. Glucose utilization and anti-oxidative mechanisms of the aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South-west Nigeria, water decoctions of Hunteria umbellata seeds are highly valued by traditional healers in the local management of diabetes mellitus, ... In conclusion, results of this study showed HU treatment to significantly ameliorate the hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic rats which was ...

  19. Regional seroreactivity and vector-borne disease co-exposures in dogs in the United States from 2004-2010: utility of canine surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Caroline B; Hegarty, Barbara C; Qurollo, Barbara A; Levy, Michael G; Birkenheuer, Adam J; Weber, David J; Diniz, Pedro P V P; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2014-10-01

    Vector-borne disease (VBD) pathogens remain an emerging health concern for animals and humans throughout the world. Surveillance studies of ticks and humans have made substantial contributions to our knowledge of VBD epidemiology trends, but long-term VBD surveillance data of dogs in the United States is limited. This seroreactivity study assessed US temporal and regional trends and co-exposures to Anaplasma, Babesia, Bartonella, Borrelia burgdorferi, Dirofilaria immitis, Ehrlichia spp., and spotted fever group Rickettsia in dogs from 2004-2010. Dog serum samples (N=14,496) were submitted to the North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Vector Borne Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for vector-borne pathogens diagnostic testing using immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assays. These convenience samples were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The largest proportion of samples originated from the South (47.6%), with the highest percent of seroreactive samples observed in the Midatlantic (43.4%), compared to other US regions. The overall seroreactivity of evaluated VBD antigens were Rickettsia rickettsia (10.4%), B. burgdorferi (5.2%), Ehrlichia spp. (4.3%), Bartonella henselae (3.8%), Anaplasma spp. (1.9%), Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (1.5%), Babesia canis (1.1%), and D. immitis (0.8%). Significant regional and annual seroreactivity variation was observed with B. burgdorferi, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia exposures. Seasonal seroreactivity variation was evident with Rickettsia. Seroreactivity to more than one antigen was present in 16.5% of exposed dogs. Nationally, the most prevalent co-exposure was Rickettsia with Ehrlichia spp. (5.3%), and the highest odds of co-exposure was associated with Anaplasma spp. and B. burgdorferi (odds ratio=6.6; 95% confidence interval 5.0, 8.8). Notable annual and regional seroreactivity variation was observed with certain pathogens over 7 years of study

  20. National Coal Utilization Assessment. An integrated assessment of increased coal use in the Midwest: impacts and constraints. [14 states Midwest region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    This study examines the impacts and constraints to increased coal production and use for a 14-state Midwestern region. The assessment considers technology characteristics, energy supply and demand trends, siting constraints, impacts on water availability and coal reserves, impacts on air and water quality, and ecosystems, effects of trace elements, social and economic impacts, and health risks. The significant air quality constraints to coal use are related to the short-term National Ambient Air Quality Standards, PSD standards, and exposure to sulfates. In general, cumulative water supply in the 14-state region is adequate to satisfy foreseeable energy requirements; however, on a localized basis significant water shortages may develop which could constrain a smaller portion of the energy development. Water quality impacts are primarily restricted to areas with insufficient water resources. Coal mining will continue to have significant effects on water quality in smaller streams draining the major coal regions unless strict control practices are maintained. Coal-conversion plants may cause localized water quality problems; however, the effluent characteristics of these plants are not well-known. A significant amount of the coal development is anticipated to occur in counties with high susceptibility to social and economic impacts. The timing, magnitude, and nature of these impacts could be mitigated by the development of effective management strategies.

  1. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Labrune Philippe; Gajdos Vincent; Eberschweiler Pascale; Hubert-Buron Aurélie; Petit François; Vianey-Saban Christine; Boudjemline Alix; Piraud Monique; Froissart Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, betw...

  2. Glucose recognition proteins for glucose sensing at physiological concentrations and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Smita; Turner, Kendrick B; Daunert, Sylvia

    2014-07-18

    Advancements in biotechnology have allowed for the preparation of designer proteins with a wide spectrum of unprecedented chemical and physical properties. A variety of chemical and genetic methods can be employed to tailor the protein's properties, including its stability and various functions. Herein, we demonstrate the production of semisynthetic glucose recognition proteins (GRPs) prepared by truncating galactose/glucose binding protein (GBP) of E. coli and expanding the genetic code via global incorporation of unnatural amino acids into the structure of GBP and its fragments. The unnatural amino acids 5,5,5-trifluoroleucine (FL) and 5-fluorotryptophan (FW) were chosen for incorporation into the proteins. The resulting semisynthetic GRPs exhibit enhanced thermal stability and increased detection range of glucose without compromising its binding ability. These modifications enabled the utilization of the protein for the detection of glucose within physiological concentrations (mM) and temperatures ranging from hypothermia to hyperthermia. This ability to endow proteins such as GBP with improved stability and properties is critical in designing the next generation of tailor-made biosensing proteins for continuous in vivo glucose monitoring.

  3. Imaging the tissue distribution of glucose in livers using a PARACEST sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jimin; Trokowski, Robert; Zhang, Shanrong; Malloy, Craig R; Sherry, A Dean

    2008-11-01

    Noninvasive imaging of glucose in tissues could provide important insights about glucose gradients in tissue, the origins of gluconeogenesis, or perhaps differences in tissue glucose utilization in vivo. Direct spectral detection of glucose in vivo by (1)H NMR is complicated by interfering signals from other metabolites and the much larger water signal. One potential way to overcome these problems is to use an exogenous glucose sensor that reports glucose concentrations indirectly through the water signal by chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). Such a method is demonstrated here in mouse liver perfused with a Eu(3+)-based glucose sensor containing two phenylboronate moieties as the recognition site. Activation of the sensor by applying a frequency-selective presaturation pulse at 42 ppm resulted in a 17% decrease in water signal in livers perfused with 10 mM sensor and 10 mM glucose compared with livers with the same amount of sensor but without glucose. It was shown that livers perfused with 5 mM sensor but no glucose can detect glucose exported from hepatocytes after hormonal stimulation of glycogenolysis. CEST images of livers perfused in the magnet responded to changes in glucose concentrations demonstrating that the method has potential for imaging the tissue distribution of glucose in vivo.

  4. Comparison of serum glucose and salivary glucose in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreedevi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The importance of saliva for oral health is well known. Diabetes mellitus affects the salivary gland functioning and thus alters the salivary constituents. For many years the question of the presence of glucose in saliva has been a subject of debate and only few people found correlation between serum glucose and salivary glucose in diabetics. Hence, the purpose of this study was to estimate and correlate salivary glucose concentration and serum glucose concentration in diabetics and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: 60 newly diagnosed diabetic patients and 60 age and sex matched control subjects were included in the study. Blood and saliva samples from both the groups were collected at least two hours after the breakfast. The samples were centrifuged and subjected to glucose analysis using Semiautoanalyzer (BioSystems BTS-310 Photometer. For experimental group, the samples were collected again after the control of diabetes mellitus. The statistical comparisons were performed using paired and unpaired t -test. Results: A highly significant correlation was found between salivary glucose and serum glucose before the treatment and also after the control of diabetes. The correlation between salivary glucose and serum glucose was also highly significant in controls. The levels of salivary glucose did not vary with age and sex. Conclusion and Interpretation: As there was significant correlation between salivary glucose and serum glucose, salivary glucose holds the potential of being a marker in diabetes. Further, it has an added advantage of being non-invasive procedure with no need of special equipments and with fewer compliance problems as compared with collection of blood.

  5. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  6. Continued glucose output after re-feeding contributes to glucose intolerance in hyperthyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Holness, M J; Sugden, M C

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hyperthyroidism to elicit glucose intolerance after glucose administration were decreased under conditions where hepatic glucose output was suppressed. It is concluded that continued hepatic glucose output contributes to abnormal glucose tolerance in hyperthyroidism.

  7. National, regional, and global trends in fasting plasma glucose and diabetes prevalence since 1980: systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies with 370 country-years and 2·7 million participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danaei, Goodarz; Finucane, Mariel M; Lu, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Data for trends in glycaemia and diabetes prevalence are needed to understand the effects of diet and lifestyle within populations, assess the performance of interventions, and plan health services. No consistent and comparable global analysis of trends has been done. We estimated trends and thei......Data for trends in glycaemia and diabetes prevalence are needed to understand the effects of diet and lifestyle within populations, assess the performance of interventions, and plan health services. No consistent and comparable global analysis of trends has been done. We estimated trends...... and their uncertainties in mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and diabetes prevalence for adults aged 25 years and older in 199 countries and territories....

  8. Study on heat collector of the solar system utilizing outdoor air. Experimental results in cases of cold and warm regions; Gaiki donyushiki solar system no shunetsubu ni kansuru kenkyu. Kanreichi to ondanchi ni okeru shunetsu jikken to kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komano, S.; Ebara, Y. [OM Solar Association, Shizuoka (Japan); Wada, H. [Wada Building Constructors Co. Ltd., Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    An experiment on heat collection was made in the heat collector of a solar system utilizing outdoor air in cold and warm regions. In this system, outdoor air is heated by the air circulation layer on the roof exposed to solar radiation. The heated air is supplied to the object space for heating and ventilation. In the experiment in a cold region, the heat collection characteristics can be adjusted by putting a baffle plate in the air duct according to the experiment of a glass heat collector. The heat collecting air layer on only the iron roof may leak or freeze in the region subject to coldness or heavy snowfall. Therefore, preheat forms the space of a garret, and the preheat temperature comparatively becomes low. The data in which the heat collection characteristics can be adjusted using only a glass heat collector is required corresponding to the regional situation. In the experiment in a warm region, an experiment was made inclusive of the preheat for which outdoor air is absorbed at the eaves. As a result, the heat collection characteristics of preheat were improved. Moreover, a heat collection temperature of about 60{degree}C was obtained on the heat collection surface including the preheat. 1 ref., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Utilidad del campo magnético en la cervicobraquialgia crónica Utility of the regional magnetic field in the chronic cervical pain

    OpenAIRE

    J. Berty Tejedas; B.M. González Méndez; A. Hernández Díaz

    2012-01-01

    La medicina física y rehabilitación consta con un arsenal terapéutico amplio para tratar afecciones crónicas, utilizando esencialmente agentes físicos naturales y artificiales. El tratamiento casi siempre es conservador y puede utilizarse la aplicación local de las corrientes eléctricas y el campo magnético como medidas de fisioterapia. Teniendo en cuenta los efectos biológicos de la terapia con campo magnético regional, se investigó su utilidad en la cervicobraquialgia crónica, que represent...

  10. Transport equations in an enzymatic glucose fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariwala, Soham; Krishnamurthy, Balaji

    2018-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to study the effects of convective flux and operating temperature on the performance of an enzymatic glucose fuel cell with a membrane. The model assumes isothermal operating conditions and constant feed rate of glucose. The glucose fuel cell domain is divided into five sections, with governing equations describing transport characteristics in each region, namely - anode diffusion layer, anode catalyst layer (enzyme layer), membrane, cathode catalyst layer and cathode diffusion layer. The mass transport is assumed to be one-dimensional and the governing equations are solved numerically. The effects flow rate of glucose feed on the performance of the fuel cell are studied as it contributes significantly to the convective flux. The effects of operating temperature on the performance of a glucose fuel cell are also modeled. The cell performances are compared using cell polarization curves, which were found compliant with experimental observations.

  11. Geo-diversity and geo-materials in the region of Rabat-Salé-Zemmour-Zaer: Characterization and Rationalization of Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaj, Siham; Bahi, Lahcen; Akhssas, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    The Rabat-Salé-Zemmour-Zaer (RSZZ) is distinguished by a rich geology is varied. Outcrops are found in both the Paleozoic basement, especially along the major wadis in the area and a fairly extensive coverage postpaléozoïque and locally very thick. It offers a wide variety of petrographic facies some of which the construction of geomaterials value (GMC), very solicited by the construction sector and public works (BTP). Among the most important GMC furniture and beds of RSZZ: - The sands. They are a fundamental component for the preparation of mortar and hydraulic concrete. They also enter into the composition of adobe and are used for the foundation of shoes. -The Clays. They are mainly used by ceramists (industrial units manufacturing tiles). The red clay of Triassic age are most represented in the Region in deposits whose thickness can reach several tens of meters. -The Calcarenite. : It is the most used local stone in building the cities of Rabat and Salé, where she is well known as the Stone of Salé. The same stone is used in the manufacture of lime through calcination. Geologically, it is a calcareous sandstone, of Pliocene-Quaternary age that is in the form of a dune system that runs parallel to the Atlantic coast. -The Limestones: These massive limestones and more or less metamorphosed dolomitized Devonian. These limestone outcrop along major wadis of the region (Akrech, Ykem, ...) as layers sometimes quite thick and more or less tectonized. According to localities, these limestones show a wide range of colors (white, gray, black pink) and a wide variety of structures (colorful, beaded, veined, textured) - The quartzites. They correspond to Ordovician bars that appear quite often emerged in relation to other surrounding formations because of their high resistance to erosion. The rock is generally brownish gray and shows a very high hardness related to its siliceous. Local and temporary holdings allow blocks extraction for various public works

  12. Glucose-mediated control of ghrelin release from primary cultures of gastric mucosal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ichiro; Park, Won-Mee; Walker, Angela K.; Piper, Paul K.; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is released from a distinct group of gastrointestinal cells in response to caloric restriction, whereas its levels fall after eating. The mechanisms by which ghrelin secretion is regulated remain largely unknown. Here, we have used primary cultures of mouse gastric mucosal cells to investigate ghrelin secretion, with an emphasis on the role of glucose. Ghrelin secretion from these cells upon exposure to different d-glucose concentrations, the glucose antimetabolite 2-deoxy-d-glucose, and other potential secretagogues was assessed. The expression profile of proteins involved in glucose transport, metabolism, and utilization within highly enriched pools of mouse ghrelin cells and within cultured ghrelinoma cells was also determined. Ghrelin release negatively correlated with d-glucose concentration. Insulin blocked ghrelin release, but only in a low d-glucose environment. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose prevented the inhibitory effect of high d-glucose exposure on ghrelin release. mRNAs encoding several facilitative glucose transporters, hexokinases, the ATP-sensitive potassium channel subunit Kir6.2, and sulfonylurea type 1 receptor were expressed highly within ghrelin cells, although neither tolbutamide nor diazoxide exerted direct effects on ghrelin secretion. These findings suggest that direct exposure of ghrelin cells to low ambient d-glucose stimulates ghrelin release, whereas high d-glucose and glucose metabolism within ghrelin cells block ghrelin release. Also, low d-glucose sensitizes ghrelin cells to insulin. Various glucose transporters, channels, and enzymes that mediate glucose responsiveness in other cell types may contribute to the ghrelin cell machinery involved in regulating ghrelin secretion under these different glucose environments, although their exact roles in ghrelin release remain uncertain. PMID:22414807

  13. Role of NMDA receptors in the increase of glucose metabolism in the rat brain induced by fluorocitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Shinichiro; Umetani, Yukiko; Amitani, Misato; Hosoi, Rie; Momosaki, Sotaro; Hatazawa, Jun; Gee, Antony; Inoue, Osamu

    2007-03-30

    The effect of inhibition of glial metabolism by infusion of fluorocitrate (FC, 1 nmol/microl, 2 microl) into the right striatum of the rat brain on the glucose metabolism was studied. Significant increases in [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) uptake (45 min) in the right cerebral cortex and striatum were observed 4h after the infusion of FC, both as determined by the tissue dissection method and autoradiography. No significant increase in the initial uptake of [(18)F]FDG (1 min) was seen in the striatum. Pretreatment with dizocilpine (MK-801), an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, reduced [(18)F]FDG uptake in not only FC infused hemisphere but also in the contralateral hemisphere (saline-infused side). The radioactivity concentrations in plasma at 1, 5 and 45 min after the [(18)F]FDG injection were not altered by MK-801. This effect of MK-801 on glucose metabolism observed in the rat brain infused with FC was different from previous reports which indicated an increase in glucose metabolism in some areas of normal rat brain. In addition, the enhancement of glucose metabolism in the striatum induced by FC was almost completely abolished by pretreatment with MK-801. In the cerebral cortex, the relative ratio of radioactivity concentration in the right hemisphere to that in the left hemisphere still remained 1.37 (tissue dissection method) or 1.55 (autoradiography), which indicated that MK-801 partially blocked the effect of FC of enhancing glucose metabolism in this region. These results indicate an important role of NMDA-mediated signal transmission on the increase of glucose utilization induced by inhibition of glial metabolism.

  14. Glucose transporters in healthy heart and in cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2017-03-01

    Heart consumes more energy than any other organ. It can utilize various metabolic substrates as a source of energy. The primary substrates are free fatty acids, especially long-chain fatty acids and glucose. The lipid bilayer of plasmalemma is impermeable for glucose. Therefore, glucose transport across the plasma membrane is mediated via glucose transporters. In human, cardiac cells are expressed as 2 families of glucose transporters: GLUTs and SGLTs. These transport proteins are GLUT1, GLUT3, GLUT8, GLUT10, GLUT11, GLUT12 and SGLT1. In human heart, GLUT4 is the major isoform that represents approximately 70% of the total glucose transporters. The changes observed in diabetic heart showed that type 1 diabetes mellitus alters the expression and translocation of GLUT4 and GLUT8 in the atria. In diabetic atria, the content in cell surface of these glucose transporters is downregulated. Expression of SGLT1, is increased in patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy secondary to type 2 diabetes. Increased expression of SGLT1 is a compensatory mechanism to the reduction in cardiac GLUT1 and GLUT4 expression. In animal model of type 1 diabetes, the expression of Sglt1 transporter is significantly decreased, and in the animal model of type 2 diabetes it is significantly increased. In heart diseases, such as cardiac hypertrophy (that is similar to fetal heart), heart failure and myocardial ischemia different perturbations in expression of glucose transporters are observed, especially in GLUT1 and GLUT4, due to changes in heart glucose metabolism. In this article, the functions of glucose transporters in healthy heart and in cardiac diseases are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Lab-on-a-Chip-Based Non-Invasive Optical Sensor for Measuring Glucose in Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Dong Geon; Jung, Daewoong; Kong, Seong Ho

    2017-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip (LOC)-based non-invasive optical sensor for measuring glucose in saliva was fabricated. Existing glucose sensors utilizing blood require acquisition of a blood sample by pricking the finger, which is painful and inconvenient. To overcome these limitations, we propose a non-invasive glucose sensor with LOC, micro-electro-mechanical system and optical measurement technology. The proposed sensor for measuring glucose in saliva involves pretreatment, mixing, and measurement on a s...

  16. [Hip Fracture--Epidemiology, Management and Liaison Service. Prevention of the secondary hip fractures utilizing the regional post-referral treatment plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Mutsumi

    2015-04-01

    Fragility fracture can result in a series of fractures, with the need for the prevention of secondary hip fractures seen as increasingly pertinent in Japan. In 2006, regional post-referral treatment plans for femoral neck fracture came into effect in Japan, but treatment of fracture and prevention of secondary fracture were fragmented. Patient education about prevention included on explanation forms were commenced, but the levels of discharge prescription for osteoporosis medications did not indicate an improvement. We evaluated a fracture liaison service for post-referral treatment plans for femoral neck fracture, by registering rehabilitation-stage hospitals and surveying data over a six-month period about whether there was prescription of osteoporosis medications on discharge, and the varieties of medication prescribed.

  17. Lactose-over-Glucose Preference in Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705: glcP, Encoding a Glucose Transporter, Is Subject to Lactose Repression†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parche, Stephan; Beleut, Manfred; Rezzonico, Enea; Jacobs, Doris; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Titgemeyer, Fritz; Jankovic, Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of culture supernatants obtained from Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 grown on glucose and lactose revealed that glucose utilization is impaired until depletion of lactose. Thus, unlike many other bacteria, B. longum preferentially uses lactose rather than glucose as the primary carbon source. Glucose uptake experiments with B. longum cells showed that glucose transport was repressed in the presence of lactose. A comparative analysis of global gene expression profiling using DNA arrays led to the identification of only one gene repressed by lactose, the putative glucose transporter gene glcP. The functionality of GlcP as glucose transporter was demonstrated by heterologous complementation of a glucose transport-deficient Escherichia coli strain. Additionally, GlcP exhibited the highest substrate specificity for glucose. Primer extension and real-time PCR analyses confirmed that expression of glcP was mediated by lactose. Hence, our data demonstrate that the presence of lactose in culture medium leads to the repression of glucose transport and transcriptional down-regulation of the glucose transporter gene glcP. This may reflect the highly adapted life-style of B. longum in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. PMID:16452407

  18. Lactose-over-glucose preference in Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705: glcP, encoding a glucose transporter, is subject to lactose repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parche, Stephan; Beleut, Manfred; Rezzonico, Enea; Jacobs, Doris; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Titgemeyer, Fritz; Jankovic, Ivana

    2006-02-01

    Analysis of culture supernatants obtained from Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 grown on glucose and lactose revealed that glucose utilization is impaired until depletion of lactose. Thus, unlike many other bacteria, B. longum preferentially uses lactose rather than glucose as the primary carbon source. Glucose uptake experiments with B. longum cells showed that glucose transport was repressed in the presence of lactose. A comparative analysis of global gene expression profiling using DNA arrays led to the identification of only one gene repressed by lactose, the putative glucose transporter gene glcP. The functionality of GlcP as glucose transporter was demonstrated by heterologous complementation of a glucose transport-deficient Escherichia coli strain. Additionally, GlcP exhibited the highest substrate specificity for glucose. Primer extension and real-time PCR analyses confirmed that expression of glcP was mediated by lactose. Hence, our data demonstrate that the presence of lactose in culture medium leads to the repression of glucose transport and transcriptional down-regulation of the glucose transporter gene glcP. This may reflect the highly adapted life-style of B. longum in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals.

  19. Metabolic characteristics of patients with apparently normal fasting plasma glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatvedt, Geoff; Gamble, Greg; Kyle, Cam

    2006-08-18

    To describe the prevalence of dysglycaemia in patients with fasting glucose <6.1 mmol/L. Consecutive patients referred for OGTT between July 2002 and December 2003 to eight Diagnostic Medical Laboratory depots in the Auckland region of New Zealand were invited to participate. In addition to a standard OGTT, patients' BMI was calculated and HbA1c, fructosamine, lipids, and insulin concentrations were measured. Patients were grouped according to fasting glucose of <5.5 mmol/L=normal, 5.5-6.0 mmol/L="high fives", 6.1-6.9 mmol/L="old" impaired fasting glucose, and greater than and equal to 7 mmol//L=diabetes. 310 patients were studied. 111 patients had a fasting glucose of <5.5 mmol/L, and of these, 23 had IGT and 2 diabetes on OGTT; 85 patients had a fasting glucose 5.5-6.0 mmol/L, and 18 of these had IGT and 11 diabetes on OGTT; 75 patients had a fasting glucose of 6.1-6.9 mmol/L, and of these, 33 had IGT and 21 diabetes on OGTT; 39 patients had a fasting glucose greater than and equal to 7 mmol/L and 38 were confirmed diabetic on OGTT. This study suggests that the upper limit of normal fasting glucose be lowered to <5.5 mmol/L in line with Australian and American Diabetes Society guidelines.

  20. Engineering and rapid selection of a low-affinity glucose/galactose-binding protein for a glucose biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiss, Terry J; Sherman, Douglas B; Nycz, Colleen M; Andaluz, Sandra A; Pitner, J Bruce

    2007-11-01

    Periplasmic expression screening is a selection technique used to enrich high-affinity proteins in Escherichia coli. We report using this screening method to rapidly select a mutated D-glucose/D-galactose-binding protein (GGBP) having low affinity to glucose. Wild-type GGBP has an equilibrium dissociation constant of 0.2 microM and mediates the transport of glucose within the periplasm of E. coli. The protein undergoes a large conformational change on binding glucose and, when labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore, GGBP can relay glucose concentrations, making it of potential interest as a biosensor for diabetics. This use necessitates altering the glucose affinity of GGBP, bringing it into the physiologically relevant range for monitoring glucose in humans (1.7-33 mM). To accomplish this a focused library was constructed using structure-based site-saturation mutagenesis to randomize amino acids in the binding pocket of GGBP at or near direct H-bonding sites and screening the library within the bacterial periplasm. After selection, equilibrium dissociation constants were confirmed by glucose titration and fluorescence monitoring of purified mutants labeled site-specifically at E149C with the fluorophore IANBD (N,N'-dimethyl-N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)ethylene-diamine). The screening identified a single mutation A213R that lowers GGBP glucose affinity 5000-fold to 1 mM. Computational modeling suggested the large decrease in affinity was accomplished by the arginine side chain perturbing H-bonding and increasing the entropic barrier to the closed conformation. Overall, these experiments demonstrate the ability of structure-based site-saturation mutagenesis and periplasmic expression screening to discover low-affinity GGBP mutants having potential utility for measuring glucose in humans.

  1. SU-F-J-171: Robust Atlas Based Segmentation of the Prostate and Peripheral Zone Regions On MRI Utilizing Multiple MRI System Vendors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, R [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Swallen, A; Nelson, A [MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Automatically generated prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image registration with CT or ultrasound and to reduce the burden of contouring for radiation treatment planning. In addition, prostate and zonal contours can assist to automate quantitative imaging features extraction and the analyses of longitudinal MRI studies. These potential gains are limited if the solutions are not compatible across different MRI vendors. The goal of this study is to characterize an atlas based automatic segmentation procedure of the prostate collected on MRI systems from multiple vendors. Methods: The prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) were manually contoured by an expert radiation oncologist on T2-weighted scans acquired on both GE (n=31) and Siemens (n=33) 3T MRI systems. A leave-one-out approach was utilized where the target subject is removed from the atlas before the segmentation algorithm is initiated. The atlas-segmentation method finds the best nine matched atlas subjects and then performs a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of these subjects to the target subject. These nine contours are then merged into a single contour using Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE). Contour comparisons were made using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and Hausdorff distances. Results: Using the T2 FatSat (FS) GE datasets the atlas generated contours resulted in an average DSC of 0.83±0.06 for prostate, 0.57±0.12 for PZ and 0.75±0.09 for CG. Similar results were found when using the Siemens data with a DSC of 0.79±0.14 for prostate, 0.54±0.16 and 0.70±0.9. Contrast between prostate and surrounding anatomy and between the PZ and CG contours for both vendors demonstrated superior contrast separation; significance was found for all comparisons p-value < 0.0001. Conclusion: Atlas-based segmentation yielded promising results for all contours compared to expertly defined contours in both Siemens and GE 3T systems providing

  2. Prediction methods for blood glucose concentration design, use and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, John; Renard, Eric; Re, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    This book tackles the problem of overshoot and undershoot in blood glucose levels caused by delay in the effects of carbohydrate consumption and insulin administration. The ideas presented here will be very important in maintaining the welfare of insulin-dependent diabetics and avoiding the damaging effects of unpredicted swings in blood glucose – accurate prediction enables the implementation of counter-measures. The glucose prediction algorithms described are also a key and critical ingredient of automated insulin delivery systems, the so-called “artificial pancreas”. The authors address the topic of blood-glucose prediction from medical, scientific and technological points of view. Simulation studies are utilized for complementary analysis but the primary focus of this book is on real applications, using clinical data from diabetic subjects. The text details the current state of the art by surveying prediction algorithms, and then moves beyond it with the most recent advances in data-based modeling o...

  3. Glucose Monitoring System Based on Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra LEAL

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and development of a prototype sensor unit for implementation in a long-term glucose monitoring system suitable for estimating glucose levels in people suffering from diabetes mellitus. The system utilizes osmotic pressure as the sensing mechanism and consists of a sensor prototype that is integrated together with a pre-amplifier and data acquisition unit for both data recording and processing. The sensor prototype is based on an embedded silicon absolute pressure transducer and a semipermeable nanoporous membrane that is enclosed in the sensor housing. The glucose monitoring system facilitates the integration of a low power microcontroller that is combined with a wireless inductive powered communication link. Experimental verification have proven that the system is capable of tracking osmotic pressure changes using albumin as a model compound, and thereby show a proof of concept for novel long term tracking of blood glucose from remote sensor nodes.

  4. Insulin Induces an Increase in Cytosolic Glucose Levels in 3T3-L1 Cells with Inhibited Glycogen Synthase Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena H. Chowdhury

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is an important source of energy for mammalian cells and enters the cytosol via glucose transporters. It has been thought for a long time that glucose entering the cytosol is swiftly phosphorylated in most cell types; hence the levels of free glucose are very low, beyond the detection level. However, the introduction of new fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based glucose nanosensors has made it possible to measure intracellular glucose more accurately. Here, we used the fluorescent indicator protein (FLIPglu-600µ to monitor cytosolic glucose dynamics in mouse 3T3-L1 cells in which glucose utilization for glycogen synthesis was inhibited. The results show that cells exhibit a low resting cytosolic glucose concentration. However, in cells with inhibited glycogen synthase activation, insulin induced a robust increase in cytosolic free glucose. The insulin-induced increase in cytosolic glucose in these cells is due to an imbalance between the glucose transported into the cytosol and the use of glucose in the cytosol. In untreated cells with sensitive glycogen synthase activation, insulin stimulation did not result in a change in the cytosolic glucose level. This is the first report of dynamic measurements of cytosolic glucose levels in cells devoid of the glycogen synthesis pathway.

  5. The roles of time of day and sleep quality in modulating glucose regulation: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Van Cauter, E

    1998-01-01

    Consistent variations in glucose regulation across the 24-hour cycle are present in normal subjects. These diurnal variations are altered in various states of impaired glucose tolerance (aging, obesity, diabetes). Changes in insulin secretion, clearance and/or action across the day have been demonstrated. Studies in subjects receiving continuous intravenous glucose infusion have shown that major alterations of glucose tolerance occur during sleep and that sleep quality markedly influences glucose utilization. Diurnal variations in glucose tolerance result from the alternation of wake and sleep states as well as from intrinsic effects of circadian rhythmicity. The important roles of physiological variations in levels of counterregulatory hormones which are markedly dependent on sleep (i.e. growth hormone) or circadian rhythmicity (i.e. cortisol) have only begun to be appreciated. The modulatory effects of sleep and circadian rhythmicity on glucose regulation may have important clinical implications for the diagnosis and treatment of abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism.

  6. Utilization of teledentistry as a tool to screen for dental caries among 12-year-old school children in a rural region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Bharathi M; Singh, Abhinav; Dwivedi, Ashish

    2017-03-01

    The study aims to assess the reliability of video-graphic method as a tool to screen the dental caries among 12-year-old school children in a rural region of India. A total of 139 school children participated in the study. Visual tactile examinations were conducted using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Simultaneously, standardized video recording of the oral cavity was performed. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for video-graphic assessment of dental caries. Bland-Altman plot was used to assess agreement between the two methods of caries assessment. Likelihood ratio (LR) and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to assess the predictive accuracy of the video-graphic method. Mean DMFT for the study population was 2.47 ± 2.01 and 2.46 ± 1.91 by visual tactile and video-graphic assessment (P = 0.76; > 0.05). Sensitivity and specificity values of 0.86 and 0.58 were established for video-graphic assessment. A fair degree of agreement was noted between the two methods with Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) value of 0.56. LR for video-graphic assessment was 2.05. Bland-Altman plot confirmed the level of agreement between the two assessment methods. The area under curve was 0.69 (CI 0.57, 0.80, P = 0.001). Teledentistry examination is comparable to clinical examination when screening for dental caries among school children. This study provides evidence that teledentistry may be used as an alternative screening tool for assessment of dental caries and is viable for remote consultation and treatment planning. Teledentistry offers to change the dynamics of dental care delivery and may effectively bridge the rural-urban oral health divide. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  7. Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel B; Calanna, Salvatore; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    : 6.5 ± 0.1% [48 ± 2 mmol/mol]). INTERVENTION: We infused physiological amounts of GIP (2 pmol × kg(-1) × min(-1)) or saline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured plasma concentrations of glucagon, glucose, insulin, C-peptide, intact GIP, and amounts of glucose needed to maintain glucose clamps. RESULTS...... glucagon levels during the initial 30 minutes, resulting in less glucose needed to be infused to maintain the clamp (29 ± 8 vs 49 ± 12 mg × kg(-1), P hyperglycemia (1.5 × fasting plasma glucose ∼12 mmol/L), GIP augmented insulin secretion throughout the clamp, with slightly less glucagon......, during hyperglycemia, GIP increases glucose disposal through a predominant effect on insulin release....

  8. A Simple Image Analysis Method for Determination of Glucose by using Glucose Oxidase CdTe/TGA Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Tashkhourian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose, as the major energy source in cellular metabolism, plays an important role in the natural growth of cells. Herein, a simple, rapid and low-cost method for the glucose determination by utilizing glucose oxidase and CdTe/thioglycolic acid (TGA quantum dots (QDs on a thin layer chromatography (TLC plate has been described. The detection was based on the combination of the glucose enzymatic reaction and the quenching effect of H2O2 on the CdTe/TGA quantum dots photoluminescence. This QDs-based assay exhibits several advantages. Enzyme immobilization and QDs modification process are not required and the high stability of the QDs towards photobleaching is beneficial to this sensing system. The proposed method is linear in concentration range of 1.00 × 10-1-3.00 × 10-5 M of glucose and has a detection limit of 1.25 × 10-8 M. The results of real sample analysis show that the glucose oxidase CdTe/TGA QDs system would be a promising glucose-biosensing system.

  9. Alcohol Fermentation and Biomass formation from xylose, glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper addresses the potential for utilizing xylose fermenting yeasts in fermenting pentoses from lignocellulosic materials obtained from saw dust and agricultural based products such as post harvest straws from maize, rice, sorghum, millet and bagasse from the sugar industries. Key words: wort, hydrolyzate, glucose, ...

  10. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garetto, L P; Richter, Erik; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    Thirty minutes after a treadmill run, glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis in perfused rat skeletal muscle are enhanced due to an increase in insulin sensitivity (Richter et al., J. Clin. Invest. 69: 785-793, 1982). The exercise used in these studies was of moderate intensity, and muscle gl...

  11. Lower arterial glucose concentrations in lambs with aortopulmonary shunts after an 18-hour fast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaufort-Krol, GCM; Takens, J; Smid, GB; Molenkamp, MC; Zijlstra, WG; Kuipers, JRG

    Spontaneously occurring hypoglycemia has been described in children with severe acute congestive heart failure. Hypoglycemia may he the result of an increase in glucose utilization in tissues, a decrease in glucose production, or a decrease in the dietary intake of nutrients. To determine whether

  12. The kinetics of glucose production from rice straw by Aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... and practical utility in the production of glucose from rice straw. Conclusion. Rice straw hydrolysis provides an alternative source of fermentable sugar (glucose), which can be further converted into value added product such as ethanol. It can be concluded that pre-treatment of rice straw enhances the rate of ...

  13. Mild fasting hyperglycemia shifts fuel reliance toward fat during exercise in adults with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Steven K; Viskochil, Richard; Oliver, Corianne; Braun, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is characterized by decreased oxidative capacity and reduced carbohydrate utilization during exercise. However, it is unclear if the presence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) affects fuel utilization during exercise in adults with IGT. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of IFG in adults with IGT decreases reliance on carbohydrate during exercise. Middle-aged, obese, sedentary individuals (n = 6, IGT and n = 6, IFG+IGT) were compared during exercise at 60% peak O2 consumption for 45 min on a cycle ergometer. Glucose rates of appearance and disposal and muscle glycogen were assessed by stable isotope dilution methods, and fat utilization was estimated via indirect calorimetry. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to determine fasting and 2-h glucose concentrations. A glucose intolerance severity z-score was calculated from the oral glucose tolerance test. Glucose flux (i.e., rates of appearance and disposal) was not different between groups. However, individuals with IFG+IGT had lower muscle glycogen use (P fuel selection toward increased fat oxidation and decreased muscle glycogen utilization during exercise in adults with IGT. Whether these differences in substrate use contribute to, or are the result of, movement along the continuum from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes awaits further work.

  14. SPCE Based Glucose Sensor Employing Novel Thermostable Glucose Dehydrogenase, FADGDH: Blood Glucose Measurement with 150nL Sample in One Second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Hideaki; Sode, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an important component of the modern therapy for diabetes mellitus. Thanks to the current progress in electronics and sensor fabrication technology, both the time and the blood sample volume required for the measurement have decreased drastically. However, devices that work with an even smaller sample volume and a shorter measurement time are in demand. Methods A disposable glucose sensor that works with an ultra-small sample volume was developed employing the novel thermostable glucose-dehydrogenase (FADGDH) complex composed of a catalytic subunit, an electron transfer subunit (cytochrome c), and a small subunit. The electrode is a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE), and hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride (Ru complex) is utilized as the electron mediator. A disposable enzyme sensor was constructed by depositing the FADGDH complex and Ru complex onto the SPCE, and the sensor performance was evaluated. Results Whole-blood glucose can be measured within 1 sec using this enzyme sensor and a 150-nL whole-blood sample, with high precision (>0.99br>) and high reproducibility (CV) within the glucose concentration range of 0-533 mg/dL. The sensor reading was stable for more than 60 days even at 70°C. Conclusions The simplicity of the construction and the high precision of this FADGDH-based glucose biosensor makes it an alternative to previously reported commercially available glucose sensors. Especially the sample volume of 150 nL and the 1-sec measurement time are the highest specifications in the world for currently available glucose sensors designed for the SMBG. PMID:19888376

  15. Genetic control of carbohydrate uptake and utilization in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    OpenAIRE

    Engels, V.

    2008-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum can utilize a variety of carbohydrates and organic acids. In contrast to other bacteria, C. glutamicum typically does not show diauxic growth on mixed carbon sources, but co-utilizes the present carbon sources. Uptake of the preferred carbon source glucose via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) is reduced during growth on substrate mixtures as compared to growth on glucose as sole carbon source. To cope with fast changing situations, e...

  16. Assessment of Production and Distribution of Printed Information Education Communication (IEC) Materials in Ethiopia and Utilization in the Case of Jimma Zone, Oromiya National Regional State: A Cross Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Godesso, Ameyu; Jira, Challi; Morankar, Sudhakar

    2011-08-01

    Health promotion and health education activities rely on a variety of well designed and effective printed Information Education Communication materials to help ensure success. However, in Ethiopia, there is no well established evidence that shows the extent to which printed Information Education Communication materials are produced distributed, utilized and the existing needs and gaps. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the process of printed Information Education Communication materials production, distribution and utilization and to identify current Information Education Communication needs and gaps. Cross sectional study combining quantitative and qualitative approaches was conducted at Federal, Regional (Oromiya), zonal (Jimma) and facility levels. Fourteen health centers within Jimma Zone were randomly selected and 303 health workers working in these health centers were included in the study. Purposive sampling technique was used to identify respondents for in-depth interview. The quantitative data were analyzed by SPSS for windows version 16.0. The materials designed both by the Health Education Extension Center and Oromiya Regional Health Bureau were not fully culture sensitive. Information Education Communication materials inventories had not been practiced, particularly at zonal and health center levels. Furthermore, at zonal and health center level, there were no safe storage places. Chronic shortage of Information Education Communication materials was reported consistently. Only 206 (68.0%) of the participants had ever used printed Information Education Communication material. 146 (48.2%) and 29 (9.6%) of the participants were rated the IEC material they have seen as very good in terms of understablity and the extent to which it takes the local context into account, respectively. Participants who were nurse and laboratory technologist were 0.35 and 0.23 times less likely to use IEC materials than environmental Health experts [AOR=0

  17. Renal glucose handling in diabetes and sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resham Raj Poudel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys play a major role in glucose homeostasis through its utilization, gluconeogenesis, and reabsorption via sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLTs. The defective renal glucose handling from upregulation of SGLTs, mainly the SGLT2, plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Genetic mutations in a SGLT2 isoform that results in benign renal glycosuria, as well as clinical studies with SGLT2 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes support the potential of this approach. These studies indicate that inducing glycosuria by suppressing SGLT2 can reduce plasma glucose and A1c levels, as well as decrease weight, resulting in improved β-cell function and enhanced insulin sensitivity in liver and muscle. Because the mechanism of SGLT2 inhibition is independent of insulin secretion and sensitivity, these agents can be combined with other antidiabetic agents, including exogenous insulin. This class represents a novel therapeutic approach with potential for the treatment of both type 2 and type 1 diabetes.

  18. Temporal Changes in Cortical and Hippocampal Expression of Genes Important for Brain Glucose Metabolism Following Controlled Cortical Impact Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI causes transient increases and subsequent decreases in brain glucose utilization. The underlying molecular pathways are orchestrated processes and poorly understood. In the current study, we determined temporal changes in cortical and hippocampal expression of genes important for brain glucose/lactate metabolism and the effect of a known neuroprotective drug telmisartan on the expression of these genes after experimental TBI. Adult male C57BL/6J mice (n = 6/group underwent sham or unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI injury. Their ipsilateral and contralateral cortex and hippocampus were collected 6 h, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after injury. Expressions of several genes important for brain glucose utilization were determined by qRT-PCR. In results, (1 mRNA levels of three key enzymes in glucose metabolism [hexo kinase (HK 1, pyruvate kinase, and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH] were all increased 6 h after injury in the contralateral cortex, followed by decreases at subsequent times in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus; (2 capillary glucose transporter Glut-1 mRNA increased, while neuronal glucose transporter Glut-3 mRNA decreased, at various times in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus; (3 astrocyte lactate transporter MCT-1 mRNA increased, whereas neuronal lactate transporter MCT-2 mRNA decreased in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus; (4 HK2 (an isoform of hexokinase expression increased at all time points in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus. GPR81 (lactate receptor mRNA increased at various time points in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus. These temporal alterations in gene expression corresponded closely to the patterns of impaired brain glucose utilization reported in both TBI patients and experimental TBI rodents. The observed changes in hippocampal gene expression were delayed and prolonged, when compared with those in the cortex. The patterns of alterations were specific

  19. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel Bring

    2016-01-01

    The hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted by enteroendocrine cells in the intestinal mucosa in response to nutrient ingestion. They are called incretin hormones because of their ability to enhance insulin secretion. However, i...... glucose to prevent hypoglycaemia. In conclusion, the studies position GIP as a bifunctional blood glucose stabilising hormone that glucose-dependently regulates insulin and glucagon responses in humans.......The hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted by enteroendocrine cells in the intestinal mucosa in response to nutrient ingestion. They are called incretin hormones because of their ability to enhance insulin secretion. However...... the blood glucose levels. In Study 3, we also used stable glucose isotopes to estimate the endogenous glucose production and assessed symptoms and cognitive function during hypoglycaemia. The results from the three studies indicate that GIP has effects on insulin and glucagon responses highly dependent upon...

  20. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel; Vedtofte, Louise; Holst, Jens Juul

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the glucose dependency of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) effects on insulin and glucagon release in 10 healthy male subjects ([means ± SEM] aged 23 ± 1 years, BMI 23 ± 1 kg/m2, and HbA1c 5.5 ± 0.1%). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Saline or physiological doses...

  1. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique

    2015-01-01

    ...-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief...

  2. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...

  3. Determination of glucose flux in live myoblasts by microfluidic nanosensing and mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Alessandro; Zoso, Alice; Luni, Camilla; Frommer, Wolf B; Elvassore, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Glucose is the main energy source for cells in an organism and its blood concentration is tightly regulated in healthy individuals. However, impaired blood glucose control has been found in diseases such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes, and anomalous glucose utilization in cancer tissues. Dissecting the dynamics of the different phenomena involved in glucose handling (extracellular mass transport, membrane diffusion, and intracellular phosphorylation) is very relevant to identify which mechanisms are disrupted under disease conditions. In this work, we developed an effective methodology for quantitatively analyzing these phenomena in living cells. A measurement of steady-state glucose uptake is, by itself, insufficient to determine the dynamics of intracellular glucose. For this purpose, we integrated two types of measurements: cytosolic glucose concentration at the single-cell level, obtained using a cytosolic FRET