WorldWideScience

Sample records for regional geochemical baselines

  1. TAPIR--Finnish national geochemical baseline database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarva, Jaana; Tarvainen, Timo; Reinikainen, Jussi; Eklund, Mikael

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, a Government Decree on the Assessment of Soil Contamination and Remediation Needs has generated a need for reliable and readily accessible data on geochemical baseline concentrations in Finnish soils. According to the Decree, baseline concentrations, referring both to the natural geological background concentrations and the diffuse anthropogenic input of substances, shall be taken into account in the soil contamination assessment process. This baseline information is provided in a national geochemical baseline database, TAPIR, that is publicly available via the Internet. Geochemical provinces with elevated baseline concentrations were delineated to provide regional geochemical baseline values. The nationwide geochemical datasets were used to divide Finland into geochemical provinces. Several metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn) showed anomalous concentrations in seven regions that were defined as metal provinces. Arsenic did not follow a similar distribution to any other elements, and four arsenic provinces were separately determined. Nationwide geochemical datasets were not available for some other important elements such as Cd and Pb. Although these elements are included in the TAPIR system, their distribution does not necessarily follow the ones pre-defined for metal and arsenic provinces. Regional geochemical baseline values, presented as upper limit of geochemical variation within the region, can be used as trigger values to assess potential soil contamination. Baseline values have also been used to determine upper and lower guideline values that must be taken into account as a tool in basic risk assessment. If regional geochemical baseline values are available, the national guideline values prescribed in the Decree based on ecological risks can be modified accordingly. The national geochemical baseline database provides scientifically sound, easily accessible and generally accepted information on the baseline values, and it can be used in various

  2. Sampling designs for geochemical baseline studies in the Colorado oil shale region: a manual for practical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klusman, R. W.; Ringrose, C. D.; Candito, R. J.; Zuccaro, B.; Rutherford, D. W.; Dean, W. E.

    1980-06-01

    This manual presents a rationale for sampling designs, and results of geochemical baseline studies in the Colorado portion of the oil-shale region. The program consists of a systematic trace element study of soils, stream sediments, and plants carried out in a way to be conservative of human and financial resources and yield maximum information. Extension of this approach to other parameters, other locations, and to environmental baseline studies in general is a primary objective. A baseline for any geochemical parameter can be defined as the concentration of that parameter in a given medium such as soil, the range of its concentration, and the geographic scale of variability. In air quality studies, and to a lesser extent for plants, the temporal scale of variability must also be considered. In studies of soil, the temporal variablility does not become a factor until such time that a study is deemed necessary to evaluate whether or not there have been changes in baseline levels as a result of development. The manual is divided into five major parts. The first is a suggested sampling protocol which is presented in an outline form for guiding baseline studies in this area. The second section is background information on the physical features of the area of study, trace elements of significance occurring in oil shale, and the sample media used in these studies. The third section is concerned primarily with sampling design and its application to the geochemical studies of the oil shale region. The last sections, in the form of appendices, provide actual data and illustrate in a systematic manner, the calculations performed to obtain the various summary data. The last segment of the appendices is a more academic discussion of the geochemistry of trace elements and the parameters of importance influencing their behavior in natural systems.

  3. Geochemical baseline studies of soil in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    The soil element concentrations regionally vary a lot in Finland. Mostly this is caused by the different bedrock types, which are reflected in the soil qualities. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is carrying out geochemical baseline studies in Finland. In the previous phase, the research is focusing on urban areas and mine environments. The information can, for example, be used to determine the need for soil remediation, to assess environmental impacts or to measure the natural state of soil in industrial areas or mine districts. The field work is done by taking soil samples, typically at depth between 0-10 cm. Sampling sites are chosen to represent the most vulnerable areas when thinking of human impacts by possible toxic soil element contents: playgrounds, day-care centers, schools, parks and residential areas. In the mine districts the samples are taken from the areas locating outside the airborne dust effected areas. Element contents of the soil samples are then analyzed with ICP-AES and ICP-MS, Hg with CV-AAS. The results of the geochemical baseline studies are published in the Finnish national geochemical baseline database (TAPIR). The geochemical baseline map service is free for all users via internet browser. Through this map service it is possible to calculate regional soil baseline values using geochemical data stored in the map service database. Baseline data for 17 elements in total is provided in the map service and it can be viewed on the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/Tapir/indexEN.html).

  4. Geochemical baseline data, Youngs Bay, Oregon, 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Johnson, V.G.; Cutshall, N.H.

    1975-04-01

    This report comprises one part of a final report to the Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation on the Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay''. The data reported herein are the product of the geochemical baseline section of the project. The primary objectives of the geochemical study were: to provide a baseline record of fluoride and selected trace metal levels in Youngs Bay bottom sediment, to identify areas that might function as heavy metal traps, to attempt to determine the recent depositional history of sediment in the bay. In addition to these primary objectives, a number of secondary tasks were undertaken during the study. While time did not allow these additional studies to be carried to completion, preliminary results are included herein because of their potential usefulness in assessing the impact of environmental releases of fluoride to aquatic systems in the vicinity of Youngs Bay or elsewhere. This report is made up of two major sections. In the first, a description of sample collection and analytical procedures is followed by a discussion of the baseline results. Obvious vertical and horizontal patterns of elemental distribution are identified and their origins considered. Problems needed further research are also discussed. In the second section, the data are presented in interpretive, graphical form, as well as in tables. 35 refs., 29 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Geochemical background/baseline values in top soils of Campania region: assessment of the toxic elements threat to ecosystem and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Albanese, S.; Bove, M.; Cicchella, D.; Civitillo, D.; Cosenza, A.; Grezzi, G.

    2009-04-01

    In the late years an intense geochemical prospecting activity on the whole territory of Campania region (Southern Italy) has been carried aiming at the definition of the geochemical backgrounds/baselines at both regional and local scale. At the end of 2003 the first edition of an atlas containing 200 maps showing the distribution patterns of 40 chemical elements on the whole regional territory was published (De Vivo et al., 2003, 2006a; Albanese et al., 2007a). The atlas provided a base knowledge of environmental status of the region and allowed to individuate some critical areas to be further investigated by topsoils sampling follow up activity; the topsoils are considered as the best media in order to examine closely the sources and the distribution patterns of harmful elements at a local scale. The topsoils sampling was mainly focused on anthropized areas (at urban and metropolitan scale), industrial settlments, brownfields and intensely cultivated zones, aimed at: • showing the distribution of concentration values and to determine baseline values (or backgrounds, depending on local conditions) of each analyzed element (38) in the top soils; • assessing harmful elements pollution levels and their geographic distribution; • providing reliable analytical data for assessment of toxic element pollution threat to ecosystem and human health; • creating a sound basis for policy makers and legislators who need to address the public concerns regarding environmental pollution. Five atlases (De Vivo et al., 2006b; Albanese et al., 2007b; Lima et al., 2007; Fedele et al., 2007 Cicchella et al., 2009) were produced reporting soil geochemical maps compiled using 1620 samples collected both in the metropolitan and provincial area of Napoli and in the cities of Avellino, Benevento, Caserta and Salerno. Further studies were also carried out taking into account Pb isotopes (Cicchella et al., 2008a), PGE's (Cicchella et al., 2003; 2008b) and bioavailability of harmful

  6. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard;

    2008-01-01

    and variations in water chemistry that are caused by large scale geochemical processes taking place at the timescale of thousands of years. The most important geochemical processes are ion exchange (Valreas and Aveiro) where freshwater solutes are displacing marine ions from the sediment surface, and carbonate...... dissolution (East Midlands, Valreas and Aveiro). Reactive transport models, employing the code PHREEQC, which included these geochemical processes and one-dimensional solute transport were able to duplicate the observed patterns in water quality. These models may provide a quantitative understanding...

  7. Hydrogeochemistry of regional aquifer systems from Tuscany (central Italy): the state of the art before the definition of a geochemical baseline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisi, Barbara; Battaglini, Raffaele; Raco, Brunella

    2013-04-01

    European Community Water Framework Directive (WFD) and its derivative regulations have recognized the urgent need to adopt specific measures against the contamination of water bodies by individual pollutants that may significantly affect the quality of water itself. Italian regulation takes into account the EU Directives, and charges the regional authorities to create monitoring networks and produce assessment reports on the contamination of groundwater. The knowledge of "natural baseline" for various dissolved elements in groundwaters on a regional scale becomes of primary importance to distinguish natural sources and anthropogenic inputs. The studied area includes the whole Tuscan regional district (central Italy) and covers an area of about 23,000 km2. From a geolithological point of view, Tuscan territory consists of several complexes outcropping regionally, the most typical features being the Mesozoic and Cenozoic carbonate and evaporitic formations, overlain by flysch sequences, as well as granite intrusions and volcanic rocks. Moreover, two geothermal areas (Larderello and Mt. Amiata), a large number of thermal springs and CO2-rich gas vents are mostly present in the central-southern part of Tuscany. Finally in southern Tuscany (e.g. Campiglia M.Ma, Mt. Amiata, Elba Island), mining districts, predominantly characterized by polimetallic sulphides ore deposits, were exploited since the Etruscan time. In this work statistical distribution models are used to develop summary statistics and estimate probabilities of exceeding water-quality standards according to the National Legislative Decree 152/06. Descriptive statistics on solute concentrations are based on geochemical data from the main Tuscan aquifers and investigated by the CNR-IGG (Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources of Pisa, Italy) and Department of Earth Sciences (University of Florence, Italy). The data processing was carried out on 4,767 water samples collected from 1997 to 2009. According to

  8. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    Reactive transport models, were developed to explore the evolution in groundwater chemistry along the flow path in three aquifers; the Triassic East Midland aquifer (UK), the Miocene aquifer at Valreas (F) and the Cretaceous aquifer near Aveiro (P). All three aquifers contain very old groundwaters...... of the evolution in natural baseline properties in groundwater....

  9. The IUGS/IAGC Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David B.Smith; Shaun Reeder; Alecos Demetriades

    2012-01-01

    The Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines,operating under the auspices of both the International Union of Geological Sciences(IUGS) and the International Association of Geochemistry(IAGC),has the long-term goal of establishing a global geochemical database to document the concentration and distribution of chemical elements in the Earth's surface or near-surface environment.The database and accompanying element distribution maps represent a geochemical baseline against which future human-induced or natural changes to the chemistry of the land surface may be recognized and quantified.In order to accomplish this long-term goal,the activities of the Task Group include:(1) developing partnerships with countries conducting broad-scale geochemical mapping studies;(2) providing consultation and training in the form of workshops and short courses;(3) organizing periodic international symposia to foster communication among the geochemical mapping community;(4) developing criteria for certifying those projects whose data are acceptable in a global geochemical database;(5) acting as a repository for data collected by those projects meeting the criteria for standardization;(6) preparing complete metadata for the certified projects;and(7) preparing,ultimately,a global geochemical database.This paper summarizes the history and accomplishments of the Task Group since its first predecessor project was established in 1988.

  10. The IUGS/IAGC Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Wang, Xueqiu; Reeder, Shaun; Demetriades, Alecos

    2012-01-01

    The Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines, operating under the auspices of both the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) and the International Association of Geochemistry (IAGC), has the long-term goal of establishing a global geochemical database to document the concentration and distribution of chemical elements in the Earth’s surface or near-surface environment. The database and accompanying element distribution maps represent a geochemical baseline against which future human-induced or natural changes to the chemistry of the land surface may be recognized and quantified. In order to accomplish this long-term goal, the activities of the Task Group include: (1) developing partnerships with countries conducting broad-scale geochemical mapping studies; (2) providing consultation and training in the form of workshops and short courses; (3) organizing periodic international symposia to foster communication among the geochemical mapping community; (4) developing criteria for certifying those projects whose data are acceptable in a global geochemical database; (5) acting as a repository for data collected by those projects meeting the criteria for standardization; (6) preparing complete metadata for the certified projects; and (7) preparing, ultimately, a global geochemical database. This paper summarizes the history and accomplishments of the Task Group since its first predecessor project was established in 1988.

  11. Regional Geochemical Division-A Tool for Delineating Geochemical Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Regional geochemical division is a mapping technique to divide an area into slices where the associations between geochemical elements are relatively simple and uniform. The result of division is expressed on a 2-D map. The scheme of regional geochemical division includes non-supervised pattern recognition, elementary statistics and factor analysis. A practical example in a gold prospecting area in Jilin, China, and the corresponding explanation are presented. Regional geochemical division is a basic approach to the delineation of the geochemical blocks as well.

  12. Geochemical baselines for the radioelements K, U, and Th in the Campania region, Italy: a comparison of stream-sediment geochemistry and gamma-ray surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, A. [Dipartimento di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: anlima@unina.it; Albanese, S. [Dipartimento di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Naples (Italy); Cicchella, D. [Dipartimento di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Naples (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents new data on the baseline concentrations of U, Th and K in 2389 stream sediments over the whole Campania region. These data, based on systematic sampling and analysis, are compared with those obtained by gamma-ray spectrometry surveys. Variations in the U, Th and K concentration in the surficial environment of the Campania region appear to be related to bedrock lithology. Generally, high U, Th and K values in stream sediments correspond well with the occurrence of volcanic rocks in the central-western part of the region, whereas low values are found in areas characterized by silico-clastic and carbonate deposits, occurring mostly in the southern and eastern part of the region. Gamma-ray spectrometry maps show a similar pattern, although the distribution of the highest radioactivity levels define more restricted areas than the ones resulting from mapping stream sediment geochemistry. Particularly high {sup 40}K radioactivity levels delimit all the known eruptive centers (Roccamonfina, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius), including the fissural sources of Campania Ignimbrites, much better than U and Th radioactivity. One of the concerns for human health in the Campania region is the total gamma radiation and Rn potential related mostly to alkaline volcanics of the Neapolitan volcanological province. In particular, geothermal activity occurring in all the Campanian volcanic areas represents a potential hazard for Rn gas.

  13. Comparison on humus and soil geochemical baselines in Southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minolfi, Giulia; Tarvainen, Timo; Jarva, Jaana

    2016-04-01

    Humus has been recognized since a survey in 1977 (Allen and Steinnes, 1980) as one of the best sampling media for mapping regional environmental contamination because of the strong geochemical contrast between anomalous and background concentrations resulting from its capacity to accumulate high levels of trace metals. This study is in the framework of the comparison between humus, topsoil and moss deposition data, in order to analyze the humus behavior and to find possible similarities to underlying geology and long-range atmospheric deposition. The analyzed samples are part of a geochemical mapping programme carried out by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK); subsoil, topsoil and humus samples have been collected in a large area in Southern Finland since 2002. 816 sample pairs (humus and topsoil samples) were selected for statistical analysis. Statistical graphs, like histograms, CP plots and box plots, were realized for 31 elements, and showed that most of the elements have completely different distribution of concentrations in humus and in topsoil samples. Then the correlation between the element concentrations in humus and minerogenic topsoil has been evaluated measuring the Spearman rank correlation value and elaborating scatter plots between the element concentrations in humus and minerogenic topsoil, and between the content of the element vs. the content of organic C. The concentrations of some elements, like K, Mg, Fe, Al, in humus samples are controlled by the content of mineral matter, derived by the soil dust. Other elements, such as As, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Th, V and Zn showed evident outliers, with probable anthropogenic origin. In order to explain these anomalous high values in humus, the geographic distributions of these elements in humus and topsoil were analyzed and then compared to the deposition data obtained by the national moss data. High values appear in areas where the anthropogenic impact is strong, like the Harjavalta

  14. [Environmental geochemical baseline of heavy metals in soils of the Ili river basin and pollution evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-Ru; Nasier, Telajin; Cheng, Yong-Yi; Zhan, Jiang-Yu; Yang, Jian-Hong

    2014-06-01

    Environmental geochemical baseline models of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Hg were established by standardized method in the ehernozem, chestnut soil, sierozem and saline soil from the Ili river valley region. The theoretical baseline values were calculated. Baseline factor pollution index evaluation method, environmental background value evaluation method and heavy metal cleanliness evaluation method were used to compare soil pollution degrees. The baseline factor pollution index evaluation showed that As pollution was the most prominent among the four typical types of soils within the river basin, with 7.14%, 9.76%, 7.50% of sampling points in chernozem, chestnut soil and sierozem reached the heavy pollution, respectively. 7.32% of sampling points of chestnut soil reached the permitted heavy metal Pb pollution index in the chestnut soil. The variation extent of As and Pb was the largest, indicating large human disturbance. Environmental background value evaluation showed that As was the main pollution element, followed by Cu, Zn and Pb. Heavy metal cleanliness evaluation showed that Cu, Zn and Pb were better than cleanliness level 2 and Hg was the of cleanliness level 1 in all four types of soils. As showed moderate pollution in sierozem, and it was of cleanliness level 2 or better in chernozem, chestnut soil and saline-alkali soil. Comparing the three evaluation systems, the baseline factor pollution index evaluation more comprehensively reflected the geochemical migration characteristics of elements and the soil formation processes, and the pollution assessment could be specific to the sampling points. The environmental background value evaluation neglected the natural migration of heavy metals and the deposition process in the soil since it was established on the regional background values. The main purpose of the heavy metal cleanliness evaluation was to evaluate the safety degree of soil environment.

  15. Geochemical baseline level and function and contamination of phosphorus in Liao River Watershed sediments of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaoqing; Wang, Jing; Lin, Chunye; He, Mengchang; Liu, Xitao

    2013-10-15

    The quantitative assessment of P contamination in sediments is a challenge due to sediment heterogeneity and the lacking of geochemical background or baseline levels. In this study, a procedure was proposed to determine the average P background level and P geochemical baseline level (GBL) and develop P geochemical baseline functions (GBF) for riverbed sediments of the Liao River Watershed (LRW). The LRW has two river systems - the Liao River System (LRS) and the Daliao River System (DRS). Eighty-eight samples were collected and analyzed for P, Al, Fe, Ca, organic matter, pH, and texture. The results show that Fe can be used as a better particle-size proxy to construct the GBF of P (P (mg/kg) = 39.98 + 166.19 × Fe (%), R(2) = 0.835, n = 66). The GBL of P was 675 mg/kg, while the average background level of P was 355 mg/kg. Noting that many large cities are located in the DRS watershed, most of the contaminated sites were located within the DRS and the riverbed sediments were more contaminated by P in the DRS watershed than in the LRS watershed. The geochemical background and baseline information of P are of great importance in managing P levels within the LRW.

  16. The MINK methodology: background and baseline. [USA - Midwest Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, N.J.; Crosson, P.R.; Frederick, K.D.; Easterling, W.E. III; McKenney, M.S.; Bowes, M.D.; Sedjo, R.A.; Darmstadter, J.; Katz, L.A.; Lemon, K.M. (Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-06-01

    A four step methodology has been developed for study of the regional impacts of climate change and the possible responses thereto. First the region's climate sensitive sectors and total economy are described (Task A, current baseline). Next a scenario of climate change is imposed on the current baseline (Task B, current baseline with climate change). A new baseline describing the climate sensitive sectors and total regional economy is projected for some time in the future (Task C, future baseline, year 2030) in the absence of climate change. Finally, the climate change scenario is reimposed on the future baseline (Task D, future baseline with climate change). Impacts of the climate change scenario on the current and future regional economies are determined by means of simulation models and other appropriate techniques. These techniques are also used to assess the impacts of an elevated CO[sub 2] concentration (450 ppm) and of various forms of adjustments and adaptations. The region chosen for the first test of the methodology is composed of the four U.S. states of Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas. The climate change scenario is the actual weather of the 1930s decade in the MINK region. 'Current' climate is the actual weather of the period 1951-1980. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Well sediments: a medium for geochemical prospecting, an example from the Nisa region, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, S.P.; Dekkers, M.J.; Janssen, M.A.; Commandeur, J.

    1991-01-01

    Vriend, S.P., Dekkers, M.J.. Janssen, M.A. and Commandeur, J., 1991. Well sediments: a medium for geochemical prospecting, an example from the Nisa region. Portugal. In: A.W. Rose and P.M. Taufen I Editors). Geochemical Exploration ! 989. J. Geochem. Expior., 4 ! : ! 5 I- 167. Tile potential of well

  18. Baseline geochemical characterisation of a vulnerable tropical karstic aquifer; Lifou, New Caledonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Nicolini

    2016-03-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: This study represents the first baseline isotopic characterisation of Lifou Island’s groundwater aquifer composition and provides a reference for future investigative studies on groundwater quality and security. Groundwater sampled in June and October 2012 had nearly identical isotopic composition. Tap water sampled monthly between February 2012 and January 2014 also had a constant isotopic composition similar to the groundwater. Groundwater recharge was found to occur when monthly precipitation exceeded 140 mm, with the recharge cycle representing 20–30% of the annual rainfall. Relationships between HCO32− content, pH, soil δ13C DIC and satellite photo interpretation suggests a variance of soil pCO2, which is explained by different vegetation cover and higher water use efficiencies in forested areas (high pCO2, more negative δ13C isotope values. The δ15NNO3 values for most groundwater indicate they are uncontaminated with anthropogenic nitrates, although some samples taken in October (dry season showed a slight denitrification, possibly of natural origin.

  19. Global Geochemical Baselines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaun Reeder

    2007-01-01

    @@ Background There is worldwide concern about the potentially damaging effects of chemicals in the environment on the health of humans, animals, agriculture and ecosystems. Economic and population growth are increasing rapidly, exacerbating such problems as land degradation and pollution from uncontrolled urbanisation, industrialisation,intensive agricultural practices and over-exploitation of aquifers.

  20. Geographical baselines of sustainable planning of the regional development of Zasavje region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Plut

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Geographical baselines of planning the regional development and interventions into the geographical environment derive from the premises of the concept of permanent adjusting the anthropogenic changes in the landscape to specific capacities and limitations of landscape-forming components. In the landscape-degraded region of Zasavje the improvement of environmental quality (curative measures and regional economic progress within the scope of carrying capacities and space (preventative measures are the primary, developmentaly-environmentally devised goal of developmental strategy.

  1. [Study on geochemical susceptivity of groundwater system in representative karstic regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shou-yang; Zhu, Li-jun; Dong, Zhi-fen; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Xiao-hong

    2010-05-01

    We investigated geochemical susceptivity of groundwater in representative karst groundwater system. The results indicated that Ca2+ and Mg2+, correlative the average values of geochemical susceptivity index (GSI) were 0.73 and 0.19; HCO3- and SO4(2-), interrelated the average values of geochemical susceptivity index were 0.92 and 0.37, are the principal cations and anions in karstic groundwater system, respectively. And the major elements are obviously characterized by the geochemical susceptivity. The rank order of geochemical susceptivity for major elements in study region is HCO3- > Ca2+ > SO4(2+) > Mg2+ > Cl- > Na+ > NO3- > K+. The susceptive regions of groundwater system were zoned by the geochemical susceptivity index of HCO3- (GSI(HCO3-)), which classified as GSI(HCO3-) 1 is high-susceptivity zone, respectively. The groundwater systems in high-susceptivity zone may become as a collected and genetic room for pollutants. Furthermore, both continual or active exchange and mutual recharge between surface water and groundwater in high-susceptivity zones might induce intersectant pollution and serious cycle.

  2. 洞庭湖区土壤地球化学基准值与污染等级划分%Soil geochemical baseline and pollution level division in Dongting lake area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建新

    2014-01-01

    Deep soil and its geochemical significance in multi-objective investigation are hot topics among environmental scientists. The author compared 54 indexes and their geochemical distribution characteristics in surface soil and deep soil of Dongting plain and hillock area, and studied the element content variation from natural differentiation and anthropogenic influence in the pedogenic process. With deep soil as the reference, the author obtained regional soil geochemical background value and baseline and proposed a method for the classification of surface soil pollution levels.%通过洞庭湖平原与周边丘岗山地区深、表层土壤中54项指标的地球化学分析对比,研究成壤过程中元素的自然分异和人为叠加作用造成的土壤元素含量在垂向上的差异;以深层土壤为参照,求解区域土壤的地球化学背景值和基准值,并以此为标准提出表层土壤污染等级划分的地球化学方法。

  3. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  4. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20081182 Chen Guoguang(China University of Geosciences,Wuhan 430074,China);Zhou Guohua Eco-Geochemical Assessment Based On Geosciences(Resources Survey & Environment,ISSN1671-4814,CN32-1640/N,28(2),2007,p.79-84,2 tables,6 refs.)Key words:regional geochemical

  5. Element Geochemical Division of the Middle Segment of the Sanjiang(Three-River) Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈上越; 魏启荣; 莫宣学; 喻学惠; 曾普盛; 胡长寿

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the aim and principle of element geochemical division, the source of samples and data processing, the choice of divisional indices and the division of index value ranges. According to the geological structures and characteristic values (the accumulated value of enrichment coefficient) of the mantle-type elements (KT) this region can be divided into seven geochemical zones, i.e., the Yangtze basement, the Yangtze cover, the Jinshajiang paleo-Tethys, the Lancangjiang paleo-Tethys, the Lanping Mesozoic basin, the Indosinian granite, and the Himalayan granite. Again in accordance with the different characteristic val ues of high field strength elements (HFSE) (KNb) or radiogenic elements (KTh) 16 geochemi cal sub-zones can be divided. Meanwhile, this paper also discusses the rules of variation in char acteristic value of the various sub-zones and points out the characteristics of enrichment of ore forming elements in some of the sub-zones.

  6. Manual hierarchical clustering of regional geochemical data using a Bayesian finite mixture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of regional scale, multivariate geochemical data is aided by a statistical technique called “clustering.” We investigate a particular clustering procedure by applying it to geochemical data collected in the State of Colorado, United States of America. The clustering procedure partitions the field samples for the entire survey area into two clusters. The field samples in each cluster are partitioned again to create two subclusters, and so on. This manual procedure generates a hierarchy of clusters, and the different levels of the hierarchy show geochemical and geological processes occurring at different spatial scales. Although there are many different clustering methods, we use Bayesian finite mixture modeling with two probability distributions, which yields two clusters. The model parameters are estimated with Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability density function, which usually has multiple modes. Each mode has its own set of model parameters; each set is checked to ensure that it is consistent both with the data and with independent geologic knowledge. The set of model parameters that is most consistent with the independent geologic knowledge is selected for detailed interpretation and partitioning of the field samples.

  7. Granitoids of different geodynamic settings of Baikal region (Russia) their geochemical evolution and origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipin, Viktor; Sheptyakova, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    In the southern folded framing of the Siberian craton the granitoid magmatism of different ages involves batholiths, small low-depth intrusions and intrusion-dyke belts with diverse mineral and geochemical characteristics of rocks. Granitoid formation could be related to the Early Paleozoic collision stage and intra-plate magmatism of the Late Paleozoic age of the geologic development of Baikal area. The Early Paleozoic granitoids of Khamar-Daban Ridge and Olkhon region revealed their closeness in age and composition. They were referred to syncollision S-type formations derived from gneiss-schistose substratum of metamorphic sequences. The magmatic rocks were classified into various geochemical types comprising formations of normal Na-alkalinity (migmatites and plagiogranites), calc-alkaline and subalkaline (K-Na granitoids, granosyenites and quartz syenites) series. It is significant, that plagiomigmatites and plagiogranites in all elements repeat the shape of the chart of normalized contents marked for trend of K-Na granitoids, but at considerably lower level of concentrations of all elements. This general pattern of element distribution might indicate similar anatectic origin of both granitoid types, but from crustal substrata distinguished by composition and geochemical features. Comparative geochemical analysis pointed out that the source of melts of the Early Paleozoic granitoids of the Olkhon (505-477 Ma) and Khamar-Daban (516-490 Ma) complexes of the Baikal region could be the crustal substratum, which is obviously the criterion for their formation in the collisional geodynamic setting. Using the Late Paleozoic subalkaline magmatism proceeding at the Khamar-Daban Range (Khonzurtay pluton, 331 Ma) as an example, it was found that the formation of monzodiorite-syenite-leucogranite series was considerably contributed by the processes of hybridism and assimilation through mixing of the upper mantle basaltoid magma derived melts of granitic composition. The

  8. Establishing a pre-mining geochemical baseline at a uranium mine near Grand Canyon National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, approximately 404,000 ha of Federal Land in northern Arizona was withdrawn from consideration of mineral extraction for a 20-year period to protect the Grand Canyon watershed from potentially adverse effects of U mineral exploration and development. The development, operation, and reclamation of the Canyon Mine during the withdrawal period provide an excellent field site to understand and document off-site migration of radionuclides within the withdrawal area. As part of the Department of Interior's (DOI's) study plan for the exclusion area, the objective of our study is to utilize pre-defined decision units (DUs) in areas within and surrounding the Canyon Mine to demonstrate how newly established incremental sampling methodologies (ISM) combined with multivariate statistical methods can be used to document a repeatable and statistically defensible measure of pre-mining baseline conditions in surface soils and stream sediment samples prior to ore extraction. During the survey in June 2013, the highest pre-mining 95% upper confidence level (UCL) concentrations with respect to As, Mo, U, and V were found in the triplicate samples collected from surface soils in the mine site DU designated as M1. Gamma activities were slightly elevated in soils within the M1 DU (up to 28 μR/h); however, off-site gamma activities in soil and stream-sediment samples were lower (< 6 to 12 μR/h). Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was applied to 33 chemical constituents contained in the multivariate data generated from the analysis of triplicate samples collected in the soil and stream sediment DUs within and surrounding Canyon Mine. Most of the triplicate samples from individual DUs were grouped in the same dendrogram cluster when using a similarity value (SV) of 0.70 (unitless). Different group membership of triplicate samples from two of the four haul road DUs was likely the result of heterogeneity induced by non-native soil material introduced from the gravel road base

  9. Regional groundwater flow and geochemical evolution in the Amacuzac River Basin, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casique, Eric; Guinzberg-Belmont, Jacobo; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    2016-11-01

    An approach is presented to investigate the regional evolution of groundwater in the basin of the Amacuzac River in Central Mexico. The approach is based on groundwater flow cross-sectional modeling in combination with major ion chemistry and geochemical modeling, complemented with principal component and cluster analyses. The hydrogeologic units composing the basin, which combine aquifers and aquitards both in granular, fractured and karstic rocks, were represented in sections parallel to the regional groundwater flow. Steady-state cross-section numerical simulations aided in the conceptualization of the groundwater flow system through the basin and permitted estimation of bulk hydraulic conductivity values, recharge rates and residence times. Forty-five water locations (springs, groundwater wells and rivers) were sampled throughout the basin for chemical analysis of major ions. The modeled gravity-driven groundwater flow system satisfactorily reproduced field observations, whereas the main geochemical processes of groundwater in the basin are associated to the order and reactions in which the igneous and sedimentary rocks are encountered along the groundwater flow. Recharge water in the volcanic and volcano-sedimentary aquifers increases the concentration of HCO3 -, Mg2+ and Ca2+ from dissolution of plagioclase and olivine. Deeper groundwater flow encounters carbonate rocks, under closed CO2 conditions, and dissolves calcite and dolomite. When groundwater encounters gypsum lenses in the shallow Balsas Group or the deeper Huitzuco anhydrite, gypsum dissolution produces proportional increased concentration of Ca2+ and SO4 2-; two samples reflected the influence of hydrothermal fluids and probably halite dissolution. These geochemical trends are consistent with the principal component and cluster analyses.

  10. Pedo-geochemical baseline content levels and soil quality reference values of trace elements in soils from the Mediterranean (Castilla La Mancha, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesta, Raimundo; Bueno, Paz; Rubi, Juan; Giménez, Rosario

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate trace element soil contamination, geochemical baseline contents and reference values need to be established. Pedo-geochemical baseline levels of trace elements in 72 soil samples of 24 soil profiles from the Mediterranean, Castilla La Mancha, are assessed and soil quality reference values are calculated. Reference value contents (in mg kg-1) were: Sc 50.8; V 123.2; Cr 113.4; Co 20.8; Ni 42.6; Cu 27.0; Zn 86.5; Ga 26.7; Ge 1.3; As 16.7; Se 1.4; Br 20.1; Rb 234.7; Sr 1868.4; Y 38.3; Zr 413.1; Nb 18.7; Mo 2.0; Ag 7.8; Cd 4.4; Sn 8.7; Sb 5.7; I 25.4; Cs 14.2; Ba 1049.3; La 348.4; Ce 97.9; Nd 40.1; Sm 10.7; Yb 4.2; Hf 10.0; Ta 4.0; W 5.5; Tl 2.3; Pb 44.2; Bi 2.2; Th 21.6; U 10.3. The contents obtained for some elements are below or close to the detection limit: Co, Ge, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Tl and Bi. The element content ranges (the maximum value minus the minimum value) are: Sc 55.0, V 196.0, Cr 346.0, Co 64.4, Ni 188.7, Cu 49.5, Zn 102.3, Ga 28.7, Ge 1.5, As 26.4, Se 0.9, Br 33.0 Rb 432.7, Sr 3372.6, Y 39.8, Zr 523.2, Nb 59.7, Mo 3.9, Ag 10.1, Cd 1.8, Sn 75.2, Sb 9.9, I 68.0, Cs 17.6, Ba 1394.9, La 51.3, Ce 93.5, Nd 52.5, Sm 11.2, Yb 4.2, Hf 11.3, Ta 6.3, W 5.2, Tl 2.1, Pb 96.4, Bi 3.0, Th 24.4, U 16.4 (in mg kg-1). The spatial distribution of the elements was affected mainly by the nature of the bedrock and by pedological processes. The upper limit of expected background variation for each trace element in the soil is documented, as is its range as a criterion for evaluating which sites may require decontamination.

  11. Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

    2002-08-01

    This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

  12. Baseline Correction of Diffuse Reflection Near-Infrared Spectra Using Searching Region Standard Normal Variate (SRSNV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkawa, Takuma; Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Kato, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Daitaro; Murayama, Kodai; Komiyama, Makoto; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2015-12-01

    An alternative baseline correction method for diffuse reflection near-infrared (NIR) spectra, searching region standard normal variate (SRSNV), was proposed. Standard normal variate (SNV) is an effective pretreatment method for baseline correction of diffuse reflection NIR spectra of powder and granular samples; however, its baseline correction performance depends on the NIR region used for SNV calculation. To search for an optimal NIR region for baseline correction using SNV, SRSNV employs moving window partial least squares regression (MWPLSR), and an optimal NIR region is identified based on the root mean square error (RMSE) of cross-validation of the partial least squares regression (PLSR) models with the first latent variable (LV). The performance of SRSNV was evaluated using diffuse reflection NIR spectra of mixture samples consisting of wheat flour and granular glucose (0-100% glucose at 5% intervals). From the obtained NIR spectra of the mixture in the 10 000-4000 cm(-1) region at 4 cm intervals (1501 spectral channels), a series of spectral windows consisting of 80 spectral channels was constructed, and then SNV spectra were calculated for each spectral window. Using these SNV spectra, a series of PLSR models with the first LV for glucose concentration was built. A plot of RMSE versus the spectral window position obtained using the PLSR models revealed that the 8680–8364 cm(-1) region was optimal for baseline correction using SNV. In the SNV spectra calculated using the 8680–8364 cm(-1) region (SRSNV spectra), a remarkable relative intensity change between a band due to wheat flour at 8500 cm(-1) and that due to glucose at 8364 cm(-1) was observed owing to successful baseline correction using SNV. A PLSR model with the first LV based on the SRSNV spectra yielded a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.999 and an RMSE of 0.70%, while a PLSR model with three LVs based on SNV spectra calculated in the full spectral region gave an R2 of 0.995 and an RMSE of

  13. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20151884 An Guoying(China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Land and Resources,Beijing100083,China)Regional Geochemistry of Sanjiang Region in Yunnan Province and Its Copper-Polymetallic Prospecting Significance(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,

  14. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in carbonate aquifers of southern Latium region, central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sappa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Spring and well water samples, from carbonate aquifers of Latium region, have been characterized to determine the hydrochemical processes governing the evolution of the groundwater. Most of the spring samples, issuing from Lepini, Ausoni and Aurunci Mts., are characterized as alkaline earth HCO3 waters, however, some samples show a composition of Cl--SO4 -- alkaline earth waters. Groundwater samples from Pontina Plain shows three different hydrochemical facies: alkaline earth HCO3 type, Cl-- SO4 -- alkaline earth type and Cl--SO4 -- alkaline type waters. Geochemical modeling and saturation index computation of the sampled waters show an interaction with calcareous and calcareous-dolomitic lithologies. Most of the springs and wells was kinetically saturated with respect to calcite and dolomite, and all the samples were below the equilibrium state with gypsum. This indicates that the groundwater has capacity to dissolve the gypsum along the flow paths. The electrical conductivity and Cl- concentrations of the sampled waters show a positive trend with the decrease in the distance from the coast, highlighting seawater intrusion in the coastal area. According to hydrochemistry results and geochemical modeling, the dominant factors in controlling the hydrochemical characteristics of groundwater are: (i water rock interaction with calcareous and calcareous-dolomitic lithologies; (ii seawater intrusion in the coastal area; (iii dissolution and/or precipitation of carbonate and (i.e. dolomite and calcite evaporate minerals (gypsum determined by saturation indexes; (iv mineral weathering process; (the high Mg/Ca ratio due to the weathering of Mg-rich dolomite.

  15. Baseline geochemical data for stream sediment and surface water samples from Panther Creek, the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, and the Main Salmon River from North Fork to Corn Creek, collected prior to the severe wildfires of 2000 in central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Briggs, Paul H.; Brown, Zoe Ann; Crock, James G.; Meier, Allen; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Wilson, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a reconnaissance baseline geochemical study in central Idaho. The purpose of the baseline study was to establish a 'geochemical snapshot' of the area, as a datum for monitoring future change in the geochemical landscape, whether natural or human-induced. This report presents the methology, analytical results, and sample descriptions for water, sediment, and heavy-mineral concentrate samples collected during this geochemical investigation. In the summer of 2000, the Clear Creek, Little Pistol, and Shellrock wildfires swept across much of the area that was sampled. Thus, these data represent a pre-fire baseline geochemical dataset. A 2001 post- fire study is planned and will involve re-sampling of the pre-fire baseline sites, to allow for pre- and post-fire comparison.

  16. Late Holocene climate variability in the southwestern Mediterranean region: an integrated marine and terrestrial geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín-Puertas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A combination of marine (Alboran Sea cores, ODP 976 and TTR 300 G and terrestrial (Zoñar Lake, Andalucia, Spain geochemical proxies provides a high-resolution reconstruction of climate variability and human influence in the southwestern Mediterranean region for the last 4000 years at inter-centennial resolution. Proxies respond to changes in precipitation rather than temperature alone. Our combined terrestrial and marine archive documents a succession of dry and wet periods coherent with the North Atlantic climate signal. A dry period occurred prior to 2.7 cal ka BP – synchronously to the global aridity crisis of the third-millennium BC – and during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (1.4–0.7 cal ka BP. Wetter conditions prevailed from 2.7 to 1.4 cal ka BP. Hydrological signatures during the Little Ice Age are highly variable but consistent with more humidity than the Medieval Climate Anomaly. Additionally, Pb anomalies in sediments at the end of the Bronze Age suggest anthropogenic pollution earlier than the Roman Empire development in the Iberian Peninsula. The Late Holocene climate evolution of the in the study area confirms the see-saw pattern between the eastern and western Mediterranean regions and the higher influence of the North Atlantic dynamics in the western Mediterranean.

  17. Controls on the geochemical evolution of Prairie Pothole Region lakes and wetlands over decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher; Mushet, David M.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Rover, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    One hundred sixty-seven Prairie Pothole lakes, ponds and wetlands (largely lakes) previously analyzed chemically during the late 1960’s and early to mid-1970’s were resampled and reanalyzed in 2011–2012. The two sampling periods differed climatically. The earlier sampling took place during normal to slightly dry conditions, whereas the latter occurred during and immediately following exceptionally wet conditions. As reported previously in Mushet et al. (2015), the dominant effect was expansion of the area of these lakes and dilution of their major ions. However, within that context, there were significant differences in the evolutionary pathways of major ions. To establish these pathways, we employed the inverse modeling computer code NetpathXL. This code takes the initial and final lake composition and, using mass balance constrained by the composition of diluting waters, and input and output of phases, calculates plausible geochemical evolution pathways. Despite the fact that in most cases major ions decreased, a subset of the lakes had an increase in SO42−. This distinction is significant because SO42− is the dominant anion in a majority of Prairie Pothole Region wetlands and lakes. For lakes with decreasing SO42−, the proportion of original lake water required for mass balance was subordinate to rainwater and/or overland flow. In contrast, lakes with increasing SO42− between the two sampling episodes tended to be dominated by original lake water. This suite of lakes tended to be smaller and have lower initial SO42−concentrations such that inputs of sulfur from dissolution of the minerals gypsum or pyrite had a significant impact on the final sulfur concentration given the lower dilution factors. Thus, our study provides context for how Prairie Pothole Region water bodies evolve geochemically as climate changes. Because wetland geochemistry in turn controls the ecology of these water bodies, this research contributes to the prediction of the

  18. Urban geochemical mapping : essential information for redevelopment

    OpenAIRE

    Fordyce, Fiona; Ferguson, Alex; Shaw, Richard; Baldock, John

    1999-01-01

    Cost-effective fit-for-purpose redevelopment of brownfield sites requires both regional and local information on the physical and chemical states of the near-surface environment. The BGS G-BASE programme is providing baseline/benchmark geochemical data for both rural and urban areas based on the collection of stream sediment, stream water and soil samples.

  19. Lead (Pb) Isotope Baselines for Studies of Ancient Human Migration and Trade in the Maya Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Ashley E; Kamenov, George D; Gilli, Adrian; Hodell, David A; Emery, Kitty F; Brenner, Mark; Krigbaum, John

    2016-01-01

    We examined the potential use of lead (Pb) isotopes to source archaeological materials from the Maya region of Mesoamerica. The main objectives were to determine if: 1) geologic terrains throughout the Maya area exhibit distinct lead isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb), and 2) a combination of lead and strontium ratios can enhance sourcing procedures in the Mesoamerica region. We analyzed 60 rock samples for lead isotope ratios and a representative subset of samples for lead, uranium, and thorium concentrations across the Maya region, including the Northern Lowlands of the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula, the Southern Lowlands of Guatemala and Belize, the Volcanic Highlands, the Belizean Maya Mountains, and the Metamorphic Province/Motagua Valley. Although there is some overlap within certain sub-regions, particularly the geologically diverse Metamorphic Province, lead isotopes can be used to distinguish between the Northern Lowlands, the Southern Lowlands, and the Volcanic Highlands. The distinct lead isotope ratios in the sub-regions are related to the geology of the Maya area, exhibiting a general trend in the lowlands of geologically younger rocks in the north to older rocks in the south, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the southern highlands. Combined with other sourcing techniques such as strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and oxygen (δ18O), a regional baseline for lead isotope ratios can contribute to the development of lead isoscapes in the Maya area, and may help to distinguish among geographic sub-regions at a finer scale than has been previously possible. These isotope baselines will provide archaeologists with an additional tool to track the origin and movement of ancient humans and artifacts across this important region.

  20. Organic geochemical characterization and depositional paleoenvironments of the Devonian strata in Guizhong region,Guangxi,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Devonian strata in the Guizhong region,Guangxi,China consist mainly of marine deposition carbonates(limestones and dolomites) as well as restricted clastic rocks. The strata thickness is measured as 2041m and classified into 14 formations. An integrated field geological,petrographic,sedimentological,palaeobiological,and geochemical study of these strata reveals that the depositional paleoenvironments were carbonate tidal flat,restricted platform,open platform,shelf,platform margin slop,and algal herm. The total organic carbon(TOC) of sedimentary organic matter ranges between 0.07% and 1.96% with average of 0.21%. The organic matter types are Type ? and Type II1. The vitrinite reflectance(R0) of kerogen ranges between 0.99% and 2.03%,indicating the maturated and highly maturated stages. The analytical results of the representative samples collected from shelf and subtidal facies show that the differences of organic matter type and biological diagnostic compounds are related to the types of source rocks deposited in different paleoenvironments.

  1. Some geochemical characteristics of the Pachuca Obsidian Region: a strategy for interpreting artifact groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neivens, M.; Harbottle, G.; Kimberlin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian research has revealed geochemical anomalies. Neutron activation analysis was used to analyze the samples. Correlations were made between element pairs (Sc and Fe, Ba and Co). Tests were made for homogeneity. 5 figures. (DLC)

  2. Eco-geochemical Assessment of Agroecosystems: Cd in the Chengdu Economical Region, Sichuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongfang; Hou, Qingye; Yu, Tao; Chen, Jiawei; Xia, Xueqi; Huang, Yong; Li, Kuo

    The cadmium (Cd) in the Chengdu Economic Region was studied as an example of eco-geochemical assessment on agroecosystems. Dry and wet atmospheric deposition samples, chemical fertilizers, irrigation water, and plants were collected. The concentrations of Cd and other elements in these samples were analyzed and the fluxes of input and output of the agroecosystem were calculated. The results indicated that the Cd was more concentrated in the surface soil than in the deep soil, and Cd concentration in some rice samples exceeded the upper limit of the pollution-free agricultural products. The input of Cd into the agroecosystem was 17.8 g·hm -2·y -1 on average, which accounted for 85.2% of the total input. Infiltration (2.34 g·hm -2·y -1) and harvest (1.87 g·hm -2·y -1) were the two most important Cd outputs. The average increase of Cd content in soil was 0.006 mg·kg -1·y -1, which was a result of sources outside of the agroecosystem. In the next 20 years, the area of the grade III soil will increase 2-3 times under the current input and output condition of Cd, which will lead to significant decrease of the arable land. The decrease of the pH in the study area was 0.106 y -1 because of fertilization and acid rain, of which 89.6% was from the contribution of chemical fertilizers. The present study indicates that, even though 95% of the rice production is safe, after 20 years, 70% of the safe soil will degrade, and the area of alarming soil will increase rapidly from 4% to 27% of the total cultivated area in the region.

  3. Geochemical Processes Controlling Chromium Transport in the Vadose Zone and Regional Aquifer, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, P.; Ding, M.; Rearick, M.; Vaniman, D.; Katzman, D.

    2008-12-01

    The environmental aqueous geochemistry of Cr is of considerable interest to physical scientists and toxicologists in quantifying the fate and transport of this metal in surface and subsurface environments. Chromium(VI) solutions were released from cooling towers to a stream channel within Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM from 1956 to 1971. These solutions have migrated 293 m depth through the vadose zone, containing several saturated zones, to the regional water table. Concentrations of total dissolved Cr, mainly as Cr(VI), in the regional aquifer range between 0.17 to 8.46 mM. The regional aquifer is characterized by calcium-sodium-bicarbonate solution, contains dissolved oxygen (0.09 to 0.22 mM), and has a circumneutral pH (6.8 to 8.3). Geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of Cr in groundwater at Los Alamos include a combination of adsorption and precipitation reactions within aquifer systems. Vadose zone material containing hydrous ferric oxide, smectite, silica glass, and calcite widely range in their ability to adsorb Cr(VI) under basic pH conditions. Overall, the vadose zone at Los Alamos is relatively oxidizing, however, basalt flows are locally reducing with respect to Fe. Ferrous iron concentrated within the Cerros del Rio basalt has been shown through batch experiments to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) resulting in precipitation of chromium(III) hydroxide. Regional aquifer material, consisting of silicates, oxides, and calcite, vary in the amount of Fe(II) available in reactive minerals to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The results of our studies (1) directly assess the relationship between mineralogical characterization and transport behavior of Cr using site-specific hydrogeologic material and (2) provide site-specific adsorption and precipitation parameters obtained through the experiments to refine the fate and transport modeling of Cr within the vadose zone and regional aquifer. Natural attenuation of Cr at Los

  4. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid; Donnan, Geoffrey A. [The University of Melbourne, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies. (orig.)

  5. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C V; Moffat, Bradford A; Steward, Christopher; Churilov, Leonid; Parsons, Mark W; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Desmond, Patricia M; Davis, Stephen M; Bivard, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies.

  6. 基于稳健统计学确定高潜在污染土壤CU、Pb基线值%DEFINING Cu AND Pb GEOCHEMICAL BASELINES FOR SOILS HIGH IN POLLUTION RISK WITH ROBUST STATISTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志刚; 赵永存; 孙维侠; 黄标; 邵学新; Jeremy L.Dariek

    2011-01-01

    It is of great practice significance to define baselines for soil heavy metals in the Yangtze River Delta Region to evaluation of status quo of the heavy metal accumulation in the soil. In the presence of anthropogenic heavy metal pollution, soil heavy metal data always significantly deviate from normal or lognormal distribution, which affects reliability of the results of classical statistics. In contrast, robust statistics is aimed at lowering the effect of outliers on statistical analysis. With the robust regression method regression relationships between Cu and Pb concentrations in topsoil and in subsoil were established for the study region of Zhangjiagang, which has thousands of years of agricultural history and has recently been developing rapidly in industry. Based on the topsoil Cu and Pb concentration baselines calculated through robust regression of their subsoil concentrations, the status of soil Cu and Pb accumulations were evaluated. Results show that the calculated geochemical baselines can reflect natural variation of soil Cu and Pb background values between different sampling sites. Compared with the robust statistical method, the evaluation of soil heavy metal accumulation in a region that has spatial variation of natural background values on the basis of the national standard for soil environmental quality or regional soil background values would generate bigger errors.%土壤重金属基线值的确定对于评价重金属积累现状具有重要意义.在存在人为污染的情况下,土壤重金属数据经常强烈地偏离正态分布和对数正态分布,影响统计分析结果的可信度,而稳健统计方法可以降低离群值对统计分析结果的影响.本研究以张家港为研究区域,采用稳健回归方法,建立表层和底层土壤Cu、Pb的回归关系,通过底层土壤Cu、Pb含量计算表层土壤Cu、Pb基线值,并对土壤Cu、Pb积累状况进行评价.结果表明,稳健回归方法确定的表层土壤Cu、Pb

  7. Contribution of volcanic ashes to the regional geochemical balance: the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, F; Fernandez-Turiel, J L; Saavedra, J; Gimeno, D; Polanco, E; Amigo, A; Galindo, G; Caselli, A

    2012-05-15

    The environmental geochemical behaviour of the rhyolitic ashes from the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile, has been studied. After the bulk characterisation, the potential contribution to the regional geochemical fluxes was examined using: i) single batch leaching tests to provide a rapid screening of the implied major and trace elements; and ii) column experiments to evaluate the temporal mobility of leached elements. The environmental concerns of these ashes are related to the fine grained component present in each sample (independent of distance from the source), in particular the presence of cristobalite, and the geochemical hazards posed by ash-water interaction. Leaching experiments show the fast dissolution of surface salts and aerosols, which dominate over glass dissolution during the first steps of the ash-water interaction. Chaitén ashes could transfer to the environment more than 1×10(10)g or 10,000 metric tonnes (mt) of Cl, S, Ca, Na, Si, and K; between 1000 and 10,000 mt of F, Mg, and Al; between 100 and 1000 mt of As, Pb, P, Fe, Sr, Zn, Mn, and Br; between 10 and 100 mt of Ba, Li, Ti, Ni, Nb, Cu, Rb, Zr, V, Mo, Co, and Sc; and less than 10 mt of Cr, Sb, Ce, Ga, Cs, and Y. These results show the fertilising potential of the ashes (e.g., providing Ca and Fe) but also the input of potentially toxic trace elements (e.g., F and As) in the regional geochemical mass balance. The Chaitén results evidence lower potentials for poisoning and fertilising than low silica ashes due to the lower contents released of practically all elements.

  8. Quantifying baseline emission factors of air pollutants in China's regional power grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenjia; Wang, Can; Jin, Zhugang; Chen, Jining

    2013-04-16

    Drawing lessons from the clean development mechanism (CDM), this paper developed a combined margin methodology to quantify baseline emission factors of air pollutants in China's regional power grids. The simple average of baseline emission factors of SO2, NOX, and PM2.5 in China's six power grids in 2010 were respectively 1.91 kg/MWh, 1.83 kg/MWh and 0.32 kg/MWh. Several low-efficient mitigation technologies, such as low nitrogen oxide burner (LNB), were suggested to be replaced or used together with other technologies in order to virtually decrease the grid's emission factor. The synergies between GHG and air pollution mitigation in China's power sector was also notable. It is estimated that in 2010, that every 1% CO2 reduction in China's power generation sector resulted in the respective coreduction of 1.1%, 0.5%, and 0.8% of SO2, NOX, and PM2.5. Wind is the best technology to achieve the largest amount of coabatement in most parts of China. This methodology is recommended to be used in making comprehensive air pollution control strategies and in cobenefits analysis in future CDM approval processes.

  9. Geochemical variation of groundwater in the Abruzzi region: earthquakes related signals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Caliro, S.; Frondini, F.; Avino, R.; Minopoli, C.; Morgantini, N.

    2009-12-01

    The presence of a deep and inorganic source of CO2 has been recently recognized in Italy on the basis of the deeply derived carbon dissolved in the groundwater. In particular, the regional map of CO2 Earth degassing shows that two large degassing structures affect the Tyrrhenian side of the Italian peninsula. The northern degassing structure (TRDS, Tuscan Roman degassing structure) includes Tuscany, Latium and part of Umbria regions (~30000 km2) and releases > 6.1 Mt/y of deeply derived CO2. The southern degassing structure (CDS, Campanian degassing structure) affects the Campania region (~10000 km2) and releases > 3.1 Mt/y of deeply derived CO2. The total CO2 released by TRDS and CDS (> 9.2 Mt/y) is globally significant, being ~10% of the estimated present-day total CO2 discharge from sub aerial volcanoes of the Earth. The comparison between the map of CO2 Earth degassing and of the location of the Italian earthquakes highlights that the anomalous CO2 flux suddenly disappears in the Apennine in correspondence of a narrow band where most of the seismicity concentrates. A previous conceptual model proposed that in this area, at the eastern borders of TRDS and CDS plumes, the CO2 from the mantle wedge intrudes the crust and accumulate in structural traps generating over-pressurized reservoirs. These CO2 over-pressurized levels can play a major role in triggering the Apennine earthquakes, by reducing fault strength and potentially controlling the nucleation, arrest, and recurrence of both micro and major (M>5) earthquakes. The 2009 Abruzzo earthquakes, like previous seismic crises in the Northern Apennine, occurred at the border of the TRDS, suggesting also in this case a possible role played by deeply derived fluids in the earthquake generation. In order to investigate this process, detailed hydro-geochemical campaigns started immediately after the main shock of the 6th of April 2009. The surveys include the main springs of the area which were previously studied in

  10. Diurnal variation in baseline human regional cerebral blood flow demonstrated by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, D.J.; Mintun, M.A.; Moore, R.Y. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    We have previously described the diurnal variation in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) response to bright light in human subjects as demonstrated by the positron emission tomography (PET) activation method. In this abstract, we report the differences in rCBF (an indicator of differences in regional neuronal activity) between the evening and midday dim light baseline scans which served as the control states in the above bright light activation study. Five right-handed, healthy volunteers underwent both an evening (8pm) and a midday (12N) O-15 water PET scanning session. Each scanning session was preceded by one hour of dim light adaptation (50 lux) and consisted of six rCBF scans at three different light intensities in an AABBCC sequence (A=50 lux, B=2500 lux, C=7000lux). Significant differences in rCBF between the evening and midday 50 lux states were identified using the statistical parametric mapping method developed by Friston et al (p<.001). The evening scans demonstrated areas of greater relative blood flow in the pineal gland, the lateral temporal cortex bilaterally, the right lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior aspect of the anterior cingulate, and the left thalamus. The midday scans showed areas of greater relative blood flow in the visual cortex, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. the inferior aspect of the anterior cingulate, the left parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Our results demonstrate an extensive diurnal variation in baseline human rCBF. This indicates that time of day may be an important variable in conducting and interpreting functional brain imaging studies. Furthermore, these results suggest possible neuroanatomical substrates through which the circadian system may regulate the various physiologic and behavioral processes that manifest circadian rhythms.

  11. A First Baseline for the Magnets in the High Luminosity LHC Insertion Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; Ambrosio, G; Arduini, G; Cerutti, F; De Maria, R; Esposito, L; Fartoukh, S; Ferracin, P; Felice, H; Gupta, R; Kersevan, R; Mokhov, N; Nakamoto, T; Rakno, I; Rifflet, J M; Rossi, L; Sabbi, G L; Segreti, M; Toral, F; Xu, Q; Wanderer, P; van Weelderen, R

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project aims at accumulating 3000 fb-1 in the years 2023-2035, i.e. ten times more w.r.t. the nominal LHC performance expected for 2010- 2021. One key element to reach this challenging performance is a new insertion region to reduce the beam size in the interaction point by approximately a factor two. This requires larger aperture magnets in the region spanning from the interaction point to the matching section quadrupoles. This aperture has been fixed to 150 mm for the inner triplet quadrupoles in 2012. In this paper we give a first baseline of the interaction region. We discuss the main motivations that lead us to choose the technology, the combination of fields/gradients and lengths, the apertures, the quantity of superconductor, and the operational margin. Key elements are also the constraints given by the energy deposition in terms of heat load and radiation damage; we present the main features related to shielding and heat removal.

  12. User’s guide for GcClust—An R package for clustering of regional geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Smith, David B.

    2016-04-08

    GcClust is a software package developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for statistical clustering of regional geochemical data, and similar data such as regional mineralogical data. Functions within the software package are written in the R statistical programming language. These functions, their documentation, and a copy of the user’s guide are bundled together in R’s unit of sharable code, which is called a “package.” The user’s guide includes step-by-step instructions showing how the functions are used to cluster data and to evaluate the clustering results. These functions are demonstrated in this report using test data, which are included in the package.

  13. Use of Multi-Media Sampling as Integrated Approach to Surficial Geochemical Sampling for Gold in Regional Reconnaissance Surveys in Parts of the Ashanti Belt, Southwest Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosper M. Nude

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the conventional method used in surficial geochemical sampling to multimedia sampling method during reconnaissance surveys in gold exploration. The use of the conventional method in regional reconnaissance exploration surveys whereby surficial geochemical sampling is done step-wise, first by sampling stream sediments followed by rock chips then soils and other regolith materials in the search and defining of prospective targets of gold mineralization appears inefficient in geological environments characterized by complex regolith and landform modifications. However, multi-media geochemical sampling which involves the simultaneous sampling of different geochemical samples appears a better alternative and eliminates false and erratic anomalies often associated with the sampling of a single medium. Multi-media samples comprising rock chips, scree, termite mounds and lateritic lags, were collected simultaneously to support stream sediments in parts of the Ashanti belt in the Birimian of southwest Ghana, which is characterized by complex regolith and landform modifications. The most prospective targets among the three anomalous zones defined by the stream survey were better pronounced with the support of the other media, based on the consistency in significant gold contents in those samples. Gold assay values from the multi-media samples ranked the Manso East target as the most prospective and the Manso Northwest target being least prospective due to the inconsistent gold assay values in the different media. Thus the integration of the gold assay values from the various media defined real and prospective geochemical gold targets better than in the conventional method in which sampling of different media was done in stages. Unlike the conventional method, the multi-media survey provided gold results that showed regional, proximal and in-situ anomalies simultaneously. Multi-media geochemical survey therefore, appears to be a

  14. Mineralogical and geochemical features of the Oleninskoe gold occurrence (Kola region, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, N.; Gavrilenko, B.

    2003-04-01

    The Oleninskoe gold occurrence is situated within the Archean Kolmozero-Voron’ja suture structure. The host rocks are basalts and gabbro-diabases metamorphosed in the amphibolite facies. The mineralized zone is bordered in the west by a major fault intersecting the entire structure. The thickness of the zone is approximately 50 m, it strikes over 1.5 km, and dips to at least 100 m. The alteration processes in the rocks of the Oleninskoe occurrence are represented mainly by the silicification (thin quartz veinlet), biotitization, epidotization, diopsidization etc. Based on study of fissure systems in the host rocks, it is established that ore bodies tend to an intersection of disjunctive dislocations of the lower order represented by steep longitudinal and transversal fissures. Pyrrhotite-arsenopyrite mineralization of the Oleninskoe gold occurrence is of the streaky-disseminated type. It can be referred to low-sulfide gold-quartz formation. The major ore minerals are pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite, native gold, electrum, native silver, chalcopyrite, blende, galena and silver sulphosalts. The primary gold-bearing mineral is arsenopyrite, in which early gold is emulsive. The size of gold grains varies from 0.001 mm up to 0.2 mm. Later gold is represented by veinlets in sulphides and silicates being 0.1 up to 0.5 mm in size. On the basis of 100 individual geochemical analyses, primary geochemical aureoles of Au, Ag and As were mapped. That allowed to reveal a pod-like shape and orientation of the ore bodies. The orientation of the ore bodies coincides spatially with crystallization and metamorphic schistosity of host rocks and corresponds to the general direct strike of the Archean Kolmozero-Voron’ja structure. It is noted according to the primary aureoles that the rocks with highest concentration of Au, Ag and As tend to the contact of gabbro-diabases and muscovite-quartz metasomatic rocks. The gold composition in the Archean Kolmozero-Voron’ja structure ranges from

  15. Preliminary environmental assessment of selected geopressured - geothermal prospect areas: Louisiana Gulf Coast Region. Volume II. Environmental baseline data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newchurch, E.J.; Bachman, A.L.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Newman, J.P. Jr.; Smith, C.G. Jr.; Bailey, J.I. Jr.; Kelly, G.G.; Reibert, K.C.

    1978-10-15

    A separate section is presented for each of the six prospect areas studied. Each section includes a compilation and discussion of environmental baseline data derived from existing sources. The data are arranged as follows: geology and geohydrology, air quality, water resources and flood hazards, ecological systems, and land use. When data specific to the prospect were not available, regional data are reported. (MHR)

  16. Positive Emotionality is Associated with Baseline Metabolism in Orbitofrontal Cortex and in Regions of the Default Network

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Positive Emotionality (personality construct of well being, achievement/motivation, social and closeness) has been associated with striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability in healthy controls. Since striatal D2 receptors modulate activity in orbitofrontal cortex and cingulate (brain regions that process natural and drug rewards) we hypothesized that these regions underlie positive emotionality. To test this we assessed the correlation between baseline brain glucose metabolism (measured with...

  17. Correlation of fluid properties and geochemical parameters with heavy oil viscosity and density on trans-regional scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehne, E.; Rojas, K.; McCarthy, K.; Taylor, S.D. [Schlumberger (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Heavy oils around the world are characterized by high specific gravity and high contents of heavy components but their viscosity differs from one reservoir to another. This research aimed at finding correlations of geochemical characteristics with oil viscosity for heavy oil from different basins. This study was conducted on 15 heavy oil samples from northern and southern America and from Asia; the samples were characterized using gas chromatography, capillarity viscometer, data from stable carbon isotopes, SARA analysis, GC-FID and freezing point depression. Results showed that the degradation-viscosity correlation observed on a regional scale cannot be applied to the worldwide scale, and determined that, at that scale, oil viscosity depends on the original oil maturity and organofacies characteristics. In addition, biomarkers were found to help limit potential oil viscosity although they did not show a direct correlation. This study showed that original oil maturity and organofacies characteristics have to be taken into account in predictive models of oil viscosity.

  18. Late Triassic tuff intervals in the Ordos basin, Central China: Their depositional, petrographic, geochemical characteristics and regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xinwei; Liu, Chiyang; Mao, Guangzhou; Deng, Yu; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Jianqiang

    2014-02-01

    Tuff intervals of Upper Triassic Yanchang Formation are laterally widespread in the Ordos basin, Central China. This paper focuses on magmatic origins and potential source regions of these tuff intervals through detail depositional, petrographic and geochemical analyses. Most of the tuff intervals are well-documented at the bottom of the Chang7 oil reservoir unit and can be correlated laterally, and certain tuff beds are reworked by turbidity current or seismic activity. Petrographic studies of the Chang7 tuffs indicate that they are composed of crystal shards, lithic shards and altered glass shards, and the crystal shards include plagioclase, quartz and biotite. Alteration of the Chang7 tuffs is ubiquitous, thus, most of these tuffs transformed into illite/smectite (I/S) mixed-layers which are identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Less common minerals are also detected in the Chang7 tuffs such as zircon, hematite, siderite, anatase. Major elements are determined by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, the results indicate that the Chang7 tuffs are enriched in K2O (average 4.21%), the ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 ranges from 1.73 to 2.85 (average 2.17), and the ratio of TiO2/Al2O3 varies between 0.006 and 0.032 (average 0.017), which imply that the Chang7 tuffs originated from a felsic parental magma. Trace elements are determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), indicating the total rare earth element (∑REE) concentrations are variable, and range from 117.46 to 466.83 ppm (average 251.88 ppm). REE distribution pattern of the Chang7 tuffs presents a LREE rightward incline with flat HREE curve. The value of δEu ranges from 0.151 to 0.837 (average 0.492), suggesting a strong to weak negative Eu anomaly. The Chang7 tuffs show positive anomalies in Rb, Th and U and negative anomalies in Nb, Sr and Eu on a primitive mantle normalized spidergram. A preliminary analysis of the geochemical composition of the

  19. Geochemical processes regulating F-, as and NO3- content in the groundwater of a sector of the Pampean Region, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzi, Guido E; García, Leandro; Carol, Eleonora S

    2015-10-15

    The presence of F(-) and As in groundwater is common in volcanic aquifers. Excessive concentrations of these ions affect the quality of drinking water and can be harmful to health. When there is an anthropogenic source in phreatic aquifers, NO3(-) is incorporated to the groundwater components, deteriorating its quality. The objective of this work is to assess the geochemical processes that regulate the contents of F(-), As and NO3(-) of the groundwater in a sector of the Pampean Region in Argentina. This area is supplied with water by exploiting a multilayer aquifer, composed of a phreatic aquifer occurring in loess sediments and a fluvial semi-confined aquifer, separated by an aquitard. The results obtained show that the phreatic aquifer has a higher concentration of F(-), As and NO3(-) than the semi-confined aquifer. Fluoride derives from the dissolution of volcanic glass at a slightly alkaline pH and from anion exchange; however, it may also be absorbed by the reprecipitating carbonates. The As is released by desorption, with the main source being the glass and lithic fragments of the loess. The NO3(-) originates from the decomposition of organic matter, mainly in the septic tanks of the peri-urban areas. Meanwhile, the As and F(-) content in the semi-confined aquifer is lower and its origin is the result of water inflow by vertical downward infiltration from the phreatic aquifer through the aquitard. The Pampean Region is one of the areas with the largest volume of agricultural exports in the world and at present it is undergoing a strong social and economic growth. Understanding the geochemical processes that regulate the quality of drinking water is of vital importance to generate water management guidelines aiming at minimizing the deterioration of drinking water sources.

  20. Volcanological, petrographical and geochemical characteristics of Late Cretaceous volcanic rocks around Borçka-Artvin region (NE Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Rasim; Aydin, Faruk; Oguz, Simge

    2015-04-01

    This study presents volcanological, petrographical and geochemical data for late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Borçka-Artvin region (NE Turkey) in order to investigate their origin and magmatic evolution. Based on the previous ages and recent field studies, the late Cretaceous time in the study area is characterized by two different bimodal volcanic periods. The first bimodal period of the late Cretaceous volcanism is mainly represented by mafic rock series (basaltic-basaltic andesitic pillow lavas and hyaloclastites) in the lower part, and felsic rock series (dacitic lavas, hyaloclastites, and pyrite-bearing tuffs) in the upper part. The second bimodal period of the late Cretaceous volcanism begins with mafic rock suites (basaltic-andesitic lavas and dikes-sills) and grades upward into felsic rock suites (biotite-bearing rhyolitic lavas and hyaloclastites), which are intercalated with hyaloclastites and red pelagic limestones. All volcano-sedimentary units are covered by Late Campanian-Paleocene clayey limestones and biomicrites with lesser calciturbidites. The mafic volcanic series of the study area, which comprise basaltic and andesitic rocks, generally show amygdaloidal and aphyric to porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of calcic to sodic plagioclase and augite in a hyalopilitic matrix of plag+cpx+mag. Zircon and magnetite are sometimes observed as accessory minerals, whereas chlorite, epidote and calcite are typical alteration products. On the other hand, the felsic volcanic series consisting of dacitic and rhyolitic rocks mostly display porphyritic and glomeroporphyritic textures with predominant feldspar, quartz and some biotite phenocrysts. The microgranular to felsophyric groundmass is mainly composed of aphanitic plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. Accessory minerals such as zircon, apatite and magnetite are common. Typical alteration products are sericite and clay minerals. Late Cretaceous Artvin-Borçka bimodal rock series generally display a

  1. Impact of baseline geometry in processing of regional networks on resulting coordinates and ZTD time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepniak, Katarzyna; Bock, Olivier; Wielgosz, Pawel

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the most accurate and homogeneous processing strategy to reprocess ground-based GNSS data from national networks for precise positioning and climate monitoring applications. We investigate the influence of the network geometry design strategy on the estimated coordinates of permanent stations and Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) time series. Three variants of processing were carried out and analyzed: 1) pre-defined network which usually contains baseline skeletons of reference stations and baselines to secondary stations forming a star-like structures with the main nodes connected to the reference skeleton; 2) the standard "obs-max" strategy available in Bernese GNSS Software; 3) a newly developed baselines design strategy optimized for ZTD estimation. The study shows that the network design has a strong impact especially on the quality and continuity of ZTD estimates. In case of sub-daily gaps in the measurements at reference stations, small clusters of stations can be disconnected from the main network in the first network strategy. This has little impact on coordinates, but offsets of a few centimeters in ZTD estimates and spikes in their formal errors can appear at all stations of the disconnected cluster. It is also responsible for significant discontinuities in the estimated ZTD series. Using the new developed network design strategy the reprocessed ZTD time series as well as time series of station positions are much more continuous and homogeneous in comparison to the standard approaches. Moreover, a post-processing screening procedure applied for ZTD and coordinates was applied to remove remaining outliers in time series. As a final screening and validation step, GNSS ZTD estimates were compared to ERA-Interim. The agreement between GNSS and ERA-Interim results with the new baseline design strategy and screening show a significant improvement.

  2. Geochemical characterization of critical dust source regions in the American West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Sarah M.; Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Emily I.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Scott, Sean R.; Aarons, Charles

    2017-10-01

    The generation, transport, and deposition of mineral dust are detectable in paleoclimate records from land, ocean, and ice, providing valuable insight into earth surface conditions and cycles on a range of timescales. Dust deposited in marine and terrestrial ecosystems can provide critical nutrients to nutrient-limited ecosystems, and variations in dust provenance can indicate changes in dust production, sources and transport pathways as a function of climate variability and land use change. Thus, temporal changes in locations of dust source areas and transport pathways have implications for understanding interactions between mineral dust, global climate, and biogeochemical cycles. This work characterizes dust from areas in the American West known for dust events and/or affected by increasing human settlement and livestock grazing during the last 150 years. Dust generation and uplift from these dust source areas depends on climate and land use practices, and the relative contribution of dust has likely changed since the expansion of industrialization and agriculture into the western United States. We present elemental and isotopic analysis of 28 potential dust source area samples analyzed using Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) for 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd composition and Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) for 176Hf/177Hf composition, and ICPMS for major and trace element concentrations. We find significant variability in the Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope compositions of potential source areas of dust throughout western North America, ranging from 87Sr/86Sr = 0.703699 to 0.740236, εNd = -26.6 to 2.4, and εHf = -21.7 to -0.1. We also report differences in the trace metal and phosphorus concentrations in the geologic provinces sampled. This research provides an important resource for the geochemical tracing of dust sources and sinks in western North America, and will aid in modeling the biogeochemical impacts of increased

  3. Geochemical Analyses of Rock, Sediment, and Water from the Region In and Around the Tuba City Landfill, Tuba City, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Wirt, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    The Tuba City Landfill (TCL) started as an unregulated waste disposal site in the 1940s and was administratively closed in 1997. Since the TCL closure, radionuclides have been detected in the shallow ground water. In 2006, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to better understand the source of radionuclides in the ground water at the TCL compared to the surrounding region. This report summarizes those data and presents interpretations that focus on the geochemistry in the rocks and water from the Tuba City region. The TCL is sited on Navajo Sandstone above the contact with the Kayenta Formation. These formations are not rich in uranium but generally are below average crustal abundance values for uranium. Uranium ores in the area were mined nearby in the Chinle Formation and processed at the Rare Metals mill (RMM). Regional samples of rock, sediment, leachates, and water were collected in and around the TCL site and analyzed for major and minor elements, 18O, 2H, 3H, 13C, 14C,34S, 87Sr, and 234U/238U, as appropriate. Results of whole rock and sediment samples, along with leachates, suggest the Chinle Formation is a major source of uranium and other trace elements in the area. Regional water samples indicate that some of the wells within the TCL site have geochemical signatures that are different from the regional springs and surface water. The geochemistry from these TCL wells is most similar to leachates from the Chinle Formation rocks and sediments. Isotope samples do not uniquely identify TCL-derived waters, but they do provide a useful indicator for shallow compared to deep ground-water flow paths and general rock/water interaction times. Information in this report provides a comparison between the geochemistry within the TCL and in the region as a whole.

  4. Geochemical Mapping——Evolution of Its Aims, Ideas and Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xuejing

    2008-01-01

    The development of geochemical mapping progressed from local geochemical prospecting through regional geochemical exploration and regional geochemical mapping to national and global geochemical mapping. This paper discusses the evolution of aims, ideas and methodology of geochemical mapping in Western countries, Russia and China. The sophistication of geochemical mapping methodology will make great contributions to solving resources and environmental problems in the 21st century.

  5. Methamphetamine reduces LTP and increases baseline synaptic transmission in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarod Swant

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is an addictive psychostimulant whose societal impact is on the rise. Emerging evidence suggests that psychostimulants alter synaptic plasticity in the brain--which may partly account for their adverse effects. While it is known that METH increases the extracellular concentration of monoamines dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, it is not clear how METH alters glutamatergic transmission. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and systemic METH on basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP; an activity-induced increase in synaptic efficacy in CA1 sub-field in the hippocampus. Both the acute ex vivo application of METH to hippocampal slices and systemic administration of METH decreased LTP. Interestingly, the acute ex vivo application of METH at a concentration of 30 or 60 microM increased baseline synaptic transmission as well as decreased LTP. Pretreatment with eticlopride (D2-like receptor antagonist did not alter the effects of METH on synaptic transmission or LTP. In contrast, pretreatment with D1/D5 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 or 5-HT1A receptor antagonist NAN-190 abrogated the effect of METH on synaptic transmission. Furthermore, METH did not increase baseline synaptic transmission in D1 dopamine receptor haploinsufficient mice. Our findings suggest that METH affects excitatory synaptic transmission via activation of dopamine and serotonin receptor systems in the hippocampus. This modulation may contribute to synaptic maladaption induced by METH addiction and/or METH-mediated cognitive dysfunction.

  6. Geothermal environmental studies, Heber Region, Imperial Valley, California. Environmental baseline data acquisition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-02-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been studying the feasibility of a Low Salinity Hydrothermal Demonstration Plant as part of its Geothermal Energy Program. The Heber area of the Imperial Valley was selected as one of the candidate geothermal reservoirs. Documentation of the environmental conditions presently existing in the Heber area is required for assessment of environmental impacts of future development. An environmental baseline data acquisition program to compile available data on the environment of the Heber area is reported. The program included a review of pertinent existing literature, interviews with academic, governmental and private entities, combined with field investigations and meteorological monitoring to collect primary data. Results of the data acquisition program are compiled in terms of three elements: the physical, the biological and socioeconomic settings.

  7. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110462 Chen Furong(Anhui Institute of Geological Survey,Hefei 230001,China)Ore-Search Prospects of Gold and Tungsten Geochemical Anomalies in Ningdun Area,Anhui Province(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,CN11-1906/P,34(2),2010,p.150-153,5 illus.,2 tables,6 refs.)Key words:gold ores,tungsten ores,geochemical exploration,AnhuiGeochemical anomalies of gold and tungsten in Ningdun area are dominated by the element association of Au-As-W-Bi.These anomalies are well coincident with

  8. Lead (Pb) Isotope Baselines for Studies of Ancient Human Migration and Trade in the Maya Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharpe, Ashley E; Kamenov, George D; Gilli, Adrian; Hodell, David A; Emery, Kitty F; Brenner, Mark; Krigbaum, John

    2016-01-01

    .... We analyzed 60 rock samples for lead isotope ratios and a representative subset of samples for lead, uranium, and thorium concentrations across the Maya region, including the Northern Lowlands...

  9. Baseline and projected future carbon storage and greenhouse-gas fluxes in the Great Plains region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Michelle; Butman, David; Hawbaker, Todd; Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Jinxun; Liu, Shu-Guang; McDonald, Cory; Reker, Ryan; Sayler, Kristi; Sleeter, Benjamin; Sohl, Terry; Stackpoole, Sarah; Wein, Anne; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2011-01-01

    This assessment was conducted to fulfill the requirements of section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 and to improve understanding of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in the Great Plains region in the central part of the United States. The assessment examined carbon storage, carbon fluxes, and other GHG fluxes (methane and nitrous oxide) in all major terrestrial ecosystems (forests, grasslands/shrublands, agricultural lands, and wetlands) and freshwater aquatic systems (rivers, streams, lakes, and impoundments) in two time periods: baseline (generally in the first half of the 2010s) and future (projections from baseline to 2050). The assessment was based on measured and observed data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and many other agencies and organizations and used remote sensing, statistical methods, and simulation models.

  10. Regional Gray Matter Atrophy in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Baseline Analysis of Multi-Center Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sushmita; Staewen, Terrell D.; Cofield, Stacy S.; Cutter, Gary R.; Lublin, Fred D.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Regional gray matter (GM) atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset and its temporal variation can provide objective information regarding disease evolution. An automated pipeline for estimating atrophy of various GM structures was developed using tensor based morphometry (TBM) and implemented on a multi-center sub-cohort of 1008 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Four hundred age and gender matched healthy controls were used for comparison. Using the analysis of covariance, atrophy differences between MS patients and healthy controls were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. Regional GM atrophy was observed in a number of deep GM structures that included thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and cortical GM regions. General linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effects of age, gender, and scanner field strength, and imaging sequence on the regional atrophy. Correlations between regional GM volumes and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration (DD), T2 lesion load (T2 LL), T1 lesion load (T1 LL), and normalized cerebrospinal fluid (nCSF) were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Thalamic atrophy observed in MS patients compared to healthy controls remained consistent within subgroups based on gender and scanner field strength. Weak correlations between thalamic volume and EDSS (r = −0.133; p < 0.001) and DD (r = −0.098; p = 0.003) were observed. Of all the structures, thalamic volume moderately correlated with T2 LL (r = −0.492; p-value < 0.001), T1 LL (r = −0.473; p-value < 0.001) and nCSF (r = −0.367; p-value < 0.001). PMID:25787188

  11. Regional gray matter atrophy in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: baseline analysis of multi-center data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sushmita; Staewen, Terrell D; Cofield, Stacy S; Cutter, Gary R; Lublin, Fred D; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2015-03-01

    Regional gray matter (GM) atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset and its temporal variation can provide objective information regarding disease evolution. An automated pipeline for estimating atrophy of various GM structures was developed using tensor based morphometry (TBM) and implemented on a multi-center sub-cohort of 1008 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Four hundred age and gender matched healthy controls were used for comparison. Using the analysis of covariance, atrophy differences between MS patients and healthy controls were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. Regional GM atrophy was observed in a number of deep GM structures that included thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and cortical GM regions. General linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effects of age, gender, and scanner field strength, and imaging sequence on the regional atrophy. Correlations between regional GM volumes and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration (DD), T2 lesion load (T2 LL), T1 lesion load (T1 LL), and normalized cerebrospinal fluid (nCSF) were analyzed using Pearson׳s correlation coefficient. Thalamic atrophy observed in MS patients compared to healthy controls remained consistent within subgroups based on gender and scanner field strength. Weak correlations between thalamic volume and EDSS (r=-0.133; p<0.001) and DD (r=-0.098; p=0.003) were observed. Of all the structures, thalamic volume moderately correlated with T2 LL (r=-0.492; P-value<0.001), T1 LL (r=-0.473; P-value<0.001) and nCSF (r=-0.367; P-value<0.001).

  12. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131784 An Guoying(China Aero Geophysical Survey and Remote Sensing Center for Land and Resources,Beijing 100083,China);Lei Yingping Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenic Prospecting Areas in Yunkai Area,Guangxi(Geophysical and Geochemical Exploration,ISSN1000-8918,CN11-1906/P,36

  13. Sedimentary and Geochemical Characteristics of Sinian Cap Carbonates in the Upper Yangtze Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑞东; 王世杰; 董丽敏; 姜立君; 张卫华; 高慧

    2003-01-01

    A global-scale glaciation occurred at about 600 Ma ago. As a result,the Earth became the "Snowball Earth". The glaciation came to the end abruptly when atmospheric carbon dioxide increased to such an extent as to be about 350 times the modern level because of subaerial volcanic degassing. The rapid termination of glaciation would have led to warming of the Snowball Earth and extreme greenhouse conditions would have been created. The transfer of atmospheric carbon dioxide to oceans would give rise to the rapid precipitation of calcium carbonate in warm surface seawaters,thus forming the cap carbonate rocks as observed worldwide today.Regionally persisting,thin layers of carbonate rocks directly and ubiquitously overlie Proterozoic glacial deposits almost on every continent,and are commonly referred to as cap carbonates.Their unusual litho- fabrics,stratigraphically abrupt basal and upper-level contacts and strongly negative carbonate isotopic signatures ( δ 13Ccarb. values range from - 7.0‰ - 0‰) suggest a chemical oceanographic origin,the details of which remain unknown. It is proposed that these enigmatic deposits are related to the destabilization of gaseous hydrate in terrestrial permafrost following rapid postglacial warming and flooding of widely exposed continental shelves and internal basins.The authors carried out studies on the geochemistry,sedimentology and palaeontology of the Sinian cap carbonates in Guizhou and Hunan provinces,including the occurrence of cap carbonates of unusual fabrics,strongly negative carbon isotopic signatures,and a lot of bitumen nodules.From the results it is suggested that the cap carbonates were formed from solid methane seepage,and it is in agreement with Kennedy' s viewpoint (2001) that the cap carbonates resulted from the rapid precipitation of calcium carbonate in response to solid methane seepage.

  14. Positive emotionality is associated with baseline metabolism in orbitofrontal cortex and in regions of the default network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, N D; Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Fowler, J S; Telang, F; Goldstein, R Z; Alia-Klein, N; Woicik, P; Wong, C; Logan, J; Millard, J; Alexoff, D

    2011-08-01

    Positive emotionality (PEM) (personality construct of well-being, achievement/motivation, social and closeness) has been associated with striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability in healthy controls. As striatal D2 receptors modulate activity in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and cingulate (brain regions that process natural and drug rewards), we hypothesized that these regions underlie PEM. To test this, we assessed the correlation between baseline brain glucose metabolism (measured with positron emission tomography and [(18)F]fluoro-deoxyglucose) and scores on PEM (obtained from the multidimensional personality questionnaire or MPQ) in healthy controls (n = 47). Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analyses revealed that PEM was positively correlated (P(c)personality dimensions (negative emotionality and constraint) were not significant (SPM P(c)personality factors and brain dysfunction underlying substance use disorders. In addition, we also uncovered an association between PEM and baseline metabolism in regions from the DMN, which suggests that PEM may relate to global cortical processes that are active during resting conditions (introspection, mind wandering).

  15. Baseline Survey for an Assessment of the Nitrate Problematic in Divjaka Region of Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIVIA PLOECHL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available the whole EU legislation has to be implemented into Albanian law. Thus, the limit value of the nitrate concentration in groundwater is defined with 50 mg/l according to the EU Groundwater Directive. However, in a definite region in Albania that is called Divjaka area it is assumed that this limit value is exceeded due to intensive agricultural land use, whereas no measurements are currently available. Therefore, simulation results of the nitrogen discharge model EPIC are presented, including the annual nitrogen leaching and the nitrate concentration in percolation water. As the latter exceeded the limit value, the findings at least indicate the necessity to monitor groundwater quality as basis for further studies and potential measures to avoid pollution.

  16. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091835 Cheng Hangxin(School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering,Peking University,Beijing 100871,China);Zhuang Guangmin The Cd Geochemical Province in the Source Area of the Yangtze River and the Output Fluxes of Cd for Its Major Water Systems(Earth Science Frontiers,ISSN1005-2321,CN11-3370/P,15(5),2008,p.203-211,5 illus.,5 tables,25 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:cadmium,geochemical province,Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau20091836 Cheng Hangxin(School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering,Peking University,Beijing 100871,China);Yang Zhongfang A New Round of Global Geochemical

  17. Geochemical fingerprints of waters in the Lake Baringo-Bogoria region, Kenya: Implications for hydrogeochemical processes and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, V. C.; Ashley, G. M.; Renaut, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    Lake Baringo and Lake Bogoria lie within an asymmetric half-graben in the East African Rift, Central Kenya. Lake Baringo to the north is fresh because of subsurface outflow (~0.8 g/l TDS; pH=8.9) whereas to the south, Lake Bogoria, which is hydrologically closed, is saline/alkaline (mixolimnion: ~40 g/l TDS; pH=10.2). The climate is semi arid (Plakes is comprised of Pleistocene and Holocene alluvium and lake sediments >1 km thick. The primary sources of water in the area are rivers draining the highlands, and hot, warm and cool springs and seeps of different salinities associated with the faults. Freshwater wetlands and rivers traversing the Loboi Plain represent a limited resource in this semi-arid environment and are heavily utilized for drinking water by the resident population, livestock, and wildlife, and for crop irrigation. To better understand the hydrogeochemical processes affecting the freshwater sources in the southern Loboi Plain, water samples that were collected from lakes, rivers, springs, and one of the large wetlands (Loboi Swamp) were analyzed for a full suite of major and minor elements. The objective of the study was to determine the extent to which the composition of water from a variety of environments could be used as geochemical fingerprints for hydrogeochemical processes. Conservative mixing between the most dilute river-water endmember (~0.1g/l TDS) and the most concentrated Lake Bogoria surface water, is indicated by the covariation of Na^{+} with (Alk_{T}+Cl^{-}) and with F^{-} content for nearly all surface and spring waters in the region. This trend is consistent with an overall process of evapoconcentration of dilute meteoric water containing dominantly Na^{+}, HCO_{3}$-, and Cl- derived from weathering of intermediate (trachyphonolite) and basaltic volcanic rocks in the region. Spring waters feeding the Loboi Swamp are warm (~35°C), with pH~6.4-6.9, and compositions (~0.25 g/l TDS) consistent with interaction of relatively shallow

  18. Geochemical evolution of Jurassic diorites from the Bristol Lake region, California, USA, and the role of assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E.D.; Wooden, J.L.; Shieh, Y.-N.; Farber, D.

    1992-01-01

    Late Jurassic dioritic plutons from the Bristol Lake region of the eastern Mojave Desert share several geochemical attributes with high-alumina basalts, continental hawaiite basalts, and high-K are andesites including: high K2O concentrations; high Al2O3 (16-19 weight %); elevated Zr/TiO2; LREE (light-rare-earth-element) enrichment (La/YbCN=6.3-13.3); and high Nb. Pearce element ratio analysis supported by petrographic relations demonstrates that P, Hf, and Zr were conserved during differentiation. Abundances of conserved elements suggest that dioritic plutons from neighboring ranges were derived from similar parental melts. In the most voluminous suite, correlated variations in elemental concentrations and (87Sr/86Sr)i indicate differentiation by fractional crystallization of hornblende and plagioclase combined with assimilation of a component characterized by abundant radiogenic Sr. Levenberg-Marquardt and Monte Carlo techniques were used to obtain optimal solutions to non-linear inverse models for fractional crystallization-assimilation processes. Results show that the assimilated material was chemically analogous to lower crustal mafic granulites and that the mass ratio of contaminant to parental magma was on the order of 0.1. Lack of enrichment in 18O with differentiation is consistent with the model results. Elemental concentrations and O, Sr, and Nd isotopic data point to a hydrous REE-enriched subcontinental lithospheric source similar to that which produced some Cenozoic continental hawaiites from the southern Cordillera. Isotopic compositions of associated granitoids suggest that partial melting of this subcontinental lithosphere may have been an important process in the development of the Late Jurassic plutonic arc of the eastern Mojave Desert. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Climate implications of major geochemical elements in the Holocene sediments of the North and East China monsoonal regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianli SUN; Zhanghua WANG; Jing CHEN; Wu FENG

    2009-01-01

    Two Holocene sediment cores were retrieved respectively from the enclosed Lake Daihai in the monsoon/arid transition zone of North China and the Taihu Lake coast in the monsoonal area of the Yangtze delta, Eastern China. Distribution of major geochemical elements and their ratios were employed to reveal the characteristics of Holocene climate and associated envir-onmental implications in the two regions. It is suggested that the temporal distribution of major elements serve as a useful indicator to denote the variations of monsoon effective precipitation for the enclosed lake area. High values of resistant elements such as Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, (FeO + Fe2O3), MnO in the lake sediments correspond to the depressed chemical weathering and weakened mon-soon effective precipitation, while the highs of mobile and easy soluble elements such as MgO, CaO, Na2O reflect the enhanced chemical weathering and increased monsoon effective precipitation in the lake basin. In comparison, the behaviors of the major elements in sediments of the Taihu Lake coast were largely controlled by the changes both in sea transgression in the different Holocene time periods and the monsoon precipitation. The relatively highs of Al2O3, TiO2, (FeO + Fe2O3), in marine-influenced sedi-ments suggest relatively strong coastal hydrodynamics and chemical weathering, and vice versa. Meanwhile, the lows of SiO2, Na2O and CaO in the non-marine-influenced sediments also denote relatively strong hydrodynamics and chemical weathering due to enhanced monsoon precipita-tion, and vice versa. Sedimentary environment should be taken into account when achieving a full understanding of their climate implications.

  20. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20152642 Baoyinwuliji(Inner Mongolia Institute of Geological Survey,Hohhot 010020,China);Zhao Wentao Geochemical Anomaly and Metallogenic Potential of the Naomugengsumu Lithium Mineralization Area in Inner Mongolia(Geology and Resources,ISSN1671

  1. Application of the superfine fraction analysis method in ore gold geochemical prospecting in the Shamanikha-Stolbovsky Area (Magadan Region)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Yuliya; Sokolov, Sergey; Glukhov, Anton

    2014-05-01

    The Shamanikha-Stolbovsky gold cluster is located in the North-East of Russia, in the basin of the Kolyma River. In 1933, gold placers were discovered there, but the search for significant gold targets for more than 50 years did not give positive results. In 2009-2011, geochemical and geophysical studies, mining and drilling were conducted within this cluster. Geochemical exploration was carried out in a modification based on superimposed secondary sorption-salt haloes (sampling density of 250x250 m, 250x50 m, 250x20 m) using the superfine fraction analysis method (SFAM) because of complicated landscape conditions (thick Quaternary sediments, widespread permafrost). The method consists in the extraction of superfine fraction (quartz formation are identified within the anomalous geochemical field core zone. 3. In all these prospects, mining and drilling penetrated gold ore bodies within the identified potentially gold zones. The Nadezhda target now has the status of gold deposit.

  2. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122626 Li Dongfeng ( Liaoning Institute of Mineral Resources Exploration,Shenyang 110032,China ) Application of Comprehensive Geophysical-Geochemical Method in Toudao-yingzi Gold Field ( Journal of Liaoning Technical University ( Natural Sciences ), ISSN1008-0562,CN21-1379 / N,30 ( 6 ), 2011,p.849-852,1illus.,2tables,10refs. ) Key words:gold ores,geophysical exploration,geochemical exploration,Liaoning Province

  3. Geochemical controls on fluoriferous groundwaters of the Pliocene and the more recent aquifers: The case of Aigion region, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanou, K.; Siavalas, G.; Lambrakis, N.

    2013-12-01

    High fluoride concentrations (> 8 mg/L) in the groundwater of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments are rare; however, this is the case around Aigion town, where teeth fluorosis has been detected since the 80s. Aiming to investigate the origin and the mobility mechanism of fluorine in groundwater and sediments a hydrogeological and geochemical research has been conducted. The hydrogeological research revealed that the Na-HCO3 water type of boreholes aligned along a fault and hosted in the confined aquifers display the higher fluoride content. The unconfined aquifer is mostly dominated by Na-Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 water, which displays much lower fluoride concentrations. The most permeable sectors of this aquifer host fresh water of Ca-HCO3 type. The geochemical research revealed significant amount of fluorine in the base of a lignite sequence hosted in the Plio-Pleistocene sediments.

  4. Establishing a baseline for regional scale monitoring of eelgrass (Zostera marina) habitat on the lower Alaska Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogrefe, Kyle R.; Ward, David H.; Donnelly, Tyrone F.; Dau, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Seagrass meadows, one of the world’s most widespread and productive ecosystems, provide a wide range of services with real economic value. Worldwide declines in the distribution and abundance of seagrasses and increased threats to coastal ecosystems from climate change have prompted a need to acquire baseline data for monitoring and protecting these important habitats. We assessed the distribution and abundance of eelgrass (Zostera marina) along nearly 1200 km of shoreline on the lower Alaska Peninsula, a region of expansive eelgrass meadows whose status and trends are poorly understood. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a multi-scale approach by using Landsat satellite imagery to map the total areal extent of eelgrass while integrating field survey data to improve map accuracy and describe the physical and biological condition of the meadows. Innovative use of proven methods and processing tools was used to address challenges inherent to remote sensing in high latitude, coastal environments. Eelgrass was estimated to cover ~31,000 ha, 91% of submerged aquatic vegetation on the lower Alaska Peninsula, nearly doubling the known spatial extent of eelgrass in the region. Mapping accuracy was 80%–90% for eelgrass distribution at locations containing adequate field survey data for error analysis.

  5. Establishing a Baseline for Regional Scale Monitoring of Eelgrass (Zostera marina Habitat on the Lower Alaska Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle R. Hogrefe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass meadows, one of the world’s most widespread and productive ecosystems, provide a wide range of services with real economic value. Worldwide declines in the distribution and abundance of seagrasses and increased threats to coastal ecosystems from climate change have prompted a need to acquire baseline data for monitoring and protecting these important habitats. We assessed the distribution and abundance of eelgrass (Zostera marina along nearly 1200 km of shoreline on the lower Alaska Peninsula, a region of expansive eelgrass meadows whose status and trends are poorly understood. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a multi-scale approach by using Landsat satellite imagery to map the total areal extent of eelgrass while integrating field survey data to improve map accuracy and describe the physical and biological condition of the meadows. Innovative use of proven methods and processing tools was used to address challenges inherent to remote sensing in high latitude, coastal environments. Eelgrass was estimated to cover ~31,000 ha, 91% of submerged aquatic vegetation on the lower Alaska Peninsula, nearly doubling the known spatial extent of eelgrass in the region. Mapping accuracy was 80%–90% for eelgrass distribution at locations containing adequate field survey data for error analysis.

  6. Environmental response to past and recent climate variability in the Trondheimsfjord region, central Norway - A multiproxy geochemical approach

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Norwegian fjords have a great potential for providing high-resolution sedimentary records that reflect local terrestrial and marine processes and therefore, fjords offer unique opportunities for the investigation of sedimentological and geochemical climatically induced processes. However, the complexity of fjord systems in terms of bathymetry and oceanography requires a profound knowledge of the fjord environmental setting before starting to interpret past climatic signals in Holocene sedimen...

  7. Regional and hemispheric influences on temporal variability in baseline carbon monoxide and ozone over the Northeast US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Mao, H.; Demerjian, K.; Hogrefe, C.; Liu, J.

    2017-09-01

    Interannual variability in baseline carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3), defined as mixing ratios under minimal influence of recent and local emissions, was studied for seven rural sites in the Northeast US over 2001-2010. Annual baseline CO exhibited statistically significant decreasing trends (-4.3 to -2.3 ppbv yr-1), while baseline O3 did not display trends at any site. In examining the data by season, wintertime and springtime baseline CO at the two highest sites (1.5 km and 2 km asl) did not experience significant trends. Decadal increasing trends (∼2.55 ppbv yr-1) were found in springtime and wintertime baseline O3 in southern New Hampshire, which was associated with anthropogenic NOx emission reductions from the urban corridor. Biomass burning emissions impacted summertime baseline CO with ∼38% variability from wildfire emissions in Russia and ∼22% from Canada at five sites and impacted baseline O3 at the two high elevation sites only with ∼27% variability from wildfires in both Russia and Canada. The Arctic Oscillation was negatively correlated with summertime baseline O3, while the North Atlantic Oscillation was positively correlated with springtime baseline O3. This study suggested that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, and meteorological conditions were important factors working together to determine baseline O3 and CO in the Northeast U.S. during the 2000s.

  8. Formation of the Permian basalts and implications of geochemical tracing for paleo-tectonic setting and regional tectonic background in the Turpan-Hami and Santanghu basins, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dingwu; LIU Yiqun; XING Xiujuan; HAO Jianrong; DONG Yunpeng; OUYANG Zhengjian

    2006-01-01

    The Turpan-Hami and Santanghu basins are the late Paleozoic-Mesozoic-Cenozoic reworked intracontinental basins that superposed on the folded basement of the Paleozoic orogenic belt. 40Ar/39Ar geochronological study of the basalts developed in the basins reveals that the formation period is Permain (293-266 Ma). From geochemical comparison of the basalts, the Santanghu basalts exhibit a strong depletion in Nb and Ta, and a selective enrichment in HFSE, reflecting that the source region is influenced by the subducted components related to subduction of the ancient oceanic crust and characterized with "lagged arc volcanic rocks". In contrast, the Turpan-Hami basalts show a slight depletion in Nb and Ta, high Th/Ta ratio, similar to the basalts formed in an intracontinental extensional zone or in an initial rift. Combined with the formation period of the ophiolite and ophiolite mélange zones and regional magmatic activities occurring on the post-orogenic extensional background in northern Xinjiang, it can be inferred from these geochemical characteristics that the tectonic background for forming the Turpan-Hami and Santanghu basins is closely related to the regional extension after the continent-continent collisional orogeny. The basalts of the two basins came from different sources on the post-orogenic extensional background of the similar basin-forming dynamics. Although the settings are all intracontinental rift, the source for the Santanghu basalts is obviously subjected to the metasomatism of the subducted components, implying the existence of the previous subduction.

  9. Baseline indoor air quality measurements collected from 136 metropolitan New York region commercial office buildings between 1997-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, John P; Esposito, William A; Cleversey, Keith W

    2002-01-01

    Between January 1997 and December 1999, 648 surveys were performed in 136 commercial office buildings in the metropolitan New York region as part of an ongoing proactive indoor environmental quality (IEQ) program. Sampling was performed on a spot basis in "nonproblem" buildings, during normal business hours, either quarterly or semiannually. Carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) were among the various physical and gaseous parameters sampled for. More than 15,000 data points were collected, and the results were analyzed to determine the mean, median, mode, and standard deviation for each of those parameters. The data was then compared to various standards and/or guidelines applicable to the indoor environment. The results indicated that 98% of the CO2 readings were below 1000 ppm, and 99.9% of the CO readings were below 10 ppm. However, for TVOCs, nearly 88% of the readings exceeded the proposed European guideline value of 0.3 mg/m3. Ultimately, these results can be used to compare both baseline and periodic readings collected in future studies, and to help determine if potential problems exist within a building.

  10. The surface geochemical exploration of oil and gas in the Gangbatong-Ya’anxiang and the Dongqiao-Nam Co of the Qinghai-Tibet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to the complexity of geological background and the adverseness of natural geographical environment in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau,it is very difficult to carry out petroleum geological study in this region. The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is the only blank space of petroleum exploration on a large scale. The authors carried out the surface geochemical exploration of oil and gas in the Gangbatong-Ya’anxiang and Dongqiao-Nam Co of the Qinghai-Tibet region. Based on the data of actual detection and experiments in the studied area,the characteristics of concentration and profile distribution of the main geochemical exploration indicators(total adsorbed hydrocarbon,altered carbonate,thermal released mercury,etc.) were discussed. The origin of hydrocarbon was also discussed. Moreover,the oil and gas potential of different sections in the Qiangtang Basin and the Biru Basin were evaluated,which could provide references for the exploration and prediction of oil and gas in this region. The concentrations of total adsorbed hydrocarbons in the Ya’anxiang of Suoxian County-Zadong of Baqing County and the Jiecha-Dangxiong of Anduo County in the Qinghai-Tibet region are high,averaging 312.64 μL·kg-1 and 164.36 μL·kg-1. Their altered carbonate concentrations are relatively low,averaging 0.11% and 0.56%. Their concentrations of thermal released mercury are relatively high,averaging 13.09×10-9 and 1.94×10-9. Geochemical exploration results in fact reflect hydrocarbon information in the underground,which are mainly petroleum associated gas and over-matured cracking gas. The Jiecha-Charenluma and the Xiamaya’ertong-Suoba sections in the Qiangtang Basin are the most favorable ones for oil and gas and the Ekou-Zadong section is relatively favorable one,while the Nam Co and the Zigetangcuo-Dongqiao sections in the Biru Basin are the favorable ones for oil and gas,and the Jiang Co-Nading Co and the Ya’anxiang-Ya’ertong sections are relatively favorable ones.

  11. The Source, Spatial Distribution and Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Soil from the Pearl River Delta Based on the National Multi-Purpose Regional Geochemical Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingyan; Guo, Shuhai; Wu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The data on the heavy metal content at different soil depths derived from a multi-purpose regional geochemical survey in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) were analyzed using ArcGIS 10.0. By comparing their spatial distributions and areas, the sources of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, As and Pb) were quantitatively identified and explored. Netted measuring points at 25 ×25 km were set over the entire PRD according to the geochemical maps. Based on the calculation data obtained from different soil depths, the concentrations of As and Cd in a large area of the PRD exceeded the National Second-class Standard. The spatial disparity of the geometric centers in the surface soil and deep soil showed that As in the surface soil mainly came from parent materials, while Cd had high consistency in different soil profiles because of deposition in the soil forming process. The migration of Cd also resulted in a considerable ecological risk to the Beijiang and Xijiang River watershed. The potential ecological risk index followed the order Cd ≥ Hg > Pb > As. According to the sources, the distribution trends and the characteristics of heavy metals in the soil from the perspective of the whole area, the Cd pollution should be repaired, especially in the upper reaches of the Xijiang and Beijiang watershed to prevent risk explosion while the pollution of Hg and Pb should be controlled in areas with intense human activity, and supervision during production should be strengthened to maintain the ecological balance of As.

  12. Measurement of western U.S. baseline ozone from the surface to the tropopause and assessment of downwind impact regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, O. R.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. R.; Pollack, I.; Cullis, P. D.; Ives, M. A.; Tarasick, D. W.; Al-Saadi, J.; Stajner, I.

    2011-11-01

    Since 1997, baseline ozone monitoring from the surface to the tropopause along the U.S. west coast has been limited to the weekly ozonesondes from Trinidad Head, California. To explore baseline ozone at other latitudes, an ozonesonde network was implemented during spring 2010, including four launch sites along the California coast. Modeling indicated that North American pollution plumes impacted the California coast primarily below 3 km, but had no measurable impact on the average coastal ozone profiles. Vertical and latitudinal variation in free tropospheric baseline ozone appears to be partly explained by polluted and stratospheric air masses that descend isentropically along the west coast. Above 3 km, the dominant sources of ozone precursors were China and international shipping, while international shipping was the greatest source below 2 km. Approximately 8-10% of the baseline ozone that enters California in the 0-6 km range impacts the surface of the USA, but very little reaches the eastern USA. Within California, the major impact of baseline ozone above 2 km is on the high elevation terrain of eastern California. Baseline ozone below 2 km has its strongest impact on the low elevation sites throughout the state. To quantify ozone production within California we compared inland ozone measurements to baseline measurements. For average daytime conditions, we found no enhancements of lower tropospheric ozone in the northern Central Valley, but enhancements of 12-23% were found in the southern Central Valley. Enhancements above Joshua Tree were greater, 33-41%, while the greatest enhancements occurred over the LA Basin, 32-63%.

  13. Rb-Sr Geochronology and Geochemical Characteristics of Mafic Dikes in the Nova Lacerda and Conquista D´Oeste Region, Mato Grosso, SW Amazonian Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarildo Salina Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Nova Lacerda and Conquista D’Oeste regions, Mato Grosso State, SW part of the Amazonian Craton, mafi c dikestrending NNW intrude the Nova Lacerda Granite (1462 ± 12 Ma, within the Jauru Domain, in the Rondonia-San IgnacioProvince (1.55 - 1.3 Ga. The mafi c swarm comprises diabases, metadiabases and amphibolites. Metadiabases originatedfrom uralitization of diabases. These rocks have tholeiitic affi nity and predominant basaltic composition. Some samples are andesi-basalts. The ages of diabases and metabasites are 1380 ± 32 Ma and 1330 ± 120 Ma respectively. Geochemical data indicate that the compositional variation of diabases and metadiadases is due to fractional crystallization of evolved tholeiitic magmas. The origin of the basaltic magmas is related to a heterogeneous mantle source.

  14. Regional Geochemical Results from the Reanalysis of NURE Stream Sediment Samples - Eagle 3? Quadrangle, East-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, J.G.; Briggs, P.H.; Gough, L.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Brown, Z.A.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents reconnaissance geochemical data for a cooperative study in the Fortymile Mining District, east-central Alaska, initiated in 1997. This study has been funded by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program. Cooperative funds were provided from various State of Alaska sources through the Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Results presented here represent the initial reconnaissance phase for this multidisciplinary cooperative study. In this phase, 239 sediment samples from the Eagle 3? Quadrangle of east-central Alaska, which had been collected and analyzed for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation program (NURE) of the 1970's (Hoffman and Buttleman, 1996; Smith, 1997), are reanalyzed by newer analytical methods that are more sensitive, accurate, and precise (Arbogast, 1996; Taggart, 2002). The main objectives for the reanalysis of these samples were to establish lower limits of determination for some elements and to confirm the NURE data as a reliable predictive reconnaissance tool for future studies in Alaska's Eagle 3? Quadrangle. This study has wide implications for using the archived NURE samples and data throughout Alaska for future studies.

  15. Geochemical maps of stream sediments in central Colorado, from New Mexico to Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Giles, Stuart A.; Klein, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed a series of geologic, mineral resource, and environmental assessment studies in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado, from Leadville eastward to the range front and from New Mexico to the Wyoming border. Regional stream-sediment geochemical maps, useful for assessing mineral resources and environmental effects of historical mining activities, were produced as part of the study. The data portrayed in this 56-parameter portfolio of landscape geochemical maps serve as a geochemical baseline for the region, indicate element abundances characteristic of various lithologic terranes, and identify gross anthropogenic effects of historical mining. However, although reanalyzed in this study by modern, sensitive methods, the majority of the stream-sediment samples were collected in the 1970s. Thus, metal concentrations portrayed in these maps represent stream-sediment geochemistry at the time of collection.

  16. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  17. GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111167 Cao Zhonghuang(Wuhan Iron & Steel Group Minerals Company,Wuhan 430063,China);Luo Xianrong Comparative Study of Copper-Nickel Deposit Exploration by the Geoelectro-chemical Extraction Method in Different Overburden Areas(Geology and Prospecting,ISSN0495-5331,CN11-2043/P,46(3),2010,p.476-482,4 illus.,5 tables,20 refs.)Key words:geo-electrochemical methods,copper ores,nickel ores,Gansu Province,Jilin Province The authors have made a comparative study of quantitative and qualitative analysis and application of the geoelectro-chemical extraction method in different overburden areas in southward extension of Jinchuan in Gansu Province and Hongqiling in Jilin Province.The authors found that this method extracted very few ions in arid areas covered with debris,but the prospecting effect was almost the same as that in moist areas covered with thick overburden.And this method could show objectively differences of geochemical characters

  18. Baseline rationing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    The standard problem of adjudicating conflicting claims describes a situation in which a given amount of a divisible good has to be allocated among agents who hold claims against it exceeding the available amount. This paper considers more general rationing problems in which, in addition to claims......, there exist baselines (to be interpreted as objective entitlements, ideal targets, or past consumption) that might play an important role in the allocation process. The model we present is able to accommodate real-life rationing situations, ranging from resource allocation in the public health care sector...... to international protocols for the reduction of greenhouse emissions, or water distribution in drought periods. We define a family of allocation methods for such general rationing problems - called baseline rationing rules - and provide an axiomatic characterization for it. Any baseline rationing rule within...

  19. Isotopic, geochemical, and temporal characterization of Proterozoic basement rocks in the Quitovac region, northwestern Sonora, Mexico: Implications for the reconstruction of the southwestern margin of Laurentia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriondo, A.; Premo, W.R.; Martinez-Torres, L. M.; Budahn, J.R.; Atkinson, W.W.; Siems, D.F.; Guaras-Gonzalez, B.

    2004-01-01

    A detailed geochemical characterization of 19 representative Proterozoic basement rocks in the Quitovac region in northwestern Sonora, Mexico, has identified two distinct Paleoproterozoic basement blocks that coincide spatially with the previously proposed Caborca and "North America" blocks. New U-Pb zircon geochronology revises their age ranges, the Caborca (1.78-1.69 Ga) and "North America" (1.71-1.66 Ga) blocks at Quitovac, and precludes a simple age differentiation between them. In addition, Grenvillian-age granitoids (ca. 1.1 Ga), spatially associated with the Caborca block have been identified at Quitovac. Nd isotopes and major- and trace-element geochemistry support the distinction of these Paleoproterozoic blocks. Granitoids of the "North America" block are characterized by depleted ??Nd values (3.4-3.9) and younger Nd model ages (1800-1740 Ma) and have lower K2O, Y, Rb, Ba, Th, REE, and Fe/Mg values than coeval rocks of the Caborca block. The Caborca block granitoids are likewise characterized by slightly less depleted ??Nd (0.6-2.6) and older Nd model ages (2070-1880 Ma). Despite the subtle differences, granitoids from both the Caborca and "North America" blocks exhibit island arc-like affinities. We propose that the Proterozoic basement rocks from the Quitovac region are an extension of the Proterozoic crustal provinces in the southwestern United States. Specifically, rocks of the Caborca block exhibit an affinity to rocks of either the Yavapai province or the Mojave-Yavapai transition zone, whereas rocks of the "North America" block have signatures similar to those of the Mazatzal province or possibly the Yavapai province of Arizona. The new isotopic ages and geochemical data do not support the existence of the Late Jurassic Mojave-Sonora megashear at Quitovac, as originally proposed. However, the Quitovac region accounts only for a small fraction of the Proterozoic basement in Sonora, so these findings do not eliminate the possibility of a megashear

  20. Baseline element composition of foliose and fruticose lichens along the steep climatic gradient of SW Patagonia (Aisén Region, Chile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaci, Fabrizio; Fantozzi, Federica; Figueroa, Ricardo; Parra, Oscar; Bargagli, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Samples of foliose (Nephroma antarcticum) and fruticose (Usnea sp.) lichens were collected across a steep climatic and vegetation gradient in a remote, almost pristine region of SW Chilean Patagonia. Concentrations of major and trace elements in lichens from the rainforest were among the lowest ever reported worldwide for foliose and fruticose lichens and can be considered background levels for the region. The two lichen growth forms showed different elemental compositions mainly due to the greater capacity of foliose thalli to intercept elements from windborne and canopy-leached particles. The patterns of spatial variation in the chemical composition of lichens were effectively explained by statistical methods and reflected the different availability of wet and dry deposition along the steep climatic gradient. Baseline values established for N. antarcticum samples growing in temperate Nothofagus forests were therefore distinct from those of samples growing in more open, drier habitats. The fruticose Usnea sp. showed a higher affinity for atmophile Hg, low concentrations of lithophilic elements, and the same baseline composition whether from temperate forests or from dry, barren environments. The provided background and baseline values against which variations can be measured will be useful in the early detection of local or regional climatic and environmental change, especially in view of the planned construction of hydropower dams under the recently approved HidroAysén Project.

  1. The formation of auriferous quartz-sulfide veins in the Pataz region, northern Peru: A synthesis of geological, mineralogical, and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, D. W.; Amstutz, G. C.; Fontboté, L.

    1990-12-01

    The Pataz region in the eastern part of the North Peruvian Department La Libertad hosts a number of important gold mining districts like La Lima, El Tingo, Pataz, Parcoy, and Buldibuyo. Economic gold mineralization occurs in quartz-sulfide veins at the margin of the calc-alkaline Pataz Batholith, that mainly consists of granites, granodiorites, and monzodiorites. The batholith is of Paleozoic age and cuts the Precambrian to Early Paleozoic low-grade metamorphic basement series. Its intrusion was controlled by a NNW-trending fault of regional importance. The gold-bearing veins are characterized by a two-stage sulfide mineralization. Bodies of massive pyrite and some arsenopyrite were formed in stage 1, and after subsequent fracturing they served as sites for deposition of gold, electrum, galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. It is concluded that gold was transported as a AuCl{2/-}-complex by oxidizing chloride solutions and deposited near older pyrite by micro-scale redox changes and a slight temperature decrease. Mineralogical, textural, geochemical, and microthermometric features are interpreted as a consequence of mineralization at considerable depth produced by a hydrothermal system linked with the emplacement of the Pataz Batholith. acteristics in order to outline a general physicochemical model of the hydrothermal ore-forming processes.

  2. The geochemical atlas of Italian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vivo, Benedetto; Cicchella, Domenico; Albanese, Stefano; Dinelli, Enrico; Giaccio, Lucia; Lima, Annamaria; Valera, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The geochemical Atlas of Italian agricultural and grazing land soils was carried out as part of GEMAS project whose objective was to characterize soils of rural areas of the whole Europe. Soil samples were collected at an average sampling density of 1 site per 2500 km2. Two different sample types were collected: (1) 121 agricultural soils (Ap) on regularly ploughed land to a depth of 20 cm and (2) 121 grazing land soils (Gr) (land under permanent grass cover) to a depth of 10 cm. All soil samples were air dried, sieved to pH, TOC, total carbon and total sulphur, LOI, CEC, Sr-isotopes, Pb-isotopes, MIR-spectra. By means of a GIS software, georeferenced data of the Italian territory were used to produce the geochemical maps of all the analysed elements for both agricultural and grazing land soils. Specifically, for each element and sampling media a map reporting interpolated data and graduated dots was produced; univariate statistics and graphs were also associated to each map. The Atlas also contain: 5 maps for regional variability of factor scores of elemental associations resulting from R-mode factor analysis and 15 baseline and land use maps for some selected elements (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, Zn) following the Italian intervention criteria.

  3. Geochemical Characterization of Rain Water Particulate Material on a Coastal Sub-Tropical Region in SE: Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Filho, E. V.; Paiva, R. P.; WASSERMAN, J.C.; Lacerda,L. D.

    1998-01-01

    Airborne contamination has been of concern for a number of scientist in temperate regions. In the tropics, a very small amount of data is available. In this work, rain water particulate material was monitored in two sites in Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil): the first (Sepetiba), subjected to high inputs of metals from industrial activities and the second (Iguaba), subjected to very mild contamination. Particulate material was obtained by filtration of rain water samples. The filters were analys...

  4. Invasive blue mussels threaten regional scale genetic diversity in mainland and remote offshore locations: the need for baseline data and enhanced protection in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P A; Zbawicka, Małgorzata; Westfall, Kristen M; Wenne, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Human-mediated biological transfers of species have substantially modified many ecosystems with profound environmental and economic consequences. However, in many cases, invasion events are very hard to identify because of the absence of an appropriate baseline of information for receiving sites/regions. In this study, use of high-resolution genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms - SNPs) highlights the threat of introduced Northern Hemisphere blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) at a regional scale to Southern Hemisphere lineages of blue mussels via hybridization and introgression. Analysis of a multispecies SNP dataset reveals hotspots of invasive Northern Hemisphere blue mussels in some mainland New Zealand locations, as well as the existence of unique native lineages of blue mussels on remote oceanic islands in the Southern Ocean that are now threatened by invasive mussels. Samples collected from an oil rig that has moved between South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand were identified as invasive Northern Hemisphere mussels, revealing the relative ease with which such non-native species may be moved from region to region. In combination, our results highlight the existence of unique lineages of mussels (and by extension, presumably of other taxa) on remote offshore islands in the Southern Ocean, the need for more baseline data to help identify bioinvasion events, the ongoing threat of hybridization and introgression posed by invasive species, and the need for greater protection of some of the world's last great remote areas.

  5. Geochemical Study of Gold and Arsenic Mineralization of the Carlin-Type Gold Deposits, Qinling Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张复新; 马建秦; 陈衍景

    2001-01-01

    Element geochemistry of gold and arsenic and mineralogical features of their sulfides in the Carlin-type gold deposits of the Qinling region are discussed in this paper. The initial contents of ore-forming elements such as gold and arsenic are high in the ore-bearing rock series in the Qinling region. Furthermore, both the metals are concentrated mainly in the diagenetic pyrite. Study on the mineralogy of arsenic-bearing sulfide minerals in the ores demonstrated that there is a positive correlation between gold and arsenic in the sulfide minerals. Available evidence suggests that gold in the As-bearing sulfide minerals is likely to be presented as a charge species (Au + ), and it is most possible for it to replace the excess arsenic at the site of iron and was probably deposited together with arsenic as solid solution in the sulfide minerals.Pyrite is composed of (Au3x+, Fe12-+ x) ([AsS]3x- [S2]12--x), and arsenopyrite of (Au3x+ , Fe13-+x)([AsS]3x- [AsS2 ]1-3-x). The occurrence of gold in the As-sulfide minerals from the Carlin-type gold deposits in the Qinling region has been confirmed by electron probe and transmission elec tron microscopic studies. The results show that gold was probably deposited together with ar senic as coupled solid solutions in sulfide minerals in the early stage of mineralization. Metallo genic chemical reactions concerning gold deposition in the Carlin-type As-rich gold deposits would involve oxidation of gold and concurrent reduction of arsenic. Later, the deposited gold as solid solution was remobilized and redistributed as exsolutions, as a result of increasing hy drothermal alteration and crystallization, and decreasing resistance to refractoriness of the host minerals. Gold occurs as sub-microscopic grains (ranging from 0.04 to 0.16 μm in diameter)of native gold along micro factures in and crystalline grains of the sulfides.

  6. Spatial modelling of disaster resilience using infrastructure components of baseline resilience indicators for communities (BRIC) in special region of Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscahyadi, Febriana; Meilano, Irwan; Riqqi, Akhmad

    2017-07-01

    Special Region of Yogyakarta Province (DIY) is one of Indonesian regions that often harmed by varied natural disasters which caused huge negative impacts. The most catastrophic one is earthquake in May, 27th 2006 with 6.3 magnitude moment [1], evoked 5716 people died, and economic losses for Rp. 29.1 Trillion, [2]. Their impacts could be minimized by committing disaster risk reduction program. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the natural disaster resilience within a region. Since infrastructure are might be able as facilities that means for evacuations, distribute supplies, and post disaster recovery [3], this research concerns to establish spatial modelling of natural disaster resilience using infrastructure components based on BRIC in DIY Province. There are three infrastructure used in this model; they are school, health facilities, and roads. Distance analysis is used to determine the level of resilient zone. The result gives the spatial understanding as a map that urban areas have better disaster resilience than the rural areas. The coastal areas and mountains areas which are vulnerable towards disaster have less resilience since there are no enough facilities that will increase the disaster resilience

  7. Geochemical Mapping: With Special Emphasis on Analytical Requirements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xuejing; CHENG Hangxin; LIU Dawen

    2008-01-01

    More than 40 national and regional geochemical mapping projects in the world carried out from 1973 to 1988 do not conform to common standards. In particular they have many analytical deficiencies. In the period 1988 to 1992, the International Geochemical Mapping project (Project 259 of UNESCO's IGCP Program) prepared recommendations designed to standardize geochemical mapping methods. The analytical requirements are an essential component of the overall recommendations. They included the following: 71 elements should be analyzed in future mapping projects; the detection limits of trace and ultratrace elements must be lower than the corresponding crustal abundances; and the Chinese GSD and Canadian STSD standard sample series should be used for the correlation of global data. A proposal was also made to collect 5000 composite samples, at very low sampling densities to cover the whole Earth's land surface. In 1997 an IUGS Working Group on Global Geochemical Baselines was formed to continue the work which began with IGCP 259. From 1997 up to now, new progress has been made especially in China and FOREGS countries under the aegis of this working group, including the study of suitable sampling media, development of a multi-element analytical system, new proficiency test for selection of competent laboratories and role of wide-spaced mapping in mineral exploration. One of the major problems awaiting solution has been the inability of many laboratories to meet the IGCP recommendations to generate high quality geochemical maps. Fortunately several laboratories in China and Europe have demonstrated an ability to meet the requirements and they will be well placed to render technical assistance to other countries.

  8. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Paleoproterozoic ultramafic lamprophyres and carbonatites from the Chitrangi region, Mahakoshal supracrustal belt, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajesh K Srivastava

    2013-06-01

    region due to lithospheric thinning caused by possible plume activity provided suitable conditions for the genesis of ultramafic lamprophyre (possibly aillikitic) and carbonatitic melts which ultimately crystallized as dykes and plugs.

  9. Geochronological and geochemical assessment of Cenozoic volcanism from the Terror Rift region of the West Antarctic Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, Sarah E.

    The work presented in this dissertation explains results from three different methods to determine the relation between tectonism and rift-related volcanism in the Terror Rift region of the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). Alkaline lavas from seven submarine features, Beaufort Island and Franklin Islands, and several locations near Mt Melbourne were dated by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and analyzed for elemental and isotopic chemical signatures. Each chapter addresses a different aspect of the hypothesis that the presence of volatiles, primarily H2O or CO2, in the magma source has led to anomalously high volumes of magmatism after rift-related decompressional melting rather than requiring an active mantle plume source. Chapter 2 provides the temporal framework, illustrating that the sampled features range in age from 6.7 Ma to 89 ka, post-dating the main Miocene age phase of Terror Rift extension. Chapter 3 illustrates the traditional enriched elemental and isotopic chemical signatures to support the overall homogeneity of these lavas and previously analyzed areas of the WARS. This chapter also provides a new model for the generation of the Pb isotopic signatures consistent with a history of metasomatism in the magma source. Chapter 4 provides an entirely new chemical dataset for the WARS. The first platinum group element (PGE) abundances and extremely unradiogenic Os isotopic signatures of Cenozoic lavas from Antarctica provide the strongest evidence of melting contributions from a lithospheric mantle source. The combined results from these three studies consistently support the original hypothesis of this dissertation. New evidence suggests that WARS related lavas are not related to a mantle plume(s) as previously proposed. Instead, they are generated by passive, decompressional melting of a source, likely a combination of the asthenospheric and lithospheric mantle, which has undergone previous melting events and metasomatism.

  10. Geochemical components in a Cretaceous island arc: The Th/La-(Ce/Ce*)Nd diagram and implications for subduction initiation in the inter-American region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Alan R.; Mitchell, Simon F.; Treloar, Peter J.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Neill, Iain; Barfod, Dan N.

    2013-03-01

    Tectonic models of the evolution of the inter-American region show that induced subduction initiation/polarity reversal is required in order to isolate the Caribbean as a separate plate. However, the timing and mechanism of this subduction initiation/reversal are still controversial. In order to shed light on this issue we investigate the geochemistry of arc-derived, ~ 80 Ma, basic to acidic igneous rocks from the Main Ridge Formation (MRF) in central Jamaica. The affinity of the mantle component in the MRF arc rocks can help increase our understanding of the initiation of any new subduction zone in the inter-American region. Trace element geochemistry demonstrates that the MRF mantle source component was N-MORB-like. Conversely, younger circum-Caribbean arc rocks (≤ 75 Ma) have a more enriched plume-like mantle component. Unfortunately, when considering the slab component, some of the most useful trace elements that can be used to identify the affinity of a slab flux in arc lavas (e.g., Ba) have been mobilised by subsolidus alteration processes in the MRF. Consequently, the immobile element Th/La-(Ce/Ce*)Nd discrimination diagram is proposed as a method of determining the affinity of slab components from altered igneous rocks. This diagram identifies sedimentary slab components that have potentially contaminated an arc source region, e.g., continental detritus, volcanic detritus, hydrogenous Fe-Mn oxides, fish debris-rich clay and hydrothermal sediments. In this study, the Th/La-(Ce/Ce*)Nd diagram suggests that the slab component in most of the MRF samples has a composition similar to continental detritus/GLOSS II. Additionally, several MRF samples are derived from a source region that has been fluxed with a subduction component, in part, composed of fish debris and hydrothermal sediments. These results help constrain the timing and mechanism of Cretaceous subduction initiation in the inter-American region. The geochemical components recognised in the MRF rocks

  11. National Geochemical Database: Soil

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of soil samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are from the continental US...

  12. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment in...

  13. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment...

  14. Integrating systematic screening for gender-based violence into sexual and reproductive health services: results of a baseline study by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, A; Bott, S; Cuca, Y

    2002-09-01

    Three Latin American affiliates of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, Inc. (IPPF/WHR) have begun to integrate gender-based violence screening and services into sexual and reproductive health programs. This paper presents results of a baseline study conducted in the affiliates. Although most staff support integration and many had already begun to address violence in their work, additional sensitization and training, as well as institution-wide changes are needed to provide services effectively and to address needs of women experiencing violence.

  15. Occurrence of volatile organic compounds in shallow alluvial aquifers of a Mediterranean region: Baseline scenario and ecological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, T; Borgoni, R; Ambrosini, R; Cifoni, M; Galassi, D M P; Petitta, M

    2015-12-15

    A regional survey of eight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), namely BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene) and four chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs: chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene), was carried out at 174 sites, in 17 alluvial aquifers of Abruzzo, a Mediterranean region of southern Italy, from 2004 to 2009. Frequency of detection, concentration range, spatial distribution pattern, and temporal trend of contaminant concentration in each aquifer were analyzed as well as the relationships between VOC concentrations and the total amount of precipitation during the 90days preceding each sampling date. A review of published ecotoxicological data, providing an indication of the biological risk associated with the observed levels of VOC contamination, was presented and discussed. BTEX concentrations were under detection limits in all the investigated aquifers, indicating absence of contamination. In contrast, CAH contamination occurred in 14 out of 17 aquifers. The two most frequently detected compounds were chloroform and tetrachloroethene. No significant temporal trend was observed for chloroform and tetrachloroethene concentrations during the six years of observation, indicating the persistence of stable contaminations, except for some slightly decreasing trends observed in three out of 17 aquifers. In four aquifers chloroform and tetrachloroethene concentrations increased with precipitations in the preceding months. Spatial patterns of contamination differed among aquifers, indicating highly complex contaminant distributions at aquifer scale not related to single-plume geometries. Patterns of contamination by chloroform and tetrachloroethene in the most urbanized aquifers were likely associated with multiple sources of VOCs not clearly detectable at the scale used in this study. In five out of 17 aquifers, chloroform and tetrachloroethene co-occurred at concentrations that are lethal to groundwater

  16. Geochemical and tectonic relationships in the east Indonesian arc-continent collision region: Implications for the subduction of the Australian passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.; Hoogewerff, J. A.

    1993-07-01

    Van Bergen, M.J., Vroon, P.Z. and Hoogewerff, J.A., 1993. Geochemical and tectonic relationships in the east Indonesian arc-continent collision region: implications for the subduction of the Australian passive margin. In: M.J.R. Wortel, U. Hansen and R. Sabadini (Editors), Relationships between Mantle Processes and Geological Processes at or near The Earth's Surface. Tectonophysics, 223: 97-116. Variations in the isotopic signatures of volcanics along the East Sunda Banda Arc reflect changes in the nature and amount of sedimentary material supplied by the northeast Indian Ocean floor and the adjacent Australian passive continental margin, which form the two major domains of the Indian Ocean plate that approach the arc system. A compilation of isotopic data for 200-500-km-long arc sectors shows that the trend in magmatic signatures follows distinct subduction/collision stages reached by the corresponding oceanic and continental-margin sections entering the trench system. Maximum amounts of magma source contamination are inferred for volcanics near an extinct sector north of Timor, where the Australian continent started to collide with the arc first. Pb-Nd isotopic source mixing models point to contamination by sediments with variations in composition, similar to observed along-arc changes in sediments entering the trench. The results indicate an increasing contribution of subducted continental material in the direction of the collision region. Mass-balance calculations, considering the magmatic output and minimum input of subducted continental material required to generate the composition of the volcanic arc in the collision region, are difficult to reconcile with subduction of ocean-floor sediments alone. Thicknesses of sediments presently covering oceanic crust near the margin are close to calculated thicknesses of the sediments fluxed into the trench and magmatically returned to the arc crust, but cannot account for the additional volumes of material accreted on

  17. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional brain atrophy rates in healthy elders, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Mattsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF α-synuclein is reduced in synucleinopathies, including dementia with Lewy bodies, and some studies have found increased CSF α-synuclein in Alzheimer's disease (AD. No study has explored effects of CSF α-synuclein on brain atrophy. Here we tested if baseline CSF α-synuclein affects brain atrophy rates and if these effects vary across brain regions, and across the cognitive spectrum from healthy elders (NL, to patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and AD. METHODS: Baseline CSF α-synuclein measurements and longitudinal structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 74 NL, 118 MCI patients and 55 AD patients. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional atrophy rates were tested in 1 four pre-hoc defined regions possibly associated with Lewy body and/or AD pathology (amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, brainstem, and 2 all available regions of interest. Differences across diagnoses were tested by assessing the interaction of CSF α-synuclein and diagnosis (testing NL versus MCI, and NL versus AD. RESULTS: The effects of CSF α-synuclein on longitudinal atrophy rates were not significant after correction for multiple comparisons. There were tendencies for effects in AD in caudate (higher atrophy rates in subjects with higher CSF α-synuclein, P=0.046 and brainstem (higher atrophy rates in subjects with lower CSF α-synuclein, P=0.063. CSF α-synuclein had significantly different effects on atrophy rates in NL and AD in brainstem (P=0.037 and caudate (P=0.006. DISCUSSION: With the possible exception of caudate and brainstem, the overall weak effects of CSF α-synuclein on atrophy rates in NL, MCI and AD argues against CSF α-synuclein as a biomarker related to longitudinal brain atrophy in these diagnostic groups. Any effects of CSF α-synuclein may be attenuated by possible simultaneous occurrence of AD-related neuronal injury and concomitant Lewy body pathology, which may elevate and

  18. Geochemical signature of columbite-tantalite and environmental impact of radioactive pegmatite mining in the Parelhas region, Rio Grande do Norte, Northeast Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Jorge Costa de; Cruz, Paulo R.; Pereira, Valmir, E-mail: jcmoura@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: pcruz@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: vpereira@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ludka, Isabel P.; Mendes, Julio C., E-mail: ludka@geologia.ufrj.br, E-mail: julio@geologia.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal de Rio do Janeiro (CCMN/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Matematicas e da Natureza. Dept. de Geologia

    2013-07-01

    This article comprises geochemical, structural and radiometric investigations on radioactive pegmatites of the Borborema Pegmatitic Province in Northeast Brazil. The studied area is located in the surroundings of the city of Parelhas, in the geotectonic Province of Borborema. It is well known for its thousands of pegmatitic bodies exploited in primitive mines called garimpos. The main goal was to find an efficient, cheap and routine inspection procedure to identify the origin of commercialized radioactive columbite-tantalite (coltan) ore. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Agency (CNEN) controls uranium commerce and nuclear activity in Brazil. Without an effective method to characterize coltan ores from different localities it is impossible to control the trade. The here presented new method was developed by correlating structural features of these pegmatites with the geochemical behavior of their coltan samples. It was found that the variation of U/Th vs. Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} provides geochemical signatures (analytical fingerprints) for the source location of such ore. The new method was tested with coltan samples of commercial batches from the Brazilian states of Amapa and Rondonia and also generated distinct geochemical signatures. A radiometric survey (CPS) to study the environmental impact of gamma radiation was also carried out in several mines and pegmatites. It included in situ measurements of pegmatite walls, enclosing rocks, soil, and accumulated water and revealed that gamma emitters are hardly solubilized and therefore environmental gamma radiation generally is not enhanced to a dangerous level. (author)

  19. Data sets used in the analysis presented in the manuscript “Regional and Hemispheric Influences on Temporal Variability in Baseline Carbon Monoxide and Ozone over the Northeast US”

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset documents that all of the data analyzed in the manuscript "Regional and Hemispheric Influences on Temporal Variability in Baseline Carbon Monoxide and...

  20. Major- and Trace-Element Concentrations in Soils from Northern California: Results from the Geochemical Landscapes Project Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Smith, David B.

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), and the Mexican Geological Survey (Servicio Geologico Mexicano, or SGM) initiated pilot studies in preparation for a soil geochemical survey of North America called the Geochemical Landscapes Project. The purpose of this project is to provide a better understanding of the variability in chemical composition of soils in North America. The data produced by this survey will be used to construct baseline geochemical maps for regions within the continent. Two initial pilot studies were conducted: (1) a continental-scale study involving a north-south and east-west transect across North America and (2) a regional-scale study. The pilot studies were intended to test and refine sample design, sampling protocols, and field logistics for the full continental soils geochemical survey. Smith and others (2005) reported the results from the continental-scale pilot study. The regional-scale California study was designed to represent more detailed, higher resolution geochemical investigations in a region of particular interest that was identified from the low-sample-density continental-scale survey. A 20,000-km2 area of northern California (fig. 1), representing a wide variety of topography, climate, and ecoregions, was chosen for the regional-scale pilot study. This study area also contains diverse geology and soil types and supports a wide range of land uses including agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, forested areas in portions of the Sierra Nevada, and urban/suburban centers such as Sacramento, Davis, and Stockton. Also of interest are potential effects on soil geochemistry from historical hard rock and placer gold mining in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, historical mercury mining in the Coast Range, and mining of base-metal sulfide deposits in the Klamath Mountains to the north. This report presents the major- and trace-element concentrations from the regional-scale soil geochemical

  1. Geochemical signature of columbite-tantalite and radiometric survey of radioactive pegmatites in the region of Parelhas, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; Assinatura geoquimica de columbita-tantalita e levantamento radiometrico de pegmatitos radioativos da regiao de Parelhas, RN, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Jorge Costa de

    2013-07-01

    This thesis is the result of geochemical, structural and radiometric investigations on radioactive pegmatites of the Borborema Pegmatitic Province in Northeast Brazil. The studied area, located in the surroundings of the city of Parelhas in the region of the Serra da Borborema, is well known for its thousands of pegmatitic bodies exploited in primitive mines called 'garimpos'. The main goal was to find an efficient, cheap and routine inspection procedure to identify the origin of commercialized radioactive columbite-tantalite (coltan) ore. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Agency (CNEN) controls uranium commerce and nuclear activity in Brazil. Without an effective method to characterize coltan ores from different localities it is impossible to control the trade. The here presented new method was developed by correlating structural features of these pegmatites with the geochemical behavior of their coltan samples. It was found that the variation of the ratio U/Th versus Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} provides geochemical signatures (analytical fingerprints) for the source location of such ore. A test of the new method with coltan samples of commercial batches from the Brazilian states Amapa and Rondonia also generated distinct geochemical signatures. A radiometric survey (CPS) was carried out in several mines and pegmatites to study the environmental impact of gamma radiation. It included in situ measurements of pegmatite walls, host rocks, soil, and accumulated water and revealed that gamma emitters are hardly solubilized and environmental gamma radiation therefore generally is not enhanced to a dangerous level. (author)

  2. Frontline staff motivation levels and health care quality in rural and urban primary health facilities: a baseline study in the Greater Accra and Western regions of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward

    2016-12-01

    The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70 % of the estimated 26.9 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32.1 % of the national health sector workforce works. Doctor-patient ratio in a predominantly rural region is about 1:18,257 compared to 1:4,099 in an urban region. These rural-urban inequities significantly account for the inability of Ghana to attain the health related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) before the end of 2015. To ascertain whether or not rural-urban differences exist in health worker motivation levels and quality of health care in health facilities accredited by the National Health Insurance Authority in Ghana. This is a baseline quantitative study conducted in 2012 among 324 health workers in 64 accredited clinics located in 9 rural and 7 urban districts in Ghana. Ordered logistic regression was performed to determine the relationship between facility geographic location (rural/urban) and staff motivation levels, and quality health care standards. Quality health care and patient safety standards were averagely low in the sampled health facilities. Even though health workers in rural facilities were more de-motivated by poor availability of resources and drugs than their counterparts in urban facilities (p facilities. For Ghana to attain the newly formulated sustainable development goals on health, there is the need for health authorities to address the existing rural-urban imbalances in health worker motivation and quality health care standards in primary healthcare facilities. Future studies should compare staff motivation levels and quality standards in accredited and non-accredited health facilities since the current study was limited to health facilities accredited by the National Health Insurance Authority.

  3. Significance of baseline FDG-PET/CT scan as a method of staging regional lymph nodes in patients with operable distal oesophageal or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaxoinis, George; Weaver, Jamie M J; Khoja, Leila; Patrao, Ana; Stamatopoulou, Sofia; Alchawaf, Alia; Owen-Holt, Vikki; Germetaki, Theodora; Kordatou, Zoe; Mansoor, Wasat

    2017-09-01

    The new American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition (AJCC8) staging is the first to describe separate clinical and pathology staging systems, but still has low performance to predict prognosis in patients with oesophageal/gastroesophageal junction (O/GOJ) adenocarcinoma, who are candidates for surgery. Recent studies have demonstrated that O/GOJ cancer patients with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avid regional lymph nodes (RLNs) may have poor prognosis. The aim of our study was to examine whether the baseline assessment of the FDG uptake of RLN improves the prognostic accuracy of the new AJCC8 staging. This single-centre retrospective study included patients with operable FDG avid O/GOJ adenocarcinoma treated with perioperative chemotherapy. All patients were reclassified according to the new AJCC8 clinical staging. Prognostic factors for time-to-progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were explored. Of 430 patients included in the study, 180 (41.9%) had FDG avid RLN at baseline PET/CT scan before starting perioperative chemotherapy. The presence of FDG avid RLN was significantly and independently associated with shorter TTP and OS, especially in clinical stage III patients (p < .001 in both cases). Stage III patients with FDG avid RLN had similar TTP and OS to those with stage IVA. Classifying stage III patients with FDG avid RLN into stage IVA led to a significant improvement of the prognostic accuracy of the new AJCC8 clinical staging system (Harrell's concordance index improved from 0.555 to 0.588, p < .001). Of 430 patients starting perioperative chemotherapy, 332 underwent radical tumour resection. The presence of FDG avid RLN before starting perioperative chemotherapy could additionally predict a significantly shorter postoperative time-to-relapse and OS (p < .001 in both cases). We propose that the incorporation of RLN status (by FDG PET/CT scan) into the AJCC8 staging system of O/GOJ adenocarcinoma improves its prognostic accuracy and

  4. DISCUSSION ON USE OF REGIONAL GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION DATA FOR ECOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT APPRAISAL%利用区域化探数据进行生态环境评价探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张应娥; 汤正江

    2012-01-01

    Based on many years of experience in regional geochemical exploration work,combined with understanding of eco-environment geochemistry theory,the author tried to evaluate environmental quality of the study area using regional geochemical exploration data(1:200000),analyzed the soil fertility,deficiency or excess of human healthy elements,judged the human living environment quality,and discussed the risk and effective use.%笔者根据多年从事区域地球化学工作的经验结合对生态环境地球化学理论的肤浅了解,尝试利用区域化探(1∶20万)数据对全区的环境质量进行评价,分析研究土壤肥力、人体健康元素的缺乏、过量,判别人类生存环境的质量好坏,并阐明其危害性及有效利用等,以供后人参考。

  5. National Geochemical Database: Concentrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemistry of concentrates from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are from the continental US and...

  6. Heavy metals in geochemical sediment fractions of the border region between Baja California, Mexico, and California, USA; Metales pesados en fracciones geoquimicas de sedimentos de la region fronteriza de Baja California, Mexico, y California, EUA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaescusa-Celaya, Julio A; Gutierrez-Galindo, Efrain A; Flores-Munoz, Gilberto [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, B.C., (Mexico)

    1997-03-01

    The concentrations of the heavy metals Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ag, Mn and Fe in the different geochemical sediment fractions are determined in this study, as a means of assessing the impact of residual wastewater on the coastal sediments of the region. During an oceanographic cruise in April 1992 (ECOBAC IV), 20 samples of surface sediments were collected from the coastal shelf of the border region between Baja California (Mexico) and California (USA), The sediment samples were subjected to a sequential extraction procedure designed to obtain the geochemical fractions defined as: exchangeable (F1), carbonates (F2), Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides (F3), organic matter/sulfides (F4) and residual or lithogenic (F5). The operational speciation of the metals indicates that the principal phases in the sediments that accumulate metal are the detrital or lithogenic matrix, the Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides and the organic Matter/sulfides, in this order. In general, the spatial distribution of the heavy metals in the reactive phase (defined as the sum of F1-F4) tended to increase in concentration in offshore sediments. The heavy metals in the reactive phase are apparently controlled by the concentration of reactive iron in the sediments, except for Pb, Cd and Ag, suggesting that the latter elements are controlled by other processes, such as particulate matter of biogenic origin. In contrast, the spatial distribution of heavy metals in the detrital phase behaved inversely, that is, the greatest concentrations of metals are found close to the coast off the wastewater treatment plant at Punta Bandera, Baja California. The average concentrations of total metals (sum of F1-F5) were 7.6, 40, 21, 68, 428, 11, 0.10 and 0.025 {mu}g{sup -}1 for Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Mn, Pb, Cd and Ag, respectively, and 2.3% for Fe. These concentrations are similar to those reported for uncontaminated reference sediments from southern California, indicating that a large amount of pollutants from the effluent of residual

  7. Offshore baseline for the exposed East Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (U.S. Canadian Border to the Hulahula River) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the exposed north coast of...

  8. Offshore baseline for the sheltered East Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (U.S. Canadian Border to the Hulahula River) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the sheltered north coast...

  9. Offshore baseline for the sheltered West Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Colville River to Point Barrow) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the sheltered north coast...

  10. Offshore baseline for the sheltered Central Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Hulahula River to the Colville River) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the sheltered north coast...

  11. Offshore baseline for the exposed West Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Colville River to Point Barrow) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the exposed north coast of...

  12. Offshore baseline for the exposed Central Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Hulahula River to the Colville River) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the exposed north coast of...

  13. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  14. Atlantic NAD 83 SLA Baseline Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains baseline points in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. Baseline points are the discrete coordinate points along the...

  15. Atlantic NAD 83 SLA Baseline Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains baseline points in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. Baseline points are the discrete coordinate points along the...

  16. Atlantic NAD 83 SLA Baseline Tangents

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains baseline tangent lines in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. Baseline tangent lines are typically bay or river closing...

  17. Incorporation of island-arc rocks into a Caribbean subduction channel: Geochemical constraints from eclogite boulders and greenschist rocks, Guajira region, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M.; Cardona, A.; Altenberger, U.; Garcia-Casco, A.; Valencia, V.; Tobón, M.; Zapata, S.

    2009-12-01

    Characterization of the protoliths of a subduction-accretion complex can provide major insights into the dynamics of the subduction channel. Geochemistry of eclogites found as boulders in a Tertiary conglomerate from the Guajira Peninsula, Colombia, indicate that these rocks are mainly metamorphosed basalts. A negative Nb-anomaly and flat to enriched REE patterns suggest that the eclogite protoliths evolved in a subduction related tectonic setting, with island arc affinities. The geochemical characteristics are similar to low-grade greenschists from the nearby Etpana Formation, which is interpreted as part of a Cretaceous intra-oceanic arc. This further supports evidence that the deposition and metamorphism of these units record the ongoing Late Cretaceous continental subduction of the South American margin beneath the advancing Caribbean arc. This gave way to an arc-continent collision between the Caribbean and the South American plates. Arc-rocks were incorporated into the subduction channel and the accretionary wedge, either though influx of tectonically eroded arc material (subduction erosion) or incorporation into the accretionary wedge during arc-continent collision.

  18. Quest to identify geochemical risk factors associated with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) in an endemic region of Sri Lanka-a multimedia laboratory analysis of biological, food, and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Keith E; Redmon, Jennifer Hoponick; Elledge, Myles F; Wanigasuriya, Kamani P; Smith, Kristin; Munoz, Breda; Waduge, Vajira A; Periris-John, Roshini J; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Harrington, James M; Womack, Donna S; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of a new form of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) in Sri Lanka's North Central Province (NCP) has become a catastrophic health crisis. CKDu is characterized as slowly progressing, irreversible, and asymptomatic until late stages and, importantly, not attributed to diabetes, hypertension, or other known risk factors. It is postulated that the etiology of CKDu is multifactorial, involving genetic predisposition, nutritional and dehydration status, exposure to one or more environmental nephrotoxins, and lifestyle factors. The objective of this limited geochemical laboratory analysis was to determine the concentration of a suite of heavy metals and trace element nutrients in biological samples (human whole blood and hair) and environmental samples (drinking water, rice, soil, and freshwater fish) collected from two towns within the endemic NCP region in 2012 and 2013. This broad panel, metallomics/mineralomics approach was used to shed light on potential geochemical risk factors associated with CKDu. Based on prior literature documentation of potential nephrotoxins that may play a role in the genesis and progression of CKDu, heavy metals and fluoride were selected for analysis. The geochemical concentrations in biological and environmental media areas were quantified. Basic statistical measurements were subsequently used to compare media against applicable benchmark values, such as US soil screening levels. Cadmium, lead, and mercury were detected at concentrations exceeding US reference values in many of the biological samples, suggesting that study participants are subjected to chronic, low-level exposure to these elements. Within the limited number of environmental media samples, arsenic was determined to exceed initial risk screening and background concentration values in soil, while data collected from drinking water samples reflected the unique hydrogeochemistry of the region, including the prevalence of hard or very hard water, and

  19. Geochemical Calculations Using Spreadsheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutch, Steven Ian

    1991-01-01

    Spreadsheets are well suited to many geochemical calculations, especially those that are highly repetitive. Some of the kinds of problems that can be conveniently solved with spreadsheets include elemental abundance calculations, equilibrium abundances in nuclear decay chains, and isochron calculations. (Author/PR)

  20. Performance Comparison of Stion CIGS Modules to Baseline Monocrystalline Modules at the New Mexico Florida and Vermont Regional Test Centers: January 2015-December 2016.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lave, Matthew Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burnham, Laurie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report provides performance data and analysis for two Stion copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) module types, one framed, the other frameless, and installed at the New Mexico, Florida and Vermont RTCs. Sandia looked at data from both module types and compared the latter with data from an adjacent monocrystalline baseline array at each RTC. The results indicate that the Stion modules are slightly outperforming their rated power, with efficiency values above 100% of rated power, at 25degC cell temperatures. In addition, Sandia sees no significant performance differences between module types, which is expected because the modules differ only in their framing. In contrast to the baseline systems, the Stion strings showed increasing efficiency with increasing irradiance, with the greatest increase between zero and 400 Wm -2 but still noticeable increases at 1000 Wm -2 . Although baseline data availability in Vermont was spotty and therefore comparative trends are difficult to discern, the Stion modules there may offer snow- shedding advantages over monocrystalline-silicon modules but these findings are preliminary.

  1. Emplacement ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characterization of Mesozoic to early Cenozoic granitoids of the Sikhote-Alin Orogenic Belt, Russian Far East: Crustal growth and regional tectonic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Bor-ming; Valui, Galina; Kruk, Nikolai; Gonevchuk, V.; Usuki, Masako; Wu, Jeremy T. J.

    2015-11-01

    The Sikhote-Alin Range of the Russian Far East is an important accretionary orogen of the Western Pacific Orogenic Belt. In order to study the formation and tectonic evolution of the orogen, we performed zircon U-Pb dating, as well as geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic analyses on 24 granitoid samples from various massifs in the Primorye and Khabarovsk regions. The zircon dating revealed that the granitoids were emplaced from 131 to 56 Ma (Cretaceous to Paleogene). In the Primorye Region, granitoids in the coastal Sikhote-Alin intruded the Cretaceous Taukha Accretionary Terrane from ca. 90 to 56 Ma, whereas those along the Central Sikhote-Alin Fault zone intruded the Jurassic Samarka Accretionary Terrane during ca. 110-75 Ma. The "oldest" monzogranite (131 Ma) was emplaced in the Lermontovka area of the NW Primorye Region. Granitoid massifs along the Central Sikhote-Alin Fault zone in the Khabarovsk Region formed from 109 to 58 Ma. Thus, the most important tectonothermal events in the Sikhote-Alin orogen took place in the Cretaceous. Geochemical analysis indicates that most samples are I-type granitoids. They have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.7040 to 0.7083, and initial Nd isotopic ratios, expressed as εNd(t) values, from +3.0 to -5.0 (mostly 0 to -5). The data suggest that the granitoid magmas were generated by partial melting of sources with mixed lithologies, including the subducted accretionary complex ± hidden Paleozoic-Proterozoic basement rocks. Based on whole-rock Nd isotopic data, we estimated variable proportions (36-77%) of juvenile component (=mantle-derived basaltic rocks) in the generation of the granitic magmas. Furthermore, zircon Hf isotopic data (εHf(t) = 0 to +15) indicate that the zircon grains crystallized from melts of mixed sources and that crustal assimilation occurred during magmatic differentiation. The quasi-continuous magmatism in the Sikhote-Alin orogen suggests that the Paleo-Pacific plate subduction was very active in the

  2. Geochemical Characterization of the Upper and Middle Floridan Aquifer System, South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirecki, J.; Richardson, E.; Bennett, M.; Hendel, J.

    2008-05-01

    Our study focus is to characterize the water quality and geochemical environment of the Floridan Aquifer System (FAS) throughout the regional flowpath. A synoptic survey of 21 wells (n=15, upper FAS; n=6 middle FAS) was supplemented by additional samples (n=11) obtained during exploratory well development at 4 aquifer storage recovery (ASR) pilot sites. Synoptic survey samples were analyzed intensively, yielding a dataset that consists of major and trace dissolved constituents (including metals), stable isotopes (δ18O, δ13C, δD, δ34S in sulfate and sulfide), carbon species (carbonate alkalinity and organic carbon), uranium-series radionuclides, nutrients, and selected microbes and pathogens. The objectives of this study are three-fold: 1) to provide baseline water-quality and geochemical information prior to initiation of ASR activities that are part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan; 2) to quantify the major controls on geochemical evolution along upper and middle FAS flowpaths using geochemical modeling methods; and 3) to identify areas where water- quality may limit the feasibility of ASR methods in the FAS. Preliminary interpretations water quality changes along the regional FAS flowpath can be summarized as follows. Concentrations of dissolved constituents increase from north to south along the flow path; generally, the upper FAS has lower total dissolved solids than the middle FAS at locations where well pairs were analyzed. The redox environment changes from oxic to strongly anoxic, very close to the recharge area. Redox measurements, dissolved iron, sulfide, and sulfur isotope data are consistent with sulfate-reducing conditions. Uranium-series isotope concentrations and activities generally are below regulatory criteria, with few exceptions in both the upper and middle FAS. Areas with greater radionuclide activity occur primarily at distal flowpath locations or at the coast.

  3. Geochemical modeling: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted.

  4. A stratigraphical-geochemical study on the Chaco Paraná continental rift basin- An approach study based on regional sedimentology and drill-hole core analyses,South América

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Torra

    2006-01-01

    This paper is focused on a geologic "regional rift basin system pattern" and its stratigraphical-geochemical relationship. This is mainly based on the littoral shallow marine sedimentary succession paleogeography and deposits. These successions characterize the large extensional intracratonic Chaco rift basin system evolved from the Upper Cretaceous ( Late Campanian-Senonian-Maastrichtian-Early Paleocene) to Quaternary time. The siliciclastic littoral shallow marine successions were deposited from Early Senonian-Maastrichtian to Late Miocene during three main successive littoral shallow marine transgressions of continental extension.These transgressions happened over the wide pediplanized terrains of South America. These lands exist west of the more positive areas, between the Brazilian Shield and the foreland massifs that were settled in the more westernwards areas. Later, these regional foreland massifs were coupled and raised to the Andean Orogen Belt during the last 5 million years.The extensive intracratonic pediplanized low topographic relief areas were the reservoirs of siliciclastic littoral shallow marine succession deposits during the three successive widespread vast continental littoral shallow marine transgressions.The first transgression began at the Latest Campanian-Senonian and/or Early Maastrichtian time. After this episode, the sedimentary depositional systems continued during the Cenozoic until the Latest Miocene. These successions constitute a major allostratigraphic unit.The limit with underlying units is the regional unconformity between the regional volcanic event (Jurassic-Cretacic and interleaved eolianite sandstones) at the base and the undifferentiated Quaternary sediments (called as the Pampeano and Post-Pampeano Formations sensu lato). Based on many facies analyses there had been checked out different levels in the eustatic sea level variations within the allostratigraphic unit.Three major stages of extensional climax were recognized and

  5. Reconnaissance soil geochemical survey of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesilio, Liesl; Farago, Margaret E; Thornton, Iain

    2003-03-01

    The extreme density of population of Gibraltar, situated at the southern tip of Spain, exerts considerable pressure on land use and thus future planning is of utmost importance. An initial reconnaissance soil geochemical survey of Gibraltar was based on 120 surface samples (0-15 cm) taken from a wide range of exposed, either bare soil or vegetated sites, to provide the optimum geographical distribution. The 'total' elemental concentrations of 26 elements (Li, Na, K, Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Al, La, Ti, V, Cr, Mo, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Zn, Cd, Pb, P, S, As) were determined by nitric/percholric acid digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis. The reconnaissance data shows that the spatial distribution of various elements depended on previous and present land use. Most elements (Ca, Cr, Mg and Mn excluded) exhibited relatively high concentrations in civilian and natural soils. Trends have been established for many elements, and concentrations exceeding guideline values have been found in certain areas of Gibraltar. This reconnaissance of Gibraltar is at present being followed by a more detailed baseline geochemical survey, which will establish the extent and magnitude of the variations in major and trace elements in soils and dusts, assess the impact of industrial, commercial and urban development on the geochemical landscape and to make recommendations concerning sustainable development.

  6. Identification of Geochemical Anomaly by Multifractal Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Shuyun; Cheng Qiuming; Ke Xianzhong; Bao Zhengyu; Wang Changming; Quan Haoli

    2008-01-01

    The separation of anomalies from geochemical background is an important part of data analysis because lack of such identifications might have profound influence on or even distort the final analysis results. In this article, 1 672 geochemical analytical data of 11 elements, including Cu, Mo, Ag, Sn, and others, from a region within Tibet, South China, are used as one example. Together with the traditional anomaly recognition method of using the iterative mean ±2σ, local multifractality theory has been utilized to delineate the ranges of geochemical anomalies of the elements. To different degrees, on the basis of original data mapping, C-A fractal analysis and singularity exponents, Sn differs from the other 10 elements. Moreover, geochemical mapping results based on values of the multifractal asymmetry index for all elements delineate the highly anomalous area. Similar to other 10 elements, the anomalous areas of Sn delineated by the asymmetry index distribute along the main structure orientations. According to the asymmetry indexes, the 11 elements could be classified into 3 groups: (1) Ag and Au, (2) As-Sb-Cu-Pb-Zn-Mo, and (3) Sn-Bi-W.This paragenetic association of elements can be used to interpret possible origins of mineralization, which is in agreement with petrological analysis and field survey results.

  7. Methane baseline concentrations and sources in shallow aquifers from the shale gas-prone region of the St. Lawrence lowlands (Quebec, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Anja; Hélie, Jean-Francois; Pinti, Daniele L; Larocque, Marie; Barnetche, Diogo; Retailleau, Sophie; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Yves

    2015-04-07

    Hydraulic fracturing is becoming an important technique worldwide to recover hydrocarbons from unconventional sources such as shale gas. In Quebec (Canada), the Utica Shale has been identified as having unconventional gas production potential. However, there has been a moratorium on shale gas exploration since 2010. The work reported here was aimed at defining baseline concentrations of methane in shallow aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands and its sources using δ(13)C methane signatures. Since this study was performed prior to large-scale fracturing activities, it provides background data prior to the eventual exploitation of shale gas through hydraulic fracturing. Groundwater was sampled from private (n = 81), municipal (n = 34), and observation (n = 15) wells between August 2012 and May 2013. Methane was detected in 80% of the wells with an average concentration of 3.8 ± 8.8 mg/L, and a range of -50‰, indicating a potential thermogenic source. Localized areas of high methane concentrations from predominantly biogenic sources were found throughout the study area. In several samples, mixing, migration, and oxidation processes likely affected the chemical and isotopic composition of the gases, making it difficult to pinpoint their origin. Energy companies should respect a safe distance from major natural faults in the bedrock when planning the localization of hydraulic fracturation activities to minimize the risk of contaminating the surrounding groundwater since natural faults are likely to be a preferential migration pathway for methane.

  8. Influence of source distribution and geochemical composition of aerosols on children exposure in the large polymetallic mining region of the Bolivian Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goix, Sylvaine; Point, David; Oliva, Priscia; Polve, Mireille; Duprey, Jean Louis; Mazurek, Hubert; Guislain, Ludivine; Huayta, Carlos; Barbieri, Flavia L; Gardon, Jacques

    2011-12-15

    The Bolivian Altiplano (Highlands) region is subject to intense mining, tailing and smelting activities since centuries because of the presence of large and unique polymetallic ore deposits (Ag, Au, Cu, Pb, Sn, Sb, Zn). A large scale PM(10), PM(2.5) aerosol monitoring survey was conducted during the dry season in one of the largest mining cities of this region (Oruro, 200,000 inhabitants). Aerosol fractions, source distribution and transport were investigated for 23 elements at approximately 1 km(2) scale resolution, and compared to children exposure data obtained within the same geographical space. As, Cd, Pb, Sb, W and Zn in aerosols are present at relatively high concentrations when compared to studies from other mining regions. Arsenic exceeds the European council PM(10) guide value (6 ng/m(3)) for 90% of the samples, topping 200 ng/m(3). Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Sb are present at significantly higher levels in the district located in the vicinity of the smelter zone. At the city level, principal component analysis combined with the mapping of factor scores allowed the identification and deconvolution of four individual sources: i) a natural magmatic source (Co, Cs, Fe, K, Mn, Na, Rb and U) originating from soil dust, resuspended by the traffic activity; ii) a natural sedimentary source (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Th) resulting from the suspension of evaporative salt deposits located South; iii) an anthropogenic source specifically enriched in mined elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb and Zn) mainly in the smelting district of the city; and iv) a Ni-Cr source homogenously distributed between the different city districts. Enrichment factors for As, Cd and Sb clearly show the impact of smelting activities, particularly in the finest PM(2.5) fraction. Comparison to children's hair metal contents collected in five schools from different districts shows a direct exposure to smelting activity fingerprinted by a unique trace elements pattern (Ag, As, Cu, Pb, Sb).

  9. Recurrences after intensity modulated radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma more likely to originate from regions with high baseline [18F]-FDG uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Anne Kirkebjerg; Vogelius, Ivan Richter; Aznar, Marianne;

    2014-01-01

    received radiotherapy for HNSCC from 2005 to 2009. Among 100 patients achieving complete clinical response and a later recurrence, 39 patients with 48 loco-regional failures had a recurrence CT scan before any salvage therapy. The estimated point of origin of each recurrence was transferred to the planning...

  10. Geochemical constraints on the relationship between the Miocene-Pliocene volcanism and tectonics in the Palaoco and Fortunoso volcanic fields, Mendoza Region, Argentina: New insights from 40Ar/39Ar dating, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and trace elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhr, Charlotte T.; Holm, Paul M.; Llambías, Eduardo J.

    2013-10-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar analyses constrain the formation of the volcanic succession of Sierra de Palaoco in the present back-arc of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), near 36°S, to the Late Miocene and assigns them to the Huincán II Formation. The composition of major and trace elements, Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes of the Palaoco and nearby Río Grande rocks require a strong arc-like component in the mantle that is absent or weak in both Early Miocene (Fortunoso Group) and Pleistocene alkaline lavas (Llancanelo Group) erupted in the same area. We evaluate the relative roles of varying mantle source compositions and crustal contamination in the generation of geochemically very different lavas from the Palaoco, Fortunoso and Río Grande volcanic fields, north of the Payún Matrú Volcano. The source for the Early Miocene Fortunoso(I) basalts was a OIB-type mantle devoid of subduction zone input. This type of OIB-like volcanic activity terminated due to a change from an extensional to a compressional tectonic regime. Towards the end of the Miocene renewed alkaline volcanism at Fortunoso (II) display a transition to arc-type incompatible element enrichment. Shortly after the calc-alkaline Palaoco volcanism started with a very strong geochemical arc-signature including Ba/La ≈ 60 and La/Nb = 2-3. After a quiesence of 1 Ma the major part of the voluminous Late Palaoco basalts were erupted around 7.5 Ma over a few hundred ka. These are less enriched in Ba and Sr and have compositions like many Holocene rocks of the Southern Volcanic Zone. Isotopically the Fortunoso I and Palaoco rocks are distinct. Regional volcanism of the Charilehue, Huincán I and II mostly has a moderate arc-type enrichment indicating incipient arc developments. However, Palaoco and La Brea at (c. 35°S) show full geochemical arc-signature, and we infer that a frontal arc was established. The subsequent development in the Palaoco-Río Grande area encompasses renewed late Pliocene calc-alkaline low volume

  11. Massive sulfide exploration models of the Iberian Pyrite Belt Neves Corvo mine region, based in a 3D geological, geophysical and geochemical ProMine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverno, Carlos; Matos, João Xavier; Rosa, Carlos; Mário Castelo-Branco, José; Granado, Isabel; Carvalho, João; João Baptista, Maria; Represas, Patrícia; Pereira, Zélia; Oliveira, Tomás; Araujo, Vitor

    2013-04-01

    superficial directional derivatives to obtain the various directions of the late-Variscan faults, the main overthrusts and lithological structures. iv) - Detailed palynological sediment dating; v) - A seismic survey was conducted in the vicinities of the Neves Corvo mine totalling 82 km of profiles with target depth of over 10 km. A 3D regional model has been constructed for the selected IPB area using GoCAD, integrating the most critical information of the follow geological units: the lower unit BAFG Mértola Formation, the VSC, the Neves Corvo ores and the PQG. It incorporated surface regional geological maps, 168 drill-hole geological logs throughout the area, structural and tectonic data, former seismic sections, where available, and a digital terrain model. Chemical data from 42 selected drill-holes in order to outline in 3D the Cu distribution in the area. The results have already indicated new important guidelines for VHMS exploration and new regional correlations with the Neves Corvo mining area. The 3D modelling study was essential to the detail understanding of the complex IPB geological structures observed in the south of Portugal.

  12. Geochemical anomaly and the causes of transition metal accumulations in late Permian coal from the eastern Yunnan-western Guizhou region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yanyan; Qin Yong; Wang Aikuan; Shen Jian

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of 39 trace elements in coal from the late Permian taken from the eastern Yunnanwestern Guizhou region was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.It was found that the mean content of Ti,V,Cr,Mo,Co,Ni,Y,and Zr is higher than the national average.The occurrence of Mn,Ni,and Co in the different coalfields is distinctly different.Most of the enriched transition metal elements exist mainly as inorganic minerals.In the Zhina coalfield,Co,Ni,and Nb are primarily associated with sulfur.Mn,Cs,and Mo are mostly sulfides.Almost all Co was organic and a significant part of the Ni is also organic in the Liupanshui coalfield.Cs,Co,and Ni are related to sulfur in the coal taken from eastern Yunnan.Carbonate is the main form of Mn in the coal from eastern Yunnan and the Liupanshui coalfield.Ti is the oxide in the coal samples where Ti is enriched.Zr is in the form of zircon in the samples where Zr is enriched.The situation for most of the transition metal elements is consistent with terrestrial genesis.Coal seams are universally influenced by the sea.The strongly seawater effected peat bog with a reductive and alkaline environment favors the relative enrichment of Mn.A reducing environment is conducive to transition metal element enrichment.

  13. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  14. 重庆东北城口地区黑色岩系地球化学异常模式%A Geochemical Anomaly Model for Black Shales in Chengkou Region of Northeast Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷恩; 王丹; 杨洪永; 秦林

    2012-01-01

    Good prospecting effect is gained by stream sediment survey in black shales area in Chengkou region of Northeast Chongqing, which consists of Upper Sinian to Lower Cambrian rocks such as black carbonaceous aleurolite, carbonaceous silty slate, and carbonaceous siliceous rocks. Focusing on the study of black shales and based on comprehensive analysis, this paper has pointed out that manganese, vanadium, silver, and barium are the main ore-forming elements, while manganese mainly enriches in Dengying and Doushantuo formations, vanadium and silver in Lujiaping Formation, and barium in Bashan Formation. The paper has also established a geochemical anomaly model for black shales and shown a clear direction for prospecting.%重庆东北城口地区黑色岩系广泛发育,主要岩性有上震旦统到下武寒统的黑色碳质粉砂岩、含碳粉砂质板岩、含碳硅质岩等,在区内进行水系沉积物测量工作取得了良好的找矿效果.以区内的黑色岩系为重点研究对象,通过对样品分析数据的综合研究,指出了区内的主要成矿元素有Mn、V、Ag、Ba等,其中Mn主要富集在灯影组和陡山沱组中,V、Ag主要富集在鲁家坪组中,Ba则富集在巴山组中,初步确定了黑色岩系的地球化学异常模式,指明了区内黑色岩系的找矿方向.

  15. The geochemical Phenomenon-Local geochemical fields in a glacier (scientific note)

    OpenAIRE

    V. N., Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical fields in alpine cold and warm glaciers were studied. Local geochemical fields of typomorphic elements were found to form in the ice and on the surface of glaciers overlying ore bodies and endogenic geochemical haloes. The formation of local cryogenic geochemical fields in the glaciers results from sharp geochemical heterogeneity and geochemical processes in underlying rocks which cause cryogenic migration of chemical elements and compounds in the glacier. The thickness of geochem...

  16. The geochemical Phenomenon-Local geochemical fields in a glacier (scientific note)

    OpenAIRE

    V. N., Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical fields in alpine cold and warm glaciers were studied. Local geochemical fields of typomorphic elements were found to form in the ice and on the surface of glaciers overlying ore bodies and endogenic geochemical haloes. The formation of local cryogenic geochemical fields in the glaciers results from sharp geochemical heterogeneity and geochemical processes in underlying rocks which cause cryogenic migration of chemical elements and compounds in the glacier. The thickness of geochem...

  17. Digital Offshore Cadastre (DOC) - Pacific83 - Baseline Tangent Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains baseline tangent lines and bay closing lines in ESRI Arc/Info export and Arc/View shape file formats for the BOEM Pacific Region. Baseline...

  18. Magic Baseline Beta Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2007-01-01

    We study the physics reach of an experiment where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN are observed in a large magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The CERN-INO distance is close to the so-called "magic" baseline which helps evade some of the parameter degeneracies and allows for a better measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy and $\\theta_{13}$.

  19. Rationing with baselines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new operator for general rationing problems in which, besides conflicting claims, individual baselines play an important role in the rationing process. The operator builds onto ideas of composition, which are not only frequent in rationing, but also in related problems...... such as bargaining, choice, and queuing. We characterize the operator and show how it preserves some standard axioms in the literature on rationing. We also relate it to recent contributions in such literature....

  20. The TDAQ Baseline Architecture

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F J

    The Trigger-DAQ community is currently busy preparing material for the DAQ, HLT and DCS TDR. Over the last few weeks a very important step has been a series of meetings to complete agreement on the baseline architecture. An overview of the architecture indicating some of the main parameters is shown in figure 1. As reported at the ATLAS Plenary during the February ATLAS week, the main area where the baseline had not yet been agreed was around the Read-Out System (ROS) and details in the DataFlow. The agreed architecture has: Read-Out Links (ROLs) from the RODs using S-Link; Read-Out Buffers (ROB) sited near the RODs, mounted in a chassis - today assumed to be a PC, using PCI bus at least for configuration, control and monitoring. The baseline assumes data aggregation, in the ROB and/or at the output (which could either be over a bus or in the network). Optimization of the data aggregation will be made in the coming months, but the current model has each ROB card receiving input from 4 ROLs, and 3 such c...

  1. Geochemical variability of soils and biogeochemical variability of plants in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.L.; Severson, R.C.; Dean, W.E.; Klusman, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Geochemical baselines for native soils and biogeochemical baselines for plants in the Piceance basin provide data that can be used to assess geochemical and biogeochemical effects of oil-shale development, monitor changes in the geochemical and biogeochemical environment during development, and assess the degree of success of rehabilitation of native materials after development. Baseline values for 52 properties in native soils, 15 properties in big sagebrush, and 13 properties in western wheatgrass were established. Our Study revealed statistically significant regional variations of the following properties across the basin: in soil&-aluminum, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, sodium, nickel, phosphorus, lead, scandium, titanium, vanadium, zinc, organic and total carbon, pH, clay, dolomite, sodium feldspar, and DTPA-extractable calcium, cadmium, iron, potassium, manganese, nickel, phosphorus, yttrium, and zinc; in big sagebrush-barium, calcium, copper, magnesium, molybdenum, sodium, strontium, zinc, and ash; and in western wheatgrass-boron, barium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, strontium, zinc, and ash. These variations show up as north-south trends across the basin, or they reflect differences in elevation, hydrology, and soil parent material. Baseline values for properties that do not have statistically significant regional variations can be represented by geometric means and deviations calculated from all values within the basin. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of soil and chemical analyses of western wheatgrass samples from Colorado State University's experimental revegetation plot at Anvil Points provide data useful in assessing potential effects on soil and plant properties when largescale revegetation operations begin. The concentrations of certain properties are related to the presence of topsoil over spent shale in the lysimeters. In soils, calcium, fluorine, lithium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, strontium, carbonate and total carbon

  2. Geochemistry@BGS : a guide to geochemical data at the British Geological Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C C

    2011-01-01

    This report reviews the main activities in the British Geological Survey (and previously as the Institute of Geological Sciences) that have generated geochemical data. Included are; the mineral reconnaissance programme; regional geochemical mapping; groundwater geochemistry; marine and estuarine surveys; environmental geochemistry and health; radiometric surveys; isotopic geochemistry; lithogeochemical investigations; organic geochemistry laboratories; and many international activities involv...

  3. Population Study of Urban, Rural, and Semiurban Regions for the Detection of Endovascular Disease and Prevalence of Risk Factors and Holistic Intervention Study: Rationale, Study Design, and Baseline Characteristics of PURSE-HIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanikachalam, Sadagopan; Harivanzan, Vijayakumar; Mahadevan, Murugappapillai V; Murthy, J S N; Anbarasi, Chandrasekar; Saravanababu, Chidambaram S; Must, Aviva; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Abraham, William T; Thanikachalam, Mohan

    2015-12-01

    We designed and implemented the PURSE-HIS (Population Study of Urban, Rural and Semiurban Regions for the Detection of Endovascular Disease and Prevalence of Risk Factors and Holistic Intervention Study) to understand the prevalence and progression of subclinical and overt endovascular disease (EVD) and its risk factors in urban, semiurban, and rural communities in South India. The study is also designed to generate clinical evidence for effective, affordable, and sustainable community-specific intervention strategies to control risks factors for EVD. As of June 2012, 8,080 (urban: 2,221; semiurban: 2,821; rural: 3,038) participants >20 years of age were recruited using 2-stage cluster sampling. Baseline measurements included standard cardiovascular disease risk factors, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle habits, psychosocial factors, and nutritional assessment. Fasting blood samples were assayed for putative biochemical risk factors and urine samples for microalbuminuria. All nondiabetic participants underwent oral glucose tolerance test with blood and urine samples collected every 30 min for 2 h. Additional baseline measurements included flow-mediated brachial artery endothelial vasodilation, assessment of carotid intimal medial wall thickness using ultrasonography, screening for peripheral vascular disease using ankle and brachial blood pressures, hemodynamic screening using a high-fidelity applanation tonometry to measure central blood pressure parameters, and aortic pulse wave velocity. To assess prevalence of coronary artery disease, all participants underwent surface electrocardiography and documentation of ventricular wall motion abnormality and function using echocardiography imaging. To detect subclinical lesions, all eligible participants completed an exercise treadmill test. Prospectively, the study will assess progression of subclinical and overt EVD, including risk factor-outcome relation differences across communities. The study will also evaluate

  4. Concerning evaluation of eco-geochemical background in remediation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The geochemical concept of biosphere developed by V.I. Vernadsky states the geological role of the living organisms in the course of their active chemical interaction with the inert matter (Vernadsky, 1926, 1960). Basing on this theory it is reasonable to suggest that coevolution of living organisms and their environment led to development of the dynamically stable biogeocenoses precisely adequate to their geochemical environment. Soil cover was treated by V.I. Vernadsky as a balanced bio-inert matter resulting from this interaction. Appearance of human mind and then a civilization led to global expansion of human beings, first able to survive in unfavorable geochemical conditions and then starting chemical transformation of the environment to satisfy the growing demands of mankind in food and energy. The residence in unfavorable environment and local contamination was followed by appearance of endemic diseases of plants, animals and man. Therefore zonal, regional and local chemical composition of the soil cover formed in natural conditions may be used for estimation of the optimum geochemical background, most adequate for the corresponding zonal biogeocenoses and species. Moreover, the natural geochemical background and technogenic fields have unequal spatial structure and this facilitates their identification that may be relatively easy realized in remediation strategy. On the assumption of the foregoing, the adequate methodical approach to remediation of technogenically affected areas should account of the interaction of the existing natural and the newly formed technogenic geochemical fields and include the following steps: 1) the study and mapping of geochemical structure of the natural geochemical background basing on soil maps; 2) the study of contaminants and mapping spatial distribution of technogenic releases; 3) construction of risk maps for the target risk groups with due regard to natural ecological threshold concentration in context of risk degree for

  5. NOAA and MMS Marine Minerals Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Minerals Geochemical Database was created by NGDC as a part of a project to construct a comprehensive computerized bibliography and geochemical database...

  6. Evaluation of geochemical data acquired from regular grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezvoda, V.; Jelinkova, E.; Segeth, K.

    1986-11-01

    Geochemical data obtained during mineral exploration often are biased by systematic as well as random errors; these may result in failures when usual methods of evaluation are used. This is true particularly in soil surveys carried out in regions where a long history of prospecting and mining activity has occurred and/or where aerial chemical pollution is likely to have occurred. A satisfactory evaluation of geochemical data even in such an unfavorable case requires sampling on a relatively dense grid and utilization of all available knowledge of types of mineralization. The evaluation procedure proposed consists of five consecutive phases: (1) dividing the area of interest into subareas of a relatively homogeneous geological nature; (2) processing by multivariate methods (factor analysis, in particular) without consideration of geographic relations; (3) a preliminary interpretation and search for a geochemical explanation of factors; (4) processing of individual factors in two-dimensional geographic space by directional and frequency linear filtering methods; (5) final interpretation and construction of a geochemical model. The procedure is illustrated by an example from a geochemical exploration survey in the vicinity of Pribram (Middle Bohemia).

  7. Geochemical patterns in the soils of Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David R; Rutherford, Neil F; Morisseau, Eleni; Zissimos, Andreas M

    2012-03-15

    The soil geochemical atlas of Cyprus is a recent addition to the series of national to continental-scale geochemical mapping programmes implemented over the last two decades for environmental and resource applications. The study has been conducted at the high sampling density of 1 site per 1km(2), with multi-element and multi-method analysis performed on samples of top soil (0-25cm) and sub soil (50-75cm) from a grid of over 5350 sites across a major portion of Cyprus. Major and most trace elements display sharp concentration changes across the main geological boundaries but a high degree of spatial continuity and consistency of values within those boundaries. Some elements display one to two orders of magnitude difference in median concentrations between the soils developed over ultramafic or mafic units and those developed over sedimentary rocks or alluvial units. The ratio of aqua regia-extractable to total metal contents provides an indication of the general mineralogical host for a number of trace elements. The majority of soils are near-neutral to alkaline with the small proportion of areas with soil pHgeochemical values. Where the concentrations of some elements (including Pb, Hg and Sn) are indicative of contamination, the values are typically higher in the top soil samples in these areas. Variations in the concentration of elements with strong redox controls on mobility are linked to changes in sedimentary environment between deep and shallow marine conditions. Some element patterns can be related to the effects of urbanisation and sulphide mining operations; however the dominant control on soil geochemistry is the parent geology and regolith forming processes. The atlas demonstrates the effectiveness of high-density sampling in mapping local to regional-scale features of the geochemical landscape.

  8. Establishing nursery estuary otolith geochemical tags for Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Is temporal stability estuary dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Diarmuid; Wögerbauer, Ciara; Roche, William

    2016-12-01

    The ability to determine connectivity between juveniles in nursery estuaries and adult populations is an important tool for fisheries management. Otoliths of juvenile fish contain geochemical tags, which reflect the variation in estuarine elemental chemistry, and allow discrimination of their natal and/or nursery estuaries. These tags can be used to investigate connectivity patterns between juveniles and adults. However, inter-annual variability of geochemical tags may limit the accuracy of nursery origin determinations. Otolith elemental composition was used to assign a single cohort of 0-group sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax to their nursery estuary thus establishing an initial baseline for stocks in waters around Ireland. Using a standard LDFA model, high classification accuracies to nursery sites (80-88%) were obtained. Temporal stability of otolith geochemical tags was also investigated to assess if annual sampling is required for connectivity studies. Geochemical tag stability was found to be strongly estuary dependent.

  9. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzetto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Following the discovery of neutrino oscillations by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration, recently awarded with the Nobel Prize, two generations of long baseline experiments had been setup to further study neutrino oscillations. The first generation experiments, K2K in Japan, Minos in the States and Opera in Europe, focused in confirming the Super-Kamiokande result, improving the precision with which oscillation parameters had been measured and demonstrating the ντ appearance process. Second generation experiments, T2K in Japan and very recently NOνA in the States, went further, being optimized to look for genuine three neutrino phenomena like non-zero values of θ13 and first glimpses to leptonic CP violation (LCPV) and neutrino mass ordering (NMO). The discovery of leptonic CP violation will require third generation setups, at the moment two strong proposals are ongoing, Dune in the States and Hyper-Kamiokande in Japan. This review will focus a little more in these future initiatives.

  10. Biofuels Baseline 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamelinck, C.; Koper, M.; Berndes, G.; Englund, O.; Diaz-Chavez, R.; Kunen, E.; Walden, D.

    2011-10-15

    The European Union is promoting the use of biofuels and other renewable energy in transport. In April 2009, the Renewable Energy Directive (2009/28/EC) was adopted that set a 10% target for renewable energy in transport in 2020. The directive sets several requirements to the sustainability of biofuels marketed in the frame of the Directive. The Commission is required to report to the European Parliament on a regular basis on a range of sustainability impacts resulting from the use of biofuels in the EU. This report serves as a baseline of information for regular monitoring on the impacts of the Directive. Chapter 2 discusses the EU biofuels market, the production and consumption of biofuels and international trade. It is derived where the feedstock for EU consumed biofuels originally come from. Chapter 3 discusses the biofuel policy framework in the EU and major third countries of supply. It looks at various policy aspects that are relevant to comply with the EU sustainability requirements. Chapter 4 discusses the environmental and social sustainability aspects associated with EU biofuels and their feedstock. Chapter 5 discusses the macro-economic effects that indirectly result from increased EU biofuels consumption, on commodity prices and land use. Chapter 6 presents country factsheets for main third countries that supplied biofuels to the EU market in 2008.

  11. 全国主要大中型金铜多金属矿区域地球化学数据库%REGIONAL GEOCHEMICAL DATABASE OF MAIN LARGE-MIDDLE GOLD AND CO PPER POLYMETALLIC OREFIELDS AND DEPOSITS OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史长义; 张金华

    2001-01-01

    利用Visual dBase 5.5和Visual Basic 语言完成了全国主要大中型金铜多金属矿区域地球化学数据库(CRGD1.0)系统的设计和开发,并将所收集到的约30个大中型金、铜、多金属矿田/床的基础地质资料、区域地球化学资料装入库中,形成了全国主要大中型金铜多金属矿区域地球化学数据库,同时还开发、设计了数据录入、数据浏览、数据查询、数据输出、格式转换等功能。%The regional geochemical database (CRGD1.0) system of main large-middle gold and copper-polymetallic ore fields and deposits in China has been developed. The ba sic geological information and regional geochemical data of over 30 large-middle gold and copper ploy-metallic ore fields and deposits are stored into the CRGD1 .0. At the same time, some application functions such as data inputting, data br owsing, data querying, data outputting and data format transforming also have be en developed for users.

  12. Alteration geochemistry of the volcanic-hosted Dedeninyurdu, Yergen and Fındıklıyar Cu-Fe mineralization, Northern part of Gökçedoǧan Village, Çorum-Kargi Region, Turkey: Implications for the rare earth elements geochemical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sercan; Gumus, Lokman; Abdelnasser, Amr; Yalçin, Cihan; Kumral, Mustafa; Hanilçi, Nurullah

    2016-04-01

    This study deals with the rare earth element (REE) geochemical behavior the alteration zonesassociated with the volcanic-hosted Cu-Femineralization at the northern part of Gökçedoǧan village, Çorum-Kargi region (N Turkey) which are Dedeninyurdu, Yergen and Fındıklıyar mineralization. The study areacomprises Bekirli Formation, Saraycık Formation, Beşpınar Formation, and Ilgaz Formation. Saraycık Formation consists ofUpper Cretaceous KargıOphiolites, pelagic limestone, siltstone, chert and spilitic volcanic rocks. Fe-Cu mineralization occurred in the spiliticvolcanic rocks of Saraycık Formation representing the host rockand is related with the silicification and sericitizationalteration zones. Dedeninyurdu and Yergen mineralization zone directed nearly N75-80oEis following structural a line but Fındıklıyar mineralization zone has nearly NW direction. The ore mineralogy in these zonesinclude pyrite, chalcopyrite, covellite, hematite with malachite, goethite and a limonite as a result of oxidation. The geochemical characteristics of REE of the least altered spiliticbasalt show flat light and heavy REE with slight positive Eu- and Sr-anomalies according to their chondrite-, N-type MORB, and primitive mantle-normalized REE patterns. While the REE geochemical features of the altered rocks collected from the different alteration zones show that there are negative Eu and Sr anomalies as a result of leaching during the alteration processes.There are positive and negative correlations between K2O index with LREE and HREE, respectively. This is due to the additions of K and La during the alteration processes referring to the pervasive sericitization alteration is the responsible for the Cu-Fe mineralization at the study area. Keywords: Cu-Fe mineralization, Spilitic volcanic rocks, alteration, Rare earth elements (REE) geochemistry.

  13. Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This database was initiated, designed, and populated to collect and integrate geochemical data from central Colorado in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessment, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessment, and medical geology. The Microsoft Access database serves as a geochemical data warehouse in support of the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses determined by 70 analytical laboratory and field methods for 47,478 rock, sediment, soil, and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed either in the analytical laboratories of the USGS or by contract with commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects. In addition, geochemical data from 7,470 sediment and soil samples collected and analyzed under the Atomic Energy Commission National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program (henceforth called NURE) have been included in this database. In addition to data from 2,377 samples collected and analyzed under CCAP, this dataset includes archived geochemical data originally entered into the in-house Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database (used by the USGS from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s) and the in-house PLUTO database (used by the USGS from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s). All of these data are maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB and from the NURE database were used to generate most of this dataset. In addition, USGS data that have been excluded previously from the NGDB because the data predate earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  14. The Geochemical Society(GS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seth M.Davis

    2007-01-01

    @@ Mission The Geochemical Society is an international nonprofit organization for scientists involved in the practice,study and teaching of geochemistry.0ur principal roles are to understand and meet the needs of our members so as to provide them with programs and services that will help them be better geochemists;to empower geochemists through information,education,relationships and resources that will enrich their professional development and careers;and to advance the thought and application of geochemistry.

  15. Geochemical Stratigraphy of Southern Parana' Lava Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzoli, A.; De Min, A.; Marques, L. S.; Nardy, A.; Chiaradia, M.

    2015-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows of the Paranà Large Igneous Province exhibit significant regional and stratigraphic geochemical variations. While the most notable difference concerns the dominance of low-Ti (TiO2 Esmeralda low-Ti basalts (these latter being present both towards the base and the top of the sequence) in Paranà State, while in Santa Caterina State Gramado flows are interlayered with Urubici-type high-Ti basalts. The interlayering of distinct basaltic magma type requires near-synchronous eruption of chemically strongly different magma types generated from clearly heterogeneous mantle sources and erupted through separated magma plumbing systems, without apparent interaction (mixing) among the distinct basalts. In conclusion, the relative timing of low- and high-Ti magma types seems to be much more complicated than previously thought, as for example Esmeralda or Pitanga basalts, previously considered as quite late and postdating Gramado basalts, are indeed synchronous with them.

  16. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The report describes geochemical parameters and methods that provide information about the hydrodynamic stability of groundwaters in low permeability fractured rocks that are potential hosts for radioactive waste repositories. Hydrodynamic stability describes the propensity for changes in groundwater flows over long timescales, in terms of flow rates and flow directions. Hydrodynamic changes may also cause changes in water compositions, but the related issue of geochemical stability of a potential repository host rock system is outside the scope of this report. The main approaches to assessing groundwater stability are numerical modelling, measurement and interpretation of geochemical indicators in groundwater compositions, and analyses and interpretations of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in these minerals. This report covers the latter two topics, with emphasis on geochemical indicators. The extent to which palaeohydrogeology and geochemical stability indicators have been used in past safety cases is reviewed. It has been very variable, both in terms of the scenarios considered, the stability indicators considered and the extent to which the information was explicitly or implicitly used in assessing FEPs and scenarios in the safety cases. Geochemical indicators of hydrodynamic stability provide various categories of information that are of hydrogeological relevance. Information about groundwater mixing, flows and water sources is potentially provided by the total salinity of groundwaters, their contents of specific non-reactive solutes (principally chloride) and possibly of other solutes, the stable isotopic ratio of water, and certain characteristics of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions. Information pertaining directly to groundwater ages and the timing of water and solute movements is provided by isotopic systems including tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, uranium isotopes and dissolved mobile gases in

  17. A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    very general indication of geochemical distribution patterns and should not be used for site specific studies. The atlas maps for each element were computer-generated at the state's geographic information system (Center for Geographic Information and Analysis [CGIA]). The Division of Statistics and Information Services provided input files. The maps in the atlas are point maps. Each sample is represented by a symbol generally corresponding to a quartile class. Other reports will transmit sample and analytical data for state regions. Data are tentatively planned to be available on disks in spreadsheet format for personal computers. During the second phase of this project, stream-sediment samples are being assigned to state geologic map unit names using a GIS system to determine background and anomaly values. Subsequent publications will make this geochemical data and accompanying interpretations available to a wide spectrum of interdisciplinary users. ?? 1993.

  18. Geological and geochemical characteristics of the Aksug porphyry Cu-Mo system, Altay-Sayan region, Russia%俄罗斯阿尔泰-Sayan地区Aksug斑岩Cu-Mo体系的地质与地球化学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Berzina AN; Berzina AP

    2008-01-01

    The Aksug deposit, located in Ahay-Sayan region of Russia, is one of the largest porphyry Cu-Mo deposits in Southern Siberia. The ore-bearing porphyries of the Aksug porphyry Cu-Mo system were formed in post-collisional environment. Geochemically they belong to calk-alkaline and high K-calk-alkaline series. Rocks are characterized by enrichment of LILE and depletion of HSFE and HREE, showing the importance of subduction-related components in magma generation. Large plutonic intrusions that host porphyry systems have been formed during collision. The origin of porphyritic rocks is dominantly the mantle with lower crustal contribution. The mainly economically important Cu-Mo mineralization is closely related to a porphyry series in time and space, being emplaced towards the end of magmatic activity. Though the emplacement of plutonic and ore-bearing porphyry complexes took place in different geodynamic environments, both complexes are characterized by certain similarity in geochemical composition, alkalinity, trace element content, Sr isotopic composition. This fact evidently indicates a common deep-seated magmatic source (at the lower crust-upper mantle level), Low initial 87Sr/86Sr, sulfur isotopic characteristics and presence of PGE-Co-Ni mineralization in associated pyrite-chalcopyrite ores suggest that mantle source of chalcophile elements was of high importance in porphyry Cu-Mo mineralization of the Aksug deposit.

  19. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) - Geochemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Soil, Mineral, and Concentrate Sample Media

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping,...

  20. Geochemical Evidence for a Terrestrial Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Carl B.

    1999-01-01

    The aftermath of phase separation and crystal-liquid fractionation in a magma ocean should leave a planet geochemically differentiated. Subsequent convective and other mixing processes may operate over time to obscure geochemical evidence of magma ocean differentiation. On the other hand, core formation is probably the most permanent, irreversible part of planetary differentiation. Hence the geochemical traces of core separation should be the most distinct remnants left behind in the mantle and crust, In the case of the Earth, core formation apparently coincided with a magma ocean that extended to a depth of approximately 1000 km. Evidence for this is found in high pressure element partitioning behavior of Ni and Co between liquid silicate and liquid iron alloy, and with the Ni-Co ratio and the abundance of Ni and Co in the Earth's upper mantle. A terrestrial magma ocean with a depth of 1000 km will solidify from the bottom up and first crystallize in the perovskite stability field. The largest effect of perovskite fractionation on major element distribution is to decrease the Si-Mg ratio in the silicate liquid and increase the Si-Mg ratio in the crystalline cumulate. Therefore, if a magma ocean with perovskite fractionation existed, then one could expect to observe an upper mantle with a lower than chondritic Si-Mg ratio. This is indeed observed in modern upper mantle peridotites. Although more experimental work is needed to fully understand the high-pressure behavior of trace element partitioning, it is likely that Hf is more compatible than Lu in perovskite-silicate liquid pairs. Thus, perovskite fractionation produces a molten mantle with a higher than chondritic Lu-Hf ratio. Arndt and Blichert-Toft measured Hf isotope compositions of Barberton komatiites that seem to require a source region with a long-lived, high Lu-Hf ratio. It is plausible that that these Barberton komatiites were generated within the majorite stability field by remelting a perovskite

  1. Hanford Site technical baseline database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, P.E.

    1996-09-30

    This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database as of September 30, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that dellinate the differences between this revision and revision 4 (May 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database.

  2. Hanford Site technical baseline database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, P.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-10

    This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database as of May 10, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that delineate the differences between this revision and revision 3 (April 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database.

  3. Rb-Sr geochronology and geochemical characteristics of mafic dikes in the Nova Lacerda and Conquista D'Oeste region, Mato Grosso, SW Amazonian Craton; Geocronologia Rb-Sr e caracteristicas geoquimicas dos diques maficos da regiao de Nova Lacerda e Conquista D'Oeste (MT), porcao sudoeste do Craton Amazonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Cesar Correa da; Matos, Joao Batista de [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Recursos Minerais; Grupo de Pesquisas em Evolucao Crustal e Metalogenia Guapore, Cuiaba, MT (Brazil)], e-mail: pccorrea@ufmt.br, e-mail: jmatos@cpd.ufmt.br; Girardi, Vicente Antonio Vitorio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Mineralogia e Geotectonica], e-mail: girardi@usp.br; Ruiz, Amarildo Salina [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia Geral; Grupo de Pesquisas em Evolucao Crustal e Metalogenia Guapore, Cuiaba, MT (Brazil)], e-mail: asruiz@rc.unesp.br

    2009-07-01

    In the Nova Lacerda and Conquista D'Oeste regions, Mato Grosso State, SW part of the Amazonian Craton, mafic dikes trending NNW intrude the Nova Lacerda Granite (1462{+-}12 Ma), within the Jauru Domain, in the Rondonia-San Ignacio Province (1.55 - 1.3 Ga). The mafic swarm comprises diabases, metadiabases and amphibolites. Metadiabases originated from uralitization of diabases. These rocks have tholeiitic affinity and predominant basaltic composition. Some samples are andesi-basalts. The ages of diabases and metabasites are 1380 {+-} 32 Ma and 1330 {+-} 120 Ma respectively. Geochemical data indicate that the compositional variation of diabases and metadiadases is due to fractional crystallization of evolved tholeiitic magmas. The origin of the basaltic magmas is related to a heterogeneous mantle source. (author)

  4. Plutonium Immobilization Project Baseline Formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.

    1999-02-01

    A key milestone for the Immobilization Project (AOP Milestone 3.2a) in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) is the definition of the baseline composition or formulation for the plutonium ceramic form. The baseline formulation for the plutonium ceramic product must be finalized before the repository- and plant-related process specifications can be determined. The baseline formulation that is currently specified is given in Table 1.1. In addition to the baseline formulation specification, this report provides specifications for two alternative formulations, related compositional specifications (e.g., precursor compositions and mixing recipes), and other preliminary form and process specifications that are linked to the baseline formulation. The preliminary specifications, when finalized, are not expected to vary tremendously from the preliminary values given.

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

  6. Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-27

    PNNL developed a new tool for oscillation analysis and baselining. This tool has been developed under a new DOE Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) Project (GM0072 - “Suite of open-source applications and models for advanced synchrophasor analysis”) and it is based on the open platform for PMU analysis. The Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool (OBAT) performs the oscillation analysis and identifies modes of oscillations (frequency, damping, energy, and shape). The tool also does oscillation event baselining (fining correlation between oscillations characteristics and system operating conditions).

  7. Quivira NWR biological baseline data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset is biological baseline data for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge as of January 2016. It contains data on species found on the refuge, when and where...

  8. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  9. Digital Offshore Cadastre (DOC) - Pacific83 - Baseline Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains baseline points in ESRI Arc/Info export and Arc/View shape file formats for the BOEM Pacific Region. Baseline points are used by the BOEM to...

  10. Multi-element geochemical mapping in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhizhong; Xie, Xuejing; Yao, Wensheng; Feng, Jizhou; Zhang, Qin; Fang, Jindong

    2014-04-01

    The 76-element Geochemical Mapping (76 GEM) Project was undertaken in southwestern China in 2000 and in southeastern China in 2008. In this project, 5244 composite samples of stream sediment at a density of one composite sample for each 1:50,000-scale map sheet were prepared from sample archives of the China Regional Geochemistry-National Reconnaissance (RGNR) Project, which have been available since 1978. The 76 elements were analyzed by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). In the present study, a new quality-control method known as the visualized standard map method was applied to the results of the 76 GEM project. Mean value and background value, which indicate the average concentration of the 76 elements in southern China, were derived from statistical data. Moreover, geochemical maps were compiled to demonstrate the distribution of the 76 elements in southern China.

  11. Geochemical Study of Lichens in Tatun Volcano Group, North Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Ssu-Yu

    2015-04-01

    Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is located in the northwest of Taipei, the capital of Taiwan. Although the last activity was 200000 years ago, it is critical to monitor TVG because it is nearby metropolitan area. This study is part of the monitoring program and attempts to observe the geochemical relationship between lichen and volcanic gas. Lichens have been extensively used for monitoring atmospheric quality. Lichen can live in critical environments and can accumulate metals from atmosphere due to lack of excretion mechanism. Moreover, lichen can live long and growth in a low rate; therefore, lichen geochemistry can represent an average in a long term manner. In TVG, fruticose lichen can be seldom found due to the high concentration of SO2 in the atmosphere. However, foliose lichen and crustose lichen are not rare in the study area. In this study, lichens were collected from TVG and Nan-ao Trail which is in non-volcanic area. The cations were measured by ICP-MS. The geochemical results were analyzed by principal components analysis (PCA). It shows that there is no significant difference among non-volcanic lichens and the non-volcanic lichens are located at an end-member of two distinct trends. It is believed that the non-volcanic lichens indicate a geochemical baseline in north Taiwan and two trends may represent the mixing between two different types of volcanic gases in TVG and geochemical baseline. In this study, rare earth elements (REEs) were also measured. The results of non-volcanic and TVG lichens were normalized by North America Shale and TVG andesite, respectively. Both obtain a flat REE pattern, which confirm that TVG lichens receive metals from volcanic origin and non-volcanic lichens give information of background geochemistry in north Taiwan. In addition, a middle REE enrichment and distinct Ce negative anomaly can be observed. According to the previous studies, middle REE enrichment may be achieved by the selected adsorption of middle REEs by organic

  12. THE GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GRANITES AND THEIR GEOLOGICAL IMPLICATION IN NORTH-CENTRAL REGION OF LAOS%老挝中北部花岗岩地球化学特征及其地质意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾润幸; 方维萱; 胡瑞忠

    2011-01-01

    老挝NM矿区位于中北部长山(Truong Son)岩浆-构造内.在二叠-三叠纪的印支运动期间,Sibumasu板块沿Nan-Uttaradit缝合线与印支板块拼接后,在印支板块的东部形成了北西向右旋的长山(Truong Son)岩浆-构造剪切带.NM矿区的花岗岩可分为中粗粒花岗岩、斑状花岗岩和细粒花岗岩.本区不同类型花岗岩的地球化学特征显示其ACNK值多介于0.9~1.1之间,为高钾钙碱性花岗岩;微量元素中多富集Cs,Rb,Th,U,K而相对亏损Ba,Sr等大离子亲石元素,高场强元素分异明显,Nb,P,Ti表现出明显的负异常;稀土元素相对富集轻稀土,轻稀土元素分馏程度高而重稀土元素分馏程度不明显,铕具中等或明显的负异常,上述特征表明本区不同类型花岗岩的物质来源相似.结合本区的大地构造特征和花岗岩的地球化学特征来看,本区花岗岩可能形成于印支碰撞造山后期的挤压-剪切环境.同时岩浆在从中粗粒花岗岩向斑状花岗岩和细粒花岗岩的结晶演化过程中,TFe,TiO2,MgO,CaO,Na2O的含量逐渐降低,而SiO2和K2O的含量相对增加,Fe,Cu,Zn (Pb)等矿化主要与其中的斑状花岗岩的关系较为密切.%The NM deposit is located in the northwest trending magmatic-tectonic belt, north-central part of Truong Son, which was subjected to right-lateral shearing due to the collision of Sibumasu micro-continent with Indo-China micro-continent along Nan-Uttaradit suture during Permian-Triassic Period. Based on the grain size and spatial distribution, the granites in NM deposit can be classified into medium-coarse grained granite, porphyritic granite and fine grained granite respectively. The geochemical characteristics of different types of granite show that they are high-potassium, calc-alkaline granitoids with the ACNK ratios mostly ranging from 0.9 to 1. 1. Trace elements of the granites show that the variety of LILE enriches in Cs,Rb,Th,U,K, while depletes in Ba and Sr

  13. Geochemical modeling of magmatic gas scrubbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gambardella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The EQ3/6 software package, version 7.2 was successfully used to model scrubbing of magmatic gas by pure water at 0.1 MPa, in the liquid and liquid-plus-gas regions. Some post-calculations were necessary to account for gas separation effects. In these post-calculations, redox potential was considered to be fixed by precipitation of crystalline a-sulfur, a ubiquitous and precocious process. As geochemical modeling is constrained by conservation of enthalpy upon water-gas mixing, the enthalpies of the gas species of interest were reviewed, adopting as reference state the liquid phase at the triple point. Our results confirm that significant emissions of highly acidic gas species (SO2(g, HCl(g, and HF(g are prevented by scrubbing, until dry conditions are established, at least locally. Nevertheless important outgassing of HCl(g can take place from acid, HCl-rich brines. Moreover, these findings support the rule of thumb which is generally used to distinguish SO2-, HCl-, and HF-bearing magmatic gases from SO2-, HCl-, and HF-free hydrothermal gases.

  14. Learning to Baseline Business Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gore

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available bills, sign multi-­‐year contracts, and make purchasing decisions without having an overall technology plan. That plan includes a technology baseline to fully assess existing technology. A CIO's goal is to align IT with business goals. Businesses must know total cost of ownership and the return on investment for all technology purchases and monthly costs. A business must also be able to manage technology assets and best utilize resources across the business. Teaching students to baseline technology will enable them to track and manage costs, discover errors and waste, and consolidate and improve existing technology.

  15. A geochemical perspective of Red Mountain: an unmined volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in the Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Stuart A.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has investigated the environmental geochemistry of a group of unmined volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits in the Bonnifield mining district, Alaska Range, east-central Alaska. The spectacularly colored Red Mountain deposit is the best exposed of these and provides excellent baseline geochemical data for natural environmental impacts of acidic rock drainage, metal dissolution and transport, and acidic salt and metal precipitation from an exposed and undisturbed VMS deposit.

  16. Heavy Metal Pollution Assessment by Partial Geochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    sediments geochemical anomalies has been applied with success in .... pure exploration geological to environmental pollution studies as well as remote sensing ..... erosion of the amorphous phase to the sea in the form of suspension while ...

  17. Statistical Analysis Of Reconnaissance Geochemical Data From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Statistical Analysis Of Reconnaissance Geochemical Data From Orle District, ... The univariate methods used include frequency distribution and cumulative ... The possible mineral potential of the area include base metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Mo, etc.) ...

  18. The National Geochemical Survey - database and documentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in collaboration with other federal and state government agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting the National Geochemical Survey (NGS) to produce...

  19. The National Geochemical Survey - database and documentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in collaboration with other federal and state government agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting the National Geochemical Survey (NGS) to produce a...

  20. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinberg, J [comp.

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  1. Baseline Removal From EMG Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    a time-varying baseline contamination. Acknowledgements: Work funded by the Departamento de Salud del Gobierno de Navarrra and by a Spanish MEC...Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electra y Electronica Universidad Publica de Navarra Pamplona, Spain Performing Organization Report

  2. A new method for geochemical anomaly separation based on the distribution patterns of singularity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Zhou, Kefa; Cheng, Qiuming

    2017-08-01

    Singularity analysis is one of the most important models in the fractal/multifractal family that has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for identifying hybrid distribution patterns of geochemical data, such as normal and multifractal distributions. However, the question of how to appropriately separate these patterns using reasonable thresholds has not been well answered. In the present study, a new method termed singularity-quantile (S-Q) analysis was proposed to separate multiple geochemical anomaly populations based on integrating singularity analysis and quantile-quantile plot (QQ-plot) analysis. The new method provides excellent abilities for characterizing frequency distribution patterns of singularity indices by plotting singularity index quantiles vs. standard normal quantiles. From a perspective of geochemical element enrichment processes, distribution patterns of singularity indices can be evidently separated into three groups by means of the new method, corresponding to element enrichment, element generality and element depletion, respectively. A case study for chromitite exploration based on geochemical data in the western Junggar region (China), was employed to examine the potential application of the new method. The results revealed that the proposed method was very sensitive to the changes of singularity indices with three segments when it was applied to characterize geochemical element enrichment processes. And hence, the S-Q method can be considered as an efficient and powerful tool for separating hybrid geochemical anomalies on the basis of statistical and inherent fractal/multifractal properties.

  3. A preliminary study on the geochemical environment for deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Yong Kwon; Park, Byoung Yun

    2000-03-01

    Geochemical study on the groundwater from crystalline rocks (granite and gneiss) for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste was carried out in order to elucidate the hydrogeochemical and isotope characteristics and geochemical evolution of the groundwater. Study areas are Jungwon, Chojeong, Youngcheon and Yusung for granite region, Cheongyang for gneiss region, and Yeosu for volcanic region. Groundwaters of each study areas weree sampled and analysed systematically. Groundwaters can be grouped by their chemistry and host rock. Origin of the groundwater was proposed by isotope ({sup 18}O, {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 34}S, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 15}N) studies and the age of groundwater was inferred from their tritium contents. Based ont the geochemical and isotope characteristics, the geochemical evolutions of each types of groundwater were simulated using SOLVEQ/CHILLER and PHREEQC programs.

  4. The effect of scale on the interpretation of geochemical anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, P.K.; Eppinger, R.G.; Turner, R.L.; Shiquan, S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of geochemical surveys changes with scale. Regional surveys identify areas where mineral deposits are most likely to occur, whereas intermediate surveys identify and prioritize specific targets. At detailed scales specific deposit models may be applied and deposits delineated. The interpretation of regional geochemical surveys must take into account scale-dependent difference in the nature and objectives of this type of survey. Overinterpretation of regional data should be resisted, as should recommendations to restrict intermediate or detailed follow-up surveys to the search for specific deposit types or to a too limited suite of elements. Regional surveys identify metallogenic provinces within which a variety of deposit types and metals are most likely to be found. At intermediate scale, these regional provinces often dissipate into discrete clusters of anomalous areas. At detailed scale, individual anomalous areas reflect local conditions of mineralization and may seem unrelated to each other. Four examples from arid environments illustrate the dramatic change in patterns of anomalies between regional and more detailed surveys. On the Arabian Shield, a broad regional anomaly reflects the distribution of highly differentiated anorogenic granites. A particularly prominent part of the regional anomaly includes, in addition to the usual elements related to the granites, the assemblage of Mo, W and Sn. Initial interpretation suggested potential for granite-related, stockwork Mo deposits. Detailed work identified three separate sources for the anomaly: a metal-rich granite, a silicified and stockwork-veined area with scheelite and molybdenite, and scheelite/powellite concentrations in skarn deposits adjacent to a ring-dike complex. Regional geochemical, geophysical and remote-sensing data in the Sonoran Desert, Mexico, define a series of linear features interpreted to reflect fundamental, northeast-trending fractures in the crust that served as the prime

  5. Principles of landscape-geochemical studies in the zones contaminated by technogenical radionuclides for ecological and geochemical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    Efficiency of landscape-geochemical approach was proved to be helpful in spatial and temporal evaluation of the Chernobyl radionuclide distribution in the environment. The peculiarity of such approach is in hierarchical consideration of factors responsible for radionuclide redistribution and behavior in a system of inter-incorporated landscape-geochemical structures of the local and regional scales with due regard to the density of the initial fallout and patterns of radionuclide migration in soil-water-plant systems. The approach has been applied in the studies of distribution of Cs-137, Sr-90 and some other radionuclides in soils and vegetation cover and in evaluation of contribution of the stable iodine supply in soils to spatial variation of risk of thyroid cancer in areas subjected to radioiodine contamination after the Chernobyl accident. The main feature of the proposed approach is simultaneous consideration of two types of spatial heterogeneities: firstly, the inhomogeneity of external radiation exposure due to a complex structure of the contamination field, and, secondly, the landscape geochemical heterogeneity of the affected area, so that the resultant effect of radionuclide impact could significantly vary in space. The main idea of risk assessment in this respect was to reproduce as accurately as possible the result of interference of two surfaces in the form of risk map. The approach, although it demands to overcome a number of methodological difficulties, allows to solve the problems associated with spatially adequate protection of the affected population and optimization of the use of contaminated areas. In general it can serve the basis for development of the idea of the two-level structure of modern radiobiogeochemical provinces formed by superposition of the natural geochemical structures and the fields of technogenic contamination accompanied by the corresponding peculiar and integral biological reactions.

  6. Use of Geochemical Indices in Environmental Assessment of Soil; the Predictable and the Predictably Unpredictable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Hannah; Clarke, Bradley; van de Graaff, Robert; Reichman, Suzie

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical correlations between common contaminants (Pb, Ni, As, Cr, Co and Zn) and earth metals, Fe and Mn, have been recommended as empirical tools to estimate "background" concentrations of metals in soil. A limited number of studies indicate that geochemical ratios between Pb, Ni, As, Cr, Co, V and Zn with scavenger metals Fe or Mn, are consistent between soils collected from different regions (Hamon et al. 2004, Myers and Thorbjornsen 2004). These studies have resulted in the incorporation of geochemical indices into Australian guidance, for derivation of ecological investigation levels for Ni, Cr, Cu and Zn. However, little research has been undertaken to assess the variation of geochemical patterns between soils derived from different parent materials or different weathering environments. A survey of background soils derived from four different parent materials, across Victoria, Australia, was undertaken, comprising collection of samples (n=640) from the surface (0 to 0.1 m) and sub-surface (0.3 to 0.6 m). Soil samples were collected from urban and rural areas of low disturbance, away from point sources of contamination. Samples were analysed for metals/metalloids and soil physical and chemical properties. Statistical review of results included regression and multivariate analysis. The results of the soil survey were compared against geochemical relationships reported within Australia and internationally. Compilation of results from this study and international data sets, indicates that geochemical relationships for metals Cr and V (in the format of log[Cr] = alog[Fe] +c) are predictable, not only between soils derived from different parent materials, but also between soils of different continents. Conversely, relationships between Zn and Fe, Pb and Fe, Cu and Fe, Co and Mn are variable, particularly within soils derived from alluvial sediments, which may have undergone periods of reducing conditions, resulting in dissociation from metal oxides. Broad

  7. Using biofilms and grazing chironomids (Diptera: Chironomidae) to determine primary production, nitrogen stable isotopic baseline and enrichment within wetlands differing in anthropogenic stressors and located in the Athabasca oil sands region of Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, K.; Ciborowski, J.J. [Windsor Univ., Windsor, ON (Canada); Wytrykush, C.M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study that investigated the effects of oil sands process materials (OSPM) and construction disturbances on primary production and nitrogen stable isotope enrichment in reclaimed and reference wetlands at oil sands mines in the Athabasca basin. Productivity and food web analyses were instrumental in evaluating the succession and viability of reclaimed wetlands. Primary production was estimated through chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations and biomass. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope ratios were used to identify energy sources, storage and the magnitude and direction of energy transfer within food webs. The objectives were to determine primary productivity, the N baseline, and N enrichment from biofilms and grazing invertebrates colonizing artificial substrates immersed in the water column of two OSPM-affected, two constructed reference and two natural reference wetlands. The lower biomass and Chl a concentrations in OSPM-affected and constructed wetlands suggests that both anthropogenic disturbance and OSPM have an adverse effect on primary productivity and overall wetland function.

  8. Organic geochemical constraints on paleoelevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, P. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Currie, B. S.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The elevation history of the land surface is an important factor in the interpretation of past tectonic, climate and ecological processes. However, quantitative estimates of paleoelevation are difficult to produce and new techniques are needed. Organic geochemical approaches to quantifying paleoelevations provide a new perspective on this difficult task. The hydrogen isotopic composition of organic biomarker molecules synthesized by plants and algae is systematically related to the water used for growth. Organic molecules in ancient sediments can provide values for the isotopic composition of this water and thus elevation, provided the relationship between elevation and isotopic values is known. Molecular hydrogen isotope ratios from Cenozoic lake sediments on the Tibetan Plateau demonstrate the utility of a biomarker approach. Terrestrial plant-wax D/H values on Neogene sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin provide new paleoelevation estimates that compare well with previous studies. Plant wax D/H ratios paired with lacustrine carbonate oxygen isotope values from the Lunpola and Hoh-Xil basins illustrate how paired isotope systems can unravel the isotopic composition of precipitation from evaporative enrichment of lake waters. A potentially fruitful avenue for future research is illustrated by D/H analyses on older sediments from the Namling-Oiyug Basin. These sediments—like many that could be useful for paleoaltimetry—have experienced significant burial and heating. As temperatures approach the oil window it becomes possible to exchange hydrogen in both the extractable organic molecules (bitumen) and the insoluble organic residue (kerogen). The extent to which this exchange alters the original isotopic composition will determine the usefulness of D/H analyses on thermally mature organic matter. The potential payoff and pitfalls of D/H analyses on heated sediments is illustrated with thermally immature and mature samples from the Namling-Oiyug Basin.

  9. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  10. Telescoping ore targets by geochemical exploration at multiple scales in Eastern Yunnan Pt geochemical province,southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Platinum has been one of the highly needed mineral resources in China.The geochemical exploration at two survey scales was applied in telescoping ore targets for the first time in Eastern Yunnan Pt geochemical province that was delineated using Pt data from flood plain sediments with extra-low sampling density.Our study was based on the delineations and assessments of both regional and local Pt anomalies using the Pt data by analyzing with C-OES the composite samples with two sampling densities.The composite samples were obtained by recomposing at two sampling densities the original stream sediment samples collected by the National Geochemical Mapping Project.Semivariograms were used to quantitatively describe the variability of Pt anomalies and further analyze the factors controlling the variability.Pt resource potentials of both the regional Pt anomalies and the local Pt anomalies in the study area were estimated based on the geochemical block methods,respectively.It comes to the conclusions as follows.(1) From the regional to local Pt anomaly,the factors controlling their variability from the deep seated faults-basalts turn into the basalts-branch faults,which suggest that Semivariograms could identify the geological factors controlling the variability of the Pt anomalies identified by the Pt data from the stream sediments with different sampling densities.(2) There exist two types of Pt anomalies in the study area.One is those displaying at sampling densities,and its average Pt concentration significantly increases with sampling density increasing.The other is getting weaker and/or disappears with sampling density increasing.This shows that TOTGEMS could gradu-ally eliminate non-ore anomalies and keep ore anomalies.(3) The average Pt concentration of the local Pt anomaly blocks delineated using Pt data from stream sediments with sampling density of one composite per 16 km2 is twice as much as that of the regional Pt anomaly blocks delineated using Pt data from

  11. Geochemical characterization of groundwater discharging from springs north of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, 2009–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Tillman, Fred D; Anderson, Jessica R.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Bills, Donald J.

    2017-08-01

    A geochemical study was conducted on 37 springs discharging from the Toroweap Formation, Coconino Sandstone, Hermit Formation, Supai Group, and Redwall Limestone north of the Grand Canyon near areas of breccia-pipe uranium mining. Baseline concentrations were established for the elements As, B, Li, Se, SiO2, Sr, Tl, U, and V. Three springs exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards: Fence Spring for arsenic, Pigeon Spring for selenium and uranium, and Willow (Hack) Spring for selenium. The majority of the spring sites had uranium values of less than 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L), but six springs discharging from all of the geologic units studied that are located stratigraphically above the Redwall Limestone had uranium values greater than 10 μg/L (Cottonwood [Tuckup], Grama, Pigeon, Rock, and Willow [Hack and Snake Gulch] Springs). The geochemical characteristics of these six springs with elevated uranium include Ca-Mg-SO4 water type, circumneutral pH, high specific conductance, correlation and multivariate associations between U, Mo, Sr, Se, Li, and Zn, low 87Sr/86Sr, low 234U/238U activity ratios (1.34–2.31), detectable tritium, and carbon isotopic interpretation indicating they may be a mixture of modern and pre-modern waters. Similar geochemical compositions of spring waters having elevated uranium concentrations are observed at sites located both near and away from sites of uranium-mining activities in the present study. Therefore, mining does not appear to explain the presence of elevated uranium concentrations in groundwater at the six springs noted above. The elevated uranium at the six previously mentioned springs may be influenced by iron mineralization associated with mineralized breccia pipe deposits. Six springs discharging from the Coconino Sandstone (Upper Jumpup, Little, Horse, and Slide Springs) and Redwall Limestone (Kanab and Side Canyon Springs) contained water with corrected radiocarbon ages as much as 9

  12. Mode S Baseline Radar Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    range units and 20 azimuth units) overlaying the position of the beacon reports. In the cases analyzed where beacon reports were not radar reinforced ...82/53 j~ C ~ 7 C _ _ _ _ _ _ 4. Title end Su.btitle 5. Neget at. November 1982 MDDE S BASELINE RADAR TRACKIN4G 6. Poelin Orgeuianti.. Cede ACT-100...Ground Clutter 33 Mode S/ARTS III 100-Scan False Radar Track Summary 74 34 Percent Beacon Radar Reinforcement 77 vii INTRODUCTION PURPOSE. The purpose of

  13. DEEP-LEVEL GEODYNAMICS: BOUNDARIES OF THE PROCESS ACCORDING TO GEOCHEMIC AND PETROLOGIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei V. Ivanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical features for volcanic rocks and petrologic data for deep-seated inclusions, which can be used to infer mass transfer between different geospheres, are reviewed. It is typically believed that slabs can subduct as deep as the core-mantle boundary with the following recycling by plumes coming up to the sublithospheric regions of magma generation. However, the petrologic evidence of the deepest accessible material is limited by the depth of the uppermost lower mantle (~650–700km, i.e. by the depth of the deepest earthquakes. Ferropericlase inclusions in some diamonds do not exclude involvement of deeper mantle horizons, yet do not unambiguously support it. No unambiguous confirmation of involvement of the lower mantle into magma generation underneath volcanically active regions is obtained from geochemical data either, while the geochemical data suggest complete chemical isolation of the Earth’s core from the upper mantle processes.

  14. The WITCH Model. Structure, Baseline, Solutions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosetti, V.; Massetti, E.; Tavoni, M.

    2007-07-01

    WITCH - World Induced Technical Change Hybrid - is a regionally disaggregated hard link hybrid global model with a neoclassical optimal growth structure (top down) and an energy input detail (bottom up). The model endogenously accounts for technological change, both through learning curves affecting prices of new vintages of capital and through R and D investments. The model features the main economic and environmental policies in each world region as the outcome of a dynamic game. WITCH belongs to the class of Integrated Assessment Models as it possesses a climate module that feeds climate changes back into the economy. In this paper we provide a thorough discussion of the model structure and baseline projections. We report detailed information on the evolution of energy demand, technology and CO2 emissions. Finally, we explicitly quantifiy the role of free riding in determining the emissions scenarios. (auth)

  15. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  16. 沧州地区微咸水水化学特征及灌溉水质评价%Geochemical Characteristics and Irrigation Water Quality Evaluation of Salinewater in Cangzhou Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何锦; 范基姣; 刘元晴; 付雷; 李文鹏

    2016-01-01

    随着我国利用微咸水灌溉面积逐年增加,灌溉水质安全问题显得非常重要。以沧州中部微咸水分布区为典型研究区,采用统计分析、相关性分析及同位素分析等方法来研究区域内微咸水的水化学特征和补给来源,同时利用全盐量(以电导率EC指示)和钠吸附比( SAR)两个指标来综合评价灌溉水质。结果发现:浅层地下水类型多为Cl-Na型,来自全新世以来的降雨补给,盐分来源于海相沉积地层中的盐岩溶解;地表水的水化学类型多为Cl·SO4-Na·Mg型,主要补给来源为浅层地下水,盐分受蒸发作用控制;利用当地微咸水灌溉均会产生盐害和碱害,但碱害程度小于盐害程度,其中地表水灌溉盐化危害程度为低-中度,地下水灌溉引起盐化程度为中-重度。%As irrigation area used by saline water increasing every year, people pay more and more attention to the security of irrigation water quality in our country. As typical study region, central Cangzhou was studied in saline water chemical characteristics and recharge source by statistical analysis, correlation analysis and isotope analysis and etc. At the same time, the quality of irrigation water in the region was comprehensively evaluated by electric conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio ( SAR ) indexes in this paper. Research shows that the chemical type of shallow groundwater is largely Cl⁃Na, recharged by precipitation since the Holocene, the salinity of shallow groundwater source is from saltrocks dissolving in marine sedimentary strata. Moreover, the chemical type of surface water is mainly Cl·SO4⁃Na·Mg, recharged by shallow groundwater and the salinity in surface water controlled by evaporation. In this region, it can produce salt damage and alkali injury if it is irrigated by saline water, however, the alkali injury degree is less than salt damage. The salinization hazard degree irrigated by surface

  17. The geochemical atlas of Alaska, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory K.; Yager, Douglas B.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Granitto, Matthew; Denning, Paul D.; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.

    2016-06-21

    A rich legacy of geochemical data produced since the early 1960s covers the great expanse of Alaska; careful treatment of such data may provide significant and revealing geochemical maps that may be used for landscape geochemistry, mineral resource exploration, and geoenvironmental investigations over large areas. To maximize the spatial density and extent of data coverage for statewide mapping of element distributions, we compiled and integrated analyses of more than 175,000 sediment and soil samples from three major, separate sources: the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys geochemical databases. Various types of heterogeneity and deficiencies in these data presented major challenges to our development of coherently integrated datasets for modeling and mapping of element distributions. Researchers from many different organizations and disparate scientific studies collected samples that were analyzed using highly variable methods throughout a time period of more than 50 years, during which many changes in analytical techniques were developed and applied. Despite these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey has produced a new systematically integrated compilation of sediment and soil geochemical data with an average sample site density of approximately 1 locality per 10 square kilometers (km2) for the entire State of Alaska, although density varies considerably among different areas. From that compilation, we have modeled and mapped the distributions of 68 elements, thus creating an updated geochemical atlas for the State.

  18. Lithology, mineralogy and geochemical characterizations of sediment-hosted Sr-F deposits in the eastern Neo-Tethyan region - With special reference to evaporation and halokinesis in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, H. G.; Nolte, N.; Hansen, B. T.

    2014-04-01

    The Neo-Tethyan basin is known for its sediment-hosted Sr deposits in Spain, Turkey, Cyprus, and the Gulf Region. Sediment-hosted Sr-F deposits with base metals formed in the rim sinks and on top of salt domes resulting from halokinesis of Triassic evaporites near the southern edge of the Mediterranean Sea in Tunisia. These evaporites delivered part of the elements, created a basin-and-swell topography and provided the local and regional unconformities to which many of the mineral deposits are related. Five mineralizing processes, each with characteristic sedimentary ore textures, are related to this subsurface salt movement: (1 + 2) Early- and late-stage replacement ("zebra rocks"), (3) hydraulic fracturing ("fitting breccia" sensuDill and Weber, 2010b), (4) remobilization ("spinifex structures"), and (5) open-space filling ("caves and vein-like deposits"). Basinal brines from Mesozoic aquifers delivered Pb, Zn, Cd, REE, Y, Hg, and Se, while Sr, Cs, Be, Li, Cu and Co have been derived from Cenozoic salinas of the Neo-Tethyan basin. Mixing of Mesozoic and Cenozoic brines between 28 and 19 Ma provoked the emplacement of Sr-F mineralization at temperatures below 200 °C under strong alkaline conditions. Epigenetic polyphase Sr-F deposits bearing base-metals which are closely related to salt domes (Tunisian-Type) may be traced into epigenetic monophase Sr deposits within bioherms (Cyprus-Type) devoid of Pb, Zn and F. Moving eastward, syndiagenetic monophase Sr deposits in biostromes (Gulf-Type) herald the beginning of Sr concentration in Miocene sabkhas of the Neo-Tethys. The current results are based upon field-related sediment petrography and on mineralogical studies, which were supplemented by chemical studies. The present studies bridge the gap between epigenetic carbonate-hosted MVT and syndiagenetic evaporite deposits, both of which developed during the same time span (Neogene) and were hosted by the same environment (near-shore marine marginal facies of the Neo

  19. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Diwan, M V; Qian, X; Rubbia, A

    2016-01-01

    We review long-baseline neutrino experiments in which neutrinos are detected after traversing macroscopic distances. Over such distances neutrinos have been found to oscillate among flavor states. Experiments with solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrinos have resulted in a coherent picture of neutrino masses and mixing of the three known flavor states. We will summarize the current best knowledge of neutrino parameters and phenomenology with our focus on the evolution of the experimental technique. We proceed from the first evidence produced by astrophysical neutrino sources to the current open questions and the goals of future research.

  20. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, M. V.; Galymov, V.; Qian, X.; Rubbia, A.

    2016-10-01

    We review long-baseline neutrino experiments in which neutrinos are detected after traversing macroscopic distances. Over such distances neutrinos have been found to oscillate among flavor states. Experiments with solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrinos have resulted in a coherent picture of neutrino masses and mixing of the three known flavor states. We summarize the current best knowledge of neutrino parameters and phenomenology, with a focus on the evolution of the experimental technique. We proceed from the first evidence produced by astrophysical neutrino sources to the current open questions and the goals of future research.

  1. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  2. Baseline Estimates of Adherence to American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Board of Internal Medicine Choosing Wisely Initiative Among Patients With Cancer Enrolled With a Large Regional Commercial Health Insurer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D; Fedorenko, Catherine; Chauhan, Rakesh; McGee, Richard; Lyman, Gary H; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Bansal, Aasthaa

    2015-07-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Choosing Wisely (CW) measures aim to reduce the use of interventions that lack evidence of benefit in cancer care. The study presented here characterized adherence to the 2012 ASCO/ABIM CW recommendations by linking health plan claims data with a regional cancer registry and sought to identify areas for research interventions to improve adherence. SEER records for patients diagnosed with cancer in Western Washington State between 2007 and 2014 were linked with enrollment and claims from a large regional commercial insurance plan. Using claims and SEER records, algorithms were developed to characterize adherence to each CW measure. In addition, we calculated differences in total reimbursements and procedure-specific reimbursements for patients receiving adherent and nonadherent care. A total of 22,359 unique individuals with cancer were linked with insurance enrollment records and met basic eligibility criteria. Overall adherence varied from 53% (breast surveillance) to 78% (breast staging). Within each measure, adherence varied substantially by stage at diagnosis and by cancer site in situations in which the CW measure affected multiple types of cancer. The difference in reimbursements between adherent and nonadherent populations across all five measures was approximately $29 million. Adherence to the ASCO/ABIM CW measures varies widely, as does the cost implication of nonadherence. A structured approach to evaluating adherence and cost impact is needed before developing programs aimed at improving adherence to the ASCO/ABIM CW measures. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. FED baseline engineering studies report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, P.H.

    1983-04-01

    Studies were carried out on the FED Baseline to improve design definition, establish feasibility, and reduce cost. Emphasis was placed on cost reduction, but significant feasibility concerns existed in several areas, and better design definition was required to establish feasibility and provide a better basis for cost estimates. Design definition and feasibility studies included the development of a labyrinth shield ring concept to prevent radiation streaming between the torus spool and the TF coil cryostat. The labyrinth shield concept which was developed reduced radiation streaming sufficiently to permit contact maintenance of the inboard EF coils. Various concepts of preventing arcing between adjacent shield sectors were also explored. It was concluded that installation of copper straps with molybdenum thermal radiation shields would provide the most reliable means of preventing arcing. Other design studies included torus spool electrical/structural concepts, test module shielding, torus seismic response, poloidal conditions in the magnets, disruption characteristics, and eddy current effects. These additional studies had no significant impact on cost but did confirm the feasibility of the basic FED Baseline concept.

  4. Development of thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.C. [Monitor Scientific, L.L.C., Denver, Colorado (United States); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Neyama, Atsushi [Computer Software Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Two thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations supporting research and development on geological disposal concepts for high level radioactive waste are described in this report. One, SPRONS.JNC, is compatible with thermodynamic relations comprising the SUPCRT model and software, which permits calculation of the standard molal and partial molal thermodynamic properties of minerals, gases, aqueous species and reactions from 1 to 5000 bars and 0 to 1000degC. This database includes standard molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard molal entropies and volumes, and Maier-Kelly heat capacity coefficients at the reference pressure (1 bar) and temperature (25degC) for 195 minerals and 16 gases. It also includes standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard partial molal entropies, and Helgeson, Kirkham and Flowers (HKF) equation-of-state coefficients at the reference pressure and temperature for 1147 inorganic and organic aqueous ions and complexes. SPRONS.JNC extends similar databases described elsewhere by incorporating new and revised data published in the peer-reviewed literature since 1991. The other database, PHREEQE.JNC, is compatible with the PHREEQE series of geochemical modeling codes. It includes equilibrium constants at 25degC and l bar for mineral-dissolution, gas-solubility, aqueous-association and oxidation-reduction reactions. Reaction enthalpies, or coefficients in an empirical log K(T) function, are also included in this database, which permits calculation of equilibrium constants between 0 and 100degC at 1 bar. All equilibrium constants, reaction enthalpies, and log K(T) coefficients in PHREEQE.JNC are calculated using SUPCRT and SPRONS.JNC, which ensures that these two databases are mutually consistent. They are also internally consistent insofar as all the data are compatible with basic thermodynamic definitions and functional relations in the SUPCRT model, and because primary

  5. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-06-01

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  6. TWRS privatization process technical baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, R.M.

    1996-09-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is planning a two-phased program for the remediation of Hanford tank waste. Phase 1 is a pilot program to demonstrate the procurement of treatment services. The volume of waste treated during the Phase 1 is a small percentage of the tank waste. During Phase 2, DOE intends to procure treatment services for the balance of the waste. The TWRS Privatization Process Technical Baseline (PPTB) provides a summary level flowsheet/mass balance of tank waste treatment operations which is consistent with the tank inventory information, waste feed staging studies, and privatization guidelines currently available. The PPTB will be revised periodically as privatized processing concepts are crystallized.

  7. Integrated Baseline Review (IBR) Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jon F.; Kehrer, Kristen C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is intended to be a how-to guide to prepare for, conduct, and close-out an Integrated Baseline Review (IBR). It discusses the steps that should be considered, describes roles and responsibilities, tips for tailoring the IBR based on risk, cost, and need for management insight, and provides lessons learned from past IBRs. Appendices contain example documentation typically used in connection with an IBR. Note that these appendices are examples only, and should be tailored to meet the needs of individual projects and contracts. Following the guidance in this handbook will help customers and suppliers preparing for an IBR understand the expectations of the IBR, and ensure that the IBR meets the requirements for both in-house and contract efforts.

  8. Vegetation baseline report : Connacher great divide project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-08-01

    This baseline report supported an application by Connacher Oil and Gas Ltd. to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environment (AENV) for the Great Divide Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) Project. The goal of the report was to document the distribution and occurrence of ecosite phases and wetland classes in the project footprint as well as to document the distribution of rare plants; rare plant communities: and intrusive species and old growth communities, including species of management concern. A methodology of the baseline report was presented, including details of mapping and field surveys. Six vegetation types in addition to the disturbed land unit were identified in the project footprint and associated buffer. It was noted that all vegetation types are common for the boreal forest natural regions. Several species of management concern were identified during the spring rare plant survey, including rare bryophytes and non-native or invasive species. Mitigation was identified through a slight shift of the footprint, transplant of appropriate bryophyte species and implementation of a weed management plan. It was noted that results of future surveys for rare plants will be submitted upon completion. It was concluded that the effects of the project on existing vegetation is expected to be low because of the small footprint, prior disturbance history, available mitigation measures and conservation and reclamation planning. 27 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Helium and lead isotopes reveal the geochemical geometry of the Samoan plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M G; Hart, S R; Konter, J G; Kurz, M D; Blusztajn, J; Farley, K A

    2014-10-16

    Hotspot lavas erupted at ocean islands exhibit tremendous isotopic variability, indicating that there are numerous mantle components hosted in upwelling mantle plumes that generate volcanism at hotspots like Hawaii and Samoa. However, it is not known how the surface expression of the various geochemical components observed in hotspot volcanoes relates to their spatial distribution within the plume. Here we present a relationship between He and Pb isotopes in Samoan lavas that places severe constraints on the distribution of geochemical species within the plume. The Pb-isotopic compositions of the Samoan lavas reveal several distinct geochemical groups, each corresponding to a different geographic lineament of volcanoes. Each group has a signature associated with one of four mantle endmembers with low (3)He/(4)He: EMII (enriched mantle 2), EMI (enriched mantle 1), HIMU (high µ = (238)U/(204)Pb) and DM (depleted mantle). Critically, these four geochemical groups trend towards a common region of Pb-isotopic space with high (3)He/(4)He. This observation is consistent with several low-(3)He/(4)He components in the plume mixing with a common high-(3)He/(4)He component, but not mixing much with each other. The mixing relationships inferred from the new He and Pb isotopic data provide the clearest picture yet of the geochemical geometry of a mantle plume, and are best explained by a high-(3)He/(4)He plume matrix that hosts, and mixes with, several distinct low-(3)He/(4)He components.

  10. Evolution of Geochemical Variations Along the Central American Volcanic Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, I. S.; Gazel, E.; Condie, C.; Carr, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    New geochemical analyses of volcanic rocks in El Salvador add to existing data from Nicaragua and Costa Rica to create a comprehensive set of geochemical data for Central American volcanics. These data coupled with previously published 40Ar/39Ar ages covering the past 30 Ma shows that Costa Rica and Nicaragua had similar U/Th and Ba/La values until 10 Ma when the region developed the distinctive along arc variations that made this margin famous. U/Th values increased in Nicaragua since the Miocene, while remaining unchanged along the rest of the volcanic front. This coincides temporally with the Carbonate Crash, which caused a transition in Cocos plate sediments from low-U carbonates to high-U, organic rich hemipelagic muds. Increases in uranium are not observed in Costa Rica because its lower slab dip produces a more diffuse zone of partial melting and because of the contribution from Galapagos-derived tracks dilutes this signal. Ba/La has been used as a geochemical proxy for contributions from the subducting slab, however our analyses indicate that the Ba concentrations do not vary significantly along strike either in the subducting sediment or the volcanic front. Along-arc variation is controlled by changes in La, an indicator of the degree of partial melting or source enrichment. Trace element models of five segments of the volcanic front suggest that a subducting sediment component is more important to magmas produced in El Salvador and Nicaragua than in Costa Rica, where the geochemistry is controlled by recent (<10 Ma) recycling of Galapagos tracks.

  11. Geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of volcanic rocks from Tamulangou Formation in Erguna Region, northern Da Hinggan Mountain%大兴安岭北部额尔古纳地区塔木兰沟组火山岩岩石地球化学特征及成因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛安琦; 孙德有; 苟军; 李旭; 杨爱雪; 杨东光

    2016-01-01

    额尔古纳地区塔木兰沟组火山岩的岩石地球化学成分显示其以粗安岩为主,少量安山岩和玄武安山岩。该组火山岩SiO2含量为53.47%~58.50%,全碱含量为[w(K2 O+Na2 O)]4.27%~7.68%, w(MgO)=1.76%~4.03%,Mg#=0.34~0.51;微量元素分析表明,稀土元素配分模式呈轻稀土富集右倾型,轻重稀土元素分馏较强[(La/Yb)N =16.35~33.73],富集Rb、Ba、K、Sr等大离子亲石元素(LILE),亏损Nb、Ta等高场强元素(HFSE),Eu负异常不明显(δEu=0.89~0.92)。地球化学等特征表明塔木兰沟组火山岩未经受明显的地壳物质混染,岩浆来源于俯冲流体交代形成的富集岩石圈地幔,经历了以分离结晶作用为主导的演化过程。综合研究认为,额尔古纳地区塔木兰沟组火山岩形成于岩石圈伸展构造环境,与蒙古—鄂霍茨克洋闭合后的后造山伸展体制有关。%Geochemical study of the volcanic rocks from Tamulangou Formation in Erguna region suggested they are mainly composed of trachyandesite with a small amount of andesite and basaltic andesite.The volcanic rocks exhibitted w (SiO2)as 53. 47%~58. 50%,total alkali content [w (K2O+Na2O)]as 4. 27%~7. 68%, w (MgO)as 1 . 76%~4. 03%,and Mg#as 0. 34 ~0. 51 .The chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE ) patterns displayed the characteristics of rightward sloping with high fractionation of LREE and HREE [(La/Yb)N=1 6. 35 ~33. 73].The volcanic rocks are riched in LILE (e. g.Rb,Ba,K and Sr),and deficited in HFSE (e. g.Nb and Ta),with weak Eu negative anomalies (δEu=0. 70~0. 93).The geochemical characteristics indi-cate that the magma source of the volcanic rocks in the Tamulangou Formation derived from the enriched lithospher-ic mantle formed by metasomatism of subduction fluids,and underwent the evolutionary process dominated by the fractional crystallization without significant crustal

  12. Metallogenetic and geochemical provinces : book review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    In November 1972 a symposium on metallogenetic and geochemical provinces was organized in Leoben by Prof. W.E. Petrascheck; the proceedings of this symposium have now appeared. The book is recommended to all those who want to combine their interest in economic geology with a somewhat wider

  13. Metallogenetic and geochemical provinces : book review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    In November 1972 a symposium on metallogenetic and geochemical provinces was organized in Leoben by Prof. W.E. Petrascheck; the proceedings of this symposium have now appeared. The book is recommended to all those who want to combine their interest in economic geology with a somewhat wider outlook i

  14. Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph N. Moore

    2007-12-31

    . In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

  15. Alaska Geochemical Database, Version 2.0 (AGDB2)--including “best value” data compilations for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2) contains new geochemical data compilations in which each geologic material sample has one “best value” determination for each analyzed species, greatly improving speed and efficiency of use. Like the Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/637/) before it, the AGDB2 was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This relational database, created from the Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) that was released in 2011, serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables in several different formats describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel and analyzed in U.S. Geological Survey laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various U.S. Geological Survey programs and projects from 1962 through 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB2 includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the U.S. Geological Survey Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the U.S. Geological Survey PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate

  16. The Earth's heterogeneous mantle a geophysical, geodynamical, and geochemical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Amir

    2015-01-01

    This book highlights and discusses recent developments that have contributed to an improved understanding of observed mantle heterogeneities and their relation to the thermo-chemical state of Earth's mantle, which ultimately holds the key to unlocking the secrets of the evolution of our planet. This series of topical reviews and original contributions address 4 themes. Theme 1 covers topics in geophysics, including global and regional seismic tomography, electrical conductivity and seismic imaging of mantle discontinuities and heterogeneities in the upper mantle, transition zone and lower mantle. Theme 2 addresses geochemical views of the mantle including lithospheric evolution from analysis of mantle xenoliths, composition of the deep Earth and the effect of water on subduction-zone processes. Theme 3 discusses geodynamical perspectives on the global thermo-chemical structure of the deep mantle. Theme 4 covers application of mineral physics data and phase equilibrium computations to infer the regional-scale ...

  17. Geobiochemistry: Placing Biochemistry in Its Geochemical Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E.; Boyer, G. M.; Canovas, P. A., III; Prasad, A.; Dick, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Goals of geobiochemistry include simultaneously evaluating the relative stabilities of microbial cells and minerals, and predicting how the composition of biomolecules can change in response to the progress of geochemical reactions. Recent developments in theoretical geochemistry make it possible to predict standard thermodynamic properties of proteins, nucleotides, lipids, and many metabolites including the constituents of the citric acid cycle, at all temperatures and pressures where life is known to occur, and beyond. Combining these predictions with constraints from geochemical data makes it possible to assess the relative stabilities of biomolecules. Resulting independent predictions of the environmental occurrence of homologous proteins and lipid side-chains can be compared with observations from metagenomic and metalipidomic data to quantify geochemical driving forces that shape the composition of biomolecules. In addition, the energetic costs of generating biomolecules from within a diverse range of habitable environments can be evaluated in terms of prevailing geochemical variables. Comparisons of geochemical bioenergetic calculations across habitats leads to the generalization that the availability of H2 determines the cost of autotrophic biosynthesis relative to the aquatic environment external to microbial cells, and that pH, temperature, pressure, and availability of C, N, P, and S are typically secondary. Increasingly reduced conditions, which are determined by reactions of water with mineral surfaces and mineral assemblages, allow many biosynthetic reactions to shift from costing energy to releasing energy. Protein and lipid synthesis, as well as the reverse citric acid cycle, become energy-releasing processes under these conditions. The resulting energy balances that determine habitability contrast dramatically with assumptions derived from oxic surface conditions, such as those where human biochemistry operates.

  18. Geochemical landscape strategy in monitoring the areas contaminated by the Chernobyl radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobova, E.M.; Linnik, V.G. (Department of Geoinformation Investigations, Russian Scientific-Practical and Expert-Analytical Centre (RNEC), Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1993-12-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to radionuclide contamination of vast areas that now need to be monitored; the development of a regional land use strategy is now needed. Landscape geochemistry enables us to structure, classify and map the environmental factors responsible for the redistribution of radionuclides (i.e. soil-forming rocks and soil properties, vegetation cover, types of ground water migration, and vertical and lateral geochemical barriers). Combined with land use information, regional geochemical landscape maps serve as the basis to map in toposequence conditions of mass migration and accumulation in natural and cultivated landscapes. Such mapping makes it easier to choose representative monitoring sites. This type of mapping is also helpful to interrelate and extrapolate the data already obtained on radionuclides' environmental migration for different groups of geochemical landscapes with similar types of contamination, migration and accumulation patterns. A geochemical landscape approach is demonstrated using the example of part of the Bryansk region (Russia), which is considerably contaminated with [sup 134]Cs and [sup 137]Cs.

  19. Geochemical Mapping of 4 Vesta Begins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Feldman, William C.; Forni, Olivier; Joy, Steven P.; Lawrence, David J.; LeCorre, Lucille; Mafi, Joseph N.; McCord, Thomas B.; McCoy, Timothy J.; McSween, Harry Y.; Middlefehldt, David W.; Polanskey, Carol; Rayman, Marc; Raymond, Carol A.; Reddy, Vishnu; Reedy, Robert C.; Russell, Christopher T.; Titus, Timothy N.; Toplis, Mike J.

    2011-01-01

    By December, the NASA Dawn spacecraft will have descended to a low altitude mapping orbit (LAMO), where the Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) will acquire global mapping data for up to four months. Measurements by GRaND will help answer elusive questions about how Vesta differentiated and the nature of processes that shaped Vesta s surface. The data will be analyzed to determine the abundances of Mg, Si, Fe, K, Th, and H at a spatial resolution of roughly 300 km full-width-at-half-maximum from a 465 km radius orbit. Thermal and fast neutron counting data will be analyzed to determine the neutron macroscopic absorption cross section and average atomic mass, providing constraints on additional elements, such as Ca and Al. GRaND will quantify the elemental composition of coarse spatial units identified by Dawn s Framing Camera (FC) and the Visible & Infrared Spectrometer (VIR). In addition, GRaND will map the mixing ratio of compositional end members selected from the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites, determine the relative proportions of plagioclase and mafic minerals, and search for compositions that are absent or under-represented in the meteorite collection. While it is generally thought that Vesta s crust on a regional scale should be well-represented by linear mixing of HED whole-rock compositions, there are hints that Vesta may be more diverse than implied by this model. For example, the discovery of K-rich impact glasses in howardites suggests that K-rich rocks may be present on a portion of Vesta s surface, and the analysis of diogenites indicates considerable variability in the magmatic processes that formed them. The chemical composition of materials within Vesta s south polar structure may provide further clues to how it formed. An impact might have exposed mantle and lower crustal materials, which should have a distinctive compositional signature. We present the analysis of data acquired by GRaND from cruise through the descent to

  20. 2016 Annual Technology Baseline (ATB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley; Kurup, Parthiv; Hand, Maureen; Feldman, David; Sigrin, Benjamin; Lantz, Eric; Stehly, Tyler; Augustine, Chad; Turchi, Craig; O' Connor, Patrick; Waldoch, Connor

    2016-09-01

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), National Renewable Energy Laboratory provides an organized and centralized dataset that was reviewed by internal and external experts. It uses the best information from the Department of Energy laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information. The ATB includes both a presentation with notes (PDF) and an associated Excel Workbook. The ATB includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind; offshore wind; utility-scale solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to existing facilities, powering non-powered dams, and new stream-reach development); conventional coal; coal with carbon capture and sequestration; integrated gasification combined cycle coal; natural gas combustion turbines; natural gas combined cycle; conventional biopower. Nuclear laboratory's renewable energy analysts and Energy Information Administration information for conventional technologies. The ATB will be updated annually in order to provide an up-to-date repository of current and future cost and performance data. Going forward, we plan to revise and refine the values using best available information.

  1. 2016 Annual Technology Baseline (ATB) - Webinar Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley; Kurup, Parthiv; Hand, Maureen; Feldman, David; Sigrin, Benjamin; Lantz, Eric; Stehly, Tyler; Augustine, Chad; Turchi, Craig; Porro, Gian; O' Connor, Patrick; Waldoch, Connor

    2016-09-13

    This deck was presented for the 2016 Annual Technology Baseline Webinar. The presentation describes the Annual Technology Baseline, which is a compilation of current and future cost and performance data for electricity generation technologies.

  2. Geochemical mapping of New Mexico, USA, using stream sediment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumlot, Taisser; Goodell, Philip; Howari, Fares

    2009-10-01

    The spatial analysis of geochemical data has several environmental and geological applications. The present study investigated the regional distribution of Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sc, Th, Ti, U, V, and Zn elements in stream sediment samples from New Mexico State. These elements were studied in order to integrate them with geological and environmental characteristics of the area. Data are used from 27,798 samples that were originally collected during the national uranium resource evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance (HSSR) program in the 1970s. The original data are available as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 97-492. The study used a variety of data processing and filtering techniques that included univariate, bivariate, factor analyses and spatial analyses to transform the data into a useable format. Principal component analysis and GIS techniques are applied to classify the elements and to identify geochemical signatures, either natural or anthropogenic. The study found that the distribution of the investigated elements is mainly controlled by the bed rock chemistry. For example, along the Rio Grande rift and Jemez lineament a strong association between Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Sc, Ti, V and Zn was observed and indicates that elements distribution in the area controlled by the mafic factor. The rare earth elements (REE) factor which is consists of Ce, La and U, also has strong, localized, clusters in the felsic centers in New Mexico.

  3. Impact of geochemical stressors on shallow groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y.-J.; Kampbell, D.H.; Jeong, S.-W.; Jewell, K.P.; Masoner, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Groundwater monitoring wells (about 70 wells) were extensively installed in 28 sites surrounding Lake Texoma, located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas, to assess the impact of geochemical stressors to shallow groundwater quality. The monitoring wells were classified into three groups (residential area, agricultural area, and oil field area) depending on their land uses. During a 2-year period from 1999 to 2001 the monitoring wells were sampled every 3 months on a seasonal basis. Water quality assay consisted of 25 parameters including field parameters, nutrients, major ions, and trace elements. Occurrence and level of inorganics in groundwater samples were related to the land use and temporal change. Groundwater of the agricultural area showed lower levels of ferrous iron and nitrate than the residential area. The summer season data revealed more distinct differences in inorganic profiles of the two land use groundwater samples. There is a possible trend that nitrate concentrations in groundwater increased as the proportions of cultivated area increased. Water-soluble ferrous iron occurred primarily in water samples with a low dissolved oxygen concentration and/or a negative redox potential. The presence of brine waste in shallow groundwater was detected by chloride and conductivity in oil field area. Dissolved trace metals and volatile organic carbons were not in a form of concentration to be stressors. This study showed that the quality of shallow ground water could be related to regional geochemical stressors surrounding the lake. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Geochemical and geophysical monitoring of thermal waters in Sloveniain relation to seismic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dolenec, T.; Popit, A.; J. Vaupotic

    2005-01-01

    Pre-seismic related strains in the Earth s crust are the main cause of the observed geophysical and geochemical anomalies in ground waters preceding an earthquake. Posoc?je Region, situated along the Soc?a River, is one of the most seismically active areas of Slovenia. Our measuring stations close to the Posoc?je Region were installed in the thermal springs at Bled in 1998 and at Zatolmin in 1999. Since the beginning of our survey, radon concentration, electrical conductiv...

  5. Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-05-01

    The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

  6. 40 CFR 1042.825 - Baseline determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Baseline determination. 1042.825... Provisions for Remanufactured Marine Engines § 1042.825 Baseline determination. (a) For the purpose of this... not valid. (f) Use good engineering judgment for all aspects of the baseline determination. We may...

  7. A geochemical examination of humidity cell tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maest, Ann; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2017-01-01

    Humidity cell tests (HCTs) are long-term (20 to >300 weeks) leach tests that are considered by some to be the among the most reliable geochemical characterization methods for estimating the leachate quality of mined materials. A number of modifications have been added to the original HCT method, but the interpretation of test results varies widely. We suggest that the HCTs represent an underutilized source of geochemical data, with a year-long test generating approximately 2500 individual chemical data points. The HCT concentration peaks and valleys can be thought of as a “chromatogram” of reactions that may occur in the field, whereby peaks in concentrations are associated with different geochemical processes, including sulfate salt dissolution, sulfide oxidation, and dissolution of rock-forming minerals, some of which can neutralize acid. Some of these reactions occur simultaneously, some do not, and geochemical modeling can be used to help distinguish the dominant processes. Our detailed examination, including speciation and inverse modeling, of HCTs from three projects with different geology and mineralization shows that rapid sulfide oxidation dominates over a limited period of time that starts between 40 and 200 weeks of testing. The applicability of laboratory tests results to predicting field leachate concentrations, loads, or rates of reaction has not been adequately demonstrated, although early flush releases and rapid sulfide oxidation rates in HCTs should have some relevance to field conditions. Knowledge of possible maximum solute concentrations is needed to design effective treatment and mitigation approaches. Early flush and maximum sulfide oxidation results from HCTs should be retained and used in environmental models. Factors that complicate the use of HCTs include: sample representation, time for microbial oxidizers to grow, sample storage before testing, geochemical reactions that add or remove constituents, and the HCT results chosen for use

  8. Geochemical dynamics in selected Yellowstone hydrothermal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschel, G.; Kamyshny, A.; Findlay, A.; Nuzzio, D.

    2010-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park has a wide diversity of thermal features, and includes springs with a range of pH conditions that significantly impact sulfur speciation. We have utilized a combination of voltammetric and spectroscopic techniques to characterize the intermediate sulfur chemistry of Cinder Pool, Evening Primrose, Ojo Caliente, Frying Pan, Azure, and Dragon thermal springs. These measurements additionally have demonstrated the geochemical dynamics inherent in these systems; significant variability in chemical speciation occur in many of these thermal features due to changes in gas supply rates, fluid discharge rates, and thermal differences that occur on second time scales. The dynamics of the geochemical settings shown may significantly impact how microorganisms interact with the sulfur forms in these systems.

  9. Seeking a geochemical identifier for authigenic carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Yan-Yan

    2016-03-07

    Authigenic carbonate was recently invoked as a third major global carbon sink in addition to primary marine carbonate and organic carbon. Distinguishing the two carbonate sinks is fundamental to our understanding of Earth's carbon cycle and its role in regulating the evolution of atmospheric oxygen. Here, using microscale geochemical measurements of carbonates in Early Triassic strata, we show that the growth of authigenic carbonate follows a different trajectory from primary marine carbonate in a cross-plot of uranium concentration and carbon isotope composition. Thus, a combination of the two geochemical variables is able to distinguish between the two carbonate sinks. The temporal distribution of authigenic carbonates in the Early Triassic strata suggests that the increase in the extent of carbonate authigenesis acted as a negative feedback to the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  10. Geochemical Investigations of Respirable Particulate Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Jurinski, Joseph Bernard Jr.

    1998-01-01

    GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF RESPIRABLE PARTICULATE MATTER Joseph Bernard Jurinski (Abstract) Over the course of our lives we are exposed to airborne particulate matter in the workplace, home, and environment that results in the deposition of millions of particles in the lung. These exposures may result in disease if they are significant enough. The potential for harmful exposure depends in part on the dust's biodurability and the bioavailability of harmful constituents d...

  11. Geochemical data requirements for performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.; Stenhouse, M.J.

    1997-08-15

    This report reviews the geochemical data requirements and their application to the assessment of the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive wastes. It is concluded that information must be acquired on pH, redox reactions, inorganic and organic ligands in groundwater and colloids and processes such as precipitation, adsorption and diffusion and palaeohydrogeologic information in order to predict present hydrogeologic properties of potential repository sites. (UK).

  12. Geochemical quantification of semiarid mountain recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahi, Arun K; Hogan, James F; Ekwurzel, Brenda; Baillie, Matthew N; Eastoe, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of a typical semiarid mountain system recharge (MSR) setting demonstrates that geochemical tracers help resolve the location, rate, and seasonality of recharge as well as ground water flowpaths and residence times. MSR is defined as the recharge at the mountain front that dominates many semiarid basins plus the often-overlooked recharge through the mountain block that may be a significant ground water resource; thus, geochemical measurements that integrate signals from all flowpaths are advantageous. Ground water fluxes determined from carbon-14 ((14)C) age gradients imply MSR rates between 2 x 10(6) and 9 x 10(6) m(3)/year in the Upper San Pedro Basin, Arizona, USA. This estimated range is within an order of magnitude of, but lower than, prior independent estimates. Stable isotopic signatures indicate that MSR has a 65% +/- 25% contribution from winter precipitation and a 35% +/- 25% contribution from summer precipitation. Chloride and stable isotope results confirm that transpiration is the dominant component of evapotranspiration (ET) in the basin with typical loss of more than 90% of precipitation-less runoff to ET. Such geochemical constraints can be used to further refine hydrogeologic models in similar high-elevation relief basins and can provide practical first estimates of MSR rates for basins lacking extensive prior hydrogeologic measurements.

  13. Monitoring active volcanoes: The geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The geochemical surveillance of an active volcano aims to recognize possible signals that are related to changes in volcanic activity. Indeed, as a consequence of the magma rising inside the volcanic "plumbing system" and/or the refilling with new batches of magma, the dissolved volatiles in the magma are progressively released as a function of their relative solubilities. When approaching the surface, these fluids that are discharged during magma degassing can interact with shallow aquifers and/or can be released along the main volcano-tectonic structures. Under these conditions, the following main degassing processes represent strategic sites to be monitored.

    The main purpose of this special volume is to collect papers that cover a wide range of topics in volcanic fluid geochemistry, which include geochemical characterization and geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes using different techniques and at different sites. Moreover, part of this volume has been dedicated to the new geochemistry tools.

  14. Geochemical engineering and materials program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) was designated as lead agency in discharging the overall legislative mandate for federal R&D to assist the private sector in developing appropriate technology for exploiting geothermal energy resources. The Geochemical Engineering and Materials (GEM) Program was conceived, as part of DOE'S overall strategy, to address specific and plant-wide problems and uncertainties in the use of materials and in geochemical engineering. This program assists industry in the conduct of long-term,high-risk R&D needed to overcome the significant technical and economic GEM-related obstacles faced by developers and potential developers of this alternative energy source. The program focuses on: (1) Increasing the knowledge about the properties of materials and their performance under geothermal energy system conditions; (2) Developing and utilizing more reliable and/or cost-effective materials than previously available; and (3) Developing a greater understanding of and control over geochemical processes during fluid production and transport, energy conversion, and waste management. As a stand-alone program and as support to other DOE geothermal technology development programs, the GEM Program contributes to the feasibility of designing and operating efficient, reliable, and safe fluid handling and energy conversion systems.

  15. Camera Trajectory fromWide Baseline Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlena, M.; Torii, A.; Pajdla, T.

    2008-09-01

    Camera trajectory estimation, which is closely related to the structure from motion computation, is one of the fundamental tasks in computer vision. Reliable camera trajectory estimation plays an important role in 3D reconstruction, self localization, and object recognition. There are essential issues for a reliable camera trajectory estimation, for instance, choice of the camera and its geometric projection model, camera calibration, image feature detection and description, and robust 3D structure computation. Most of approaches rely on classical perspective cameras because of the simplicity of their projection models and ease of their calibration. However, classical perspective cameras offer only a limited field of view, and thus occlusions and sharp camera turns may cause that consecutive frames look completely different when the baseline becomes longer. This makes the image feature matching very difficult (or impossible) and the camera trajectory estimation fails under such conditions. These problems can be avoided if omnidirectional cameras, e.g. a fish-eye lens convertor, are used. The hardware which we are using in practice is a combination of Nikon FC-E9 mounted via a mechanical adaptor onto a Kyocera Finecam M410R digital camera. Nikon FC-E9 is a megapixel omnidirectional addon convertor with 180° view angle which provides images of photographic quality. Kyocera Finecam M410R delivers 2272×1704 images at 3 frames per second. The resulting combination yields a circular view of diameter 1600 pixels in the image. Since consecutive frames of the omnidirectional camera often share a common region in 3D space, the image feature matching is often feasible. On the other hand, the calibration of these cameras is non-trivial and is crucial for the accuracy of the resulting 3D reconstruction. We calibrate omnidirectional cameras off-line using the state-of-the-art technique and Mičušík's two-parameter model, that links the radius of the image point r to the

  16. Modeling Low-temperature Geochemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. K.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemical modeling has become a popular and useful tool for a wide number of applications from research on the fundamental processes of water-rock interactions to regulatory requirements and decisions regarding permits for industrial and hazardous wastes. In low-temperature environments, generally thought of as those in the temperature range of 0-100 °C and close to atmospheric pressure (1 atm=1.01325 bar=101,325 Pa), complex hydrobiogeochemical reactions participate in an array of interconnected processes that affect us, and that, in turn, we affect. Understanding these complex processes often requires tools that are sufficiently sophisticated to portray multicomponent, multiphase chemical reactions yet transparent enough to reveal the main driving forces. Geochemical models are such tools. The major processes that they are required to model include mineral dissolution and precipitation; aqueous inorganic speciation and complexation; solute adsorption and desorption; ion exchange; oxidation-reduction; or redox; transformations; gas uptake or production; organic matter speciation and complexation; evaporation; dilution; water mixing; reaction during fluid flow; reaction involving biotic interactions; and photoreaction. These processes occur in rain, snow, fog, dry atmosphere, soils, bedrock weathering, streams, rivers, lakes, groundwaters, estuaries, brines, and diagenetic environments. Geochemical modeling attempts to understand the redistribution of elements and compounds, through anthropogenic and natural means, for a large range of scale from nanometer to global. "Aqueous geochemistry" and "environmental geochemistry" are often used interchangeably with "low-temperature geochemistry" to emphasize hydrologic or environmental objectives.Recognition of the strategy or philosophy behind the use of geochemical modeling is not often discussed or explicitly described. Plummer (1984, 1992) and Parkhurst and Plummer (1993) compare and contrast two approaches for

  17. Geochemical and mineralogical maps for soils of the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Solano, Federico; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began sampling in 2007 for a low-density (1 site per 1,600 square kilometers, 4,857 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils in the conterminous United States as part of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project. The sampling protocol for the national-scale survey included, at each site, a sample from a depth of 0 to 5 centimeters, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a deeper sample from the soil C horizon or, if the top of the C horizon was at a depth greater than 1 meter, a sample from a depth of approximately 80–100 centimeters. The elements by methods that yield the total or near-total elemental content. The major mineralogical components in the samples from the soil A and C horizons were determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method using Rietveld refinement. Sampling in the conterminous United States was completed in 2010, with chemical and mineralogical analyses completed in May 2013. The resulting data set provides an estimate of the abundance and spatial distribution of chemical elements and minerals in soils of the conterminous United States and represents a baseline for soil geochemistry and mineralogy against which future changes may be recognized and quantified. This report releases geochemical and mineralogical maps along with a histogram, boxplot, and empirical cumulative distribution function plot for each element or mineral.

  18. Long-term geochemical evaluation of the coastal Chicot aquifer system, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, David M.; Broussard, Whitney P.

    2016-02-01

    Groundwater is increasingly being overdrafted in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal regions of the United States. Geochemical data associated with groundwater in these aquifers can provide important information on changes in salinity, recharge, and reaction pathways that can be used to improve water management strategies. Here we evaluated long-term geochemical changes associated with the 23,000 km2 Chicot aquifer system in Louisiana, USA. The Chicot aquifer is currently being overdrafted by about 1,320,000 m3 per day. We compiled selected bulk geochemical data from samples collected from 20 wells in the Chicot aquifer from 1993 to 2015. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope measurements were additionally completed for the 2014 samples. We identified three zones of groundwater with distinctive geochemical character; (1) A groundwater recharge zone in the northern part of the study area with low pH, low salinity, and low temperature relative to other groundwater samples, (2) a groundwater recharge zone in the southeastern part of the study area with low temperature, high alkalinity, and higher Ca and Mg concentrations compared to the other groundwater samples, and (3) groundwater in the southwestern part of the aquifer system with high salinity, high temperature, and a ∼1:1 Na/Cl ratio. The geochemistry of these regions has been relatively stable over the last ∼20 years. However, in the drought year of 2011, the estimated extent of zones with elevated salinity increased substantially. Geochemical evidence suggests that there was increased infiltration of deeper, more salt-rich waters into the shallower Chicot aquifer.

  19. Supraglacial dust and debris: geochemical compositions from glaciers in Svalbard, southern Norway, Nepal and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Casey

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alpine glacier samples were collected in four contrasting regions to measure supraglacial dust and debris geochemical composition and quantify regional variability. A total of 70 surface glacier ice, snow and debris samples were collected in Svalbard, southern Norway, Nepal and New Zealand. Trace elemental abundances in snow and ice samples were measured via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Supraglacial debris mineral, bulk oxide and trace element composition were determined via X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF. A total of 45 major, trace and rare earth elements and 10 oxide compound abundances are reported. Elemental abundances revealed sea salt aerosol and metal enrichment in Svalbard, low levels of crustal dust and marine influences to southern Norway, high crustal dust and anthropogenic enrichment in the Khumbu Himalayas, and sulfur and metals attributed to quiescent degassing and volcanic activity in northern New Zealand. Rare earth element and Al/Ti elemental ratios demonstrated distinct provenance of particulates in each study region. Ca/S elemental ratio data showed seasonal denudation in Svalbard and southern Norway. Ablation season atmospheric particulate transport trajectories were mapped in each of the study regions and suggest provenance pathways. The in situ data presented provides first-order glacier surface geochemical variability as measured in the four diverse alpine glacier regions. The surface glacier geochemical data set is available from the PANGAEA database at doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.773951. This geochemical surface glacier data is relevant to glaciologic ablation rate understanding as well as satellite atmospheric and land-surface mapping techniques currently in development.

  20. Post Auction Coverage Baseline 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — FINAL TELEVISION CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT INFORMATION RELATED TO INCENTIVE AUCTION REPACKING. NOTE: This file provides new baseline coverage and population data for all...

  1. Geochemical characteristics and palaeoclimate significance of the Quaternary laterite of Tutan section in Poyang Lake region, northern Jiangxi Province%赣北鄱阳湖地区土塘剖面第四纪红土地球化学特征及古气候意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌超豪; 龙进; 贾玉连; 洪君; 徐传奇; 王鹏岭

    2015-01-01

    赣北鄱阳湖地区土塘剖面发育第四纪红土,自下而上可分为强网纹红土层、弱网纹红土层、微网纹红土层、均质红土层和下蜀黄土层。基于常量元素、粒度分析数据以及前人年代框架,初探土塘剖面化学风化特征及其古气候意义。(1)土塘剖面粒度组分均一,常量元素含量相近,风化淋溶强烈。(2)土塘剖面各地层间化学风化强度存在差异:下蜀黄土层为初期的去 Na、Ca 阶段;均质红土层为中期的去 K 阶段;微网纹红土层由去 K 阶段向去 Si 阶段过渡;网纹红土层已完全进入晚期去 Si 阶段。剖面常量元素的相对迁移能力为:Na2 O>MnO2>CaO>P 2 O5>MgO>K2 O>SiO2>Al2 O3>TiO2>Fe 2 O3。(3)中更新世以来赣北鄱阳湖地区气候总体上由暖湿趋于干冷,期间伴随多个明显的干湿旋回佐证强烈的淋溶与干湿交替作用是网纹红土发育的重要驱动因子。%The Quaternary laterite was developed in the Tutang section in Poyang Lake region, northern Jiangxi Province,and it was divided into four layers from bottom to top,including the highly de_veloped vermicular laterite layer,the weakly developed vermicular laterite layer,the very weakly devel_oped vermicular laterite layer,the homogenous laterite layer and the Xiashu loess layer.The geochemical characteristics and palaeoclimate of Tutang section was analyzed based on the major element,grain size and chronological data from former researchers,and the conclusions were drawn as follows:(1 ) All lay_ers of Tutang section are quite coincident in particle size and geochemical characteristics,and they all ex_perienced an intense chemical weathering process.(2) As for the degree of weathering,the Xiashu loess is in the primary stage by leaching Ca and Na;the homogenous laterite almost reaches the secondary stage by leaching K;the very weakly developed vermicular laterite almost finishes the secondary stage

  2. Geochemical orientation for mineral exploration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, W.C.; Grimes, D.J.; Seitz, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    This report is a supplement to previous accounts of geochemical exploration conducted in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan by the Natural Resources Authority of the Royal Government of Jordan and the U.S. Geological Survey. The field work on which this report is based was sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of State. Procedures used in collecting various kinds of rocks, ores, slags, eluvial and alluvial sediments, heavy-mineral concentrates, and organic materials for use as geochemical sample media are summarized, as are the laboratory procedures followed for the analysis of these sample materials by semiquantitative spectrographic, atomic absorption, fluorometric, and X-ray diffraction methods. Geochemical evaluations of the possibilities for economic mineral deposits in certain areas are presented. The results of these preliminary investigations open concepts for further use in geochemical exploration in the search for metallic mineral deposits in Jordan. Perhaps the most desirable new activity would be hydrogeochemical exploration for uranium and base metals, accompanied by interpretation of such remote-sensing data as results of airborne radiometric surveys and computer-enhanced LANDSAT imagery. For more conventional approaches to geochemical exploration, however, several fundamental problems regarding proper choice of geochemical sample media for different geologic and geographic parts of the Country must be solved before effective surveys can be made. The present results also show that such common geochemical exploration techniques as the determination of the trace-element contents of soils, plant ash, and slags have direct application also toward the resolution of several archaeological problems in Jordan. These include the relation of trace-elements chemistry of local soils to the composition of botanic remains, the trace-elements composition of slags to the technological development of the extractive metallurgy of

  3. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly Ann; Kaab, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland) and 68% (Nepal), while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland) and 56% (New Zealand), yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  4. Spatial analysis and modelling of glaciogenic geochemical dispersion - Implication for mineral exploration in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarala, Pertti; Nykänen, Vesa

    2017-04-01

    Spatial modelling for prospectivity mapping involves the integration of various geoscientific digital map data. It is essential that the quality of data is high class and that the geological processes involved are well understood. Effects of glacial dynamics and glaciogenic geochemical dispersion need to be taken into consideration when using till geochemistry as one of such input dataset for prospectivity modelling. This paper investigates this issue by developing a fuzzy logic prospectivity model that integrates airborne geophysical data with two different till geochemical datasets. First we use the original geochemical sample set and secondly a spatially corrected dataset that is based on the knowledge of glacial dynamics on the regional scale within the study area. The effect of this correction is tested by comparing the modelling results of both cases using the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) technique to validate the models by using the location of known gold deposits represented by exploration drilling. This study confirms that by taking into consideration the transport caused by the glaciation we can significantly improve the performance of a prospectivity model using till geochemical data.

  5. Estimation of Supraglacial Dust and Debris Geochemical Composition via Satellite Reflectance and Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Casey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate spectral estimation of supraglacial dust, debris, ash and tephra geochemical composition from glaciers and ice fields in Iceland, Nepal, New Zealand and Switzerland. Surface glacier material was collected and analyzed via X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD for geochemical composition and mineralogy. In situ data was used as ground truth for comparison with satellite derived geochemical results. Supraglacial debris spectral response patterns and emissivity-derived silica weight percent are presented. Qualitative spectral response patterns agreed well with XRF elemental abundances. Quantitative emissivity estimates of supraglacial SiO2 in continental areas were 67% (Switzerland and 68% (Nepal, while volcanic supraglacial SiO2 averages were 58% (Iceland and 56% (New Zealand, yielding general agreement. Ablation season supraglacial temperature variation due to differing dust and debris type and coverage was also investigated, with surface debris temperatures ranging from 5.9 to 26.6 C in the study regions. Applications of the supraglacial geochemical reflective and emissive characterization methods include glacier areal extent mapping, debris source identification, glacier kinematics and glacier energy balance considerations.

  6. Kriging - a challenge in geochemical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojdl, Jiri; Matys Grygar, Tomas; Elznicova, Jitka; Popelka, Jan; Vachova, Tatina; Hosek, Michal

    2017-04-01

    Geochemists can easily provide datasets for contamination mapping thanks to recent advances in geographical information systems (GIS) and portable chemical-analytical instrumentation. Kriging is commonly used to visualise the results of such mapping. It is understandable, as kriging is a well-established method of spatial interpolation. It was created in 1950's for geochemical data processing to estimate the most likely distribution of gold based on samples from a few boreholes. However, kriging is based on the assumption of continuous spatial distribution of numeric data that is not realistic in environmental geochemistry. The use of kriging is correct when the data density is sufficient with respect to heterogeneity of the spatial distribution of the geochemical parameters. However, if anomalous geochemical values are focused in hotspots of which boundaries are insufficiently densely sampled, kriging could provide misleading maps with the real contours of hotspots blurred by data smoothing and levelling out individual (isolated) but relevant anomalous values. The data smoothing can thus it results in underestimation of geochemical extremes, which may in fact be of the greatest importance in mapping projects. In our study we characterised hotspots of contamination by uranium and zinc in the floodplain of the Ploučnice River. The first objective of our study was to compare three methods of sampling: random (based on stochastic generation of sampling points), systematic (square grid) and judgemental sampling (based on judgement stemming from principles of fluvial deposition) as the basis for pollution maps. The first detected problem in production of the maps was the reduction of the smoothing effect of kriging using appropriate function of empirical semivariogram and setting the variation of at microscales smaller than the sampling distances to minimum (the "nugget" parameter of semivariogram). Exact interpolators such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) or Radial

  7. A New Geochemical Classification of Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Changmou; L. Lynn Chyi

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical classification proposed by Goldschmidt was based on meteoritic analysis and elemental partition in blast furnace. There are many surprises when applied to the discussion of natural occurrences. A modified classification of elements based on basic chemical properties and their occurrences. A modified classification of elements based on basic chemical properties and their occurrences in nature is, therefore, proposed for students learning geochemistry and geologists working in the field. Elements are classified into six groups including lithophile, oxyphile, siderophile, chalcophile, biophile, and atmophile elements. Five terms are taken from Goldshcmidt's original classification. Oxyphile is a new term.

  8. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Matthew

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  9. Combined GPS + BDS for short to long baseline RTK positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odolinski, R.; Teunissen, P. J. G.; Odijk, D.

    2015-04-01

    The BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has become fully operational in the Asia-Pacific region and it is of importance to evaluate what BDS brings when combined with the Global Positioning System (GPS). In this contribution we will look at the short, medium and long single-baseline real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning performance. Short baseline refers to when the distance between the two receivers is at most a few kilometers so that the relative slant ionospheric and tropospheric delays can be assumed absent, whereas with medium baseline we refer to when the uncertainty of these ionospheric delays can reliably be modeled as a function of the baseline length. With long baseline we refer to the necessity to parameterize the ionospheric delays and (wet) Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) as completely unknown. The GNSS real data are collected in Perth, Australia. It will be shown that combining the two systems allows for the use of higher than customary elevation cut-off angles. This can be of particular benefit in environments with restricted satellite visibility such as in open pit mines or urban canyons.

  10. Is formamide a geochemically plausible prebiotic solvent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bada, Jeffrey L; Chalmers, John H; Cleaves, H James

    2016-07-27

    From a geochemical perspective, significant amounts of pure formamide (HCONH2) would have likely been rare on the early Earth. There may have been mixed formamide-water solutions, but even in the presence of catalyst, solutions with >20 weight% water in formamide would not have produced significant amounts of prebiotic compounds. It might be feasible to produce relatively pure formamide by a rare occurrence of freezing formamide/water mixtures at temperatures lower than formamide's freezing point (2.55 °C) but greater than the freezing point of water. Because of the high density of formamide ice it would have sunk and accumulated at the bottom of the solution. If the remaining water froze on the surface of this ice, and was then removed by a sublimation-ablation process, a small amount of pure formamide ice might have been produced. In addition a recent report suggested that ∼85 weight% formamide could be prepared by a geochemical type of fractional distillation process, offering another possible route for prebiotic formamide production.

  11. A geostatistical method applied to the geochemical study of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robidoux, P.; Roberge, J.; Urbina Oviedo, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The origin of magmatism and the role of the subducted Coco's Plate in the Chichinautzin volcanic field (CVF), Mexico is still a subject of debate. It has been established that mafic magmas of alkali type (subduction) and calc-alkali type (OIB) are produced in the CVF and both groups cannot be related by simple fractional crystallization. Therefore, many geochemical studies have been done, and many models have been proposed. The main goal of the work present here is to provide a new tool for the visualization and interpretation of geochemical data using geostatistics and geospatial analysis techniques. It contains a complete geodatabase built from referred samples over the 2500 km2 area of CVF and its neighbour stratovolcanoes (Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl and Nevado de Toluca). From this database, map of different geochemical markers were done to visualise geochemical signature in a geographical manner, to test the statistic distribution with a cartographic technique and highlight any spatial correlations. The distribution and regionalization of the geochemical signatures can be viewed in a two-dimensional space using a specific spatial analysis tools from a Geographic Information System (GIS). The model of spatial distribution is tested with Linear Decrease (LD) and Inverse Distance Weight (IDW) interpolation technique because they best represent the geostatistical characteristics of the geodatabase. We found that ratio of Ba/Nb, Nb/Ta, Th/Nb show first order tendency, which means visible spatial variation over a large scale area. Monogenetic volcanoes in the center of the CVF have distinct values compare to those of the Popocatepetl-Iztaccihuatl polygenetic complex which are spatially well defined. Inside the Valley of Mexico, a large quantity of monogenetic cone in the eastern portion of CVF has ratios similar to the Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl complex. Other ratios like alkalis vs SiO2, V/Ti, La/Yb, Zr/Y show different spatial tendencies. In that case, second

  12. Baseline groundwater model update for p-area groundwater operable unit, NBN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Amidon, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the development of a numerical groundwater flow and transport model of the hydrogeologic system of the P-Area Reactor Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). The P-Area model provides a tool to aid in understanding the hydrologic and geochemical processes that control the development and migration of the current tritium, tetrachloroethene (PCE), and trichloroethene (TCE) plumes in this region.

  13. Baseline Scotland : the Lower Devonian aquifer of Strathmore

    OpenAIRE

    O Dochartaigh, B.E.; Smedley, P. L.; MacDonald, A M; Darling, W. G.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the groundwater chemistry of the Devonian sedimentary aquifer in Strathmore, eastern Scotland. The area covered by this study extends from Perth in the southwest to Stonehaven in the northeast. The survey forms part of the ongoing Baseline Scotland project. The Devonian sedimentary rocks of Strathmore form an important regional aquifer in an area of some of the most fertile agricultural land in Scotland, with a number of major urban settleme...

  14. REE Geochemical Characteristics of the Cambrian Carbonaceous Rock Series in the Mian-Liie Region and Their Genetical Implications%勉略地区寒武纪含碳岩系稀土元素地球化学特征及成因意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔耿彪; 杨钟堂; 李智明; 杨晓勇; 蓝翔华

    2011-01-01

    The authors analyzed REE contents of the Cambrian carbonaceous rock series in the Mian-Liie region by using ICP - MS method in order to investigate their geochemical characteristics and genetic implications. Some conclusions can be reached from the acquired analytical data: the carbonaceous rock series show narrow variation in the total contents of rare earth elements (∑REE),from 167. 88×10-6 to 210. 50×10-6 with an average at 192. 20 × 10-6; the ratios of LREE/HREE vary from 6. 64 to 16. 25 with an average at 11. 52, showing relative enrichment of LREE and depletion in HREE; the carbonaceous rock series show remarkable negative Ce anomalies, varying from 0. 58 to 0. 90 (0. 78 on average ), suggesting that the carbonaceous rock series formed in a dry and anoxic sedimentary environment close to a marginal sea of continental slope; The carbonaceous rock series also show distinctly negative Eu anomalies, δEuN =0. 47 - 0. 83(0. 62 on average),suggesting that they formed in a passive continental margin environment as products of normal marine sediments under low temperature(<250℃) diagenesis, consistent with the their geotectonic location in the northern margin of the Yangtze platform ;according to the diagrams of La/Yb - Ce/La and La/Yb - REE, it is also confirmed that the carbonaceous rock series not formed in a hydrothermal sedimentary condition but in a normal marine condition with their main source materials coming from a continental crust with high quartz content.%采用等离子质仪(ICP - MS)测试方法对岩石的稀土元素含量进行了测定,探讨了勉略地区寒武纪含碳岩系的稀土元素地球化学特征及其成因.研究表明:含碳岩系岩石的稀土元素总量(∑REE)总体变化不大,质量分数为(167.88~210.50)×10-6,平均为192.20×10-6;轻重稀土比值(LREE/HREE)为6.64~16.25.平均为11.52,显示轻稀土富集而重稀土亏损;含碳岩系岩石具明显的Ce负异常,δCeN值为0.58~0.90(平均为0

  15. Life Support Baseline Values and Assumptions Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Molly S.; Ewert, Michael K.; Keener, John F.; Wagner, Sandra A.

    2015-01-01

    The Baseline Values and Assumptions Document (BVAD) provides analysts, modelers, and other life support researchers with a common set of values and assumptions which can be used as a baseline in their studies. This baseline, in turn, provides a common point of origin from which many studies in the community may depart, making research results easier to compare and providing researchers with reasonable values to assume for areas outside their experience. With the ability to accurately compare different technologies' performance for the same function, managers will be able to make better decisions regarding technology development.

  16. Radio-geochemical methods at surface expiotation of oil and gas fields

    OpenAIRE

    Sobolev, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    A review of the situation with radio-geochemical methods of searching oil and gas fields is presented. Potential reasons of radio-geochemical anomalies formation are considered, some approaches to interpretation of radio-geochemical datum are listed

  17. Breton Island, Louisiana Baseline (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Baseline (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector line data that were input into the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0,...

  18. SSA FITARA Common Baseline Implementation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This document describes the agency's plan to implement the Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA) Common Baseline per OMB memorandum M-15-14.

  19. NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) comprises ten radio telescopes spanning 5,351 miles. It's the world's largest, sharpest, dedicated telescope array. With an eye...

  20. Breton Island, Louisiana Baseline (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Breton Island, Louisiana Baseline (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector line data that were input into the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0,...

  1. Hanford Site technical baseline database. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, P.E.

    1995-01-27

    This report lists the Hanford specific files (Table 1) that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database. Table 2 includes the delta files that delineate the differences between this revision and revision 0 of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database. This information is being managed and maintained on the Hanford RDD-100 System, which uses the capabilities of RDD-100, a systems engineering software system of Ascent Logic Corporation (ALC). This revision of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database uses RDD-100 version 3.0.2.2 (see Table 3). Directories reflect those controlled by the Hanford RDD-100 System Administrator. Table 4 provides information regarding the platform. A cassette tape containing the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database is available.

  2. U-Pb SHRIMP data and geochemical characterization of granitoids intruded along the Coxixola shear zone, Provincia Borborema, NE Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Ignez de Pinho; Silva Filho, Adejardo Francisco da; Silva, Francis M.J.V. da, E-mail: ignez@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernanmbuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Armstrong, Richard [Australian National University (Australia)

    2011-07-01

    A large volume of granitic magmatism associated with large scale shear zone and metamorphism under high-T amphibolite facies conditions characterize the Brasiliano Orogeny in the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. Granitoids from two plutons and later dykes intruded along the Coxixola shear zone show distinct crystallization ages and geochemical signature. The oldest granitoids (618 ± 5 Ma), Serra de Inacio Pereira Pluton are coeval with the peak of regional metamorphism and they were probably originated by melting of a paleoproterozoic source. The granitoids from the Serra do Marinho Pluton show crystallization age of 563 ± 4 Ma and geochemical signature of post-collisional A-type granites. The later dykes have crystallization age of 526 ± 7 Ma, geochemical signature of A-type granitoids. (author)

  3. Advances in geochemical research on nanometer materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Important advances have been made in the field of geochemistry since nanometer science and technology were introduced into the field of geoscience. The nanometer particulates have been discovered in naturally-occurring ore deposits, volcano-eruptive materials and geo-gases, and a more detailed exploration of the metallogenic mechanism of endogenic metallic ore deposits has been conducted. It is considered that some ore-forming metals may transport in the form of native particulates. Because they have very strong capabilities of adsorption, adsorption is always regarded as an important mechanism of metallogenesis under supergenic and low temperature conditions.Therefore, a new technology of ore exploration has also been developed. This paper attempts to review the new advances in geochemical research on nanometer materials, as well as its perspectivess.

  4. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  5. The geochemical record in rock glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steig, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Potter, N.; Clark, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    A 9.5 m ice core was extracted from beneath the surficial debris cover of a rock glacier at Galena Creek, northwestern Wyoming. The core contains clean, bubble-rich ice with silty debris layers spaced at roughly 20 cm intervals. The debris layers are similar in appearance to those in typical alpine glaciers, reflecting concentration of debris by melting at the surface during the summer ablation season. Profiles of stable isotope concentrations and electrical conductivity measurements provide independent evidence for melting in association with debris layers. These observations are consistent with a glacial origin for the ice, substantiating the glacigenic model for rock glacier formation. The deuterium excess profile in the ice indicates that the total depth of meltwater infiltration is less than the thickness of one annual layer, suggesting that isotope values and other geochemical signatures are preserved at annual resolution. This finding demonstrates the potential for obtaining useful paleoclimate information from rock glacier ice.

  6. Geochemical and geophysical monitoring of thermal waters in Sloveniain relation to seismic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dolenec

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-seismic related strains in the Earth s crust are the main cause of the observed geophysical and geochemical anomalies in ground waters preceding an earthquake. Posoc?je Region, situated along the Soc?a River, is one of the most seismically active areas of Slovenia. Our measuring stations close to the Posoc?je Region were installed in the thermal springs at Bled in 1998 and at Zatolmin in 1999. Since the beginning of our survey, radon concentration, electrical conductivity and water temperature have been measured continuously once every hour. In May 2002, the number of geochemical parameters monitored was extended to ionic concentration, pH and Eh, which are analysed once a month. Before seeking a correlation between geochemical and geophysical anomalies with seismic events, the influence of meteorological (atmospheric precipitation, barometric pressure and hydrological (water table of the Tolminka River factors on observed anomalies were studied. Results at Zatolmin showed that some radon variation during the period from June to October 2002 may be related to seismic activity and not only to meteorological effects.

  7. Geochemical characteristics of Guizhou Permian coal measure strata and analysis of the control factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Rui-dong; LIU Ling; WEI Huai-rui; CUI Yu-chao; CHENG Wei

    2011-01-01

    Based on element geochemical studies of the main Permian exploitable coal measure strata in Western Guizhou, the element geochemical distribution characteristics of the main exploitable coal measures were revealed in the regions of Dafang,Qianxi, Weining, Hezhang, Zhijin, etc., of Guizhou Province, and the results show that their element contents are mainly affected by terrestrial material supply. Coal measures formed in the delta plain environment where sufficient terrestrial materials are supplied contain relatively abundant trace elements and rare-earth elements, whereas those formed in the tidal-flat environment influenced greatly by seawater have relatively low contents of trace elements and rare-earth elements, mainly controlled by the geological fact that basalts the parent rocks from source regions contain high trace elements and rare-earth elements. In addition, coal measures affected by later hydrothermal activities and fault tectonics contain a large amount of harmful elements. According to the rules of distribution of elements in coal measures, a new idea was put forward to classify coal-forming environments by using the geochemical composition characteristics, which is of great significance in dissolving the problem of whether coal measures were formed either in delta environments or in tidal-flat environments in Western Guizhou. At the same time, the rules of distribution of elements in the main exploitable coal measures in Western Guizhou were fully understood, which is of direct significance in utilizing coal resources on the basis of classification of coals, as well as in developing the coal chemical industry.

  8. High-Resolution Geochemical Significance of Lowest Triassic at Majiashan Section, Chaohu, Anhui Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) and the lowest Triassic in the Yangtze region are considered to be the sediments of dysaeroxic and even anoxic environments, due to the dark thin-bedded fine deposits, the highly developed parallel beddings with pyrites, the suppression of bio-disturbance, and the monotonoas fossils. However, the trace fossils there show a rather weak effect of the anoxic event. Meanwhile, the high-resolution geochemical data are analyzed with 2-cm interval in the PTB and the lowest Triassic at the Majiashan Section, Chaohu, Anhui Province. The results show that the water depth of Chaohu region in the earliest Triassic was shallow, which might be a feature of the neritic environment. The high-resolution geochemical proxies for anoxia have some contrary results. The geochemical data often indicate the dysaeroxic and even anoxic environments during that time, whereas other proxies (such as w(V)/w(Cr), w(Ni)/w(Co)) denote that they are normal marine sediments.

  9. Geochemical and isotopic signatures for the identification of seawater intrusion in an alluvial aquifer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indu S Nair; S P Rajaveni; M Schneider; L Elango

    2015-08-01

    Seawater intrusion is one of the alarming processes that reduces the water quality and imperils the supply of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The region, north of the Chennai city, India is one such site affected by seawater intrusion. The objective of this study is to identify the extent of seawater intruded area by major geochemical and isotopic signatures. A total of 102 groundwater samples were collected and analysed for major and minor ions. Groundwater samples with electrical conductivity (EC) greater than 5000 S/cm and a river mouth sample were analyzed for Oxygen-18 (18O) and Deuterium (2H) isotopes to study their importance in monitoring seawater intrusion. The molar ratio of geochemical indicators and isotopic signatures suggests an intrusion up to a distance of 13 km from the sea as on March 2012 and up to 14.7 km during May 2012.

  10. Results of a geochemical survey, Aban Al Ahmar Quadrangle, Sheet 25F, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. Roger; Arnold, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The interpretation of geochemical data from a regional survey of the Aban al Ahmar quadrangle resulted in the selection of areas for follow-up studies. The results of detailed geochemical studies of these areas, combined with field observation, resulted in the selection of areas of moderate to high mineral resource potential. The most important areas are (1) the Jibal Minyah area, Aban al Asmar area, Jibal Suwaj area, and Nubayah area where tin and tungsten mineralization are associated with Abanat-suite rocks or possible buried Abanat-suite plutons; (2) several areas containing rocks of the Murdama group in the northern part of the quadrangle, the Buqaya al Luaah area, and the Jabal Akkash area where precious- and base-metal mineralization are generally associated with small Idah-suite plutons; and (3) the southern periphery of Jibal Qitan associated with skarn mineralization.

  11. Research and Application of New Methods to Oil-Gas Geochemical Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the results of researches and applications for many years, it has been discovered that new methods and techniques for geochemical exploration of oil and gas such as D C, altered carbonate, Hg in absorption phase, Ks, Fe2+, d 13C, fluorescence in two and three dimensions, and N2 and O2 in heat release can give full play in the following five fields: (1) optimization of the favourable target or hollow zones and structural zones in a region; (2) evaluation of oil traps and delineation of prospective oil and gas areas; (3) prediction of deep-seated oil-bearing horizons; (4) evaluation of the genesis of oil and gas geochemical anomalies and determination of the types of oil and gas accumulations; (5) forecast of the burial depths of oil and gas pools.

  12. Research on the Eco-Geochemical Effects of Black Shales in Pingli County, Shaanxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方维萱; 兀鹏武; 黄转莹

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of eco-geochemical research on black rock series en riched in metallic elements in Pingli County, Shaanxi Province, which lies at the northern mar gin of the Yangtze Platform. There is a suite of bone coal-bearing black carbonaceous rocks in the Cambrian Donghe Formation throughout the region. Soils in Pingli contain high metallic el ements derived from the bone coal and carbonaceous rocks. Edible plants growing in the soils contain high Se, Cu and Mo. Two case studies are documented. One is a black shale area with bone coal and Se enrichment, and the other is a black shale area with bone coal mine and cop per mineralization. Eco-geochemical effects of metallic element-rich black shales on plants are reported in this paper.

  13. Determination of pre-mining geochemical conditions and paleoecology in the Animas River Watershed, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, S.E.; Fey, D.L.; Brouwers, E.M.; Holmes, C.W.; Blair, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Determination of the pre-mining geochemical baseline in bed sediments and the paleoecology in a watershed impacted by historical mining activity is of utmost importance in establishing watershed restoration goals. We have approached this problem in the Animas River watershed using geomorphologic mapping methods to identify old pre-mining sediments. A systematic evaluation of possible sites resulted in collection of a large number of samples of pre-mining sediments, overbank sediments, and fluvial tailings deposits from more than 50 sites throughout the watershed. Chemical analysis of individual stratigraphic layers has resulted in a chemical stratigraphy that can be tied to the historical record through geochronological and dendochronological studies at these sites. Preliminary analysis of geochemical data from more than 500 samples from this study, when coupled with both the historical and geochronological record, clearly show that there has been a major impact by historical mining activities on the geochemical record preserved in these fluvial bed sediments. Historical mining activity has resulted in a substantial increase in metals in the very fine sand to clay sized component of the bed sediment of the upper Animas River, and Cement and Mineral Creeks. Enrichment factors for metals in modern bed sediments, relative to the pre-mining sediments, range from a factor of 2 to 6 for arsenic, 4 to more than 10 for cadmium, 2 to more than 10 for lead, 2 to 5 for silver, and 2 to more than 15 for zinc. However, the pre-mining bed sediment geochemical baseline is high relative to crustal abundance levels of many orerelated metals and the watershed would readily be identified as a highly mineralized area suitable for mineral exploration if it had not been disturbed by historical mining activity. We infer from these data that the water chemistry in the streams was less acidic prior to historical mining activity in the watershed. Paleoentologic evidence does not indicate a

  14. Baseline Survey for an Impact Evaluation of the Greenbelt Transformation Initiative in South Sudan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This data set is derived from a 2013 household baseline survey in the country's Greenbelt region as part of an impact evaluation of the Food, Agribusiness, and Rural...

  15. How to build stable geochemical reservoirs on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2014-05-01

    To explain the complex thermo-chemical processes needed for the formation of distinct and stable geochemical reservoirs early in the thermo-chemical evolution of Mars, most geochemical studies argue that fractional crystallization of a global magma ocean may reproduce the isotopic characteristic of the SNCs [1, 2]. However, geodynamical models show that such scenario is difficult to reconcile with other observations like late volcanic activity and crustal density values as obtained from gravity and topography modelling [3, 4]. The stable density gradient, which establishes after the mantle overturn has completed, inhibits thermal convection. Albeit capable to provide stable reservoirs, this scenario suggests a conductive mantle after the overturn which on the one hand fails to sample deep regions of the mantle and on the other hand is clearly at odds with the volcanic history of Mars. This is best explained by assuming a convective mantle and partial melting as the principal agents responsible for the generation and evolution of Martian volcanism. Therefore, in this work an alternative scenario for the formation of early stable geochemical reservoirs is presented similar to the model of [5]. We investigate the influence of partial melting on mantle dynamics, crustal formation, and volcanic outgassing of a one-plate planet using a 2D mantle convection code. When melt is extracted to form crust, the mantle material left behind is more buoyant than its parent material and depleted in radioactive heat sources. The extracted heat-producing elements are then enriched in the crust, which also has an insulating effect due to its lower thermal conductivity compared to the mantle. In addition, partial melting can influence the mantle rheology through the dehydration (water depletion) of the mantle material by volcanic outgassing. As a consequence, the viscosity of water-depleted regions increases more than two orders of magnitude compared to water-saturated rocks resulting

  16. Baseline assessment of groundwater quality in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Cravotta, III, Charles A.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    2016-06-30

    ) calcium ions released by calcite dissolution are exchanged for sodium ions on clay minerals. The spatial distribution of groundwater compositions generally shows that (1) relatively dilute, slightly acidic, oxygenated, calcium-carbonate type waters tend to occur in the uplands along the western border of Wayne County; (2) waters of near neutral pH with the highest amounts of hardness (calcium and magnesium) generally occur in areas of intermediate altitudes; and (3) waters with pH values greater than 8, low oxygen concentrations, and the highest arsenic, sodium, lithium, bromide, and methane concentrations can occur in deep wells in uplands but most frequently occur in stream valleys, especially at low elevations (less than about 1,200 ft above North American Vertical Datum of 1988) where groundwater may be discharging regionally, such as to the Delaware River. Thus, the baseline assessment of groundwater quality in Wayne County prior to gas-well development shows that shallow (less than about 1,000 ft deep) groundwater is generally of good quality, but methane and some constituents present in high concentrations in brine (and produced waters from gas and oil wells) may be present at low to moderate concentrations in some parts of Wayne County.

  17. Salton Sea sampling program: baseline studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, R.E.; Carter, J.L.; Langlois, G.W.

    1981-04-13

    Baseline data are provided on three species of fish from the Salton Sea, California. The fishes considered were the orange mouth corvina (Cynoscion xanthulus), gulf croaker (Bairdiella icistius) and sargo (Anisotremus davidsonii). Morphometric and meristic data are presented as a baseline to aid in the evaluation of any physiological stress the fish may experience as a result of geothermal development. Analyses were made on muscle, liver, and bone of the fishes sampled to provide baseline data on elemental tissue burdens. The elements measured were: As, Br, Ca, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Mn, Mi, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Zn, and Zr. These data are important if an environmentally sound progression of geothermal power production is to occur at the Salton Sea.

  18. Baseline methodologies for clean development mechanism projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.K. (ed.); Shrestha, R.M.; Sharma, S.; Timilsina, G.R.; Kumar, S.

    2005-11-15

    The Kyoto Protocol and the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) came into force on 16th February 2005 with its ratification by Russia. The increasing momentum of this process is reflected in more than 100 projects having been submitted to the CDM Executive Board (CDM-EB) for approval of the baselines and monitoring methodologies, which is the first step in developing and implementing CDM projects. A CDM project should result in a net decrease of GHG emissions below any level that would have resulted from other activities implemented in the absence of that CDM project. The 'baseline' defines the GHG emissions of activities that would have been implemented in the absence of a CDM project. The baseline methodology is the process/algorithm for establishing that baseline. The baseline, along with the baseline methodology, are thus the most critical element of any CDM project towards meeting the important criteria of CDM, which are that a CDM should result in 'real, measurable, and long term benefits related to the mitigation of climate change'. This guidebook is produced within the frame work of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) facilitated 'Capacity Development for the Clean Development Mechanism (CD4CDM)' Project. This document is published as part of the projects effort to develop guidebooks that cover important issues such as project finance, sustainability impacts, legal framework and institutional framework. These materials are aimed to help stakeholders better understand the CDM and are believed to eventually contribute to maximize the effect of the CDM in achieving the ultimate goal of UNFCCC and its Kyoto Protocol. This Guidebook should be read in conjunction with the information provided in the two other guidebooks entitled, 'Clean Development Mechanism: Introduction to the CDM' and 'CDM Information and Guidebook' developed under the CD4CDM project. (BA)

  19. Neutrino Interactions and Long-Baseline Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mosel, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extraction of neutrino mixing parameters and the CP-violating phase requires knowledge of the neutrino energy. This energy must be reconstructed from the final state of a neutrino-nucleus reaction since all long-baseline experiments use nuclear targets. This reconstruction requires detailed knowledge of the neutrino reactions with bound nucleons and of the final state interactions of hadrons with the nuclear environment. Quantum-kinetic transport theory can be used to build an event generator for this reconstruction that takes basic nuclear properties, such as binding, into account. Some examples are discussed that show the effects of nuclear interactions on observables in long-baseline experiments

  20. Long-baseline Neutrino Oscillation at DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elizabeth; DUNE Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with primary physics goals of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and measuring δc P with sufficient sensitivity to discover CP violation in neutrino oscillation. CP violation sensitivity in DUNE requires careful understanding of systematic uncertainty, with contributions expected from uncertainties in the neutrino flux, neutrino interactions, and detector effects. In this presentation, we will describe the expected sensitivity of DUNE to long-baseline neutrino oscillation parameters, how various aspects of the experimental design contribute to that sensitivity, and the planned strategy for constraining systematic uncertainty in these measurements.

  1. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of fluvially deposited sulfidic mine tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielinga; Lucy; Moore; Seastone; Gannon

    1999-04-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated.

  2. A geochemical and mineralogical approach to environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmi, I. [Siena Univ., Siena (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze della Terra; Hunziker, J.C. [UNIL BFSH-2 CH, Institut de Mineralogie, Lausanne (Switzerland); Panichi, C. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, International Institute for Geothermal Research, Ghezzano, PI (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Chemical pollution of the biospheric environment by human activity has become a problem of regional and global scale. There is no doubt that the contribution of geochemistry and mineralogy in defining the extent of this problem and estimating its long-term effects on life-forms is fundamental. Most of the environmental pollution problems arise from human activity associated with the exploitation and utilisation of the Earth's resources, involving minerals and fluids in some way. These problems include waste generated by mining activity, industrial, domestic, and nuclear waste. Particular problems can arise form the use of minerals and rocks in buildings and monuments. The relationship between minerals and human health represents a special case. Minerals can, on the one hand, create a problem; but, on the other hand, due to their peculiar structural properties of potentially hazardous and also useful minerals, capable of adsorbing or neutralizing any toxic, acid and undesirable components. Geochemistry can make important contributions in defining background concentrations, in mapping and accounting for dispersion patterns, in understanding the chemical interaction of pollutants with natural dissolved constituents and mineral matter, in estimating residence times and the extent to which geochemical processes will remove pollutants from the environment.

  3. Multielement geochemical dataset of surficial materials for the northern Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Mary Jane; Kotlyar, Boris B.; Ludington, Steve; Folger, Helen W.; Mossotti, Victor G.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents geochemical data generated during mineral and environmental assessments for the Bureau of Land Management in northern Nevada, northeastern California, southeastern Oregon, and southwestern Idaho, along with metadata and map representations of selected elements. The dataset presented here is a compilation of chemical analyses of over 10,200 stream-sediment and soil samples originally collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation's (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program of the Department of Energy and its predecessors and reanalyzed to support a series of mineral-resource assessments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The dataset also includes the analyses of additional samples collected by the USGS in 1992. The sample sites are in southeastern Oregon, southwestern Idaho, northeastern California, and, primarily, in northern Nevada. These samples were collected from 1977 to 1983, before the development of most of the present-day large-scale mining infrastructure in northern Nevada. As such, these data may serve as an important baseline for current and future geoenvironmental studies. Largely because of the very diverse analytical methods used by the NURE HSSR program, the original NURE analyses in this area yielded little useful geochemical information. The Humboldt, Malheur-Jordan-Andrews, and Winnemucca-Surprise studies were designed to provide useful geochemical data via improved analytical methods (lower detection levels and higher precision) and, in the Malheur-Jordan-Andrews and Winnemucca Surprise areas, to collect additional stream-sediment samples to increase sampling coverage. The data are provided in *.xls (Microsoft Excel) and *.csv (comma-separated-value) format. We also present graphically 35 elements, interpolated ("gridded") in a geographic information system (GIS) and overlain by major geologic trends, so that users may view the variation in elemental concentrations over the

  4. Geochemical and mineralogical data for soils of the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Solano, Federico; Kilburn, James E.; Fey, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a low-density (1 site per 1,600 square kilometers, 4,857 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous United States as part of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project. Sampling and analytical protocols were developed at a workshop in 2003, and pilot studies were conducted from 2004 to 2007 to test and refine these recommended protocols. The final sampling protocol for the national-scale survey included, at each site, a sample from a depth of 0 to 5 centimeters, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a deeper sample from the soil C horizon or, if the top of the C horizon was at a depth greater than 1 meter, from a depth of approximately 80–100 centimeters. The elements by methods that yield the total or near-total elemental content. The major mineralogical components in the samples from the soil A and C horizons were determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method using Rietveld refinement. Sampling in the conterminous United States was completed in 2010, with chemical and mineralogical analyses completed in May 2013. The resulting dataset provides an estimate of the abundance and spatial distribution of chemical elements and minerals in soils of the conterminous United States and represents a baseline for soil geochemistry and mineralogy against which future changes may be recognized and quantified. This report (1) describes the sampling, sample preparation, and analytical methods used; (2) gives details of the quality control protocols used to monitor the quality of chemical and mineralogical analyses over approximately six years; and (3) makes available the soil geochemical and mineralogical data in downloadable tables.

  5. Geochemical characterization of tubular alteration features in subseafloor basalt glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Emily; Staudigel, Hubert; Templeton, Alexis

    2013-07-01

    There are numerous indications that subseafloor basalts may currently host a huge quantity of active microbial cells and contain biosignatures of ancient life in the form of physical and chemical basalt glass alteration. Unfortunately, technological challenges prevent us from observing the formation and mineralization of these alteration features in situ, or reproducing tubular basalt alteration processes in the laboratory. Therefore, comprehensive analysis of the physical and chemical traces retained in mineralized tubules is currently the best approach for deciphering a record of glass alteration. We have used a number of high-resolution spectroscopic and microscopic methods to probe the geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tubular alteration features in basalt glasses obtained from a suite of subseafloor drill cores that covers a range of different collection locations and ages. By combining three different synchrotron-based X-ray measurements - X-ray fluorescence microprobe mapping, XANES spectroscopy, and μ-XRD - with focused ion beam milling and transmission electron microscopy, we have spatially resolved the major and trace element distributions, as well as the oxidation state of Fe, determined the coordination chemistry of Fe, Mn and Ti at the micron-scale, and constrained the secondary minerals within these features. The tubular alteration features are characterized by strong losses of Fe2+, Mn2+, and Ca2+ compared to fresh glass, oxidation of the residual Fe, and the accumulation of Ti and Cu. The predominant phases infilling the alteration regions are Fe3+-bearing silicates dominated by 2:1 clays, with secondary Fe- and Ti-oxides, and a partially oxidized Mn-silicate phase. These geochemical patterns observed within the tubular alteration features are comparable across a diverse suite of samples formed over the past 5-100 Ma, which shows that the microscale mineralization processes are common and consistent throughout the ocean basins and

  6. The geochemical evolution of the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paone, A.

    2006-05-01

    This work integrates new geochemical data with the numerous published analyses on rocks from the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano. New quantitative models for the evolution of magma source regions and magma at different depths are proposed. The origin of the Somma-Vesuvius parental magma is modeled as 0.05-0.1 melt fractions of a MORB-type source composed of 54% olivine, 30% orthopyroxene, 10% clinopyroxene, 1% garnet, and 4% amphibole, and 1-5% sediment introduced through the adjacent arc system. The excess concentrations of Rb, Ba, K, and Sr are attributed to a subduction-related fluid phase. Major and trace element concentrations, coupled with Sr-Nd-Pb isotope signatures suggest that the bulk composition of sediments being subducted below southern Italy is similar to that of the carbonate rich sediment columns described by Plank and Langmuir (1998) and Vroon et al. (1995). Furthermore, it appears that the sediment contribution was introduced as a partial melt, which would account for some geochemical patterns, such as 143Nd/144Nd versus Th/Ce. The EC-AFC model ( Spera and Bohrson, 2001) is then used to track the evolution of Somma-Vesuvius magmas. The results are consistent with the melting of crustal Hercynian basement at depths of 12 and >20 km ( De Natale et al., 2001). Such a model is also consistent with the thermal model of Annen and Sparks (2002) for the evolution of magmatic provinces. Here, magmas from the upper mantle form a melt intrusion and storage zone at 12 to >20 km allowing for crustal melting to take place. At Vesuvius, Plinian eruptions involve the first magma withdrawn from a deep magma reservoir. Interplinian eruptions involve reduced volumes of magma stored over a larger depth range until the volcanic activity stops. This suggests that little magma is left in the melt intrusion and storage zone. A new cycle is started by a Plinian event when new magma rises from the upper mantle and is emplaced in the lower crust.

  7. Lead and zinc geochemical behavior based on geological characteristics in Parkam Porphyry Copper System, Kerman, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyyed; Saeed; Ghannadpour; Ardeshir; Hezarkhani

    2015-01-01

    Parkam(Sarah) porphyry system is located on the metallogenic belt of Kerman, Iran. Due to existence of some copper-rich resources in this region, finding out the exact statistical characteristics such as distribution of data population, mean, variance and data population behavior of elements like Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn is necessary for interpreting their geological behavior. For this reason, precise calculation of statistical characteristics of Pb and Zn grade datasets was performed and results were interpreted geologically. The natures of Pb and Zn distributions were initially identified and their distributions were normalized through statistical treatment. Subsequently, the variograms were calculated for each exploration borehole and show that both Pb and Zn geochemical variates are spatially correlated. According to the similarity of the behavior of Pb and Zn in these calculations, it is decided to measure their exact behavior applying K-means clustering method. K-means clustering results show that the Zn grade varies linearly relative to that of Pb values and their behavior is similar. Based on the geochemical behavior similarity of Pb and Zn, throughout the pervasive secondary hydrothermal activity, they are remobilized in the similar manner, from the deep to the shallow levels of the mineralization zones. However, statistical analysis suggests that hydrothermal activity associated with secondary waters in Parkam is effective in remobilizing and enriching both Pb and Zn since they have similar geochemical characteristics. However, the process does not result in generation of economic concentrations.

  8. Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport invariably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2000-08-08

    Reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in unsaturated fractured rocks has received increasing attention for studies of contaminant transport, groundwater quality, waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposits, sedimentary diagenesis, and fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems. This paper presents methods for modeling geochemical systems that emphasize: (1) involvement of the gas phase in addition to liquid and solid phases in fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) treatment of physically and chemically heterogeneous and fractured rocks, (3) the effect of heat on fluid flow and reaction properties and processes, and (4) the kinetics of fluid-rock interaction. The physical and chemical process model is embodied in a system of partial differential equations for flow and transport, coupled to algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations for chemical interactions. For numerical solution, the continuum equations are discretized in space and time. Space discretization is based on a flexible integral finite difference approach that can use irregular gridding to model geologic structure; time is discretized fully implicitly as a first-order finite difference. Heterogeneous and fractured media are treated with a general multiple interacting continua method that includes double-porosity, dual-permeability, and multi-region models as special cases. A sequential iteration approach is used to treat the coupling between fluid flow and mass transport on the one hand, chemical reactions on the other. Applications of the methods developed here to variably saturated geochemical systems are presented in a companion paper (part 2, this issue).

  9. [Study on the Geochemical Anomalies Identification of REE Based on HJ-1A-HSI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-gan; Wang, Mei-juan; Li, Peng

    2015-11-01

    The characteristic spectral bands of REE do not vary with the occurrence state, cannot be used to identify mineral species, but can prove the existence of its own. Here we report the spectrum characteristics of REE and their compounds by remote sensing wave band from visible light-near infrared, with the quantitative relationship between the contents of REE and absorption index of characteristic spectral bands. The experimental study was carried out in Bayan Obo area, Inner Mongolia. Spectrums and Nd contents of typical rock and ore samples were gathered and analyzed. There is positive correlation between the Nd content, the absorption depth and absorption index of different spectrum characteristics (correlation coefficient > 0.778). Moreover, the correlation between absorption index of 726-772 nm band and Nd content is the best, at 0. 937. As mentioned above, the quantitative model and the inversion information remote sensing geochemical anomaly of Nd were built by the band of HJ-1A-HIS hyperspectral remote sensing data. Our results consistent with 1:200,000 stream sediment geochemical anomalies of Nd. The model provides a new means for rapid extract regional geochemical anomalies of REE.

  10. Multivariate analysis of ATR-FTIR spectra for assessment of oil shale organic geochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was coupled with partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis to relate spectral data to parameters from total organic carbon (TOC) analysis and programmed pyrolysis to assess the feasibility of developing predictive models to estimate important organic geochemical parameters. The advantage of ATR-FTIR over traditional analytical methods is that source rocks can be analyzed in the laboratory or field in seconds, facilitating more rapid and thorough screening than would be possible using other tools. ATR-FTIR spectra, TOC concentrations and Rock–Eval parameters were measured for a set of oil shales from deposits around the world and several pyrolyzed oil shale samples. PLSR models were developed to predict the measured geochemical parameters from infrared spectra. Application of the resulting models to a set of test spectra excluded from the training set generated accurate predictions of TOC and most Rock–Eval parameters. The critical region of the infrared spectrum for assessing S1, S2, Hydrogen Index and TOC consisted of aliphatic organic moieties (2800–3000 cm−1) and the models generated a better correlation with measured values of TOC and S2 than did integrated aliphatic peak areas. The results suggest that combining ATR-FTIR with PLSR is a reliable approach for estimating useful geochemical parameters of oil shales that is faster and requires less sample preparation than current screening methods.

  11. The Geochemical Features and Evolution of Laterite in the Karst Areas of Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立军; 林进也

    1996-01-01

    Guizhou is one of the dominating karst regions,where laterite is widespread,in China.Seventy-two laterite samples were taken from twelve laterite sections in the karst areas of Guizhou Province,which are possessed of typical subtropical karst geomphological and ecological environmental features and have evolved completely from dolostones and limestones.In terms of the major,trace and REE deta for thd samples this paper discusses the geochemical characteristics of laterite in the karst areas with an attempt to disclose the geochemical process and evolutionary rule of laterite formation.There have been involved three important pedogenetic geochemical precesses in the formation of laterite in the karst areas:(1)enrichment of silicon and aluminum and depletion of calcium and magnesium;(2)enrichment of iron and manganese;and(3) enrichment of aluminum and depletion of silicon.During the formation and evolution of laterite,obvious enrichment and differentiation of trace elements such as Cu,Pb,Zn,Ni,Co,Cr,Pb,F,Cl,and As can be observed,but for the rare-earth elements,their enrichment is remarkable against a weak differentiation.The REE distribution patterns in the laterite are similar to those of its parental carbonate rocks.

  12. Structure-geochemical zoning of Topolninsk gold-ore field (Gorny Altai)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timkin, T. V.; Lavrov, D. S.; Askanakova, O. Y.; Korotchenko, T. V.

    2014-08-01

    Geochemical zoning of prospective mineable gold-bearing skarns was carried out. The geochemical field abnormal structures of different hierarchy levels associated with gold- skarn formations were revealed. The interrelation between the structure of ore-geochemical fields and associated ring structures was studied. Complex structure-geochemical criteria for gold mineralization prospecting and evaluation were proposed.

  13. The Aqueous Alteration of CR Chondrites: Experiments and Geochemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perronnet, M.; Berger, G.; Zolensky, M. E.; Toplis, M. J.; Kolb, V. M.; Bajagic, M.

    2007-03-01

    Laboratory alteration experiments were performed on mineralogical assemblages having the unaltered CR composition. The mineralogy of reaction products was compared to that of Renazzo and GRO 95577 and to predictions of geochemical modeling.

  14. National Geochemical Survey Locations and Results for Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The United States Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with other state and federal agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting a National Geochemical...

  15. Identification of Sediment Sources to Calumet River through Geochemical Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Other Tracers for Dredged Material Fate” ERDC TR-17-1 ii Abstract Geochemical sedimentary markers provide a well-established methodology for...12 Principal component analysis...22 Principal component analysis (PCA

  16. Chlorine isotopes potential as geo-chemical tracers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Pradhan, U.K.; Banerjee, R.

    The potential of chlorine isotopes as tracers of geo-chemical processes of earth and the oceans is highlighted based on systematic studies carried out in understanding the chlorine isotope fractionation mechanism, its constancy in seawater and its...

  17. Investigation of Hydro-Geochemical Characteristics of Groundwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of Hydro-Geochemical Characteristics of Groundwater In Port Harcourt City, ... Constituents of the heavy metals as shown in this study reveal that, in some ... Microbial analysis of the water samples to determine the presumptive ...

  18. Toxicity of major geochemical ions to freshwater species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extensive testing regarding the toxicity of major geochemical ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Hyalella azteca, and Pimephales promelas will be presented. For C. dubia, tests of single salts and binary mixtures in various dilution waters demonstrated multiple mechanisms of toxicity an...

  19. Geochemistry of rock samples from the National Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains geochemical data for rock samples collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed either in the analytical laboratories of...

  20. Multifractal Simulation of Geochemical Map Patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a simple multifractal model based on the model De Wijs, various geochemical map patterns for element concentration values are being simulated. Each pattern is self-similar on the average in that a similar pattern can be derived by application of the multiplicative cascade model used to any small subarea on the pattern. In other experiments, the original, self-similar pattern is distorted by superimposing a 2-dimensional trend pattern and by mixing it with a constant concentration value model. It is investigated how such distortions change the multifractal spectrum estimated by means of the 3-step method of moments. Discrete and continuous frequency distribution models are derived for patterns that satisfy the model of De Wijs. These simulated patterns satisfy a discrete frequency distribution model that as upper bound has a continuous frequency distribution to which it approaches in form when the subdivisions of the multiplicative cascade model are repeated indefinitely. This limiting distribution is lognormal in the center and has Pareto tails. Potentially, this approach has important implications in mineral and oil resource evaluation.

  1. Geochemical Enirchment and Mineralization of Indium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张乾; 战新志; 等

    1998-01-01

    Indium occurs in a very dispersed manner in nature with enrichment of economic in terest rarely known.The highly dispersed nature of indium,among several other elements,has for a long time retarded our understanding of the regularities that control their mineralization,which in turn has hindered exploitation and application of these elements.Recent studies of ours show that no significant enrichment of indium can be recognized in various types of Pb-Zn sulphide deposits as well as in deposits of copper,iron and manganese,Indium Concentrations in ores of these deposits are generally below 10×10-6.In contrast,however,indium is found to be enriched to a significant extent in cassiterite-sulphide deposits and some tin-rich Pb-Zn polymetallic deposits.The average content of indium in these deposits can be over 100×10-6,and more than 90% of it is concentrated in sphalerite.Generally,these deposits may be considered as large paragenic deposits for indium and ,therefore,there must be some regularities that govern the geochemical enrichment of the so-called "dispersed element" indium.

  2. Waste management project technical baseline description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederburg, J.P.

    1997-08-13

    A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alternative analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, implementation definitions, and discussion of uncertainties facing the Project.

  3. How Valid Are the Portland Baseline Essays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Erich

    1991-01-01

    Portland, Oregon's "African-American Baseline Essays," widely used in creating multicultural curricula, inaccurately depicts ancient Egyptians as black people and Olmec civilization as derived from African influences. The authors advance racial theories long abandoned by mainline Africa scholars, attribute mystical powers to pyramids,…

  4. Physics Potential of Long-Baseline Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of neutrino mixing and oscillations over the past decade provides firm evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Recently, θ13 has been determined to be moderately large, quite close to its previous upper bound. This represents a significant milestone in establishing the three-flavor oscillation picture of neutrinos. It has opened up exciting prospects for current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments towards addressing the remaining fundamental questions, in particular the type of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible presence of a CP-violating phase. Another recent and crucial development is the indication of non-maximal 2-3 mixing angle, causing the octant ambiguity of θ23. In this paper, I will review the phenomenology of long-baseline neutrino oscillations with a special emphasis on sub-leading three-flavor effects, which will play a crucial role in resolving these unknowns. First, I will give a brief description of neutrino oscillation phenomenon. Then, I will discuss our present global understanding of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters and will identify the major unknowns in this sector. After that, I will present the physics reach of current generation long-baseline experiments. Finally, I will conclude with a discussion on the physics capabilities of accelerator-driven possible future long-baseline precision oscillation facilities.

  5. Solid Waste Program technical baseline description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, A.B.

    1994-07-01

    The system engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Solid Waste Program is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, facility and project bases, and uncertainties facing the program.

  6. Rationing in the presence of baselines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a general model of rationing in which agents have baselines, in addition to claims against the (insufficient) endowment of the good to be allocated. Many real-life problems fit this general model (e.g., bankruptcy with prioritized claims, resource allocation in the public health care...

  7. National Cyberethics, Cybersafety, Cybersecurity Baseline Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study that explores the nature of the Cyberethics, Cybersafety, and Cybersecurity (C3) educational awareness policies, initiatives, curriculum, and practices currently taking place in the U.S. public and private K-12 educational settings. The study establishes baseline data on C3 awareness, which can be used…

  8. A visual basic spreadsheet macro for geochemical background analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakić, Zoran; Posavec, Kristijan; Bacani, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A Visual Basic macro entitled BACKGROUND calculates geochemical background values of chemical parameters and estimates threshold values separating background data from anomalies. The macro uses two statistical methods, the iterative 2-sigma technique and the calculated distribution function, and integrates these model-based objective methods into a widely accessible platform (i.e., MS Excel). The macro offers the possibility for automated processing of geochemical data and enables an automated generation of background range and threshold values for chemical parameters.

  9. Ternary geochemical-tracing system in natural gas accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of geochemical-tracing system of gas generation and accumulation is helpful to re-elucidating the gas migration and accumulation in time and space. To deduce the complex process of gas accumulation, a ternary geochemical-tracing system is set up, according to stable isotope inheritance of source rocks, kinetic fractionation of stable isotopes, time-accumulating effect of noble gas isotopes, mantle-derived volatile inheritance, and organic molecule inheritance of light hydrocarbons and thermally kinetic fractionation in their generation, in combination with the previous achievements of gas geochemistry and geochemical parameters of gas-source correlation. There are tight interactions for the geochemical parameters with much information about parent inheritance and special biomarkers, in which they are confirmed each other, reciprocally associated and preferentially used for the requirement so that we can use these geochemical parameters to effectively demonstrate the sources of natural gas, sedimentary environments and thermal evolution of source rocks, migration and accumulation of natural gas, and rearrangement of natural gas reservoirs. It is necessary for the ternary geochemical-tracing system to predict the formation of high efficient gas reservoir and their distribution in time and space.

  10. Geochemical tracers to evaluate hydrogeologic controls on river salinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephanie J; Bassett, R L; Liu, Beiling; Wolf, Christopher P; Doremus, Dale

    2008-01-01

    The salinization of rivers, as indicated by salinity increases in the downstream direction, is characteristic of arid and semiarid regions throughout the world. Historically, salinity increases have been attributed to various mechanisms, including (1) evaporation and concentration during reservoir storage, irrigation, and subsequent reuse; (2) displacement of shallow saline ground water during irrigation; (3) erosion and dissolution of natural deposits; and/or (4) inflow of deep saline and/or geothermal ground water (ground water with elevated water temperature). In this study, investigation of salinity issues focused on identification of relative salinity contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources in the Lower Rio Grande in the New Mexico-Texas border region. Based on the conceptual model of the system, the various sources of water and, therefore, salinity to the Lower Rio Grande were identified, and a sampling plan was designed to characterize these sources. Analysis results for boron (delta(11)B), sulfur (delta(34)S), oxygen (delta(18)O), hydrogen (delta(2)H), and strontium ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) isotopes, as well as basic chemical data, confirmed the hypothesis that the dominant salinity contributions are from deep ground water inflow to the Rio Grande. The stable isotopic ratios identified the deep ground water inflow as distinctive, with characteristic isotopic signatures. These analyses indicate that it is not possible to reproduce the observed salinization by evapotranspiration and agricultural processes alone. This investigation further confirms that proper application of multiple isotopic and geochemical tracers can be used to identify and constrain multiple sources of solutes in complex river systems.

  11. Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2) - Including "Best Value" Data Compilations for Geochemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Soil, Mineral, and Concentrate Sample Media

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2) contains new geochemical data compilations in which each geologic material sample has one "best value"...

  12. Compilation of kinetic data for geochemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.C. [Monitor Scientific, LLC., Denver, Colorado (United States); Savage, D. [Quintessa, Ltd., Nottingham (United Kingdom); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic data, including rate constants, reaction orders and activation energies, are compiled for 34 hydrolysis reactions involving feldspars, sheet silicates, zeolites, oxides, pyroxenes and amphiboles, and for similar reactions involving calcite and pyrite. The data are compatible with a rate law consistent with surface reaction control and transition-state theory, which is incorporated in the geochemical software package EQ3/6 and GWB. Kinetic data for the reactions noted above are strictly compatible with the transition-state rate law only under far-from-equilibrium conditions. It is possible that the data are conceptually consistent with this rate law under both far-from-equilibrium and near-to-equilibrium conditions, but this should be confirmed whenever possible through analysis of original experimental results. Due to limitations in the availability of kinetic data for mine-water reactions, and in order to simplify evaluations of geochemical models of groundwater evolution, it is convenient to assume local-equilibrium in such models whenever possible. To assess whether this assumption is reasonable, a modeling approach accounting for couple fluid flow and water-rock interaction is described that can be use to estimate spatial and temporal scale of local equilibrium. The approach is demonstrated for conditions involving groundwater flow in fractures at JNC's Kamaishi in-situ tests site, and is also used to estimate the travel time necessary for oxidizing surface waters to migrate to the level of a HLW repository in crystalline rock. The question of whether local equilibrium is a reasonable assumption must be addressed using an appropriate modeling approach. To be appropriate for conditions at the Kamaishi site using the modeling approach noted above, the fracture fill must closely approximate a porous mine, groundwater flow must be purely advective and diffusion of solutes across the fracture-host rock boundary must not occur. Moreover, the

  13. Geochemical identification of projectiles in impact rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Roald; Hecht, Lutz

    2006-11-01

    The three major geochemical methods for impactor identification are evaluated with respect to their potential and limitations with regards to the precise detection and identification of meteoritic material in impactites. The identification of a projectile component in impactites can be achieved by determining certain isotopic and elemental ratios in contaminated impactites. The isotopic methods are based on Os and Cr isotopic ratios. Osmium isotopes are highly sensitive for the detection of minute amounts of extraterrestrial components of even isotopic method requires the relatively highest projectile contamination (several wt%) in order to detect an extraterrestrial component, but may allow the identification of three different groups of extraterrestrial materials, ordinary chondrites, an enstatite chondrites, and differentiated achondrites. A significant advantage of this method is its independence of the target lithology and post-impact alteration. The use of elemental ratios, including platinum group elements (PGE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Rh, Pd), in combination with Ni and Cr represents a very powerful method for the detection and identification of projectiles in terrestrial and lunar impactites. For most projectile types, this method is almost independent of the target composition, especially if PGE ratios are considered. This holds true even in cases of terrestrial target lithologies with a high component of upper mantle material. The identification of the projectile is achieved by comparison of the "projectile elemental ratio" derived from the slope of the mixing line (target-projectile) with the elemental ratio in the different types of possible projectiles (e.g., chondrites). However, this requires a set of impactite samples of various degree of projectile contamination.

  14. Petroleum geochemical proxies for reservoir engineering parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, B. [Petroleum Reservoir Group (PRG), Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Lager, A. [NRG: School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Drummond Building, The University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Potter, D.K.; Buckman, J.O. [Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Larter, S.R. [Petroleum Reservoir Group (PRG), Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); NRG: School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Drummond Building, The University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    The prediction of fluid flow behaviour in petroleum reservoirs is influenced by the physical and chemical processes active in interacting crude oil/brine/rock systems. It is usually not possible to assess these complex systems directly so proxies for molecular scale behaviour are needed. By their very nature, polar non-hydrocarbons are sensitive to fluid-rock interactions, and if properly exploited they may be utilised as proxies for describing reservoir engineering properties (e.g. wettability) that are also sensitive to fluid-rock interactions. We have identified a group of aromatic oxygen (alkylphenols and alkylfluorenones) and aromatic nitrogen (alkylcarbazoles) compounds present in petroleum that appear to respond to variations in fluid-rock properties. Here we describe the chemical and physical changes in a series of core samples obtained from North Sea reservoirs. A number of petrophysical parameters displayed strong correlations with polar non-hydrocarbon occurrence. For example, deflections in gamma ray logs in response to clay content in a coarsening upwards sandstone unit also showed similar deflections from a number of geochemical logs. A core-flood experiment was designed to monitor the chemical and physical changes during oil migration in a siltstone core. Following completion of the core-flood experiment, Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) analysis of core samples indicated hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface tendencies grading throughout the core. The distributions of polar non-hydrocarbons (e.g. C{sub 0}-C{sub 3}-phenols) appear to correspond closely to the observed wettability alteration. The results confirm the potential for developing proxies for fluid-rock interactions through monitoring the surface active compounds present in the polar non-hydrocarbon fraction of petroleum. (author)

  15. Geochemical fate of arsenic in swine litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quazi, S.; Makris, K.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Punamiya, P.

    2007-12-01

    Swine diet is often supplemented by organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone to treat diseases and to promote growth. Recent data reported roxarsone degradation under anaerobic conditions in poultry litter, but no such data exist for swine wastes typically stored in unprotected lagoons in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, serious environmental health risk may arise upon significant arsenic (As) release into solution. The problem may be exacerbated under certain environmental conditions where organoarsenicals, such as roxarsone transform into the more toxic inorganic As, posing serious health risk to the surrounding ecosystem. The objective of this study were to analyze swine wastes collected from 19 randomly selected CAFOs in the USA for As concentrations, and to determine the geochemical fate of As in the swine waste suspensions. Swine wastes were analyzed for total-recoverable, total soluble, and water-extractable As, which were measured by ICP-MS. Speciation of As was performed following a well-established hyphenated technique using HPLC- ICPMS. Swine waste suspensions differed in solids contents; thus, the particulate matters with varying As concentrations were spiked with roxarsone and incubated under dark/light and aerobic/anaerobic conditions. Findings show the prevalence of inorganic As [As(V)] in swine waste suspension solutions. Roxarsone underwent degradation to both organoarsenicals, such as p-ASA, as well as inorganic arsenate and to a number of unidentified metabolites. Roxarsone degradation kinetics was influenced by the solids content and the air conditions (anaerobic/aerobic) of the swine waste suspensions. Maximum degradation rates were observed under anaerobic conditions, in suspensions which were low in solids content. Roxarsone degradation was primarily microbially-mediated, but in certain cases abiotic degradation was also observed, which were significantly slower.

  16. Geochemical Treasure Hunt for Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesmer, Maja; Frick, Daniel; Gerrits, Ruben; des GFZ-GeoWunderWerkstatt, Schülerlabor

    2017-04-01

    How can you inspire school children for geochemistry, and scientific exploratory urge? The key is to raise their curiosity and make learning new things a hands-on experience. The Fellows of the European Marie Curie Initial Training Network IsoNose designed and established a "Geochemical Treasure Hunt" to excite children for scientific investigations. This workshop explains primary school children the research and scientific methods of isotopic geochemistry, and their use to understand processes on the Earth's surface. From obtaining 'samples', performing various experiments, the school children gather clues leading them to the hidden treasure on the Telegrafenberg (campus of the GFZ Potsdam). The course was designed for school children to learn hands-on the meaning of elements, atoms and isotopes. In small groups the children conduct experiments of simplified methods being indispensable to any isotope geochemist. However, prior to working in any laboratory environment, a security briefing is necessary. For the course, two stages were implemented; firstly the use of harmful substances and dangerous equipment was minimised, and secondly children were equipped with size-matched personal protective equipment (lab coats, gloves, and safety googles). The purification of elements prior to isotopic analysis was visualised using colour chromatography. However, instead of using delicate mass spectrometers for the isotope ratio measurements, the pupils applied flame spectroscopy to analyse their dissolved and purified mineral solutions. Depending on the specific element present, a different colour was observed in the flame. The children plotted their colours of the flame spectroscopy onto a map and by interpreting the emerging colour patterns they localized the treasure on the map. In small teams they swarmed out on the Telegrafenberg to recover the hidden treasure. The project leading to this outreach activity has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie

  17. Soil Geochemical Control Over Nematode Populations in Bull Pass, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poage, M. A.; Barrett, J. E.; Virginia, R. A.; Wall, D. H.

    2005-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys occupy the largest ice-free region of Antarctica and are characterized by climatic conditions among the most extreme on Earth. Despite the harsh environmental conditions, some soils of the dry valleys host simple low-diversity ecosystems dominated by microbes and several taxa of metazoans, predominantly nematodes. Distributions, abundance, and diversity of these biota appear to be related to the highly variable soil geochemistry (pH, conductivity, nitrate, sulfate, chloride) of the dry valleys. Bull Pass is a glacially carved valley within the dry valleys. An ancient lake margin near the valley floor creates a continuous gradient spanning the full range of geochemical parameters found across the entire McMurdo Dry Valleys system. This unique setting provides the opportunity to systematically investigate the soil geochemical control on local biodiversity and establish, on the spatial scale of hundreds of meters, correlations between nematode populations and individual geochemical parameters that have application at the regional scale. We measured soil geochemistry and nematode population data from a 1500-meter transect across this ancient lake margin. There were significant negative correlations between live nematode abundance and concentrations of soil nitrate, sulfate and chloride as well as total soil salinity, consistent with recent laboratory experiments showing strong salinity inhibition of nematode survival. A logistical regression analysis based on a compilation of published datasets from across the dry valleys was designed to calculate the probably of live nematode populations occurring given a particular soil chemistry, using the dataset from the Bull Pass transect as a case study to field-test the model. Small-scale chemical and biological gradients can provide insights on the distribution of soil biota at much larger regional scales.

  18. CASA Uno GPS orbit and baseline experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, B. E.; Ho, C. S.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Tapley, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    CASA Uno data from sites distributed in longitude from Australia to Europe have been used to determine orbits of the GPS satellites. The characteristics of the orbits determined from double difference phase have been evaluated through comparisons of two-week solutions with one-week solutions and by comparisons of predicted and estimated orbits. Evidence of unmodeled effects is demonstrated, particularly associated with the orbit planes that experience solar eclipse. The orbit accuracy has been assessed through the repeatability of unconstrained estimated baseline vectors ranging from 245 km to 5400 km. Both the baseline repeatability and the comparison with independent space geodetic methods give results at the level of 1-2 parts in 100,000,000. In addition, the Mojave/Owens Valley (245 km) and Kokee Park/Ft. Davis (5409 km) estimates agree with VLBI and SLR to better than 1 part in 100,000,000.

  19. Joint Multi-baseline SAR Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tebaldini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a technique to provide interferometry by combining multiple images of the same area. This technique differs from the multi-baseline approach in literature as (a it exploits all the images simultaneously, (b it performs a spectral shift preprocessing to remove most of the decorrelation, and (c it exploits distributed targets. The technique is mainly intended for DEM generation at centimetric accuracy, as well as for differential interferometry. The problem is framed in the contest of single-input multiple-output (SIMO channel estimation via the cross-relations (CR technique and the resulting algorithm provides significant improvements with respect to conventional approaches based either on independent analysis of single interferograms or multi-baselines phase analysis of single pixels of current literature, for those targets that are correlated in all the images, like for long-term coherent areas, or for acquisitions taken with a short revisit time (as those gathered with future satellite constellations.

  20. Dissipative Effect in Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Roberto L N

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of neutrinos in long baselines experiments may be influenced by dissipation effects. Using Lindblad Master Equation we evolve neutrinos taking into account these dissipative effects. The MSW and the dissipative effects may change the probabilities behavior. In this work, we show and explain how the behavior of the probabilities can change due to the decoherence and relaxation effects acting individually with the MSW effect. A new exotic peak appears in this case and we show the difference between the decoherence and relaxation effects in the appearance of this peak. We also adapt the usual approximate expression for survival and appearance probabilities with all possible decoherence effects. We suppose the baseline of DUNE and show how each decoherence parameters change the probabilities analyzing the possible modification using numeric and analytic approach.

  1. CASA Uno GPS orbit and baseline experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, B. E.; Ho, C. S.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Tapley, B. D.

    1990-01-01

    CASA Uno data from sites distributed in longitude from Australia to Europe have been used to determine orbits of the GPS satellites. The characteristics of the orbits determined from double difference phase have been evaluated through comparisons of two-week solutions with one-week solutions and by comparisons of predicted and estimated orbits. Evidence of unmodeled effects is demonstrated, particularly associated with the orbit planes that experience solar eclipse. The orbit accuracy has been assessed through the repeatability of unconstrained estimated baseline vectors ranging from 245 km to 5400 km. Both the baseline repeatability and the comparison with independent space geodetic methods give results at the level of 1-2 parts in 100,000,000. In addition, the Mojave/Owens Valley (245 km) and Kokee Park/Ft. Davis (5409 km) estimates agree with VLBI and SLR to better than 1 part in 100,000,000.

  2. Systematic errors in long baseline oscillation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2006-02-01

    This article gives a brief overview of long baseline neutrino experiments and their goals, and then describes the different kinds of systematic errors that are encountered in these experiments. Particular attention is paid to the uncertainties that come about because of imperfect knowledge of neutrino cross sections and more generally how neutrinos interact in nuclei. Near detectors are planned for most of these experiments, and the extent to which certain uncertainties can be reduced by the presence of near detectors is also discussed.

  3. The Gambia Impact Evaluation Baseline Report

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The Government of The Gambia is implementing the Maternal and Child Nutrition and Health Results Project (MCNHRP) to increase the utilization of community nutrition and primary maternal and child health services. In collaboration with the Government, the World Bank is conducting an impact evaluation (IE) to assess the impact of the project on key aspects of maternal and child nutrition and health. The baseline survey for the MCNHRP IE took place between November 2014 and February 2015. It c...

  4. Efficient Wide Baseline Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Mario; Mayer, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a Structure from Motion approach for complex unorganized image sets. To achieve high accuracy and robustness, image triplets are employed and (an approximate) camera calibration is assumed to be known. The focus lies on a complete linking of images even in case of large image distortions, e.g., caused by wide baselines, as well as weak baselines. A method for embedding image descriptors into Hamming space is proposed for fast image similarity ranking. The later is employed to limit the number of pairs to be matched by a wide baseline method. An iterative graph-based approach is proposed formulating image linking as the search for a terminal Steiner minimum tree in a line graph. Finally, additional links are determined and employed to improve the accuracy of the pose estimation. By this means, loops in long image sequences are implicitly closed. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by results for several complex image sets also in comparison with VisualSFM.

  5. Geogenic distribution and baseline concentrations of Cu and Zn in surficial soil of Guiyang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji; WANG Shijie; OUYANG Ziyuan; LI Ruiling

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the environmentally geochemical characteristics of heavy metal pollu tants such as Cu and Zn in the surficial soil of Guiyang, the capital city of Guizhou Province. The baseline concentrations of heavy metals in soil and the geochemical norms have been established to distinguish natural or artificial influence on the environment. Using the statistically analytical methods, we have established the baseline of Cu in Guiyang ( 18.8 mg/kg) and the soil ( over 68.4 mg/kg) may suffer Cu contamination. The data of Zn are 46.3 mg/kg and 112.0 mg/kg. Geoaccumulation index analysis indicated that the surficial soil that has suffered non-pollution to mid-pollution of Cu accounts for 38%, 38%, and 22% for mid-pollution, and only 2% between mid-pollution to severe pollution. Surficial soil that has suffered non-pollution to mid-pollution of Zn accounts for 41%, 50%, and 7% for mid-pollution, and only 2% between mid-pollution to severe pollution. The maximal degree of Cu contamination is 5.09 in the surficial soil of Guiyang. Surficial soil that has not suffered Cu pollution accounts for 53.2%. The total pollution degree of Cu is slightly over zero. So the surficial soil of Guiyang has suffered slight Cu pollution. The maximum value of Zn contamination degree is 2.85 in the surficial soil of Guiyang. 77.8% of the surficial soil has not yet suffered any Zn pollution. The total pollution degree of Zn is less than zero.So the surficial soil in Guiyang is free from pollution of Zn.

  6. Baseline sediment trace metals investigation: Steinhatchee River estuary, Florida, Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, C.A.; Hoenstine, R.W.; Highley, A.B.; Donoghue, J.F.; Ragland, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This Florida Geological Survey/U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service Cooperative Study provides baseline data for major and trace metal concentrations in the sediments of the Steinhatchee River estuary. These data are intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with future metal concentration data measurements. The Steinhatchee River estuary is a relatively pristine bay located within the Big Bend Wildlife Management Area on the North Central Florida Gulf of Mexico coastline. The river flows 55 km through woodlands and planted pines before emptying into the Gulf at Deadman Harbor. Water quality in the estuary is excellent at present. There is minimal development within the watershed. The estuary is part of an extensive system of marshes that formed along the Florida Gulf coast during the Holocene marine transgression. Sediment accretion rate measurements range from 1.4 to 4.1 mm/yr on the basis of lead-210 measurements. Seventy-nine short cores were collected from 66 sample locations, representing four lithofacies: clay- and organic-rich sands, organic-rich sands, clean quartz sands, and oyster bioherms. Samples were analyzed for texture, total organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, clay mineralogy, and major and trace-metal content. Following these analyses, metal concentrations were normalized against geochemical reference elements (aluminum and iron) and against total weight percent organic matter. Metals were also normalized granulometrically against total weight percent fines (stress to young planted pines on tree farms within the watershed.The Florida Geological Survey/US Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service Cooperative Study provides baseline data for major and trace metal concentrations in the sediments of the Steinhatchee River estuary. The data are intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with metal concentration data measurements. Seventy nine short cores were collected from 66 sample locations

  7. History and evaluation of national-scale geochemical data sets for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Smith, Steven M.; Horton, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Six national-scale, or near national-scale, geochemical data sets for soils or stream sediments exist for the United States. The earliest of these, here termed the ‘Shacklette’ data set, was generated by a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project conducted from 1961 to 1975. This project used soil collected from a depth of about 20 cm as the sampling medium at 1323 sites throughout the conterminous U.S. The National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (NURE-HSSR) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy was conducted from 1975 to 1984 and collected either stream sediments, lake sediments, or soils at more than 378,000 sites in both the conterminous U.S. and Alaska. The sampled area represented about 65% of the nation. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), from 1978 to 1982, collected samples from multiple soil horizons at sites within the major crop-growing regions of the conterminous U.S. This data set contains analyses of more than 3000 samples. The National Geochemical Survey, a USGS project conducted from 1997 to 2009, used a subset of the NURE-HSSR archival samples as its starting point and then collected primarily stream sediments, with occasional soils, in the parts of the U.S. not covered by the NURE-HSSR Program. This data set contains chemical analyses for more than 70,000 samples. The USGS, in collaboration with the Mexican Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada, initiated soil sampling for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project in 2007. Sampling of three horizons or depths at more than 4800 sites in the U.S. was completed in 2010, and chemical analyses are currently ongoing. The NRCS initiated a project in the 1990s to analyze the various soil horizons from selected pedons throughout the U.S. This data set currently contains data from more than 1400 sites. This paper (1) discusses each data set in terms of its purpose, sample collection protocols, and analytical

  8. History and evaluation of national-scale geochemical data sets for the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Smith

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Six national-scale, or near national-scale, geochemical data sets for soils or stream sediments exist for the United States. The earliest of these, here termed the ‘Shacklette’ data set, was generated by a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS project conducted from 1961 to 1975. This project used soil collected from a depth of about 20 cm as the sampling medium at 1323 sites throughout the conterminous U.S. The National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (NURE-HSSR Program of the U.S. Department of Energy was conducted from 1975 to 1984 and collected either stream sediments, lake sediments, or soils at more than 378,000 sites in both the conterminous U.S. and Alaska. The sampled area represented about 65% of the nation. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS, from 1978 to 1982, collected samples from multiple soil horizons at sites within the major crop-growing regions of the conterminous U.S. This data set contains analyses of more than 3000 samples. The National Geochemical Survey, a USGS project conducted from 1997 to 2009, used a subset of the NURE-HSSR archival samples as its starting point and then collected primarily stream sediments, with occasional soils, in the parts of the U.S. not covered by the NURE-HSSR Program. This data set contains chemical analyses for more than 70,000 samples. The USGS, in collaboration with the Mexican Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada, initiated soil sampling for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project in 2007. Sampling of three horizons or depths at more than 4800 sites in the U.S. was completed in 2010, and chemical analyses are currently ongoing. The NRCS initiated a project in the 1990s to analyze the various soil horizons from selected pedons throughout the U.S. This data set currently contains data from more than 1400 sites. This paper (1 discusses each data set in terms of its purpose, sample collection protocols

  9. Canada’s First National Interoperability Baseline Assessment: CPRC 91052 Project Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    5 5 Current State Interoperability – by First Responder Group...region and first responder group  Identify differences and similarities across regions and organizations  Provide a baseline so that progress over...interoperability. For all First Responder groups, the biggest gap between the current and ideal states is with regard to data interoperability; they

  10. Hydrologic Regulation of Global Geochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.

    2015-12-01

    understand the processes controlling marine isotopic weathering processes, the need to integrate solute and solid transport into Earth system models, and the need to understand the role of extreme physical and temporal heterogeneities in moderating geochemical fluxes.

  11. Adjustment of geochemical background by robust multivariate statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conventional analyses of exploration geochemical data assume that the background is a constant or slowly changing value, equivalent to a plane or a smoothly curved surface. However, it is better to regard the geochemical background as a rugged surface, varying with changes in geology and environment. This rugged surface can be estimated from observed geological, geochemical and environmental properties by using multivariate statistics. A method of background adjustment was developed and applied to groundwater and stream sediment reconnaissance data collected from the Hot Springs Quadrangle, South Dakota, as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Source-rock lithology appears to be a dominant factor controlling the chemical composition of groundwater or stream sediments. The most efficacious adjustment procedure is to regress uranium concentration on selected geochemical and environmental variables for each lithologic unit, and then to delineate anomalies by a common threshold set as a multiple of the standard deviation of the combined residuals. Robust versions of regression and RQ-mode principal components analysis techniques were used rather than ordinary techniques to guard against distortion caused by outliers Anomalies delineated by this background adjustment procedure correspond with uranium prospects much better than do anomalies delineated by conventional procedures. The procedure should be applicable to geochemical exploration at different scales for other metals. ?? 1985.

  12. Geochemical Fate and Transport of Diphenhydramine and Cetirizine in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wireman, R.; Rutherford, C. J.; Vulava, V. M.; Cory, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals compounds presence in natural soils and water around the world has become a growing concern. These compounds are being discharged into the environment through treated wastewater or municipal sludge applications. The main goal of this study is determine their geochemical fate in natural soils. In this study we investigated sorption and transport behavior of diphenhydramine (DPH) and cetirizine (CTZ) in natural soils. These two commonly-used antihistamines are complex aromatic hydrocarbons with polar functional groups. Two clean acidic soils (pH~4.5) were used for these studies - an A-horizon soil that had higher organic matter content (OM, 7.6%) and a B-horizon soil that had lower OM (1.6%), but higher clay content (5.1%). Sorption isotherms were measured using batch reactor experiments. Data indicated that sorption was nonlinear and that it was stronger in clay-rich soils. The pKa's of DPH and CTZ are 8.98 and 8.27 respectively, i.e., these compounds are predominantly in cationic form at soil pH. In these forms, they preferentially sorb to negatively charged mineral surfaces (e.g., clay) present in the soils. Soil clay mineral characterization indicated that kaolinite was the dominant clay mineral present along with small amount of montmorillonite. The nonlinear sorption isotherms were fitted with Freundlich model. Transport behavior of both compounds was measured using glass chromatography columns. As expected both DPH and CTZ were strongly retained in the clay-rich soil as compared with OM-rich soil. The asymmetrical shape of the breakthrough curves indicated that there were likely two separate sorption sites in the soil, each with different reaction rates with each compound. A two-region advection-dispersion transport code was used to model the transport breakthrough curves. There was no evidence of transformation or degradation of the compounds during our sorption and transport studies.

  13. Geochemical characteristics of pyrite in Duolanasayi gold deposit, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guodong; XIAO Huiliang; WANG Henian; ZHOU Jiyuan

    2005-01-01

    The Duolanasayi gold deposit, 60 km NW of Habahe County, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, is a mid-large-scale gold deposit controlled by brittle-ductile shearing, and superimposed by albitite veins and late-stage magma hydrothermal solutions. There are four types of pyrite, which are contained in the light metamorphosed rocks (limestone, siltstone), altered-mineralized rocks (chlorite-schist, altered albite-granite, mineralized phyllite), quartz veins and carbonatite veinlets. The pyrite is the most common ore mineral. The Au-barren pyrite is present mainly in a simple form and gold-bearing pyrite is present mainly in a composite form. From the top downwards, the pyrite varies in crystal form from {100} and {210}+{100} to {210}+{100}+{111} to {100}+{111}. Geochemical studies indicate that the molecular contents of pyrite range from Fe1.057S2 to Fe0.941S2. Gold positively correlates with Mn, Sr, Zn, Te, Pb, Ba and Ag. There are four groups of trace elements: Fe-Cu-Sr-Ag, Au-Te-Co, As-Pb-Zn and Mn-V-Ti-Ba-Ni-Cr in pyrite. The REE characteristics show that the total amount of REE (ΣREE) ranges from 32.35×10 -6 to 132.18×10 -6; LREE/HREE, 4.466-9.142; (La/Yb)N, 3.719-11.133; (Eu/Sm)N, 0.553-1.656; (Sm/Nd)N, 0.602-0.717; La/Yb, 6.26-18.75; δEu, 0.628-2.309; δCe, 0.308-0.816. Sulfur isotopic compositions (δ 34S=-2.46‰--7.02‰) suggest that the sulfur associated with gold mineralization was derived from the upper mantle or lower crust.

  14. Pipeline integrity: ILI baseline data for QRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Todd R. [Tuboscope Pipeline Services, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: tporter@varco.com; Silva, Jose Augusto Pereira da [Pipeway Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: guto@pipeway.com; Marr, James [MARR and Associates, Calgary, AB (Canada)]. E-mail: jmarr@marr-associates.com

    2003-07-01

    The initial phase of a pipeline integrity management program (IMP) is conducting a baseline assessment of the pipeline system and segments as part of Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA). This gives the operator's integrity team the opportunity to identify critical areas and deficiencies in the protection, maintenance, and mitigation strategies. As a part of data gathering and integration of a wide variety of sources, in-line inspection (ILI) data is a key element. In order to move forward in the integrity program development and execution, the baseline geometry of the pipeline must be determined with accuracy and confidence. From this, all subsequent analysis and conclusions will be derived. Tuboscope Pipeline Services (TPS), in conjunction with Pipeway Engenharia of Brazil, operate ILI inertial navigation system (INS) and Caliper geometry tools, to address this integrity requirement. This INS and Caliper ILI tool data provides pipeline trajectory at centimeter level resolution and sub-metre 3D position accuracy along with internal geometry - ovality, dents, misalignment, and wrinkle/buckle characterization. Global strain can be derived from precise INS curvature measurements and departure from the initial pipeline state. Accurate pipeline elevation profile data is essential in the identification of sag/over bend sections for fluid dynamic and hydrostatic calculations. This data, along with pipeline construction, operations, direct assessment and maintenance data is integrated in LinaViewPRO{sup TM}, a pipeline data management system for decision support functions, and subsequent QRA operations. This technology provides the baseline for an informed, accurate and confident integrity management program. This paper/presentation will detail these aspects of an effective IMP, and experience will be presented, showing the benefits for liquid and gas pipeline systems. (author)

  15. Western Alborz Volcanic Rocks, a new Geochemical Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, M.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic and pyroclastic rocks of Eocene age comprise vast outcrops of Alborz Mountain Range, a fold-thrusted structural unit extending across northern Iran for 2000 km in a curvilinear pattern. In his account of structural evolution of Iranian plateau, Berberian (1983; p. 55) ascribed these rocks to a subduction-type magmatism. Based on a tectonostratigraphic study, these rocks are attributed to an arc-type magmatism (Alavi; 1996, p. 29). Recently a new data set of major and trace element (including REE) analyses of volcanic rocks from western Alborz, some 50 km west of city of Qazvin, has been made available (Asiabanha, 2001). Careful examination of the data (i.e., those of basic-intermediate rocks) in present study revealed, for the first time, some geochemical characteristics which have important implications on the geodynamic synthesis of this structural unit. The rocks contain 50-60 wt% SiO2. They lie in the midalkaline-to-subalkaline domain of TAS diagram (Middlemost, 1997; p.216) and fall in the calcalkaline field of AFM diagram. The volcanic rocks display two distinct chondrite-normalized REE patterns, one is MREE-depleted while the other is a rather smooth uniform M-HREE pattern. These are called MREE-depleted and smooth M-HREE series. Basic rocks from the latter contain higher silica than the former (>53 vs. >50 wt%), yet they show lower incompatible elements (e.g., K and Rb) and HFSE contents. These features can not be explained by differentiation and might be interpreted as implying the involvement of two source regions. Chondrite-normalized trace element patterns of the MREE-depleted series is more akin to the island arc calcalkaline (IACA) basic rocks than the basic rocks from any other tectonic settings. However, island arc products, known for being depleted in HFSE relative to other incompatible elements, differ from the MREE-depleted series which is rich in both HFSE and incompatible elements. One may advocate the role of OIB-type mantle

  16. Preliminary Geochemical and Rock Magnetic Study of a Stalagmite From Quintana Roo, Northeastern Yucatan Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Perez-Cruz, L.; Zhao, X.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present the preliminary results of geochemical, stable isotopes and rock magnetic studies of a stalagmite from a cave in eastern Quintana Roo, northern Yucatan peninsula. In the past years, there has been increased interest in understanding the paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental evolution of the Yucatan peninsula and northern Central America, investigating the relationships between climate variations and the development of the Maya civilization. In particular, the variations in regional precipitation and occurrence of several drought periods, which might have been related to the collapse of the Classic Maya period. Stable isotope data on speleothems from different sites in Yucatan and Central America have provided evidence on changes in precipitation, which have affected the Maya region. The stalagmite is ~47 cm long and about 4-5 cm wide at its base. It was collected from the Hilariós Well cave in Tulum, Quintana Roo. Magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses have been completed as part of the initial characterization of the stalagmite, with measurements taken every centimeter. Geochemical analyses have been carried out for x-ray fluorescence, with a Niton XRF analyzer. Magnetic susceptibility was determined with a Bartington MS2 instrument using the high resolution surface probe. Additional rock magnetic analyses include magnetic hysteresis loops and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition, and saturation IRM demagnetization, which have been measured with a MicroMag instrument. Hysteresis loops are diamagnetic, with small varying low-coercivity ferromagnetic components. The elemental compositions of major oxides and trace elements vary with depth. Calcium is the major element and displays a pattern of small amplitude fluctuations with a trend to lower values at the bottom, which are also shown in other elements such as barium. Silica and elements such as titanium and strontium are positively correlated and show an apparent cyclic pattern

  17. Geochemical Responses to Anthropogenic and Natural Influences in Ebinur Lake Sediments of Arid Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Wu, Jinglu; Abuduwaili, Jilili; Liu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical concentrations were extracted for a short sediment core from Ebinur Lake, located in arid northwest China, and mathematical methods were used to demonstrate the complex pattern of the geochemical anomalies resulting from the temporal changes in natural and anthropogenic forces on the lake sediments. The first element assemblage (C1) (aluminum, potassium, iron, magnesium, beryllium, etc.) was predominantly terrigenous; among the assemblage, total phosphorus and titanium were generally consistent with aluminum except with regards to their surface sequences, which inferred the differences of source regions for terrigenous detrital material led to this change around ca. 2000AD. The second assemblage (C2) (calcium and strontium) was found to have a negative relationship with aluminum through a cluster analysis. The third assemblage (C3) included sodium and magnesium, which were influenced by the underwater lake environment and deposited in the Ebinur depression. The concentration ratio of C1/(C1+C2) was used as an indicator for denudation amount of detrital materials, which was supported by the values of magnetic susceptibility. The enrichment factors for heavy metals suggested that the influence of human activities on heavy-metal enrichment in Ebinur Lake region was not severe over the past century. Prior to the 1960s, geochemical indicators suggested a stable lacustrine environment with higher water levels. Beginning in the 1960s, high agricultural water demand resulted in rapid declines in lake water level, with subsequent increases of lake water salinity, as evidenced by enhanced sodium concentration in lake core sediments. During this period, anthropogenic activity also enhanced the intensity of weathering and the denudation of the Ebinur watershed.

  18. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-11-01

    As discussed in the program plan for the Savannah River Plant (SRP) Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, this program has been implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the current state of knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The objective of the program is to install a series of observation well clusters (wells installed in each major water bearing formation at the same site) at key locations across the plant site in order to: (1) provide detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and groundwater hydrology, (2) provide observation wells to monitor the groundwater quality, head relationships, gradients, and flow paths.

  19. Very Long Baseline Interferometry with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Paragi, Zsolt; Reynolds, Cormac; Rioja, Maria; Deller, Adam; Zhang, Bo; Gurvits, Leonid; Bietenholz, Michael; Szomoru, Arpad; Bignall, Hayley; Boven, Paul; Charlot, Patrick; Dodson, Richard; Frey, Sandor; Garrett, Michael; Imai, Hiroshi; Lobanov, Andrei; Reid, Mark; Ros, Eduardo; van Langevelde, Huib; Zensus, J Anton; Zheng, Xing Wu; Alberdi, Antxon; Agudo, Ivan; An, Tao; Argo, Megan; Beswick, Rob; Biggs, Andy D; Brunthaler, Andreas; Campbell, Robert M; Cimo, Giuseppe; Colomer, Francisco; Corbel, Stephane; Conway, John; Cseh, David; Deane, Roger; Falcke, Heino; Gabanyi, Krisztina; Gawronski, Marcin; Gaylard, Michael; Giovannini, Gabriele; Giroletti, Marcello; Goddi, Ciriaco; Goedhart, Sharmila; Gomez, Jose L; Gunn, Alastair; Jung, Taehyun; Kharb, Preeti; Klockner, Hans-Rainer; Kording, Elmar; Kovalev, Yurii Yu; Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Lindqvist, Michael; Lister, Matt; Mantovani, Franco; Marti-Vidal, Ivan; Mezcua, Mar; McKean, John; Middelberg, Enno; Miller-Jones, James; Moldon, Javier; Muxlow, Tom; O'Brien, Tim; Pérez-Torres, Miguel; Pogrebenko, Sergei; Quick, Jonathan; Rushton, Anthony P; Schilizzi, Richard; Smirnov, Oleg; Sohn, Bong Won; Surcis, Gabriele; Taylor, Greg; Tingay, Steven; Tudose, Valeriu; van der Horst, Alexander; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Venturi, Tiziana; Vermeulen, Rene; Vlemmings, Wouter; de Witt, Aletha; Wucknitz, Olaf; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Adding VLBI capability to the SKA arrays will greatly broaden the science of the SKA, and is feasible within the current specifications. SKA-VLBI can be initially implemented by providing phased-array outputs for SKA1-MID and SKA1-SUR and using these extremely sensitive stations with other radio telescopes, and in SKA2 by realising a distributed configuration providing baselines up to thousands of km, merging it with existing VLBI networks. The motivation for and the possible realization of SKA-VLBI is described in this paper.

  20. Optimization of the CLIC Baseline Collimation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; /Oxford U., JAI; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; /Daresbury; Fernandez-Hernando, Juan; /Daresbury; Jackson, Frank; /Daresbury; Dalena, Barbara; /CERN; Schulte, Daniel; /CERN; Tomas, Rogelio; /CERN; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Important efforts have recently been dedicated to the improvement of the design of the baseline collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Different aspects of the design have been optimized: the transverse collimation depths have been recalculated in order to reduce the collimator wakefield effects while maintaining a good efficiency in cleaning the undesired beam halo; the geometric design of the spoilers have also been reviewed to minimize wakefields; in addition, the optics design have been polished to improve the collimation efficiency. This paper describes the current status of the CLIC collimation system after this optimization.

  1. SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation, Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bledsoe, H.W.

    1988-08-01

    The SRP Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation was implemented for the purpose of updating and improving the knowledge and understanding of the hydrogeologic systems underlying the SRP site. Phase III, which is discussed in this report, includes the drilling of 7 deep coreholes (sites P-24 through P-30) and the installation of 53 observation wells ranging in depth from approximately 50 ft to more than 970 ft below the ground surface. In addition to the collection of geologic cores for lithologic and stratigraphic study, samples were also collected for the determination of physical characteristics of the sediments and for the identification of microorganisms.

  2. SRP baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Aquifer characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, R.N.; Kaback, D.S.

    1992-03-31

    An investigation of the mineralogy and chemistry of the principal hydrogeologic units and the geochemistry of the water in the principal aquifers at Savannah River Site (SRS) was undertaken as part of the Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation. This investigation was conducted to provide background data for future site studies and reports and to provide a site-wide interpretation of the geology and geochemistry of the Coastal Plain Hydrostratigraphic province. Ground water samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, minor and trace elements, gross alpha and beta, tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and carbon-14. Sediments from the well borings were analyzed for mineralogy and major and minor elements.

  3. Baseline Response Levels Are a Nuisance in Infant Contingency Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, W. S.; Weir, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The impact of differences in level of baseline responding on contingency learning in the first year was examined by considering the response acquisition of infants classified into baseline response quartiles. Whereas the three lower baseline groups showed the predicted increment in responding to a contingency, the highest baseline responders did…

  4. The application of long-lived bivalve sclerochronology in environmental baseline monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Steinhardt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of the impact of construction, operation and removal of large infrastructures and other human activities on the marine environment are limited because they do not fully quantify the background baseline conditions and relevant scales of natural variability. Baselines as defined in Environmental Impact Assessments typically reflect the status of the environment and its variability drawn from published literature and augmented with some short term site specific characterization. Consequently, it can be difficult to determine whether a change in the environment subsequent to industrial activity is within or outside the range of natural background variability representative of an area over decades or centuries. An innovative approach that shows some promise in overcoming the limitations of traditional baseline monitoring methodology involves the analysis of shell material (sclerochronology from molluscs living upon or within the seabed in potentially affected areas. Bivalves especially can be effective biomonitors of their environment over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A rapidly expanding body of research has established that numerous characteristics of the environment can be reflected in morphological and geochemical properties of the carbonate shell material in bivalve shells, as well as in functional responses such as growth rates. In addition, the annual banding pattern in shells can provide an absolute chronometer of environmental variability and/or industrial effects. Further, some species of very long-lived bivalves can be crossdated back in time, like trees, by comparing the annual banding patterns in their shells. It is therefore feasible to develop extended timeseries of certain marine environmental variables that can provide important insights into long temporal scales of baseline variability. We review recent innovative work on the shell structure, morphology and geochemistry of bivalves and conclude that they

  5. Physics Potential of Long-Baseline Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of neutrino mixing and oscillations over the past decade provides firm evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Recently, theta13 has been determined to be moderately large, quite close to its previous upper bound. This represents a significant milestone in establishing the three-flavor oscillation picture of neutrinos. It has opened up exciting prospects for current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments towards addressing the remaining fundamental questions, in particular the type of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible presence of a CP-violating phase. Another recent and crucial development is the indication of non-maximal 2-3 mixing angle, causing the octant ambiguity of theta23. In this paper, I will review the phenomenology of long-baseline neutrino oscillations with a special emphasis on sub-leading three-flavor effects, which will play a crucial role in resolving these unknowns. First, I will give a brief description of neutrino oscillation phenomeno...

  6. Baseline and benchmark model development for hotels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, Edward T., Jr.

    The hotel industry currently faces rising energy costs and requires the tools to maximize energy efficiency. In order to achieve this goal a clear definition of the current methods used to measure and monitor energy consumption is made. Uncovering the limitations to the most common practiced analysis strategies and presenting methods that can potentially overcome those limitations is the main purpose. Techniques presented can be used for measurement and verification of energy efficiency plans and retrofits. Also, modern energy modeling tool are introduced to demonstrate how they can be utilized for benchmarking and baseline models. This will provide the ability to obtain energy saving recommendations and parametric analysis to explore energy savings potential. These same energy models can be used in design decisions for new construction. An energy model is created of a resort style hotel that over one million square feet and has over one thousand rooms. A simulation and detailed analysis is performed on a hotel room. The planning process for creating the model and acquiring data from the hotel room to calibrate and verify the simulation will be explained. An explanation as to how this type of modeling can potentially be beneficial for future baseline and benchmarking strategies for the hotel industry. Ultimately the conclusion will address some common obstacles the hotel industry has in reaching their full potential of energy efficiency and how these techniques can best serve them.

  7. 电子废物堆场表层土壤重金属元素的生态地球化学预警——以广东贵屿为例%Eco-geochemical Warning of Heavy Metals in Surface Soil in Dismantling Household Appliance Storage Yard as Exemplified by the Guiyu Region,Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗杰; 方楚凝; 游远航; 欧阳春飞

    2012-01-01

    电子垃圾及贵金属回收会造成严重的环境污染并使居民健康受损。通过基于元素形态的缓变型地球化学灾害模型和基于元素全量的多重分形,对广东省贵屿镇表层土壤有毒有害元素含量及分布进行研究。结果表明,贵屿镇家电拆解区的有毒有害元素Ni、Zn、Cd、As的可释放总量分别为11.42、39.00、0.111和1.25mg/kg,均超过对应临界值8.11、19.67、0.054和0.69mg/kg。80%的Cu的可释放总量为12.15mg/kg,超过临界值10.42mg/kg,说明TRCP的释放向有效形态转化的速度加速,具有爆发缓变型地球化学灾害的可能性;Hg、Pb元素服从高浓集的连续多重分形叠加模式,说明受人类活动影响强烈,Cd具有较小的分维数,自低含量点到高含量点的转化慢,表明有较多的高含量点分布,污染发展趋势较严重。贵屿镇与家电拆解有关的有毒有害元素污染均有进一步恶化的趋势。%Dismantling electronic waste and recovery of precious metals cause serious environmental pollution and damage residents′ health.By studying the delayed geochemical hazards model based on element speciation and multi-fractal model based on total elements,we derived that the total releasable amounts of Ni,Zn,Cd and As in top soil from a dismantling household appliance storage yard in Guiyu were 11.42 mg/kg,39.00 mg/kg,0.111 mg/kg and 1.25 mg/kg,respectively.They all exceeded the corresponding critical values: 8.11 mg/kg,19.67 mg/kg,0.054 mg/kg and 0.69 mg/kg,respectively.Eighty percent of the total releasable amount of Cu was 12.15 mg/kg,exceeding the critical value of 10.42 mg/kg.It is shown that the transformation of TRCP to available form would be accelerated,thus producing geochemical hazards.Hg and Pb obey the high-concentration continuous multifractal model,i.e.,Hg and Pb are strongly influenced by human activities.Cd has minor fractal dimension,slow in transformation from low level to high level,showing that the

  8. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network

  9. Cambrian Kherlen ophiolite in northeastern Mongolia and its tectonic implications: SHRIMP zircon dating and geochemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Laicheng; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Zhang, Fochin; Anaad, Chimedtseren; Zhu, Mingshuai; Yang, Shunhu

    2016-09-01

    The Kherlen terrane, which contains the Kherlen ophiolitic complex, is located between two Precambrian continental blocks in the northeastern Mongolia. We present new geochemical and SHRIMP zircon U-Pb data for the Kherlen ophiolitic complex and for granitic plutons intruding the complex, providing constraints on the regional evolution in Early Paleozoic time. The Kherlen ophiolite, which is geochemically similar to SSZ-type ophiolites, was originated from two distinct mantle sources, a N-MORB-like source and an E-MORB-like source. A gabbro and a plagiogranite dike intruding the gabbro from the Kherlen ophiolite yielded similar SHRIMP zircon U-Pb ages of ca. 500 Ma, suggesting that the ophiolite formed in Late Cambrian time. Post- or syn-collisional granites intruding the ophiolitic complex yielded crystallization ages of ca. 440 Ma, which is interpreted to record the minimum age of the tectonic emplacement of the ophiolite. These new data demonstrate that the Kherlen ophiolite belt is an Early Paleozoic suture between the Ereendavaa and the Idermeg continental terranes, which is generally coeval with the Bayankhongor belt in central Mongolia, indicating that they are regionally correlated, and thus they define a major Early Paleozoic suture between two Precambrian continental blocks in the central-northeastern Mongolia.

  10. Geostatistical discrimination between different sources of soil pollutants using a magneto-geochemical data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Szuszkiewicz, Marcin; Fabijańczyk, Piotr; Magiera, Tadeusz

    2016-12-01

    The primary goal of this work was to distinguish between soil pollution from long-range and local transport of atmospheric pollutants using soil magnetometry supported by geochemical analyses. The study area was located in the Izery region of Poland (within the "Black Triangle" region, which is the nickname for one of Europe's most polluted areas, where Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic meet). One site of the study area was situated in the Forest Glade and was exposed to anthropogenic pollution from a former glasswork. The second site of the study area was located on a neighboring hill (Granicznik) of which the western, northwestern and southwestern parts of the slope were exposed to the long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants from the Czech Republic, Germany and Poland. Magnetic susceptibility was measured on the soil surface and in the soil samples using a MS2 Bartington meter equipped with MS2D and MS2C sensors, respectively. Using soil magnetometry, it was possible to discriminate between long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants and anthropogenic pollution related to the former glasswork located in the Forest Glade. Additionally, using MS2C measurements and geochemical analyses of sixteen trace elements, it was possible to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic origins of a soil magnetic susceptibility signal. Our results indicate that the Forest Glade site is characterized by relatively significant anthropogenic translocation of topsoil horizons, presence of artefacts, more hot spots, very high spatial variability, and higher nugget effect than on the Granicznik Hill.

  11. Heterogeneity of Parent Rocks and Its Constraints on Geochemical Criteria in Weathering Crusts of Carbonate Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shijie; FENG Zhigang

    2004-01-01

    Owing to the low contents of their acid-insoluble components, carbonate rocks tend to decrease sharply in volume in association with the formation of weathering crust. The formation of a 1 m-thick weathering crust would usually consume more than ten meters to several tens of meters of thickness of parent rocks. The knowledge of how to identify the homogeneity of parent rocks is essential to understand the formation mechanism of weathering crust in karst regions,especially that of thick-layered red weathering crust. In this work the grain-size analyses have demonstrated that the three profiles studied are the residual weathering crust of carbonate rocks and further showed that there objectively exists the heterogeneity of parent rocks in the three studied weathering crusts. The heterogeneity of parent rocks can also be reflected in geochemical parameters of major elements, just as the characteristics of frequency plot of grain-size distribution.Conservative trace element ratios Zr/Hf and Nb/Ta are proven to be unsuitable for tracing the heterogeneity of parent rocks of weathering crust, but its geochemical mechanism is unclear. The authors strongly suggest in this paper that the identification of the homogeneity of parent rocks of weathering crust in karst regions is of prime necessity.

  12. REE Geochemical Study of the Permian-Triassic Marine Sedimentary Environment in Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    南君亚; 刘丛强; 周德全; 王筑明

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with the REE geochemical characteristics of Permian-Triassic marine carbonate rocks in Guizhou Province. It is found that there are two broad categories of stratigraphic units in the region studied in accordance with their ∑ REE contents and REE distribution patterns: one is characterized by LREE enrichment and slight Ce depletion, with the REE distribution patterns similar to those of North American shales, and the other features relative HREE enrichment and relatively remarkable Ce depletion, with the REE distribution patterns close to those of pelagic sediments. In terms of their different ∑ REE contents, five types of stratigraphic units can be distinguished. Incorporation of detrital minerals, REE complexing capability, oxidation-reduction conditions of the media are the main factors affecting the REE composition and REE distribution patterns of marine carbonate rocks in the region studied. In the light of REE geochemical characteristics of carbonate rocks, coupled with sedimentary facies analysis, this paper discusses the characteristics of the Permian-Triassic marine sedimentary environment in Guizhou Province and its evolutional rules.

  13. The tectonic emplacement of Sumba in the Sunda-Banda Arc: paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene Jawila volcanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensink, H.; Bergen, M.J. van

    1995-01-01

    The island of Sumba is a continental fragment in the fore-arc region near the transition between the Sunda Arc and Banda Arc in southeastern Indonesia. Paleomagnetic and geochemical evidence from the early Miocene volcanics of the Jawila Formation in western Sumba constrain the final drift stage

  14. Geochemical signals of progressive continental rupture in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, T.; Bryce, J.; Yirgu, G.; Ayalew, D.; Cooper, L.

    2003-04-01

    Mafic volcanics of the Main Ethiopian Rift record the development of magmatic rift segments during continental extension. The Ethiopian Rift is one arm of a triple junction that formed above a Paleogene mantle plume, concurrent with eruption of flood basalts ca. 30 Ma across northern Ethiopian and Yemen. The geochemistry of Ethiopian Rift lavas thus provides insight into processes associated with the shift from mechanical (lithospheric) to magmatic (asthenospheric) segmentation in the transitional phase of continental rifting. Quaternary basalts from five volcanic centers representing three magmatic segments display along-axis geochemical variations that likely reflect the degree of rifting and magma supply, which increase abruptly with proximity to the highly-extended Afar region. To first order, the geochemical data indicate a decreasing degree of shallow-level fractionation and greater involvement of depleted or plume-like mantle source materials in basalts sampled closer to the Afar. These spatially controlled geochemical signatures observed in contemporaneous basalts are similar to temporal variations documented in southern Ethiopia, where Quaternary lavas indicate a greater degree of crustal extension than those erupted at the onset of plume activity. Primitive Ethiopian Rift basalts have geochemical signatures (e.g., Ce/Pb, La/Nb, Ba/Nb, Ba/Rb, U/Th) that overlap ocean island basalt compositions, suggesting involvement of sub-lithospheric source materials. The estimated depth of melting (65-75 km) is shallower than values obtained for young primitive mafic lavas from the Western Rift and southern Kenya as well as Oligocene Ethiopian flood basalts from the onset of plume-driven activity. Basalts from the Turkana region (N. Kenya) and Erta 'Ale (Danakil depression) reflect melting at shallower levels, corresponding to the greater degree of crustal extension in these provinces. Preliminary Sr and Nd isotopic data trend towards primitive earth values, consistent

  15. Geochemical Signatures in Corals from Looe Key, Florida since 1870 A.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. M.; Quinn, T. M.; Halley, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    Geochemical variations in modern and fossil coral skeletons (Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, δ 18O, δ 13C) are increasingly being used to reconstruct climate variability in tropical ocean-atmosphere system on interannual to centennial timescales. Sub-annually resolved, centennial-length records of climate from the Atlantic that overlap with and extend beyond the instrumental record are sparse, yet required to assess interannual climate variations over decades to centuries. We address this data gap by presenting a %\\sim132 year time series of monthly geochemical variations in Montastraea annularis (complex) corals from Looe Key reef, Florida USA (24.5\\deg N, 81.4\\deg W). We first reconstructed estimates of hydrographic and temperature variability at Looe Key using temperature calibrations developed over the decade in which we have thermistor data. Calibration-verification exercises over this interval indicate differences in mean values of 0.6\\degC Sr/Ca-SST and 0.2\\degC \\delta$18O-SST. Next we extended the calibration-verification intervals by comparing the coral geochemical variations with a SST record extracted from the HadISST 1.1 database using the appropriate 1° by 1° grid point for Looe Key. These longer-term verification exercises show a better agreement in estimation of the mean in δ 18O-SST (0.15° C) than Sr/Ca-SST (0.47° C). Comparisons of monthly Sr/Ca and δ 18O anomalies with monthly temperature anomalies over the entire record reveal weak relationships (r = -0.13, -0.10, respectively); however, there is a strong coupling between Sr/Ca and δ 18O anomalies (r = 0.51) that shares spectral power in the decadal band. The relationship between decadally smoothed geochemical values and the AMO is also weak (r = -0.13, 0.09; for Sr/Ca and δ 18O) despite a strong correlation between the AMO and SST from the Looe Key region (r = 0.72). The low correlation between SSTA/AMO and the coral proxies (Sr/Ca and δ 18O), despite the good fit between the coral proxies

  16. Radio sources - Very, Very Long Baseline Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. H.

    1983-03-01

    With resolution of a thousandth of an arcsecond, the radio technique of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) provides astronomers with their highest-resolution view of the universe. Data taken with widely-separated antennas are combined, with the help of atomic clocks, to form a Michelson interferometer whose size may be as great as the earth's diameter. Extraordinary phenomena, from the birth of stars as signaled by the brilliant flashes of powerful interstellar masers to the 'faster-than-light' expansion of the cores of distant quasars, are being explored with this technique. However, earth-bound VLBI suffers from several restrictions due to the location of the component antennas at fixed places on the earth's surface. The use of one or more antennas in space in concert with ground-based equipment will greatly expand the technical and scientific capabilities of VLBI, leading to a more complete and even higher resolution view of cosmic phenomena.

  17. The OPERA long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilquet, G.

    2008-05-01

    OPERA is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to observe the appearance of vτ in a pure vμ beam in the parameter space indicated by the atmospheric neutrinos oscillation signal. The detector is situated in the underground LNGS laboratory under 3 800 water meter equivalent at a distance of 730 km from CERN where the CNGS neutrino beam to which it is exposed originates. It consists of two identical 0.68 kilotons lead/nuclear emulsion targets, each instrumented with a tracking device and complemented by a muon spectrometer. The concept and the status of the detector are described and the first results obtained with cosmic rays and during two weeks of beam commissioning in 2006 are reported.

  18. In-Space Manufacturing Baseline Property Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Tom; Schneider, Judith; Prater, Tracie; Bean, Quincy; Werkheiser, Nicki

    2016-01-01

    The In-Space Manufacturing (ISM) project at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center currently operates a 3D FDM (fused deposition modeling) printer onboard the International Space Station. In order to enable utilization of this capability by designer, the project needs to establish characteristic material properties for materials produced using the process. This is difficult for additive manufacturing since standards and specifications do not yet exist for these technologies. Due to availability of crew time, there are limitations to the sample size which in turn limits the application of the traditional design allowables approaches to develop a materials property database for designers. In this study, various approaches to development of material databases were evaluated for use by designers of space systems who wish to leverage in-space manufacturing capabilities. This study focuses on alternative statistical techniques for baseline property development to support in-space manufacturing.

  19. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek scabbling technology was tested at Florida International University (FIU) and is being evaluated as a baseline technology. This report evaluates it for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek concrete scabbling system consisted of the MOOSE{reg_sign}, SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I, and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross-section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 318 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  20. Steganography Based on Baseline Sequential JPEG Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Information hiding in Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) compressed images are investigated in this paper. Quantization is the source of information loss in JPEG compression process. Therefore, information hidden in images is probably destroyed by JPEG compression. This paper presents an algorithm to reliably embed information into the JPEG bit streams in the process of JPEG encoding. Information extraction is performed in the process of JPEG decoding. The basic idea of our algorithm is to modify the quantized direct current (DC) coefficients and non-zero alternating current (AC) coefficients to represent one bit information (0 or 1). Experimental results on gray images using baseline sequential JPEG encoding show that the cover images (images without secret information) and the stego-images (images with secret information) are perceptually indiscernible.

  1. Intensity interferometry: Optical imaging with kilometer baselines

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, Dainis

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from laboratory measurements over hundreds of optical baselines. This review outlines the method from its beginnings, describes current experiments, and sketches prospects for future observations.

  2. Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, long-baseline neutrino experiments played a fundamental role in confirming neutrino flavor change and in measuring the neutrino mixing matrix with high precision. This role will be amplified with the next generation of experiments, which will begin probing the possibility of CP violation in the leptonic sector and possibly pin down the neutrino mass hierarchy. An account of the most recent results from the MINOS experiment is presented, along with the earlier measurement from the K2K experiment. The next generation projects, T2K and NOvA, are described and their current status, schedule and physics reach discussed. Finally, we report on future efforts, currently in the R&D stage, such as the LBNE and T2KK projects.

  3. Octant degeneracy, CPV phase at Long Baseline $\

    CERN Document Server

    Bora, Kalpana; Dutta, Debajyoti

    2015-01-01

    In a recent work by two of us, we have studied, how CP violation discovery potential can be improved at long baseline neutrino experiments (LBNE/DUNE), by combining with its ND (near detector) and reactor experiments. In this work, we discuss how this study can be further analysed to resolve entanglement of the quadrant of CPV phase and Octant of atmospheric mixing angle {\\theta}23, at LBNEs. The study is done for both NH (Normal hierarchy) and IH (Inverted hierarchy). We further show how leptogenesis can enhance this effect of resolving this entanglement. A detailed analytic and numerical study of baryogenesis through leptogenesis is performed in this framework in a model independent way. We then compare our result of the baryon to photon ratio with the the current observational data of the baryon asymmetry.

  4. Tightly coupled long baseline/ultra-short baseline integrated navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Pedro; Silvestre, Carlos; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel integrated navigation filter based on a combined long baseline/ultra short baseline acoustic positioning system with application to underwater vehicles. With a tightly coupled structure, the position, linear velocity, attitude, and rate gyro bias are estimated, considering the full nonlinear system dynamics without resorting to any algebraic inversion or linearisation techniques. The resulting solution ensures convergence of the estimation error to zero for all initial conditions, exponentially fast. Finally, it is shown, under simulation environment, that the filter achieves very good performance in the presence of sensor noise.

  5. Owning the program technical baseline for future space systems acquisition: program technical baseline tracking tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien M.; Guillen, Andy T.; Hant, James J.; Kizer, Justin R.; Min, Inki A.; Siedlak, Dennis J. L.; Yoh, James

    2017-05-01

    The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has recognized the needs for owning the program and technical knowledge within the Air Force concerning the systems being acquired to ensure success. This paper extends the previous work done by the authors [1-2] on the "Resilient Program Technical Baseline Framework for Future Space Systems" and "Portfolio Decision Support Tool (PDST)" to the development and implementation of the Program and Technical Baseline (PTB) Tracking Tool (PTBTL) for the DOD acquisition life cycle. The paper describes the "simplified" PTB tracking model with a focus on the preaward phases and discusses how to implement this model in PDST.

  6. Biological baseline data Youngs Bay, Oregon, 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Higley, D.L.; Holton, R.L.

    1975-04-01

    This report presents biological baseline information gathered during the research project, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies on Youngs Bay.'' Youngs Bay is a shallow embayment located on the south shore of the Columbia River, near Astoria, Oregon. Research on Youngs Bay was motivated by the proposed construction by Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation of an aluminum reduction plant at Warrenton, Oregon. The research was designed to provide biological baseline information on Youngs Bay in anticipation of potential harmful effects from plant effluents. The information collected concerns the kinds of animals found in the Youngs Bay area, and their distribution and seasonal patterns of abundance. In addition, information was collected on the feeding habits of selected fish species, and on the life history and behavioral characteristics of the most abundant benthic amphipod, Corophium salmonis. Sampling was conducted at approximately three-week intervals, using commonly accepted methods of animal collection. Relatively few stations were sampled for fish, because of the need to standardize conditions of capture. Data on fish capture are reported in terms of catch-per-unit effort by a particular sampling gear at a specific station. Methods used in sampling invertebrates were generally more quantitative, and allowed sampling at a greater variety of places, as well as a valid basis for the computation of densities. Checklists of invertebrate species and fish species were developed from these samples, and are referred to throughout the report. The invertebrate checklist is more specific taxonomically than are tables reporting invertebrate densities. This is because the methods employed in identification were more precise than those used in counts. 9 refs., 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  7. Geochemical characteristics and zones of surface snow on east Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Jiancheng; LIU Leibao; QIN Dahe; WANG Dali; WEN Jiahong; TAN Dejun; LI Zhongqin; LI Jun; ZHANG Xiaowei

    2004-01-01

    The surface-snow geochemical characteristics are discussed on the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, depending on the stable isotopes ratios of oxygen and hydrogen, concentration of impurities (soluble-ions and insoluble micro-particle) in surface snow collected on the ice sheet. The purpose is to study geochemical zones on the East Antarctic Ice Sheet and to research sources and transportation route of the water vapor and the impurities in surface snow. It has been found that the ratio coefficients, as S1, d1 in the equation δD = S1δ18O + d1, are changed near the elevation 2000 m on the ice sheet. The weight ratio of Cl(-)/Na+ at the area below the elevation of 2000 m is close to the ratio in the sea salt; but it is about 2 times that of the sea salt, at the inland area up to the elevation of 2000 m. The concentrations of non-sea-salt Ca2+ ion (nssCa2+) and fine-particle increase at the interior up to the elevation 2000 m. At the region below the elevation of 2000 m, the impurity concentration is decreasing with the elevation increasing. Near coastal region, the surface snow has a high concentration of impurity, where the elevation is below 800 m. Combining the translating processes of water-vapor and impurities, it suggests that the region up to the elevation 2000 m is affected by large-scale circulation with longitude-direction, and that water-vapor and impurities in surface snow come from long sources. The region below the elevation 2000 m is affected by some strong cyclones acting at peripheral region of the ice sheet, and the sources of water and impurities could be at high latitude sea and coast. The area below elevation 800 m is affected by local coastal cyclones.

  8. Geochemical Characterization of Trace MVT Mineralization in Paleozoic Sedimentary Rocks of Northeastern Wisconsin, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Luczaj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated Mississippi Valley-type (MVT mineralization occurs throughout northeastern Wisconsin, USA, and is recognized as the source of regionally extensive natural groundwater contamination in the form of dissolved arsenic, nickel, and other related metals. Although considerable attention has been given to arsenic contamination of groundwater in the region, limited attention has been focused on characterizing the bedrock sources of these and other metals. A better understanding of the potential sources of groundwater contamination is needed, especially in areas where groundwater is the dominant source of drinking water. This article describes the regional, stratigraphic, and petrographic distribution of MVT mineralization in Paleozoic rocks of northeastern Wisconsin, with a focus on sulfide minerals. Whole-rock geochemical analysis performed on 310 samples of dolomite, sandstone, and shale show detectable levels of arsenic, nickel, cobalt, copper, lead, zinc, and other metals related to various sulfide mineral phases identified using scanning electron microscopy. MVT minerals include pyrite, marcasite, sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, fluorite, celestine, barite, and others. We describe the first nickel- and cobalt-bearing sulfide mineral phases known from Paleozoic strata in the region. Arsenic, nickel, and cobalt are sometimes present as isomorphous substitutions in pyrite and marcasite, but discrete mineral phases containing nickel and cobalt elements are also observed, including bravoite and vaesite. Locally abundant stratigraphic zones of sulfide minerals occur across the region, especially in the highly enriched Sulfide Cement Horizon at the top of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. Abundant quantities of sulfides also appear near the contact between the Silurian Mayville Formation and the underlying Maquoketa and Neda formations in certain areas along and east of the Niagara escarpment. This article illustrates how a detailed

  9. Levelling and merging of two discrete national-scale geochemical databases: A case study showing the surficial expression of metalliferous black shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven M.; Neilson, Ryan T.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Government-sponsored, national-scale, soil and sediment geochemical databases are used to estimate regional and local background concentrations for environmental issues, identify possible anthropogenic contamination, estimate mineral endowment, explore for new mineral deposits, evaluate nutrient levels for agriculture, and establish concentration relationships with human or animal health. Because of these different uses, it is difficult for any single database to accommodate all the needs of each client. Smith et al. (2013, p. 168) reviewed six national-scale soil and sediment geochemical databases for the United States (U.S.) and, for each, evaluated “its appropriateness as a national-scale geochemical database and its usefulness for national-scale geochemical mapping.” Each of the evaluated databases has strengths and weaknesses that were listed in that review.Two of these U.S. national-scale geochemical databases are similar in their sample media and collection protocols but have different strengths—primarily sampling density and analytical consistency. This project was implemented to determine whether those databases could be merged to produce a combined dataset that could be used for mineral resource assessments. The utility of the merged database was tested to see whether mapped distributions could identify metalliferous black shales at a national scale.

  10. Baseline review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Review of the U.S. Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Accelerator project was conducted February 23--26, 1998, at the request of Dr. John R. O`Fallon, Director, Division of High Energy Physics, Office of Energy Research, U.S. DOE. This is the first review of the U.S. LHC Accelerator project. Overall, the Committee found that the U.S. LHC Accelerator project effort is off to a good start and that the proposed scope is very conservative for the funding available. The Committee recommends that the project be initially baselined at a total cost of $110 million, with a scheduled completion data of 2005. The U.S. LHC Accelerator project will supply high technology superconducting magnets for the interaction regions (IRs) and the radio frequency (rf) straight section of the LHC intersecting storage rings. In addition, the project provides the cryogenic support interface boxes to service the magnets and radiation absorbers to protect the IR dipoles and the inner triplet quadrupoles. US scientists will provide support in analyzing some of the detailed aspects of accelerator physics in the two rings. The three laboratories participating in this project are Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Committee was very impressed by the technical capabilities of the US LHC Accelerator project team. Cost estimates for each subsystem of the US LHC Accelerator project were presented to the Review Committee, with a total cost including contingency of $110 million (then year dollars). The cost estimates were deemed to be conservative. A re-examination of the funding profile, costs, and schedules on a centralized project basis should lead to an increased list of deliverables. The Committee concluded that the proposed scope of US deliverables to CERN can be readily accomplished with the $110 million total cost baseline for the project. The current deliverables should serve as

  11. Numerical modeling of geochemical variations caused by crustal relamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Katharina; Castro, Antonio; Gerya, Taras

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical consequences of composite diapirs formed in subduction zones have been studied using a thermomechanical numerical model of an ocean-continent subduction zone. This model includes dehydration of subducted crust, aqueous fluid transport, partial melting, and melt emplacement. Subduction of

  12. Mineralogical and geochemical study of mud volcanoes in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    Key word: Mud volcano, clay mineralogy, geochemistry, mud breccias, North Moroccan Atlantic margin. INTRODUCTION .... The geochemical analysis of the metals shows a high Ti ..... smectite evolved into an illite, or because the initial source is not .... Pinheiro LM, Kopf A, Boetius A (2006): Microbial methane turnover at.

  13. The Characteristics and Working Conditions of Several Geochemical Softwares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Zhen-hua

    2012-01-01

    <正>During the development of geosciences and environmental science, it is difficult to give many quantitative indicators by experiment. It can be given only by means of the geochemical simulation software. So a number of research institutions and commercial companies develop a variety of such software. They have respective advantages as regards the different simulated.

  14. A Low-Li Geochemical Province in the NE Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, J. C.; Gwozdz, R.

    1978-01-01

    Lithium was analysed in 392 basalts and related igneous rocks from the North Atlantic Tertiary-Recent province using activation analysis and Čerenkov counting. Monotonous Li values of 5.5±2 ppm in NE Atlantic basalts define a low-Li geochemical province which has persisted for 60 million years...

  15. Detection of atmospheric pressure loading using very long baseline interferometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, T. M.; Herring, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Loading of the Earth by the temporal redistribution of global atmospheric mass is likely to displace the positions of geodetic monuments by tens of millimeters both vertically and horizontally. Estimates of these displacements are determined by convolving National Meteorological Center (NMC) global values of atmospheric surface pressure with Farrell's elastic Green's functions. An analysis of the distances between radio telescopes determined by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) between 1984 and 1992 reveals that in many of the cases studied there is a significant contribution to baseline length change due to atmospheric pressure loading. Our analysis covers intersite distances of between 1000 and 10,000 km and is restricted to those baselines measured more than 100 times. Accounting for the load effects (after first removing a best fit slope) reduces the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length residuals on 11 of the 22 baselines investigated. The slight degradation observed in the WRMS scatter on the remaining baselines is largely consistent with the expected statistical fluctuations when a small correction is applied to a data set having a much larger random noise. The results from all baselines are consistent with approximately 60% of the computed pressure contribution being present in the VLBI length determinations. Site dependent coefficients determined by fitting local pressure to the theoretical radial displacement are found to reproduce the deformation caused by the regional pressure to within 25% for most inland sites. The coefficients are less reliable at near coastal and island stations.

  16. Mineralogical, geochemical and radiological characterisation of Selmo Formation in Batman area, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Umit; Damla, Nevzat; Akkoca, Dicle Bal; Cevik, Uğur

    2012-06-01

    This work deals with the mineralogical, geochemical and radiological characterisations of Selmo Formation in Batman neighbourhood. The upper Miocene-Pliocene Selmo Formation is common in the centre of Batman and composed of carbonated sandy claystones and silty-sandy stone lenses. The common whole minerals of the samples are quartz, feldspars, calcite and dolomite. The clay minerals are smectite, illite, chlorite and mixed-layer clay (chlorite-smectite). The geochemical mean values of the samples are 51.7% SiO(2); 12.6% Al(2)O(3); 6.2% Fe(2)O(3); 3.6% MgO; 6.3% CaO; 1.1% Na(2)O; 1.7% K(2)O; 0.8% TiO(2); 0.2% P(2)O(5); 0.1% MnO; and 0.03% Cr(2)O(3). In addition, baseline maps for the concentrations of each radionuclide, the radium equivalent activity and the outdoor gamma dose rate distributions have been plotted for the study area. The mean activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were determined to be 32, 24, 210 and 9 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The assessments of the radiological hazard indices, such as radium equivalent activity, absorbed dose rate in air, annual effective dose equivalent, excess lifetime cancer risk, external hazard index and internal hazard index, were calculated and compared with the internationally accepted reference values. This study shows that the concentrations of radioactivities in the measured samples were within the recommended safety limits and did not pose to be any significant source of radiation hazard.

  17. Geochemical evolution of Mexicali Valley groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makdisi, R.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Thompson, J.M.; Coplen, T.B.; Sanchez R., J.

    1982-08-10

    Isotopic and chemical compositions of Mexicali Valley groundwaters vary widely. Observed variations reflect different water origins, mineral-water reactions, lateral variations of delta facies as well as evaporation. Regional treatment of the groundwater data shows that northern and central regions are a mixture of old and new Colorado River water. Variations in water chemistry result from different groundwaters origins and the effects of lateral delta facies changes. Dissolution of gypsum and precipitation of carbonates, silicates, and phosphates are suggested. The eastern Mesa de San Luis and southern region water originates primarily from the Gila River catchment area. This water is undersaturated with respect to gypsum and carbonates and is oversaturated with respect to silicates. Most of the western groundwaters are a mixture of Colorado River and geothermal waters in the proximity of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. Recharge to the geothermal aquifer is from the west as well as the north and east. Calcite is being precipitated out as the groundwater temperatures rise in response to the geothermal anomaly. Other western groundwaters reflect a dominant mixture of Colorado River water and evaporated lake water. Some Western groundwater samples suggest dilution by local rainwater and/or irrigation water.

  18. Results of a geochemical survey, Wadi Ash Shu'Bah quadrangle, sheet 26E, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W.R.; Arnold, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The interpretation of geochemical data of a regional survey of the Wadi ash Shu'bah quadrangle resulted in the selection of areas for follow-up studies. The results of the detailed geochemical studies of these areas, combined with field observation, resulted in the identification of areas of moderate and high mineral resource potential. The most important areas are (1) the Jibal Ba'gham area for tin and tungsten resources associated with the post-Hadn Jufayfah syenogranite; (2) the Murran gossan belt, Aqab gossan area, and Rawdah gossan area for massive-sulfide mineralization associated with Hulayfah-group greenstones; (3) the Rawdat al Ba'ayith area and Jibal Abid area for precious- and base-metal mineralization associated with pre-Hadn intermediate-composition plutons; and (4) the Wadi al Qahad area for skarn and precious- and base-metal mineralization associated with pre-Hadn granodiorite.

  19. Integrated MSS-SAR-SPOT-geophysical and geochemical data for exploration geology in Yeder area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huadong, Guo; Pinliang, Dong

    1992-07-01

    The Yeder test area is located in the north Xinjiang Yugur Autonomous Region of China, in an area with an arid continental climate, sparse vegetation cover and extensive rock outcrops. This paper presents a part of the results of our finished project entitled ``Remote Sensing for Geological and Mineral Exploration in Xinjiang Region of China''. The X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery with two illuminated directions is acquired and digitally processed, which demonstrates the effectiveness for the study of geological structure. The Landsat MSS and high resolution SPOT images are mainly used for recognition of rock types. The integrated analysis of remotely sensed, aeromagnetic and geochemical data has been made with the support of the geographic information system. In corroboration with intensive field investigation, we have defined the existence of the ``Yeder are structure'', in which three gold anomalies and an alteration zone have been found.

  20. Reconstruction of paleostorm history using geochemical proxies in sediment cores from Eastern Lake, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, O.; Wang, Y.; Donoghue, J. F.; Coor, J. L.; Kish, S.; Elsner, J.; Hu, X. B.; Niedoroda, A. W.; Ye, M.; Xu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of geochemical proxies of coastal lake sediments provides a useful tool for reconstructing paleostorm history. Such paleostorm records can help constrain models that are used to predict future storm events. In this study, we collected two sediment cores (60 and 103 cm long, respectively) from the center of Eastern Lake located on the Gulf coast of NW Florida. These cores, which are mainly composed of organic-rich mud and organic-poor sand, were sub-sampled at 2-3mm intervals for analyses of their organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations as well as δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures. Selected samples were submitted for radiocarbon dating in order to establish a chronological framework for the interpretation of the geochemical data. There are significant variations in δ13C, δ15N, C%, N% and C/N with depth. The δ13C and δ15N values vary from -21.8‰ to -26.7‰ and 2.6‰ to 5‰, respectively. The stable isotopic signatures of carbon and nitrogen indicate that the sources of organic matter in sediments include terrestrial C3 type vegetation, marine input from Gulf of Mexico and biological productivity within the lake, such as phytoplankton and zooplankton growing in the lacustrine environment. The δ13C and δ15N values exhibit significant negative excursions by 2‰ in a 30 cm thick sand layer, bounded by a rapid return to the base value. A positive shift in the δ15N record observed in the upper part of the cores likely reflects increased anthropogenic input of N such as sewage or septic tank effluents associated with recent development of areas around the lake for human habitation. Similarly, organic C% and N% range from 5.8 to 0.4 and 0.4 to 0.1, respectively. A prominent negative shift by 2σ relative to the baseline in C% and N% has been observed at approx. 55 to 58 cm depth, consisting of an organic-poor sand layer. This shift in C% and N% can be correlated with the negative shift in the δ13C and δ15N values, indicating a major storm event

  1. Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

  2. Testing fundamentals: The chemical state of geochemical tracers in biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Read, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of many carbonate-derived geochemical proxies is underpinned by the assumption that tracer elements are incorporated 'ideally' as impurities the mineral lattice, following relatively straightforward kinetic and thermodynamic drives. This allows comparison to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a systematic starting point from which to translate geochemical tracers to environmental records. Biomineral carbonates are a prominent source of geochemical proxy material, and are far from an ideal inorganic system. They are structurally and compositionally heterogeneous mineral-organic composites, produced in tightly controlled biological environments, possibly via non-classical crystal growth mechanisms. Biominerals offer numerous opportunities for tracers to be incorporated in a 'non-ideal' state. For instance, tracers could be hosted within the organic component of the structure, in interstitial micro-domains of a separate mineral phase, or in localized high-impurity clusters. If a proxy element is hosted in a non-ideal state, our understanding of its incorporation and preservation is flawed, and the theoretical basis behind the proxies derived from it must be reevaluated. Thus far, the assumption of ideal tracer incorporation has remained largely untested, owing to the spatial resolution and sensitivity limits of available techniques. Developments in high-resolution, high-sensitivity X-ray spectroscopy at Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopes (STXMs) have allowed us to measure trace element coordination in foraminiferal calcite, at length-scales relevant to biomineralisation processes and tracer incorporation. This instrument has allowed us to test the fundamental assumptions behind several geochemical proxy elements. We present a summary of four STXM studies, assessing the chemical state and distribution of Mg (Branson et al, 2014), B (Branson et al, 2015), S and Na (unpub.), and highlight the implications of these data for the use of these

  3. The geochemical and temporal evolution of the continental lithosphere and its relationship to continental-scale faulting: The Karakoram Fault, eastern Karakoram, NW Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Richard J.; Searle, Michael P.; Parrish, Randall R.

    2013-03-01

    New laser ablation multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry U-Pb ages, coupled with Sm-Nd isotope and geochemical analysis, define the temporal and geochemical evolution of the continental lithosphere in the eastern Karakoram, India, NW Himalaya. Our analysis demonstrates that magmatism occurred between ~108 and 69 Ma and ~22 and 13 Ma. The new age data, coupled with geochemical examination of the granitoids, confirm a parallel evolution with the western Karakoram in Pakistan and supports a model of regional continental crustal thickening and related metamorphism. Middle to Late Cretaceous magmatism immediately adjacent to the Karakoram fault suggests that crustal melting and associated metamorphism are unrelated to shearing along the fault. Miocene leucogranite magmatism occurred almost exactly concomitant with the emplacement of the Baltoro batholith in Pakistan. These trans-Karakoram leucogranites also display similar geochemical evolution trends. Our new data clearly link the leucogranites along the fault to the regional Baltoro batholith and related metamorphic complexes to the west. This supports previous work suggesting that magmatism and metamorphism were not syn-kinematic with continental-scale faulting. The data demonstrate that the Karakoram fault could not have accommodated lateral offset in this region prior to ~16 Ma, limiting the long-term averaged slip rate to a maximum of ~10 mm/yr.

  4. A Study of the Method for the Recognition of Anomalies in Geochemical Hydrocarbon Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The greatest difficulties in recognizing geochemical hydrocarbon anomalies are: (1) how to objectively and accurately separate anomalies from background; (2) how to distinguish hydrocarbon-pool-related apical anomalies from lateral anomalies controlled by faults; and (3) how to eliminate interferences. These uncertainties are serious obstacles for the wide acceptance and use of geochemical techniques in hydrocarbon exploration. In this paper, the features of hydrocarbon anomalies were analyzed based on the micro-migration mechanisms. In most cases, there are two anomalous populations or point groups, which are produced by two distinct mechanisms: (1) a population that directly reflects oil and gas fields, and (2) one that is related to structures such as faults. Statistical studies show that background anomalous populations and the boundaries between them can be described by the population means, prior probabilities, which are the proportions of population sizes, and covariance matrices, when background and anomalous populations have normal distributions. When this normality condition is met, a series of formulas can be derived. The method is designed on the basis of these allows: (1) univariate anomaly recognition, (2) elimination of interferences, (3) multivariate anomaly recognition, and (4) multivariate anomaly combination which depicts a more representative picture of morphology of the anomalous target than individual anomalies. The univariate and multivariate anomaly recognition can not only separate anomalies from background objectively, but also simultaneously distinguish the two types of anomalies objectively. This method was applied to the hydrocarbon data in Yangshuiwu region, Hebei Province. The interferences from regional variation of background were eliminated, and the interpretation uncertainty was reduced greatly as the anomalous populations were separated. The method was also used in Daxing region within the confines of Beijing City, and Aershan

  5. Sources and dispersal of land-based runoff from small Hawaiian drainages to a coral reef: Insights from geochemical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesue, Renee K.; Storlazzi, Curt

    2017-01-01

    Land-based sediment and contaminant runoff is a major threat to coral reefs, and runoff reduction efforts would benefit from knowledge of specific runoff sources. Geochemical signatures of small drainage basins were determined in the fine fraction of soil and sediment, then used in the nearshore region of a coral reef-fringed urban embayment on southeast Oahu, Hawaii, to describe sources and dispersal of land-based runoff. The sedimentary rare earth element ratio (La/Yb)N showed a clear distinction between the two main rock types in the overall contributing area, tholeiitic and alkalic olivine basalt. Based on this geochemical signature it was apparent that the majority of terrigenous sediment on the reef flat originated from geologically old tholeiitic drainages. Sediment from one of five tholeiitic drainages had a distinct geochemical signature, and sediment with this signature was dispersed on the reef flat 2 km west and 150 m offshore of the contributing basin. Sediment and the anthropogenic metals Cd, Pb, and Zn were entrained in runoff from the most heavily urbanized region of the watershed. Although anthropogenic Cd and Zn had localized distributions close to shore, anthropogenic Pb was found associated with fine sediment on the westernmost part of the reef flat and 400 m offshore, illustrating how trade-wind-driven sediment transport can increase the scale of runoff impacts to nearshore communities. Our findings show that sediment geochemical signatures can provide insights about the source and dispersal of land-based runoff in shallow coastal environments. The application of such knowledge to watershed management and habitat remediation efforts can aid in the protection and restoration of runoff-impacted coastal ecosystems worldwide.

  6. Sources and dispersal of land-based runoff from small Hawaiian drainages to a coral reef: Insights from geochemical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesue, Renee K.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2017-03-01

    Land-based sediment and contaminant runoff is a major threat to coral reefs, and runoff reduction efforts would benefit from knowledge of specific runoff sources. Geochemical signatures of small drainage basins were determined in the fine fraction of soil and sediment, then used in the nearshore region of a coral reef-fringed urban embayment on southeast Oahu, Hawaii, to describe sources and dispersal of land-based runoff. The sedimentary rare earth element ratio (La/Yb)N showed a clear distinction between the two main rock types in the overall contributing area, tholeiitic and alkalic olivine basalt. Based on this geochemical signature it was apparent that the majority of terrigenous sediment on the reef flat originated from geologically old tholeiitic drainages. Sediment from one of five tholeiitic drainages had a distinct geochemical signature, and sediment with this signature was dispersed on the reef flat 2 km west and 150 m offshore of the contributing basin. Sediment and the anthropogenic metals Cd, Pb, and Zn were entrained in runoff from the most heavily urbanized region of the watershed. Although anthropogenic Cd and Zn had localized distributions close to shore, anthropogenic Pb was found associated with fine sediment on the westernmost part of the reef flat and 400 m offshore, illustrating how trade-wind-driven sediment transport can increase the scale of runoff impacts to nearshore communities. Our findings show that sediment geochemical signatures can provide insights about the source and dispersal of land-based runoff in shallow coastal environments. The application of such knowledge to watershed management and habitat remediation efforts can aid in the protection and restoration of runoff-impacted coastal ecosystems worldwide.

  7. Arc melter demonstration baseline test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the test results and evaluation for the Phase 1 (baseline) arc melter vitrification test series conducted for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program (BWID). Phase 1 tests were conducted on surrogate mixtures of as-incinerated wastes and soil. Some buried wastes, soils, and stored wastes at the INEL and other DOE sites, are contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radionuclides and hazardous organics and metals. The high temperature environment in an electric arc furnace may be used to process these wastes to produce materials suitable for final disposal. An electric arc furnace system can treat heterogeneous wastes and contaminated soils by (a) dissolving and retaining TRU elements and selected toxic metals as oxides in the slag phase, (b) destroying organic materials by dissociation, pyrolyzation, and combustion, and (c) capturing separated volatilized metals in the offgas system for further treatment. Structural metals in the waste may be melted and tapped separately for recycle or disposal, or these metals may be oxidized and dissolved into the slag. The molten slag, after cooling, will provide a glass/ceramic final waste form that is homogeneous, highly nonleachable, and extremely durable. These features make this waste form suitable for immobilization of TRU radionuclides and toxic metals for geologic timeframes. Further, the volume of contaminated wastes and soils will be substantially reduced in the process.

  8. The LOFAR long baseline snapshot calibrator survey

    CERN Document Server

    Moldón, J; Wucknitz, O; Jackson, N; Drabent, A; Carozzi, T; Conway, J; Kapińska, A D; McKean, P; Morabito, L; Varenius, E; Zarka, P; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Carbone, D; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hassall, T E; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Norden, M J; Offringa, A R; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; White, S; Wise, M W; Yatawatta, S; Zensus, A

    2014-01-01

    Aims. An efficient means of locating calibrator sources for International LOFAR is developed and used to determine the average density of usable calibrator sources on the sky for subarcsecond observations at 140 MHz. Methods. We used the multi-beaming capability of LOFAR to conduct a fast and computationally inexpensive survey with the full International LOFAR array. Sources were pre-selected on the basis of 325 MHz arcminute-scale flux density using existing catalogues. By observing 30 different sources in each of the 12 sets of pointings per hour, we were able to inspect 630 sources in two hours to determine if they possess a sufficiently bright compact component to be usable as LOFAR delay calibrators. Results. Over 40% of the observed sources are detected on multiple baselines between international stations and 86 are classified as satisfactory calibrators. We show that a flat low-frequency spectrum (from 74 to 325 MHz) is the best predictor of compactness at 140 MHz. We extrapolate from our sample to sho...

  9. Lorentz symmetry and very long baseline interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Hees, A.; Lambert, S.

    2016-12-01

    Lorentz symmetry violations can be described by an effective field theory framework that contains both general relativity and the Standard Model of particle physics called the Standard Model extension (SME). Recently, postfit analysis of Gravity Probe B and binary pulsars led to an upper limit at the 10-4 level on the time-time coefficient s¯T T of the pure-gravity sector of the minimal SME. In this work, we derive the observable of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) in SME and then implement it into a real data analysis code of geodetic VLBI observations. Analyzing all available observations recorded since 1979, we compare estimates of s¯T T and errors obtained with various analysis schemes, including global estimations over several time spans, and with various Sun elongation cutoff angles, and by analysis of radio source coordinate time series. We obtain a constraint on s¯ T T=(-5 ±8 )×10-5 , directly fitted to the observations and improving by a factor of 5 previous postfit analysis estimates.

  10. Gated integrator with signal baseline subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xucheng

    1996-01-01

    An ultrafast, high precision gated integrator includes an opamp having differential inputs. A signal to be integrated is applied to one of the differential inputs through a first input network, and a signal indicative of the DC offset component of the signal to be integrated is applied to the other of the differential inputs through a second input network. A pair of electronic switches in the first and second input networks define an integrating period when they are closed. The first and second input networks are substantially symmetrically constructed of matched components so that error components introduced by the electronic switches appear symmetrically in both input circuits and, hence, are nullified by the common mode rejection of the integrating opamp. The signal indicative of the DC offset component is provided by a sample and hold circuit actuated as the integrating period begins. The symmetrical configuration of the integrating circuit improves accuracy and speed by balancing out common mode errors, by permitting the use of high speed switching elements and high speed opamps and by permitting the use of a small integrating time constant. The sample and hold circuit substantially eliminates the error caused by the input signal baseline offset during a single integrating window.

  11. Gated integrator with signal baseline subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.

    1996-12-17

    An ultrafast, high precision gated integrator includes an opamp having differential inputs. A signal to be integrated is applied to one of the differential inputs through a first input network, and a signal indicative of the DC offset component of the signal to be integrated is applied to the other of the differential inputs through a second input network. A pair of electronic switches in the first and second input networks define an integrating period when they are closed. The first and second input networks are substantially symmetrically constructed of matched components so that error components introduced by the electronic switches appear symmetrically in both input circuits and, hence, are nullified by the common mode rejection of the integrating opamp. The signal indicative of the DC offset component is provided by a sample and hold circuit actuated as the integrating period begins. The symmetrical configuration of the integrating circuit improves accuracy and speed by balancing out common mode errors, by permitting the use of high speed switching elements and high speed opamps and by permitting the use of a small integrating time constant. The sample and hold circuit substantially eliminates the error caused by the input signal baseline offset during a single integrating window. 5 figs.

  12. Resetting predator baselines in coral reef ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Darcy; Conklin, Eric; Papastamatiou, Yannis P.; McCauley, Douglas J.; Pollock, Kydd; Pollock, Amanda; Kendall, Bruce E.; Gaines, Steven D.; Caselle, Jennifer E.

    2017-01-01

    What did coral reef ecosystems look like before human impacts became pervasive? Early efforts to reconstruct baselines resulted in the controversial suggestion that pristine coral reefs have inverted trophic pyramids, with disproportionally large top predator biomass. The validity of the coral reef inverted trophic pyramid has been questioned, but until now, was not resolved empirically. We use data from an eight-year tag-recapture program with spatially explicit, capture-recapture models to re-examine the population size and density of a key top predator at Palmyra atoll, the same location that inspired the idea of inverted trophic biomass pyramids in coral reef ecosystems. Given that animal movement is suspected to have significantly biased early biomass estimates of highly mobile top predators, we focused our reassessment on the most mobile and most abundant predator at Palmyra, the grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos). We estimated a density of 21.3 (95% CI 17.8, 24.7) grey reef sharks/km2, which is an order of magnitude lower than the estimates that suggested an inverted trophic pyramid. Our results indicate that the trophic structure of an unexploited reef fish community is not inverted, and that even healthy top predator populations may be considerably smaller, and more precarious, than previously thought. PMID:28220895

  13. Baseline air quality study at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, M.J.; Charboneau, R.

    1980-10-01

    Air quality and meteorological data collected at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The data represent baseline values for the pre-construction phase of a proposed coal-gasification test facility. Air quality data were characterized through continuous monitoring of gaseous pollutants, collection of meteorological data, data acquisition and reduction, and collection and analysis of discrete atmospheric samples. Seven air quality parameters were monitored and recorded on a continuous real-time basis: sulfur dioxide, ozone, total hydrocarbons, nonreactive hydrocarbons, nitric oxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. A 20.9-m tower was erected near Argonne's mobile air monitoring laboratory, which was located immediately downwind of the proposed facility. The tower was instrumented at three levels to collect continuous meteorological data. Wind speed was monitored at three levels; wind direction, horizontal and vertical, at the top level; ambient temperature at the top level; and differential temperature between all three levels. All continuously-monitored parameters were digitized and recorded on magnetic tape. Appropriate software was prepared to reduce the data. Statistical summaries, grphical displays, and correlation studies also are presented.

  14. Lorentz symmetry and Very Long Baseline Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Poncin-Lafitte, C Le; lambert, S

    2016-01-01

    Lorentz symmetry violations can be described by an effective field theory framework that contains both General Relativity and the Standard Model of particle physics called the Standard-Model extension (SME). Recently, post-fit analysis of Gravity Probe B and binary pulsars lead to an upper limit at the $10^{-4}$ level on the time-time coefficient $\\bar s^{TT}$ of the pure-gravity sector of the minimal SME. In this work, we derive the observable of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) in SME and then we implement it into a real data analysis code of geodetic VLBI observations. Analyzing all available observations recorded since 1979, we compare estimates of $\\bar s^{TT}$ and errors obtained with various analysis schemes, including global estimations over several time spans and with various Sun elongation cut-off angles, and with analysis of radio source coordinate time series. We obtain a constraint on $\\bar s^{TT}=(-5\\pm 8)\\times 10^{-5}$, directly fitted to the observations and improving by a factor 5 pr...

  15. Statistical parameters for resource evaluation of geochemical data from the Ajo 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, P.K.; Barton, Harlan N.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical data are presented from a regional geochemical study of the Ajo 1? X 2? quadrangle exclusive of the Papago Indian Reservation, but including the extension of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument into the Lukeville 1? X 2? quadrangle. Frequency distribution data from the analysis of stream-sediment and heavy-mineral-concentrate samples for 31 elements have broad ranges and for most elements have maxima well above normal. Elemental associations derived from correlation and R-mode factor analysis related to regional lithologic variation and for some associations suggest mineral-resource potential.

  16. The effect of short-baseline neutrino oscillations on LBNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, William C. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Short-baseline neutrino oscillations can have a relatively big effect on long-baseline oscillations, due to the cross terms that arise from multiple mass scales. The existing short-baseline anomalies suggest that short-baseline oscillations can affect the ν{sub μ} → ν{sub e} appearance probabilities by up to 20-40%, depending on the values of the CP-violating parameters.

  17. The effect of short-baseline neutrino oscillations on LBNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, William C.

    2015-10-01

    Short-baseline neutrino oscillations can have a relatively big effect on long-baseline oscillations, due to the cross terms that arise from multiple mass scales. The existing short-baseline anomalies suggest that short-baseline oscillations can affect the νμ → νe appearance probabilities by up to 20-40%, depending on the values of the CP-violating parameters.

  18. Geochemical and geologic factors effecting the formulation of gas hydrate: Task No. 5, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective of our work has been to determine the primary geochemical and geological factors controlling gas hydrate information and occurrence and particularly in the factors responsible for the generation and accumulation of methane in oceanic gas hydrates. In order to understand the interrelation of geochemical/geological factors controlling gas hydrate occurrence, we have undertaken a multicomponent program which has included (1) comparison of available information at sites where gas hydrates have been observed through drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) on the Blake Outer Ridge and Middle America Trench; (2) regional synthesis of information related to gas hydrate occurrences of the Middle America Trench; (3) development of a model for the occurrence of a massive gas hydrate as DSDP Site 570; (4) a global synthesis of gas hydrate occurrences; and (5) development of a predictive model for gas hydrate occurrence in oceanic sediment. The first three components of this program were treated as part of a 1985 Department of Energy Peer Review. The present report considers the last two components and presents information on the worldwide occurrence of gas hydrates with particular emphasis on the Circum-Pacific and Arctic basins. A model is developed to account for the occurrence of oceanic gas hydrates in which the source of the methane is from microbial processes. 101 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Snowmelt induced hydrologic perturbations drive dynamic microbiological and geochemical behaviors across a shallow riparian aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danczak, Robert; Yabusaki, Steven; Williams, Kenneth; Fang, Yilin; Hobson, Chad; Wilkins, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Shallow riparian aquifers represent hotspots of biogeochemical activity in the arid western US. While these environments provide extensive ecosystem services, little is known of how natural environmental perturbations influence subsurface microbial communities and associated biogeochemical processes. Over a six-month period we tracked the annual snowmelt-driven incursion of groundwater into the vadose zone of an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River, leading to increased dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the normally suboxic saturated zone. Strong biogeochemical heterogeneity was measured across the site, with abiotic reactions between DO and sulfide minerals driving rapid DO consumption and mobilization of redox active species in reduced aquifer regions. Conversely, extensive DO increases were detected in less reduced sediments. 16S rRNA gene surveys tracked microbial community composition within the aquifer, revealing strong correlations between increases in putative oxygen-utilizing chemolithoautotrophs and heterotrophs and rising DO concentrations. The gradual return to suboxic aquifer conditions favored increasing abundances of 16S rRNA sequences matching members of the Microgenomates (OP11) and Parcubacteria (OD1) that have been strongly implicated in fermentative processes. Microbial community stability measurements indicated that deeper aquifer locations were relatively less affected by geochemical perturbations, while communities in shallower locations exhibited the greatest change. Reactive transport modeling of the geochemical and microbiological results supported field observations, suggesting that a predictive framework can be applied to develop a greater understanding of such environments.

  20. Geochemical surface exploration between Bueckeberge Hills and Rehburg Anticline (Lower Saxony Basin, Germany)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, U. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Hannover (Germany); Marquardt, D. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    The Lower Saxony Basin (LSB) of northwestern Germany is since long a target in hydrocarbon-related research in which the organic-rich Wealden sediments, known to contain good to excellent source rocks, play an important role. We demonstrate that cost effective surface exploration and geochemical research provide significant insight into the petroleum geology of an area of interest. Our research concentrates on a sub-basin in the eastern part of the LSB and aims at assessing the petroleum geology, hydrocarbon potential, depositional environment and tectonics of the Stadthagen syncline using surface samples of Wealden outcrops and evaluating these subsequently with geochemical methods (XRF, total sulfur, total organic carbon, Rock-Eval pyrolysis) and physical property data. The depositional environment in the research area varied significantly throughout the Lower Cretaceous (oxic to anoxic) due to paleoclimate changes and tectonically induced marine ingressions. Microbial sulfate reduction related to the marine ingressions reduced organic matter quality in the basin significantly, supporting the strong vertical variability in hydrocarbon potential of the sediments. Thermal maturity data suggests a complex tectonic history for the Stadthagen syncline. Thermal maturities (oil to wet gas window) combined with a multi-heat flow scenario result in estimated burial and subsequent uplift in the region of more than 2500 m. (orig.)

  1. Geochemical characterization of elements in Vitis vinifera cv. Negroamaro grape berries grown under different soil managements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepi, Salvatore; Coletta, Antonio; Crupi, Pasquale; Leis, Marilena; Russo, Sabrina; Sansone, Luigi; Tassinari, Renzo; Chicca, Milvia; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2016-04-01

    The present geochemical study concerns the impact of viticultural practices in the chemical composition of the grape cultivar "Negroamaro" in Apulia, a southern Italian region renowned for its quality wine. Three types of soil management (SM), two cover cropping with different mixtures, and a soil tillage were considered. For each SM, the vines were irrigated according to two irrigation levels. Chemical composition of soil and of berries of Vitis vinifera cultivar "Negroamaro" were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics (linear discrimination analysis). In detail, we investigated major and trace elements behavior in the soil according to irrigation levels, the related index of bioaccumulation (BA) and the relationship between trace element concentration and soil management in "Negroamaro" grapes. The results indicate that soil management affects the mobility of major and trace elements. A specific assimilation of these elements in grapes from vines grown under different soil management was confirmed by BA. Multivariate statistics allowed to associate the vines to the type of soil management. This geochemical characterization of elements could be useful to develop fingerprints of vines of the cultivar "Negroamaro" according to soil management and geographical origin.

  2. Selection of Multifractal Scaling Breaks and Separation of Geochemical and Geophysical Anomaly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Spatially superimposed multiple processes such as multiplicative cascade processes often generate multifractal measures possessing so-called self-similarity or self-affinity that can be described by power-law type of functions within certain scale ranges. The multifractalities can be estimated by applying multifractal modeling to the measures reflecting the characteristics of the physical processes such as the element concentration values analyzed in rock and soil samples and caused by the underlying mineralization processes and the other geological processes. The local and regional geological processes may result in geochemical patterns with distinct multifractalities as well as variable scaling ranges. Separation of these multifractal measures on the basis of both the distinct multifractalities and the scaling ranges will be significant for both theoretical studies of multifractal modeling and its applications. Multifractal scaling breaks have been observed from various multifractal patterns. This paper introduces a technique for separating multifractal measures on the basis of scaling breaks. It has been demonstrated that the method is effective for decomposing geochemical and geophysical anomalies required for mineral exploration. A dataset containing the element concentration values of potassium and phosphorus in soil samples was employed for demonstrating the application of the method for studying the fertilizer and yield optimization in agriculture.

  3. Geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality in lower Palar river basin, southern India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Senthilkumar; L Elango

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeochemical study of groundwater was carried out in a part of the lower Palar river basin, southern India to determine the geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality. Thirty-nine groundwater samples were collected from the study area and analysed for pH, Eh, EC, Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, CO3, Cl and SO4. The analysed parameters of the groundwater in the study area were found to be well within the safe range in general with respect to the Bureau of Indian Standards for drinking water except for few locations. The results of these analyses were used to identify the geochemical processes that are taking place in this region. Cation exchange and silicate weathering are the important processes controlling the major ion distribution of the study area. Mass balance reaction model NETPATH was used to assess the ion exchange processes. High concentration of Ca in groundwater of the study area is due to the release of Ca by aquifer material and adsorption of Na due to ion exchange processes. Groundwater of the study area is suitable for drinking and irrigation purposes except for few locations.

  4. 蒙古国东南部额尔登查干地区晚古生代火山岩地球化学特征及成因%Geochemical Characteristics and Genesis of Late Paleozoic Volcanic Rocks in Erdenetsagaan Region of Southeastern Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾文臣; 张宝林; 沈晓丽; 郭志华; 黄雪飞; 徐永生

    2012-01-01

    在蒙古国苏赫巴托省东南部额尔登查干地区古生代地层中新发现一套火山岩,其Rb-Sr同位素年龄为(370±21) Ma,与前人划分的地层年代(志留纪—泥盆纪)比较吻合.岩石学和地球化学综合研究表明:该套火山岩基本同期同源演化,但岩性变化较大,以安山岩类为主,还有少量玄武岩类和流纹岩—英安岩类.熔融地幔源区受到了来自俯冲板片的改造,原始岩浆起源于俯冲带流体交代的地幔,并在上侵过程中发生地壳物质混染.岩浆的不均匀性和分异演化是产生多类型火山岩组合(安山岩、玄武岩、流纹岩—英安岩)的主要原因.推测该套火山岩形成于古亚洲洋闭合过程中的岛弧环境,表明火山岩形成时(晚古生代)中朝板块和西伯利亚板块还没有碰撞.%A set of volcanic rocks was newly discovered in Paleozoic strata in the southern Mongolia. The Rb-Sr age of the volcanic rocks is (370 ± 21) Ma, being comparatively consistent with their host stratum age proposed by former researchers. Based on petrologic and geochemical study, the volcanic rocks are contemporaneous and homologous basically. However, their lithology varies significantly, and they are composed mainly of andesites and minorly of basalts, rhyolite and dacites. Their mantle source has apparently modified by the subducting slab. The original magma for the volcanics came from the mantle modified by fluids originally contained in the subducted slab, and was contacted late by the overlying crust during its ascending. It is suggested that the inhomogenous nature and strong fractionation of the magmas are the main reasons for the diversity of varied volcanic rocks (andesite, basalt, rhyolite and dacite) in the set. It is suggested that these volcanic rocks were formed in an island arc environment during the closing of the ancient Asian Ocean. This implies that the formation of these volcanic rocks took place before the collision between the

  5. Petrological, organic geochemical and geochemical characteristics of coal from the Soko mine, Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zivotic, Dragana; Simic, Vladimir [Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Djusina 7, 11000 Belgrade (RS); Wehner, Herman; Scheeder, Georg; Vidal, Angelika [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Cvetkovic, Olga; Sajnovic, Aleksandra [Center of Chemistry, IChTM, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade (RS); Jovancicevic, Branimir [Center of Chemistry, IChTM, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade (RS); Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade (RS); Grzetic, Ivan [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade (RS); Ercegovac, Marko [Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Knez Mihailova 35,11000 Belgrade (RS)

    2008-02-01

    A petrological, organic geochemical and geochemical study was performed on coal samples from the Soko Mine, Soko Banja basin, Serbia. Ten coal and two carbonaceous clay samples were collected from fresh, working faces in the underground brown coal mine from different parts of the main coal seam. The Lower Miocene, low-rank coal of the Soko Mine is a typical humic coal with huminite concentrations of up to 76.2 vol.%, liptinite less than 14 vol.% and inertinite less than 11 vol.%. Ulminite is the most abundant maceral with variable amounts of densinite and clay minerals. Sporinite and resinite are the most common macerals of the liptinite group. Inertodetrinite is the most abundant maceral of the inertinite group. The mineral-bituminous groundmass identified in some coal samples, and carbonaceous marly clay, indicate sub-aquatic origin and strong bacterial decomposition. The mean random huminite reflectance (ulminite B) for the main coal seam is 0.40 {+-} 0.05% Rr, which is typical for an immature to early mature stage of organic matter. The extract yields from the coal of the Soko Banja basin ranges from 9413 to 14,096 ppm, in which alkanes constituted 1.0-20.1%, aromatics 1.3-14.7%, asphaltenes 28.1-76.2% and resins 20.2-43.5%. The saturated hydrocarbon fractions included n-C{sub 15} to n-C{sub 32}, with an odd carbon number that predominate in almost all the samples. The contents of n-C{sub 27} and n-C{sub 29} alkanes are extremely high in some samples, as a contribution of epicuticular waxes from higher plants. Acyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons are minor constituents in the aliphatic fraction, and the pristane/phytane (Pr/Ph) ratio varies between 0.56 and 3.13, which implies anaerobic to oxic conditions during sedimentation. The most abundant diterpanes were abietane, dehydroabietane and 16{alpha}(H)-phyllocladane. In samples from the upper part of the coal seam, diterpanes are the dominant constituents of the alkane fraction. Polycyclic alkanes of the triterpane

  6. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a... gasoline volume of the facility, per § 80.91. (b) Baseline exhaust benzene emissions—simple model. (1) Simple model exhaust benzene emissions of conventional gasoline shall be determined using the following...

  7. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy... Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of the... inventory, the responsible employer must: (1) Review current and historical records; (2) Interview...

  8. Bounding the integer bootstrapped GNSS baseline's tail probability in the presence of stochastic uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, Steven E.; Khanafseh, Samer M.; Pervan, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Differential carrier phase applications that utilize cycle resolution need the probability density function of the baseline estimate to quantify its region of concentration. For the integer bootstrap estimator, the density function has an analytical definition that enables probability calculations given perfect statistical knowledge of measurement and process noise. This paper derives a method to upper bound the tail probability of the integer bootstrapped GNSS baseline when the measurement and process noise correlation functions are unknown, but can be upper and lower bounded. The tail probability is shown to be a non-convex function of a vector of conditional variances, whose feasible region is a convex polytope. We show how to solve the non-convex optimization problem globally by discretizing the polytope into small hyper-rectangular elements, and demonstrate the method for a static baseline estimation problem.

  9. Bounding the integer bootstrapped GNSS baseline's tail probability in the presence of stochastic uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, Steven E.; Khanafseh, Samer M.; Pervan, Boris

    2016-11-01

    Differential carrier phase applications that utilize cycle resolution need the probability density function of the baseline estimate to quantify its region of concentration. For the integer bootstrap estimator, the density function has an analytical definition that enables probability calculations given perfect statistical knowledge of measurement and process noise. This paper derives a method to upper bound the tail probability of the integer bootstrapped GNSS baseline when the measurement and process noise correlation functions are unknown, but can be upper and lower bounded. The tail probability is shown to be a non-convex function of a vector of conditional variances, whose feasible region is a convex polytope. We show how to solve the non-convex optimization problem globally by discretizing the polytope into small hyper-rectangular elements, and demonstrate the method for a static baseline estimation problem.

  10. Hydro-geochemical characterization of Treated Domestic Waste Water for possible use in homestead irrigation and managed aquifer recharge in the coastal city of Khulna, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, T.; Ahmed, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Bangladesh is among the most densely populated countries in the world. Rapid and unplanned urbanization in Bangladesh has resulted in heterogeneous land use pattern and larger demands for municipal water. To meet the ever-increasing demand of water for such population, the usage of treated domestic waste water (DWW) has become a viable option that can serve specific purposes, i.e. homestead irrigation, managed aquifer recharge (MAR) in major cities like Khulna, the largest city in the southwest coastal region. It is an attractive solution to minimize the deficit between the demand and supply of water in the study area where, in specific parts, city-dwellers suffer year round shortage of potable water due to high salinity in shallow depths. However, certain degree of treatment is mandatory for DWW in order to ensure the compliance of the output water with a set of standards and regulations for the DWW reuse. At present, the DWW is being treated through Constructed Wetlands but the treated water is not used and discharged into the sewer system. Wastewater that has been treated through a constructed wetland is a resource that can be used for productive uses in homestead garden irrigation, artificial aquifer recharge, and other non-potable uses. The study addresses the effectiveness of constructed wetlands in improving the quality of wastewater through on the hydro-geochemical characterization of both raw and treated DWW as well as baseline water quality analysis of surface and ground water in and around the treatment plant with consideration of seasonal variations. The study aims at sustainable development through conservation of water, satisfaction of demands, reliability of water supply, contribution to urban food supply, sustenance of livelihood and replenishment of the depleting aquifer by assessing the suitability of the treated DWW for various non-potable uses and also to provide guidelines for possible uses of treated DWW without adverse impact on environment

  11. Nonintrusive methodology for wellness baseline profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Danny Wen-Yaw; Tsai, Yuh-Show; Miaou, Shaou-Gang; Chang, Walter H.; Chang, Yaw-Jen; Chen, Shia-Chung; Hong, Y. Y.; Chyang, C. S.; Chang, Quan-Shong; Hsu, Hon-Yen; Hsu, James; Yao, Wei-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Sin; Chen, Ming-Chung; Lee, Shi-Chen; Hsu, Charles; Miao, Lidan; Byrd, Kenny; Chouikha, Mohamed F.; Gu, Xin-Bin; Wang, Paul C.; Szu, Harold

    2007-04-01

    We develop an accumulatively effective and affordable set of smart pair devices to save the exuberant expenditure for the healthcare of aging population, which will not be sustainable when all the post-war baby boomers retire (78 millions will cost 1/5~1/4 GDP in US alone). To design an accessible test-bed for distributed points of homecare, we choose two exemplars of the set to demonstrate the possibility of translation of modern military and clinical know-how, because two exemplars share identically the noninvasive algorithm adapted to the Smart Sensor-pairs for the real world persistent surveillance. Currently, the standard diagnoses for malignant tumors and diabetes disorders are blood serum tests, X-ray CAT scan, and biopsy used sometime in the physical checkup by physicians as cohort-average wellness baselines. The loss of the quality of life in making second careers productive may be caused by the missing of timeliness for correct diagnoses and easier treatments, which contributes to the one quarter of human errors generating the lawsuits against physicians and hospitals, which further escalates the insurance cost and wasteful healthcare expenditure. Such a vicious cycle should be entirely eliminated by building an "individual diagnostic aids (IDA)," similar to the trend of personalized drug, developed from daily noninvasive intelligent databases of the "wellness baseline profiling (WBP)". Since our physiology state undulates diurnally, the Nyquist anti-aliasing theory dictates a minimum twice-a-day sampling of the WBP for the IDA, which must be made affordable by means of noninvasive, unsupervised and unbiased methodology at the convenience of homes. Thus, a pair of military infrared (IR) spectral cameras has been demonstrated for the noninvasive spectrogram ratio test of the spontaneously emitted thermal radiation from a normal human body at 37°C temperature. This invisible self-emission spreads from 3 microns to 12 microns of the radiation wavelengths

  12. Regionalism, Regionalization and Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu C. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained development is a concept associating other concepts, in its turn, in the EU practice, e.g. regionalism, regionalizing and afferent policies, here including structural policies. This below text, dedicated to integration concepts, will limit on the other hand to regionalizing, otherwise an aspect typical to Europe and to the EU. On the other hand, two aspects come up to strengthen this field of ideas, i.e. the region (al-regionalism-(regional development triplet has either its own history or precise individual outline of terms.

  13. 1993 baseline solid waste management system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armacost, L.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

    1994-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has prepared this report under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The report provides an integrated description of the system planned for managing Hanford`s solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic waste, and transuranic mixed waste. The primary purpose of this document is to illustrate a collective view of the key functions planned at the Hanford Site to handle existing waste inventories, as well as solid wastes that will be generated in the future. By viewing this system as a whole rather than as individual projects, key facility interactions and requirements are identified and a better understanding of the overall system may be gained. The system is described so as to form a basis for modeling the system at various levels of detail. Model results provide insight into issues such as facility capacity requirements, alternative system operating strategies, and impacts of system changes (ie., startup dates). This description of the planned Hanford solid waste processing system: defines a baseline system configuration; identifies the entering waste streams to be managed within the system; identifies basic system functions and waste flows; and highlights system constraints. This system description will evolve and be revised as issues are resolved, planning decisions are made, additional data are collected, and assumptions are tested and changed. Out of necessity, this document will also be revised and updated so that a documented system description, which reflects current system planning, is always available for use by engineers and managers. It does not provide any results generated from the many alternatives that will be modeled in the course of analyzing solid waste disposal options; such results will be provided in separate documents.

  14. Prebiotic Chemistry: Geochemical Context and Reaction Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderson James Cleaves

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The origin of life on Earth is widely believed to have required the reactions of organic compounds and their self- and/or environmental organization. What those compounds were remains open to debate, as do the environment in and process or processes by which they became organized. Prebiotic chemistry is the systematic organized study of these phenomena. It is difficult to study poorly defined phenomena, and research has focused on producing compounds and structures familiar to contemporary biochemistry, which may or may not have been crucial for the origin of life. Given our ignorance, it may be instructive to explore the extreme regions of known and future investigations of prebiotic chemistry, where reactions fail, that will relate them to or exclude them from plausible environments where they could occur. Come critical parameters which most deserve investigation are discussed.

  15. The LBNO long-baseline oscillation sensitivities with two conventional neutrino beams at different baselines

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, S.K.; Aittola, M.; Alekou, A.; Andrieu, B.; Antoniou, F.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Autiero, D.; Besida, O.; Balik, A.; Ballett, P.; Bandac, I.; Banerjee, D.; Bartmann, W.; Bay, F.; Biskup, B.; Blebea-Apostu, A.M.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Bolognesi, S.; Borriello, E.; Brancus, I.; Bravar, A.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Caiulo, D.; Calin, M.; Calviani, M.; Campanelli, M.; Cantini, C.; Cata-Danil, G.; Chakraborty, S.; Charitonidis, N.; Chaussard, L.; Chesneanu, D.; Chipesiu, F.; Crivelli, P.; Dawson, J.; De Bonis, I.; Declais, Y.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Delbart, A.; Di Luise, S.; Duchesneau, D.; Dumarchez, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Eliseev, A.; Emery, S.; Enqvist, T.; Enqvist, K.; Epprecht, L.; Erykalov, A.N.; Esanu, T.; Franco, D.; Friend, M.; Galymov, V.; Gavrilov, G.; Gendotti, A.; Giganti, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Goddard, B.; Gomoiu, C.M.; Gornushkin, Y.A.; Gorodetzky, P.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Horikawa, S.; Huitu, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jipa, A.; Kainulainen, K.; Karadzhov, Y.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kopylov, A.N.; Korzenev, A.; Kosyanenko, S.; Kryn, D.; Kudenko, Y.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Lazanu, I.; Lazaridis, C.; Levy, J.M.; Loo, K.; Maalampi, J.; Margineanu, R.M.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Mari, C.; Matveev, V.; Mazzucato, E.; Mefodiev, A.; Mineev, O.; Mirizzi, A.; Mitrica, B.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Narita, S.; Nesterenko, D.A.; Nguyen, K.; Nikolics, K.; Noah, E.; Novikov, Yu.; Oprima, A.; Osborne, J.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pascoli, S.; Patzak, T.; Pectu, M.; Pennacchio, E.; Periale, L.; Pessard, H.; Popov, B.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M.; Resnati, F.; Ristea, O.; Robert, A.; Rubbia, A.; Rummukainen, K.; Saftoiu, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sanchez-Galan, F.; Sarkamo, J.; Saviano, N.; Scantamburlo, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Slupecki, M.; Smargianaki, D.; Stanca, D.; Steerenberg, R.; Sterian, A.R.; Sterian, P.; Stoica, S.; Strabel, C.; Suhonen, J.; Suvorov, V.; Toma, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trzaska, W.H.; Tsenov, R.; Tuominen, K.; Valram, M.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vannucci, F.; Vasseur, G.; Velotti, F.; Velten, P.; Venturi, V.; Viant, T.; Vihonen, S.; Vincke, H.; Vorobyev, A.; Weber, A.; Wu, S.; Yershov, N.; Zambelli, L.; Zito, M.

    2014-01-01

    The proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Observatory (LBNO) initially consists of $\\sim 20$ kton liquid double phase TPC complemented by a magnetised iron calorimeter, to be installed at the Pyh\\"asalmi mine, at a distance of 2300 km from CERN. The conventional neutrino beam is produced by 400 GeV protons accelerated at the SPS accelerator delivering 700 kW of power. The long baseline provides a unique opportunity to study neutrino flavour oscillations over their 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima exploring the $L/E$ behaviour, and distinguishing effects arising from $\\delta_{CP}$ and matter. In this paper we show how this comprehensive physics case can be further enhanced and complemented if a neutrino beam produced at the Protvino IHEP accelerator complex, at a distance of 1160 km, and with modest power of 450 kW is aimed towards the same far detectors. We show that the coupling of two independent sub-MW conventional neutrino and antineutrino beams at different baselines from CERN and Protvino will allow to measure ...

  16. Geochemical Parameters Required from the SKB Site Characterisation Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2002-01-01

    SKB has described its approach to site characterisation in a number of Technical Reports. One of the scientific topics in which specific information requirements and priorities are set out is geochemistry. This report for SKI examines critically whether the geochemical parameters identified in the SKB programme documents will be adequate for safety and regulatory requirements. It also examines some of the details of parameter requirements and interpretation tools that will be necessary to convert site investigation data into knowledge about chemical conditions and groundwater movements. The SKB strategy for geochemical data focuses on a small number of 'suitability indicators', primarily dissolved oxygen, pH and salinity. Their parameter requirements aim to assess those primary characteristics, as well as to acquire a wider range of data that will support those assessments and provide a broader understanding of candidate areas. An initial observation in this review that, though it is a primary suitability indicator, dissolved oxygen apparently will not be measured and instead will be inferred from other redox indicators. This raises a number of issues about sampling and monitoring measures, analytical data reliability and sensitivity, and the degree of confidence in geochemical understanding. A geochemical programme involves reconnaissance by desk study and acquisition of new data at levels of details that are appropriate to the stage of site investigations. As early as possible, a conceptual model of a candidate area should help to define the objectives of geochemical measurements on both rock and groundwater samples. It is recommended that parameters requirements should be defined and considered not only in terms of isolated measurements but more in terms of addressing broader objectives that relate to safety and also to geoscientific understanding. The safety priorities remain (e.g. dissolved oxygen) but will then be supported by an understanding of

  17. Early Giant Planet Migration in the Solar System: Geochemical and Cosmochemical Implications for Terrestrial Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, David P.; Walsh, K. J.; Morbidelli, A.; Raymond, S. N.; Mandell, A. M.; Bond, J. C.

    2010-10-01

    A new terrestrial planet formation model (Walsh et al., this meeting) explores the effects of a two-stage, inward-then-outward migration of Jupiter and Saturn, as found in numerous hydrodynamical simulations of giant planet formation (Masset & Snellgrove 2001, Morbidelli & Crida 2007, Pierens & Nelson 2008). Walsh et al. show that the inward migration of Jupiter truncates the disk of planetesimals and embryos in the terrestrial planet region. Subsequent accretion in that region then forms a realistic system of terrestrial planets, in particular giving a low-mass Mars, which has been difficult to reproduce in simulations with a self-consistent set of initial conditions (see, eg. Raymond et al. 2009). Additionally, the outward migration of the giant planets populates the asteroid belt with distinct populations of bodies, with the inner belt filled by bodies originating inside of 3 AU, and the outer belt filled with bodies originating from beyond the giant planets. From a geochemical and cosmochemical point of view, this scenario differs significantly from the "standard model" in which essentially all of the material in the inner Solar System initially formed there. Specifically, the assumption that the current radial distribution of material in the inner Solar System is reflective of the primordial distribution of material in that region is no longer necessary. This is important for understanding the chemical and isotopic diversity of the inner Solar System as inferred from studies of the terrestrial planets, asteroids, and meteorites, as well as for understanding the origin of Earth's water. We will discuss the geochemical and cosmochemical implications of this model in relation to available constraints, as well as to previous models of terrestrial planet formation. Masset & Snellgrove (2001), MNRAS 320, L55. Morbidelli & Crida (2007), Icarus 191, 158. Pierens & Nelson (2008), A&A 482, 333. Raymond et al. (2009), Icarus 203, 644.

  18. Defining and modeling the soil geochemical background of heavy metals from the Hengshi River watershed (southern China): integrating EDA, stochastic simulation and magnetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Xia, Beicheng

    2010-08-15

    It is crucial to separate the soil geochemical background concentrations from anthropogenic anomalies and to provide a realistic environmental geochemical map honoring the fluctuations in original data. This study was carried out in the Hengshi River watershed, north of Guangdong, China and the method proposed combined exploratory data analysis (EDA), sequential indicator co-simulation (SIcS) and the ratio of isothermal remnant magnetization (S(100)=-IRM(-100 mT)/SIRM). The results showed that this is robust procedure for defining and mapping soil geochemical background concentrations in mineralized regions. The rock magnetic parameter helps to improve the mapping process by distinguishing anthropogenic influences. In this study, the geochemical backgrounds for four potentially toxic heavy metals (copper 200mg/kg; zinc 23 0mg/kg; lead 190 mg/kg and cadmium 1.85 mg/kg) Cu, Zn and Cd exceeded the soil Grade II limits (for pHgeochemical background level for Cd exceeds standard six times. Results suggest that local public health is at high-risk along the riparian region of the Hengshi River, although the watershed ecosystem has not been severely disturbed.

  19. Environmental Status and geochemical assessment Sediments of Lake Skadar, Montenegro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastratović, Vlatko; Jaćimović, Željko; Bigović, Miljan; Đurović, Dijana; Krivokapić, Slađana

    2016-08-01

    The environmental mobility and geochemical partitioning of ten metals were examined in sediments collected from the six locations around Lake Skadar in Montenegro. A three-step sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the distribution of the metals in various substrates of lacustrine sediments, and the concentrations were measured in the liquid extract by ICP-OES. The largest portion of the total amount of cadmium, strontium and manganese can be found in sediment bound to the hydrated iron and manganese oxides; cobalt, lead, copper and nickel in the oxidizable fraction and the highest portion of chromium, vanadium and zinc are in the residual fraction. The most mobilized and potentially mobile metals are strontium, cadmium and cobalt while the most immobilized metals are chromium, vanadium and zinc. Based on geochemical parameters, an assessment of sediment contamination by the investigated metals was performed and the results showed potential risks ranging from "no risk" to "low risk" to the environment.

  20. Geochemical modeling of cyanide in tailing dam gold processing plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Ahmad; Monjezi, M.; Mehrpouya, H.; Dehghani, H.

    2009-09-01

    This research is aimed at investigating possible neutralization of cyanide in tailing dam of Muteh gold processing plant in Isfahan, Iran at various conditions such as pH and temperature using USEPA Visual MINTEQ geochemical model simulation. The model is based on geochemical equilibrium which uses the simultaneous solution of the non-linear mass action expressions and linear mass balance relationships to formulate and solve the multiple-component chemical equilibrium problems. In this study the concentration of aqueous species in tailing dam as an aqueous, solid and gaseous were used as input in the model. Temperature and pH variation were simulated. The results of the model indicated that cyanide may be complexes in 10 < pH < 5. In other pH values complexation is not important. The results also indicated that cyanide reduction mechanism in acidic pH and temperature above 30°C is due to cyanide acid formation which is vaporized.

  1. Geochemical and Mineralogical Proxies for characterizing Tsunami and Paleotsunami Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwhagen, L.; Jankaew, K.; Kylander, M. E.; Skelton, A.; Wohlfarth, B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show how geochemistry and mineralogy can be used to correlate between previously dated tsunami and paleotsunami deposits in western Thailand. We do this based on cores from three parallel swales along a transect from the shoreline inland. Stratigraphy, together with geochemical and mineralogical analyses was used to correlate between tsunami and paleotsunami layers at these sites. Using element biplots (Ti-Zr, Ti-Y and Zr-Y) and mineralogical constraints, source signatures of each of the tsunami and paleotsunami layers were used to correlate between sand layers representing the 2004 tsunami and sand layers representing at least three paleotsunamis. Based on our correlations between these swales, we predict different inundation distances and directions for these paleotsunamis. Our study shows that a combination of geochemical and mineralogical analysis provides a powerful tool for correlation between tsunami and paleotsunami layers.

  2. Geochemical barriers for environment protection and recovery of nonferrous metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanturiya, Valentine; Masloboev, Vladimir; Makarov, Dmitriy; Nesterov, Dmitriy; Bajurova, Julia; Svetlov, Anton; Men'shikov, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    A study of natural minerals, ore tailings and their products as materials for artificial geochemical barriers is presented. In particular, it focuses on interaction between calcite and dolomite and sulfate solutions containing nickel, copper and iron under static conditions. Calcite of -0.1 mm fraction has been shown to perform well as a barrier when added to water phases of tailing dumps and natural reservoirs. Experiments under dynamic conditions have revealed a high potential of thermally activated copper-nickel tailings as barriers. After a 500-day precipitating period on a geochemical barrier, the contents of nickel and copper in ore dressing tailings were found to increase 12- and 28-fold, respectively. An effective sorbent of copper, iron and nickel ions is a brucite-based product of hydrochloric acid treatment of vermiculite ore tailings. Its sorption capacity can be essentially increased through thermal activation.

  3. Geochemical Constraints for Mechanisms of Planetary Differentiation and Volatile Depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaliwal, Jasmeet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the terrestrial planets involved a range of complex processes, including accretion, core formation, post-core formation accretion, mantle differentiation and volatile depletion. The earliest processes of accretion and core formation have largely been overprinted on Earth and Mars, but can be investigated using geochemical measurements of extraterrestrial materials. Highly siderophile elements (HSE; Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Re, Au) preferentially partition into metal phases an...

  4. Geochemical signatures of tsunami deposits - what do they tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chague-Goff, Catherine; Goff, James R.

    2010-05-01

    In the last two and half decades, but even more since the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT), there has been a significant increase in the amount of literature dealing with recent, historical and palaeotsunamis. Much has been written and debated about the diagnostic criteria of historical and palaeotsunami deposits. Most of the diagnostic criteria or proxies used reflect the expertise of the researchers involved and thus tend to be biased towards sedimentology, stratigraphy and micropalaeontology, with some reference to geomorphology, archaeology, anthropology and palynology. It should however be noted that all criteria have never been reported from one site, and neither are they all found in one single deposit. Thus, the lack of one or more proxies should not be taken as unique evidence to refute the tsunamigenic origin of a specific deposit. Although geochemical signatures have long been used as indicators for palaeosalinity in sedimentary sequences, there appears to have been some reluctance to use them to help in the identification of historical and palaeotsunami deposits. Like other proxies, geochemistry alone may not provide a definite answer to the origin of a deposit. Furthermore, poor preservation due to environmental conditions or as a result of post-diagenetic processes, might complicate the interpretation of geochemical signatures left by tsunami inundation. Similar taphonomic problems are also faced for microfossil proxies. However, geochemistry provides another piece to the puzzle, and together with other proxies, it can help identify palaeotsunami deposits. Geochemical signatures can also provide clues about the landward limit of runup of a tsunami, beyond the area of sediment deposition. This was recently documented following the 2004 IOT and the 2009 South Pacific tsunami. A summary of examples of geochemical signatures recorded in interstitial water and sediment of recent, historical and palaeotsunami deposits is presented.

  5. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Sridhar D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The geochemical discriminate diagrams help to distinguish the volcanics recovered from different tectonic settings but these diagrams tend to group the ocean floor basalts (OFB under one class i.e., as mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB. Hence, a method is specifically needed to identify the OFB as normal (N-MORB, enriched (E-MORB and ocean island basalts (OIB. We have applied Artificial Neural Network (ANN technique as a supervised Learning Vector Quantisation (LVQ to identify the inherent geochemical signatures present in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB basalts. A range of N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB dataset was used for training and testing of the network. Although the identification of the characters as N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB is completely dependent upon the training data set for the LVQ, but to a significant extent this method is found to be successful in identifying the characters within the CIOB basalts. The study helped to geochemically delineate the CIOB basalts as N-MORB with perceptible imprints of E-MORB and OIB characteristics in the form of moderately enriched rare earth and incompatible elements. Apart from the fact that the magmatic processes are difficult to be deciphered, the architecture performs satisfactorily.

  6. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pranab; Iyer, Sridhar D

    2009-12-23

    The geochemical discriminate diagrams help to distinguish the volcanics recovered from different tectonic settings but these diagrams tend to group the ocean floor basalts (OFB) under one class i.e., as mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB). Hence, a method is specifically needed to identify the OFB as normal (N-MORB), enriched (E-MORB) and ocean island basalts (OIB). We have applied Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique as a supervised Learning Vector Quantisation (LVQ) to identify the inherent geochemical signatures present in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) basalts. A range of N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB dataset was used for training and testing of the network. Although the identification of the characters as N-MORB, E-MORB and OIB is completely dependent upon the training data set for the LVQ, but to a significant extent this method is found to be successful in identifying the characters within the CIOB basalts. The study helped to geochemically delineate the CIOB basalts as N-MORB with perceptible imprints of E-MORB and OIB characteristics in the form of moderately enriched rare earth and incompatible elements. Apart from the fact that the magmatic processes are difficult to be deciphered, the architecture performs satisfactorily.

  7. Fault controlled geochemical properties in Lahendong geothermal reservoir Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Maren; Deon, Fiorenza; Haase, Christoph; Wiegand, Bettina; Kamah, Yustin; Sauter, Martin; Regenspurg, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Rock and fluid geochemical data from Lahendong, Indonesia, were analyzed to evaluate the influence of fault zones on reservoir properties. It was found that these properties depend on fault-permeability controlled fluid flow. Results from measurements of spring and well water as well as rocks and their hydraulic properties were combined with hydrochemical numerical modeling. The models show that the geothermal field consists of two geochemically distinct reservoir sections. One section is characterized by acidic water, considerable gas discharge and high geothermal-power productivity—all related to increased fault zone permeability. The other section is characterized by neutral water and lower productivity. Increased fluid flow in the highly fractured and permeable areas enhances chemical reaction rates. This results in strong alteration of their surrounding rocks. Numerical models of reactions between water and rock at Lahendong indicate the main alteration products are clay minerals. A geochemical conceptual model illustrates the relation between geochemistry and permeability and their distribution within the area. Our conceptual model illustrates the relation between geochemistry and fault-zone permeability within the Lahendong area. Further mapping of fault-related permeability would support sustainable energy exploitation by avoiding low-productive wells or the production of highly corroding waters, both there and elsewhere in the world.

  8. Geochemical influences and mercury methylation of a dental wastewater microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Asha; Rockne, Karl J; Drummond, James; Al-Hinai, Muntasar; Ranjan, Ravi

    2015-08-14

    The microbiome of dental clinic wastewater and its impact on mercury methylation remains largely unknown. Waste generated during dental procedures enters the sewer system and contributes a significant fraction of the total mercury (tHg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) load to wastewater treatment facilities. Investigating the influence of geochemical factors and microbiome structure is a critical step linking the methylating microorganisms in dental wastewater (DWW) ecosystems. DWW samples from a dental clinic were collected over eight weeks and analyzed for geochemical parameters, tHg, MeHg and bacterio-toxic heavy metals. We employed bacterial fingerprinting and pyrosequencing for microbiome analysis. High concentrations of tHg, MeHg and heavy metals were detected in DWW. The microbiome was dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi and many unclassified bacteria. Significant correlations were found between the bacterial community, Hg levels and geochemical factors including pH and the predicted total amount (not fraction) of neutral Hg-sulfide species. The most prevalent known methylators included Desulfobulbus propionicus, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio magneticus and Geobacter sulfurreducens. This study is the first to investigate the impact of high loads of Hg, MeHg and other heavy metals on the dental clinic wastewater microbiome, and illuminates the role of many known and unknown sulfate-reducing bacteria in Hg methylation.

  9. Identifying paleotsunami deposits in Thailand using geochemical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwhagen, Linda; Jankaew, Kruawun; Kylander, Malin; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Paleotsunami research has received considerable attention following the devastating Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004. Specific questions involve the magnitude, frequency and impact of past tsunamis. Phra Thong Island in the eastern Andaman Sea is an ideal location to study paleotsunami deposits in great detail (Jankaew et al., 2008). Apart from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami layer, three more distinct tsunami layers, separated by soil horizons have been identified and dated (Jankaew et al., 2008). In a collaborative project between Stockholm University and Chulalongkorn University, four sites on Phra Thong Island were chosen for detailed geochemical studies and additional AMS 14C dating. Paleotsunami deposits at these sites can be seen as more or less distinct sand layers embedded between the peaty soils. Here we report the initial results of XRF core scanning and loss on ignition analysis, which are supplemented by new 14C dates. The XRF data sets show a good correlation between synchronous tsunami layers along a coast-inland transect. The geochemistry moreover suggests a change in source area for the oldest tsunami layer. Further work will focus on a detailed geochemical characterization of the tsunami and soil layers, and on the influence of soil processes on the geochemical record. Reference: Jankaew, K; Atwater, B; Sawai, Y; Choowong, M; Charoentitirat, T; Martin, M; Prendergast, A, 2008. Medieval forewarning of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Thailand. Nature 455, 1228-1231.

  10. Geoecological assessment of environmental components Carpathian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishhenko L.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available On borderlandterritory of the Transcarpatian wich enters composition of Carpathiens European Region, executed ecological audit of being componentsof environment - geomorphosphere, soil cover, surface and underground waters, atmospheric air and landscape - by the methods of ecology-geochemical evaluation of contaminations by heavy metals, radionuclides, pesticides, oil products.

  11. Identifying the role of historical anthropogenic activities on urban soils: geochemical impact and city scale mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guern, Cecile; Baudouin, Vivien; Conil, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Recently, European cities have faced several changes including deindustrialization and population increase. To limit urban sprawl, urban densification is preferred. It conducts to (re)develop available areas such as brownfields. Although these areas can be attractive for housing due to their location (in proximity to the city centre or to a riverside), their soils and subsoils are often contaminated. They are therefore potentially harmful for human health and the environment, and potentially costly to remediate. Currently, in case of contamination suspicion, depth geochemical characterization of urban soil and subsoil are carried out at site scale. Nevertheless, large redevelopment project occur at quarter to city scale. It appears therefore useful to acquire the preliminary knowledge on the structure and quality of soil and subsoils, as well as on the potential sources of contamination at quarter to city scale. In the frame of the Ile de Nantes (France) redevelopment project, we considered more particularly anthropogenic deposits and former industrial activities as main sources of contamination linked to human activities. To face the low traceability of the use of anthropogenic deposits and the lack of synthesis of former industrial activities, we carried out a historical study, synthetizing the information spread in numerous archive documents to spatialize the extent of the deposits and of the former activities. In addition we developed a typology of made grounds according to their contamination potential to build a 3D geological model with a geochemical coherence. In this frame, we valorized existing borehole descriptions coming mainly from pollution diagnosis and geotechnical studies. We also developed a methodology to define urban baseline compatibility levels using the existing analytical data at depth from pollution diagnosis. These data were previously gathered in a local geodatabase towards with borehole descriptions (more than 2000 borehole descriptions

  12. Lunar Meteorites: A Global Geochemical Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Joy, K. H.; Arai, T.; Gross, J.; Korotev, R. L.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    To date, the world's meteorite collections contain over 260 lunar meteorite stones representing at least 120 different lunar meteorites. Additionally, there are 20-30 as yet unnamed stones currently in the process of being classified. Collectively these lunar meteorites likely represent 40-50 distinct sampling locations from random locations on the Moon. Although the exact provenance of each individual lunar meteorite is unknown, collectively the lunar meteorites represent the best global average of the lunar crust. The Apollo sites are all within or near the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT), thus lithologies from the PKT are overrepresented in the Apollo sample suite. Nearly all of the lithologies present in the Apollo sample suite are found within the lunar meteorites (high-Ti basalts are a notable exception), and the lunar meteorites contain several lithologies not present in the Apollo sample suite (e.g., magnesian anorthosite). This chapter will not be a sample-by-sample summary of each individual lunar meteorite. Rather, the chapter will summarize the different types of lunar meteorites and their relative abundances, comparing and contrasting the lunar meteorite sample suite with the Apollo sample suite. This chapter will act as one of the introductory chapters to the volume, introducing lunar samples in general and setting the stage for more detailed discussions in later more specialized chapters. The chapter will begin with a description of how lunar meteorites are ejected from the Moon, how deep samples are being excavated from, what the likely pairing relationships are among the lunar meteorite samples, and how the lunar meteorites can help to constrain the impactor flux in the inner solar system. There will be a discussion of the biases inherent to the lunar meteorite sample suite in terms of underrepresented lithologies or regions of the Moon, and an examination of the contamination and limitations of lunar meteorites due to terrestrial weathering. The

  13. Geological and geochemical record of 3400-million-year-old terrestrial meteorite impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Donald R.; Byerly, Gary R.; Asaro, Frank; Kyte, Frank T.

    1989-01-01

    Beds of sand-sized spherules in the 3400-million-year-old Fig Tree Group, Barberton Greenstone belt, South Africa, formed by the fall of quenched liquid silicate droplets into a range of shallow- to deep-water depositional environments. The regional extent of the layers, their compositional complexity, and lack of included volcanic debris suggest that they are not products of volcanic activity. The layers are greatly enriched in iridium and other platinum group elements in roughly chondritic proportions. Geochemical modeling based on immobile element abundances suggests that the original average spherule composition can be approximated by a mixture of fractionated tholeiitic basalt, komatiite, and CI carbonaceous chondrite. The spherules are thought to be the products of large meteorite impacts on the Archean earth.

  14. Geological and geochemical record of 3400-million-year-old terrestrial meteorite impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, D.R. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA)); Byerly, G.R. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA)); Asaro, F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Kyte, F.T. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Beds of sand-sized spherules in the 3400-million-year-old Fig Tree Group, Barberton Greenstone belt, South Africa, were formed by the fall of quenched liquid silicate droplets into a range of shallow- to deep-water depositional environments. The regional extent of the layers, their compositional complexity, and lack of included volcanic debris suggest that they are not products of volcanic activity. The layers are greatly enriched in iridium and other platinum group elements in roughly chondritic proportions. Geochemical modeling based on immobile element abundances suggests that the original average spherule composition can be approximated by a mixture of fractionated tholeiitic basalt, komatiite, and CI carbonaceous chondrite. The spherules are thought to be the products of large meteorite impacts on the Archean earth. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Modeling of geochemical interactions between acidic and neutral fluids in the Onikobe Geothermal Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-01-10

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir, one is neutral and the other is acidic (pH=3). It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. We carried out reactive geothermal transport simulations using TOUGHREACT (Xu and Pruess, 1998 and 2001) to test such a conceptual model. One-dimensional models were used to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids. Mn-rich smectite precipitated near the mixing front and is likely to form an impermeable barrier between regions with acidic and neutral fluids.

  16. Multi-Element Analysis and Geochemical Spatial Trends of Groundwater in Rural Northern New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O’Connor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Samples from private wells (n = 169 throughout St. Lawrence County, NY were analyzed by ICP-MS multi-element techniques. St. Lawrence County spans three diverse bedrock terranes including Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Adirondack Lowlands (mostly paragneisses and Highlands (mostly orthogneisses, as well as Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the St. Lawrence Valley. An ArcGIS database was constructed and used to generate contour plots for elements across the county. Strontium isotopes and unique geochemical signatures were used to distinguish water from various geologic units. The results were consistent with a large (7,309 km2, sparsely populated (~110,000, rural region with diverse bedrock and glacial cover.

  17. Digital image processing applied to analysis of geophysical and geochemical data for southern Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Leff, C. E.; Edwards, M. H.; Bindschadler, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Digital image-processing techniques have been used to analyze a variety of geophysical and geochemical map data covering southern Missouri, a region with important basement and strata-bound mineral deposits. Gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns, which have been reformatted to image displays, indicate a deep crustal structure cutting northwest-southeast through southern Missouri. In addition, geologic map data, topography, and Landsat multispectral scanner images have been used as base maps for the digital overlay of aerial gamma-ray and stream sediment chemical data for the 1 x 2-deg Rolla quadrangle. Results indicate enrichment of a variety of elements within the clay-rich alluvium covering many of the interfluvial plains, as well as a complicated pattern of enrichment for the sedimentary units close to the Precambrian rhyolites and granites of the St. Francois Mountains.

  18. Adaptive Multiscale Modeling of Geochemical Impacts on Fracture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Deng, H.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding fracture evolution is essential for many subsurface energy applications, including subsurface storage, shale gas production, fracking, CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy extraction. Geochemical processes in particular play a significant role in the evolution of fractures through dissolution-driven widening, fines migration, and/or fracture sealing due to precipitation. One obstacle to understanding and exploiting geochemical fracture evolution is that it is a multiscale process. However, current geochemical modeling of fractures cannot capture this multi-scale nature of geochemical and mechanical impacts on fracture evolution, and is limited to either a continuum or pore-scale representation. Conventional continuum-scale models treat fractures as preferential flow paths, with their permeability evolving as a function (often, a cubic law) of the fracture aperture. This approach has the limitation that it oversimplifies flow within the fracture in its omission of pore scale effects while also assuming well-mixed conditions. More recently, pore-scale models along with advanced characterization techniques have allowed for accurate simulations of flow and reactive transport within the pore space (Molins et al., 2014, 2015). However, these models, even with high performance computing, are currently limited in their ability to treat tractable domain sizes (Steefel et al., 2013). Thus, there is a critical need to develop an adaptive modeling capability that can account for separate properties and processes, emergent and otherwise, in the fracture and the rock matrix at different spatial scales. Here we present an adaptive modeling capability that treats geochemical impacts on fracture evolution within a single multiscale framework. Model development makes use of the high performance simulation capability, Chombo-Crunch, leveraged by high resolution characterization and experiments. The modeling framework is based on the adaptive capability in Chombo

  19. Precision Neutrino Oscillation Physics with an Intermediate Baseline Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S; Piai, M; Choubey, Sandhya

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the physics potential of intermediate $L \\sim 20 \\div 30$ km baseline experiments at reactor facilities, assuming that the solar neutrino oscillation parameters $\\Delta m^2_{\\odot}$ and $\\theta_{\\odot}$ lie in the high-LMA solution region. We show that such an intermediate baseline reactor experiment can determine both $\\Delta m^2_{\\odot}$ and $\\theta_{\\odot}$ with a remarkably high precision. We perform also a detailed study of the sensitivity of the indicated experiment to $\\Delta m^2_{\\rm atm}$, which drives the dominant atmospheric $\

  20. pplication of Fractal Technique for Analysis of Geophysical - Geochemical Databases in Tekieh Pb-Zn Ore Deposit (SE of Arak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Mehrnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tekieh Lead-Zinc ore deposit that is located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone has been recognized as one of the most important mineralized regions in Malayer-Isfahan metallogenic sub-state, south east of Arak (Momenzadeh and Ziseman, 1981. Carbonate host units have been developed along (or across the Vishan-Tekieh anticline as the main structure extended in NW-SE trends (Annells et al, 1985. According to geochemical investigations (Salehi, 2004, the element content of the mineralized regions has originated from Alpine post-volcanisms and subsequently it has migrated toward early Cretaceous formations (dolomitic limestones among several hypogenic stages (Torkashvand et a.2009. Also echelon type structures consisting of folded systems and inversed faulting of structures are the most common features in western and eastern parts of ore deposit regions (Annells et al, 1985. Syngenetic enrichments beside limited (rarely developed epigenetic mineralization have been known as two main phases which are closely relevant to ore forming processes in the massive lenses and vein type occurrences, respectively (Momenzadeh and Ziseman, 1981. Material and Methods In this research, two statistical techniques that consist of classical and fractal equations (Mandelbrot, 2005 were applied in geochemical (Torkashvand et al., 2009 and geophysical (Jafari, 2007 databases for obtaining the linear and nonlinear distributions of geochemical elements (Tekieh Pb-Zn content in association with resistivity variations and induction polarization measurements (Calagari, 2010. According to linear statistical techniques (Torkashvand et al., 2009, the main central parameters such as mean, median and mode in addition to variances and standard deviations as distribution tendencies could be used for obtaining the regression coefficients of the databases. However, in fractal statistics, a reliable regression between geoelectrical - geochemical anomalies should be

  1. Integrating Geochemical and Geodynamic Numerical Models of Mantle Evolution and Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Xie, S.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's mantle and plates are inextricably coupled by the plate tectonic - mantle convective system. Convection causes chemical differentiation, recycling and mixing, while chemical variations affect the convection through physical properties such as density and viscosity which depend on composition. It is now possible to construct numerical mantle convection models that track the thermo-chemical evolution of major and minor elements, and which can be used to test prospective models and hypotheses regarding Earth's chemical and thermal evolution. Model thermal and chemical structures can be compared to results from seismic tomography, while geochemical signatures (e.g., trace element ratios) can be compared to geochemical observations. The presented, two-dimensional model combines a simplified 2-component major element model with tracking of the most important trace elements, using a tracer method. Melting is self-consistently treated using a solidus, with melt placed on the surface as crust. Partitioning of trace elements occurs between melt and residue. Decaying heat-producing elements and secular cooling of the mantle and core provide the driving heat sources. Pseudo-plastic yielding of the lithosphere gives a first-order approximation of plate tectonics, and also allows planets with a rigid lid or intermittent plate tectonics to be modeled simply by increasing the yield strength. Preliminary models with an initially homogeneous mantle show that regions with a HIMU-like signature can be generated by crustal recycling, and regions with high 3He/4He ratios can be generated by residuum recycling. Outgassing of Argon is within the observed range. Models with initially layered mantles will also be investigated. In future it will be important to include a more realistic bulk compositional model that allows continental crust as well as oceanic crust to form, and to extend the model to three dimensions since toroidal flow may alter

  2. Geochemical hunting of lithogenic and anthropogenic impacts on polymetallic distribution (Bregalnica river basin, Republic of Macedonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanova, Biljana; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Tănăselia, Claudiu

    2016-11-09

    The main subject of this investigation was the assessment of the lithogenic and anthropogenic distribution of 69 elements in the sediments and fluvisol in the Bregalnica river basin. Alluvial soil and fluvisol samples were collected from the total of eighteen locations along the course of the Bregalnica river and additional thirteen samples were collected from its tributaries. The matrix elements accumulation patterns followed the order: Fe > Na > Al > Ca > Mg > K > Ti > P. The potentially toxic elements, such as As, Cd, Pb, and Zn, have enriched content in the sediments in the medium course of the river, where the main anthropogenic introduction activities occurred. By multivariate analysis the dominant geochemical associations were extracted, as follows: F1: Y-Eu-Lu-Cr-V-La-Gd-Nb-Co-Hf-Zr-Ga-Mg-Fe-Sr-Ta-Sn-Li-Na-Rb-Ni-Ge-Be-Cs; F2: As-W-Ba-Ag-Cu-Tl-Zn-Sb-Mo-In-Cd-Te-Bi-Pb and F3: I-Sc-Br-K. Lead and zinc contents were strongly correlated with the hydrothermal exploitations, especially in the area of Neogene clastite and vulcanite. These elements occur as dominant geochemical markers of the anthropogenic impacts of polymetallic enrichments due to the hydrothermal ore exploitation (Factor 2). The impact of Oligocene volcanism (Kratovo-Zletovo region) was observed in the lithological enrichments of Pb, Zn, Cu, As, Sb, Mo and Bi. Despite the natural distribution along the course of the Bregalnica river, an exceptional anomaly in the iron distribution of the old polymetallic unused mineralization was detected in Zone 1 (Berovo region).

  3. Fluid–rock interaction across the South Tibetan Detachment, Garhwal Himalaya (India): Mineralogical and geochemical evidences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anubhooti Saxena; Himanshu K Sachan; Pulok K Mukherjee; Dilip K Mukhopadhya

    2012-02-01

    The Malari Leucogranite in the Garhwal Himalaya is cut across by a continental-scale normal fault system called the South Tibetan Detachment (STD). A mineralogical, geochemical and fluid inclusion study of samples from the fault zone of the Malari Granite was performed to reveal the imprints of fluid–rock interaction. Fluid inclusion assemblages observed in the alteration zone indicate the presence of NaCl-dominated aqueous fluids with varied salinity of 6 –16 wt.% of NaCl equivalent. Mineralogical changes include the alteration of feldspar to muscovite and muscovite to chlorite. This alteration took place at temperatures of 275°–335°C and pressures between 1.9 and 4.2 kbars as revealed by the application of chlorite thermometry, fluid isochores, and presence of K-feldspar+muscovite+chlorite+quartz mineral assemblage. Geochemical mass-balance estimates predict 32% volume loss during alteration. An estimated fluid/rock ratio of 82 is based on loss of silica during alteration, and reveals presence of a moderately low amount of fluid at the time of faulting. Results of fluid inclusion and alteration mineralogy indicate that the Malari Leucogranites were exhumed due to normal faulting along the STD and erosion from mid-crustal levels. Most of the leucogranites in the Himalayas occur along the STD and possibly a regional-scale fluid flow all along the STD might have caused similar alteration of leucogranites along this tectonic break. Regional fluid flow was probably concentrated along the STD and channelized through mesoscopic fractures, microcracks and grain boundaries.

  4. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched

  5. The two-layer geochemical structure of modern biogeochemical provinces and its significance for spatially adequate ecological evaluations and decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Contamination of the environment has reached such a scale that ecogeochemical situation in any area can be interpreted now as a result of the combined effect of natural and anthropogenic factors. The areas that appear uncomfortable for a long stay can have natural and anthropogenic genesis, but the spatial structure of such biogeochemical provinces is in any case formed of a combination of natural and technogenic fields of chemical elements. Features of structural organization and the difference in factors and specific time of their formation allow their separation on one hand and help in identification of areas with different ecological risks due to overlay of the two structures on the other. Geochemistry of soil cover reflects the long-term result of the naturally balanced biogeochemical cycles, therefore the soil geochemical maps of the undisturbed areas may serve the basis for evaluation of the natural geochemical background with due regard to the main factors of geochemical differentiation in biosphere. Purposeful and incidental technogenic concentrations and dispersions of chemical elements of specific (mainly mono- or polycentric) structure are also fixed in soils that serve as secondary sources of contamination of the vegetation cover and local food chains. Overlay of the two structures forms specific heterogeneity of modern biogeochemical provinces with different risk for particular groups of people, animals and plants adapted to specific natural geochemical background within particular concentration interval. The developed approach is believed to be helpful for biogeochemical regionalizing of modern biosphere (noosphere) and for spatially adequate ecogeochemical evaluation of the environment and landuse decisions. It allows production of a set of applied geochemical maps such as: 1) health risk due to chemical elements deficiency and technogenic contamination accounting of possible additive effects; 2) adequate soil fertilization and melioration with due

  6. Reproducibility of Geochemical and Climate Signatures in Montastrea annularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. M.; Quinn, T. M.; Halley, R. B.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemical variations in modern and fossil coral skeletons (Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, δ 18O, δ 13C) are increasingly being used to reconstruct climate variability in tropical ocean-atmosphere system on interannual to centennial timescales. Coral-based climate studies are usually carried out using a single coral core from a reef, or a collection of cores covering different time intervals from the same reef site. Cross checking or replication - the generation of multiple climate time series from a single locality - is not a standard operating procedure in coral paleoclimatology because of the expense of generating additional geochemical time series. Quantitative assessment of intra-reef geochemical variability in multiple coral cores from the same reef is needed to verify the fidelity of climate reconstructions based on geochemical variations from a single coral. We perform such an assessment using the geochemical signals derived from two Montastrea annularis corals (LK1 and LK23) recovered in 2002 from Looe Key reef, Florida USA (24.5° N, 81.4° W). Looe Key is located in the central portion of the Florida Keys and has an hourly in situ seawater temperature record extending back to 1990. We extended this in situ SST record further back in time by splicing in HadISST 1.1 data extracted from the appropriate 1° by 1° grid point. Paired geochemical measurements of Sr/Ca, δ 18O and δ 13C were made by sampling coral LK1 and LK23 along their respective major growth axes. Geochemical variations versus depth were converted to monthly resolved time series extending from 2002-1966. The two ˜37 year coral time series replicate well in terms of both phasing and mean perspective: (δ 18O LK1, -3.90+/-0.28 ‰ , 1σ ; LK23, -3.93+/-0.31 ‰ , 1σ ), δ 13C (LK1, -0.80+/-0.68 ‰ , 1σ ; LK23, -0.72+/-0.59 ‰ , 1σ ) and Sr/Ca (LK1, 9.208+/-0.080 mmol/mol, 1σ ; LK23, 9.226+/-0.082 mmol/mol, 1σ ). Coral Sr/Ca-SST estimates of mean SST over the period 2002-1966 for LK1 (27.25+/-2.00

  7. Risk evaluation of uranium mining: A geochemical inverse modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillard, J.; Zuddas, P.; Scislewski, A.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that uranium extraction operations can increase risks linked to radiation exposure. The toxicity of uranium and associated heavy metals is the main environmental concern regarding exploitation and processing of U-ore. In areas where U mining is planned, a careful assessment of toxic and radioactive element concentrations is recommended before the start of mining activities. A background evaluation of harmful elements is important in order to prevent and/or quantify future water contamination resulting from possible migration of toxic metals coming from ore and waste water interaction. Controlled leaching experiments were carried out to investigate processes of ore and waste (leached ore) degradation, using samples from the uranium exploitation site located in Caetité-Bahia, Brazil. In experiments in which the reaction of waste with water was tested, we found that the water had low pH and high levels of sulphates and aluminium. On the other hand, in experiments in which ore was tested, the water had a chemical composition comparable to natural water found in the region of Caetité. On the basis of our experiments, we suggest that waste resulting from sulphuric acid treatment can induce acidification and salinization of surface and ground water. For this reason proper storage of waste is imperative. As a tool to evaluate the risks, a geochemical inverse modelling approach was developed to estimate the water-mineral interaction involving the presence of toxic elements. We used a method earlier described by Scislewski and Zuddas 2010 (Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 6996-7007) in which the reactive surface area of mineral dissolution can be estimated. We found that the reactive surface area of rock parent minerals is not constant during time but varies according to several orders of magnitude in only two months of interaction. We propose that parent mineral heterogeneity and particularly, neogenic phase formation may explain the observed variation of the

  8. Baseline arsenic levels in marine and terrestrial resources from a pristine environment: Isabel Island, Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinham, Alistair; Kvennefors, Charlotte; Fisher, Paul L; Gibbes, Badin; Albert, Simon

    2014-11-15

    Baseline records are crucial in understanding how chemicals of concern impact on the receiving environment. We analysed terrestrial and marine resources from a pristine site on Isabel Island, Solomon Islands, to provide environmental baseline levels for total arsenic and arsenic species composition for commonly consumed marine resources. Our data show that levels of the more toxic inorganic arsenic species were very low or below detectable limits, with the exception of the seaweed Sargassum sp. that contained pentavalent inorganic arsenic levels of 4.63 μg g(-1). Total arsenic concentrations in the majority of marine and terrestrial samples collected were below 2 μg g(-1). The less toxic arsenobetaine was the predominant arsenic species present in all marine fauna samples analysed. This work highlights the need for arsenic speciation analysis to accurately assess potential toxicity of marine resources and provides a crucial baseline to assess the impact of future development within this region.

  9. APOC impact assessment studies: baseline ophthalmological findings in Morogoro, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, O E; Maegga, B; Katenga, S; Ogbuagu, F K; Umeh, R E; Seketeli, E; Braide, E

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) is to eliminate Onchocerciasis as a disease of public Health significance and an important constraint to socio-economic development in the 19 none OCP (Onchocerciasis Control Project) countries covered through Community-Directed Treatment with Ivermectin, CDTI. In 1998, impact assessment studies were carried out in Morogoro, Tanzania during which baseline ophthalmological parameters were established. The hypothesis being tested is that CDTI will prevent or delay progression of onchocercal eye lesions and blindness. A total of 425 subjects aged 10 years or more from 14 villages within Bwakira district ofMorogoro region in Tanzania were examined for Snellen visual acuity, ocular microfilaria, lens opacities, uveitis and posterior segment disease especially chorioretinitis and optic nerve disease. Motion Sensitivity Screening Test (MSST) was carried out as well. Microfilaria was present in the anterior chamber of nearly half (49.2%) of all subjects examined. Prevalence of blindness was extremely high at 15.2%. Onchocercal lesions were responsible for blindness in 41.5% of these, followed by cataracts (27.7%), glaucoma (10.8%) and trachoma (6.2%). The main pathway to onchocercal blindness in this population was anterior uveitis with or without secondary cataracts. There is an urgent need to get CDTI underway and institute other horizontal primary eye care measures, especially cataract backlog reduction, in order to reduce the excessive burden of avoidable blindness in this community.

  10. Thermographic patterns of the upper and lower limbs: baseline data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Alfred; Formosa, Cynthia; Cassar, Kevin; Camilleri, Kenneth P; De Raffaele, Clifford; Mizzi, Anabelle; Azzopardi, Carl; Mizzi, Stephen; Falzon, Owen; Cristina, Stefania; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To collect normative baseline data and identify any significant differences between hand and foot thermographic distribution patterns in a healthy adult population. Design. A single-centre, randomized, prospective study. Methods. Thermographic data was acquired using a FLIR camera for the data acquisition of both plantar and dorsal aspects of the feet, volar aspects of the hands, and anterior aspects of the lower limbs under controlled climate conditions. Results. There is general symmetry in skin temperature between the same regions in contralateral limbs, in terms of both magnitude and pattern. There was also minimal intersubject temperature variation with a consistent temperature pattern in toes and fingers. The thumb is the warmest digit with the temperature falling gradually between the 2nd and the 5th fingers. The big toe and the 5th toe are the warmest digits with the 2nd to the 4th toes being cooler. Conclusion. Measurement of skin temperature of the limbs using a thermal camera is feasible and reproducible. Temperature patterns in fingers and toes are consistent with similar temperatures in contralateral limbs in healthy subjects. This study provides the basis for further research to assess the clinical usefulness of thermography in the diagnosis of vascular insufficiency.

  11. Thermographic Patterns of the Upper and Lower Limbs: Baseline Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Gatt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To collect normative baseline data and identify any significant differences between hand and foot thermographic distribution patterns in a healthy adult population. Design. A single-centre, randomized, prospective study. Methods. Thermographic data was acquired using a FLIR camera for the data acquisition of both plantar and dorsal aspects of the feet, volar aspects of the hands, and anterior aspects of the lower limbs under controlled climate conditions. Results. There is general symmetry in skin temperature between the same regions in contralateral limbs, in terms of both magnitude and pattern. There was also minimal intersubject temperature variation with a consistent temperature pattern in toes and fingers. The thumb is the warmest digit with the temperature falling gradually between the 2nd and the 5th fingers. The big toe and the 5th toe are the warmest digits with the 2nd to the 4th toes being cooler. Conclusion. Measurement of skin temperature of the limbs using a thermal camera is feasible and reproducible. Temperature patterns in fingers and toes are consistent with similar temperatures in contralateral limbs in healthy subjects. This study provides the basis for further research to assess the clinical usefulness of thermography in the diagnosis of vascular insufficiency.

  12. Geochemical variations in the Quaternary Andean back-arc volcanism, southern Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanon, Venera R.; Chivas, Allan R.; Kinsley, Leslie P. J.; Dosseto, Anthony

    2014-11-01

    The Payenia Basaltic Province (PBP) is located 450 km east of the Chile-Peru trench in central west Argentina, behind the Andean arc front, constituting the back-arc. In order to evaluate the influence of the subducting slab as well as the magmatic source of this region, two volcanic fields located at comparable distance to the trench, having abundant basaltic products and similar eruptive timeframes were chosen. The Llancanelo (LLVF) and the Payún Matrú (PMVF) volcanic fields are part of the PBP and exhibit abundant basaltic activity during the Pleistocene. The geochemical data suggest that the LLVF has some arc signatures which have been described as weak as they are not as pronounced as in the Andean arc. The weak arc signature is not derived from slab dehydration as high Th enrichment relative to U cannot be explained by this process. We relate the Th enrichment as well as the lack of large residual garnet signatures, to slab sediments in the source. In the case of the PMVF, no arc signature has been inferred despite being only 30 km south of the LLVF. However the PMVF has a composition similar to that of the local intraplate end member, represented by the Rio Colorado volcanic field. The two volcanic fields, LLVF and PMVF, show indications of lower crustal assimilation as they trend towards the lower continental crust end member in Nb/U vs Ce/Pb and Nb/Yb vs Th/Yb diagrams. The geochemical differences between the LLVF and the PMVF as well as between several volcanic fields are illustrated using spatial distribution maps of geochemical ratios. Using this new approach, the decrease in arc signature can be traced in the back-arc and the higher enrichment in high field strength elements (HFSE) relative to large ion lithophile elements (LILE) in the PMVF compared to the LLVF is explicitly shown. These geospatial maps provide a graphical manner to illustrate the presence of two distinct types of volcanism (OIB-like and arc-like) occurring in the same Quaternary

  13. Geochemical studies of backfill aggregates, lake sediment cores and the Hueco Bolson Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapalia, Anita

    Aquifer that an important sources of water in the El Paso/Cd. Juraez metroplex. To delineate the boundary between fresh and brackish water from the northern Hueco Bolson Aquifer, we utilize an integrative geochemical, geophysical, and sedimentological approach. The goal of this study is to use geophysical well-log analysis and the water chemical analysis for identifying the changes in the quality of the groundwater. A detailed microgravity survey is utilized to explore the subsurface geological structures that control the conduits and/or barriers of groundwater flow. A detailed geochemical analysis of aquifer samples provide salinity of groundwater that will complement to the subsurface structures obtained from the geophysical study. This fundamental research in developing methods from an integrated approach to estimate aquifer quality can be used as an analog for similar studies in other arid regions.

  14. Influence of seasonal and geochemical changes on the geomicrobiology of an iron carbonate mineral water spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegler, Florian; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Hanselmann, Kurt; Behrens, Sebastian; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Fuschna Spring in the Swiss Alps (Engadin region) is a bicarbonate iron(II)-rich, pH-neutral mineral water spring that is dominated visually by dark green microbial mats at the side of the flow channel and orange iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in the flow channel. Gradients of O(2), dissolved iron(II), and bicarbonate establish in the water. Our goals were to identify the dominating biogeochemical processes and to determine to which extent changing geochemical conditions along the flow path and seasonal changes influence mineral identity, crystallinity, and microbial diversity. Geochemical analysis showed microoxic water at the spring outlet which became fully oxygenated within 2.3 m downstream. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed calcite (CaCO(3)) and ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)(3)] to be the dominant minerals which increased in crystallinity with increasing distance from the spring outlet. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis banding pattern cluster analysis revealed that the microbial community composition shifted mainly with seasons and to a lesser extent along the flow path. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that microbial communities differ between the flow channel and the flanking microbial mat. Microbial community analysis in combination with most-probable-number analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that the mat was dominated by cyanobacteria and the channel was dominated by microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (1.97 × 10(7) ± 4.36 × 10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1) using Gallionella-specific qPCR primers), while high numbers of Fe(III) reducers (10(9) cells/g) were identified in both the mat and the flow channel. Phototrophic and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers were present as well, although in lower numbers (10(3) to 10(4) cells/g). In summary, our data suggest that mainly seasonal changes caused microbial community shifts, while geochemical gradients along the flow path influenced mineral crystallinity.

  15. PHAST Version 2-A Program for Simulating Groundwater Flow, Solute Transport, and Multicomponent Geochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The computer program PHAST (PHREEQC And HST3D) simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow systems. PHAST is a versatile groundwater flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. Major enhancements in PHAST Version 2 allow spatial data to be defined in a combination of map and grid coordinate systems, independent of a specific model grid (without node-by-node input). At run time, aquifer properties are interpolated from the spatial data to the model grid; regridding requires only redefinition of the grid without modification of the spatial data. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated groundwater systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock/water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, or density-dependent flow. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux (specified-flux), and leaky (head-dependent) conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers, drains, and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association or Pitzer specific interaction thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange sites, surface complexation sites, solid solutions, and gases; and

  16. 77 FR 26535 - Hope Gas, Inc.; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hope Gas, Inc.; Notice of Baseline Filing Take notice that on April 26, 2012, Hope Gas, Inc. (Hope Gas) submitted a baseline filing of their Statement of Operating Conditions...

  17. 77 FR 31841 - Hope Gas, Inc.; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hope Gas, Inc.; Notice of Baseline Filing Take notice that on May 16, 2012, Hope Gas, Inc. (Hope Gas) submitted a revised baseline filing of their Statement of...

  18. Adapting the M3 Surveillance Metrics for an Unknown Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Michael Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Abes, Jeff I. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jaramillo, Brandon Michael Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The original M3 surveillance metrics assume that the baseline is known. In this article, adapted M3 metrics are presented when the baseline is not known and estimated by available data. Deciding on how much available data is enough is also discussed.

  19. 40 CFR 80.93 - Individual baseline submission and approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: (i) Refinery block flow diagram, showing principal refining units; (ii) Principal refining unit..., whether or not the auditor was retained through the baseline approval process. (ii) Identification of the... samples from batch processes, including volume of each batch sampled; and (G) Baseline fuel parameter...

  20. Searching for neutrino oscillation parameters in long baseline experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Vihonen, Sampsa

    2016-01-01

    Developing neutrino astronomy requires a good understanding of the neutrino oscillations mechanism. The European strategy for neutrino oscillation physics sets a high priority on future long baseline neutrino experiments with the aim to measure the intrinsic parameters that govern the neutrino oscillations. In this work we take a look at the next generation of long baseline experiments and discuss their prospects in future research.

  1. Using Baseline Studies in the Investigation of Test Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Dianne; Horak, Tania

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of "baseline studies" in investigations of test impact and to illustrate the type of thinking underlying the design and implementation of such studies by reference to a recent study relating to a high-stakes test of English language proficiency. Baseline studies are used to describe an educational…

  2. The 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign : An Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ALMA Partnership, [Unknown; Fomalont, E. B.; Vlahakis, C.; Corder, S.; Remijan, A.; Barkats, D.; Lucas, R.; Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Asaki, Y.; Matsushita, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Hills, R. E.; Phillips, N.; Richards, A. M. S.; Cox, P.; Amestica, R.; Broguiere, D.; Cotton, W.; Hales, A. S.; Hiriart, R.; Hirota, A.; Hodge, J. A.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Kern, J.; Kneissl, R.; Liuzzo, E.; Marcelino, N.; Marson, R.; Mignano, A.; Nakanishi, K.; Nikolic, B.; Perez, J. E.; Pérez, L. M.; Toledo, I.; Aladro, R.; Butler, B.; Cortes, J.; Cortes, P.; Dhawan, V.; Di Francesco, J.; Espada, D.; Galarza, F.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Humphreys, E. M.; Jung, T.; Kameno, S.; Laing, R. A.; Leon, S.; Mangum, J.; Marconi, G.; Nagai, H.; Nyman, L.-A.; Radiszcz, M.; Rodón, J. A.; Sawada, T.; Takahashi, S.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; van Kempen, T.; Vila Vilaro, B.; Watson, L. C.; Wiklind, T.; Gueth, F.; Tatematsu, K.; Wootten, A.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Chapillon, E.; Dumas, G.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Francke, H.; Gallardo, J.; Garcia, J.; Gonzalez, S.; Hibbard, J. E.; Hill, T.; Kaminski, T.; Karim, A.; Krips, M.; Kurono, Y.; Lopez, C.; Martin, S.; Maud, L.; Morales, F.; Pietu, V.; Plarre, K.; Schieven, G.; Testi, L.; Videla, L.; Villard, E.; Whyborn, N.; Alves, F.; Andreani, P.; Avison, A.; Barta, M.; Bedosti, F.; Bendo, G. J.; Bertoldi, F.; Bethermin, M.; Biggs, A.; Boissier, J.; Brand, J.; Burkutean, S.; Casasola, V.; Conway, J.; Cortese, L.; Dabrowski, B.; Davis, T. A.; Diaz Trigo, M.; Fontani, F.; Franco-Hernandez, R.; Fuller, G.; Galvan Madrid, R.; Giannetti, A.; Ginsburg, A.; Graves, S. F.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hogerheijde, M.; Jachym, P.; Jimenez Serra, I.; Karlicky, M.; Klaasen, P.; Kraus, M.; Kunneriath, D.; Lagos, C.; Longmore, S.; Leurini, S.; Maercker, M.; Magnelli, B.; Marti Vidal, I.; Massardi, M.; Maury, A.; Muehle, S.; Muller, S.; Muxlow, T.; O’Gorman, E.; Paladino, R.; Petry, D.; Pineda, J.; Randall, S.; Richer, J. S.; Rossetti, A.; Rushton, A.; Rygl, K.; Sanchez Monge, A.; Schaaf, R.; Schilke, P.; Stanke, T.; Schmalzl, M.; Stoehr, F.; Urban, S.; van Kampen, E.; Vlemmings, W.; Wang, K.; Wild, W.; Yang, Y.; Iguchi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Saito, M.; Inatani, J.; Mizuno, N.; Asayama, S.; Kosugi, G.; Morita, K.-I.; Chiba, K.; Kawashima, S.; Okumura, S. K.; Ohashi, N.; Ogasawara, R.; Sakamoto, S.; Noguchi, T.; Huang, Y.-D.; Liu, S.-Y.; Kemper, F.; Koch, P. M.; Chen, M.-T.; Chikada, Y.; Hiramatsu, M.; Iono, D.; Shimojo, M.; Komugi, S.; Kim, J.; Lyo, A.-R.; Muller, E.; Herrera, C.; Miura, R. E.; Ueda, J.; Chibueze, J.; Su, Y.-N.; Trejo-Cruz, A.; Wang, K.-S.; Kiuchi, H.; Ukita, N.; Sugimoto, M.; Kawabe, R.; Hayashi, M.; Miyama, S.; Ho, P. T. P.; Kaifu, N.; Ishiguro, M.; Beasley, A. J.; Bhatnagar, S.; Braatz, J. A., III; Brisbin, D. G.; Brunetti, N.; Carilli, C.; Crossley, J. H.; D’Addario, L.; Donovan Meyer, J. L.; Emerson, D. T.; Evans, A. S.; Fisher, P.; Golap, K.; Griffith, D. M.; Hale, A. E.; Halstead, D.; Hardy, E. J.; Hatz, M. C.; Holdaway, M.; Indebetouw, R.; Jewell, P. R.; Kepley, A. A.; Kim, D.-C.; Lacy, M. D.; Leroy, A. K.; Liszt, H. S.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Matthews, B.; McKinnon, M.; Mason, B. S.; Moellenbrock, G.; Moullet, A.; Myers, S. T.; Ott, J.; Peck, A. B.; Pisano, J.; Radford, S. J. E.; Randolph, W. T.; Rao Venkata, U.; Rawlings, M. G.; Rosen, R.; Schnee, S. L.; Scott, K. S.; Sharp, N. K.; Sheth, K.; Simon, R. S.; Tsutsumi, T.; Wood, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is to make accurate images with resolutions of tens of milliarcseconds, which at submillimeter (submm) wavelengths requires baselines up to ∼15 km. To develop and test this capability, a Long Baseline Campaign (LBC) was carried

  3. Leveling data in geochemical mapping: scope of application, pros and cons of existing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Benoît; Vandeuren, Aubry; Sonnet, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Geochemical mapping successfully met a range of needs from mineral exploration to environmental management. In Europe and around the world numerous geochemical datasets already exist. These datasets may originate from geochemical mapping projects or from the collection of sample analyses requested by environmental protection regulatory bodies. Combining datasets can be highly beneficial for establishing geochemical maps with increased resolution and/or coverage area. However this practice requires assessing the equivalence between datasets and, if needed, applying data leveling to remove possible biases between datasets. In the literature, several procedures for assessing dataset equivalence and leveling data are proposed. Daneshfar & Cameron (1998) proposed a method for the leveling of two adjacent datasets while Pereira et al. (2016) proposed two methods for the leveling of datasets that contain records located within the same geographical area. Each discussed method requires its own set of assumptions (underlying populations of data, spatial distribution of data, etc.). Here we propose to discuss the scope of application, pros, cons and practical recommendations for each method. This work is illustrated with several case studies in Wallonia (Southern Belgium) and in Europe involving trace element geochemical datasets. References: Daneshfar, B. & Cameron, E. (1998), Leveling geochemical data between map sheets, Journal of Geochemical Exploration 63(3), 189-201. Pereira, B.; Vandeuren, A.; Govaerts, B. B. & Sonnet, P. (2016), Assessing dataset equivalence and leveling data in geochemical mapping, Journal of Geochemical Exploration 168, 36-48.

  4. Geochemical explorations for gold deposits at Goldfield, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Roger P.; Keith, William J.

    1978-01-01

    The main problem in geochemical exploration for gold ore bodies in the 40 km2 hydrothermally altered area at Goldfield is to decide which of the many silicified ledges exposed are most likely to yield deposits with additional subsurface exploration. We conclude that the most efficient way to search for exploration targets is to collect rock samples from the ledges and analyze for the following elements in decreasing order of priority: gold, lead and silver, bismuth, and mercury. These elements form relict hypogene aureoles restricted to the ledges and are not appreciably redistributed during supergene leaching.

  5. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using artificial neural network

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, P.; Iyer, S.D.

    -MORB, E or P-MORB and T-MORB, respectively) or as OIB [5-7]. The discrimination diagrams provide a broad picture of the type of basalts but it is difficult to determine the basic characters that are involved in the geochemical classification of OFB based... classifications for each input pattern of the form. Some instances where LVQ architecture has being extensively used are for pattern recognition and seafloor classification [9] and character- isation of the seafloor sediments [10]. In this commu- nication we use...

  6. This year`s model: Geochemical modeling and groundwater quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuchfeld, H.A.; Simmons, S.P.; Jesionek, K.S. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)]|[GeoSyntec Consultants, Atlanta, GA (United States); Romito, A.A. [Browning-Ferris Industries, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1998-07-01

    It has been determined that landfill gas migration is a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater. This can occur through: direct partitioning of migrating gas constituents into the groundwater; alteration of the physiochemical properties of the groundwater; and by indirect means (such as migration of landfill gas condensate and vadose zone water contaminated by landfill gas). This article examines the use of geochemical modeling as a useful tool for differentiating the effects of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill gas versus leachate on groundwater quality at MSW landfill sites.

  7. Geochemical association of plutonium in marine sediments from Palomares (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, M.P. [Dept. de Geoquimica e Impacto Ambiental, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Gasco, C. [Dept. de Geoquimica e Impacto Ambiental, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A. [Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Pujol, L. [Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-12-31

    The geochemical association of plutonium in sediments from the marine ecosystem of Palomares has been studied. A sequential leaching technique using selective extractants has been employed to determine the percentages of Pu in the following forms: (a) readily available, (b) exchangeable and adsorbed to specific sites, (c) associated with organic matter, (d) sesquioxides, (e) residual. Plutonium was found to be associated mainly with phases (c), (d) and (e), and therefore, appears to be relatively immobile and not readily available to bottom feeding biota. The effect of different source terms on Pu distribution is also discussed. (orig.)

  8. A New Geochemical Reaction Model for Groundwater Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Through a survey of the literature on geology, hydrogeology and hydrogeochemistry, this paper presents a hydrogeochemical model for the groundwater system in a dross-dumping area of the Shandong Aluminium Plant. It is considered that the groundwater-bearing medium is a mineral aggregate and that the interactions between groundwater and the groundwater-bearing medium can be described as a series of geochemical reactions. On that basis, the principle of minimum energy and the equations of mass balance, electron balance and electric neutrality are applied to construct a linear programming mathematical model for the calculation of mass transfer between water and rock with the simplex method.

  9. Geochemical Precursors to Volcanic Activity at Mount St. Helens, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlo, Kim; Blundy, Jon; Turner, Simon; Cashman, Kathy; Hawkesworth, Chris; Black, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    The importance of the interplay between degassing and crystallization before and after the eruption of Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA) in 1980 is well established. Here, we show that degassing occurred over a period of decades to days before eruptions and that the manner of degassing, as deduced from geochemical signatures within the magma, was characteristic of the eruptive style. Trace element (lithium) and short-lived radioactive isotope (lead-210 and radium-226) data show that ascending magma stalled within the conduit, leading to the accumulation of volatiles and the formation of lead-210 excesses, which signals the presence of degassing magma at depth.

  10. Geophysical and geochemical characterisation of groundwater resources in Western Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongo, Mkhuzo; Banda, Kawawa Eddy; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    both ground-based and airborne geophysical methods as well as extensive water quality sampling. The occurrence of saline groundwater follows a clear spatial pattern and appears to be related to the palaeo Lake Makgadikgadi, whose northernmost extension reached into the Machile area. Because the lake...... precipitation has formed limited freshwater reservoirs in a generally saline area, which need to be sustainably managed. We will present initial results from the geophysical and geochemical surveys conducted over the past few years. We will interpret these findings in terms of the geologic history of Southern...

  11. Geochemical Interactions and Viral-Prokaryote Relationships in Freshwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, J. E.; Ferris, G.

    2009-05-01

    Viral and prokaryotic abundances were surveyed throughout southern Ontario aquatic habitats to determine relationships with geochemical parameters in the natural environment. Surface water samples were collected from acid mine drainage in summer of 2007 and 2008 and from circum-neutral pH environments in October to November 2008. Site determination was based on collecting samples from various aquatic habitats (acid mine drainage, lakes, rivers, tributaries, wetlands) with differing bedrock geology (limestone and shale dominated vs granitic Canadian Shield) to obtain a range of geochemical conditions. At each site, measurements of temperature, pH, and Eh were conducted. Samples collected for microbial counts and electron imaging were preserved to a final concentration of 2.5 % (v/v) glutaraldehyde. Additional sample were filtered into 60 mL nalgene bottles and amber EPA certified 40 mL glass vials to determine chemical constituents and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respectively. Water was also collected to determine additional physiochemical parameters (dissolved total iron, ferric iron, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, alkalinity, and turbidity). All samples were stored at 4 °C until analysis. Viral and prokaryotic abundance was determined by staining samples with SYBR Green I and examining with a epifluorescence microscope under blue excitation. Multiple regression analysis using stepwise backwards regression and general linear models revealed that viral abundance was the most influential predictor of prokaryotic abundance. Additional predictors include pH, sulfate, phosphate, and magnesium. The strength of the model was very strong with 90 % of the variability explained (R2 = 0.90, p multicollinearity with sulfate, iron was removed from the model (as sulfate acts more conservatively across the range of pH sampled, 2.5-9.0). Geochemical variables that have been reported to influence viral abundances under laboratory and field experiments (i.e. Ca2+, DOC

  12. Geochemical variability of copper and iron in Oman margin sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    : Microchem. J.: 91(1); 2009; 111-117 Geochemical variability of copper and iron in Oman Margin sediments R. ALAGARSAMY * Chemical Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (C... in the upper 100 mm. The Mn 5 distribution in core 12687#8 (Fig. 3d) showed a similar distribution to that observed for copper. As determined by sequential leaching, however, there was no detectable non-detrital Mn observed in core 12687#10 (only Mn 5...

  13. Geochemical Characteristics of Sinian Manganese Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Sinian is one of the main periods of the formation of manganese deposits in China. Sinian manganese deposits are mainly hosted in carbon-rich black shale and siliceous shale formed during the Sinian interglacial period. The composition of manganese ore is simple. The main ore mineral is manganiferous carbonates. The grade of manganese ore is about 16- 25%, with Mn/Fe>5 and P/Mn=0.006- 0.14. Based on the tectonic setting and geological and geochemical characteristics of manganese deposits, this paper discusses the process of migration and concentration of manganese and ore-forming conditions of Sinian manganese deposits in China.

  14. Occurrence and origin of methane in groundwater in Alberta (Canada): Gas geochemical and isotopic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humez, P., E-mail: phumez@ucalgary.ca [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Mayer, B.; Ing, J.; Nightingale, M.; Becker, V.; Kingston, A. [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Akbilgic, O. [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); UTHSC-ORNL Center for Biomedical Informatics, 910 Madison Avenue, Memphis, TN, 38104 (United States); Taylor, S. [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    To assess potential future impacts on shallow aquifers by leakage of natural gas from unconventional energy resource development it is essential to establish a reliable baseline. Occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater in Alberta between 2006 and 2014 was assessed and was ubiquitous in 186 sampled monitoring wells. Free and dissolved gas sampling and measurement approaches yielded comparable results with low methane concentrations in shallow groundwater, but in 28 samples from 21 wells methane exceeded 10 mg/L in dissolved gas and 300,000 ppmv in free gas. Methane concentrations in free and dissolved gas samples were found to increase with well depth and were especially elevated in groundwater obtained from aquifers containing coal seams and shale units. Carbon isotope ratios of methane averaged − 69.7 ± 11.1‰ (n = 63) in free gas and − 65.6 ± 8.9‰ (n = 26) in dissolved gas. δ{sup 13}C values were not found to vary with well depth or lithology indicating that methane in Alberta groundwater was derived from a similar source. The low δ{sup 13}C values in concert with average δ{sup 2}H{sub CH4} values of − 289 ± 44‰ (n = 45) suggest that most methane was of biogenic origin predominantly generated via CO{sub 2} reduction. This interpretation is confirmed by dryness parameters typically > 500 due to only small amounts of ethane and a lack of propane in most samples. Comparison with mud gas profile carbon isotope data revealed that methane in the investigated shallow groundwater in Alberta is isotopically similar to hydrocarbon gases found in 100–250 meter depths in the WCSB and is currently not sourced from thermogenic hydrocarbon occurrences in deeper portions of the basin. The chemical and isotopic data for methane gas samples obtained from Alberta groundwater provide an excellent baseline against which potential future impact of deeper stray gases on shallow aquifers can be assessed. - Highlights: • Analysis of gas geochemical data from 186

  15. Esophageal impedance baseline according to different time intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummarino Dario

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impedance baseline has been shown to reflect esophageal integrity, and to be decreased in patients with esophagitis. However, different methods for the determination of the impedance baseline have not been compared. Methods The median impedance baseline was calculated in 10 consecutive multichannel intraluminal impedance recordings in children with non-erosive reflux disease. All children underwent an endoscopy with a biopsy as part of the clinical work-up to exclude esophagitis. The impedance baseline was obtained both by including and excluding all impedance episodes (IE; reflux, swallows and gas episodes during the full recording, and during the first 1-minute period without an IE every hour (method 1, every 2 hours (method 2 or every 4 hours (method 3. The impedance baseline obtained during the full recording was set at 100%, and the variation (difference in impedance baseline for the different methods and variability (difference in impedance baseline during one analysis period were assessed. Results None of the participants had esophagitis. The mean difference over the six channels between the impedance baseline over the total recording with and without IE was approximately 2.5%, and comparable for each channel (range 0.47% to 5.55%. A mean of 1,028 IEs were excluded in each tracing, and it took between 4 and 24 hours to delete all events in one tracing. The difference in the impedance baseline obtained with and without IEs was mainly caused by the gas episodes in the upper channels and swallows in the lower channels. The median impedance baseline according to the three one-minute analysis methods was comparable to the median impedance baseline according to the 24 hour analysis. Conclusions The automatic determination of the median impedance baseline over the total tracing including IEs is an adequate method. In isolated tracings with numerous IEs, the calculation of the median impedance baseline over one minute

  16. Establishing a store baseline during interim storage of waste packages and a review of potential technologies for base-lining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTeer, Jennifer; Morris, Jenny; Wickham, Stephen [Galson Sciences Ltd. Oakham, Rutland (United Kingdom); Bolton, Gary [National Nuclear Laboratory Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); McKinney, James; Morris, Darrell [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Moor Row, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Angus, Mike [National Nuclear Laboratory Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cann, Gavin; Binks, Tracey [National Nuclear Laboratory Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Interim storage is an essential component of the waste management lifecycle, providing a safe, secure environment for waste packages awaiting final disposal. In order to be able to monitor and detect change or degradation of the waste packages, storage building or equipment, it is necessary to know the original condition of these components (the 'waste storage system'). This paper presents an approach to establishing the baseline for a waste-storage system, and provides guidance on the selection and implementation of potential base-lining technologies. The approach is made up of two sections; assessment of base-lining needs and definition of base-lining approach. During the assessment of base-lining needs a review of available monitoring data and store/package records should be undertaken (if the store is operational). Evolutionary processes (affecting safety functions), and their corresponding indicators, that can be measured to provide a baseline for the waste-storage system should then be identified in order for the most suitable indicators to be selected for base-lining. In defining the approach, identification of opportunities to collect data and constraints is undertaken before selecting the techniques for base-lining and developing a base-lining plan. Base-lining data may be used to establish that the state of the packages is consistent with the waste acceptance criteria for the storage facility and to support the interpretation of monitoring and inspection data collected during store operations. Opportunities and constraints are identified for different store and package types. Technologies that could potentially be used to measure baseline indicators are also reviewed. (authors)

  17. Geological and Geochemical Characteristics of Early Cretaceous Mafic Dikes in Northern Jiangxi Province, SE China and Their Geodynamic Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guiqing; HU Ruizhong; MAO Jingwen; LI Ruiling; CAO Jinjian; JIANG Guohao; QI Liang

    2005-01-01

    The development of Early Cretaceous mafic dikes in northern and southern Jiangxi allows an understanding of the geodynamic setting and characteristics of the mantle in southeast China in the Cretaceous. Geological and geochemical characteristics for the mafic dikes from the Wushan copper deposit and No. 640 uranium deposit are given in order to constrain the nature of source mantle, genesis and tectonic implications. According to the mineral composition,the mafic dikes in northern Jiangxi can be divided into spessartite and olive odinite types, which belong to slightly potassium-rich calc-alkaline lamprophyre characterized by enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE), large depletion in high strength field elements (HSFE) and with negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, as well as 87Sr/86Sr ratios varying from 0.7055 to 0.7095 and 143Nd/144Nd ratios varying from 0.5119 to 0.5122.All features indicate that the magma responsible for the mafic dikes was derived mainly from metasomatic lithosphere mantle related to dehydration and/or upper crust melting during subduction. Differences in geochemical characteristics between the mafic dikes in northern Jiangxi and the Dajishan area, southern Jiangxi were also studied and they are attributed to differences in regional lithosphefic mantle components and/or magma emplacement depth. Combining geological and geochemical characteristics with regional geological history, we argue that southeast China was dominated by an extensional tectonic setting in the Early Cretaceous, and the nature of the mantle source area was related to enrichment induced by asthenosphere upwelling and infiltration of upper crust-derived fluids responding to Pacific Plate subduction.

  18. Genesis and Geochemical Characteristics of the Cambrian Carbonaceous Rock Series in Mianxian-Lüeyang Region, Shaanxi Province%陕西省勉县-略阳地区寒武纪含碳岩系的地球化学特征及其成因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔耿彪; 杨钟堂; 李智明; 杨晓勇; 蓝翔华

    2011-01-01

    勉县-略阳(勉略)地区寒武纪的含碳岩系与磷、锰矿的形成关系密切,是该区重要的找矿标志.通过对研究区含碳岩系常量元素和微量元素的分析测试认为,含碳岩系总体上富亲石元素和亲铜元素,贫亲铁元素.含碳岩系中P、Mn元素相对富集且富集系数较为接近,反映含碳岩系与本区P、Mn矿的成因具有一定的联系.含碳岩系中较低的MnO/TiO2值、Na-Mg和Sr-Ba投点均反映了近陆源的浅海沉积环境;含碳岩系中较低的Sr/Ba和U/Th值以及Al-Fe-Mn图解均反映出非热水沉积特征;含碳岩系中较高的V/(V+Ni)和δU值反映为缺氧沉积环境.因此,勉略地区寒武系含碳岩系形成于缺氧(还原)沉积环境.%The formation of phosphorus and manganese ore deposit was closely related to the Cambrian carbonaceous rock series which were important prospecting criteria in Mianxian-Lüeyang region.Samples of carbonaceous rock series collected from the study area were analyzed for major and trace elements that were used to demonstrate the genesis.P, Mn element were relatively enriched in carbonaceous rock series and enrichment coefficients were similar, suggesting that the carbonaceous rock series were related to the genesis of the Mn and P deposit.Low MnO/TiO2 values, plots in Na-Mg and Sr-Ba diagram indicate sedimentary environment from the land closer to marginal sea of the continental slope.Low Sr/Ba, U/Th values and plots in the Al-Fe-Mn triangle diagram represent a non-hydrothermal sedimentary condition.The high V/( V + Ni) and δU values indicate an anoxic sedimentary environment, so the carbonaceous rock series were deposited in an anoxic oxygen (reduction) sedimentary environment.

  19. Geochemical and mantle-like isotopic (Nd, Sr) composition of the Baklan Granite from the Muratdağı Region (Banaz, Uşak), western Turkey: Implications for input of juvenile magmas in the source domains of western Anatolia Eocene Miocene granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğan, M. Selman; Çoban, Hakan; Bozcu, Mustafa; Akıncı, Ömer

    2008-07-01

    The (late syn)- post-collisional magmatic activities of western and northwestern Anatolia are characterized by intrusion of a great number of granitoids. Amongst them, Baklan Granite, located in the southern part of the Muratdağı Region from the Menderes Massif (Banaz, Uşak), has peculiar chemical and isotopic characteristics. The Baklan rocks are made up by K-feldspar, plagioclase, quartz, biotite and hornblende, with accessory apatite, titanite and magnetite, and include mafic microgranular enclaves (MME). Chemically, the Baklan intrusion is of sub-alkaline character, belongs to the high-K, calc-alkaline series and displays features of I-type affinity. It is typically metaluminous to mildly peraluminous, and classified predominantly as granodiorite in composition. The spider and REE patterns show that the rocks are fractionated and have small negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu ∗ = 0.62-0.86), with the depletion of Nb, Ti, P and, to a lesser extent, Ba and Sr. The pluton was dated by the K-Ar method on the whole-rock, yielded ages between 17.8 ± 0.7 and 19.4 ± 0.9 Ma (Early Miocene). The intrusion possesses primitive low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.70331-0.70452) and negative ɛNd(t) values (-5.0 to -5.6). The chemical contrast between evolved Baklan rocks (SiO 2, 62-71 wt.%; Cr, 7-27 ppm; Ni, 5-11 ppm; Mg#, 45-51) and more primitive clinopyroxene-bearing monzonitic enclaves (SiO 2, 54-59 wt.%; Cr, 20-310 ppm; Ni, 10-70 ppm; Mg#, 50-61) signifies that there is no co-genetic link between host granite and enclaves. The chemical and isotopic characteristics of the Baklan intrusion argue for an important role of a juvenile component, such as underplated mantle-derived basalt, in the generation of the granitoids. Crustal contamination has not contributed significantly to their origin. However, with respect to those of the Baklan intrusion, the generation of the (late syn)- post-collisional intrusions with higher Nd(t) values from the western Anatolia