WorldWideScience

Sample records for regional consequence examination

  1. RKU North Sea. Update on the regional consequence examination concerning the petroleum industry in the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    An overview over prognoses for oil and gas production and the emissions related to these activities is provided for the years 2005-2025. A description of the Norwegian Continental Shelf's ecosystem, environmental technology employed, and considerations regarding the petroleum industry's effect on the ecosystem are considered. Emissions to air, planned emissions to the sea and accident emissions and spills are treated, as well as other possible environmental effects. Consequences for fishery, cultural monuments and for the society in general are also examined (ml)

  2. RKU North Sea. Update on the regional consequence examination concerning the petroleum industry in the North Sea; RKU-Nordsjoeen. Oppdatering av regional konsekvensutredning for petroleumsvirksomhet i Nordsjoeen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-12-15

    An overview over prognoses for oil and gas production and the emissions related to these activities is provided for the years 2005-2025. A description of the Norwegian Continental Shelf's ecosystem, environmental technology employed, and considerations regarding the petroleum industry's effect on the ecosystem are considered. Emissions to air, planned emissions to the sea and accident emissions and spills are treated, as well as other possible environmental effects. Consequences for fishery, cultural monuments and for the society in general are also examined (ml)

  3. RKU North Sea. Update on the regional consequence examination concerning the petroleum industry in the North Sea; RKU-Nordsjoeen. Oppdatering av regional konsekvensutredning for petroleumsvirksomhet i Nordsjoeen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-12-15

    An overview over prognoses for oil and gas production and the emissions related to these activities is provided for the years 2005-2025. A description of the Norwegian Continental Shelf's ecosystem, environmental technology employed, and considerations regarding the petroleum industry's effect on the ecosystem are considered. Emissions to air, planned emissions to the sea and accident emissions and spills are treated, as well as other possible environmental effects. Consequences for fishery, cultural monuments and for the society in general are also examined (ml)

  4. An examination of the consequences in high consequence operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spray, S.D.; Cooper, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    Traditional definitions of risk partition concern into the probability of occurrence and the consequence of the event. Most safety analyses focus on probabilistic assessment of an occurrence and the amount of some measurable result of the event, but the real meaning of the ``consequence`` partition is usually afforded less attention. In particular, acceptable social consequence (consequence accepted by the public) frequently differs significantly from the metrics commonly proposed by risk analysts. This paper addresses some of the important system development issues associated with consequences, focusing on ``high consequence operations safety.``

  5. Stabilizing greenhouse gases. Global and regional consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcamo, J.; Krol, M.; Leemans, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper assesses the environmental consequences of two targets for CO 2 stabilization: 350 ppm by the year 2150 (367 ppm by 2100), and 450 ppm by 2100. As a tool for this investigation we use the IMAGE 2 integrated model of climate change. It was found that these targets lead to much lower regional impacts on crop productivity, natural vegetation, and sea level rise as compared to the baseline case. Nevertheless some negative impacts do occur, and to further reduce these impacts would require more stringent stabilization targets. It was also found that to achieve these stabilization targets in the atmosphere, global emissions should not substantially increase at any time in the future, and eventually they must be significantly reduced. 8 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs., 1 appendix

  6. The consequences of price differentiation for regional development in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Przekota

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Each region in Poland has a different economic potential due to its own specific features. Taking account of the specific nature of individual regions is important for the management of the country as a whole and of its particular regions. Existing disparities in the economic development may lead to many negative phenomena, such as internal migration or regional marginalization. Excessive price and income inequalities may weaken economic growth throughout the country. It is important for the coherence of the whole country that the disparities between regions are not too big. The study determines the consequences of price differentiation for regional development in Poland. The analysis was conducted using the coefficient of variation, correlation coefficient, regression coefficient and medium pace. The regions differ in terms of development, dynamic growth and wages. However, prices are much less diverse.

  7. THE ARAB SPRING - REGIONAL AND GLOBAL EVOLUTIONS AND CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin MINCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly presents the developments in the Arab World between December 2010 and February 2012, epitomizing om the international context, the geopolitical and economic importance of states from Northern Africa and the Middle East, causes, goals, characteristics and consequences of the Arab Spring", the implications of these movements in the repositioning of the great powers and regional actors in the following period.

  8. Focus on regional consequences by allocation of gas contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, E.S.; Sunnevaag, K.

    1994-08-01

    The Ministry of Industry and Energy evaluates which of the natural gas fields to be selected for covering the gas supply based on contract obligations. The evaluation aims at giving a total valuation of possible development solutions on the Norwegian continental shelf. Actual solutions are based on fields located in the Haltenbanken area or in the North Sea. The present report relates to a study analysing the consequences on how the employment and regional conditions are influencing the socio-economic and real economic factors by alternative solutions of contract allocations. 38 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs

  9. An Examination of the Relationship between Consequence-Specific Normative Belief Patterns and Alcohol-Related Consequences among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavy, Racheal; Cleveland, Michael J.; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Scaglione, Nichole M.; Sell, Nichole M.; Turrisi, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has previously identified a high-risk subgroup of college students who experience high levels of multiple and repeated alcohol-related consequences (MRC group). The purpose of this study was to examine the association between consequence-specific normative influences and experiencing multiple and repeated drinking-related consequences using a person-centered approach. Normative subgroups were identified using latent profile analysis (LPA), which were then used to predict MRC group status at 6-month follow-up. Methods First-year college student drinkers (N=2024) at a large northeastern university completed online surveys during the fall and spring semesters of their freshman year. Retention was high with 92% of invited participants completing T2, of which the MRC group accounted for 27%. Results Three student profiles were identified from LPA on T1 data: Non Permissive Parents (77%), Positive Peer and Parent Norms (20%), and Permissive Parents (3%). Logistic regression revealed that both the Positive Peer and Parent Norms and Permissive Parents profiles had significantly higher odds of MRC group membership at follow-up (1.81 and 2.78 times greater, respectively). Conclusions The results suggest value in prevention efforts that include normative beliefs about alcohol-related consequences. Further, parental norms in particular have the potential to enhance interventions, especially through direct communication of disapproval for experiencing consequences. PMID:27805274

  10. REGIONAL BLACK SEA ARCHITECTURE AND CONSEQUENCES FOR THE REGIONAL COOPERATION FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Homorozean

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes considered an asset, other times a liability, the Black Sea started recently to be regarded as a region. However, the Black Sea Region lacks a common vision, often due to the complicated and often inefficient nexus of regional cooperation initiatives. Following the logic of finding regional solutions for regional problems, this paper aims to assess existing institutional and regional initiatives, reflecting on the implications for the success of Black Sea regionalism in creating patterns of sustained and sustainable development and a high degree of actors' involvement.This paper concentrates on two complementary research questions: What is the regional order in the BSR and what does it imply for its future? What is the current contribution of the most significant cooperation initiatives and what are the consequences for regional institutionalism? For the purpose of this paper, I draw on best-practices from other two regions: the Northern Dimension and South- East Asia. Through a comparative perspective, I suggest an analysis of the most important initiatives: BSEC, CDC, Black Sea Synergy, Eastern Partnership, Baku Initiative and the BSF. This paper argues that a possible strategic solution for successful policy development lies in the creation of an integrated regional cooperation package, functioning on the principles of multi-speed and multi-dimensional cooperation in several policy fields, in a context in which the BSR seems to be caught between two paradigms: a European and a Russian-oriented one.

  11. Regional energy autarky: Potentials, costs and consequences for an Austrian region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; Schönhart, M.; Biberacher, M.; Guggenberger, T.; Hausl, S.; Kalt, G.; Leduc, S.; Schardinger, I.; Schmid, E.

    2012-01-01

    Local actors at community level often thrive for energy autarky to decrease the dependence on imported energy resources. We assess the potentials and trade-offs between benefits and costs of increasing levels of energy autarky for a small rural region of around 21,000 inhabitants in Austria. We use a novel modeling approach which couples a regional energy system model with a regional land use optimization model. We have collected and processed data on the spatial distribution of energy demand and potentials of biomass, photovoltaics and solar thermal resources. The impacts of increasing biomass production on the agricultural sector are assessed with a land-use optimization model that allows deriving regional biomass supply curves. An energy system model is subsequently applied to find the least cost solution for supplying the region with energy resources. Model results indicate that fossil fuel use for heating can be replaced at low costs by increasing forestry and agricultural biomass production. However, autarky in the electricity and the heating sector would significantly increase biomass production and require a full use of the potentials of photovoltaics on roof tops. Attaining energy autarky implies high costs to consumers and a decline in the local production of food and feed. - Highlights: ► Energy autarky strong vision for many regional actors. ► Assessment of consequences of energy autarky for a rural region in Austria. ► Novel modeling approach coupling energy system model with land use model. ► Power and heat autarky causes high costs and decline in regional food and feed production. ► Heat autarky achievable at lower costs by utilizing regional forestry and agricultural biomass.

  12. Roentgeno-radiological examination for ruptures of the main bronchi and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Kudryavtseva, N.F.; Nersesova, L.I.; Kon'kov, Eh.G.

    1981-01-01

    The results of roentgeno-radiological examination of patients with the main bronchial ruptures show the great diagnostic value of this method of examination. There are 6 types of clinical and x-ray syndromes to be distinguished: gaseous, hemorrhagic, compression, aspiration, ventilatory, perfusive. Both direct and indirect radiomorphological and radiofunctional features of the bronchial ruptures are distinguished. Post-traumatic bronchial stenoses, as well as the results of reconstructive interventions in bronchial ruptures and their consequences are discussed [ru

  13. Meiotic Consequences of Genetic Divergence Across the Murine Pseudoautosomal Region

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Beth L.

    2017-01-01

    The production of haploid gametes during meiosis is dependent on the homology-driven processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination. On the mammalian heterogametic sex chromosomes, these key meiotic activities are confined to the pseudoautosomal region (PAR), a short region of near-perfect sequence homology between the X and Y chromosomes. Despite its established importance for meiosis, the PAR is rapidly evolving, raising the question of how proper X/Y segregation is buffered against the ...

  14. Examining Antecedents and Consequences of Gambling Passion: The Case of Gambling on Horse Races

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Choong-Ki; Back, Ki-Joon; Hodgins, David C.; Lee, Tae Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the antecedents and consequences of gambling passion using structural equation modeling to examine relationships among gambling motivation, passion, emotion, and behavioral intentions in the horse racing industry. Methods An onsite survey was conducted with 447 patrons at a horseracing park in South Korea. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that the Gambling Passion Scale was valid and reliable, resulting in two sub-scales: obsessive passion (OP) and harmo...

  15. Meiotic Consequences of Genetic Divergence Across the Murine Pseudoautosomal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Beth L

    2017-03-01

    The production of haploid gametes during meiosis is dependent on the homology-driven processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination. On the mammalian heterogametic sex chromosomes, these key meiotic activities are confined to the pseudoautosomal region (PAR), a short region of near-perfect sequence homology between the X and Y chromosomes. Despite its established importance for meiosis, the PAR is rapidly evolving, raising the question of how proper X / Y segregation is buffered against the accumulation of homology-disrupting mutations. Here, I investigate the interplay of PAR evolution and function in two interfertile house mouse subspecies characterized by structurally divergent PARs, Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. castaneus Using cytogenetic methods to visualize the sex chromosomes at meiosis, I show that intersubspecific F 1 hybrids harbor an increased frequency of pachytene spermatocytes with unsynapsed sex chromosomes. This high rate of asynapsis is due, in part, to the premature release of synaptic associations prior to completion of prophase I. Further, I show that when sex chromosomes do synapse in intersubspecific hybrids, recombination is reduced across the paired region. Together, these meiotic defects afflict ∼50% of spermatocytes from F 1 hybrids and lead to increased apoptosis in meiotically dividing cells. Despite flagrant disruption of the meiotic program, a subset of spermatocytes complete meiosis and intersubspecific F 1 males remain fertile. These findings cast light on the meiotic constraints that shape sex chromosome evolution and offer initial clues to resolve the paradox raised by the rapid evolution of this functionally significant locus. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Examining the structural relationships among gambling motivation, passion, and consequences of internet sports betting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Ki; Chung, Namho; Bernhard, Bo J

    2014-12-01

    The rise in popularity of Internet gambling has led to new gambling controversies among researchers and policymakers alike. Opponents frequently point to the negative impacts of problem gambling, while advocates tend to view this form of gambling as relatively harmless and convenient entertainment for the vast majority of participants. Interestingly, in making their points, both sides cite empirical arguments about passion for the gambling act-with opponents arguing that Internet gambling enables unhealthy obsessions, and advocates pointing to the apparent intensive interest of large numbers of Internet players. As it turns out, both sides may have a point. In this paper, we examine whether types of passion were related to types of motivation and consequences. The data were collected through a sample from an online gambling website in South Korea. We rely upon Rousseau et al.'s (J Gambl Stud 18(1):45-66, 2002) seminal work on positive and negative aspects of passion, and in the process we develop a framework for understanding positive and negative consequences of this form of gambling. The results reveal that intrinsic gambling motivations (e.g., gambling for excitement) is related to harmonious passion, which in turn results in positive consequences. Meanwhile, extrinsic gambling motivations (e.g., money) is related to obsessive passion, which in turn results in negative consequences.

  17. Climatic Consequences and Agricultural Impact of Regional Nuclear Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Robock, A.; Mills, M. J.; Xia, L.

    2013-05-01

    A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, would inject smoke from the resulting fires into the stratosphere.This could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history and global-scale ozone depletion, with enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface.Simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), run at higher vertical and horizontal resolution than a previous simulation with the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE, and incorporating ozone chemistry for the first time, show a longer stratospheric residence time for smoke and hence a longer-lasting climate response, with global average surface air temperatures still 1.1 K below normal and global average precipitation 4% below normal after a decade.The erythemal dose from the enhanced UV radiation would greatly increase, in spite of enhanced absorption by the remaining smoke, with the UV index more than 3 units higher in the summer midlatitudes, even after a decade. Scenarios of changes in temperature, precipitation, and downward shortwave radiation from the ModelE and WACCM simulations, applied to the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer crop model for winter wheat, rice, soybeans, and maize by perturbing observed time series with anomalies from the regional nuclear war simulations, produce decreases of 10-50% in yield averaged over a decade, with larger decreases in the first several years, over the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The impact of the nuclear war simulated here, using much less than 1% of the global nuclear arsenal, would be devastating to world agricultural production and trade, possibly sentencing a billion people now living marginal existences to starvation.The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of

  18. Dental Care Utilization for Examination and Regional Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Sin; Han, Sun-Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Receiving proper dental care plays a significant role in maintaining good oral health. We investigated the relationship between regional deprivation and dental care utilization. Methods: Multilevel logistic regression was used to identify the relationship between the regional deprivation level and dental care utilization purpose, adjusting for individual-level variables, in adults aged 19+ in the 2008 Korean Community Health Survey (n=220 258). Results: Among Korean adults, 12.8% used dental care to undergo examination and 21.0% visited a dentist for other reasons. In the final model, regional deprivation level was associated with significant variations in dental care utilization for examination (pdental care utilization for other reasons in the final model. Conclusions: This study’s findings suggest that policy interventions should be considered to reduce regional variations in rates of dental care utilization for examination. PMID:26265665

  19. Examination of Conservatism in Ground-level Source Release Assumption when Performing Consequence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-yeop; Lim, Ho-Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    One of these assumptions frequently assumed is the assumption of ground-level source release. The user manual of a consequence analysis software HotSpot is mentioning like below: 'If you cannot estimate or calculate the effective release height, the actual physical release height (height of the stack) or zero for ground-level release should be used. This will usually yield a conservative estimate, (i.e., larger radiation doses for all downwind receptors, etc).' This recommendation could be agreed in aspect of conservatism but quantitative examination of the effect of this assumption to the result of consequence analysis is necessary. The source terms of Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident have been estimated by several studies using inverse modeling and one of the biggest sources of the difference between the results of these studies was different effective source release height assumed by each studies. It supports the importance of the quantitative examination of the influence by release height. Sensitivity analysis of the effective release height of radioactive sources was performed and the influence to the total effective dose was quantitatively examined in this study. Above 20% difference is maintained even at longer distances, when we compare the dose between the result assuming ground-level release and the results assuming other effective plume height. It means that we cannot ignore the influence of ground-level source assumption to the latent cancer fatality estimations. In addition, the assumption of ground-level release fundamentally prevents detailed analysis including diffusion of plume from effective plume height to the ground even though the influence of it is relatively lower in longer distance. When we additionally consider the influence of surface roughness, situations could be more serious. The ground level dose could be highly over-estimated in short downwind distance at the NPP sites which have low surface roughness such as Barakah site in

  20. Vichada meteorite impact effects from simulation of regional environmental consequences of a meteoroid impact on Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Hernandez Pardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates the regional environmental consequences of the impactor extraterrestrial body that could produce the probable Vichada impact crater structure on the Vichada Plain, in Colombia, South America. This paper details the parameter assumptions upon which the estimation is made. It describes an approach to quantifying the principal impact processes that could have affected the landscape in the vicinity of the probable Vichada impact event in the past. The key parameters are impactor diameter, impactor density, impact velocity before atmospheric entry, impact angle, and the distance from the impact at which the environmental effects are to be calculated, and the target type of sedimentary rock or crystalline rock. These parameters were chosen with support from The Vichada Structure dimensions obtained from remote sensing data interpretation, regional geologic mapping and interpreted satellite data and ground-based gravity and magnetic anomalies. The calculations are based on compiled novel algorithms for estimating the thermal radiation emitted by the impact-generated vapor plume or fireball, and the intensity of seismic shaking. Model validation is performed by obtaining the approximates various dimensions of the Vichada impact crater and ejecta deposit, as well as estimating the severity of the air blasting both crater-forming and air burst impacts. We illustrate the utility of the calculations by examining the predicted environmental consequences in seven localities of the Colombian territory, through hypothetical impact scenarios occurring in Cumaribo and Puerto Carreño (Vichada, Puerto Inirida (Guainía, Puerto Gaitán and Villavicencio (Meta, Mitú (Vaupes and Bogotá, D.C. It is concluded that the most wide-reaching environmental consequence is seismic shaking. Both ejecta deposit thickness and air-blast pressure decay much more rapidly with distance than with seismic ground motion. Close to the impact site, the most

  1. Examining antecedents and consequences of gambling passion: the case of gambling on horse races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Ki; Back, Ki-Joon; Hodgins, David C; Lee, Tae Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the antecedents and consequences of gambling passion using structural equation modeling to examine relationships among gambling motivation, passion, emotion, and behavioral intentions in the horse racing industry. An onsite survey was conducted with 447 patrons at a horseracing park in South Korea. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that the Gambling Passion Scale was valid and reliable, resulting in two sub-scales: obsessive passion (OP) and harmonious passion (HP). Study results indicated that extrinsic motivation influenced OP whereas intrinsic motivation significantly affected HP. Furthermore, OP was correlated with negative emotion, whereas HP was related to positive emotion. Gamblers' satisfaction was found to be influenced positively by positive emotion and negatively by negative emotion. Finally, satisfaction appeared to affect gamblers' behavioral intentions. Study results echoed the notion of distinct and separate gambling motivations and passions among horse racing gamblers. Furthermore, results identified specific areas to which horse racing operators or policy makers should pay special attention in developing effective marketing strategies to promote responsible gambling.

  2. Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 214-AW-102 Knuckle Region. Examination completed February 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.

    2003-01-01

    COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic examination of the knuckle region of Double-Shell Tank 241-AW-102 utilizing the Remotely Operated Nondestructive Examination (RONDE) system. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the knuckle region of the primary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-AW-102 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any circumferentially oriented cracks that might be present in the knuckle area of the primary tank. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-7869, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided t o PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report(s) that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations

  3. Questionnaire of social probability and potential consequences: Examination of reliability and validity on Serbian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Kristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prejudice in judgment has an important role in cognitive models of psychopathology. Every selective processing of emotionally relevant stimuli is called cognitive prejudice. One of the cognitive prejudices that is considered a key factor of socially - anxious disorder is prejudice in judgment. It is defined as a disposition to overestimate the probability of occurrence of negative social events in the near future, as well as potential consequences (agitation that might follow them. The perception of danger is essentially determined by a joined effect of subjective assessment of probability and agitation created by certain events. The researches have shown that socially-anxious individuals have a more expressive prejudice in judgment and that it can be reduced by applying certain psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatments, which proves its relevance for the socially-anxious disorder. Considering the significance of the prejudice in judgment construct for the research and clinical practice and the lack of instruments that is operational in our country, the basic purpose of this paper is to check metric characteristics of the Serbian version of one of the most often mentioned and used questionnaires aimed at the assessment of this construct. It is the Questionnaire of social probability and potential consequences, which has two subscales: 1 to examine the reliability of the questionnaire on the sample of examinees from Serbia; 2 to examine the latent structure of the questionnaire and 3 to examine the construct of validity of the questionnaire by checking the correlations with other relevant constructs (personality traits, anxiety as a trait and fear of negative evaluation.The was adapted for Serbian language from English. The sample consists of 166 examinees, aged from 19 to 29 (AS = 21,73; SD = 1,43. The questionnaire for sensitivity to confirmation assessment was used to estimate personality traits, Anxiety as a trait was estimated by the

  4. LUTETIAN LIMESTONES IN THE PARIS REGION: PETROGRAPHIC AND COMPOSITIONAL EXAMINATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLANC, A.; HOLMES, L.L.; HARBOTTLE, G.

    1998-01-01

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific-stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemist whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries

  5. Examination of health status of population from Uranium contaminated regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milacic, S.; Jovicic, D.; Pantelic, G.; Kovacevic, R.; Pavlovic, M.; Tanaskovic, I.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium is widely distributed in the natural environment: in the soil, air and food. And thus all people on the planet inhale or ingest small quantities of uranium every day. However, depleted uranium (DU) is industrial product. It is used in medicine, aviation, astronomy, oil exploitation, as well as for military purposes for penetrating ammunition. America is not the only country that applies depleted uranium ammunition. It is a part of the military arsenal in France, England, Turkey, Israel, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Thailand. Depleted uranium is toxic for both humans and animals for two basic reasons: as a heavy metal, it has toxic chemical effects, and as an alpha-emitter, it also has radioactive effects. Although it is considered less radioactive than natural uranium, its toxicity is high due to high LET (linear energetic transfer) irradiation, tissue deposition (bones, kidneys, blood, lungs) and elimination time (5000 days). Radiation limit above which adverse health effects are initiated (radiation carcinogenic risk), depends on the quantity and contamination time (how much and how long), including also other factors, such as age, sex, previous health status, exposure to other materials, genetic predisposition and radiosensitivity (lack of indicators), diet and stress. According to ICRP recommendations, carcinogenic risk for the occupationally exposed individuals is minimal if the exposure is limited to the effective dose of 100 mSv for five years and not above 50 in a single year, being five times lower for general population. In average annual effective dose per population, from all sources is below 1mSv, carcinogenic risk will range from 1 per 10 000 to 1 per 100 000, and in occupationally exposed individuals exposed to maximum permitted doses (MPD), the risk of cancer with fatal outcome is below 3 per 100 000). Immediate effects of population exposure to low uranium doses do not result in evident clinical picture. Late consequences include

  6. Regional consequences of a biotic interchange: insights from the Lessepsian invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Rafal; Albano, Paolo G.; Chattopadhyay, Devapriya; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The fossil record provides ample evidence of large-scale biotic interchanges and their pervasive effects on regional biotas, but mechanisms controlling such events are difficult to decipher in deep time. Massive invasion of Indo-Pacific species into the Mediterranean Sea triggered by the opening of the Suez Canal offers a unique opportunity to examine the ecological consequences of breaking down biogeographic barriers. We developed an extensive database of taxonomic composition, body size and ecological characteristics of the Red Sea and Mediterranean bivalve fauna in order to link biotic selectivity of the invasion process with its effects on the recipient biota. Shallow-water occurrence and presence outside the tropical zone in other regions are the strongest predictors of the successful transition through the Suez Canal. Subsequent establishment of alien species in the Mediterranean Sea correlates with early arrival and preference for hard substrates. Finally, large-bodied species and hard-bottom dwellers are over-represented among the invasive aliens that have reached the spread stage and impose a strong impact on native communities. Although body size is important only at the last invasion stage, alien species are significantly larger compared to native Mediterranean bivalves. This reflects biogeographic difference in the body-size distributions of the source and recipient species pools related to the recent geological history of the Mediterranean Sea. Contrary to the general expectations on the effects of temperature on average body size, continued warming of the Mediterranean Sea accelerates the entry of tropical aliens and thus indirectly leads to increase in the proportion of large-bodied species in local communities and the regional biota. Invasion-driven shifts in species composition are stronger in hard-substrate communities, which host a smaller pool of incumbent species and are more susceptible to the establishment of newcomers. Analogous differences

  7. Present consequences of the post-war migration in the Czech borderland for regional developemnt

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Dvořák, Petr; Nosková, Helena; Zapletalová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (2017), s. 5-15 ISSN 2081-6383 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 ; RVO:68378114 Keywords : borderland regions * resettlement * social consequences Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography ; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (USD-C) OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects); Environmental sciences (social aspects) (USD-C) https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/quageo.2017.36.issue-4/quageo-2017-0032/quageo-2017-0032.xml?format=INT

  8. An Examination of Regional Competitiveness: Early Findings from Banten, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holis, Y. M.; Syabri, I.; Prabatmojo, H.

    2018-05-01

    Over time, the regional development planning paradigm continues to change procedural, substantive, actor and institutional aspects. The increasing globalization and decentralized governance systems will continue to determine how a country or region can compete and even be able to take advantage of the positive value of economic globalization. This certainly provides challenges and opportunities for the renewal of regional development concepts, in particular, the concept of regional competitiveness. This concept still lacks a scientific basis and its interpretation is still in debate. To date, the clear scientific basis is the concepts of corporate and national competitiveness. Whereas, the concept of competitiveness at the meso-level, namely the competitiveness of the region, becomes very important. Regional competitiveness prepares a region and to survive in response to the more open dynamics of economic globalization and the system of decentralization of authority in Indonesia. The objective of this research is to complement the concept of competitiveness which is still at the level of microeconomics (business theory) and macroeconomy (theory of growth) with the concept of competitiveness at the regional level that focuses on (i) finding determinant factors at the regional level in Indonesia; (ii) profiling regional competitiveness in several regions; and (iii) assessing the role of local government (institutional and actor) on determinants of regional competitiveness. This research is carried out by using a mixed-methods approach with a concurrent triangulation strategy model. The research follows the stages of literature study to identify the determinant factors of regional competitiveness relevant to the purpose of research, followed by descriptive analysis of the variables and selected by statistics through Analytical Network Process (ANP) to become the determinant factor of competitiveness. In accordance with the concept and definition of regional

  9. What's driving the binge in binge eating disorder?: A prospective examination of precursors and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Richard I; Kenardy, Justin; Wiseman, Claire V; Dounchis, Jennifer Zoler; Arnow, Bruce A; Wilfley, Denise E

    2007-04-01

    Previous research, mostly using retrospective reports, indicated a relation of negative affect and dietary restraint with the occurrence of binge episodes in binge eating disorder (BED). We employed Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) to better understand precursors and consequences of binge eating. Thirty-three females with BED carried a handheld computer for 7 days, and were periodically prompted to indicate their current emotions, hunger, and binge status. Negative mood and hunger were significantly higher at prebinge than at nonbinge times, but negative mood was even higher at postbinge. Participants attributed binge episodes to mood more frequently than to hunger or abstinence violation. The finding that negative mood is actually heightened subsequent to a binge suggests the need to further investigate what is reinforcing about a binge, including possible escape from self-awareness. Strengths of EMA technology are discussed, as well as its broad utility in BED assessment and treatment.

  10. The design and application of a radiological consequence model for tropical and subtropical regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domel, R.U.; Harris, F.F.; Crawford, J.

    1998-01-01

    The post Chernobyl era has seen the development of a plethora of radiological consequence models. The information used in these models pertains mostly to temperate and cold climate data, with these data mostly being hard-wired into the body of the model. At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), a model is being developed with a user-friendly interface which will assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in tropical and sub-tropical climates. The model combines specific regional data (South East Asia) with transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) obtained for tropical and sub-tropical regions. Flexibility has been incorporated into the the design of the model to allow application in other regions. Where the relevant data are not available, default temperate data are used whilst specific research will be initiated to determine the information required. A Geographic Information System (GIS) is used for the display of input and output data allowing quick access to not only the results but also to the underlying assumptions

  11. The design and application of a radiological consequence model for tropical and subtropical regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domel, R.U.; Harris, F.F.; Crawford, J.

    1997-01-01

    The post Chernobyl era has seen the development of a plethora of radiological consequence models. At ANSTO, a model is being developed with a user-friendly interface which will assess the radiological consequences, after an incident, in tropical and sub-tropical climates. The model combines specific regional dispersion and deposition data to determine the dose to man via the major pathways of external and internal irradiation. The external irradiation data will need to include lifestyle information such as time spent L indoors/outdoors, the high/low activity times of the different groups of people (especially critical groups) and shielding factors for housing. The internal irradiation data requires food consumption values, effect of food processing and transfer parameters (soil to plant, plant to animal) to be obtained for tropical and sub-tropical regions. The model allows the user to specify the radionuclide of interest, the age of the person receiving l the dose, race, dietary components and lifestyle. The operator may use a number of default categories, but regional information may also be entered and incorporated into the radiological model allowing assessment of dose to critical groups using site specific data. Initially, the model will deal with the South East Asian region but flexibility has been incorporated into the design to allow application in other regions. A geographic information system is used for display of all input and output data allowing quick access to not only the results but also the underlying assumptions. The model also has portability across computer platforms. The model has been developed to provide a tool for directing future research, has application as a planing tool for emergency response operations but its priority lies in understanding the behaviour of radionuclides in the tropical and sub-tropical environments and their effect on humankind

  12. Rape as a legal indication for abortion: implications and consequences of the medical examination requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklehaimanot, K I; Smith, C Hord

    2004-01-01

    A number of countries adopt abortion laws recognizing rape as a legal ground for access to safe abortion service. As rape is a crime, these abortion laws carry with them criminal and health care elements that in turn result in the involvement of legal and medical expertise. The most common objective of the laws should be providing safe abortion services to women survivors of rape. Depending on purposes of a given abortion law, the laws usually require women to undergo a medical examination to qualify for a legal abortion. Some abortion laws are so vague as to result in uncertainties regarding the steps health personnel must follow in conducting medical examination. Another group of abortion laws do not leave room for regulation and remain too rigid to respond to changing socio-economic circumstances. Still others require medical examination as a prerequisite for abortion. As a result, a number of abortion laws remain on the books. The paper attempts to analyze legal and practical issues related to medical examination in rape cases.

  13. Evaluation of ecological consequences of coal mine closure in Kuzbass coal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schastlivcev, E.L.; Barannic, L.P.; Ovdenko, B.I.; Bykov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Kemerovo region (otherwise called Kuzbass) is the most industrially developed and urbanized region of Siberia, Russia. The main industrial branch of Kuzbass is coal output. Open pits and underground mines of Kuzbass produce about 40% of total amount of coal in Russia and more than 70% of coking coal. In the current process of the coal industry's restructuring, the closing of many unprofitable coal enterprises is associated with radical changes in their influence on the environment. The task to provide a probable forecast of ecological consequence of mine closure is both practically significant and complicated. In order to find some scientific approach to solve named problem the authors made in the paper the first attempts to analyze of accessible closed mines data in Kuzbass, to classify coal mines (working and closed) with respect to there negative influence on soil, water and atmosphere and to obtain some numerical estimates of possible bounds of this influence. 7 refs

  14. Causes and consequences of ecosystem service regionalization in a coastal suburban watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Mark B. Green,; Pellerin, Brian A.; Morse, Nathaniel B.; Hopkinson, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The demand for ecosystem services and the ability of natural ecosystems to provide those services evolve over time as population, land use, and management practices change. Regionalization of ecosystem service activity, or the expansion of the area providing ecosystem services to a population, is a common response in densely populated coastal regions, with important consequences for watershed water and nitrogen (N) fluxes to the coastal zone. We link biophysical and historical information to explore the causes and consequences of change in ecosystem service activity—focusing on water provisioning and N regulation—from 1850 to 2010 in a coastal suburban watershed, the Ipswich River watershed in northeastern Massachusetts, USA. Net interbasin water transfers started in the late 1800s due to regionalization of water supply for use by larger populations living outside the Ipswich watershed boundaries, reaching a peak in the mid-1980s. Over much of the twentieth century, about 20 % of river runoff was diverted from reaching the estuary, with greater proportions during drought years. Ongoing regionalization of water supply has contributed to recent declines in diversions, influenced by socioecological feedbacks resulting from the river drying and fish kills. Similarly, the N budget has been greatly perturbed since the suburban era began in the 1950s due to food and lawn fertilizer imports and human waste release. However, natural ecosystems are able to remove most of this anthropogenic N, mitigating impacts on the coastal zone. We propose a conceptual model whereby the amount and type of ecosystem services provided by coastal watersheds in urban regions expand and contract over time as regional population expands and ecosystem services are regionalized. We hypothesize that suburban watersheds can be hotspots of ecosystem service sources because they retain sufficient ecosystem function to still produce services that meet increasing demand from the local population

  15. An Examination of Regional Hardwood Roundwood Markets in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Luppold; Delton Alderman; Delton Alderman

    2005-01-01

    West Virginia?s hardwood resource is large and diverse ranging from oak-hickory forests in the southern and western portions of the state to northern hardwood stands in the northeastern region. West Virginia also has a diverse group of primary hardwood- processing industries, including hardwood grade mills, industrial hardwood sawmills, engineered wood-product...

  16. An efficient power market - consequences for energy-intensive industries and regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bye, Torstein; Hoel, Michael; Stroem, Steinar

    2000-01-01

    From economic theory we know that, unless special arguments can be made, we obtain economic efficiency if all buyers of a homogeneous good pay the same price for the good. If this principle is violated inefficiency will occur. The principle holds for all goods, i.e. both for consumer goods (e.g. clothing or food), inputs in a production process (e.g. raw materials), and for combined goods. Electricity is an example of a combined good that can be used both as a final good and as an input in production processes. In Norway, the energy intensive industry (metals and chemicals) and the paper and pulp industry pay a lower price for their use of electricity than other users pay. The reason is that this industry has signed long-term contracts where the prices have been influenced by political processes. This pricing leads to an inefficient use of electricity in Norway. In this book we study the consequences of changing the electricity prices for this sectors so that we obtain a situation where all domestic users of electricity pay the same price. The book contains numerical calculations of potential structural changes and changes in overall economic welfare (producer and consumer surplus). We also calculate changes in emissions both from these sectors and from the rest of the economy. The last chapter deals with structural change and regional differences, with emphasis on the regions in which the energy intensive firms are located. We discuss how strong the negative impact on these regions will be as a consequence of shutting down non-profitable energy intensive firms when the price of electricity changes. A main conclusion in the book is that Norway will benefit from increasing the electricity price paid by the energy intensive sectors, both in economic terms and with respect to overall pollution. Reduced electricity use in the energy intensive sectors will in the short run lead to increased export of electricity. In the longer run, new investments in power producing

  17. Social knowledge in children with language impairments: examination of strategies, predicted consequences, and goals in peer conflict situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timler, Geralyn R

    2008-09-01

    This study investigated social knowledge in school-age children, aged 8-12 years, with and without language impairment (LI and TD groups). A hypothetical peer conflict task was administered to examine the relationship among prosocial responses and parent/teacher ratings of children's social behaviours. Stimuli included 12 hypothetical peer conflict vignettes presented in an open-ended and forced choice condition. The LI group generated (open-ended) and selected (forced choice) fewer prosocial strategies. When asked to predict a friend's reaction to a selected conflict resolution strategy, the LI group predicted fewer positive consequences; however, the proportion of prosocial strategies followed by prediction of a positive peer consequence was similar across groups. Both groups identified more self-interest than relationship goals as the rationale for selected strategies. In the LI group, teacher ratings of children's social skills and problems in peer provocation situations were associated with selection of prosocial strategies. Implications for clinical service providers are discussed.

  18. Regional potential radiological consequences and their variability of failtRe events in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.; Friedland, W.; Geiss, H.; Muller, H.; Prohl, G.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program system has been developed for best estimate assessments of radiological consequences of accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides. Computerized data bases as realistic as possible have been established and used describing weather sequences, land topography and usage, human population density, yield of agricultural products, etc. Input from the complex atmospheric transport program MUSEMEI and from the food chain program ECOSYS is combined with the main program BAMBUS to calculate site specific probability distributions for individual and regional collective exposures as functions of the time of year of the release, spatial location, exposure pathway, etc. In this paper, the principles of the program system are described and examples are given for its application to a selected hypothetical failure event in a reprocessing plant

  19. A Curse of Coal? Exploring Unintended Regional Consequences of Coal Energy in The Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantál Bohumil

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on coal energy from a geographical perspective, the unintended regional consequences of coal mining and combustion in the Czech Republic are discussed and analysed in terms of the environmental injustice and resource curse theories. The explorative case study attempts to identify significant associations between the spatially uneven distribution of coal power plants and the environmental and socioeconomic characteristics and development trends of affected areas. The findings indicate that the coal industries have contributed to slightly above average incomes and pensions, and have provided households with some technical services such as district heating. However, these positive effects have come at high environmental and health costs paid by the local populations. Above average rates of unemployment, homelessness and crime indicate that the benefits have been unevenly distributed economically. A higher proportion of uneducated people and ethnic minorities in affected districts suggest that coal energy is environmentally unjust.

  20. The Remotely Operated Nondestructive Examination System for Examining the Knuckle Region of Hanford's Double Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Pardini, Allan F.; Donald Thompson and Dale Chimenti

    2005-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed a technology to address the examination requirements associated with the knuckle region of Hanford's double shell waste tanks. This examination poses a significant technical challenge because the area that requires examination is in a confined space, high radiation region and is not accessible using conventional measurement techniques. This paper describes the development, deployment, and modification of the remotely operated nondestructive examination (RONDE) system that utilizes a technique known as Synthetic Aperture Focusing (SAFT). The system detects stress corrosion cracking in the high stress region of the knuckle and characterizes the crack with tandem SAFT. PNNL has qualified the system to perform inspections on the entire knuckle region of Hanford's double shell waste tanks

  1. Economic and regional consequences of direct payments under the current CAP philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Věra Bečvářová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with one of the key instruments of the actual EU Common Agricultural Policy (the CAP, the direct payments. The economic as well as the regional implications of application for direct payments in the CAP strategy are evaluated there. The study deals with the economic costs, direct and indirect effects of such type of subsidy in general and a demonstration thereof in the context of the development of the European model of agriculture. Based on the economic principle of this type of transfer evalution, the processes of the income redistribution in the framework of global/common policy in general is characterized. It explains the causes as well as the nature of implementation of this instrument in the reform processes in the last twenty years, focusing on the reasons and consequences of different application in the original and the new EU member states. It considers the question of whether this type of support to agriculture is truly a tool that does not interfere with market conditions affect the respective competitive ability of agricultural producers. In the context of changes to income support in agriculture in the CAP development process, the effect of decoupled payments on the pricing within the agricultural commodity markets is specified. At the same time the work deals with a broader social context and social impact of the differing forms of support in European regions.

  2. Referring physicians' experiences of outsourcing radiological examinations – A variety of views on the consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, P.T.; Blomqvist, L.; Fridell, K.; Aspelin, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There are strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges when outsourcing advanced radiological examinations such as magnetic resonance examinations from university hospitals to external private institutions. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of referring physicians when their referrals for radiological examinations are outsourced from a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Method: This qualitative study is a part of a larger study investigating the consequences of outsourcing referrals for radiological examinations from a university hospital to private external units. Ten referring physicians from orthopedic and oncology departments, representing clinics with large volumes of radiological referrals at a university hospital, were interviewed. Results: The results showed that the requirements for radiological services differ between these specialties. The overall opinion was that examinations performed by external radiology departments needed additional re-assessment work which causes higher costs for their clinics. This indicates that there is insufficient communication between referring physicians and the radiological department at the University Hospital. Conclusions: For better planning of radiological services, radiology departments must consider the referring physicians' needs and develop suitable contract when organizing the practice of outsourcing. The management structure in radiology departments and communication between referring physicians and radiologists in the radiology departments should be studied further, to promote better understanding and improve the efficiency of the outsourcing process. - Highlights: • The requirements for radiological services differ between specialties. • Outsourced examinations need more frequent re-assessment. • Outsourced examinations cause higher costs for referring departments. • Outsourcing radiological examinations entail more administrative work.

  3. Industrialization of western region of ukraine: problems of environmental consequences management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Malyarchuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the consequences of industrialization of the western region of the Ukrainian SSR – large-scale construction industry provided jobs for the active population of the region, led to the expansion of infrastructure of settlements and towns, strengthened social sphere and became a positive factor for the development of the western regions of Ukraine. However, due to the increased production capacity natural resources got depleted. The ability of ecosystems to self-healing and self-cleaning was not taken into account, which caused devastating impact on nature and human health. Uncontrolled industrial pollution of air, water and land resources became a common phenomenon for the urbanized western region. Promoting environmental knowledge and declaration of achievement of significant progress in official documents gave no mechanisms to solve environmental problems. Overcoming the difficulties of the past is connected with the Ukraine had been being a part of the USSR. The leading place took environmental issues. Poor environmental condition of the whole country was not only caused by the world’s largest man-made disaster on the Chernobyl nuclear plant in April 1986, but also intensive industrialization and collectivization. Full conversion of the economy and agriculture in the middle of the last century led to the growth of anthropogenic impact on the environment. A radical break steady of socio-political and socio-economic life took place in western Ukraine in the second half of the twentieth century. Party-Soviet government in a short time made a «socialist transformation» and social progress was considered only as a means to achieve this goal. A number of issues concerning environmental protection, safety of life, were ignored. Environmental protection, regulation of environmental and economic activities, guaranteeing rights of Ukrainian citizens to environmental safety is currently among the national priorities of the

  4. Image and Substance Failures in Regional Organisations: Causes, Consequences, Learning and Change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Hsuan Chou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available States often pool their sovereignty, capacity and resources to provide regionally specific public goods, such as security or trade rules, and regional organisations play important roles in international relations as institutions that attempt to secure peace and contribute to achieving other similar global policy goals. We observe failures occurring in these arrangements and activities in two areas: substance and image. To analytically account for this, we distinguish four modes of substance and image change and link these to specific types of failure and (lack of learning. To empirically ground and test our assumptions, we examine instances of image failure in ASEAN (political/security policy and substantive policy failure in EU labour migration policy. In so doing, this article contributes to several different fields of study and concepts that have hitherto rarely engaged with one another: analyses of policy failure from public policy, and regional integration concerns from area studies and international relations. We conclude with suggestions for ways forward to further analyse and understand failures at the international and supranational levels.

  5. Communicating and Sharing in the Semantic Web: An Examination of Social Media Risks, Consequences, and Attitudinal Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A. Buzzetto-More

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Empowered by and tethered to ubiquitous technologies, the current generation of youth yearns for opportunities to engage in self-expression and information sharing online with personal disclosure no longer governed by concepts of propriety and privacy. This raises issues about the unsafe online activities of teens and young adults. The following paper presents the findings of a study examining the social networking activities of undergraduate students and also highlights a program to increase awareness of the dangers and safe practices when using and communicating, via social media. According to the survey results, young adults practice risky social networking site (SNS behaviors with most having experienced at least one negative consequence. Further, females were more likely than males to engage in oversharing as well as to have experienced negative consequences. Finally, results of a post-treatment survey found that a targeted program that includes flyers, posters, YouTube videos, handouts, and in-class information sessions conducted at a Mid-Atlantic Historically Black College or University (HBCU increased student awareness of the dangers of social media as well as positively influenced students to practice more prudent online behaviors.

  6. Fasting and exercise increase plasma cannabinoid levels in THC pre-treated rats: an examination of behavioural consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alexander; Keats, Kirily; Rooney, Kieron; Hicks, Callum; Allsop, David J; Arnold, Jonathon C; McGregor, Iain S

    2014-10-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, accumulates in fat tissue where it can remain for prolonged periods. Under conditions of increased fat utilisation, blood cannabinoid concentrations can increase. However, it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences. Here, we examined whether rats pre-treated with multiple or single doses of THC followed by a washout would show elevated plasma cannabinoids and altered behaviour following fasting or exercise manipulations designed to increase fat utilisation. Behavioural impairment was measured as an inhibition of spontaneous locomotor activity or a failure to successfully complete a treadmill exercise session. Fat utilisation was indexed by plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels with plasma concentrations of THC and its terminal metabolite (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) also measured. Rats given daily THC (10 mg/kg) for 5 days followed by a 4-day washout showed elevated plasma THC-COOH when fasted for 24 h relative to non-fasted controls. Fasted rats showed lower locomotor activity than controls suggesting a behavioural effect of fat-released THC. However, rats fasted for 20 h after a single 5-mg/kg THC injection did not show locomotor suppression, despite modestly elevated plasma THC-COOH. Rats pre-treated with THC (5 mg/kg) and exercised 20 h later also showed elevated plasma THC-COOH but did not differ from controls in their likelihood of completing 30 min of treadmill exercise. These results confirm that fasting and exercise can increase plasma cannabinoid levels. Behavioural consequences are more clearly observed with pre-treatment regimes involving repeated rather than single THC dosing.

  7. An Examination of Women Experiencing Obstetric Complications Requiring Emergency Care: Perceptions and Sociocultural Consequences of Caesarean Sections in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rasheda; Sultana, Marzia; Bilkis, Sayeda; Koblinsky, Marge

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the physical and socioeconomic postpartum consequences of women who experience obstetric complications and require emergency obstetric care (EmOC), particularly in resource-poor countries such as Bangladesh where historically there has been a strong cultural preference for births at home. Recent increases in the use of skilled birth attendants show socioeconomic disparities in access to emergency obstetric services, highlighting the need to examine birthing preparation and perceptions of EmOC, including caesarean sections. Twenty women who delivered at a hospital and were identified by physicians as having severe obstetric complications during delivery or immediately thereafter were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Purposive sampling was used for selecting the women. The study was carried out in Matlab, Bangladesh, during March 2008–August 2009. Data-collection methods included in-depth interviews with women and, whenever possible, their family members. The results showed that the women were poorly informed before delivery about pregnancy-related complications and medical indications for emergency care. Barriers to care-seeking at emergency obstetric facilities and acceptance of lifesaving care were related to apprehensions about the physical consequences and social stigma, resulting from hospital procedures and financial concerns. The respondents held many misconceptions about caesarean sections and distrust regarding the reason for recommending the procedure by the healthcare providers. Women who had caesarean sections incurred high costs that led to economic burdens on family members, and the blame was attributed to the woman. The postpartum health consequences reported by the women were generally left untreated. The data underscore the importance of educating women and their families about pregnancy-related complications and preparing families for the possibility of caesarean section. At the same time, the health

  8. Examination of Regional Transit Service Under Contracting : A Case Study in the Greater New Orleans Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Many local governments and transit agencies in the United States face financial difficulties in providing adequate public transit service in individual systems, and in providing sufficient regional coordination to accommodate transit trips involving ...

  9. Water infiltration in soil at catchment scale: consequences for cold-climate regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, J.; French, H.K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Soil erosion is a global problem because of its environmental consequences, including sedimentation and pollution in many areas of the world. An estimated 400 million hectares of land have been abandoned due to soil erosion over the past 50 years. The main biophysical factor influencing the quantity

  10. Examining the Causes and Consequences of Short-Term Behavioral Change during the Middle Stone Age at Sibudu, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Conard

    Full Text Available Sibudu in KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa with its rich and high-resolution archaeological sequence provides an ideal case study to examine the causes and consequences of short-term variation in the behavior of modern humans during the Middle Stone Age (MSA. We present the results from a technological analysis of 11 stratified lithic assemblages which overlie the Howiesons Poort deposits and all date to ~58 ka. Based on technological and typological attributes, we conducted inter-assemblage comparisons to characterize the nature and tempo of cultural change in successive occupations. This work identified considerable short-term variation with clear temporal trends throughout the sequence, demonstrating that knappers at Sibudu varied their technology over short time spans. The lithic assemblages can be grouped into three cohesive units which differ from each other in the procurement of raw materials, the frequency in the methods of core reduction, the kind of blanks produced, and in the nature of tools the inhabitants of Sibudu made and used. These groups of assemblages represent different strategies of lithic technology, which build upon each other in a gradual, cumulative manner. We also identify a clear pattern of development toward what we have previously defined as the Sibudan cultural taxonomic unit. Contextualizing these results on larger geographical scales shows that the later phase of the MSA during MIS 3 in KwaZulu-Natal and southern Africa is one of dynamic cultural change rather than of stasis or stagnation as has at times been claimed. In combination with environmental, subsistence and contextual information, our high-resolution data on lithic technology suggest that short-term behavioral variability at Sibudu can be best explained by changes in technological organization and socio-economic dynamics instead of environmental forcing.

  11. Examining the Causes and Consequences of Short-Term Behavioral Change during the Middle Stone Age at Sibudu, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Nicholas J; Will, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Sibudu in KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa) with its rich and high-resolution archaeological sequence provides an ideal case study to examine the causes and consequences of short-term variation in the behavior of modern humans during the Middle Stone Age (MSA). We present the results from a technological analysis of 11 stratified lithic assemblages which overlie the Howiesons Poort deposits and all date to ~58 ka. Based on technological and typological attributes, we conducted inter-assemblage comparisons to characterize the nature and tempo of cultural change in successive occupations. This work identified considerable short-term variation with clear temporal trends throughout the sequence, demonstrating that knappers at Sibudu varied their technology over short time spans. The lithic assemblages can be grouped into three cohesive units which differ from each other in the procurement of raw materials, the frequency in the methods of core reduction, the kind of blanks produced, and in the nature of tools the inhabitants of Sibudu made and used. These groups of assemblages represent different strategies of lithic technology, which build upon each other in a gradual, cumulative manner. We also identify a clear pattern of development toward what we have previously defined as the Sibudan cultural taxonomic unit. Contextualizing these results on larger geographical scales shows that the later phase of the MSA during MIS 3 in KwaZulu-Natal and southern Africa is one of dynamic cultural change rather than of stasis or stagnation as has at times been claimed. In combination with environmental, subsistence and contextual information, our high-resolution data on lithic technology suggest that short-term behavioral variability at Sibudu can be best explained by changes in technological organization and socio-economic dynamics instead of environmental forcing.

  12. Conscientious objection and refusal to provide reproductive healthcare: a White Paper examining prevalence, health consequences, and policy responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavkin, Wendy; Leitman, Liddy; Polin, Kate

    2013-12-01

    Global Doctors for Choice-a transnational network of physician advocates for reproductive health and rights-began exploring the phenomenon of conscience-based refusal of reproductive healthcare as a result of increasing reports of harms worldwide. The present White Paper examines the prevalence and impact of such refusal and reviews policy efforts to balance individual conscience, autonomy in reproductive decision making, safeguards for health, and professional medical integrity. The White Paper draws on medical, public health, legal, ethical, and social science literature published between 1998 and 2013 in English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Estimates of prevalence are difficult to obtain, as there is no consensus about criteria for refuser status and no standardized definition of the practice, and the studies have sampling and other methodologic limitations. The White Paper reviews these data and offers logical frameworks to represent the possible health and health system consequences of conscience-based refusal to provide abortion; assisted reproductive technologies; contraception; treatment in cases of maternal health risk and inevitable pregnancy loss; and prenatal diagnosis. It concludes by categorizing legal, regulatory, and other policy responses to the practice. Empirical evidence is essential for varied political actors as they respond with policies or regulations to the competing concerns at stake. Further research and training in diverse geopolitical settings are required. With dual commitments toward their own conscience and their obligations to patients' health and rights, providers and professional medical/public health societies must lead attempts to respond to conscience-based refusal and to safeguard reproductive health, medical integrity, and women's lives. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. THE MODELING OF DRUG ADDICTION PREVALENCE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES IN RUSSIAN REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Sirotin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The narcotization prevalence in Russia as whole and its regions is described. In order to provide the adequate models the clusters of regions on the level of their economic development are defined. For every group the regression model of drug addiction social distress is constructed. Modeling results allow to find the features of regions and the most significant factors determining the drug addiction prevalence.

  14. Evaluation of an IPCC climate report. An analysis of conclusions on the possible regional consequences of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report contains the results of a study of the reliability of the regional chapters (H9-16) of the contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Climate Report of the IPCC (the sub report on consequences, adaptation and vulnerability). Moreover an assessment was made of the possible consequences of errors for the conclusions in the high level summaries of that report. The Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency did not detect any errors that may undermine the main conclusions of the scientific UN Climate Panel IPCC of 2007 on the possible future consequences of climate change. However, some of the substantiations of the conclusions lack clarity. To prevent lack of clarity and inaccuracies the IPCC needs to invest more in quality checks. [nl

  15. Water infiltration in soil at catchment scale: consequences for cold-climate regions

    OpenAIRE

    Stolte, J.; French, H.K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Soil erosion is a global problem because of its environmental consequences, including sedimentation and pollution in many areas of the world. An estimated 400 million hectares of land have been abandoned due to soil erosion over the past 50 years. The main biophysical factor influencing the quantity of overland flow is the infiltration rate. Infiltration during a runoff-generating rainfall event is regulated by the hydraulic properties of the Critical Zone and the antecedent soil moisture con...

  16. The Felbertauern landslide of 2013: Traffic disruption, regional economic consequences and policy decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, Clemens; Genovese, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    The Felbertauern landslide of May 2013 caused the total destruction of approximately 100 meters of road including an avalanche gallery, generating several direct and indirect impacts on the regional-economy. The Felbertauern road, an important traffic arteria for the whole NUTS-3 region East-Tyrol (Austria), was totally blocked for several weeks. Short after the event, regional decision makers were hardly in need for an estimation of the regional-economic impacts of the road blockage to opt for alternatives to reopen the road. So, two weeks after the event, an analysis of the possible effects was carried out using only scattered information and statistical data. The analysis is based on a three-month interruption scenario. Retrospectively the road blockage was only two months. Due to the fact that short after the event no up-to-date data on regional-economics at necessary scales was available, impacts on tourism by analysing overnight stays, additional transportation costs and time losses for the local companies were calculated. Using these numbers, a cost-benefit-analysis was carried out for a projected bypass, a mid-term 1.5 kilometer long route as an alternative to the destroyed road. Finally, the impacts on the local companies were severe, due to additional transportation costs of approx. Euro 1.4 million and Euro 76 000 additional time costs using an alternative approach. The impacts on regional tourism were calculated with Euro 7.7 to 10.7 million - that means 0.6 to 0.8% of the total economic output of the region. The study shows the strong impact of indirect and business interruption costs on regional economies and describes the major problems faced during the study - in particular the low availability of input data. The results of consistent cost assessment are critical for decision makers who are responsible for the development of policies to prevent the impacts on societies.

  17. Complexometric consequent titration of bismuth-titanium mixtures in the μg-region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1975-01-01

    A quantitative method is described for the determination of microquantities of bismuth and titanium. Both metals are determined complexometrically with EDTA and potentiometric equivalence point indication using a Cu-ion sensitive electrode in a consequent titration. The analysis is conducted as back-titration with standard Cu-solution. The relative error of the determination is 0.8% for bismuth (50-100 μg) and for titanium (10-30 μg) at 1.0%. Under the chosen conditions, it is possible to determine as little as 15 μg bismuth and 5 μg titanium by means of this procedure. (author)

  18. Genetic consequences of the Chernobyl accident. Monitoring of congenital malformations in Kaluga region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzeev, G.G.; Kalabushkin, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    The study concentrates on the genetic after-effects of the Chernobyl accident in some districts of Kaluga's region. The frequencies and range of congenital malformations, prematurely death-rate in the radionuclear polluted districts were compared with the control districts. Prematurely death-rate in compared regions is the same. The increase of the congenital malformation frequency is revealed in one the polluted districts (256/10000) as compared with the control one (27/10000). We assume that the observed effect is mainly connected with the professional activity of the population. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Present consequences of the post-war migration in the Czech borderland for regional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishar Antonín

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Czechia lost more than 3,000,000 inhabitants as a result of the WW II. Germans displaced from the borderland formed the largest part. The newcomers after 1945 were of a different character – without any relation to their new settlements. This population formed a special social milieu familiar with the socialist way of thinking and that of a suppressed middle class. The consequences of it are seen in demographic, economic, environmental and social areas. After 1989, the factories in the borderland were mostly closed down, armies left the territory, people were not prepared to start their own businesses. Large-scale landscape protection formed a new barrier. Tourism is not able to substitute for the decrease in employment. The hope in cross-border collaboration has been overestimated.

  20. Examination of the health status of populations from depleted-uranium-contaminated regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milacic, Snezana; Petrovic, Dragana; Jovicic, Dubravka; Kovacevic, Radomir; Simic, Jadranko

    2004-01-01

    During the NATO air strikes on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) in 1999, depleted-uranium ammunition was used on 112 locations, mainly Kosovo, in the south of Serbia, and one location in Montenegro. Blood samples of residents from depleted-uranium-contaminated areas were gathered and blood cell and chromosomal aberrations were analyzed. During the last 3 years blood samples from 21 residents of Kosovo (Strpce), from 29 residents from the south of Serbia (the Vranje and Bujanovac regions), and from 19 technical television workers from the site of Pljackovica, in the vicinity of Vranje, were collected. Blood samples from 33 residents of central Serbia and 46 occupational workers exposed to X-rays were used as controls. All subjects studied were without any clinical symptoms of disease. The examinations included general clinical assessment; urine samples for α-and γ-spectrometry analysis; complete blood counts; ratio-percentages of blood cells in stained (Giemsa) capillary smears, individual leukocyte line elements; morphological changes observed under a microscope; the presence of immature forms or blasts; and leukocyte enzyme activity [alkaline phosphatase leukocyte (APL)]. Chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in 200 peripheral blood lymphocytes in mitosis. An increased incidence of rogue cells and chromosomal aberrations was found in the blood of the residents of Vranje and Bujanovac, but this was below the incidence of chromosomal aberrations in individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing irradiation. Blast cells were not found. Blood counts were decreased in only a few samples, while morphological changes of both nuclei and cytoplasm were marked in individuals in south and central Serbia. Enzymatic activity (as measured by the APL score) was decreased in samples with chromosomal aberrations and cyto-morphological changes in subjects from the south of Serbia. The contamination level measured by this examination was low. Because of

  1. Regional consequences of the way land users respond to future water availability in Murcia, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleskens, L.; Nainggolan, D.; Temansen, M.; Hubacek, K.; Reed, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural development in the Murcia autonomous region, Spain, has led to overexploitation of groundwater resources, and climate change will further increase pressures. Policy options to tackle the current unsustainable situation include the development of inter-basin water transfer (IBWT) schemes

  2. Entrepreneurial Regions : Causes and Consequences of the Spatial Variation of Entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modrego Benito, Felix Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the spatial variation in entrepreneurship, and its relationship with regional growth and development. The study is conducted using Chile as the empirical setting. The results indicate that conditions for general

  3. Promoting survival: A grounded theory study of consequences of modern health practices in Ouramanat region of Iranian Kurdistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpur, Ahmad; Rezaei, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Rasoul

    2010-05-14

    The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the way people using modern health care perceive its consequences in Ouraman-e-Takht region of Iranian Kurdistan. Ouraman-e-Takht is a rural, highly mountainous and dry region located in the southwest Kurdistan province of Iran. Recently, modern health practices have been introduced to the region. The purpose of this study was to investigate, from the Ouramains' point of view, the impact that modern health services and practices have had on the Ouraman traditional way of life. Interview data from respondents were analyzed by using grounded theory. Promoting survival was the core category that explained the impact that modern health practices have had on the Ouraman region. The people of Ouraman interpreted modern health practices as increasing their quality of life and promoting their survival. Results are organized around this core category in a paradigm model consisting of conditions, interactions, and consequences. This model can be used to understand the impact of change from the introduction of modern health on a traditional society.

  4. Promoting survival: A grounded theory study of consequences of modern health practices in Ouramanat region of Iranian Kurdistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpur, Ahmad; Rezaei, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Rasoul

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the way people using modern health care perceive its consequences in Ouraman-e-Takht region of Iranian Kurdistan. Ouraman-e-Takht is a rural, highly mountainous and dry region located in the southwest Kurdistan province of Iran. Recently, modern health practices have been introduced to the region. The purpose of this study was to investigate, from the Ouramains' point of view, the impact that modern health services and practices have had on the Ouraman traditional way of life. Interview data from respondents were analyzed by using grounded theory. Promoting survival was the core category that explained the impact that modern health practices have had on the Ouraman region. The people of Ouraman interpreted modern health practices as increasing their quality of life and promoting their survival. Results are organized around this core category in a paradigm model consisting of conditions, interactions, and consequences. This model can be used to understand the impact of change from the introduction of modern health on a traditional society. PMID:20640020

  5. Genetic and oncological consequences of chemical and radiation pollution of the Kuzbass and Altai regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyinskikh, E.N.; Kozlova, S.V.; Ilyinskikh, N.N.; Ilyinskikh, I.N.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents assessment of frequencies of micronucleated lymphocytes in 12307 individuals living in 7 towns in the south part of the Kuzbass and Altai regions. Among the towns the majority of individuals with significantly high frequencies of micronucleated lymphocytes were detected in towns adjacent to the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). The pollution of the environment was also caused by the activity of metallurgical plants and coal industry in this region. The most considerable genome instability was found in individuals born during intensive operation of the Site (1949-1962). Moreover, we have determined that residents of the towns located close to STS have significantly high levels of antibodies to potentially oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus. The considerable Epstein-Barr virus contamination among the residents in the radiation polluted zone around the STS was supposed to be caused by immunodeficiency disorders in these individuals and induce high frequencies of micronucleated cells. (author)

  6. Environmental consequences of the use of biomass and combustible waste in the Baltic Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denafas, G.; Revoldas, V.; Zaliauskiene, A.; Bendere, R.; Kudrenickis, I.; Mander, U.; Oja, T.; Sergeeva, L.; Esipenko, A.

    2002-01-01

    Three Baltic countries (Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia) and the Russian Kaliningrad region possess similar natural conditions as well as natural resources and are closely related by network of energy systems. Therefore joint research into the potentialities hidden in biomass and combustive waste as alternative fuel and into the related problems of air pollutions has been carried out. Based on the methods worked out by the main coordinator of the research work - the Kaunas University of Technology (Dept. of Env. Engineering) - emission of CO 2 , SO 2 , CO, NO x and solid particles at combustion of various fuels have been studied and the energy potential and resource of alternative fuels (different kinds of wood fuel, straw, combustible waste, bio diesel oil, bio ethanol and biogas) have been estimated with regard to each of the mentioned regions. In the paper, possibilities for substitution of the alternative fuels for traditional ones in energy production and transport are discussed and the forecasts as to possible limitations of emissions due to the substitution are given. The work presents the tabulated results of exhaustive calculation of air pollutant formation on the scale of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and the Kaliningrad region made with due consideration for the current requirements on the primary energy and existing renewable sources of alternative fuel. A separate conclusion is made concerning Lithuania, where the issue of alternative fuels is closely connected with the operation of the Ignalina NPP and its expected decommissioning. (authors)

  7. Is the OSCE more stressful? Examination anxiety and its consequences in different assessment methods in dental education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Schoonheim-Klein, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To measure the levels of anxiety, self-perception of preparation and expectation for success induced by an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), a written examination and a preclinical preparation test, and to examine the effects of the three predictive variables on the

  8. Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millstein, Dev; Menon, Surabi

    2011-01-01

    Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and photovoltaic arrays (low reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather patterns. In this work we investigate the regional climate and radiative effects of modifying surface albedo to mimic massive deployment of cool surfaces (roofs and pavements) and, separately, photovoltaic arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to investigate feedbacks between surface albedo changes, surface temperature, precipitation and average cloud cover. With the adoption of cool roofs and pavements, domain-wide annual average outgoing radiation increased by 0.16 ± 0.03 W m -2 (mean ± 95% C.I.) and afternoon summertime temperature in urban locations was reduced by 0.11-0.53 deg. C, although some urban areas showed no statistically significant temperature changes. In response to increased urban albedo, some rural locations showed summer afternoon temperature increases of up to + 0.27 deg. C and these regions were correlated with less cloud cover and lower precipitation. The emissions offset obtained by this increase in outgoing radiation is calculated to be 3.3 ± 0.5 Gt CO 2 (mean ± 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able to produce one terawatt of peak energy and were located in the Mojave Desert of California. To simulate the arrays, the desert surface albedo was darkened, causing local afternoon temperature increases of up to + 0.4 deg. C. Due to the solar arrays, local and regional wind patterns within a 300 km radius were affected. Statistically significant but lower magnitude changes to temperature and radiation could be seen across the domain due to the introduction of the solar arrays. The addition of photovoltaic arrays caused no significant change to summertime outgoing radiation when averaged

  9. Consequences of Regional Scale Nuclear Conflicts and Acts of Individual Nuclear Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    The number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986. However, the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races, and for a significant expansion in the number of nuclear weapons states. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build weapons if they so desire. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in "megacities", which are ideal targets for nuclear weapons. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as high-yield weapons, if they are targeted at city centers. A single low-yield nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in major historical conflicts. A regional war between the smallest current nuclear states involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal) could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II (WW-II), or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Portions of megacities attacked with nuclear devices or exposed to fallout of long-lived isotopes, through armed conflict or terrorism, would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war might induce significant climatic and ozone anomalies on global scales. While there are many uncertainties in the issues we discuss here, the major uncertainties are the type and scale of conflict that might occur. Each of these potential hazards deserves careful analysis by governments worldwide advised by a broad section of the world scientific community, as well as widespread

  10. Regional differences in electricity distribution costs and their consequences for yardstick regulation of access prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippini, M.; Wild, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we estimate an average-cost function for a panel of 59 Swiss local and regional electricity distribution utilities as a basis for yardstick regulation of the distribution-network access prices. Shleifer (1985) proposed yardstick competition in terms of price to regulate local monopolies producing a homogeneous good. The regulated price for the individual firms depends on the average costs of identical firms. The yardstick competition concept can also be applied to firms that produce heterogeneous goods if these goods differ only in observable characteristics. To correct the yardstick for heterogeneity the regulator can use a multivariate estimation of an average-cost function. In the case of electricity distribution, the heterogeneity of output consists mainly of different characteristics of the distribution service areas. In this paper we follow Shleifer's suggestion to estimate a multivariate average-cost function that can be employed by the regulatory commission to benchmark network access prices at the distribution level. Several exogenous variables measuring the heterogeneity of the service areas were included in the cost model specification. We find that the regional differences of the service areas - e.g. area shares of forests, agricultural areas or unproductive land and population density - significantly influence electricity distribution costs

  11. Child abuse in Odessa region: epidemiology, clinical and psychoneurological features and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryayev M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the data of world literature in epidemiology and characteristics of the manifestations of child abuse. It was revealed that enough respondents in Odessa for both men and especially women, as a child had been ill-treated (65.6% of respondents. There is insufficient knowledge of the problem of child abuse: only 13% of respondents showed a high level of awareness about domestic violence. The most common forms of ill-treatment were emotional abuse 30.0% (95% CI 26.4–33.5 (especially for girls and physical violence — 21.3% (95% CI 17.8–24.1 (especially for boys. It was found that a significant portion of respondents considered acceptable to use as punishment of children, different variants of the physical (27.6%, 95% CI 25.2–30.7 or aggressive psycho-emotional (21.4%; 95% CI 18.5 –23.5 exposure. Only 19.7% of respondents (95% CI 17.5–22.5 consider at all unacceptable methods of punishment any of child. It was found that a significant proportion of secondary school pupils of Odessa had insufficient level of awareness about core of the problem of school bullying — 85.6% (95% CI, 83.2% — 88.7%. Among the respondents, 86.3% (95% CI 83.2–88.7 students directly or indirectly faced with this phenomenon as a victim, the aggressor, the observer, or a victim advocate. In girls, the prevailing form of abuse is verbal bullying (72.0%, 95% CI 67.2–76.8, while the boys — physical bullying (21.6%; 95% CI 8.2–31.4. Psychosomatic diseases, psychoneurological syndromes, psychoemotional and cognitive disorders are the main clinical features and consequences of psychological abuse.

  12. SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONS OF UKRAINE IN TERMS OF REFORMING THE ADMINISTRATIVE AND TERRITORIAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrystenko О.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The problem of reforming the territorial structure of Ukraine is current and significant. Although during the time of independence a number of projects have been formed, but unfortunately the problem remains unresolved. The region must not only provide benefits, but also create the necessary comfortable environment, attract the necessary resources, while ensuring their effective use, create the proper conditions for increasing socio-economic development. Purpose. The purpose of the article is to study the state of socio-economic development of regions and changes in the context of reforming the administrative and territorial structure, explaining the problems of the territorial structure of Ukraine, as well as the directions of its legal, democratic and economic improvement and development. Results. The models of reforming the administrative and territorial structure (ATS, the approaches to administrative and territorial reform, as well as the stages of reforming the ATS on the basis of decentralization are explored. The ways of transformation of relations in the field of management of social and economic development between central and regional authorities are presented. The article analyzes the rating of social and economic conditions of regions of Ukraine according to certain indicators. The obstacles in the administrative and territorial reform, as well as the socio-economic and legal consequences expected during the reform, are identified. Conclusions. One of the main problems of the regional economy is the search for options for the stability and prosperity of the socio-economic development of the territories, and overcoming and eliminating the signs of their depression. In order to do this, it is necessary to study the socio-economic consequences of the reform process. The main obstacle in overcoming the disbalanced development of the territories is the disproportionality of the administrative and territorial structure of

  13. Atmospheric effects and societal consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2007-04-01

    We assess the potential damage and smoke production associated with the detonation of small nuclear weapons in modern megacities. While the number of nuclear warheads in the world has fallen by about a factor of three since its peak in 1986, the number of nuclear weapons states is increasing and the potential exists for numerous regional nuclear arms races. Eight countries are known to have nuclear weapons, 2 are constructing them, and an additional 32 nations already have the fissile material needed to build substantial arsenals of low-yield (Hiroshima-sized) explosives. Population and economic activity worldwide are congregated to an increasing extent in megacities, which might be targeted in a nuclear conflict. We find that low yield weapons, which new nuclear powers are likely to construct, can produce 100 times as many fatalities and 100 times as much smoke from fires per kt yield as previously estimated in analyses for full scale nuclear wars using high-yield weapons, if the small weapons are targeted at city centers. A single "small" nuclear detonation in an urban center could lead to more fatalities, in some cases by orders of magnitude, than have occurred in the major historical conflicts of many countries. We analyze the likely outcome of a regional nuclear exchange involving 100 15-kt explosions (less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal). We find that such an exchange could produce direct fatalities comparable to all of those worldwide in World War II, or to those once estimated for a "counterforce" nuclear war between the superpowers. Megacities exposed to atmospheric fallout of long-lived radionuclides would likely be abandoned indefinitely, with severe national and international implications. Our analysis shows that smoke from urban firestorms in a regional war would rise into the upper troposphere due to pyro-convection. Robock et al. (2007) show that the smoke would subsequently rise deep into the stratosphere due

  14. Focus on regional consequences by allocation of gas contracts; Vektlegging av regionale ringvirkninger ved allokering av gasskontrakter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundsen, E.S.; Sunnevaag, K.

    1994-08-01

    The Ministry of Industry and Energy evaluates which of the natural gas fields to be selected for covering the gas supply based on contract obligations. The evaluation aims at giving a total valuation of possible development solutions on the Norwegian continental shelf. Actual solutions are based on fields located in the Haltenbanken area or in the North Sea. The present report relates to a study analysing the consequences on how the employment and regional conditions are influencing the socio-economic and real economic factors by alternative solutions of contract allocations. 38 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. From Drinking Group Norms to Individual Drinking Consequences: A Moderated Mediation Model Examining the Role of Members' Status, Identification with the Group and with Emerging Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Tara M; Davis, Jordan P; Maxwell-Smith, Matthew A; Bell, Angelica

    2018-07-03

    Emerging adults consume alcohol most often with their peer drinking groups. Yet, little is known about the role of drinking group norms on individual members' drinking consequences, nor about the mechanisms that underlie this association. We examined the indirect relationship between drinking group descriptive norms (perceived frequency of group heavy episodic drinking; HED) and individual drinking consequences via individual HED. We also examined key moderators, including the extent to which individuals occupied high status positions within their drinking groups, the strength of their identification with the group, and the degree to which they identified with emerging adulthood, a developmental period associated with heightened alcohol consumption. Participants were 280 and 340 (replication study) emerging adults (18-29 years) who were recruited via an online crowdsourcing site to complete a survey. Across studies, higher status was associated with more individual HED and drinking consequences. Further, group identification and identification with emerging adulthood strengthened the relation between group and individual HED. Finally, the indirect relation between group HED and individual drinking consequences was significant and stronger for individuals who identified more with their drinking groups and with emerging adulthood. Conclusions/Importance: Findings contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the impact of descriptive peer norms on heavy drinking and related consequences in emerging adulthood and help identify drinking group members most at risk for internalizing descriptive group norms for HED. Key implications for prevention and intervention programming are discussed.

  16. CHANGES IN LAND USE AS CONSEQUENCE OF DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSFORMATIONS OF RURAL TERRITORIES OF THE VOLGOGRAD REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vishnyakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Analysis of the population dynamics and changes in the share of arable land in the structure of land use separate territory for several historical periods, and to determine the causes of these changes. Methods. Studies have used forwarding, statistical methods, and the method of cartographic modeling and retrospective analysis. Results. Analysis of the results of the population census allows speaking about the general negative dynamics in the rural population of the Volgograd region in general and river basin Bolshaya Golubaya in particular. Historical and cartographic analysis has shown the dependence of the arable lands of the number of residents on the territory residents. In addition, the population of the territory is significantly affected by soil fertility. Main conclusions. The population of the river basin Bolshaya Golubaya over the past hundred years have steadily decreased, as due to various socio-economic reasons, such as consolidation of rural settlements, the planned destruction of farm system, moving people into the city, and due to the difficult climatic conditions for farming: poor soil fertility, high degree of erosion areas, poor soil conditions of the territory.

  17. Role of sanitary and epidemiologic service of Gomel region aimed to minimization of consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyuchenovich, V. I.; Zinovich, V. N.

    2001-01-01

    Chernobyl accident leads to the organization and realization large-scale actions for liquidation of its consequences. In the structure of state public health service was created complete system of radiation protection. In the first days after Chernobyl accident sanitary and epidemiologic service of the Gomel region developed recommendations on working conditions in agriculture, mode of operation of all kinds of food enterprises, rest of children and adults, behavior of the population, the organization of the radiometric control of food stuffs and water. The division of a radiation control ware organized at the regional centers of hygiene and epidemiologic under the control external irradiation dozes as the basic part of the population lived in territories with high density of the radioactive contamination

  18. Regions of homozygosity in the porcine genome: consequence of demography and the recombination landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte Bosse

    Full Text Available Inbreeding has long been recognized as a primary cause of fitness reduction in both wild and domesticated populations. Consanguineous matings cause inheritance of haplotypes that are identical by descent (IBD and result in homozygous stretches along the genome of the offspring. Size and position of regions of homozygosity (ROHs are expected to correlate with genomic features such as GC content and recombination rate, but also direction of selection. Thus, ROHs should be non-randomly distributed across the genome. Therefore, demographic history may not fully predict the effects of inbreeding. The porcine genome has a relatively heterogeneous distribution of recombination rate, making Sus scrofa an excellent model to study the influence of both recombination landscape and demography on genomic variation. This study utilizes next-generation sequencing data for the analysis of genomic ROH patterns, using a comparative sliding window approach. We present an in-depth study of genomic variation based on three different parameters: nucleotide diversity outside ROHs, the number of ROHs in the genome, and the average ROH size. We identified an abundance of ROHs in all genomes of multiple pigs from commercial breeds and wild populations from Eurasia. Size and number of ROHs are in agreement with known demography of the populations, with population bottlenecks highly increasing ROH occurrence. Nucleotide diversity outside ROHs is high in populations derived from a large ancient population, regardless of current population size. In addition, we show an unequal genomic ROH distribution, with strong correlations of ROH size and abundance with recombination rate and GC content. Global gene content does not correlate with ROH frequency, but some ROH hotspots do contain positive selected genes in commercial lines and wild populations. This study highlights the importance of the influence of demography and recombination on homozygosity in the genome to understand

  19. How Do Professional Mutual Recognition Agreements Affect Higher Education? Examining Regional Policy in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Creso; Gaviria, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Professional mutual recognition agreements (MRAs) are one of the policy instruments employed in global and regional trade agreements to facilitate the mobility of skilled labour. While such agreements have been noted in the literature examining cross-border academic mobility, little is known about how they impact higher education. This paper…

  20. Causes and consequences of the hydrological droughts in the south region of European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeva, Maria; Ilich, Vladislav; Kharlamov, Maksim; Frolova, Natalia; Goncharov, Aleksandr

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade the number of extreme low-flow periods on Russian rivers has increased significantly. The most severe water shortage currently observed in the Don and Volga basin. Also suffers from lack of water of Lake Baikal region, left-bank tributaries of the Lena. The most acute problem of water shortage is in the basin of the Don river. It is located in the south od European part of Russia and has an area of 422 ths km2, which is very densely populated (more than 29 million inhabitants). The river and its tributaries are the main sources of fresh water for the population. In addition, they play a key role in industries such as fisheries, recreation, shipping, hydropower (HPP Tsimlyanskaya). Don anciently was very famous for its biodiversity and the number of organisms of the floodplain ecosystems. However, at the present time due to anthropogenic stress and climate change, these figures dropped down. This study is devoted to the complex analysis arising in the district. Don water shortage. As part of the research was carried out the spatial distribution of runoff, revealing its meteorological reasons of water shortage, the impact of water scarcity on the ecosystem in general and fish fauna in particular. Hydrological drought is clearly manifested in the annual runoff only in the lower part of the basin. From 2007 the annual runoff probability here are higher than 80%. It was found that the longest (during record from 1930ths) duration of the event associated with rotation of water shortages on the left and right-bank tributaries of the river. In addition, the analysis of the spatial distribution of seasonal runoff probability showed that in the upper catchment hydrological drought is hardly observed: the rate accounts for 60% and lower. Drought has led to the transformation of the aquatic ecosystem of the Don river and its transition from oligotrophic to eutrophic state. The concentration of phytoplankton in the August - September during low flow period

  1. Social Knowledge in Children with Language Impairments: Examination of Strategies, Predicted Consequences, and Goals in Peer Conflict Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timler, Geralyn R.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated social knowledge in school-age children, aged 8-12 years, with and without language impairment (LI and TD groups). A hypothetical peer conflict task was administered to examine the relationship among prosocial responses and parent/teacher ratings of children's social behaviours. Stimuli included 12 hypothetical peer…

  2. Examination of the inventory of drug use consequences with individuals with serious and persistent mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Melanie E; Nidecker, Melissa; Strong Kinnaman, Joanna E; Li, Lan; Bellack, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    The Inventory of Drug Use Consequences (InDUC) ( [1] ) is a 50-item measure that evaluates lifetime and recent consequences of substance use. This study examined the psychometric properties of a modified version of the Inventory of Drug Use Consequences (InDUC-M) in individuals with serious and persistent mental illness (SPMI) and co-occurring substance use disorders (SUDs). We examined self-reported consequences in the sample, evaluated internal consistency, identified items for a brief form of the InDUC-M, and explored relationships with indicators of substance use severity. InDUC-M Lifetime and Recent subscales showed good internal consistency and were related to other measures of substance use and problems. A brief version of the InDUC-M Recent (SIP-M) showed excellent internal consistency and was highly correlated with both Lifetime and Recent subscales. The InDUC-M and the SIP-M performed well in individuals with SPMI and SUDs. Overall, these findings are a useful first step in determining the utility of the InDUC-M in people with SPMI and SUDs.

  3. Risk-based consequences of extreme natural hazard processes in mountain regions - Multi-hazard analysis in Tyrol (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttenlau, Matthias; Stötter, Johann

    2010-05-01

    Reinsurance companies are stating a high increase in natural hazard related losses, both insured and economic losses, within the last decades on a global scale. This ongoing trend can be described as a product of the dynamic in the natural and in the anthroposphere. To analyze the potential impact of natural hazard process to a certain insurance portfolio or to the society in general, reinsurance companies or risk management consultants have developed loss models. However, those models are generally not fitting the scale dependent demand on regional scales like it is appropriate (i) for analyses on the scale of a specific province or (ii) for portfolio analyses of regional insurance companies. Moreover, the scientific basis of most of the models is not transparent documented and therefore scientific evaluations concerning the methodology concepts are not possible (black box). This is contrary to the scientific principles of transparency and traceability. Especially in mountain regions like the European Alps with their inherent (i) specific characteristic on small scales, (ii) the relative high process dynamics in general, (iii) the occurrence of gravitative mass movements which are related to high relief energy and thus only exists in mountain regions, (iv) the small proportion of the area of permanent settlement on the overall area, (v) the high value concentration in the valley floors, (vi) the exposition of important infrastructures and lifelines, and others, analyses must consider these circumstances adequately. Therefore, risk-based analyses are methodically estimating the potential consequences of hazard process on the built environment standardized with the risk components (i) hazard, (ii) elements at risk, and (iii) vulnerability. However, most research and progress have been made in the field of hazard analyses, whereas the other both components are not developed accordingly. Since these three general components are influencing factors without any

  4. Examining regional variability in work ethic within Mexico: Individual difference or shared value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega, Luis M; Woehr, David J; Del Rincón, Germán A

    2018-02-19

    Despite the acceptance of work ethic as an important individual difference, little research has examined the extent to which work ethic may reflect shared environmental or socio-economic factors. This research addresses this concern by examining the influence of geographic proximity on the work ethic experienced by 254 employees from Mexico, working in 11 different cities in the Northern, Central and Southern regions of the country. Using a sequence of complementary analyses to assess the main source of variance on seven dimensions of work ethic, our results indicate that work ethic is most appropriately considered at the individual level. © 2018 International Union of Psychological Science.

  5. Global and regional ramifications of climate change. Consequences for Norway; Globale og regionale foelger av klimaendringer. Konsekvenser for Norge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buan, Inga Fritzen; Inderberg, Tor Haakon; Rottem, Svein Vigeland

    2010-10-22

    There is a need for more knowledge on how climate change will affect the international society and what consequences this in turn will have for Norway. This report seeks to answer the questions of, first, how global and regional climate changes can come to affect the Norwegian society, and second, what the relevant arenas for meeting these challenges are. The report is part of a larger body of scientific analyses aimed at assessing the vulnerability of the Norwegian society to the adverse effects of climate change and the consequent needs for adaptive measures. Topics covered include increased activity in the Arctic; climate change as non-traditional security threat; migration and refugees; foreign aid and development cooperation; implications for food and water supply; the roles of international agencies and non-governmental actors, and more. It also covers internal challenges in terms of critical infrastructure (in transport, power supply, and telecommunications) and in regard to health concerns. The report also differentiates between ethical obligations and instrumental challenges. (Author)

  6. PROTOCOL FOR EXAMINATION OF THE INNER CAN CLOSURE WELD REGION FOR 3013 DE CONTAINERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-09-16

    The protocol for the examination of the inner can closure weld region (ICCWR) for 3013 DE containers is presented within this report. The protocol includes sectioning of the inner can lid section, documenting the surface condition, measuring corrosion parameters, and storing of samples. This protocol may change as the investigation develops since findings may necessitate additional steps be taken. Details of the previous analyses, which formed the basis for this protocol, are also presented.

  7. The Consequences of Official Labels: An Examination of the Rights Lost by the Mentally Ill and Mentally Incompetent Since 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrea M; Klein, Michael S; Hemmens, Craig; Stohr, Mary K; Burton, Velmer S

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a survey of state statutes which restrict the civil rights of persons with a mental illness or who have been declared mentally incompetent. Five civil rights (voting, holding public office, jury service, parenting, and marriage) are examined. The results of this study are compared with the results of studies conducted in 1989 and 1999 to determine what changes have occurred over time in the restriction of civil rights of those suffering from mental health problems. This comparison reveals that states continue to restrict the rights of the mentally ill and incompetent, and that there is a trend towards increased restriction of political rights, including the right to vote and hold public office.

  8. Collapsing Factors in Multitrait-Multimethod Models: Examining Consequences of a Mismatch Between Measurement Design and Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eGeiser

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA are frequently applied to examine the convergent validity of scores obtained from multiple raters or methods in so-called multitrait-multimethod (MTMM investigations. Many applications of CFA-MTMM and similarly structured models result in solutions in which at least one method (or specific factor shows non-significant loading or variance estimates. Eid et al. (2008 distinguished between MTMM measurement designs with interchangeable (randomly selected versus structurally different (fixed methods and showed that each type of measurement design implies specific CFA-MTMM measurement models. In the current study, we hypothesized that some of the problems that are commonly seen in applications of CFA-MTMM models may be due to a mismatch between the underlying measurement design and fitted models. Using simulations, we found that models with M method factors (where M is the total number of methods and unconstrained loadings led to a higher proportion of solutions in which at least one method factor became empirically unstable when these models were fit to data generated from structurally different methods. The simulations also revealed that commonly used model goodness-of-fit criteria frequently failed to identify incorrectly specified CFA-MTMM models. We discuss implications of these findings for other complex CFA models in which similar issues occur, including nested (bifactor and latent state-trait models.

  9. DECREASE IN SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT BASE INDUSTRIES BY FORMATION OF EFFECTIVE REGIONAL POLICY OF SUPPORT SMALL BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Shelomentsev

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Clause is devoted to an actual problem of decrease in negative consequences of technological development of key economic branches of the industry at a regional level. During social and economic transformations to Russia to the beginning of 90th years XX of a century there has been begun complex process of re-structuring of key economic branches of the industry, including technological, social and economic transformations. During re-structuring by one of key directions of the decision of existing social problems there is a formation of effective policy of support of small business at a regional and local level. Creation of favorable conditions for development of small business allows for short time and at rather low expenses to smooth disproportions of social and economic development of territories arising at re-structuring. Flexibility inherent in small business, mobility and adaptibility to changeable market conditions can promote the decision of problems of social stability, maintenance of employment and saturation of the consumer market. Creation of the enterprises of small business on the basis of local natural-economic resources raises social and economic potential of industrial territories.

  10. Reproducibility of regional DEXA examinations of abdominal fat and lean tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallroth, Kaj; Kettunen, Jyrki A; Kujala, Urho M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test the validity of a new repeatable method to delimit abdominal areas for follow-up of fat mass (FM) and lean tissue mass (LM) in DEXA examinations. 37 male volunteers underwent two DEXA examinations. Total body FM and LM measurements and corresponding abdominal measurements in a carefully defined region were calculated from the first scan. After repositioning of the subjects and a second scan, the delimited region was copied and the abdominal tissues re-calculated. The mean LM of the abdominal area was 2.804 kg (SD 0.556), and the mean FM was 1.026 kg (SD 0.537). The intra-class correlation coefficient for the repeated abdominal LM, FM, and LM/FM ratio measurements was 0.99. The mean difference (bias) for the repeated abdominal LM measurements was -13 g (95% confidence interval (CI) -193.0 to 166.8), and for the repeated abdominal FM measurements it was -35 g (95% CI -178.9 to 108.5). The results indicate that regional DEXA is a sensitive method with excellent reproducibility in the measurements of the abdominal fat and lean tissues. The method may serve as a useful tool for evaluation and follow-up of various dietary and training programmes.

  11. Hypofractionated regional nodal irradiation for breast cancer: Examining the data and potential for future studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Shah, Chirag; Arthur, Douglas; Khan, Atif J.; Freedman, Gary; Poppe, Matthew M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Limited data are available examining the role of hypofractionated radiation schedules in the management of women requiring regional nodal irradiation (RNI). The purpose of this review is to examine the available literature for the efficacy (where available) and toxicity of hypofractionated radiation schedules in breast cancer with RNI limited to the axilla and supraclavicular regions. Multiple randomized and prospective studies have documented the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules delivering whole breast irradiation (WBI) alone. Subsets from these randomized trials and smaller prospective/single-institution studies have documented the feasibility of hypofractionated RNI but the limited numbers prevent definitive conclusions and limited efficacy data are available. With regard to possible toxicity affecting organs at risk with RNI, key structures include the breast, skin, heart, lungs, axilla (lymphedema), and brachial plexus. Based on data from several randomized trials, hypofractionated radiation is not associated with significant changes in breast toxicity/cosmesis or cardiac toxicity; the addition of hypofractionated RNI would not be expected to change the rates of breast or cardiac toxicity. While RNI has been shown to increase rates of pulmonary toxicity, hypofractionated RNI has not been associated with more frequent pulmonary complications than standard RNI. Moving forward, future studies will have to evaluate for increased lung toxicity. With regard to lymphedema, data from randomized hypofractionated WBI trials failed to demonstrate an increase in lymphedema and smaller studies utilizing hypofractionated RNI have failed to as well. Data from head and neck cancer as well as hypofractionated breast radiation with RNI have failed to demonstrate an increase in brachial plexopathy with the exception of older trials that used much larger dose per fraction (>4 Gy/fraction) schedules. At this time, published data support the feasibility of

  12. Further examination of the prevalence of MIH in the Wellington region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Erin K; Morrison, David G

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to further investigate the prevalence of Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) in the Wellington region, in order to expand on the findings of a recent study. A survey of MIH in a sample of 7-to-10-year-old children attending primary school in Central Wellington, together with data from a similar survey conducted earlier in Wainuiomata. Using the modified Developmental Defects of Enamel index, a single paediatric dentist examined students in the classroom. Any visible occurrences of demarcated opacities, post-eruptive breakdown of enamel and hypoplasia were recorded, along with dental caries experience in primary and permanent teeth. The data were combined with those from the previous study, and statistical analysis was undertaken using the combined data-set. In the Central Wellington study, examinations were conducted on 235 children (participation rate 58.8%, mean age 8.2 years). MIH prevalence was 18.8%. Demarcated opacities and post-eruptive breakdown affected 23.9% and 8.1% (respectively) of the sample. Pooling the data from Central Wellington and Wainuiomata gave a total sample of 756 (mean age 8.2), among which MIH prevalence was 15.7%. Demarcated opacities and post-eruptive breakdown (of any tooth) affected 18.0% and 4.6%, respectively. Hypoplasia of any tooth was observed in 0.7% of the pooled sample. There was no statistically significant association between MIH and either ethnicity or school decile. Although MIH prevalence was 3.9 percentage points higher in the Central Wellington schools than in Wainuiomata, socioeconomic status (measured through school decile) was not significantly associated with MIH. The presence of developmental defects of enamel was associated with greater caries experience in the permanent dentition. In the Wellington schools involved in the study, approximately one in six 7-10-year-old children had MIH. Neither school decile nor ethnicity were modifying factors in the occurrence of MIH.

  13. Examining fiscal federalism, regionalization and community-based initiatives in Canada's health care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Palley, Howard A

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the ability of Canadian provinces to shape in different ways the development of various provincial health delivery systems within the constraints of the mandates of the federal Canada Health Act of 1984 and the fiscal revenues that the provinces receive if they comply with these mandates. In so doing, it will examine the operation of Canadian federalism with respect to various provincial health systems. This study applies a comparative analysis framework developed by Heisler and Peters to facilitate an understanding of the dimensionality of provincial health delivery systems as applied to the case of provincial regionalization and community-based initiatives. The three sets of relationships touched upon are: first, the levels of government and the nature of their involvement in public policy concerning the provincial health care delivery systems; and secondly, understanding of the factors influencing provincial governments' political dispositions to act in various directions. A third dimension that is taken are the factors influencing the "timing" of particular decisions. A fourth area noted by Heisler and Peters and other comparative analysts is the nature and characteristics of public and private sector activities in health care and other social policy areas. While the evolving nature of public and private sector health care delivery activities within Canada's provincial and territorial systems is a significant policy matter in the Canadian context, due to the space limitations of this article, they are not discussed herein.

  14. Comprehensive approach to an assessment of removal consequences of low doses ionizing radiation influence in background of technic genius load (as an example of Pavlodar region of the Republic of Kazakstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slazhneva, T.I.; Korchevskij, A.A.; Orazgalieva, V.D.; Milyaev, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The 'Prophylaxis' and 'Test site' comprehensive programmes are carried out for estimation of inhabitants health changes by both the Semipalatinsk test side influence and the significant technic genius pollution of environment called of industry development. It is defined, that Pavlodar region is object of radiation influence of Semipalatinsk test site. There are consequences of operation of industry enterprises (of power engineering, metallurgy, oil-chemistry) on large territory of the region. Aggravation of this region's population health was established during deepened study of sick rate with medical examination of more 12000 inhabitants and special onco-epidemical, cytological, medical genetic, immune researches. The character of chromosomal aberrations and oncological pathologies is testified about the essential influence of test site factors on health aggravation. System analysis shows, that low radiation doses are affected life quality and region population health

  15. The SMS, Phone, and medical Examination sports injury surveillance system is a feasible and valid approach to measuring handball exposure, injury occurrence, and consequences in elite youth sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, M; Wedderkopp, N; Myklebust, G; Lind, M; Sørensen, H; Hebert, J J; Attermann, J

    2018-04-01

    Current methods of sports injury surveillance are limited by lack of medical validation of self-reported injuries and/or incomplete information about injury consequences beyond time loss from sport. The aims of this study were to (a) evaluate the feasibility of the SMS, Phone, and medical Examination injury surveillance (SPEx) system (b) to evaluate the proportion of injuries and injury consequences reported by SPEx when compared to outcomes from a modified version of the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre (OSTRC) Overuse Injury Questionnaire. We followed 679 elite adolescent handball players over 31 weeks using the SPEx system. During the last 7 weeks, we also implemented a modified OSTRC questionnaire in a subgroup of 271 players via telephone interviews. The weekly response proportions to the primary SPEx questions ranged from 85% to 96% (mean 92%). SMS responses were received from 79% of the participants within 1 day. 95% of reported injuries were classified through the telephone interview within a week, and 67% were diagnosed by medical personnel. Comparisons between reported injuries from SPEx and OSTRC demonstrated fair (κ = 39.5% [25.1%-54.0%]) to substantial prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK = 66.8% [95% CI 58.0%-75.6%]) agreement. The average injury severity score difference between SPEx and the OSTRC approach was -0.2 (95% CI -3.69-3.29) of possible 100 with 95% limits of agreement from(-14.81-14.41). These results support the feasibility and validity of the SPEx injury surveillance system in elite youth sport. Future studies should evaluate the external validity of SPEx system in different cohorts of athletes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Examining the Role of Cultural Landscape in Regional Development: Defining Criteria and Looking at Ephesus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe Şimşek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The link between regional development and cultural heritage has been at the center of theoretical discussions and practices in the field of preservation. Especially, varieties of practices and regional plans have been developed in different parts of the World such as Europe, Russia and South Africa in order to ensure regional development through cultural heritage. In this paper, it is accepted that a cultural landscape, as a sub-region of a particular region, is a relevant and meaningful unit that can contribute to the qualities of the region in terms of socio-cultural and economic aspects. In this context, the main goal of this paper is to develop a set of criteria that will act as a tool for identifying to which aspects of a cultural landscape has the potential to contribute regional development and to evaluate possible contributions of Ephesus and its cultural landscape to regional development. These criteria can be classified according to a framework implying a three-fold classification; improvements in the physical quality of the cultural landscape, economic dimension and socio-cultural dimension. As a result, this case indicates that cultural landscape has great potential to contribute to the social and economic development of a region. There is a great need to support community through tools such as awareness raising programmes, regional heritage planning, regional heritage institutions acting as regional agencies.

  17. Beyond self-selection in video game play: an experimental examination of the consequences of massively multiplayer online role-playing game play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Joshua M

    2007-10-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the study of video games. Existing work is limited by the use of correlational designs and is thus unable to make causal inferences or remove self-selection biases from observed results. The recent development of online, socially integrated video games (massively multiplayer online role-playing games [MMORPGs]) has created a new experience for gamers. This randomized, longitudinal study examined the effects of being assigned to play different video game types on game usage, health, well-being, sleep, socializing, and academics. One hundred 18- to 20-year-old participants (73% male; 68% Caucasian) were randomly assigned to play arcade, console, solo computer, or MMORPG games for 1 month. The MMORPG group differed significantly from other groups after 1 month, reporting more hours spent playing, worse health, worse sleep quality, and greater interference in "real-life" socializing and academic work. In contrast, this group also reported greater enjoyment in playing, greater interest in continuing to play, and greater acquisition of new friendships. MMORPGs represent a different gaming experience with different consequences than other types of video games and appear to pose both unique risks and benefits from their use.

  18. Skin examination behavior: the role of melanoma history, skin type, psychosocial factors, and region of residence in determining clinical and self-conducted skin examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Nadine A; Bränström, Richard; Chang, Yu-mei; Affleck, Paul; Aspinwall, Lisa G; Tibben, Aad; Azizi, Esther; Baron-Epel, Orna; Battistuzzi, Linda; Bruno, William; Chan, May; Cuellar, Francisco; Debniak, Tadeusz; Pjanova, Dace; Ertmanski, Slawomir; Figl, Adina; Gonzalez, Melinda; Hayward, Nicholas K; Hocevar, Marko; Kanetsky, Peter A; Leachman, Sancy; Bergman, Wilma; Heisele, Olita; Palmer, Jane; Peric, Barbara; Puig, Susana; Schadendorf, Dirk; Gruis, Nelleke A; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2012-10-01

    To examine the frequency and correlates of skin examination behaviors in an international sample of individuals at varying risk of developing melanoma. A cross-sectional, web-based survey. Data were collected from the general population over a 20-month period on behalf of the Melanoma Genetics Consortium (GenoMEL). A total of 8178 adults from Northern (32%), Central (33%), and Southern (14%) Europe, Australia (13%), and the United States (8%). Self-reported frequency of skin self-examination (SSE) and clinical skin examination (CSE). After adjustment for age and sex, frequency of skin examination was higher in both Australia (odds ratio [OR]SSE=1.80 [99% CI, 1.49-2.18]; ORCSE=2.68 [99% CI, 2.23-3.23]) and the United States (ORSSE=2.28 [99% CI, 1.76-2.94]; ORCSE=3.39 [99% CI, 2.60-4.18]) than in the 3 European regions combined. Within Europe, participants from Southern Europe reported higher rates of SSE than those in Northern Europe (ORSSE=1.61 [99% CI, 1.31-1.97]), and frequency of CSE was higher in both Central (ORCSE=1.47 [99% CI, 1.22-1.78]) and Southern Europe (ORCSE=3.46 [99% CI, 2.78, 4.31]) than in Northern Europe. Skin examination behavior also varied according to melanoma history: participants with no history of melanoma reported the lowest levels of skin examination, while participants with a previous melanoma diagnosis reported the highest levels. After adjustment for region, and taking into account the role of age, sex, skin type, and mole count, engagement in SSE and CSE was associated with a range of psychosocial factors, including perceived risk of developing melanoma; perceived benefits of, and barriers to, skin examination; perceived confidence in one's ability to engage in screening; and social norms. In addition, among those with no history of melanoma, higher cancer-related worry was associated with greater frequency of SSE. Given the strong association between psychosocial factors and skin examination behaviors, particularly among people with

  19. Examining the Regional Aspect of Foreign Direct Investment to Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Eva Rytter

    This paper applies a general-to-specific analysis to detect regularities in the driving forces of foreign direct investment (FDI) that can explain why some regions are more attractive to foreign investors than others. The results suggest that regional differences in FDI inflows to African, Asian...... at improving the investment climate for foreign investors. This also means that there is no African bias. Among a large number of return and risk variables applied in the empirical literature, growth and inflation turn out to be the only robust and significant FDI determinants across regions although the size...... and Latin American countries can be fully explained by structural characteristics rather than fixed regional effects. The implication of this finding is that countries that are lagging behind other developing countries in attracting foreign capital have the opportunity to implement policies aimed...

  20. THE CONSEQUENCES OF LANDSCAPE CHANGE ON ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE UNITED STATES MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatially explicit identification of changes in ecological conditions over large areas is key to targeting and prioritizing areas for environmental protection and restoration by managers at watershed, basin, and regional scales. A critical limitation to this point has bee...

  1. Experimental results of the consequences of sodium water reactions at the bottom tube plate region of straight tube steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruloff, G.

    1990-01-01

    Experience with sodium water reactions has shown, that the course of such a steam generator accident depends strongly on its place in the steam generator. For the EFR steam generators we have to differentiate between: weld region at the upper tube plate (gas space); bundle region; weld region at the bottom tube plate. This paper describes results of a running tests program simulating the bottom tube plate area. One main part of these tests is the investigation of the influence of wastage protection shrouds between the tubes in the weld region to avoid a fast leak propagation and to give time for leak detection and mastering of the accidents. (author). 10 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Examining the interlinkages between regional infrastructure disparities, economic growth, and poverty: A case of Indian states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chotia Varun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the interlinkages between regional infrastructure disparities, economic growth, and poverty in the 21 major Indian States. An overall comprehensive index of infrastructure, the Composite Infrastructure Index (CII, is calculated for each Indian state using the Principal Component Analysis technique. In order to analyse the regional disparities between states in terms of infrastructure, they are ranked based on the calculated CII. We extend our analysis by evaluating the inter-relationship between the Composite Infrastructure Index, Per Capita Net State Domestic Product (PCNSDP, and poverty. The empirical analysis also proves that composite infrastructural growth and economic growth go hand in hand.

  3. Examining Pseudotsuga menziesii biomass change dynamics through succession using a regional forest inventory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M. Bell; Andrew N. Gray

    2015-01-01

    Models of forest succession provide an appealing conceptual framework for understanding forest dynamics, but uncertainty in the degree to which patterns are regionally consistent might limit the application of successional theory in forest management. Remeasurements of forest inventory networks provide an opportunity to assess this consistency, improving our...

  4. Examining Regionalization Efforts to Develop Lessons Learned and Consideration for Department of Defense Medical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    outsourcing effects of military maintenance depots. They found maintenance depots were not working at full capacity and in some cases privatizing the...need to look at the impact of the consolidated departments and if a common goal can be achieved. Funding differences can also affect regionalization...therefore be out of service until fixed. Mitchell & Pasch [5] added that there could be a customer service impact consolidating local facilities into

  5. Demographic situation in the Kaluga region for 1976-1992. Possible consequences of the Chernobyl NPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'chenko, V.N.; Kurochkina, O.I.; Kostina, M.A.; Sidenko, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper studies the demographic situation in different areas of the Kaluga region contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident, during 1976-1992. The following indices received the particular attention: the composition of population, size of population, birth rate, mortality, child mortality. It is shown that during the investigated period no variations of the size of population, of the mortality and of the increment of population resulted from the Chernobyl accident were detected

  6. From Camouflage to Classrooms: An Empirical Examination of Veterans at a Regional Midwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberweis, Trish; Bradford, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Despite a large and growing population of former military service members entering colleges and universities, there is very little empirical work that examines veterans' perspectives on service needs or their perceptions and attitudes about their college experience. Much of what we know of student veterans' views is based on a different generation…

  7. An Examination of Hurricane Emergency Preparedness Planning at Institutions of Higher Learning of the Gulf South Region Post Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Caterina Gulli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine hurricane emergency preparedness planning at institutions of higher learning of the Gulf South region following Hurricane Katrina. The problem addressed the impact of Hurricane Katrina on decision-making and policy planning processes. The focus was on individuals that administer the hurricane emergency…

  8. Hydrological consequences of land-use change from forest to pasture in the Atlantic rain forest region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Martinelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic rain forest is the most endangered ecosystem in Brazil. Its degradation has started since 1500 when the European settlers arrived. Despite of all land use changes that have occurred, hydrological studies carried out in this biome have been limited to hydrological functioning of rain forests only. In order to understand the hydrological consequences of land-use change from forest to pasture, we described the hydrological functioning of a pasture catchment that was previously covered by tropical rain forest. To reach this goal we measured the precipitation, soil matric potential, discharge, surface runoff and water table levels during one year. The results indicated that there is a decrease in surface soil saturated hydraulic conductivity. However, as low intensity rainfall prevails, the lower water conductivity does not necessarily leads to a substantially higher surface runoff generation. Regarding soil water matric potential, the pasture presented higher moisture levels than forest during the dry season. This increase in soil moisture implies in higher water table recharge that, in turn, explain the higher runoff ratio. This way, land-use change conversion from forest to pasture implies a higher annual streamflow in pasture catchments. Nonetheless, this increase in runoff due to forest conversion to pasture implies in losses of biological diversity as well as lower soil protection.

  9. Three-phase CT examination of the pancreatobiliary region using multislice CT with 1-mm collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Koujiro; Iwano, Shingo; Satake, Hiroko; Ota, Toyohiro; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement and accuracy of imaging of the circulatory phase in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions in the pancreato-biliary region with 1-mm collimation obtained by multislice computed tomography (CT). In 53 patients, two sequential acquisitions from the porta hepatis to the pancreas were performed during a single breath-hold, followed by a third-pass acquisition including the liver beginning 15 sec after the second-pass acquisition. Contrast enhancement in each acquisition was measured in the aorta, portal vein and its branches, and pancreas. Four experienced radiologists graded using four-point scoring whether or not each acquisition was appropriate for imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase. Aortic enhancement was highest at the beginning of the second-pass acquisition. The portal and splenic veins and pancreas showed maximum enhancement in the second-pass acquisition, while the superior mesenteric vein showed maximum enhancement in the third-pass acquisition. In the visual assessment, significantly higher grades were achieved in the first-pass, second-pass, and third-pass acquisitions with regard to imaging of the arterial phase, pancreatic phase, and portal venous phase, respectively. Multislice CT permits the acquisition of three distinct circulatory phases (arterial, pancreatic, and portal venous phases) in the pancreatobiliary region with 1-mm collimation. (author)

  10. Variability of Snow Ablation: Consequences for Runoff Generation at the Process Scale and Lessons for Large Cold Regions Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Carey, S. K.; Granger, R. J.; Hedstrom, N. R.; Janowicz, R.; Pietroniro, A.; Quinton, W. L.

    2002-12-01

    The supply of water to large northern catchments such as the Mackenzie and Yukon Rivers is dominated by snowmelt runoff from first order mountain catchments. In order to understand the timing, peak and duration of the snowmelt freshet at larger scale it is important to appreciate the spatial and temporal variability of snowmelt and runoff processes at the source. For this reason a comprehensive hydrology study of a Yukon River headwaters catchment, Wolf Creek Research Basin, near Whitehorse, has focussed on the spatial variability of snow ablation and snowmelt runoff generation and the consequences for the water balance in a mountain tundra zone. In northern mountain tundra, surface energetics vary with receipt of solar radiation, shrub vegetation cover and initial snow accumulation. Therefore the timing of snowmelt is controlled by aspect, in that south facing slopes become snow-free 4-5 weeks before the north facing. Runoff generation differs widely between the slopes; there is normally no spring runoff generated from the south facing slope as all meltwater evaporates or infiltrates. On the north facing slope, snowmelt provides substantial runoff to hillside macropores which rapidly route water to the stream channel. Macropore distribution is associated with organic terrain and discontinuous permafrost, which in turn result from the summer surface energetics. Therefore the influence of small-scale snow redistribution and energetics as controlled by topography must be accounted for when calculating contributing areas to larger scale catchments, and estimating the effectiveness of snowfall in generating streamflow. This concept is quite distinct from the drainage controlled contributing area that has been found useful in temperate-zone hydrology.

  11. An examination of recharge mound decay and fossil gradients in arid regional sedimentary basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    In many of the vast arid sedimentary basins of the world, groundwater gradients exist that appear to be anomalous in the context of the probable modern recharge potential. The possibility that such gradients are in fact remnant fossil conditions representing the decay of ancient recharge mounds is examined. An example of decay condition is represented using a resistor-network analogue model in which the time control is based on 14 C ages. The decay hypothesis is found to be plausible with realistic aquifer characteristics but a non-homogeneous flow is indicated from the 14 C data. (author)

  12. Quantum threshold reflection is not a consequence of a region of the long-range attractive potential with rapidly varying de Broglie wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli; Miret-Artes, Salvador

    2018-04-01

    Quantum threshold reflection is a well-known quantum phenomenon which prescribes that at threshold, except for special circumstances, a quantum particle scattering from any potential, even if attractive at long range, will be reflected with unit probability. In the past, this property had been associated with the so-called badlands region of the potential, where the semiclassical description of the scattering fails due to a rapid spatial variation of the de Broglie wavelength. This badlands region occurs far from the strong interaction region of the potential and has therefore been used to "explain" the quantum reflection phenomenon. In this paper we show that the badlands region of the interaction potential is immaterial. The extremely long wavelength of the scattered particle at threshold is much longer than the spatial extension of the badlands region, which therefore does not affect the scattering. For this purpose, we review and generalize the proof for the existence of quantum threshold reflection to stress that it is only a consequence of continuity and boundary conditions. The nonlocal character of the scattering implies that the whole interaction potential is involved in the phenomenon. We then provide a detailed numerical study of the threshold scattering of a particle by a Morse potential and an Eckart potential, especially in the time domain. We compare exact quantum computations with incoherent results obtained from a classical Wigner approximation. This study shows that close to threshold the time-dependent amplitude of the scattered particle is negligible in the badlands region and is the same whether the potential has a reflecting wall as in the Morse potential or a steplike structure as in the Eckart smooth step potential. The mean flight time of the particle is not shortened due to a local reflection from the badlands region or due to the lower density of the wave function at short distances. This study should serve to definitely rule out the

  13. The Impact Snow Albedo Feedback over Mountain Regions as Examined through High-Resolution Regional Climate Change Experiments over the Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letcher, Theodore

    As the climate warms, the snow albedo feedback (SAF) will play a substantial role in shaping the climate response of mid-latitude mountain regions with transient snow cover. One such region is the Rocky Mountains of the western United States where large snow packs accumulate during the winter and persist throughout the spring. In this dissertation, the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF) configured as a regional climate model is used to investigate the role of the SAF in determining the regional climate response to forced anthropogenic climate change. The regional effects of climate change are investigated by using the pseudo global warming (PGW) framework, which is an experimental configuration in a which a mean climate perturbation is added to the boundary forcing of a regional model, thus preserving the large-scale circulation entering the region through the model boundaries and isolating the mesoscale climate response. Using this framework, the impact of the SAF on the regional energetics and atmospheric dynamics is examined and quantified. Linear feedback analysis is used to quantify the strength of the SAF over the Headwaters region of the Colorado Rockies for a series of high-resolution PGW experiments. This technique is used to test sensitivity of the feedback strength to model resolution and land surface model. Over the Colorado Rockies, and integrated over the entire spring season, the SAF strength is largely insensitive to model resolution, however there are more substantial differences on the sub-seasonal (monthly) timescale. In contrast, the SAF strength over this region is very sensitive to choice of land surface model. These simulations are also used to investigate how spatial and diurnal variability in warming caused by the SAF influences the dynamics of thermally driven mountain-breeze circulations. It is shown that, the SAF causes stronger daytime mountain-breeze circulations by increasing the warming on the mountains slopes thus enhancing

  14. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  15. Consequences of Global Warming of 1.5 °C and 2 °C for Regional Temperature and Precipitation Changes in the Contiguous United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambarish V Karmalkar

    Full Text Available The differential warming of land and ocean leads to many continental regions in the Northern Hemisphere warming at rates higher than the global mean temperature. Adaptation and conservation efforts will, therefore, benefit from understanding regional consequences of limiting the global mean temperature increase to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, a limit agreed upon at the United Nations Climate Summit in Paris in December 2015. Here, we analyze climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 to determine the timing and magnitude of regional temperature and precipitation changes across the contiguous United States (US for global warming of 1.5 and 2°C and highlight consensus and uncertainties in model projections and their implications for making decisions. The regional warming rates differ considerably across the contiguous US, but all regions are projected to reach 2°C about 10-20 years before the global mean temperature. Although there is uncertainty in the timing of exactly when the 1.5 and 2°C thresholds will be crossed regionally, over 80% of the models project at least 2°C warming by 2050 for all regions for the high emissions scenario. This threshold-based approach also highlights regional variations in the rate of warming across the US. The fastest warming region in the contiguous US is the Northeast, which is projected to warm by 3°C when global warming reaches 2°C. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations indicate that the regional warming estimates remain outside the envelope of uncertainty throughout the twenty-first century, making them potentially useful to planners. The regional precipitation projections for global warming of 1.5°C and 2°C are uncertain, but the eastern US is projected to experience wetter winters and the Great Plains and the Northwest US are projected to experience drier summers in the future. The impact of different scenarios on regional precipitation

  16. Consequences of Global Warming of 1.5 °C and 2 °C for Regional Temperature and Precipitation Changes in the Contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmalkar, Ambarish V; Bradley, Raymond S

    2017-01-01

    The differential warming of land and ocean leads to many continental regions in the Northern Hemisphere warming at rates higher than the global mean temperature. Adaptation and conservation efforts will, therefore, benefit from understanding regional consequences of limiting the global mean temperature increase to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, a limit agreed upon at the United Nations Climate Summit in Paris in December 2015. Here, we analyze climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) to determine the timing and magnitude of regional temperature and precipitation changes across the contiguous United States (US) for global warming of 1.5 and 2°C and highlight consensus and uncertainties in model projections and their implications for making decisions. The regional warming rates differ considerably across the contiguous US, but all regions are projected to reach 2°C about 10-20 years before the global mean temperature. Although there is uncertainty in the timing of exactly when the 1.5 and 2°C thresholds will be crossed regionally, over 80% of the models project at least 2°C warming by 2050 for all regions for the high emissions scenario. This threshold-based approach also highlights regional variations in the rate of warming across the US. The fastest warming region in the contiguous US is the Northeast, which is projected to warm by 3°C when global warming reaches 2°C. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations indicate that the regional warming estimates remain outside the envelope of uncertainty throughout the twenty-first century, making them potentially useful to planners. The regional precipitation projections for global warming of 1.5°C and 2°C are uncertain, but the eastern US is projected to experience wetter winters and the Great Plains and the Northwest US are projected to experience drier summers in the future. The impact of different scenarios on regional precipitation projections is

  17. Examining significant factors in micro and small enterprises performance: case study in Amhara region, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkos, Tomas; Zegeye, Muluken; Tilahun, Shimelis; Avvari, Muralidhar

    2017-07-01

    Furniture manufacturing micro and small enterprises are confronted with several factors that affect their performance. Some enterprises fail to sustain, some others remain for long period of time without transforming, and most are producing similar and non-standard products. The main aim of this manuscript is on improving the performance and contribution of MSEs by analyzing impact of significant internal and external factors. Data was collected via a questionnaire, group discussion with experts and interviewing process. Randomly selected eight representative main cities of Amhara region with 120 furniture manufacturing enterprises are considered. Data analysis and presentation was made using SPSS tools (correlation, proximity, and T test) and impact-effort analysis matrix tool. The correlation analysis shows that politico-legal with infrastructure, leadership with entrepreneurship skills and finance and credit with marketing factors are those factors, which result in high correlation with Pearson correlation values of r = 0.988, 0.983, and 0.939, respectively. The study investigates that the most critical factors faced by MSEs are work premises, access to finance, infrastructure, entrepreneurship and business managerial problems. The impact of these factors is found to be high and is confirmed by the 50% drop-out rate in 2014/2015. Furthermore, more than 25% work time losses due to power interruption daily and around 65% work premises problems challenged MSEs. Further, an impact-effort matrix was developed to help the MSEs to prioritize the affecting factors.

  18. Choice & Consequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Azam

    to support hypothesis generation, hypothesis testing, and decision making. In addition to sensors in buildings, infrastructure, or the environment, we also propose the instrumentation of user interfaces to help measure performance in decision making applications. We show the benefits of applying principles...... between cause and effect in complex systems complicates decision making. To address this issue, we examine the central role that data-driven decision making could play in critical domains such as sustainability or medical treatment. We developed systems for exploratory data analysis and data visualization...... of data analysis and instructional interface design, to both simulation systems and decision support interfaces. We hope that projects such as these will help people to understand the link between their choices and the consequences of their decisions....

  19. A multi-region approach to assessing fiscal and farm level consequences of government support for farm risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Cooper

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2014 U.S. Farm Act has new programs for providing producers with commodity support payments covering “shallow losses” in revenue. We develop an approach to examine the sensitivity of the farmer’s downside risk protection to marginal changes in the deductible in shallow loss program scenarios. The copula approach we use simultaneously considers price and yield correlation across all U.S. counties producing several major field crops. We find that average payments under the shallow loss program scenarios are elastic with respect to the program’s payment coverage rate. To empirically assess where shallow loss is likely to most benefit producers, we map at the county level the ratios of expected shallow loss payments to crop insurance premiums for corn, soybeans, cotton, and winter wheat. As tail dependencies among individual crop yield densities may vary spatially, we propose a method for grouping counties in a t-copula that allows for heterogeneity in tail dependencies.

  20. Identifying the risk: a prospective cohort study examining postpartum haemorrhage in a regional Australian health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Lauren; Kynn, Mary; Reed, Rachel; Davenport, Lisa; Young, Jeanine; Schafer, Keppel

    2018-06-07

    In industrialised countries the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is increasing, for which exact etiology is not well understood. Studies have relied upon retrospective data with estimated blood loss as the primary outcome, known to be underestimated by clinicians. This study aimed to explore variables associated with PPH in a cohort of women birthing vaginally in coastal Queensland, Australia, using the gravimetric method to measure blood loss. Women were prospectively recruited to participate using an opt-out consent process. Maternal demographics; pregnancy history; model of care; mode of birth; third stage management practices; antenatal, intrapartum and immediate postpartum complications; gravimetric and estimated blood loss; and haematological laboratory data, were collected via a pre-designed data collection instrument. Descriptive statistics were used for demographic, intrapartum and birthing practices. A General Linear Model was used for multivariate analysis to examine relationship between gravimetric blood loss and demographic, birthing practices and intrapartum variables. The primary outcome was a postpartum haemorrhage (blood loss > 500 ml). 522 singleton births were included in the analysis. Maternal mean age was 29 years; 58% were multiparous. Most participants received active (291, 55.7%) or modified active management of third stage (191, 36.6%). Of 451 births with valid gravimetric blood loss recorded, 35% (n = 159) recorded a loss of 500 ml or more and 111 (70%) of these were recorded as PPH. Gravimetric blood loss was strongly correlated with estimated blood loss (r = 0.88; p gravimetric blood loss, about 78% of the measured value. High neonatal weight, perineal injury, complications during labour, separation of mother and baby, and observation of a gush of blood were associated with PPH. Nulliparity, labour induction and augmentation, syntocinon use were not associated with PPH. In contrast to previous study findings

  1. The SMS, Phone and medical Examination sports injury surveillance (SPEx) system is a feasible and valid approach to measuring handball exposure, injury occurrence and consequences in elite youth sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Wedderkopp, N; Myklebust, G

    2017-01-01

    Examination injury surveillance (SPEx) system 2) to evaluate the proportion of injuries and injury consequences reported by SPEx when compared to outcomes from a modified version of the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre (OSTRC) Overuse Injury Questionnaire. We followed 679 elite adolescent handball players...

  2. Distance Education Examination Management in a Lowly Resourced North-Eastern Region of Zambia: A Phenomenological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Simui

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the management of distance education examination in a lowly resourced North-Eastern region of Zambia. The study applies Hermeneutic Phenomenology approach to generate and make sense of the data. It is the lived experiences of 2 invigilators and 66 students purposively selected that the study draws its insights from. Meaning within the generated data is elicited using the Chaos theory. Emerging from this study is a multiplicity of ingredients needed to effectively manage distance education examinations in a chaotic environment. The need for visionary leadership with a shared understanding of institutional purpose, the need for motivated staff with creativity and innovation and the need for effective communication are all vital ingredients needed to manage examinations. In conclusion, we now know that amidst chaos lay opportunities for innovation and creativity in terms of new strategies for managing distance education. To this extent, chaos should be treasured and not censured.

  3. The Possible Antecedents and Consequences of Matching of Food Intake: Examining the Role of Trait Self-Esteem and Interpersonal Closeness

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, E.; Lodder, G.M.A.; Kühnen, U.; Lippke, S.; Hermans, R.C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence that people tend to match their intake to that of others, less is known about the motives underlying this effect. The current study, therefore, examined the relationship between self-esteem, a specific factor that has been related to the likelihood of social matching. Further, we examined the effects of food matching on interpersonal closeness among eating companions. The sample included 89 female dyads. All dyads had free access to palatable snack food during a 15 ...

  4. Examining leadership as a strategy to enhance health care service delivery in regional hospitals in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Sagaren; Gerwel Proches, Cecile N; Kader, Abdulla

    2018-01-01

    Background Four public hospitals in South Africa, which render both specialized and nonspecialized services to thousands of patients, were examined to determine the impact of leadership on health care service delivery. These hospitals were inundated by various problems that were impacting negatively on health care service delivery. Purpose This research study aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the challenges, complexities and constraints facing public health care in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) and to examine leadership as a strategy to enhance healthcare service delivery with a particular focus on four regional hospitals in the KZN Province. Methods The mixed-method research approach was utilized. Purposive sampling and stratified random sampling were employed in the research setting, and in-depth, semistructured interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using the Nvivo computer software package for in-depth interviews and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for the quantitative analysis. Results The research findings showed that the current leadership framework adopted by the health care leaders in regional hospitals in KZN is weak and is contributing to poor health care service delivery. Conclusion This study, therefore, aimed to address the current challenges and weaknesses that are impacting negatively on health care service delivery in regional hospitals in the KZN Province and made recommendations for improvement. PMID:29535529

  5. Examining leadership as a strategy to enhance health care service delivery in regional hospitals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Sagaren; Gerwel Proches, Cecile N; Kader, Abdulla

    2018-01-01

    Four public hospitals in South Africa, which render both specialized and nonspecialized services to thousands of patients, were examined to determine the impact of leadership on health care service delivery. These hospitals were inundated by various problems that were impacting negatively on health care service delivery. This research study aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the challenges, complexities and constraints facing public health care in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) and to examine leadership as a strategy to enhance healthcare service delivery with a particular focus on four regional hospitals in the KZN Province. The mixed-method research approach was utilized. Purposive sampling and stratified random sampling were employed in the research setting, and in-depth, semistructured interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using the Nvivo computer software package for in-depth interviews and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for the quantitative analysis. The research findings showed that the current leadership framework adopted by the health care leaders in regional hospitals in KZN is weak and is contributing to poor health care service delivery. This study, therefore, aimed to address the current challenges and weaknesses that are impacting negatively on health care service delivery in regional hospitals in the KZN Province and made recommendations for improvement.

  6. Coupling Longitudinal Data and Multilevel Modeling to Examine the Antecedents and Consequences of Jealousy Experiences in Romantic Relationships: A Test of the Relational Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Jennifer A.; Solomon, Denise Haunani

    2006-01-01

    We used longitudinal data and multilevel modeling to examine how intimacy, relational uncertainty, and failed attempts at interdependence influence emotional, cognitive, and communicative responses to romantic jealousy, and how those experiences shape subsequent relationship characteristics. The relational turbulence model (Solomon & Knobloch,…

  7. The Possible Antecedents and Consequences of Matching of Food Intake : Examining the Role of Trait Self-Esteem and Interpersonal Closeness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirata, Elizabeth; Lodder, Gerine M.A.; Kühnen, Ulrich; Lippke, Sonia; Hermans, Roel C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence that people tend to match their intake to that of others, less is known about the motives underlying this effect. The current study, therefore, examined the relationship between self-esteem, a specific factor that has been related to the likelihood of social matching.

  8. The Possible Antecedents and Consequences of Matching of Food Intake: Examining the Role of Trait Self-Esteem and Interpersonal Closeness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirata, E.; Lodder, G.M.A.; Kühnen, U.; Lippke, S.; Hermans, R.C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence that people tend to match their intake to that of others, less is known about the motives underlying this effect. The current study, therefore, examined the relationship between self-esteem, a specific factor that has been related to the likelihood of social matching.

  9. SU-E-T-104: An Examination of Dose in the Buildup and Build-Down Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, W; Kuo, H; Phillips, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine dose in the buildup and build-down regions and compare measurements made with various models and dosimeters Methods: Dose was examined in a 30×30cm 2 phantom of water-equivalent plastic with 10cm of backscatter for various field sizes. Examination was performed with radiochromic film and optically-stimulated-luminescent-dosimeter (OSLD) chips, and compared against a plane-parallel chamber with a correction factor applied to approximate the response of an extrapolation chamber. For the build-down region, a correction factor to account for table absorption and chamber orientation in the posterior-anterior direction was applied. The measurement depths used for the film were halfway through their sensitive volumes, and a polynomial best fit curve was used to determine the dose to their surfaces. This chamber was also compared with the dose expected in a clinical kernel-based computer model, and a clinical Boltzmann-transport-equation-based (BTE) computer model. The two models were also compared against each other for cases with air gaps in the buildup region. Results: Within 3mm, all dosimeters and models agreed with the chamber within 10% for all field sizes. At the entrance surface, film differed in comparison with the chamber from +90% to +15%, the BTE-model by +140 to +3%, and the kernel-based model by +20% to −25%, decreasing with increasing field size. At the exit surface, film differed in comparison with the chamber from −10% to −15%, the BTE-model by −53% to −50%, the kernel-based model by −55% to −57%, mostly independent of field size. Conclusion: The largest differences compared with the chamber were found at the surface for all field sizes. Differences decreased with increasing field size and increasing depth in phantom. Air gaps in the buildup region cause dose buildup to occur again post-gap, but the effect decreases with increasing phantom thickness prior to the gap

  10. Examining Difference in Immigration Stress, Acculturation Stress and Mental Health Outcomes in Six Hispanic/Latino Nativity and Regional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C; Gattamorta, Karina A; Berger-Cardoso, Jodi

    2018-02-27

    Little is known about the specific behavioral health impact of acculturation stressors that affect Hispanic/Latino immigrant sub-groups. These immigration-related stressors and traumatic events may have differential impact on depression depending on country/region of origin. Using a measure of immigration and acculturation stress, the current study sought to determine differences in the impact of stress on six sub-groups of Hispanic immigrants. Data on stress and depression were examined using a large, representative adult immigrant sample (N = 641). Controlling for age, gender and years in the US, factorial analysis of covariance revealed significant differences on total Hispanic Stress Inventory 2 (HSI2) stress appraisal scores based on country/region of origin. Pair wise comparisons between country/region of origin groups revealed that Mexicans had higher levels of stress compared to Cuban or Dominican immigrants. Several patterns of differential stress were also found within sub-domains of the HSI2. Using regression models, HSI2 stress appraisals and their interaction with country of origin proved to not be significant predictors of depression (PHQ9), while gender and age were significant. Differences in HSI2 stress that are based on nativity may be moderated by cultural resilience that ultimately serves a protective role to prevent the onset of depression.

  11. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in the blood plasma of examines occupationally exposed to low doses: sex differences and confounding factor consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunic, Z.; Djuric, J.; Sukalo, I.; Blagojevic, D; Spasic, M.B.; Saicic, Z.S.

    1998-01-01

    Studies on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in humans demonstrated that the changes in enzyme activities are substrate selective, as well as sex-dependent. Contrary to males, GST activities are found to be relatively stable with age in females. The paper deals with determination of GST activities in the blood plasma of healthy examines occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. The control group consisted of the examines not exposed to sources of ionizing radiation by profession. Simultaneously, standard hematological and biochemical analyses were performed, respectively. Groups were subdivided by sex and smoking habits. GST activity (nmol GSH/min/L plasma) in male control group was 4.71±0.18 (1.05) and in female 4.53±0.15 (0.97). Exposure to ionizing radiation led to an increased GST activity in the blood plasma of both sexes (exposed males 5.17±0.35 (1.22), exposed females 4.91±1.00 (2.64). Values in the group of exposed females vary widely. Differences between GST activity of male smokers (5.12±0.19 (1.07)) and male controls, as well as between female smokers (4.93±0.22 (1.39)) and female controls were observed. Difference in GST value distributions was evident in the group of female smokers in comparison with female controls. Presented results indicate that measuring GST activity in the blood plasma might be an useful parameter for examination of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  12. The possible antecedents and consequences of matching of food intake:Examining the role of trait self-esteem and interpersonal closeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eHirata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there is evidence that people tend to match their intake to that of others, less is known about the motives underlying this effect. The current study, therefore, examined the relationship between self-esteem, a specific factor that has been related to the likelihood of social matching. Further, we examined the effects of food matching on interpersonal closeness among eating companions. The sample included 89 female dyads. All dyads had free access to palatable snack food during a 15 minutes interaction. For each dyad the matching score was calculated, as well as both individual’s trait self-esteem scores and interpersonal closeness with their eating partner. The overall degree of matching within dyads was high, replicating the findings of previous research. No relationship, however, was found between trait self-esteem and the degree of matching. Furthermore, there was no effect of matching on perceived interpersonal closeness with or liking of the other person. These results suggest that self-esteem might not be a robust predictor of matching and that matching of food intake may not result in increased perceived interpersonal closeness or liking among eating partners.

  13. The Possible Antecedents and Consequences of Matching of Food Intake: Examining the Role of Trait Self-Esteem and Interpersonal Closeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Elizabeth; Lodder, Gerine M A; Kühnen, Ulrich; Lippke, Sonia; Hermans, Roel C J

    2015-01-01

    Although there is evidence that people tend to match their intake to that of others, less is known about the motives underlying this effect. The current study, therefore, examined the relationship between self-esteem, a specific factor that has been related to the likelihood of social matching. Further, we examined the effects of food matching on interpersonal closeness among eating companions. The sample included 89 female dyads. All dyads had free access to palatable snack food during a 15 min interaction. For each dyad the matching score was calculated, as well as both individual's trait self-esteem scores and interpersonal closeness with their eating partner. The overall degree of matching within dyads was high, replicating the findings of previous research. No relationship, however, was found between trait self-esteem and the degree of matching. Furthermore, there was no effect of matching on perceived interpersonal closeness with or liking of the other person. These results suggest that self-esteem might not be a robust predictor of matching and that matching of food intake may not result in increased perceived interpersonal closeness or liking among eating partners.

  14. A qualitative study examining the presence and consequences of moral framings in patients' and mental health workers' experiences of community treatment orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Delany, Toni; Pulvirenti, Mariastella; Smith, Ann; McMillan, John

    2015-11-06

    Mental health recovery involves acknowledging the importance of building the person's capacity for agency. This might be particularly important for patients on community treatment orders (CTOs - which involve enforced treatment for their mental illness), given limited international evidence for their effectiveness and underlying concerns about the use of coercion by workers and systems of care towards this population of people with mental illness. This study sought to understand how the meaning of CTOs is constructed and experienced, from the perspective of patients on CTOs and workers directly administering CTOs. Qualitative interviews were conducted with South Australian community mental health patients (n = 8) and mental health workers (n = 10) in 2013-14. During thematic analysis of data, assisted by NVIVO software, the researchers were struck by the language used by both groups of participants and so undertook an examination of the moral framings apparent within the data. Moral framing was apparent in participants' constructions and evaluations of the CTO experience as positive, negative or justifiable. Most patient participants appeared to use moral framing to: try to understand why they were placed on a CTO; make sense of the experience of being on a CTO; and convey the lessons they have learnt. Worker participants appeared to use moral framing to justify the imposition of care. Empathy was part of this, as was patients' positive right to services and treatment, which they believed would only occur for these patients via a CTO. Workers positioned themselves as trying to put themselves in the patients' shoes as a way of acting virtuously towards them, softening the coercive stick approach. Four themes were identified: explicit moral framing; best interests of the patient; lessons learned by the patient; and, empathy. Experiences of CTOs are multi-layered, and depend critically upon empathy and reflection on the relationship between what is done and

  15. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  16. Relationship between Regional Body Fat Distribution and Diabetes Mellitus: 2008 to 2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo In Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate the association between regional body fat distribution, especially leg fat mass, and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM in adult populations.MethodsA total of 3,181 men and 3,827 postmenopausal women aged 50 years or older were analyzed based on Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2008 to 2010. Body compositions including muscle mass and regional fat mass were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.ResultsThe odds ratios (ORs for DM was higher with increasing truncal fat mass and arm fat mass, while it was lower with increasing leg fat mass. In a partial correlation analysis adjusted for age, leg fat mass was negatively associated with glycosylated hemoglobin in both sexes and fasting glucose in women. Leg fat mass was positively correlated with appendicular skeletal muscle mass and homeostasis model assessment of β cell. In addition, after adjusting for confounding factors, the OR for DM decreased gradually with increasing leg fat mass quartiles in both genders. When we subdivided the participants into four groups based on the median values of leg fat mass and leg muscle mass, higher leg fat mass significantly lowered the risk of DM even though they have smaller leg muscle mass in both genders (P<0.001.ConclusionThe relationship between fat mass and the prevalence of DM is different according to regional body fat distribution. Higher leg fat mass was associated with a lower risk of DM in Korean populations. Maintaining leg fat mass may be important in preventing impaired glucose tolerance.

  17. Estimating regional long-term economic consequences of natural hazards - a case study of the 2005 flood event in Tyrol (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, C.; Lochner, B.; Brucker, A.

    2012-04-01

    businesses as main beneficiaries and about 40% mentioned infrastructural improvements, as in streets or protective measures, as the most positive effect. We present an empirical approach to assess the economic consequences of fatal events and provide rules of thumb to quickly estimate indirect economic losses from natural disasters, at least for the Alpine Space, at the local and regional level. The methods and results of this study can help to improve ex-post loss estimations, and with it, ex-ante methods for the cost efficiency of risk reduction measures, e.g. cost-benefit-analysis.

  18. Consequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodard, K.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to: Provide a realistic assessment of consequences; Account for plant and site-specific characteristics; Adjust accident release characteristics to account for results of plant-containment analysis; Produce conditional risk curves for each of five health effects; and Estimate uncertainties

  19. Examining Environmental Gradients with satellite data in permafrost regions - the current state of the ESA GlobPermafrost initative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, G.; Bartsch, A.; Kääb, A.; Westermann, S.; Strozzi, T.; Wiesmann, A.; Duguay, C. R.; Seifert, F. M.; Obu, J.; Nitze, I.; Heim, B.; Haas, A.; Widhalm, B.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost cannot be directly detected from space, but many surface features of permafrost terrains and typical periglacial landforms are observable with a variety of EO sensors ranging from very high to medium resolution at various wavelengths. In addition, landscape dynamics associated with permafrost changes and geophysical variables relevant for characterizing the state of permafrost, such as land surface temperature or freeze-thaw state can be observed with spaceborne Earth Observation. Suitable regions to examine environmental gradients across the Arctic have been defined in a community white paper (Bartsch et al. 2014, hdl:10013/epic.45648.d001). These transects have been revised and adjusted within the DUE GlobPermafrost initiative of the European Space Agency. The ESA DUE GlobPermafrost project develops, validates and implements Earth Observation (EO) products to support research communities and international organisations in their work on better understanding permafrost characteristics and dynamics. Prototype product cases will cover different aspects of permafrost by integrating in situ measurements of subsurface and surface properties, Earth Observation, and modelling to provide a better understanding of permafrost today. The project will extend local process and permafrost monitoring to broader spatial domains, support permafrost distribution modelling, and help to implement permafrost landscape and feature mapping in a GIS framework. It will also complement active layer and thermal observing networks. Both lowland (latitudinal) and mountain (altitudinal) permafrost issues are addressed. The status of the Permafrost Information System and first results will be presented. Prototypes of GlobPermafrost datasets include: Modelled mean annual ground temperature by use of land surface temperature and snow water equivalent from satellites Land surface characterization including shrub height, land cover and parameters related to surface roughness Trends from

  20. Examination of Regional Trends in Cloud Properties over Surface Sites Derived from MODIS and AVHRR using the CERES Cloud Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. L., Jr.; Minnis, P.; Bedka, K. M.; Sun-Mack, S.; Chen, Y.; Doelling, D. R.; Kato, S.; Rutan, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies analyzing long-term measurements of surface insolation at ground sites suggest that decadal-scale trends of increasing (brightening) and decreasing (dimming) downward solar flux have occurred at various times over the last century. Regional variations have been reported that range from near 0 Wm-2/decade to as large as 9 Wm-2/decade depending on the location and time period analyzed. The more significant trends have been attributed to changes in overhead clouds and aerosols, although quantifying their relative impacts using independent observations has been difficult, owing in part to a lack of consistent long-term measurements of cloud properties. This paper examines new satellite based records of cloud properties derived from MODIS (2000-present) and AVHRR (1981- present) data to infer cloud property trends over a number of surface radiation sites across the globe. The MODIS cloud algorithm was developed for the NASA Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project to provide a consistent record of cloud properties to help improve broadband radiation measurements and to better understand cloud radiative effects. The CERES-MODIS cloud algorithm has been modified to analyze other satellites including the AVHRR on the NOAA satellites. Compared to MODIS, obtaining consistent cloud properties over a long period from AVHRR is a much more significant challenge owing to the number of different satellites, instrument calibration uncertainties, orbital drift and other factors. Nevertheless, both the MODIS and AVHRR cloud properties will be analyzed to determine trends, and their level of consistency and correspondence with surface radiation trends derived from the ground-based radiometer data. It is anticipated that this initial study will contribute to an improved understanding of surface solar radiation trends and their relationship to clouds.

  1. Regional inequalities in mortality.

    OpenAIRE

    Illsley, R; Le Grand, J

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To examine the hypothesis of sustained and persistent inequalities in health between British regions and to ask how far they are a consequence of using standardised mortality ratios as the tool of measurement. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS--Data are regional, age specific death rates at seven points in time from 1931 to 1987-89 for the British regions, reconstructed to make them comparable with the 1981 regional definitions. Log variance is used to measure inequality; regi...

  2. A landscape indicator approach to the identification and articulation of the consequences of land-cover change in the Mid-Atlantic Region, 1973-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Milheim, Lesley E.; Claggett, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Landscape indicators, derived from land-use and land-cover data, hydrology, nitrate deposition, and elevation data, were used by Jones and others (2001a) to calculate the ecological consequences of land-cover change. Nitrate loading and physical bird habitat were modeled from 1973 and 1992 land-cover and other spatial data for the Mid-Atlantic region. Utilizing the same methods, this study extends the analysis another decade with the use of the 2001 National Land Cover Dataset. Land-cover statistics and trends are calculated for three time periods: 1973-1992, 1992-2001 and 1973-2001. In addition, high-resolution aerial photographs (1 meter or better ground-sample distance) were acquired and analyzed for thirteen pairs of adjacent USGS 7.5 minute quadrangle maps in areas where distinct positive or negative changes to nitrogen loading and bird habitat were previously calculated. During the entire 30 year period, the data show that there was extensive loss of agriculture and forest area and a major increase in urban land-cover classes. However, the majority of the conversion of other classes to urban occurred during the 1992-2001 period. During the 1973-1992 period, there was only moderate increase in urban area, while there was an inverse relationship between agricultural change and forest change. In general, forest gain and agricultural loss was found in areas of improving landscape indicators, and forest loss and agricultural gain was found to occur in areas of declining indicators related to habitat and nitrogen loadings, which was generally confirmed by the aerial photographic analysis. In terms of the specific model results, bird habitat, which is mainly related to the extent of forest cover, declined overall with forest extent, but was also affected more in the decline of habitat quality. Nitrate loading, which is mainly related to agricultural land cover actually improved from 1992-2001, and in the overall study, mainly due to the conversion of agriculture to

  3. Constrained consequence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available their basic properties and relationship. In Section 3 we present a modal instance of these constructions which also illustrates with an example how to reason abductively with constrained entailment in a causal or action oriented context. In Section 4 we... of models with the former approach, whereas in Section 3.3 we give an example illustrating ways in which C can be de ned with both. Here we employ the following versions of local consequence: De nition 3.4. Given a model M = hW;R;Vi and formulas...

  4. Changing values and the impact on land use and social networks in the northern forest region: a qualitative examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean Dedam; Rodney Zwick

    2007-01-01

    Patterns of land ownership and economics are changing in the Northern Forest Region of New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. The percentage of people living in the region who work in the resource extraction industry has become much smaller. Tourism and outdoor recreation are promoted as economic substitutes that will provide an alternate use of the natural...

  5. Examining Interior Grid Nudging Techniques Using Two-Way Nesting in the WRF Model for Regional Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates interior nudging techniques using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for regional climate modeling over the conterminous United States (CONUS) using a two-way nested configuration. NCEP–Department of Energy Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Pro...

  6. The consequences of "Culture's consequences"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Fabienne; Froholdt, Lisa Loloma

    2009-01-01

      In this article, it is claimed that research on cross-cultural crews is dominated by one specific understanding of the concept of culture, which is static, evenly distributed and context-independent. Such a conception of culture may bring some basic order while facing an unknown culture...... review of the theory of Geert Hofstede, the most renowned representative of this theoretical approach. The practical consequences of using such a concept of culture is then analysed by means of a critical review of an article applying Hofstede to cross-cultural crews in seafaring. Finally, alternative...... views on culture are presented. The aim of the article is, rather than to promote any specific theory, to reflect about diverse perspectives of cultural sense-making in cross-cultural encounters. Udgivelsesdato: Oktober...

  7. Predictors of Academic Success for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the Southern Regional Testing Agency Clinical Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efurd, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for conducting this study was to investigate and describe the relationship between applicant criteria for a dental hygiene program and subsequent outcomes on credentialing exams: the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam and the Southern Regional Testing Agency clinical exam. Because admission criteria play a crucial role in applicant…

  8. Emerging Requirements for U.S. Counterinsurgency: An Examination of the Insurgency in the Niger River Delta Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Economic, Social, Infrastructure and Information Operations SALW Small Arms and Light Weapons WHO World Health Organization WWF World Wildlife...order to be successful in even marginally conducting COIN in the NRD, either in partnership with the GoN and regional neighbors, or unilaterally in

  9. Examining South Atlantic Subtropical Cyclone Anita using the Satellite-Enhanced Regional Downscaling for Applied Studies Hourly Outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaicberg, H.; Palmeira, A. C. P. A.; Nunes, A.

    2017-12-01

    Studies on South Atlantic cyclones are mainly compromised by scarcity of observations. Therefore, remote sensing and global (re) analysis products are usually employed in investigations of their evolution. However, the frequent use of global reanalysis might difficult the assessment of the characteristics of the cyclones found in South Atlantic. In that regard, studies on "subtropical" cyclones have been performed using the 25-km resolution, Satellite-enhanced Regional Downscaling for Applied Studies (SRDAS), a product developed at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. In SRDAS, the Regional Spectral Model assimilates precipitation estimates from environmental satellites, while dynamically downscaling a global reanalysis using the spectral nudging technique to maintain the large-scale features in agreement with the regional model solution. The use of regional models in the downscaling of general circulation models provides more detailed information on weather and climate. As a way of illustrating the usefulness of SRDAS in the study of the subtropical South Atlantic cyclones, the subtropical cyclone Anita was selected because of its intensity. Anita developed near Brazilian south/southeast coast, with damages to local communities. Comparisons with available observations demonstrated the skill of SRDAS in simulating such an extreme event.

  10. and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Athanasopoulou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available (a Purpose: The purpose of this research is to identify the types of CSR initiatives employed by sports organisations; their antecedents, and their consequences for the company and society. (b Design/methodology/approach: This study is exploratory in nature. Two detailed case studies were conducted involving the football team and the basketball team of one professional, premier league club in Greece and their CSR initiatives. Both teams have the same name, they belong to one of the most popular teams in Greece with a large fan population; have both competed in International Competitions (UEFA’s Champion League; Final Four of the European Tournament and have realised many CSR initiatives in the past. The case studies involved in depth, personal interviews of managers responsible for CSR in each team. Case study data was triangulated with documentation and search of published material concerning CSR actions. Data was analysed with content analysis. (c Findings: Both teams investigated have undertaken various CSR activities the last 5 years, the football team significantly more than the basketball team. Major factors that affect CSR activity include pressure from leagues; sponsors; local community, and global organisations; orientation towards fulfilling their duty to society, and team CSR strategy. Major benefits from CSR include relief of vulnerable groups and philanthropy as well as a better reputation for the firm; increase in fan base; and finding sponsors more easily due to the social profile of the team. However, those benefits are not measured in any way although both teams observe increase in tickets sold; web site traffic and TV viewing statistics after CSR activities. Finally, promotion of CSR is mainly done through web sites; press releases; newspapers, and word-of-mouth communications. (d Research limitations/implications: This study involves only two case studies and has limited generalisability. Future research can extend the

  11. Examining self-rated health of young central and eastern Europeans in the context of other world regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, Margot I.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Stronks, Karien; Kunst, Anton E.

    2014-01-01

    Poor health is more prevalent in the east of Europe as compared with the west. This variation is often attributed to Soviet communism. Few studies investigate this health discrepancy within young adults who were children during this period. We studied the health of young adults by examining

  12. Burn and they will come! The western regional birds and burns study examines bird responses to prescribed fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan Thompson; John Lehmkuhl

    2008-01-01

    Although prescribed fire is increasingly being used in ponderosa pine forests as a management tool to reduce the risk of future high-severity wildfire, its effects on wildlife habitat have rarely been examined. The Birds and Burns Network was created to assist managers in planning prescribed fire projects that will reduce fuels and enhance bird habitat. Researchers...

  13. [Study on schistosomiasis control measures in mobile boat fishermen. III. Construction and application of regional joint mechanism for schistosomiasis examination and treatment in boatmen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gao; Le-Ping, Sun; Yin-Ping, Zuo; Yu-Hui, Xu; Zheng-Qiu, Zhang; Yu-Cai, Ma; Jin-Bin, Gao; Xi-Guang, Zhu; Bo, Zheng; Guo-Jing, Yang; Qing-Biao, Hong; Kun, Yang; You-Sheng, Liang

    2011-10-01

    To construct the regional joint mechanism for schistosomiasis examination and treatment and the examination protocol among mobile boatmen, so as to provide effective measures for control of mobile infectious sources of schistosomiasis in the Yangtze River basin. According to the characteristics of the cargo frequent mobility of ships with fixed anchor points, the health, maritime and transport sections were jointly cooperated to set up sites for schistosomiasis examination and treatment in ship locks, wharfs and harbors. The infection of schistosomiasis was detected by means of rapid immunological screening and stool examination, and the regional joint mechanism was constructed. The sero-positives were traced for further parasitological examinations and treatment by using the regional joint network for schistosomiasis examination and treatment. The schistosome infections in boatmen were analyzed and compared between different examination and treatment sites and among different navigation coverage. A total of 16 sites for examination and treatment of schistosomiasis, including 5 fixed sites and 11 mobile sites, were set up in 12 townships of 6 districts (counties) of Yangzhou City. During a period between June and August, the examination of schistosomiasis was conducted in 40 sites, and of the 1 225 boatmen from 967 boats detected, 19 cases were sero-positive, with a positive rate of 1.55%. Among the 14 sero-positives examined, no stool positive patients were found. Among the 1 225 boatmen detected, 820 were from fixed sites and 405 from mobile sites, and 4 and 15 cases were found, respectively, with positive rates of 0.49% and 3.70%, respectively, and the sero-positive rate was higher in mobile sites and that in fixed sites. A total of 898 boatmen from the Yangtze River basin and 305 from the local inland rivers were examined, and 3 and 16 sero-positive cases were detected, respectively, with positive rates of 0.33% and 5.25%, respectively, and the sero

  14. Archaeological application of airborne LiDAR to examine social changes in the Ceibal region of the Maya lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadan, Daniela; Pinzón, Flory; Burham, Melissa; Ranchos, José Luis; Aoyama, Kazuo; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Although the application of LiDAR has made significant contributions to archaeology, LiDAR only provides a synchronic view of the current topography. An important challenge for researchers is to extract diachronic information over typically extensive LiDAR-surveyed areas in an efficient manner. By applying an architectural chronology obtained from intensive excavations at the site center and by complementing it with surface collection and test excavations in peripheral zones, we analyze LiDAR data over an area of 470 km2 to trace social changes through time in the Ceibal region, Guatemala, of the Maya lowlands. We refine estimates of structure counts and populations by applying commission and omission error rates calculated from the results of ground-truthing. Although the results of our study need to be tested and refined with additional research in the future, they provide an initial understanding of social processes over a wide area. Ceibal appears to have served as the only ceremonial complex in the region during the transition to sedentism at the beginning of the Middle Preclassic period (c. 1000 BC). As a more sedentary way of life was accepted during the late part of the Middle Preclassic period and the initial Late Preclassic period (600–300 BC), more ceremonial assemblages were constructed outside the Ceibal center, possibly symbolizing the local groups’ claim to surrounding agricultural lands. From the middle Late Preclassic to the initial Early Classic period (300 BC-AD 300), a significant number of pyramidal complexes were probably built. Their high concentration in the Ceibal center probably reflects increasing political centralization. After a demographic decline during the rest of the Early Classic period, the population in the Ceibal region reached the highest level during the Late and Terminal Classic periods, when dynastic rule was well established (AD 600–950). PMID:29466384

  15. Archaeological application of airborne LiDAR to examine social changes in the Ceibal region of the Maya lowlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Inomata

    Full Text Available Although the application of LiDAR has made significant contributions to archaeology, LiDAR only provides a synchronic view of the current topography. An important challenge for researchers is to extract diachronic information over typically extensive LiDAR-surveyed areas in an efficient manner. By applying an architectural chronology obtained from intensive excavations at the site center and by complementing it with surface collection and test excavations in peripheral zones, we analyze LiDAR data over an area of 470 km2 to trace social changes through time in the Ceibal region, Guatemala, of the Maya lowlands. We refine estimates of structure counts and populations by applying commission and omission error rates calculated from the results of ground-truthing. Although the results of our study need to be tested and refined with additional research in the future, they provide an initial understanding of social processes over a wide area. Ceibal appears to have served as the only ceremonial complex in the region during the transition to sedentism at the beginning of the Middle Preclassic period (c. 1000 BC. As a more sedentary way of life was accepted during the late part of the Middle Preclassic period and the initial Late Preclassic period (600-300 BC, more ceremonial assemblages were constructed outside the Ceibal center, possibly symbolizing the local groups' claim to surrounding agricultural lands. From the middle Late Preclassic to the initial Early Classic period (300 BC-AD 300, a significant number of pyramidal complexes were probably built. Their high concentration in the Ceibal center probably reflects increasing political centralization. After a demographic decline during the rest of the Early Classic period, the population in the Ceibal region reached the highest level during the Late and Terminal Classic periods, when dynastic rule was well established (AD 600-950.

  16. Archaeological application of airborne LiDAR to examine social changes in the Ceibal region of the Maya lowlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Takeshi; Triadan, Daniela; Pinzón, Flory; Burham, Melissa; Ranchos, José Luis; Aoyama, Kazuo; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Although the application of LiDAR has made significant contributions to archaeology, LiDAR only provides a synchronic view of the current topography. An important challenge for researchers is to extract diachronic information over typically extensive LiDAR-surveyed areas in an efficient manner. By applying an architectural chronology obtained from intensive excavations at the site center and by complementing it with surface collection and test excavations in peripheral zones, we analyze LiDAR data over an area of 470 km2 to trace social changes through time in the Ceibal region, Guatemala, of the Maya lowlands. We refine estimates of structure counts and populations by applying commission and omission error rates calculated from the results of ground-truthing. Although the results of our study need to be tested and refined with additional research in the future, they provide an initial understanding of social processes over a wide area. Ceibal appears to have served as the only ceremonial complex in the region during the transition to sedentism at the beginning of the Middle Preclassic period (c. 1000 BC). As a more sedentary way of life was accepted during the late part of the Middle Preclassic period and the initial Late Preclassic period (600-300 BC), more ceremonial assemblages were constructed outside the Ceibal center, possibly symbolizing the local groups' claim to surrounding agricultural lands. From the middle Late Preclassic to the initial Early Classic period (300 BC-AD 300), a significant number of pyramidal complexes were probably built. Their high concentration in the Ceibal center probably reflects increasing political centralization. After a demographic decline during the rest of the Early Classic period, the population in the Ceibal region reached the highest level during the Late and Terminal Classic periods, when dynastic rule was well established (AD 600-950).

  17. The examination of biophysical parameters of skin (transepidermal water loss, skin hydration and pH value) in different body regions of normal cats of both sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanik, Marcin P; Wilkołek, Piotr M; Adamek, Lukasz R; Pomorski, Zbigniew J H

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration and skin pH in normal cats. Twenty shorthaired European cats of both sexes were examined in the study. Measurements were taken from five different sites: the lumbar region, the axillary fossa, the inguinal region, the ventral abdominal region and the left thoracic region. In each of the regions, TEWL, skin hydration and skin pH were measured. The highest TEWL value was observed in the axillary fossa (18.22g/h/m(2)) and the lowest in the lumbar region (10.53g/h/m(2)). The highest skin hydration was found in the inguinal region (18.29CU) and the lowest in the lumbar region (4.62CU). The highest skin pH was observed in the inguinal region (6.64) and the lowest in the lumbar region (6.39). Statistically significant differences in TEWL were observed between the lumbar region and the left side of the thorax region (P=0.016), the axillary fossa (P=0.0004), the ventral region (P=0.005), and the inguinal region (P=0.009). There were significant differences in skin hydration between the lumbar region and the left thorax (P=0.000003), the axillary fossa (P=0.002), the ventral abdomen (P=0.03), and the inguinal region (P=0.0003) as well as between the thorax and the ventral abdomen (P=0.005). TEWL was higher in females (15g/h/m(2)) than in males (4.57g/h/m(2)). Skin hydration was higher in females (13.89CU) than in males (12.28CU). Significant differences were not found between males and females for TEWL and skin hydration. Skin pH was higher in males (6.94) than in females (6.54), which was significant (P=0.004). Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Examination of the regional distribution of minor and trace elements in normal human brain by PIXE and chemometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Hebbrecht, G.; Reuck, J. de

    1993-01-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was used to measure two minor and six trace elements, i.e. K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Rb, in up to 50 different structures (regions) of brains from Belgian individuals without neurological disorders. The data matrix with the mean dry-weight elemental concentrations and mean wet-to-dry weight ratio (means over 18 brains) for the various structures was subjected to two chemometric techniques, i.e., VARIMAX rotated absolute principal component analysis (APCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis. Three components were identified by APCA: Components 1 and 3 represented aqueous fractions of the brain (respectively the intracellular and extracellular fluid), whereas component 2 apparently represented the solid brain fraction. The elements K, Cu, Zn, Se, and Rb were predominantly attributed to component 1, Ca to component 3, and Fe to component 2. In the hierarchical cluster analysis seven different agglomerative cluster strategies were compared. The dendrograms obtained from the furthest neighbor and Ward's error sum strategy were virtually identical, and they consisted of two large clusters with 30 and 16 structures, respectively. The first cluster included all gray matter structures, while the second comprised all white matter. Furthermore, structures involved in the same physiological function or morphologically similar regions often conglomerated in one subcluster. This strongly suggests that there is some relationship between the trace element profile of a brain structure and its function. (orig.)

  19. Examination of Relationships among Organizational Characteristics and Organizational Commitment of Nurses in Western and Eastern Region of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, A S; Namba, M; Pokharela, T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify relationships between three components of organizational commitment and organizational characteristics of nurses in the western and the eastern region of Nepal. A self-administrated questionnaire was used to collect data from 310 nurses currently working at various hospitals in the eastern and the western region of the country. The questionnaire included three sections namely 1) personal characteristics 2) organizational characteristics and 3) organizational commitments scale. Descriptive analysis and multiple regression analysis were performed to identify significance in various relationships. Out of the 240 completed questionnaires, 226 were found valid for analysis. The mean age was 27.4 years. For each depended variable affective, continuance and normative commitment, multiple regression analysis was performed with personal Characteristics and organizational characteristics as independent variables. All independent variables were found significantly related to each of the two dependent variables; affective commitment and normative commitment (R2 adjusted=0.24, pcommitment. Both support from boss (β=0.138, pcommitment. On the other hand, satisfaction with training (β=0.191, pcommitment. Since both support from boss and training program were found to be positive and significant with affective commitment, hospitals must encourage supervisors to provide more assistance to the subordinate nurses. Moreover, hospitals should develop more training programs to keep nurses motivated.

  20. EXAMINATION OF THE SOLVENCY OF ENTERPRISES DEALING WITH ACCOMMODATION SERVICE PROVIDING IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAIN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika FENYVES

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important characteristics of tourism, as an economic and social phenomenon is that it has become a leading sector of the Hungarian economy. The importance of this sector is faithfully reflected by the fact that tourism gives nearly 9% of the GDP. Of course, aim of the enterprises of this type is the liquidity as well i.e. to maintain the short-term solvency that is essential for the long-term successful and smooth operation. The other aim of enterprises is to be solvent for the long-term as well, furthermore, to increase the corporate value and to maximize the ownership value. In our treatise, we have carried out the financial analysis and bankruptcy prediction of those enterprises providing accommodation service which are the biggest from the point of view of employment in the Northern Great Plain region. We think that, due to seasonality, even greater emphasis shall be placed on this area where useful information can be obtained from and the results of bankruptcy model can also provide further useful information and ”problem alerts”.

  1. Examination of SUV of regional activity concentration for simultaneous emission/transmission acquisition using the mask technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Shinji; Nishino, Masanari; Yamashita, Masato; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To achieve quantitative accuracy of simultaneous emission/transmission (SET) acquisition using the mask technique, we determined the factor of expression that derives the true transmission data from the measured transmission and emission data. We then evaluated the standardized uptake value (SUV) of the regional activity concentration derived respectively from the SET scans and conventional scans. First, to determine the attenuation factor for the transmission source when the photons of the cylindrical phantom filled with 18 F solution reached emission memory, SET scans were performed with a dummy transmission source and under the blank status of the transmission source. Second, to evaluate the SUV, we used a hollow-sphere phantom filled with 18 F solution whose activity concentrations were approximately 3 and 5 times that of the background. Then we performed conventional and SET scans of the phantom for solutions ranging from the higher concentration to the lower concentration. All of the data were reconstructed with the decay correction, and the SUV of each sphere was derived. The results demonstrated that, when the conventional factor was used, SUV was underestimated according to the increasing activity concentration of the solution. However, when a new factor that took into account the attenuation of the transmission source was used, there was no significant difference in the SUV. We estimated the SUV derived from the SET scans was within 3% for the large spheres and within 16% for the small spheres. (author)

  2. Structural Diversity in Conserved Regions Like the DRY-Motif among Viral 7TM Receptors-A Consequence of Evolutionary Pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Davis-Poynter, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Several herpes- and poxviruses have captured chemokine receptors from their hosts and modified these to their own benefit. The human and viral chemokine receptors belong to class A 7 transmembrane (TM) receptors which are characterized by several structural motifs like the DRY-motif in TM3...... and the C-terminal tail. In the DRY-motif, the arginine residue serves important purposes by being directly involved in G protein coupling. Interestingly, among the viral receptors there is a greater diversity in the DRY-motif compared to their endogenous receptor homologous. The C-terminal receptor tail...... constitutes another regulatory region that through a number of phosphorylation sites is involved in signaling, desensitization, and internalization. Also this region is more variable among virus-encoded 7TM receptors compared to human class A receptors. In this review we will focus on these two structural...

  3. Reducing the radiation dose to the eye lens region during CT brain examination: the potential beneficial effect of the combined use of bolus and a bismuth shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, C.W.K.; Chan, T.P.; Cheung, H.Y.; Wong, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Computed Tomography (CT) is the leading contributor to medical exposure to ionizing radiation. Although the use of CT brain scans for patients with head injuries and convulsions has shown a tremendous growth, it has raised substantial concerns in the general public because of the risk of radiation-induced cataracts: the current available strategies to reduce the radiation dose to the eye lens region are limited. Therefore, the present research project was initiated with the aim of evaluating the potential benefit of the combined use of bolus and a bismuth shield on reducing the radiation dose to the eye lens region during CT brain examination. Materials and methods: We conducted a series of phantom studies to measure the entrance surface dose (ESD) that is delivered to the eye lens region during CT brain examination under the effect of different scanning and shielding setups. Results: Our results indicated, during CT brain examination: (1) a drastic reduction of 92.5% in the ESD to the eye lens region was found when the CT gantry was tilted from 0 deg. (overall ESD = 30.7 mGy) to 30 deg. cranially (overall ESD = 2.4 mGy), and (2) when the CT gantry was positioned at 0 deg. (the common practice in the clinical setting), the setups with the application of a) a bismuth shield, b) a bismuth shield with a face shield (air gap), c) a bismuth shield with bolus, and d) a bismuth shield with bolus and an air gap can result in an acceptable level of image quality with a smaller overall ESD delivered to the eye lens region (overall ESD = 23.2 mGy, 24 mGy, 21 mGy and 19.9 mGy, respectively) than the setup without the bismuth shield applied (overall ESD = 30.7 mGy). Conclusion: When the primary beam scanning through the eye lens region is unavoidable during CT brain examination, the combined use of a bismuth shield with bolus and a face shield is an easy-to-use and inexpensive shielding setup to reduce the radiation dose delivered to the eye lens region while

  4. Causes and consequences of mid–21st-century rapid ice loss events simulated by the Rossby centre regional atmosphere-ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Paquin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations and modelling studies suggest that the Arctic climate is undergoing important transition. One manifestation of this change is seen in the rapid sea-ice cover decrease as experienced in 2007 and 2012. Although most numerical climate models cannot adequately reproduce the recent changes, some models produce similar Rapid Ice Loss Events (RILEs during the mid–21st-century. This study presents an analysis of four specific RILEs clustered around 2040 in three transient climate projections performed with the coupled Rossby Centre regional Atmosphere-Ocean model (RCAO. The analysis shows that long-term thinning causes increased vulnerability of the Arctic Ocean sea-ice cover. In the Atlantic sector, pre-conditioning (thinning of sea ice combined with anomalous atmospheric and oceanic heat transport causes large ice loss, while in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean sea-ice albedo feedback appears important, particularly along the retreating sea-ice margin. Although maximum sea-ice loss occurs in the autumn, response in surface air temperature occurs in early winter, caused by strong increase in ocean-atmosphere surface energy fluxes, mainly the turbulent fluxes. Synchronicity of the events around 2040 in the projections is caused by a strong large-scale atmospheric circulation anomaly at the Atlantic lateral boundary of the regional model. The limited impact on land is caused by vertical propagation of the surface heat anomaly rather than horizontal, caused by the absence of low-level temperature inversion over the ocean.

  5. Examining Sites of Recent Star Formation in the Galactic Center: A Closer Look at the Arched Filaments and H HII Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Matthew; Herter, Terry; Lau, Ryan; Morris, Mark; Mills, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    In this dissertation presentation, we analyze mid-infrared imaging of the Arched Filaments and H HII regions in the Galactic center taken with the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST). Examining these regions are of great interest because they provide insights on star formation in the Galactic center and the interactions massive stars have with the ISM. The Arched Filaments are a collection of molecular cloud ridges which are ionized by the nearby Arches star cluster, and give the appearance of large (~25 pc) arch-like structures. The H HII regions are a collection of HII regions just to the west of the Arches cluster (~5-15 pc). The origin of the stars powering the H HII regions is uncertain, as they may have formed in a nearby molecular cloud or could be ejected members of the Arches cluster. FORCAST observations of these regions were used to study the morphology and heating structure of the HII regions, as well as constrain their luminosities.Color-temperature maps of the Arched Filaments created with the FORCAST data reveals fairly uniform dust temperatures (~70-100 K) across the length filaments. The temperature uniformity of the clouds can be explained if they are heated by the Arches cluster but are located at a larger distance from the cluster than they appear. The density of the Arched Filaments clouds was estimated from the FORCAST data and was found to be below the threshold for tidal shearing, indicating that that the clouds will be destroyed by the strong tidal field near the Galactic center. To the west of the Arched Filaments, there is an interesting collection of HII regions, referred to as the H HII regions. These regions are likely heated by massive O/B type stars, and the morphology of the dust emission associated with these objects indicate a mixture of potential in situ formation mechanisms and interlopers. Interestingly, FORCAST imaging of the H HII regions also reveal several compact sources, which may be young

  6. Are electrostatic potentials between regions of different chemical composition measurable? The Gibbs-Guggenheim Principle reconsidered, extended and its consequences revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethica, Brian A

    2007-12-21

    As indicated by Gibbs and made explicit by Guggenheim, the electrical potential difference between two regions of different chemical composition cannot be measured. The Gibbs-Guggenheim Principle restricts the use of classical electrostatics in electrochemical theories as thermodynamically unsound with some few approximate exceptions, notably for dilute electrolyte solutions and concomitant low potentials where the linear limit for the exponential of the relevant Boltzmann distribution applies. The Principle invalidates the widespread use of forms of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation which do not include the non-electrostatic components of the chemical potentials of the ions. From a thermodynamic analysis of the parallel plate electrical condenser, employing only measurable electrical quantities and taking into account the chemical potentials of the components of the dielectric and their adsorption at the surfaces of the condenser plates, an experimental procedure to provide exceptions to the Principle has been proposed. This procedure is now reconsidered and rejected. No other related experimental procedures circumvent the Principle. Widely-used theoretical descriptions of electrolyte solutions, charged surfaces and colloid dispersions which neglect the Principle are briefly discussed. MD methods avoid the limitations of the Poisson-Bolzmann equation. Theoretical models which include the non-electrostatic components of the inter-ion and ion-surface interactions in solutions and colloid systems assume the additivity of dispersion and electrostatic forces. An experimental procedure to test this assumption is identified from the thermodynamics of condensers at microscopic plate separations. The available experimental data from Kelvin probe studies are preliminary, but tend against additivity. A corollary to the Gibbs-Guggenheim Principle is enunciated, and the Principle is restated that for any charged species, neither the difference in electrostatic potential nor the

  7. Tectonic erosion and consequent collapse of the Pacific margin of Costa Rica: Combined implications from ODP leg 170, seismic offshore data, and regional geology of the Nicoya Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, P.; Scholl, D. W.; Meschede, M.; McDougall-Reid, K.

    2001-01-01

    The convergent margin off the Pacific coast of the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica exhibits evidence for subduction erosion caused by the underthrusting Cocos plate. Critical evidence for efficacy of this process was recovered at the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drilling Site 1042 (Leg 170), positioned ???7 km landward of the Middle America trench axis off the Nicoya Peninsula. The primary drilling objective at this site was to identify the age and origin of a regionally extensive and prominent seismic discontinuity, the so-called base-of-slope sediment (BOSS) horizon or surface. The BOSS horizon, which can be traced landward from near the trench to the Nicoya coastal area and parallel to it for hundreds of kilometers, separates a low-velocity (??? 2.0-2.5 km s-1) sequence of slope sediment, from an underlying sequence of much higher-velocity (> 4-4.5 km s-1) rock. Site 1042 reached the acoustically defined BOSS horizon at a below sea level depth of ??? 3900 m and yielded a carbonate-cemented calcarenitic breccia of early-middle Miocene age. Sedimentological, geochemical, paleontological, and cement paragenesis data document that the breccia accumulated in a shallow water depositional environment. On the basis of coastal exposures, the BOSS horizon, as a margin-wide geologic interface, can be temporally and lithostratigraphically correlated to a regional angular unconformity. This unconformity, known as the Mal Pais unconformity, separates Neogene and younger shelf-to-littoral beds from the underlying mafic units of the Mesozoic Nicoya Complex and Cretaceous and early Tertiary sedimentary sequences. At Site 1042 it is inferred that tectonism caused the vertical subsidence of the early Neogene breccia from a shallow to a deep water setting. The Mal Pais unconformity of the BOSS horizon thus connects the rock fabric of the outermost part of margin to that of coastal Nicoya and implies that in the early Neogene the Nicoya shelf extended seaward to near the present

  8. Consequences of long-term severe industrial pollution for aboveground carbon and nitrogen pools in northern taiga forests at local and regional scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Sirkku; Zverev, Vitali; Bergman, Igor; Kozlov, Mikhail V

    2015-12-01

    Boreal coniferous forests act as an important sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. The overall tree carbon (C) sink in the forests of Europe has increased during the past decades, especially due to management and elevated nitrogen (N) deposition; however, industrial atmospheric pollution, primarily sulphur dioxide and heavy metals, still negatively affect forest biomass production at different spatial scales. We report local and regional changes in forest aboveground biomass, C and N concentrations in plant tissues, and C and N pools caused by long-term atmospheric emissions from a large point source, the nickel-copper smelter in Monchegorsk, in north-western Russia. An increase in pollution load (assessed as Cu concentration in forest litter) caused C to increase in foliage but C remained unchanged in wood, while N decreased in foliage and increased in wood, demonstrating strong effects of pollution on resource translocation between green and woody tissues. The aboveground C and N pools were primarily governed by plant biomass, which strongly decreased with an increase in pollution load. In our study sites (located 1.6-39.7 km from the smelter) living aboveground plant biomass was 76 to 4888 gm(-2), and C and N pools ranged 35-2333 g C m(-2) and 0.5-35.1 g N m(-2), respectively. We estimate that the aboveground plant biomass is reduced due to chronic exposure to industrial air pollution over an area of about 107,200 km2, and the total (aboveground and belowground) loss of phytomass C stock amounts to 4.24×10(13) g C. Our results emphasize the need to account for the overall impact of industrial polluters on ecosystem C and N pools when assessing the C and N dynamics in northern boreal forests because of the marked long-term negative effects of their emissions on structure and productivity of plant communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The selection of ultrasonic transducers for inspection of pipeline girth welds. Vol. 3. Evaluation of the pitch-catch technique for examination of the body region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, A G; Fingerhut, M P; Dorling, D V

    1988-10-01

    Research was conducted to develop an ultrasonic inspection design for the nondestructive evaluation of pipeline girth welds made by the mechanized gas metal arc (GMA) welding process for onshore and offshore pipeline construction. This report describes the work carried out to evaluate the performance to the pitch-catch technique with respect to its ability to examine the body region of mechanized GMA welds in 19.5 mm thick material. Evaluation of the pitch-catch technique was carried out on simulated and real weld defects. Results show that an inspection design method and criteria can be specified for the detection of lack of sidewall fusion defects in the body region of mechanized GMA welds. The criteria specified a pitch-catch technique using a 2.25 MHz 45{degrees} transmitter and a 2.25 MHz 55{degrees} receiver probe. A single pair of these transducers can inspect wall thickness from 9.7 mm to 23.0 mm. The pitch-catch technique evaluated on 19.5 mm wall thickness materials demonstrated that the detection goal of projected depth with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 12dB could be met, and that no problems occurred with false indications or missed defects. High sensitivities to small defects in the body region were obtained using a single pair of pitch-catch probes that inspected the body region as a single plane. 4 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  11. JJ1017 committee report: image examination order codes--standardized codes for imaging modality, region, and direction with local expansion: an extension of DICOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Michio; Kuranishi, Makoto; Sukenobu, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tani, Shigeki; Sakusabe, Takaya; Nakajima, Takashi; Morimura, Shinya; Kabata, Shun

    2002-06-01

    The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) standard includes parts regarding nonimage data information, such as image study ordering data and performed procedure data, and is used for sharing information between HIS/RIS and modality systems, which is essential for IHE. To bring such parts of the DICOM standard into force in Japan, a joint committee of JIRA and JAHIS established the JJ1017 management guideline, specifying, for example, which items are legally required in Japan, while remaining optional in the DICOM standard. In Japan, the contents of orders from referring physicians for radiographic examinations include details of the examination. Such details are not used typically by referring physicians requesting radiographic examinations in the United States, because radiologists in the United States often determine the examination protocol. The DICOM standard has code tables for examination type, region, and direction for image examination orders. However, this investigation found that it does not include items that are detailed sufficiently for use in Japan, because of the above-mentioned reason. To overcome these drawbacks, we have generated the JJ1017 code for these 3 codes for use based on the JJ1017 guidelines. This report introduces the JJ1017 code. These codes (the study type codes in particular) must be expandable to keep up with technical advances in equipment. Expansion has 2 directions: width for covering more categories and depth for specifying the information in more detail (finer categories). The JJ1017 code takes these requirements into consideration and clearly distinguishes between the stem part as the common term and the expansion. The stem part of the JJ1017 code partially utilizes the DICOM codes to remain in line with the DICOM standard. This work is an example of how local requirements can be met by using the DICOM standard and extending it.

  12. Contrasting exome constancy and regulatory region variation in the gene encoding CYP3A4: an examination of the extent and potential implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creemer, Olivia J; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Ekong, Rosemary; Tarekegn, Ayele; Plaster, Christopher; Bains, Ripudaman K; Itan, Yuval; Bekele, Endashaw; Bradman, Neil

    2016-06-01

    CYP3A4 expression varies up to 100-fold among individuals, and, to date, genetic causes remain elusive. As a major drug-metabolizing enzyme, elucidation of such genetic causes would increase the potential for introducing personalized dose adjustment of therapies involving CYP3A4 drug substrates. The foetal CYP3A isoform, CYP3A7, is reported to be expressed in ∼10% of European adults and may thus contribute towards the metabolism of endogenous substances and CYP3A drug substrates. However, little is known about the distribution of the variant expressed in the adult. We resequenced the exons, flanking introns, regulatory elements and 3'UTR of CYP3A4 in five Ethiopian populations and incorporated data from the 1000 Genomes Project. Using bioinformatic analysis, we assessed likely consequences of observed CYP3A4 genomic variation. We also conducted the first extensive geographic survey of alleles associated with adult expression of CYP3A7 - that is, CYP3A7*1B and CYP3A7*1C. Ethiopia contained 60 CYP3A4 variants (26 novel) and more variants (>1%) than all non-African populations combined. No nonsynonymous mutation was found in the homozygous form or at more than 2.8% in any population. Seventy-nine per cent of haplotypes contained 3'UTR and/or regulatory region variation with striking pairwise population differentiation, highlighting the potential for interethnic variation in CYP3A4 expression. Conversely, coding region variation showed that significant interethnic variation is unlikely at the protein level. CYP3A7*1C was found at up to 17.5% in North African populations and in significant linkage disequilibrium with CYP3A5*3, indicating that adult expression of the foetal isoform is likely to be accompanied by reduced or null expression of CYP3A5.

  13. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk in computed tomography examinations in some selected CT facilities in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, R. K.

    2012-01-01

    The effective dose and cancer risk were determined for patients undergoing seven different types of CT examinations in two CT facilities in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. The two facilities, namely; the Diagnostic Centre Ltd and Cocoa Clinic were chosen because of their significant patient throughput. The effective dose was from patient data namely age, sex, height, weight and technique factors; namely scan length, KVp (Kilovolts peak), mAs (milliamperes per second) and CTDIv from the control console of the CT machines. The effective dose was also estimated using the dose length product (DLP) and k Coefficients which is the anatomic region specific conversion factors. The cancer risk for each patient for a particular examination was determined from the effective dose, age and sex of each patient with the help of BEIR VII. In all, a total number of 800 adult patients with 400 from each of the two CT facilities were compiled. From Diagnostic Centre Ltd, the average effective dose was 5.61mSv in the range of 1.41mSv to 13.34mSv with average BMI of 26.19kg/m 2 in the range of 16.90kg/m 2 to 48.28kg/m 2 for all types of examinations. The average cancer risk was 0.0458 Sv - 1 for 400 patients in the range of 0.0001 Sv - 1 to 0.3036 Sv -1 compared with a population of 900 patients undergoing CT examination per year. From Cocoa Clinic, the average effective dose was 3.91MSv in the range of 0.54mSv to 27.32mSv with an average BMI of 25.59 kg/m 2 in the range of 17.18kg/m 2 to 35.34kg/m 2 and the average cancer risk was 0.0371 Sv - 1 in the range of 0.0001 Sv - 1 and 0.7125 Sv -1 . Some of the values were within the range of values of typical for typical effective dose for CT examinations reported by the ICRP. It was evident from this study that the variations in scanning parameters had significant impact on the effective doses to patient for similar CT examinations among the two facilities.(au)

  14. Total Mini-Mental State Examination score and regional cerebral blood flow using Z score imaging and automated ROI analysis software in subjects with memory impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Eiji; Shiozaki, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Nobukazu; Togo, Takashi; Odawara, Toshinari; Oka, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2008-01-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is considered a useful supplementary method to diagnose dementia and evaluate the severity of cognitive disturbance. However, the region of the cerebrum that correlates with the MMSE score is not clear. Recently, a new method was developed to analyze regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using a Z score imaging system (eZIS). This system shows changes of rCBF when compared with a normal database. In addition, a three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest (ROI) template (3DSRT), fully automated ROI analysis software was developed. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between rCBF changes and total MMSE score using these new methods. The association between total MMSE score and rCBF changes was investigated in 24 patients (mean age±standard deviation (SD) 71.5±9.2 years; 6 men and 18 women) with memory impairment using eZIS and 3DSRT. Step-wise multiple regression analysis was used for multivariate analysis, with the total MMSE score as the dependent variable and rCBF change in 24 areas as the independent variable. Total MMSE score was significantly correlated only with the reduction of left hippocampal perfusion but not with right (P<0.01). Total MMSE score is an important indicator of left hippocampal function. (author)

  15. Note related to the examination of fitness to service of the vessel bottom and cover of the Flamanville EPR reactor. Pedagogical sheet: Analysis of consequences of the fabrication anomaly of the Flamanville EPR reactor vessel bottom and cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    After having recalled the context related to the discovery of a fabrication anomaly in the chemical composition of the steel used in the central part of the vessel cover and bottom of the Flamanville EPR reactor, this report presents the approach proposed and adopted by Areva for the justification of the mechanical strength of the vessel cover and bottom. It indicates the main conclusions of the IRSN and ASN on various issues addressed by the audit performed by AREVA: fabrication controls, material characterisation, thermal-mechanical loadings, mechanical analysis of a risk of sudden failure. The next part proposes a pedagogical sheet of consequences of a fabrication anomaly: presentation of vessel structure and specificities, report of the discovery of this anomaly and main consequence (steel embrittlement), expertise approach, expertise conclusions (control of the absence of any deleterious defect, characterisation of material mechanical properties, assessment of thermal-mechanical loadings, assessment of a risk of sudden failure, and in-service follow-up)

  16. The structure of long tubular bones fractures of lower extremity by the data of the regional bureau of forensic-medical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savka I.H.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the research is carrying out forensic-medical analysis of cases from expert’s practice with fractures of the long bones based on the findings of the Regional Bureau of Forensic-Medical Examination over 2009-2012 years period. The research has been carried out using methods of statistical and comparative analysis. Their distribution by gender, age, localization, character and type of external influence, the conditions of their occurrence and participation of other persons has been outlined. Fractures of lower extremity bones make up from 15,8 to 22,5% of all the cases of mechanical trauma with lethal outcomes. Therewith male persons suffer more often from injury of the left extremity at different day time and season. The principal mechanism of their origin is injury resulting from road accidents in the countryside with the participation of other persons.

  17. Migration background and childhood overweight in the Hannover Region in 2010-2014: a population-based secondary data analysis of school entry examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yusheng; von Lengerke, Thomas; Walter, Ulla; Dreier, Maren

    2018-05-01

    Overweight and obesity constitute a global epidemic with rates that are increasing rapidly in children. The aim of the present study was to examine ethnic differences in the prevalence of overweight in pre-school children in a multicultural context. Data were collected from a compulsory school entry examination in the Hannover Region, Germany (n = 50,716) from 2010 to 2014. The prevalence of overweight (including pre-obesity and obesity status) and obesity was estimated using a German national reference. The migration status of the children was based on the parent's migration history. Multivariable logistic and hierarchical multinomial regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the overweight, pre-obesity, and obesity status. The prevalence of overweight was significantly higher among migrant children (12.7%) than among the non-migrant children (6.9%). After adjusting for socioeconomic and child development variables, migration background was strongly associated with weight status. The Turkish migrant children showed the highest odds of being pre-obesity (OR 2.05, 95%CI 1.7-2.56) and obesity (OR 2.09, 95%CI 1.67-2.77) compared to non-migrant children. Ethnic and social inequalities exist in childhood overweight among pre-school children in the Hannover Region. Thus, appropriate interventions targeting high-risk migrant groups are needed. What is Known: • The current trend of prevalence rates in Germany for overweight and obesity of pre-school children is becoming stable. • Prevalence of overweight and obesity is clearly higher among migrant children than among non-migrant children. What is New: • This article reveals ethnic variance among different migrant groups. • Turkish migrant children have a higher rate of prevalence even compared to other migrant groups. • Length of child day care attendance fails to exert a strong influence on overweight after adjusting for socio-economic and child development variables.

  18. Examination of aerosol distributions and radiative effects over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea region during ICARB using satellite data and a general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cherian

    2012-02-01

    between satellite data at a 1° spatial, but only twice-daily temporal resolution, and the ship-based sunphotometer data at a much finer spatial, but daily-average temporal resolution. Examination of the satellite data further showed that the year 2006 is representative for the five-year period for which satellite data were available. Finally, we estimated the clear-sky solar direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF. We found that the cruise represents well the regional-seasonal mean forcings. Constraining simulated forcings using the observed AOD distributions yields a robust estimate of regional-seasonal mean DARF of −8.6, −21.4 and +12.9 W m−2 at the top of the atmosphere (TOA, at the surface (SUR and in the atmosphere (ATM, respectively, for the BoB region, and over the AS, of, −6.8, −12.8, and +6 W m−2 at TOA, SUR, and ATM, respectively.

  19. An examination of the causes, consequences, and policy responses to the migration of highly trained health personnel from the Philippines: the high cost of living/leaving-a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Palaganas, Erlinda; Spitzer, Denise L; Kabamalan, Maria Midea M; Sanchez, Marian C; Caricativo, Ruel; Runnels, Vivien; Labonté, Ronald; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2017-03-31

    Dramatic increases in the migration of human resources for health (HRH) from developing countries like the Philippines can have consequences on the sustainability of health systems. In this paper, we trace the outflows of HRH from the Philippines, map out its key causes and consequences, and identify relevant policy responses. This mixed method study employed a decentered, comparative approach that involved three phases: (a) a scoping review on health workers' migration of relevant policy documents and academic literature on health workers' migration from the Philippines; and primary data collection with (b) 37 key stakeholders and (c) household surveys with seven doctors, 329 nurses, 66 midwives, and 18 physical therapists. Filipino health worker migration is best understood within the context of macro-, meso-, and micro-level factors that are situated within the political, economic, and historical/colonial legacy of the country. Underfunding of the health system and un- or underemployment were push factors for migration, as were concerns for security in the Philippines, the ability to practice to full scope or to have opportunities for career advancement. The migration of health workers has both negative and positive consequences for the Philippine health system and its health workers. Stakeholders focused on issues such as on brain drain, gain, and circulation, and on opportunities for knowledge and technology transfer. Concomitantly, migration has resulted in the loss of investment in human capital. The gap in the supply of health workers has affected the quality of care delivered, especially in rural areas. The opening of overseas opportunities has commercialized health education, compromised its quality, and stripped the country of skilled learning facilitators. The social cost of migration has affected émigrés and their families. At the household level, migration has engendered increased consumerism and materialism and fostered dependency on overseas

  20. Chernobyl: what sanitary consequences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.

    2001-11-01

    Because of its public health, ecological and industrial consequences, the Chernobyl accident has become a myth which serves as the focus of many fears, justified or not. no one can question the seriousness of the event, but after fifteen years there is still no agreement about the effect it has had or will have on public health. For example, the total number of deaths attributed to Chernobyl varies from less than a hundred to several millions and congenital malformations from negligible to cataclysmic. Effects on public health may be calculated from data on contamination, from the dose received and from the risk, all three of which are likely to be very roughly known; or they may be evaluated on the spot, either by epidemiological studies or by examining medical registers. This report makes an inventory of the different risks and takes stock on them. (N.C.)

  1. Examining Dense Data Usage near the Regions with Severe Storms in All-Sky Microwave Radiance Data Assimilation and Impacts on GEOS Hurricane Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Jin, Jianjun; McCarty, Will; El Akkraoui, Amal; Todling, Ricardo; Gelaro, Ron

    2018-01-01

    Many numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers assimilate radiances affected by clouds and precipitation from microwave sensors, with the expectation that these data can provide critical constraints on meteorological parameters in dynamically sensitive regions to make significant impacts on forecast accuracy for precipitation. The Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center assimilates all-sky microwave radiance data from various microwave sensors such as all-sky GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) radiance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS), which includes the GEOS atmospheric model, the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) atmospheric analysis system, and the Goddard Aerosol Assimilation System (GAAS). So far, most of NWP centers apply same large data thinning distances, that are used in clear-sky radiance data to avoid correlated observation errors, to all-sky microwave radiance data. For example, NASA GMAO is applying 145 km thinning distances for most of satellite radiance data including microwave radiance data in which all-sky approach is implemented. Even with these coarse observation data usage in all-sky assimilation approach, noticeable positive impacts from all-sky microwave data on hurricane track forecasts were identified in GEOS-5 system. The motivation of this study is based on the dynamic thinning distance method developed in our all-sky framework to use of denser data in cloudy and precipitating regions due to relatively small spatial correlations of observation errors. To investigate the benefits of all-sky microwave radiance on hurricane forecasts, several hurricane cases selected between 2016-2017 are examined. The dynamic thinning distance method is utilized in our all-sky approach to understand the sources and mechanisms to explain the benefits of all-sky microwave radiance data from various microwave radiance sensors like Advanced Microwave Sounder Unit

  2. Literacy in Somali: Linguistic Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, Douglas; Hared, Mohamed

    1991-01-01

    Linguistic consequences of literacy in Somalia are examined in a review of the literature and through a study of five dimensions of variation among Somali registers and the expansion of linguistic variation in Somali resulting from the introduction of written registers. (36 references) (LB)

  3. Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Local Programs Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... determine how a community is designed. Consequences of Obesity More Immediate Health Risks Obesity during childhood can ...

  4. Legal consequences of kleptomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Davis, Andrew A; Kim, Suck Won

    2009-12-01

    Although studies have examined clinical characteristics of kleptomania, no previous studies have examined the legal consequences of kleptomania. From 2001 to 2007, 101 adult subjects (n = 27 [26.7%] males) with DSM-IV kleptomania were assessed on sociodemographics and clinical characteristics including symptom severity, comorbidity, and legal repercussions. Of 101 subjects with kleptomania, 73.3% were female. Mean age of shoplifting onset was 19.4 +/- 12.0 years, and subjects shoplifted a mean of 8.2 +/- 11.0 years prior to meeting full criteria for kleptomania. Co-occurring depressive, substance use, and impulse control disorders were common. Sixty-nine subjects with kleptomania (68.3%) had been arrested, 36.6% had been arrested but not convicted, 20.8% had been convicted and incarcerated after conviction, while only 10.9% had been convicted and not incarcerated after conviction. Kleptomania is associated with significant legal repercussions. The findings emphasize the need for rigorous treatment approaches to target kleptomania symptoms and prevent re-offending.

  5. Regional development and regional policy

    OpenAIRE

    Šabić, Dejan; Vujadinović, Snežana

    2017-01-01

    Economic polarization is a process that is present at global, national and regional level. Economic activity is extremely spatially concentrated. Cities and developed regions use the agglomeration effect to attract labor and capital, thus achieving more favorable economic conditions than the agrarian region. Scientific research and European experiences over the past decades have contributed to the discrepancy among theorists about the causes and consequences of regional inequalities. Regional...

  6. Neurological Consequences of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Phillipe D.; Hinder, Lucy M.; Callaghan, Brian C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity, primarily a consequence of poor dietary choices and an increased sedentary lifestyle, has become a global pandemic that brings with it enormous medical, social, and economic challenges. Not only does obesity increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers, but it is also recognized as a key driver of other metabolic syndrome (MetS) components. These components include insulin resistance, hyperglycemia with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, and are underlying contributors to systemic metabolic dysfunction. More recently, obesity and diet-induced metabolic dysfunction have been identified as risk factors for the development of a wide variety of neurological disorders in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. An abundance of literature has shown that obesity is associated with mild cognitive impairment and altered hippocampal structure and function, and there is a robust correlation between obesity and Alzheimer’s type dementia. Similarly, many reports show that both the autonomic and somatic components of the peripheral nervous system are impacted by obesity. The autonomic nervous system, under control of the hypothalamus, displays altered catabolic and anabolic processes in obese individuals attributed to sympathetic-parasympathetic imbalances. A close association also exists between obesity and polyneuropathy, a complication most commonly found in prediabetic and diabetic patients, and is likely secondary to a combination of obesity-induced dyslipidemia with hyperglycemia. This review will outline the pathophysiological development of obesity and dyslipidemia, discuss the adverse impact of these conditions on the nervous system, and provide evidence for lipotoxicity and metabolic inflammation as the drivers underlying the neurological consequences of obesity. In addition, this review will examine the benefits of lifestyle and surgical interventions in obesity-induced neurological disorders. PMID

  7. Cognitive function of 320 people over 65 years from longevous areas in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region:Feasibility of the mini-mental state examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeguang Wu; Bin Wei; Xiaoming Zhang; Guobing Zhang; Chunlin Zhang; Zhibin Li; Chenghan Wei; Jinchao Chen; Donglan Huang; Rong Zhao; Jinrui Huang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) of Chinese version has been widely used to survey cognitive function of elder people; especially, it shows a good reliability and validity for elder people in city.However, whether it is beneficial to measure cognitive function of elder people in countries in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region should be further studied.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility, reliability and validity of the cognitive function among the elderly people aged over 65 years from Jiazhuan in Bama County of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region by using the MMSE of Chinese version.DESIGN: Prevalence survey.SETTING: Department of Psychology, Nanjing Municipal Social Welfare Hospital; Department of Psychology,Yizhou Municipal Jiulong Railroad Hospital; Long Life's Institute of Bama County.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 320 old persons over 65 years old were sampled on the basis of the unit of village of Jiazhuan in Bama County of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region from the 12th to 28th, March 2004. All the subjects provided the confirmed consents.METHODS: ① Mental Health Questionnaire of long life's old man was adopted including demographic data and international standardized MMSE in Chinese. The survey of MMSE was divided into two phases: In the first phase, every case was examined by MMSE. The positive result was decided by the education level. Illiterate group, who was educated less than one year, then his MMSE scores must be less than 17; primary school group, who was educated from 1 to 6 years, then his MMSE must be less than 20; middle school group, who was educated more than 7 years, then his MMSE must be less than 24. In the second phase, these cases with positive MMSE score were given the neuro-psycho and mental health examination to confirm the dementia types after diagnosis. The content of the questionnaire was revised properly without changing the meaning of the questionnaire. The interclass correlation coefficient of MMSE was 0.89.

  8. Bridging regional innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    2013-01-01

    to assess the progress of integration in the regions, as well as the effect of cross-border innovation policies. Consequently, important questions are left unanswered, including the central research question of this paper: does the sudden removal of significant physical barriers directly impacts......The topics of regional innovation systems (RIS) and cross-border regions attract increasing attention, but few studies combine the themes. Further, the existing empirical studies of cross-border innovation and knowledge creation analyse one case at one point in time, thus, making it difficult...... collaboration activity in cross-border innovation systems? This paper examines regional integration in the Oresund Region over time. It deals with a specific part of the RIS, as it analyses research collaboration between actors from the Danish and Swedish sides, with a specific emphasis on the biotech industry...

  9. Chaotic examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildirici, Melike; Sonustun, Fulya Ozaksoy; Sonustun, Bahri

    2018-01-01

    In the regards of chaos theory, new concepts such as complexity, determinism, quantum mechanics, relativity, multiple equilibrium, complexity, (continuously) instability, nonlinearity, heterogeneous agents, irregularity were widely questioned in economics. It is noticed that linear models are insufficient for analyzing unpredictable, irregular and noncyclical oscillations of economies, and for predicting bubbles, financial crisis, business cycles in financial markets. Therefore, economists gave great consequence to use appropriate tools for modelling non-linear dynamical structures and chaotic behaviors of the economies especially in macro and the financial economy. In this paper, we aim to model the chaotic structure of exchange rates (USD-TL and EUR-TL). To determine non-linear patterns of the selected time series, daily returns of the exchange rates were tested by BDS during the period from January 01, 2002 to May 11, 2017 which covers after the era of the 2001 financial crisis. After specifying the non-linear structure of the selected time series, it was aimed to examine the chaotic characteristic for the selected time period by Lyapunov Exponents. The findings verify the existence of the chaotic structure of the exchange rate returns in the analyzed time period.

  10. Estimation of kidneys and urinary bladder doses based on the region of interest in 18fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography examination: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Farida Aimi; Bashah, Farahnaz Ahmad Anwar; Yassin, Ihsan M; Fathinul Fikri, Ahmad Saad; Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal

    2017-06-01

    Kidneys and urinary bladder are common physiologic uptake sites of 18fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) causing increased exposure of low energy ionizing radiation to these organs. Accurate measurement of organ dose is vital as 18 F-FDG is directly exposed to the organs. Organ dose from 18 F-FDG PET is calculated according to the injected 18 F-FDG activity with the application of dose coefficients established by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). But this dose calculation technique is not directly measured from these organs; rather it is calculated based on total injected activity of radiotracer prior to scanning. This study estimated the 18 F-FDG dose to the kidneys and urinary bladder in whole body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) examination by comparing dose from total injected activity of 18 F-FDG (calculated dose) and dose from organs activity based on the region of interest (ROI) (measured dose). Nine subjects were injected intravenously with the mean 18 F-FDG dose of 292.42 MBq prior to whole body PET/CT scanning. Kidneys and urinary bladder doses were estimated by using two approaches which are the total injected activity of 18 F-FDG and organs activity concentration of 18 F-FDG based on drawn ROI with the application of recommended dose coefficients for 18 F-FDG described in the ICRP 80 and ICRP 106. The mean percentage difference between calculated dose and measured dose ranged from 98.95% to 99.29% for the kidneys based on ICRP 80 and 98.96% to 99.32% based on ICRP 106. Whilst, the mean percentage difference between calculated dose and measured dose was 97.08% and 97.27% for urinary bladder based on ICRP 80 while 96.99% and 97.28% based on ICRP 106. Whereas, the range of mean percentage difference between calculated and measured organ doses derived from ICRP 106 and ICRP 80 for kidney doses were from 17.00% to 40.00% and for urinary bladder dose was 18.46% to 18.75%. There is a significant

  11. Antecedents and consequences of environmental stewardship in boundary-spanning B2B teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, de J.C.; Jong, de A.; Wetzels, M.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine antecedents and consequences of environmental stewardship in frontline business-to-business teams. On the basis of data from members of 34 teams organized into regional networks, they demonstrate the differential impact of team environmental stewardship on customer satisfaction

  12. Secular trends in regional differences in nutritional biomarkers and self-reported dietary intakes among American adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1988-1994 to 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ashima K; Graubard, Barry I

    2018-04-01

    To understand the contribution of regional differentials in dietary exposures to regional gradients in health, we examined 20-year trends in the association of US census region of residence with nutritional biomarkers and dietary intakes of American adults. Observational. The biomarker and 24 h dietary recall data were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) conducted during 1988-1994 and 1999-2010. The US census region was operationalized as Northeast, Midwest, South and West. Nutritional biomarker outcomes were serum folate, vitamins B6, B12, C, D and E, and carotenoids; dietary outcomes were intakes of nutrients, food groups and eating patterns. US adults, n>8000-40 000 for biomarkers and >43 000 for dietary outcomes. The interactions of survey time period and region were not significant for the examined biomarker and dietary outcomes, indicating similar secular trends among regions. The main effect of region was significant for all nutritional biomarkers except serum vitamin B6, most dietary micronutrients, food groups and eating patterns (P<0·001). The mean serum folate, vitamins B12, C and E, and all carotenoid (except lycopene) biomarker levels, and intakes of dietary fibre, vitamins A, E, C and B6, folate, K, Ca, Mg and Fe, fruits, vegetables and whole grains, were higher in the West and Northeast regions, relative to the South and Midwest regions. Overall, the regional gradients in dietary exposure, expressed objectively as biomarkers or as self-reported nutrient and food group intakes, paralleled trajectories reported for health outcomes and were remarkably persistent over time.

  13. Consequences and detection of invalid exogeneity conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemczyk, J.

    2009-01-01

    Estimators for econometric relationships require observations on at least as many exogenous variables as the model has unknown coefficients. This thesis examines techniques to classify variables as being either exogenous or endogenous, and investigates the consequences of invalid classifications.

  14. Guerrilla Violence in Colombia: Examining Causes and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Ecuador’s Alfaro 27 Walker, Phyllis, "National Security", in Colombia a Country Study, Washington, 1990, p. 300. 28 Registraduria Nacional del Estado Civil...necessary to profoundly transform institutions. On several occasions, the old political 114 Informe Financiero Contraloria General de la Rep~blica, June...Societies, Princeton Press, 1988. Informe Financiero Contraloria General de la Repzblica, Bogota, 1988. Kalmanovitz, Salomon, Economia del

  15. Investigating Miranda waiver decisions: An examination of the rational consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Hayley L; Rogers, Richard; Steadham, Jennifer A; Fiduccia, Chelsea E

    2015-01-01

    Millions of custodial suspects waive their Miranda rights each year without the benefit of legal counsel. Miranda understanding, appreciation, and reasoning abilities are essential to courts' acceptance of Miranda waivers (Grisso, 2003; Rogers & Shuman, 2005). The question posed to forensic psychologists and psychiatrists in the disputed Miranda waivers is whether a particular waiver decision was knowing, intelligent, and voluntary. Despite the remarkable development of Miranda research in recent decades, studies have generally focused on understanding and appreciation of Miranda rights, but with comparatively minimal emphasis on Miranda reasoning and attendant waiver decisions. Research on defendants' decisional capacities constitutes a critical step in further developing theoretical and clinical models for Miranda waiver decisions. The current study evaluated Miranda waiver decisions for 80 pretrial defendants from two Oklahoma jails to study systematically how rational decision abilities affect defendants' personal waiver decisions. In stark contrast to what was expected, many defendants were able to identify a rational decisional process in their own legal cases, yet cast such reasoning aside and chose a completely contradictory Miranda waiver decision. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Equity in Whom Gets Studied: A Systematic Review Examining Geographical Region, Gender, Commodity, and Employment Context in Research of Low Back Disorders in Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Catherine; Khan, Muhammad Idress; Adebayo, Olugbenga; Boden, Catherine; Bath, Brenna

    2015-01-01

    Farmers are at high risk of having low back disorders (LBDs). Agriculture employs half the global workforce, but it is unclear whether all farming populations are represented equitably in the LBD literature. This systematic review quantifies the number and quality of research studies by geographical region, agricultural commodity, and farmer characteristics. MEDLINE, Web of Science, CINAHL, Scopus, and Embase databases were searched using conceptual groups of search terms: "farming" and "LBD." Screening and extraction were performed by two researchers in parallel, then reconciled through discussion. Extracted study characteristics included location of study; commodity produced; worker sex, ethnicity, and migration status; type of employment; and study quality. These were compared with agricultural employment statistics from the International Labour Organization and World Bank. From 125 articles, roughly half (67) did not specify the employment context of the participants in terms of migration status or subsistence versus commercial farming. Although in many regions worldwide women make up the bulk of the workforce, only a minority of low back disorder studies focus on women. Despite the predominance of the agricultural workforce in developing nations, 91% of included studies were conducted in developed nations. There was no significant difference in study quality by geographic region. The nature of the world's agricultural workforce is poorly represented by the literature when it comes to LBD research. If developing nations, female sex, and migrant work are related to increased vulnerability, then these groups need more representation to achieve equitable occupational health study.

  17. The Implementation and Development of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination in the Community Pharmacy Course of a Select Gulf-Region Academic Institution (Ras Al Khaimah College of Pharmaceutical Sciences): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Amad Mohammed Jamil; Nagavi, B.G.; Hachim, Mahmood Y.; Mossa, Omar H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) were used to assess translational pharmacotherapeutic skills of a Gulf-region representative academic institution. Aim: The aim of the current study was to assess the clinical skills of students enrolled within the third year Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) programme within Ras Al…

  18. Aging Reservoirs in a Changing Climate: Examining Storage Loss of Large Reservoirs and Variability of Sedimentation Rate in a Dominant Cropland Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, V.; Kastens, J.; deNoyelles, F.; Huggins, D.; Martinko, E.

    2015-12-01

    Dam construction has multiple environmental and hydrological consequences including impacts on upstream and downstream ecosystems, water chemistry, and streamflow. Behind the dam the reservoir can trap sediment from the stream and fill over time. With increasing population and drinking and irrigation water demands, particularly in the areas that have highly variable weather and extended drought periods such as the United States Great Plains, reservoir sedimentation escalates water management concerns. Under nearly all projected climate change scenarios we expect that reservoir water storage and management will come under intense scrutiny because of the extensive use of interstate river compacts in the Great Plains. In the state of Kansas, located in the Great Plains, bathymetric surveys have been completed during the last decade for many major lakes by the Kansas Biological Survey, Kansas Water Office, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In this paper, we studied the spatial and temporal changes of reservoir characteristics including sedimentation yield, depletion rate, and storage capacity loss for 24 federally-operated reservoirs in Kansas. These reservoirs have an average age of about 50 years and collectively have lost approximately 15% of their original capacity, with the highest annual observed single-reservoir depletion rate of 0.84% and sedimentation yield of 1,685 m3 km-2 yr-1.

  19. Phenomenological consequences of supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.; Littenberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric theories, and with the implications of such theories for future high energy machines. The paper represents the work of a subgroup at the meeting. The authors are concerned only with high energy predictions of supersymmetry; low energy consequences (for example in the K/sub o/K-bar/sub o/ system) are discussed in the context of future experiments by another group, and will be mentioned briefly only in the context of constraining existing models. However a brief section is included on the implication for proton decay, although detailed experimental questions are not discussed

  20. The selection of ultrasonic transducers for inspection of pipeline girth welds. Vol. 2. Evaluation of a unique creeping wave probe for examination of the cap region in pipeline girth welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingerhut, M P; Glover, A G; Dorling, D V

    1988-10-01

    This work is part of a program aimed at developing an ultrasonic inspection design for the nondestructive evaluation of pipeline girth welds made by the mechanized gas metal arc (GMA) welding process for onshore and offshore pipeline construction. The feasibility of using creeping waves for examination of the cap region was investigated and, as a result, a specification for an experimental creeping wave transducer developed and a probe was designed to provide a beam oriented nearly perpendicular to expected defects in the cap region of the weld. The performance of this experimental creeping wave transducer was evaluated with respect to its ability to detect simulated and real weld defects in the cap region of mechanized GMA welds in 9.5 mm material. The probe was successful in detecting planar lack of sidewall fusion welding defects with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 12 dB, at depths of up to 4.2 mm from the plate surface. This indicates maximum pipe wall thicknesses of 10.9 mm may be satisfactorily examined before additional probes are required, assuming complete coverage in the root region is provided by other probes. The creeping wave probe not only performed well in the detection of real weld defects in the cap region for which it was intended, but also showed potential for detecting and discriminating some planar defects in the root region. 9 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Computed tomography, conventional X-ray examination, scintigraphy and tumour markers in thyroid carcinomas and suspected metastisation into the thoracic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintz, P.

    1986-01-01

    In 43 patients suffering from differentiated carcinomas of thyroid, who had previously been subjected to thyroidectomy and curative radioiodine treatment, CT scans of the thorax were used in addition to the usual X-ray examinations in order to exclude the formation of pulmonary metastases. Separate analyses of 45 records on the basis of the stage of the tumour when it was diagnosed and the behaviour of tumour marker hTg under suppression with L-thyroxin and endogenous stimulation during the follow-up permitted patient groups to be defined that are most at risk of metastisation. The results of the three methods of medical imaging were compared to those obtained using tumour marker hTg. The rate of findings revealed by CT, scintigraphy and X-ray examination was calculated with reference to the total number of results suggesting pulmonary metastisation and amounted to 89%, 48% and 44%, respectively. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Systemic Analysis of Food Supply and Distribution Systems in City-Region Systems—An Examination of FAO’s Policy Guidelines towards Sustainable Agri-Food Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Armendáriz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The world is continuously transforming to supply growing cities and urbanization processes are still driving important changes in our current food systems. Future sustainability constraints are emphasizing that Food Supply and Distribution Systems (FSDS are deeply embedded in city-region systems with specific technical and socio-ecological characteristics. This paper aims to provide a systemic understanding on FSDS focusing the integration of urban and rural structures considering the system biophysical boundaries and societal targets. A qualitative framework model, based on the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO’s FSDS literature, has been developed by using Systems Thinking (ST and System Dynamics (SD approaches. The model analysis suggested that to increase sustainability and resilience of food systems large emphasis has to be maintained on: (i estimation of local territorial carrying capacities; (ii land use planning to enhance connections among rural supplies and city needs; (iii city policies, to regulate emergent market size and local scale of production; (iv technological efficiency at farm, distribution and market levels; (v urban, peri-urban and rural functional linkages that considers social metabolic balances; (vi rural development as a core point for building sustainable food systems and counteracting the urbanization growth. These key areas are relevant to test new paths of cities-regions reconfiguration towards the transition to resilient agri-food systems.

  3. 'Sly grog' and 'homebrew': a qualitative examination of illicit alcohol and some of its impacts on Indigenous communities with alcohol restrictions in regional and remote Queensland (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, Michelle S; Robertson, Jan; Towle, Simon; Doran, Chris M; McDermott, Robyn; Miller, Adrian; Margolis, Stephen; Ypinazar, Valmae; Clough, Alan R

    2017-08-01

    Indigenous communities in Queensland (Australia) have been subject to Alcohol Management Plans since 2002/03, with significant penalties for breaching restrictions. 'Sly grog' and 'homebrew' provide access to alcohol despite restrictions. This paper describes how this alcohol is made available and the risks and impacts involved. In affected towns and communities across a large area of rural and remote Queensland, interviews and focus groups documented experiences and views of 255 long-standing community members and service providers. Using an inductive framework, transcribed interviews were analysed to identify supply mechanisms, community and service provider responses and impacts experienced. 'Homebrew' was reportedly manufactured in just a few localities, in locally-specific forms bringing locally-specific harms. However, 'sly grog' sourced from licensed premises located long distances from communities, is a widespread concern across the region. 'Sly grog' sellers circumvent retailers' takeaway liquor license conditions, stockpile alcohol outside restricted areas, send hoax messages to divert enforcement and take extraordinary risks to avoid apprehension. Police face significant challenges to enforce restrictions. On-selling of 'sly grog' appears more common in remote communities with total prohibition. Despite different motives for involvement in an illicit trade 'sly grog' consumers and sellers receive similar penalties. There is a need for: (a) a more sophisticated regional approach to managing takeaway alcohol sales from licensed suppliers, (b) targeted penalties for 'sly grog' sellers that reflect its significant community impact, (c) strategies to reduce the demand for alcohol and (d) research to assess the effects of these strategies in reducing harms.

  4. Re-examining the Role of Transport Infrastructure in Trade, Regional Growth and Governance: Comparing the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS and Central Eastern Europe (CEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bafoil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to question the hypothesis of the role of transport infrastructures in regional economic growth by comparing Central Eastern Europe (supported by the EU structural and cohesion funds and the Greater Mekong Subregion (mainly supported by the “economic corridors” of the ADB. Three main components of trade efficiency are scrutinized and compared: (1 the historical development of trade agreements, (2 the supra-national (regional capacity of trade regulation, and (3 the micro level of governance between the different actors involved in trade. The comparison between CEE and the GMS is all the more warranted because of two paradoxes that need to be explained: The first one results from the existing link between transport and growth in the case of the GMS, and the lack of a link in the case of CEE. The second paradox insists on the fact that despite their very different institutional frameworks, both subregions continue to face similar challenges concerning the implementation of trade agreements and the exchange of facilities at the local level – pointing towards the issue of governance.

  5. Acromegaly : irreversible clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, Monica Johanna Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the long-term consequences of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in patients cured from acromegaly for a mean duration of 17 years. Regarding the considerable prevalence of diverse morbidity in these patients, during the active phase of the disease but even

  6. Is multiset consequence trivial?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Paoli, F.

    First Online: 08 September 2016 (2018) ISSN 0039-7857 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14654S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 689176 - SYSMICS Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : contraction-free logics * multiset consequence * substructural logics * multiple conclusions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.855, year: 2016

  7. Choices and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Carmany

    1995-01-01

    Describes student use of Hyperstudio computer software to create history adventure games. History came alive while students learned efficient writing skills; learned to understand and manipulate cause, effect choice and consequence; and learned to incorporate succinct locational, climatic, and historical detail. (ET)

  8. Hepatic steatosis : metabolic consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Adriana Maria den

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we focused on the causes and consequences of hepatic steatosis. Epidemiological studies in humans, as well as experimental studies in animal models, have shown an association between visceral obesity and dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanism

  9. THE INTERNET ADDICTION OF PATIENTS WITH PSYCHOPATHOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OFCRANIOCEREBRAL INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Voloshyna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Kharkov Regional Clinical Psychiatric Hospital № 3 examined 100 male patients aged 38,35±0,96 years, with psychopathological consequences of craniocerebral injury (TBI. The control group consisted of 73 healthy male volunteers aged 36,97±1,73 years. The frequency of different degrees of Internet use was assessed by using AUDIT-like test INTERNET-UDIT (Internet Use Disorders Identification Test and calculation of addictive potential in groups. In patients with psychopathological consequences of craniocerebral trauma, despite the high prevalence of lack of experience “usage” of the Internet, high degrees of addiction and dependence were reported. The addictive potential of the Internet addiction in the study group exceeded 32% of that of the control group.

  10. X-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks after angiographic examinations of different anatomic regions; Strahleninduzierte DNA-Doppelstrangbrueche nach Angiografien verschiedener Koerperregionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuefner, M.A.; Schwab, S.A.; Azoulay, S.; Heckmann, M.; Heinrich, M.C.; Uder, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.; Grudzenski, S.; Lobrich, M. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Strahlenbiologie und DNA-Reparatur

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in blood lymphocytes as markers of the biological radiation effects in angiography patients. Materials and Methods: The method is based on the phosphorylation of the histone variant H 2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) after formation of DSBs. Blood samples were collected before and up to 24 hours after exposure of 31 patients undergoing angiographies of different body regions. Blood lymphocytes were isolated, fixed, and stained with a specific {gamma}-H2AX antibody. Distinct foci representing DSBs were enumerated using fluorescence microscopy. Additional in-vitro experiments (10 - 100 mGy) were performed for evaluation of DBS repair. Results: 15 minutes after the end of fluoroscopy values between 0.01 and 1.50 DSBs per cell were obtained. The DNA damage level normalized to the dose area product was 0.099 (cardiac angiographies), 0.053 (abdominal angiographies), 0.023 (pelvic/leg angiographies) and 0.004 excess foci/cell/mGym{sup 2} (cerebrovascular angiographies). A linear correlation was found between {gamma}-H2AX foci levels and the dose area product (abdomen: R2 = 0.96; pelvis/legs: R2 = 0.71). In-vivo on average 46 % of DSBs disappeared within 1 hour and 70 % within 2.5 hours. Conclusion: {gamma}-H2AX immunofluorescence microscopy is a sensitive and reliable method for the determination of X-ray-induced DSBs during angiography. The DNA damage level depends on the dose, the exposed anatomic region, and the duration/fractionation of the X-ray exposure. (orig.)

  11. Examination of regional pollutant structure in the lower troposphere--some results of the diagnostic atmospheric cross-section experiment (DACSE-I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisterson, D.L.; Shannon, J.D.; Hales, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The diurnal variation of the structure of pollutant transport and diffusion in the Ohio River Valley is examined by combining meteorological cross sections with vertical profiles of several air pollutants. An increased frequency of rawinsonde releases from NWS stations at Salem, Dayton and Pittsburgh during the period 1--10 August 1977 was supplemented on 5 and 6 August by vertical profiles taken along the cross-section line by an aircraft. The data on 5 August, a day without convective activity to complicate analyses, merit special study. Analyses of the b/sub scat/ structure superimposed on the meteorological cross sections lend support to the theory of horizontal transport of polluted layers above the nocturnal inversion or developing mixed layer without significant dilution. The effect of the daily breathing of the planetary boundary layer on the vertical structure of pollutants can be seen in the sequence of cross sections

  12. A clinical examination of antibiotics in continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A prospective randomized controlled trial of BIPM and IPM/CS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shigemichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Kamitani, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    Continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy using both protease inhibitors and antibiotics are one of the specific therapeutic methods for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). As for the administered antibiotics, imipenem/cilastatin sodium (IPM/CS) is generally chosen as a first step, but there are only a few reports comparing IPM/CS with other antibiotics. Therefore, we performed a prospective randomized controlled trial between biapenem (BIPM) and IPM/CS as CRAI antibiotics. Twelve patients with SAP were admitted to our institution during April, 2009 since August, 2006, and were randomized into two groups. They were treated with 120 mg/day of nafamostat mesilate and either 1.2 g/day of BIPM (n=6) or 2.0 g/day of IPM/CS (n=6) for CRAI therapy within 48 hours after the administration. The clinical data, inflammatory markers (WBC, CRP), serum pancreatic enzymes (lipase, tripsin, phospholipase A2, elastase 1 and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) and contrast-enhanced abdominal Computed Tomography findings were compared between the two groups and the adverse effects were monitored. CRAI therapy was performed for seven days. The curative effect of this therapy was evaluated at the beginning of the treatment, the day 7 and the day 14. Our results suggested that BIPM was a non-recessive antibiotic which had an equal effect in CRAI therapy in comparison with IPM/CS. (author)

  13. Probabilistic Criticality Consequence Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Gottlieb; J.W. Davis; J.R. Massari

    1996-01-01

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development (WPD) department with the objective of providing a comprehensive, conservative estimate of the consequences of the criticality which could possibly occur as the result of commercial spent nuclear fuel emplaced in the underground repository at Yucca Mountain. The consequences of criticality are measured principally in terms of the resulting changes in radionuclide inventory as a function of the power level and duration of the criticality. The purpose of this analysis is to extend the prior estimates of increased radionuclide inventory (Refs. 5.52 and 5.54), for both internal and external criticality. This analysis, and similar estimates and refinements to be completed before the end of fiscal year 1997, will be provided as input to Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA) to demonstrate compliance with the repository performance objectives

  14. The Chernobyl accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    Five teen years later, Tchernobyl remains the symbol of the greater industrial nuclear accident. To take stock on this accident, this paper proposes a chronology of the events and presents the opinion of many international and national organizations. It provides also web sites references concerning the environmental and sanitary consequences of the Tchernobyl accident, the economic actions and propositions for the nuclear safety improvement in the East Europe. (A.L.B.)

  15. Virtual reality - aesthetic consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Benda, Lubor

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we study aesthetic consequences of virtual reality. Exploring the fringe between fictional and virtual is one of the key goals, that will be achieved through etymologic and technologic definition of both fiction and virtual reality, fictional and virtual worlds. Both fiction and virtual reality will be then studied from aesthetic distance and aesthetic pleasure point of view. At the end, we will see the main difference as well as an common grounds between fiction and virtu...

  16. Phenomenological consequences of supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.; Littenberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    This report deals with the phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric theories, and with the implications of such theories for future high energy machines. It is concerned only with high energy predictions of supersymmetry; low energy consequences (for example in the K/sub o/anti K/sub o/ system) are discussed in the context of future experiments by another group, and will be mentioned briefly only in the context of constraining existing models. However a brief section is included on the implication for proton decay, although detailed experimental questions are not discussed. The report is organized as follows. Section I consists of a brief review of supersymmetry and the salient features of existing supersymmetric models; this section can be ignored by those familiar with such models since it contains nothing new. Section 2 deals with the consequences for nucleon decay of SUSY. The remaining sections then discuss the physics possibilities of various machines; e anti e in Section 3, ep in Section 4, pp (or anti pp) colliders in Section 5 and fixed target hadron machines in Section 6

  17. Resource consequences of reenrichment versus blending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    Many recent studies, including INFCE and NASAP, have concluded that recycling thermal reactor fuel reduces natural uranium requirements. These studies are based on a common set of assumptions concerning the method of recycling uranium, and consequently have produced quite similar results. It was assumed, however, that the residual uranium would be reenriched rather than blended with higher enriched uranium. This paper will examine several possible alternatives to reenriching residual uranium and discuss the consequences of each

  18. An examination of historic inorganic sedimentation and organic matter accumulation in several marsh types within the Mobile Bay and and Mobile-Tensaw River Delta region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Osterman, Lisa E.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2013-01-01

    Mass accumulation rates (MAR; g cm-2 y-1), linear sedimentation rates (LSR; cm y-1), and core geochronology derived from excess lead-210 (210Pb) profiles and inventories measured in six sediment cores collected from marsh sites from the MobileTensaw River Delta and Mobile Bay region record the importance of both continuous and event-driven inorganic sedimentation over the last 120 years. MAR in freshwater marshes varied considerably between sites and through time (0.24 and 1.31 g cm-2 y-1). The highest MARs occurred in the 1950s and 1960s and correspond to record discharge events along the Mobile and Tensaw Rivers. In comparison, MAR at salt marsh sites increased almost threefold over the last 120 years (0.05 to 0.18 g cm-2 y-1 or 0.23 to 0.48 cm y-1). From 1880 to 1960, organic accumulation remained fairly constant (20%), while intermittent pulses of high inorganic sedimentation were observed following 1960. The pulses in inorganic sedimentation coincide with several major hurricanes (e.g., Hurricanes Camille, Fredric, Georges, and Ivan). The nearly threefold increase in MAR in salt marshes during the last 120 years would thus appear to be partially dependent on inorganic sedimentation from storm events. This study shows that while hurricanes, floods, and other natural hazards are well-known threats to human infrastructure and coastal ecosystems, these events also transport sediment to marshes that help abate other pressures such as sea-level rise (SLR) and subsidence.

  19. Predictors and consequences of job insecurity: Comparison of Slovakia and Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ištoňová

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Job insecurity is a significant current social issue in many European countries. Slovakia and Estonia significantly differ in the prevalence of job insecurity. The main aim of the present study was to compare Slovakia and Estonia in regard to job insecurity by looking at socio-demographic, job and organisational predictors and individual and social consequences based on ESS round five data. The secondary aim was to examine relationships between job insecurity and its predictors as well as job insecurity and its consequences. The analysis covered employed people with unlimited or limited contracts, working 40-50 hours per week, within the age range of 20-60. The results suggested significant differences in the predictors of job insecurity for Slovakia and Estonia. However, the individual, social and economic consequences of job insecurity were similar for both countries. This study contributes to an enhanced understanding of job insecurity predictors and consequences in the European region.

  20. An interpretation of the tectonostratigraphic framework of the Murray Basin region of southeastern Australia, based on an examination of airborne magnetic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. M.; Tucker, D. H.; Anfiloff, V.

    1988-11-01

    New pixel map representations of regional total magnetic intensity data reveal previously unknown characteristics of the basement concealed beneath thin Cainozoic sediments of the Murray Basin in southeastern Australia. Interpretations of magnetic patterns in terms of structural features allow a revised interpretation of the nature of the tectonostratigraphic framework underlying and flanking the basin. The magnetic data indicate that arcuate or curvilinear structural trends under the Murray Basin do not conform with those of the exposed Lachlan Fold Belt to the east and suggest that the basement concealed beneath the basin, together with that exposed in the Victorian Highlands to the south, forms a distinct composite tectonostratigraphic terrane. Beneath the southwestern Murray Basin ?Proterozoic-Lower Cambrian metasediments of the Padthaway Ridge of the Kanmantoo Fold Belt display a northwesterly trending structural grain and a previously unsuspected continuity of structural trend with Adelaidean-Cambrian rocks of the Mount Lofty Ranges to the west. In the south, Cambrian volcanics of the Black Range and Stavely greenstone belts have similar magnetic response and appear to be components of a single elongate and strongly magnetic domain which extends to the northwest for at least 400 km (Stavely Belt). To the north a similar but entirely concealed northeasterly trending magnetic domain can also be interpreted as volcanics (Lake Wintlow Belt). Together these two magnetic domains appear to form an arcuate zone of volcanics, with a concave-to-the-east configuration, located at a possible suture between the Lachlan and Kanmantoo Fold Belts beneath the western Murray Basin. In the south the magnetic imagery indicates that metasediments of the ?Cambro-Ordovician Stawell Belt produce magnetic patterns distinct from those produced by the metasediments of the adjacent Ordovician Bendigo Belt, which can itself be subdivided into a number of areas of distinct magnetic

  1. Nondestructive examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mletzko, U.

    1980-01-01

    Visual examination is treated as a method for the control of size and shape of components, surface quality and weld performance. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and eddy current examinations are treated as methods for the evaluation of surface defects and material properties. The limitations to certain materials, defect sizes and types are shown. (orig./RW)

  2. Antecedents and Consequences of Envy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Geir; Glasø, Lars; Martinsen, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between individual attributes and envy, and to determine how envy may impact personal response variables in the workplace. To address these issues we apply Vecchio's theory on antecedents and consequences of envy (1995) as a theoretical framework. The present study relied on a cross-sectional measurement design. A total of 135 leaders and 772 followers employed in business organizations participated. SEM analysis shows that span of supervision serves as an important antecedent of envy, where span of supervision is significantly associated to envy via supportive leadership. Furthermore, envy seems to be indirectly and negatively related to self-esteem via distress and directly related to social loafing. The implications of these findings are discussed, and suggestions for future research are outlined.

  3. [Fertility transition in Brazil. Causes and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, J A; Wong, L R

    1992-12-01

    This work examines the determinants and most important consequences of the Brazilian fertility decline. Brazil's total fertility rate declined from 6.2 in 1940 to around 3.5 in 1985. the decline began in the 1960s and amounted to 45% in about 20 years. The most rapid drop began in the late 1970s, with much of it concentrated in 2 specific periods: 1970-75 and 1980-85. The early period coincided with Brazil's so-called "Economic Miracle", a period of rapid growth accompanied however by deteriorating living conditions for the poorest population sectors. The second period coincided with the international economic crisis of the early 1980s, which was felt more strongly in Brazil than elsewhere in Latin America because of Brazil's greater degree of industrialization and closer integration into the world economy. Most of the fertility decline has been accomplished by use of just two contraceptive methods, oral contraceptives and sterilization, which together account for around 85% of contraceptive usage throughout Brazil. The third most common method, rhythm, accounts for just 6%. No reliable data on abortion are available, but it appears to be a common practice equally accessible to all socioeconomic strata despite greater associated health risks for poorer women. Brazil's fertility transition appears to have been a response to the process of proletarianization and urbanization underway in the country as well as to particular circumstances in the country. The most evident and immediate consequence of the continuous fertility decline over more than 20 years is the change in the age structure of the population. The proportions of children under 5 will decline from 14.4% in 1980 to 9.2% in 2010. The proportion aged 5-14 will decline from 24.5% to 17.4%, while the proportion aged 65 and over will increase from 4.0% to 5.6%. Brazil's recent demographic changes are scarcely reflected in development plans and political and social projects. There is almost no mention of the new

  4. The Consequences of Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    such as the following, related to this general interdisciplinary objective: • Language use in social networks, with special reference to language contact in interpersonal relations and interactions, including codeswitching and other manifestations of the construction of sociocultural identities in face......-to-face interaction • Language contact in society and in the world, and social hierarchies between languages: consequences of (mobility driven) language spread, and the ensuing processes of redefining linguistic differences and identities: language competition, language promotion and language discrimination...... • The complex relationship between language and culture: how can we envisage mobility and language spread across cultural areas without conceptualizing language as culturally neutral? (cp. the frequent conceptualization of English as culturally neutral) • Language contact in the individual: multiple language...

  5. Radionuclide examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide examinations of the pancreas. The pancreas, situated retroperitonally high in the epigastrium, was a particularly difficult organ to image noninvasively before ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) became available. Indeed the organ still remains difficult to examine in some patients, a fact reflected in the variety of methods available to evaluate pancreatic morphology. It is something of a paradox that the pancreas is metabolically active and physiologically important but that its examination by radionuclide methods has virtually ceased to have any role in day-to-day clinical practice. To some extent this is caused by the tendency of the pancreas's commonest gross diseases emdash carcinoma and pancreatitis, for example emdash to result in nonfunction of the entire organ. Disorders of pancreatic endocrine function have generally not required imaging methods for diagnosis, although an understanding of diabetes mellitus and its nosology has been advanced by radioimmunoassay of plasma insulin concentrations

  6. Drinking Water Consequences Tools. A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, Donatella [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-12

    In support of the goals of Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) National Protection and Programs Directorate and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the DHS Office of Science and Technology is seeking to develop and/or modify consequence assessment tools to enable drinking water systems owner/operators to estimate the societal and economic consequences of drinking water disruption due to the threats and hazards. This work will expand the breadth of consequence estimation methods and tools using the best-available data describing water distribution infrastructure, owner/assetlevel economic losses, regional-scale economic activity, and health. In addition, this project will deploy the consequence methodology and capability within a Web-based platform. This report is intended to support DHS effort providing a review literature review of existing assessment tools of water and wastewater systems consequences to disruptions. The review includes tools that assess water systems resilience, vulnerability, and risk. This will help to understand gaps and limitations of these tools in order to plan for the development of the next-generation consequences tool for water and waste water systems disruption.

  7. Social Causes and Consequences of Rejection Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Bonita; Downey, Geraldine; Bonica, Cheryl; Paltin, Iris

    2007-01-01

    Predictions from the Rejection Sensitivity (RS) model concerning the social causes and consequences of RS were examined in a longitudinal study of 150 middle school students. Peer nominations of rejection, self-report measures of anxious and angry rejection expectations, and social anxiety, social withdrawal, and loneliness were assessed at two…

  8. Youth Unemployment. The Causes and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This report examines the causes and consequences of youth unemployment in Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries. Summarized first is the youth unemployment situation since the 1974/1975 recession. In a section on recent developments in youth labor markets a series of tables and graphs provide data on youth…

  9. Social consequences of closing the Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baubinas, R.; Burneika, D.

    2001-01-01

    The possible social consequences of closing the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant are studied. The social and economical situation in Visaginas and in the Utena region as a precondition for possible social consequences is shown. Also, two main groups of factors that can possibly influence the situation in the labour market are analysed. The problems of the enterprises that create working places and of the inhabitants of Visaginas whose possible behaviour can affect the situation in the labour market are discussed. Also, some proposals to neutralize the social costs of closing the Ignalina NPP are made. (author)

  10. Radiologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoeni, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The radiographic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract has been changed drastically by the introduction of endoscopic procedures that are now widely available. However, the diagnostic approach to the small bowel remains largely unchanged. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are occasionally employed but are not primary imaging modalities for small bowel disease. Even though small bowel endoscopes are available, they are infrequently used, and no scientific paper on their employment has been published. Barium studies are still the mainstay for evaluating patients with suspected small bowel abnormalities. This paper discusses the anatomy and physiology of the small bowel and lists the various types of barium and pharmacologic aids used for examining it. The different radiographic methods for examining the small bowel with barium, including SBFT, dedicated SBFT, enteroclysis, peroral pneumocolon (PPC), and retrograde small bowel examination, are described and put into perspective. To some degree such an undertaking must be a personal opinion, but certain conclusions can be made based on the available literature and practical experience. This analysis is based on the assumption that all the various barium techniques are performed with equal expertise by the individual radiologist, thus excluding bias from unfamiliarity with certain aspects of a procedure, such as intubation or skilled compression during fluoroscopy. Also, the use of water-soluble contrast material, CT, and MRI for evaluating suspected small bowel abnormalities is outlined

  11. Student Part-Time Employment: Characteristics and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to examine the consequences of students engaging in part-time employment during their studies. It reports the results of a survey of part-time employment among university students. The research examined the possible consequences of combining part-time employment with full-time study, with particular reference to…

  12. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, M.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274])

  13. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  14. EUROPEAN TRANSFERS: EVALUATION AND CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Eszter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an evaluation of EU regional policy. It asks whether cohesion programmes contribute to the reduction of differences. In the first part of the study the results of three different methodological approaches are briefly examined to analyse effects. The answer to the question is not at all unambiguous, which is why the second half of the paper attempts to find those factors which may cause the regional policy of the EU to fail to achieve its desired objectives. According to the literature review these factors are (1 the crowding out effect, (2 the existence of rent-seeking and moral hazard, (3 the counterbalancing effect of national policies, (4 a concentration of economic activities (mainly industries representing high added value, and (5 the short time frame. Finally the study establishes those preconditions which, when present, can be considered necessary and sufficient for the redistributed funds to initiate growth.

  15. Consequence Management - Ready or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    Defense will have sufficient capability and be ready to respond to a Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects attack. An effective consequence management...Defense adopts the National Military Strategy and its consequence management approach, it must identify Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects threats...that the Department of Defense: develop Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects performance standards for response assets; implement a consequence

  16. Consequences of childhood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinfeld, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    Many patients as children or adolescents received treatment for nonmalignant conditions with therapeutic-range doses of ionizing radiation. Great interest exists in this group of patients because of the possible long-term adverse effects of such irradiation. A thorough physical examination should be performed, and a careful history, listing any instances of radiation exposure, should be taken. Photographic documentation of skin and/or mucosal changes is beneficial

  17. [Relapse: causes and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P

    2013-09-01

    Relapse after a first episode of schizophrenia is the recurrence of acute symptoms after a period of partial or complete remission. Due to its variable aspects, there is no operational definition of relapse able to modelise the outcome of schizophrenia and measure how the treatment modifies the disease. Follow-up studies based on proxys such as hospital admission revealed that 7 of 10 patients relapsed after a first episode of schizophrenia. The effectiveness of antipsychotic medications on relapse prevention has been widely demonstrated. Recent studies claim for the advantages of atypical over first generation antipsychotic medication. Non-adherence to antipsychotic represents with addictions the main causes of relapse long before some non-consensual factors such as premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis and associated personality disorders. The consequences of relapse are multiple, psychological, biological and social. Pharmaco-clinical studies have demonstrated that the treatment response decreases with each relapse. Relapse, even the first one, will contribute to worsen the outcome of the disease and reduce the capacity in general functionning. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role besides patients and their families. The development of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, access to care and the therapeutic alliance should be promoted. Relapse prevention is a major goal of the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia. It is based on adherence to the maintenance treatment, identification of prodromes, family active information and patient therapeutical education. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  18. Air-quality and Climatic Consequences of Bioenergy Crop Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William Christian

    Bioenergy is expected to play an increasingly significant role in the global energy budget. In addition to the use of liquid energy forms such as ethanol and biodiesel, electricity generation using processed energy crops as a partial or full coal alternative is expected to increase, requiring large-scale conversions of land for the cultivation of bioenergy feedstocks such as cane, grasses, or short rotation coppice. With land-use change identified as a major contributor to changes in the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), many of which are known contributors to the pollutants ozone (O 3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5), careful review of crop emission profiles and local atmospheric chemistry will be necessary to mitigate any unintended air-quality consequences. In this work, the atmospheric consequences of bioenergy crop replacement are examined using both the high-resolution regional chemical transport model WRF/Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) and the global climate model CESM (Community Earth System Model). Regional sensitivities to several representative crop types are analyzed, and the impacts of each crop on air quality and climate are compared. Overall, the high emitting crops (eucalyptus and giant reed) were found to produce climate and human health costs totaling up to 40% of the value of CO 2 emissions prevented, while the related costs of the lowest-emitting crop (switchgrass) were negligible.

  19. Regionalism, Regionalization and Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu C. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained development is a concept associating other concepts, in its turn, in the EU practice, e.g. regionalism, regionalizing and afferent policies, here including structural policies. This below text, dedicated to integration concepts, will limit on the other hand to regionalizing, otherwise an aspect typical to Europe and to the EU. On the other hand, two aspects come up to strengthen this field of ideas, i.e. the region (al-regionalism-(regional development triplet has either its own history or precise individual outline of terms.

  20. Consequences of dispersal of a radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, R.O.; Chester, C.V.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the question of whether the risk and consequences of theft or sabotage of facilities or vehicles containing small quantities of SNM, source, and by-product materials are such that licensees should be required to adopt further measures to safeguard them. In the course of the study an assessment will be made of the potential consequences of malevolent use of the referenced materials. To provide, these will be compared with the corresponding characteristics of non-nuclear materials such as chemical or biological agents

  1. Nuclear medical examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Kazuo; Yamada, Hideo

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear medical examinations for cerebral vascular diseases were outlined. These procedures developed associated with development of scanners, production of radionuclides and development of labelled compounds. Examination of cerebral circulation with 133 Xe and sup(87m)Kr was replaced by CT. Furthermore, emission CT developed. Each of brain scintiscan, measurement of regional cerebral blood flow, positron emission CT and single photon emission CT was reviewed. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Ecological consequences of United Enterprises 'Majak' activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanov, G.N.; Drozko, Y.G.

    1996-01-01

    The United Enterprises ''Majak'' held in 1948 in Soviet Union has mainly dealt of plutonium production for military use. The consequence for environment of their activities has been extensively investigated. The soil, water and air contamination in the Czelabinsk region where the Majak Enterprises was localized have been recognized. The program of environment recultivation and radiation safety assurance in Majak Enterprises have been worked out and already accepted for realization. 6 figs, 10 tabs

  3. Consequences of Iraq war on petroleum market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percebois, J.

    2004-01-01

    The consequences of the last Iraq conflict on the petroleum market can be analyzed under two different aspects: one is the will of the USA to re-establish a political stability in a country which represents an important oil reserve for their future supplies, the other is a US-Russia cooperation/rivalry in a region of prime importance for both countries which are in competition for the exploitation of the Caspian sea hydrocarbon resources. (J.S.)

  4. Socioeconomic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Callaway, J.W.; Coles, B.L.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Imhoff, K.L.; Lewis, P.M.; Nesse, R.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-06-01

    This report identifies and characterizes the off-site socioeconomic consequences that would likely result from a severe radiological accident at a nuclear power plant. The types of impacts that are addressed include economic impacts, health impacts, social/psychological impacts and institutional impacts. These impacts are identified for each of several phases of a reactor accident - from the warning phase through the post-resettlement phase. The relative importance of the impact during each accident phase and the degree to which the impact can be predicted are indicated. The report also examines the methods that are currently used for assessing nuclear reactor accidents, including development of accident scenarios and the estimating of socioeconomic accident consequences with various models. Finally, a critical evaluation is made regarding the use of impact analyses in estimating the contribution of socioeconomic consequences to nuclear accident reactor accident risk. 116 references, 7 figures, 15 tables

  5. Renal Aging: Causes and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Eoin D; Hughes, Jeremy; Ferenbach, David A

    2017-02-01

    Individuals age >65 years old are the fastest expanding population demographic throughout the developed world. Consequently, more aged patients than before are receiving diagnoses of impaired renal function and nephrosclerosis-age-associated histologic changes in the kidneys. Recent studies have shown that the aged kidney undergoes a range of structural changes and has altered transcriptomic, hemodynamic, and physiologic behavior at rest and in response to renal insults. These changes impair the ability of the kidney to withstand and recover from injury, contributing to the high susceptibility of the aged population to AKI and their increased propensity to develop subsequent progressive CKD. In this review, we examine these features of the aged kidney and explore the various validated and putative pathways contributing to the changes observed with aging in both experimental animal models and humans. We also discuss the potential for additional study to increase understanding of the aged kidney and lead to novel therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  6. Becoming an Officer of Consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    ndupress .ndu.edu   issue 44, 1st quarter 2007  /  JFQ        6 Becoming an officer of Consequence m uch of the literature about military history...commander become officers of consequence because their commanders value their judgment and seek their counsel when making difficult choices...COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Becoming an Officer of Consequence 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  7. Gender Based Violence among Infertile Women In Mara Region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines women to women marriages (nyumba ntobhu) and its relation with gender-based violence (GBV) in Serengeti District of Mara Region. It also explores types of gender-based violence and consequences of women to women marriages among women, girls and children in the society. Both quantitative ...

  8. Factors Influencing Student Satisfaction in Universities in the Gulf Region: Does Gender of Students Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahoo, Sanjai K.; Harvey, Heather L.; Tamim, Rana M.

    2013-01-01

    While various research studies have focused on antecedents and consequences of student satisfaction, few studies have done so in the Gulf region. The objective of the present study was therefore to design and empirically examine a model of student satisfaction in a private university in the Gulf region that operates in a high-technology-enabled…

  9. Consequences of Diffusion of Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Kevin F.

    1979-01-01

    The article traces evolution of diffusion theory; illustrates undesirable consequences in a cross-cultural setting, reviews criticisms of several scholars; considers distributional effects and unanticipated consequences for potential ameliorative impact on diffusion theory; and codifies these factors into a framework for research into consequences…

  10. Institutional Consequences of Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joao Rosa, Maria; Tavares, Diana; Amaral, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the opinions of Portuguese university rectors and academics on the quality assessment system and its consequences at the institutional level. The results obtained show that university staff (rectors and academics, with more of the former than the latter) held optimistic views of the positive consequences of quality assessment…

  11. Accident consequence assessment code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma, T.; Togawa, O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the new computer code system, OSCAAR developed for off-site consequence assessment of a potential nuclear accident. OSCAAR consists of several modules which have modeling capabilities in atmospheric transport, foodchain transport, dosimetry, emergency response and radiological health effects. The major modules of the consequence assessment code are described, highlighting the validation and verification of the models. (author)

  12. The Consequences of School Desegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell, Christine H., Ed.; Hawley, Willis D., Ed.

    Materials on a variety of subjects related to school desegregation are collected in this book. Chapter 1 discusses assumptions about the overall consequences of desegregation. Chapters 2 to 5 synthesize the findings of existing research on the consequences of school desegregation for children and communities. Finally, Chapter 6 describes…

  13. Assessing the consequences of unrealistic optimism: Challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, James A; Pogge, Gabrielle; Howell, Jennifer L

    2017-04-01

    Of the hundreds of studies published on unrealistic optimism (i.e., expecting a better personal future than is reasonably likely), most have focused on demonstrating the phenomenon, examining boundary conditions, or documenting causes. Few studies have examined the consequences of unrealistic optimism. In this article, we provide an overview of the measurement of unrealistic optimism, review possible consequences, and identify numerous challenges confronting investigators attempting to understand the consequences. Assessing the consequences of unrealistic optimism is tricky, and ultimately probably impossible when researchers assess unrealistic optimism at the group level (which reveals if a group of people is displaying unrealistic optimism on average) rather than the individual level (which reveals whether a specific individual displays unrealistic optimism). We offer recommendations to researchers who wish to examine the consequences of unrealistic optimism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A joint analysis of determinants and performance consequences of ambidexterity

    OpenAIRE

    Eva M. Pertusa-Ortega; José F. Molina-Azorín

    2018-01-01

    Summary: This paper simultaneously analyzes antecedents and consequences of organizational ambidexterity. Regarding antecedents, the paper examines the influence of internal antecedents (organizational structure) and external antecedents (environmental dynamism). With regard to consequences, the paper analyzes the impact of ambidexterity on firm performance. Moreover, we use two different approaches to ambidexterity (structural and contextual perspectives). The findings show that a hybrid org...

  15. CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REGIONAL POPULATION DECLINE FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, Tialda; Van Wissen, Leo

    During the past few years, the Dutch education system has been confronted with a sharp decline in the number of pupils. Especially in rural villages, inhabitants fear for the closure of their local primary school, which is perceived as a very negative development for local village life. This paper

  16. Mexico’s Drug War and Its Unintended Regional Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Guatemalan President Proposes Drug.” 26 Johnson, Forman, and Bliss , Police Reform in Latin America, 32, 28, 30. 27 Tim Johnson, “Society Has Lost...Nations Office on Drugs, Transnational Organized Crime, 76. 22 Stephen Johnson, Johanna Mendelson Forman and Katherine Bliss , Police Reform in...america (accessed October 29, 2012). 33 Johnson, Forman, and Bliss , Police Reform in Latin America, 22. 34 Hooper, "The Mexican Drug Cartel Threat

  17. Bahrain’s Uprising: Regional Dimensions and International Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Coates Ulrichsen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The uprising in Bahrain that began on 14 February 2011 has been contained but not resolved. While the immediate period of danger to the position of the ruling Al-Khalifa family has passed, positions on all sides have hardened, and there is little prospect of a political settlement to Bahrain's deep-rooted social and economic inequalities. As the Bahraini government has failed to offer meaningful concessions to political reform, it has splintered and radicalised an opposition unsure what to do next, but also undermined its own constituency of support among the island's Sunni communities. These trajectories have set in motion a radical reconfiguring of the island's political landscape in ways that do not augur well for longer-term prospects for reconciliation and recovery.

  18. Consequence Prioritization Process for Potential High Consequence Events (HCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Sarah G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-31

    This document describes the process for Consequence Prioritization, the first phase of the Consequence-Driven Cyber-Informed Engineering (CCE) framework. The primary goal of Consequence Prioritization is to identify potential disruptive events that would significantly inhibit an organization’s ability to provide the critical services and functions deemed fundamental to their business mission. These disruptive events, defined as High Consequence Events (HCE), include both events that have occurred or could be realized through an attack of critical infrastructure owner assets. While other efforts have been initiated to identify and mitigate disruptive events at the national security level, such as Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-41), this process is intended to be used by individual organizations to evaluate events that fall below the threshold for a national security. Described another way, Consequence Prioritization considers threats greater than those addressable by standard cyber-hygiene and includes the consideration of events that go beyond a traditional continuity of operations (COOP) perspective. Finally, Consequence Prioritization is most successful when organizations adopt a multi-disciplinary approach, engaging both cyber security and engineering expertise, as in-depth engineering perspectives are required to recognize and characterize and mitigate HCEs. Figure 1 provides a high-level overview of the prioritization process.

  19. Dollarization in East Africa: Causes, Consequences, and Future Forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sayid Hassan Musse

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dollarization phenomenon has been widespread among the East African countries for many decades. This trend results in several consequences that might be either beneficial or harmful to these countries and their likes.The objective of this research was to empirically examine the causes, consequences and the future scenarios of dollarization in one of the leading regional countries such as Somalia. The research used a survey of over 100respondents and applied descriptive statistics and t-tests to achieve the above objectives. The findings show that the main causes of Dollarization in Somalia are the implementation of the Hawallah (money transfer system,the remarkable absence of the central bank and other monitoring financial authorities, the increasing exports and imports of the Somalian economy, the loss of confidence in the local Somalian Shilling, and the relative ease atwhich the Somalian Shilling can be printed and manipulated by selected market players. These causes are found to be mainly triggered by the revenue from exports, the policies and regulations implemented by the Somali government, the Somali Diaspora, and the international aid organizations. This has resulted in the foreign traders buying Somali goods at a relatively lower price and taking advantage of the depreciated Somali Shilling against most international currencies.

  20. Direct and indirect economic consequences of multiple sclerosis in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fogarty, Emer

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has significant financial consequences for healthcare systems, individual patients and households, and the wider society. This study examines the distribution of MS costs and resource utilisation across cost categories and from various perspectives, as MS disability increases.

  1. Radiological consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Hille, R.

    2003-01-01

    The reactor accident at unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine has deeply affected the living conditions of millions of people. Especially the health consequences have been of public concern up to the present and also been the subject of sometimes absurd claims. The current knowledge on the radiological consequences of the accident is reviewed. Though an increased hazard for some risk groups with high radiation exposure, e.g., liquidators, still cannot be totally excluded for the future, the majority of the population shows no statistically significant indication of radiation-induced illnesses. The contribution of the Research Center Juelich to the assessment of the post-accidental situation and psychological relief of the population is reported. The population groups still requiring special attention include, in particular, children growing up in highly contaminated regions and the liquidators of the years 1986 and 1987 deployed immediately after the accident. (author)

  2. [Climate changes, floods, and health consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelozzi, Paola; de' Donato, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    In the European Region, floods are the most common natural disaster, causing extensive damage and disruption. In Italy, it has been estimated that over 68% of municipalities are at high hydrogeological risk and with the recent intense rainfall events local populations have been facing severe disruptions. The health consequences of floods are wide ranging and are dependent upon the vulnerability of the environment and the local population. Health effects can be a direct or indirect consequence of flooding. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, heart attacks, injuries and hypothermia. The indirect effects include, injuries and infections, water-borne infectious disease, mental health problems, respiratory disease and allergies in both the medium and long term after a flood. Future efforts should be addressed to integrate health preparedness and prevention measures into emergency flood plans and hydrological warning systems.

  3. Possible consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Speeches of Soviet and foreign scientists at the Second Section of 2d All-UNION conference of scientists on problems of peace and prevention of nuclear war related to possible consequences of nuclear war have been considered. It is noted that production of a large amount of aerosol particles, dust, smoke and combustion products due to forest-fires, fires in cities, which change considerably atmosphere properties, will be the greatest effect of nuclear strike from the point of view of global consequencies. ''Nuclear winter'', photosynthesis suppression, plant bioproductivity weakening, long-term climate changes, ozone layer disturbance, mass and irreversible degeneration of all biosphere on the whole are great consequencies of nuclear conflict. Attention is paid to medical service, industrial accidents, radioactive fallouts consequence of radiation and other harmful factors for people in nuclear war

  4. Demographic Consequences of Defeating Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilov, Leonid A.; Gavrilova, Natalia S.

    2010-01-01

    A common objection against starting a large-scale biomedical war on aging is the fear of catastrophic population consequences (overpopulation). This fear is only exacerbated by the fact that no detailed demographic projections for radical life extension scenario have been conducted so far. This study explores different demographic scenarios and population projections, in order to clarify what could be the demographic consequences of a successful biomedical war on aging. A general conclusion o...

  5. Socio-economic assessment of the physical and ecological impacts of climate change on the marine environment of the Atlantic region of Canada. Evaluation socio-economic des consequences physiques et ecologiques du changement climatique sur le milieu marin dans la region de l'Atlantique; Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, P

    1988-01-01

    A study on the implications of long term climatic change for Atlantic Canada is summarized. The impacts on the marine environment, fisheries, marine transportation, energy development, coastal infrastructure, and tourism or outdoor recreation under a climate warming caused by a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide are assessed. The major physical changes projected include a rise in mean sea level, an increase in the average sea surface temperature, and an absence of sea ice south of Labrador for most years. A warmer climate would favor continuing growth of the aquaculture industry, longer fishing seasons, and an extension of summer recreational and tourism activities. Absence of sea ice could reduce costs for ferry services and marine transport in the region and permit extended seasons on some routes. Costs of ice-related downtime in offshore oil and gas operations could be practically eliminated. Changes in precipitation patterns would affect hydroelectric power output in various regions, with corresponding gains or losses in revenue. Heating oil demand in the region would decrease by about 25%.

  6. Social attitudes and regional inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Muštra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As the budgets of the European Union (EU become tighter, the questions about the effectiveness of EU’s expenditure, especially the most important parts such as Cohesion policy, are hotly debated. The aim of this paper is to examine whether the presence of social attitudes may influence the effectiveness of EU budget expenditure, measured by the level of regional inequalities. The analysis starts by focusing on individuals’ attitudes towards income from their own effort and income which is derived from other people’s effort, having in mind that individual actions depend on their attitudes. The next step establishes the link between the income from other people’s effort with the re-distributive dimension of the EU budget, considering that different attitudes among individuals in the EU could lead to significant differences in effectiveness of this redistributive policy among European regions and, consequently, diverse regional inequalities. Empirical research uses data for 27 EU countries observed over two waves of European Value Surveys: 1999-2000 (Wave 1 and 2008–2009 (Wave 2. The results indicate a significant role of social attitudes for regional inequalities, which raises the question of the appropriateness of simplification and uniform regional policy instruments in solving EU regional problems.

  7. Global consequences of US environmental policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedjo, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Attempts to quantify the financial and social benefits and costs, and their critiques, of habitat protection, have missed a major element: the global environmental consequences. In a global economy linked by international trade a significant reduction in timber harvests in on region will probably precipitate actions in other regions that may be detrimental to the global environment. These reactions would offset most or all of the alleged environmental benefits. The author uses the spotted owl controversy in the Pacific Northwest to illustrate his points. Global aspects of employment, marketing evaluations, fossil fuel implications are all discussed. The author feels that responses from environmentally responsible citizens would be influenced if it was more widely known that in a global system, domestic habitat protection and land-use decisions involved substantial environmental costs elsewhere

  8. Frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets (B-lines) using a regionally based lung ultrasound examination named vet BLUE (veterinary bedside lung ultrasound exam) in dogs with radiographically normal lung findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisciandro, Gregory R; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fulton, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Lung ultrasound is superior to lung auscultation and supine chest radiography for many respiratory conditions in human patients. Ultrasound diagnoses are based on easily learned patterns of sonographic findings and artifacts in standardized images. By applying the wet lung (ultrasound lung rockets or B-lines, representing interstitial edema) versus dry lung (A-lines with a glide sign) concept many respiratory conditions can be diagnosed or excluded. The ultrasound probe can be used as a visual stethoscope for the evaluation of human lungs because dry artifacts (A-lines with a glide sign) predominate over wet artifacts (ultrasound lung rockets or B-lines). However, the frequency and number of wet lung ultrasound artifacts in dogs with radiographically normal lungs is unknown. Thus, the primary objective was to determine the baseline frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets in dogs without clinical signs of respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lung findings using an 8-view novel regionally based lung ultrasound examination called Vet BLUE. Frequency of ultrasound lung rockets were statistically compared based on signalment, body condition score, investigator, and reasons for radiography. Ten left-sided heart failure dogs were similarly enrolled. Overall frequency of ultrasound lung rockets was 11% (95% confidence interval, 6-19%) in dogs without respiratory disease versus 100% (95% confidence interval, 74-100%) in those with left-sided heart failure. The low frequency and number of ultrasound lung rockets observed in dogs without respiratory disease and with radiographically normal lungs suggests that Vet BLUE will be clinically useful for the identification of canine respiratory conditions. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  9. Environmental consequences of rapid urbanization in zhejiang province, East china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuchao; Yue, Wenze; Xu, Honghui; Wu, Jingsheng; He, Yue

    2014-07-11

    Since reforms carried out in the late 1970s, China has experienced unprecedented rates of urban growth. Remote sensing data and surface observational data are used to investigate the urbanization process and related environmental consequences, focusing on extreme heat events and air pollution, in Zhejiang Province (ZJP, East China). Examination of satellite-measured nighttime light data indicates rapid urbanization in ZJP during the past decade, initially forming three urban clusters. With rapid urban sprawl, a significant Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect has emerged. During extreme heat events in summer, the UHI effect significantly exacerbates nocturnal heat stress in highly urbanized areas. Taking a long-term view, urbanization also causes additional hot days and hot degree days in urban areas. Urbanization also imposes a heavy burden on local and regional air quality in ZJP. Degraded visibility and an increase in haze days are observed at most meteorological stations, especially in the three urban clusters. The results show that urbanization has led to serious environmental problems in ZJP, not only on the city scale, but also on the regional scale. Maintaining a balance between the continuing process of urbanization and environmental sustainability is a major issue facing the local government.

  10. Environmental Consequences of Rapid Urbanization in Zhejiang Province, East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuchao Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since reforms carried out in the late 1970s, China has experienced unprecedented rates of urban growth. Remote sensing data and surface observational data are used to investigate the urbanization process and related environmental consequences, focusing on extreme heat events and air pollution, in Zhejiang Province (ZJP, East China. Examination of satellite-measured nighttime light data indicates rapid urbanization in ZJP during the past decade, initially forming three urban clusters. With rapid urban sprawl, a significant Urban Heat Island (UHI effect has emerged. During extreme heat events in summer, the UHI effect significantly exacerbates nocturnal heat stress in highly urbanized areas. Taking a long-term view, urbanization also causes additional hot days and hot degree days in urban areas. Urbanization also imposes a heavy burden on local and regional air quality in ZJP. Degraded visibility and an increase in haze days are observed at most meteorological stations, especially in the three urban clusters. The results show that urbanization has led to serious environmental problems in ZJP, not only on the city scale, but also on the regional scale. Maintaining a balance between the continuing process of urbanization and environmental sustainability is a major issue facing the local government.

  11. Unrecorded consumption, quality of alcohol and health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Jürgen; Kanteres, Fotis; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2010-07-01

    This contribution aims to examine systematically the evidence on the impact of the quality of unrecorded alcohol products on health consequences. Systematic computer assisted review of the literature. There are a number of pathways related to alcohol quality that may lead to acute or chronic health problems. The following constituents and contaminants of alcoholic beverages were identified as likely contributors to these problems: (i) toxic metals (e.g. lead) from contaminated water sources or unsuitable distillation equipment; (ii) volatile constituents, such as acetaldehyde or higher alcohols, which may be produced in significant amounts due to faults in production technology or microbiological spoilage; (iii) ethyl carbamate (urethane), a carcinogenic contaminant with major occurrence in certain fruit and sugarcane spirits; (iv) biologically active flavour compounds (e.g. coumarin in cosmetics used as non-beverage alcohol); (v) toxic compounds used to denature alcohol (e.g. methanol or diethyl phthalate). In addition, the often higher ethanol content may have detrimental health effects. These pathways should not be assumed as present for all subcategories of unrecorded alcohol, but are more relevant to certain types and geographic regions. A health impact of unrecorded alcohol over and above the effect of ethanol cannot be excluded. More research is urgently needed, especially with respect to liver disease and alcohol poisoning as endpoints. A feasible approach for new research on the effects of unrecorded alcohol could be based on a representative sample from low socioeconomic regions with high prevalence of unrecorded consumption.

  12. Greenhouse effect: analysis, incertitudes, consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, A.

    1991-01-01

    A general presentation of climatic changes due to greenhouse effect with their consequences is analysed. After a schematic description of this effect a simplified atmospheric model (box model) is proposed. This model integrates the main feedback effects and quantifies them. The effects of astronomic and atmospheric factors on climatic changes are analyzed and compared with classical paleoclimatic results. This study shows the need of good global modelization to evaluate long term quantification of climatic greenhouse effects according to the main time lag of the several biospheric boxes. An overview of biologic and agronomic consequences is given to promote new research subjects and to orientate protecting and conservative biospheric actions [fr

  13. Greenhouse effect increase and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, J.F.; Mahfouf, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Observations on the evolution of the atmospheric composition concerning trace gases (CO 2 , CH 4 , NO 2 , CFC) are first described. Then the fundamental role played by these gases in the radiative equilibrium of the earth through the greenhouse effect is examined. Numerical models have been developed to forecast the consequences of an increase of the greenhouse effect. The importance of the feedback mechanism, where the oceans and the clouds have the central part, but not well estimated by the models, is explained. Climatic changes generally accepted are reviewed. In conclusion the need to improve our knowledge of the global climatic system to forecast future modifications is underlined

  14. Radiological consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.; Hille, R.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty years of peaceful utilization of nuclear power were interrupted by the reactor accident in unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station in Ukraine in 1986, a disruptive event whose consequences profoundly affected the way of life of millions of people, and which has moved the public to this day. Releases of radioactive materials contaminated large areas of Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. Early damage in the form of radiation syndrome was suffered by a group of rescue workers and members of the reactor operating crew, in some cases with fatal consequences, while the population does not, until now, show a statistically significant increase in the rate of late damage due to ionizing radiation expect for thyroid diseases in children. In particular, no increases in the rates of solid tumors, leukaemia, genetic defects, and congenital defects were detected. For some risk groups exposed to high radiation doses (such as liquidators) the hazard may still be greater, but the large majority of the population need not live in fear of serious impacts on health. Nevertheless, the accident shows major negative social and psychological consequences reinforced by the breakdown of the Soviet Union. This may be one reason for the observed higher incidence of other diseases whose association with the effects of radiation as a cause has not so far been proven. The measurement campaign conducted by the federal government in 1991-1993 addressed these very concerns of the public in an effort to provide unbiased information about exposures detected, on the one hand, in order to alleviate the fears of the public and reduce stress and, on the other hand, to contribute to the scientific evaluation of the radiological situation in the regions most highly exposed. The groups of the population requiring special attention in the future include especially children growing up in highly contaminated regions, and the liquidators of 1986 and 1987 employed in the period immediately

  15. The macroeconomic consequences of downsizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, H.L.F.; van Schaik, A.B.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The recession in the 1980s followed by the worldwide decrease in transportation and communication costs has triggered a process of downsizing. The macroeconomic consequences of this process are only weakly understood. The model developed in this paper associates downsizing with trade between

  16. Economic consequences of biological variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Lars

    2005-01-01

    We present an economic decision support model, based on a Bayesian network, for Mycoplasma infection in slaughter swine production. The model describes the various risk factors for Mycoplasma infection and their interactions. This leads to a stochastic determination of the consequences of product...

  17. The Consequences of Consequential Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrens, William A.

    1997-01-01

    There is no agreement at present about the importance or meaning of the term "consequential validity." It is important that the authors of revisions to the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" recognize the debate and relegate discussion of consequences to a context separate from the discussion of validity.…

  18. Adolescent childbearing: consequences and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedinger, Emily; Cox, Joanne E

    2012-08-01

    Adolescent childbearing in the United States continues to occur at high rates compared with other industrialized nations, despite a recent decline. Adolescent mothers and their offspring are at risk for negative outcomes. Recent literature exploring the consequences of teenage childbearing and interventions to ameliorate these consequences are presented. Negative consequences of adolescent childbearing can impact mothers and their offspring throughout the lifespan. These consequences are likely attributable to social and environmental factors rather than solely to maternal age. Increasing educational attainment, preventing repeat pregnancy and improving mother-child interactions can improve outcomes for mothers and their children. Home, community, school and clinic-based programs are all viable models of service delivery to this population. Connecting teen mothers with comprehensive services to meet their social, economic, health and educational needs can potentially improve long-term outcomes for both mothers and their offspring. Programs that deliver care to this population in culturally sensitive, developmentally appropriate ways have demonstrated success. Future investigation of parenting interventions with larger sample sizes and that assess multiple outcomes will allow comparison among programs. Explorations of the role of the father and coparenting are also directions for future research.

  19. An Analysis of the Causes and Consequences of Kidnapping in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the objectives of the study are: to examine the nexus between terrorism and kidnapping; to investigate the mutual reinforcement between corruption and kidnapping; to find out if kidnapping and poverty are correlated; and to examine the consequences of the problem. Using secondary qualitative data, the study found ...

  20. A radiographic examination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, A.P.; Cable, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    A system for performing radiographic examination, particularly of large items such as international container units is disclosed. The system is formed as an installation comprising housings for respective linear accelerators transmitting a beam of radiation across the path of a conveyor along which the units can be displaced continuously or incrementally. On either end of the installation are container handling areas including roller conveyors with drag chains and transverse manipulators, and the whole installation is secured within automatically operated doors which seal the high energy region when a container on the conveyor is being subjected to examination. The radiation transmitted through a container is detected in a detector system incorporating a fluoroscopic screen light output from which is detected in a camera system such as a television camera, and transmitted as coded pulsed signals by a coding transfer unit to display screens where an image of the transmitted information can be displayed and/or recorded for further use. (author)

  1. Wait time management strategies for total joint replacement surgery: sustainability and unintended consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Clavel, Nathalie; Amar, Claudia; Sabogale-Olarte, Juan Carlos; Sanmartin, Claudia; De Coster, Carolyn; Noseworthy, Tom

    2017-09-07

    In Canada, long waiting times for core specialized services have consistently been identified as a key barrier to access. Governments and organizations have responded with strategies for better access management, notably for total joint replacement (TJR) of the hip and knee. While wait time management strategies (WTMS) are promising, the factors which influence their sustainable implementation at the organizational level are understudied. Consequently, this study examined organizational and systemic factors that made it possible to sustain waiting times for TJR within federally established limits and for at least 18 months or more. The research design is a multiple case study of WTMS implementation. Five cases were selected across five Canadian provinces. Three success levels were pre-defined: 1) the WTMS maintained compliance with requirements for more than 18 months; 2) the WTMS met requirements for 18 months but could not sustain the level thereafter; 3) the WTMS never met requirements. For each case, we collected documents and interviewed key informants. We analyzed systemic and organizational factors, with particular attention to governance and leadership, culture, resources, methods, and tools. We found that successful organizations had specific characteristics: 1) management of the whole care continuum, 2) strong clinical leadership; 3) dedicated committees to coordinate and sustain strategy; 4) a culture based on trust and innovation. All strategies led to relatively similar unintended consequences. The main negative consequence was an initial increase in waiting times for TJR and the main positive consequence was operational enhancement of other areas of specialization based on the TJR model. This study highlights important differences in factors which help to achieve and sustain waiting times. To be sustainable, a WTMS needs to generate greater synergies between contextual-level strategy (provincial or regional) and organizational objectives and

  2. Health consequences of child labour in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The paper examines the effect of child labour on child health outcomes in Bangladesh, advancing the methodologies and the results of papers published in different journals. Objective: We examine the effect of child labour on child health outcomes. Methods: We used Bangladesh National Child Labour Survey data for 2002-2003 for our analysis. Results: The main finding of the paper suggests that child labour is positively and significantly associated with the probability of being injured or becoming ill. Intensity of injury or illness is significantly higher in construction and manufacturing sectors than in other sectors. Health disadvantages for different age groups are not essentially parallel. Conclusions: The results obtained in this paper strengthen the need for stronger enforcement of laws that regulate child labour, especially given its adverse consequences on health. Although the paper focuses on Bangladesh, much of the evidence presented has implications that are relevant to policymakers in other developing countries.

  3. Psychosocial consequences of skin cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Markham Risica

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Screening for melanoma may save lives, but may also cause patient distress. One key reason that preventative visual skin examinations for skin cancer are not currently recommended is the inadequate available evidence to assess potential harm to psychosocial wellbeing. We investigated potential psychological harms and benefits of skin examinations by conducting telephone surveys in 2015 of 187 screened participants; all were ≥35 years old. Participants had their skin examined by practitioners who had completed INFORMED, a validated web-based training for detection of skin cancers, particularly melanoma. Participants underwent the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Psychological Consequences of Screening (PCQ, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD scale, and the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12. Analyses were conducted in 2017. Of the entire study sample, 40% were thoroughly screened as determined by patient-reported level of undress and skin areas examined. Participants who were thoroughly screened: did not differ on negative psychosocial measures; scored higher on measures of positive psychosocial wellbeing (PCQ; and were more motivated to conduct monthly self-examinations and seek annual clinician skin examinations, compared to other participants (p < 0.05. Importantly, thoroughly screened patients were more likely to report skin prevention practices (skin self-examinations to identify a concerning lesion, practitioner provided skin exam, recommend skin examinations to peers, and feel satisfied with their skin cancer education than less thoroughly screened individuals (p < 0.01. Our results suggest that visual screening for skin cancer does not worsen patient psychosocial wellbeing and may be associated with improved skin cancer-related practices and attitudes. Keywords: Cancer, Melanoma, Cancer prevention, Screening

  4. The genetic consequences of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izhewskij, P.W.

    1996-01-01

    The results of the study of genetic consequences of external gamma-irradiation of man and animals to 1 Sv are given. The investigation was performed in 3 groups under different conditions of exposure of the population: (i) among the people of Russia and Belorussia exposed due to the Chernobyl accident, (ii) among the people living on the Tetscha river basing in the South Urals; (iii) among the occupational contingent of 'Mayak' and the members of their families; The experimental estimation of genetic consequences was made on the offsprings of the white male rats. The male rats were irradiated daily for 10-15 days with external gamma- radiation of different dose power. The range of the doses received by the animals was approximated to the conditions of the exposure of man to the interval from 4 to 79 cSv for a year. (author)

  5. Abortion — facts and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Perinčić, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The author sets forth some of the most recent demographic data, important directions of legal documents as regards abortion, tackling medical and ethical problems of abortion. Some essentials particulars are also given as to the embryonic and foetal development. The whole paper concerns the problems of legal abortion during the first three months of pregnancy. The second part of the paper relates to the consequences of abortion affecting the physical and mental health of a woman as show...

  6. Long-term Consequences of Childhood ADHD on Criminal Activities*

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, Jason; Wolfe, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether childhood mental illness has long term consequences in terms of criminal behavior has been little studied, yet it could have major consequences for both the individual and society more generally. In this paper, we focus on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), one of the most prevalent mental conditions in school-age children, to examine the long-term effects of childhood mental illness on criminal activities, controlling for a rich set of individual, family...

  7. The Czech Equity Market - Its Effectiveness and Macroeconomic Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Horská

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines features of the Czech stock market’s development from 1997 to 2003 and attempts to unveil the macroeconomic consequences of stock-price development. The analysis of the stock market’s behavior supports a cautionary stance on the hypothesis of the efficient-market theory, even in its weak form. Another finding, as regards the macroeconomic consequences of stock-price development, undermined the assumption of the positive wealth effect of rising stocks. In relation to GDP gr...

  8. Normative perceptions of alcohol-related consequences among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Emma I; Leavens, Eleanor L; Miller, Mary Beth; Lombardi, Nathaniel; Leffingwell, Thad R

    2016-07-01

    College students in the U.S. continue to drink in hazardous ways and experience a range of alcohol-related consequences. Personalized feedback interventions (PFIs), which often include normative components comparing personal drinking to that of similar peers, have been effective in reducing alcohol outcomes among college students. Though normative perceptions of the quantity and frequency of alcohol use have been examined in many studies, norms for alcohol-related consequences have received less attention. The current study examined self-other discrepancies (SODs) for alcohol-related consequences among college students. Participants overestimated how often alcohol-related consequences are experienced by other same-sex students on campus and rated consequences as more acceptable for others to experience than themselves. No differences in SODs were found between those who did and did not report alcohol use. Future studies should examine the efficacy of PFIs that incorporate normative feedback on alcohol-related consequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the

  10. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  11. Environmental consequences of nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toon, Owen B. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Robock, Alan [Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Turco, Richard P. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2014-05-09

    A regional war involving 100 Hiroshima-sized weapons would pose a worldwide threat due to ozone destruction and climate change. A superpower confrontation with a few thousand weapons would be catastrophic.

  12. Biological consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinin, N.P.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation probability due to radionuclide fallout is shown to exceed 1 Gy even for the territories which have not been affected by nuclear weapons direct explosions. If some people survive in the nuclear war, their heredity would be affected. Genetic consequences of nuclear war complete the process of Homo sapiens disappearance from the Earth. Space weapons development will deteriorate the prospects of civilization ruin as a result of biological aftereffects of nuclear war and possible application of new arms, as well as chemical and biologic weapons

  13. Consequences from use of reminiscence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudex, Claire; Horsted, Charlotte; Jensen, Anders Møller

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care. Methods: In this randomised study, ten...... than those in the Control Group for Personal accomplishment, Emotional exhaustion, Depersonalisation, ‘Attitude towards individual contact with residents’ and SF-12 self-rated mental health. At 12 months after start of reminiscence, staff in the Intervention Group had significantly better scores than...

  14. Nutrition pathways in consequence modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1982-01-01

    During 1979-1980 calculations of risk from waste transportation by truck (fire following collision) and fire in temporary storage for waste were performed. A modified version of the consequence model of WASH-1400 (CRAC) was used. Two exposure pathways dominated the results: external exposure from material on the ground and exposure via nutrition. Many of the parameters entering into the nutrition calculations will depend upon local conditions, like soil composition, crop yield, etc. It was decided to collect detailed comments upon the CRAC nutritions model and parameter values from radioecologists in the four Nordic countries. Four alternate sets of parameter values were derived from these comments, and new risk calculations were performed

  15. Physical Consequences of Mathematical Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical consequences are derived from the following mathematical structures: the variational principle, Wigner’s classifications of the irreducible representations of the Poincar ́ e group and the duality invariance of the homogeneous Maxwell equations. The analysis is carried out within the validity domain of special relativity. Hierarchical re- lations between physical theories are used. Some new results are pointed out together with their comparison with experimental data. It is also predicted that a genuine Higgs particle will not be detected.

  16. Nuclear disasters and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastian, T.

    1986-01-01

    The book is intended to serve as a source of information and a line of orientation for all people afraid of or angry about the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. The author describes the effects of nuclear disasters that might happen as a result of military or 'peaceful' application of nuclear energy; he explains the situation people will have to cope with, gives advice on protective means and methods and topical information with reference to institutions or authorities where assistance might be available, also including a list of addresses and telephone numbers that has been issued by the governments after the Chernobyl accident. (orig.) [de

  17. Magninos: Experimental consequences and constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raby, S.; West, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    A stable weakly interacting massive particle can simultaneously solve both the solar neutrino and missing mass problems. We have identified this particle with a neutral lepton with mass of order 5 to 15 GeV and an anomalous magnetic moment of order 10 -2 (in the natural units). We call this new particle a [magnino]. In one scenario, the magnino is the neutral component of an electroweak doublet. It has a charged partner with mass a few GeV heavier. In this talk the experimental consequences of the magnino, its charged partner and associated Higgs are discussed. 25 refs., 9 figs

  18. Biological consequences of atomic explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerschmidt, O.

    1984-01-01

    After an introductory chapter of the development and properties of nuclear weapons and the events of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, this books shows the effects of atomic explosions for man: effects of the pressure wave, thermal radiation, initial nuclear radiation alone or in conjunction and possible medical help. In addition the less massive damage caused by induced radioactivity and fallout, their prevention resp. treatment and the malignant/nonmalignant late effects are discussed. A further chapter deals with the psychological and epidemiological effects of atomic explosions, the consequences for food and water supply, and the construction of shetters. The last chapter is concerned with the problem of organising medical help. (MG) [de

  19. Incorporating Health and Behavioral Consequences of Child Abuse in Prevention Programs Targeting Female Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.; Smith, Peggy B.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the health and behavioral consequences of child abuse, comparing parenting and never-pregnant teens. Both groups identified major consequences of suicide, prostitution, school drop-out, crime, and substance abuse. Parenting teens expressed interest in prevention programs that would address these consequences. Recommendations for child…

  20. The implication of using ''consequences'' as a criterion for reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave, L.; Holmes, P.

    1978-01-01

    The influences which may necessitate closer consideration of reactor accident consequences, rather than reactor risk, as a criterion for design are examined briefly. Possible methods for reducing consequences are described and the advantages of inherent features for this purpose are discussed. The cost effectiveness of two possible methods of reducing consequences and risks is estimated. (author)

  1. Environmental Degradation: Causes and Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Tyagi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The subject of environmental economics is at the forefront of the green debate: the environment can no longer be viewed as an entity separate from the economy. Environmental degradation is of many types and have many consequences. To address this challenge a number of studies have been conducted in both developing and developed countries applying different methods to capture health benefits from improved environmental quality. Minimizing exposure to environmental risk factors by enhancing air quality and access to improved sources of drinking and bathing water, sanitation and clean energy is found to be associated with significant health benefits and can contribute significantly to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals of environmental sustainability, health and development. In this paper, I describe the national and global causes and consequences of environmental degradation and social injustice. This paper provides a review of the literature on studies associated with reduced environmental risk and in particular focusing on reduced air pollution, enhanced water quality and climate change mitigation.

  2. CONSEQUENCES OF THE DEMOGRAPHIC CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIVIU RADU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Major dysfunctionalities can arise from the demographic decline, both on a social level and from the perspective of the economic-financial evolution of the world’s states. The obvious aging of the industrialized states’ population overlapping the import of cheap workforce in the developing countries can start mutations whose consequences are somewhat predictable but discouraging. An accelerated urbanization of the states is foreseen, as well as the decrease of birthrates, negative external migration, increase of mortality and its stagnation in a larger value than that of the birthrate, and not least the population’s aging will hinder a part of the developing countries to sustain a high rhythm of long-term economical increase. The socialeconomic consequences will be reflected in the labor market, the householders’ amount of income as well as in the education’s level. All of these aspects call for a rethinking of the public politics, especially of the social insurance’s system and of the education, a reorientation of the economy based on the increase of specializing in production and productivity, as well as a financial stability unburdened by the politics’ interference in the business environment.

  3. Individual Consequences of Internal Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghi Remus Ionut

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of the concept of internal marketing in the literature there have been almost 40 years. This period was marked by a constant increase of the concerns in the internal marketing area, these efforts being evidenced by the publication of a consistent number of articles (conceptual and empirical which analyze this subject. Considering the previous empirical studies, most of them have focused on studying the relationship between internal marketing and employee satisfaction and / or organizational commitment. However, the relationship between internal marketing and its consequences has been less analyzed in the context of emergent economies. In this paper we aimed to analyze the individual consequences of the internal marketing in the Romanian economy context, focusing our attention on three constructs: employee satisfaction, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior. The research was conducted on a sample of 83 medium and large companies in various sectors of the Romanian economy. In order to proceed with the statistical data analyses we followed these steps: verifying the scales reliability, determining factor loadings and research hypotheses testing. Our research results are consistent with results of previous studies showing that the adoption of internal marketing practice has a positive effect on employee satisfaction, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior

  4. Consequences of the Doha Round Trade Reforms for Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osakwe, P.N.; Tongeren, van F.W.; Achterbosch, T.J.; Hammouda, H.B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a quantitative estimate of the potential economic consequences of multilateral trade reform for Africa using a framework that explicitly incorporates issues of concern to the region, such as preference erosion, loss of tariff revenue, and trade facilitation. The results suggest

  5. The Iran nuclear ambitions and the international consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This analysis of the Iran situation concerning the nuclear policy, is presented and discussed in three parts: the data and hypothesis of the iranian nuclear program, the regional strategy of Iran and evolution scenario and their consequences. (A.L.B.)

  6. Field-aligned current signatures in the near-tail region. 2. Coupling between the region 1 and region 2 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, S.; Kokubun, S.; Nakamura, R.; Elphic, R.C.; Russell, C.T.; Baker, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    The development of the substorm-associated current system in the near-tail region is examined in the light of both experiment and theory. First, the March 28, 1979, event is examined intensively by using ground magnetometer data and satellite magnetic field and energetic particle data. The comparison of field-aligned current signatures at geosynchronous altitude and in the near-tail region indicates that the development of the region 1 system is not merely the enhancement in current intensity of the pre-existing system. This finding is consistent with the so-called current wedge model, in which the tail current is converted into a pair of field-aligned currents with the region 1 polarity at substorm onsets. Detailed inspection, however, suggests that the region 2 system is as important as the region 1 system. Statistical properties of the azimuthal magnetic component at synchronous orbit indicate that the deviation during disturbed periods is larger than expected from the enhancement of the region 1 current. These individual and statistical studies suggest that the region 2 system tends to develop in the synchronous region and that the coupling between the region 1 and the region 2 systems is important. The current closure in the magnetosphere is discussed from a viewpoint of the macroscopic behavior of plasma. It is suggested that the dawnside and the duskside region 2 currents are closed in the magnetosphere by the curvature current during the growth phase and by the magnetic gradient current during the expansion phase. The field-aligned currents of the region 1 and the region 2 systems are closed in the ionosphere by the Pedersen current. Consequently, the energy is dissipated as the Joule heating and this energy must be supplied from the magnetosphere. Therefore, the counter part of the Pedersen current, which closes the region 1 and the region 2 currents in magnetosphere, must be the dynamo current

  7. Consequences of severe nuclear accidents in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Petra; Arnold, Delia; Mraz, Gabriele; Arnold, Nikolaus; Gufler, Klaus; Kromp-Kolb, Helga; Kromp, Wolfgang; Sutter, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    A first part of the presentation is devoted to the consequences of the severe accident in the 1986 Chernobyl NPP. It lead to a substantial radioactive contaminated of large parts of Europe and thus raised the awareness for off-site nuclear accident consequences. Spatial patterns of the (transient) contamination of the air and (persistent) contamination of the ground were studied by both measurements and model simulations. For a variety of reasons, ground contamination measurements have variability at a range of spatial scales. Results will be reviewed and discussed. Model simulations, including inverse modelling, have shown that the standard source term as defined in the ATMES study (1990) needs to be updated. Sensitive measurements of airborne activities still reveal the presence of low levels of airborne radiocaesium over the northern hemisphere which stems from resuspension. Over time scales of months and years, the distribution of radionuclides in the Earth system is constantly changing, for example relocated within plants, between plants and soil, in the soil, and into water bodies. Motivated by the permanent risk of transboundary impacts from potential major nuclear accidents, the multidisciplinary project flexRISK (see http://flexRISK.boku.ac.at) has been carried out from 2009 to 2012 in Austria to quantify such risks and hazards. An overview of methods and results of flexRISK is given as a second part of the presentation. For each of the 228 NPPs, severe accidents were identified together with relevant inventories, release fractions, and release frequencies. Then, Europe-wide dispersion and dose calculations were performed for 2788 cases, using the Lagrangian particle model FLEXPART. Maps of single-case results as well as various aggregated risk parameters were produced. It was found that substantial consequences (intervention measures) are possible for distances up to 500-1000 km, and occur more frequently for a distance range up to 100-300 km, which is in

  8. Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study in the Asia-Pacific Region (MUSIC OS-AP: Design of a multinational, prospective, observational study examining the impact of gastrointestinal events on osteoporosis management in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Modi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The results of MUSIC OS-AP will highlight the association of gastrointestinal events with patient-reported outcomes among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and elucidate physicians' management of gastrointestinal events among this patient population in the Asia-Pacific region.

  9. Social consequences of the energy situation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Seven members of either the Council of the British Association for the Advancement of Science or the Institute of Fuel Contributed to the thinking upon which reasonable national policies must be based, and summarized in this report. The report first examines some largely economic questions--the likely future of the price of OPEC oil, its consequences for the price of other forms of energy, and the way in which economic and technical considerations are likely to change the pattern of energy consumption in countries such as Britain. Second, concentrating chiefly on Britain, the panel sets out to define the areas of public policy and social habit in which consequential changes are likely to come about; sometimes, it is possible to foretell the future. Third, they set out to understand to what extent Britain is a special case, distinguished from similar developed countries by disadvantages such as its current economic weakness or by advantages such as North Sea oil. Finally, they take up less parochial questions; the international politics of energy supply are no part of the paper, but there is great interest in such questions as the extent to which the mutual impoverishment of developed and developing countries will sour the relationship between them, not to mention the social consequences of the now probable long-term decline in the buoyancy of air travel.

  10. Future climate change driven sea-level rise: secondary consequences from human displacement for island biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Florian T; Kissling, W Daniel; Beissmann, Helmut; Penn, Dustin J

    2012-09-01

    Sea-level rise (SLR) due to global warming will result in the loss of many coastal areas. The direct or primary effects due to inundation and erosion from SLR are currently being assessed; however, the indirect or secondary ecological effects, such as changes caused by the displacement of human populations, have not been previously evaluated. We examined the potential ecological consequences of future SLR on >1,200 islands in the Southeast Asian and the Pacific region. Using three SLR scenarios (1, 3, and 6 m elevation, where 1 m approximates most predictions by the end of this century), we assessed the consequences of primary and secondary SLR effects from human displacement on habitat availability and distributions of selected mammal species. We estimate that between 3-32% of the coastal zone of these islands could be lost from primary effects, and consequently 8-52 million people would become SLR refugees. Assuming that inundated urban and intensive agricultural areas will be relocated with an equal area of habitat loss in the hinterland, we project that secondary SLR effects can lead to an equal or even higher percent range loss than primary effects for at least 10-18% of the sample mammals in a moderate range loss scenario and for 22-46% in a maximum range loss scenario. In addition, we found some species to be more vulnerable to secondary than primary effects. Finally, we found high spatial variation in vulnerability: species on islands in Oceania are more vulnerable to primary SLR effects, whereas species on islands in Indo-Malaysia, with potentially 7-48 million SLR refugees, are more vulnerable to secondary effects. Our findings show that primary and secondary SLR effects can have enormous consequences for human inhabitants and island biodiversity, and that both need to be incorporated into ecological risk assessment, conservation, and regional planning. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Malaysia's EOC Strategy in Strengthening the Science Knowledge, Awareness and National Interest towards the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabudin, Ahmad Firdaus Ahmad; Said, Noor Azzah; Rahim, Rashidah Abdul; Ng, Theam Foo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine Malaysia's involvement in the Polar Regions, in the context of education, outreach, and communication (EOC), and consequently, to determine the effectiveness of these initiatives. Using qualitative and quantitative research analyses, this study found that Malaysia's experiences in EOC can be used to increase public…

  12. The Iran nuclear ambitions and the international consequences; Les ambitions nucleaires de l'Iran et leurs consequences internationales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-01-15

    This analysis of the Iran situation concerning the nuclear policy, is presented and discussed in three parts: the data and hypothesis of the iranian nuclear program, the regional strategy of Iran and evolution scenario and their consequences. (A.L.B.)

  13. Adolescent Sleepiness: Causes and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Shana L; Capener, Dale; Daly, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Insufficient sleep duration and poor sleep quality are common among adolescents. The multidimensional causes of insufficient sleep duration and poor sleep quality include biological, health-related, environmental, and lifestyle factors. The most common direct consequence of insufficient and/or poor sleep quality is excessive daytime sleepiness, which may contribute to poor academic performance, behavioral health problems, substance use, and drowsy driving. Evaluation of sleepiness includes a detailed sleep history and sleep diary, with polysomnography only required for the assessment of specific sleep disorders. Management involves encouraging healthy sleep practices such as having consistent bed and wake times, limiting caffeine and electronics at night before bed, and eliminating napping, in addition to treating any existing sleep or medical disorders. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(9):e340-e344.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Radiological consequences of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the differential radiological impact of the nuclear fuel cycle with and without plutonium recycle is being undertaken jointly by the National Radiological Protection Board and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). A summary is given of the development of the methodology detailed in their first report to the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) (NRPB/CEA, A methodology for evaluating the radiological consequences of radioactive effluents released in normal operations. Luxembourg, CEC Doc. V/3011/75 EN (1979)). The Collective Effective Dose Equivalent Commitment was used in an attempt to assess the total health detriment. The application of the methodology within particular member states of the European Community has been discussed at seminars. Sensitivity analysis can identify the more important parameters for improving the accuracy of the assessment. (UK)

  15. Studying health consequences of microchimerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J.; Campi, Rita; Frydenberg, Morten

    2003-01-01

    may thus have a health effect beyond the parity effect. A possible design for studying this is to compare health effects for women with or without multiple partners but with the same parity. We compared total and cause specific mortality in these two groups in order to estimate their comparability......Abstract. A pregnancy requires a reasonably good health and may have positive as well as negative health consequences for the woman. Part of these health effects may depend on the immune response to the exchange of fetal cells (microchimerism). The number of biological fathers to a woman’s children...... unlikely that these large differences are entirely related to microchimerism. The study shows that caution is needed when studying health effects of procreation with multiple partners....

  16. The immunological consequences of injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, N

    2012-02-03

    Immediate and early trauma death rates are determined by "first hits" such as hypoxia, hypotension and organ injury, while late mortality correlates closely with "second hits" such as infection. An imbalance between the early systemic inflammatory response (SIRS), and the later compensatory counter-inflammatory response (CARS), is considered to be responsible for much post-traumatic morbidity and mortality. From a clinical perspective, this remains a significant healthcare problem, which has stimulated decades of experimental and clinical research aimed at understanding the functional effects of injury on the immune system. This review describes the impact of injury on the innate and adaptive immune systems. Though it is worth noting that the features of the immune response to injury overlap in many areas with immune dysregulation in sepsis, we attempt here to elucidate the mechanism by which injury predisposes to infection rather than to describe the alterations in host immunity consequent to established sepsis.

  17. The skeletal consequences of thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Jonathan J; Brassill, Mary Jane; Williams, Graham R; Bassett, J H Duncan

    2012-06-01

    Euthyroid status is essential for normal skeletal development and the maintenance of adult bone structure and strength. Established thyrotoxicosis has long been recognised as a cause of high bone turnover osteoporosis and fracture but more recent studies have suggested that subclinical hyperthyroidism and long-term suppressive doses of thyroxine (T4) may also result in decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fragility fracture, particularly in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, large population studies of euthyroid individuals have demonstrated that a hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis set point at the upper end of the normal reference range is associated with reduced BMD and increased fracture susceptibility. Despite these findings, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of thyroid hormone action in bone remain controversial and incompletely understood. In this review, we discuss the role of thyroid hormones in bone and the skeletal consequences of hyperthyroidism.

  18. Decisions and their unintended consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavrodiev, P.

    2014-07-01

    All individuals who live in groups, whether they be humans or animals, rely on collective decision-making to establish and sustain viable social organisations. While the benefits of effective collective decisions are widely recognised (e.g. functioning democracies), it is the unexpected collective effects of many individual decisions that deserve attention, as they bear far-reaching consequences for our social lives. Drawing from diverse contexts, this thesis presents examples of such unintended effects and, in the spirit of complex systems, offers a way by which we can understand these effects and, sometimes, use them to our advantage. In the first part, we focus on contemporary decision-making scenarios in human societies. How does social influence affect collective decisions and can we control its effects? How can we use social herding as a mechanism to promote cooperation without explicit enforcement? Under what conditions can user actions, innocuous at first sight, cause the collapse of an online community? Using formal tools and agent-based models, we study the interaction mechanisms underlying the complexity inherent in these questions. In the second part, we shift our focus to the mitigation of unintended negative consequences. We study two colonies of Bechtein bats, whose survival is predicated on solving a coordination problem under limited information. We follow up on existing field work and apply concepts from network theory to reveal the individual contribution in maintaining the needed group cohesion. Finally, we combine agent-based modelling and network analysis to infer simple interaction rules that reproduce the observed collective coordination. We emphasise that these mechanistic rules can serve as a guide for the design of future experimental studies on collective-decision making in Bechstein bats. (author)

  19. Decisions and their unintended consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavrodiev, P.

    2014-01-01

    All individuals who live in groups, whether they be humans or animals, rely on collective decision-making to establish and sustain viable social organisations. While the benefits of effective collective decisions are widely recognised (e.g. functioning democracies), it is the unexpected collective effects of many individual decisions that deserve attention, as they bear far-reaching consequences for our social lives. Drawing from diverse contexts, this thesis presents examples of such unintended effects and, in the spirit of complex systems, offers a way by which we can understand these effects and, sometimes, use them to our advantage. In the first part, we focus on contemporary decision-making scenarios in human societies. How does social influence affect collective decisions and can we control its effects? How can we use social herding as a mechanism to promote cooperation without explicit enforcement? Under what conditions can user actions, innocuous at first sight, cause the collapse of an online community? Using formal tools and agent-based models, we study the interaction mechanisms underlying the complexity inherent in these questions. In the second part, we shift our focus to the mitigation of unintended negative consequences. We study two colonies of Bechtein bats, whose survival is predicated on solving a coordination problem under limited information. We follow up on existing field work and apply concepts from network theory to reveal the individual contribution in maintaining the needed group cohesion. Finally, we combine agent-based modelling and network analysis to infer simple interaction rules that reproduce the observed collective coordination. We emphasise that these mechanistic rules can serve as a guide for the design of future experimental studies on collective-decision making in Bechstein bats. (author)

  20. Consequences of contamination of the spacecraft environment: immunologic consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Long-term space voyages pose numerous known and unknown health hazards, to the human immune system. Well-studied clinical examples of secondary immunodeficiencies created on Earth, lead one to predict that the conditions of prolonged space flight would weaken the human immune responses that normally hold infection and cancer in check. From evidence gathered from humans flown for prolonged periods in space and from human models of space flight studied on Earth it is reasonable to suspect that space travelers to the planet Mars would experience a weakening of immunity. Subtle defects of immune cell structure and function have been observed in astronauts, such as weakening of specific T-lymphocyte recall of specific antigens. Ground-based models also have demonstrated alterations of immune function, such as the elevation of neuroendocrine immune system messengers, interleukin-6, and soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor in sleep deprivation. Since severe immune compromise the clinical consequences of reactivation of latent virus infections and the development of cancer, has yet to be seen in space flight or in the Earth models, it is extremely important to begin to quantify early changes in immunity to predict the development of immune system collapse with poor clinical outcomes. This approach is designed to validate a number of surrogate markers that will predict trouble ahead. Inherent in this research is the development of countermeasures to reduce the risks of infection and cancer in the first humans going to Mars.

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Regional Marketing Projects on the Development of Regions from Different Stakeholder Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunze Kim-Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the competition for economically attractive stakeholders, regions have to implement strategies to gain and adhere those interest groups. Empirical studies concerning the migration motivations show that it is not only labor market but also soft locational factors of the social environment, nature and landscape that are of high importance: A majority of the population is willing to move or rather stay at a special place because of such soft locational factors. This study examines the impact of regional marketing projects on the development of regions from the perspectives of inhabitants and tourists as well as general attributes to measure a region’s attractiveness from the perspective of high potentials. We argue that those projects that fit to the region and its unique selling propositions contribute to positioning and building location brand value. We show that projects have a socio-economic effect on the attitude towards regions and contribute to building location brand value. An analysis of group differences shows that the project influence on the region and region attractiveness are perceived in significantly different manner depending on the knowledge level of the stakeholder group. Consequently, one should increase the awareness of marketing activities and regions and focus on soft locational factors while establishing and positioning a region brand.

  2. Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study in the Asia-Pacific Region (MUSIC OS-AP): Design of a multinational, prospective, observational study examining the impact of gastrointestinal events on osteoporosis management in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Ankita; Ebeling, Peter R; Lee, Mel S; Min, Yong-Ki; Mithal, Ambrish; Yang, Xiaoqin; Sajjan, Shiva

    2015-12-01

    The burden of osteoporosis in the Asia-Pacific region is not well characterized. The Medication Use Patterns, Treatment Satisfaction, and Inadequate Control of Osteoporosis Study in the Asia-Pacific Region (MUSIC OS-AP) was designed to better understand the association of gastrointestinal events with patient-reported outcomes in postmenopausal women of this region. MUSIC OS-AP is a prospective, multinational, observational cohort study of postmenopausal women ≥ 50 years of age diagnosed with osteoporosis. The study was conducted in five Asia-Pacific countries: Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Korea, and India. MUSIC OS-AP has three components: a physician questionnaire, a retrospective chart review, and a prospective cohort study. The physician questionnaire investigated the role of gastrointestinal events in physicians' pharmacologic management of osteoporosis. The retrospective chart review, also completed by physicians, recorded rate of osteoporosis treatment and the types of osteoporosis medications prescribed to osteoporosis patients. The prospective cohort study investigated the associations between gastrointestinal events and patient-reported outcomes among patients taking oral medications for osteoporosis as well as reasons for non-treatment in patients who remained untreated. The prospective cohort study enrolled two groups of patients: untreated, and treated with oral osteoporosis medications. Untreated patients completed only the baseline surveys, providing information on gastrointestinal event rates, quality of life, health care resource use, and reasons for non-treatment. Treated patients, who were either new to osteoporosis medication or continuing an ongoing medication course, completed surveys at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months post-baseline. The evaluations recorded patient characteristics, gastrointestinal events, health-related and osteoporosis-specific quality of life, health care resource use, medication adherence, and satisfaction with

  3. Adapt and cope : strategies for safeguarding the quality of life in a shrinking ageing region

    OpenAIRE

    Steinführer, Annett; Küpper, Patrick; Tautz, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    "This article examines the adaptation and coping strategies that are in place to safeguard the quality of life in a shrinking ageing region. In particular, it is investigated which resources are available to local policy-makers and the older population in order to pursue this goal. Following an introduction to the debate of regional science about demographic change and its consequences, we introduce a theoretical differentiation between adaptation and coping. Adaptation strategies refer to th...

  4. Examination stress at unified state examination: student destabilization or success factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana N. Kostromina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to clear up the influence of examination stress on the results of completing examination papers by students in the situation of trial General and Unified State Examinations, imitating the real-life environment of unified state certification of schoolchildren. The tasks of the research included determining the dynamics of psychophysiological stress indices at different examination stages, and evaluating additional factors (the subject in which the examination is held, the strategy of solving the variant, success of solving the task etc., influencing the quantity and quality of stress reactions at the examination.The novelty of the research is in the attempt to overcome the problem of confusing the notions of examination stress and examination anxiety, caused by metering the students’ state either before or after the examination. The technology of online monitoring the students’ psychophysiological state is used in the work, which makes it possible to eliminate a number of restrictions occurring during subjective evaluation of the state by the students themselves. Telemetric cardiorhythmography was chosen as the basic method. The method is based on a three-component model of extreme states with consequent domination of one of the three stress-reactive systems. A cardiointervalogramm was being registered in the research process in the online mode and underwent spectral analysis. The following indices of heart rate variability were recorded in order to determine stress reactions: the total power of the spectrum (TP, the spectrum power in low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF regions, and a vegetative balance index (relation of the spectrum powers in low-frequency and high-frequency regions (LF/HF. When the total power of the heart rate fell and, at the same time, the vegetative balance index rose, a conclusion was made of there being a stress reaction. Twenty-five students of an illustrious school were examined

  5. Youth unemployment and its consequences in Calabar metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, consequences of youth unemployment in Nigeria were examined using Calabar metropolis in Cross River State as a case study. The literature is full of scholarly research on the social phenomenon of youth unemployment around the globe. This phenomenon has continued in Nigeria in the face of unfulfilled ...

  6. How do we communicate stereotypes? Linguistic bases and inferential consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigboldus, DHJ; Semin, GR; Spears, R

    The linguistic expectancy bias is defined as the tendency to describe expectancy-consistent information at a higher level of abstraction than expectancy-inconsistent information; The communicative consequences of this bias were examined in 3 experiments. Analyses of judgments that recipients made on

  7. Cognitive Abilities and Creative Behaviors: CAB-5 and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The validity of 6 indices of divergent production was examined in relation to creative output by 144 undergraduates in 8 domains: visual arts, music, literature, theater, science and engineering, business, apparel design, and video and photographic work. Semantic fluency, ideational fluency, originality, and remote consequences correlated with…

  8. Implementation of School Health Promotion: Consequences for Professional Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, N. M. W. M.; de Vries, N. K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This case study aimed to examine the factors influencing the implementation of health promotion (HP) policies and programs in secondary schools and the consequences for professional assistance. Design/methodology/approach: Group interviews were held in two schools that represented the best and worst case of implementation of a health…

  9. Temporary and long-term consequences of bereavement on happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, J.A.; de Graaf, P.M.

    In this article, we examine the temporary and long-term consequences of the death of a parent or child on happiness. According to set-point theory external conditions are expected to only have a short-term or limited influence on happiness. This directly contradicts the basic assumption of affective

  10. Antecedents of Adolescent Parenthood and Consequences at Age 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Antecedents and consequences of adolescent parenting were examined using a representative national sample of 1,000 30-year-olds. It was found that 10 percent of men and 31 percent of women had had a child during adolescence. Higher incidences of adolescent parenting occurred among Blacks and low socio-economic status and low ability groups.…

  11. The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in adult hypopituitary patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filipsson Nyström, Helena; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Kourides, Ione

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in patients with central hypothyroidism (CH) need to be evaluated. The aim was to examine the outcome of thyroxine replacement in CH. Adult hypopituitary patients (n = 1595) with and without CH from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database...

  12. Incidence Of Poverty In Nigeria: Causes And Consequences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the turn of 21st century, after nearly forty eight years of Independence, Nigeria is by all standard of measurement, a very poor country. Poverty is wide and deep in Nigeria. This paper therefore, examines the incidence of poverty in Nigeria, causes and consequences. Much of the problems which created poverty is ...

  13. The Causes and Consequences of Academic Procrastination: A Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpen, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Examines whether students who are intrinsically motivated about learning procrastinate less than those students who are externally motivated and also explores the consequences of procrastination. Indicates that students whose motivation is external are more likely to procrastinate while procrastination is associated with poor academic performance…

  14. A Research on the Consequences of Authentic Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Akif Tabak; Mustafa Polat; Serkan Cosar; Tolga Turkoz

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between employees' authentic leadership perceptions and three relevant authentic leadership consequences, organizational trust, organizational commitment and organizational cynicism. With 371 employees in a Turkish firm, correlation analysis results showed that authentic leadership perceptions of employees were positively related to organizational trust and organizational commitment, but was negatively related with organizational cynicism. Moreover,...

  15. Studies on Determinants and Consequences of Financial Reporting Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Elemes (Tassos)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of financial reporting quality. The first study examines the impact of high quality financial reporting on private firms’ access to bank debt and trade credit capital. The results

  16. OECD Reviews of Regional Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maguire, Karen; Marsan, Giulia Ajmone; Nauwelaers, Claire

    This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth.......This book examines regional innovation in central and southern Denmark, looking at its role in the economy, its governance and policy context and regional strategies for innovation driven growth....

  17. A radiological accident consequence assessment system for Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M.C.; Lam, H.K.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the Hong Kong Radiological Accident Consequence Assessment System which would be used to assess the potential consequences of an emergency situation involving atmospheric release of radioactive material. The system has the capability to acquire real-time meteorological information from the Observatory's network of automatic stations, synoptic stations in the nearby region as well as forecast data from numerical prediction models. The system makes use of these data to simulate the transport and dispersion of the released radioactive material. The effectiveness of protective action on the local population is also modeled. The system serves as a powerful aid in the protective action recommendation processes

  18. Nursing ultrasound examination in catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Romei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US examination of the bladder can precisely determine the bladder volume and is a useful tool in estimating the residual urine volume. Its application is consequently recommended as an alternative to catheterization for the determination of residual urine. Moreover it represents a simple, noninvasive method to predict the outcome of a voiding trial following acute urine retention based on intravesical prostatic protrusion and on the US pattern of the bladder content. In this article, the Authors review the implementation and results of a bladder US program developed for non-medical caregivers at one Emergency Department.

  19. Neuropharmacological Consequences of Variant Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnoor Amjad Butt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropharmacological effects deals with the influence of drugs on nervous system which harvest the changes in mood, behavioral action of an individual. The drugs are characterized by the chemical substances that communicate with the neurons which have different impacts on nervous system. It may either conducts the abusive or pleasure response which depends on the neural chemicals activity and concerns with the licit and illicit drugs. The elucidation of drugs via LC/MS shows its exertion on the brain components. The computational model helps in the identification of signaling pathways that trigger or inhibit the neurotransmitters. The licit drugs have indisputable responses on CNS. It imparts neuroprotection by either stimulating or inhibiting the receptor, by down regulation yield antinociceptors. However, the illicit drugs have negative acknowledgment on the body as in nicotine the fewer amounts provides benefits but in higher amount mimics the activity of brain receptors and replaces it. Many other drugs induce neurodegenerative disorders. Due to advances in field of neuropharmacology innumerable drugs are available for feasible treatment. The main objective of this review is neuropharmacological consequences in correlation to licit and illicit drugs that what type of responses generated by using these drugs, the neurodegenerative disorders, and their restoration via current treatment.

  20. Health consequences of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, Roland

    2011-10-01

    The author first outlines that no exposure of mankind to environmental risks has been as exhaustively and continuously studied as that resulting from ionizing radiations. Apart from lethal effects, he describes non lethal cell lesions which are induced in tissues: mutations and modifications of gene expressions, either directly under the effect of radiation, or by water hydrolysis, or indirectly through a biochemical response to these initial events. Then, the author evokes the controversy about Chernobyl: according to scientists, there is no relationship between the health degradation (human morbidity and mortality) and fallouts whereas activist groups state that there is. The author then evokes that the WHO and the IAEA were accused to lie about the issue of victims and health consequences. He outlines that UNSCEAR reports are a reference for radio-biologists, and that the 2011 report confirmed the conclusions of the 2006 report. He comments some published data, notably those on the acute irradiation syndrome (ARS), on carcinogenic effects (essentially thyroid cancers for children, as there is no clear nor admitted relationship for other forms of cancer), on other pathologies. Finally, the author briefly discusses the issue of crisis management, the information about Fukushima, and the issue of Chernobyl fallouts in France

  1. Fatal consequences of synergistic anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen P

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are increasingly being preferred by clinicians (and patients because they have a wide therapeutic window and therefore do not require monitoring of anticoagulant effect. Herein, we describe the unfortunate case of a patient who had fatal consequences as a result of switching from warfarin to rivaroxaban. Case Summary: A 90-year-old Caucasian woman, with atrial fibrillation on chronic anticoagulation with warfarin, was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia. She was treated with levofloxacin. In the same admission, her warfarin was switched to rivaroxaban. On Day 3 after the switch, her INR was found to be 6, and she developed a cervical epidural hematoma from C2 to C7. She ultimately developed respiratory arrest, was put on comfort care and died. Discussion: Rivaroxaban and warfarin are known to have a synergistic anticoagulant effect, usually seen shortly after switching. Antibiotics also increase the effects of warfarin by the inhibition of metabolizing isoenzymes. It is hypothesized that these two effects led to the fatal cervical spinal hematoma. Conclusion: The convenience of a wide therapeutic window and no requirement of laboratory monitoring makes the NOACs a desirable option for anticoagulation. However, there is lack of data and recommendations on how to transition patients from Warfarin to NOACs or even how to transition from one NOAC to another. Care should be taken to ensure continuous monitoring of anticoagulation when stopping, interrupting or switching between NOACS to avoid the possibility of fatal bleeding and strokes.

  2. Unexpected consequences of bedload diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devauchelle, O.; Abramian, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentary grains transported as bedload bump and bounce on the rough bed of the river that entrains them. The succession of these random events causes bedload particles to diffuse across the flow, towards the less active areas of the bed. In a fashion reminiscent of that proposed by Parker (1978) for suspended load, this mechanism opposes gravity to maintain the banks of alluvial rivers. In fact, diffusion is so tightly linked to bedload that it appears in the most basic sediment transport experiment--the straight channel we use to calibrate transport laws. Indeed, the fixed sides of the channel cause the flow, and thus the bed shear stress, to vary across the flume. This variation induces bedload diffusion, which in turn deforms the bed. As a consequence, to reliably calibrate a transport law, we need to measure the full profiles of shear stress and bedload transport, rather than bulk-average these quantities. Unfortunately, using a larger channel does not solve the problem, as a large aspect ratio favors the growth of streaks caused by a diffusion-induced instability. Based on these observations, we propose a different design for sediment transport experiments.

  3. The consequences of Chernobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Chioșilă

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available These days marks 30 years since the Chernobyl nuclear accident, followed by massive radioactive contamination of the environment and human in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia, and resulted in many deaths among people who intervened to decrease the effects of the nuclear disaster. The 26 April 1986 nuclear accident contaminated all European countries, but at a much lower level, without highlighted consequences on human health. In special laboratories, the main radionuclides (I-131, Cs-137, Cs-134 and Sr-90 were also analyzed in Romania from environmental samples, food, even human subjects. These radionuclides caused the population to receive a low dose of about 1 mSv in 1986 that is half of the dose of the natural background radiation (2.4 mSv per year. As in all European countries (excluding Ukraine, Belarus and Russia this dose of about 1 mSv fell rapidly by 1990, reaching levels close to ones before the accident at the nuclear tests.

  4. Supraclassical consequence relations: Tolerating rare counterexamples

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, W

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We explore a family of supraclassical consequence relations obtained by varying the criteria according to which counterexamples to classical entailment may be deemed tolerable. This provides a different perspective on the rational consequence...

  5. Depression and dementia: cause, consequence or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sophia; Thomas, Alan J

    2014-10-01

    The relationship between depression and dementia is complex and still not well understood. A number of different views exist regarding how the two conditions are linked as well as the underlying neurobiological mechanisms at work. This narrative review examined longitudinal and cross sectional studies in the existing literature and determined the evidence supporting depression being a risk factor, a prodrome, a consequence, or an independent comorbidity in dementia. Overall there is convincing evidence to support both the notion that early life depression can act as a risk factor for later life dementia, and that later life depression can be seen as a prodrome to dementia. There is also evidence to support both conditions showing similar neurobiological changes, particularly white matter disease, either indicating shared risk factors or a shared pattern of neuronal damage. These findings highlight the need to examine if effective treatment of depressive episodes has any effect in reducing the prevalence of dementia, as well as clinicians being vigilant for late life depression indicating the incipient development of dementia, and therefore carefully following up these individuals for future cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Examination Management and Examination Malpractice: The Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunji, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Examination malpractice or cheating has become a global phenomenon. In different countries of the world today, developed and developing, academic dishonesty especially cheating in examinations has heightened and taken frightening dimension. In many countries of the world this phenomenon has become a serious matter of concern that has left many…

  7. What Consequences Do Ideas Have?

    OpenAIRE

    Tushnet, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Steven Teles's book, The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement, is a case study of ideological challenge. Teles, a political scientist, emphasizes the institutional dimensions of such challenges. Relying on interviews and internal documents produced by conservative organizations, he examines the development of conservative litigating groups (i.e., conservative public interest law firms), the growth of the Federalist Society, and the embedding of law and economics within the legal academy. T...

  8. The Consequences of Tax Reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenthal, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the effects of tax reforms for an economy in a welfare state. I do this by a macroeconomic model, which includes not only households, firms and a government but also a monopoly labour union. The households are of two types, workers and entrepreneurs. The workers are employed by the firms, which are owned by the entrepreneurs. This paper shows that decreasing labour taxation and increasing consumption taxation would have a number of positive effects. These include incr...

  9. Why do we have such difficulty assessing aerosol impacts in Southeast Asia? Examining the representativeness of regional in situ, remote sensing, and modeling data using examples from a recent field trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Lagrosas, N.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Campbell, J. R.; Chew, B.; Cook, J.; Di Girolamo, L.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Johnson, R. S.; Jonsson, H.; Lynch, P.; Sessions, W.; Simpas, J. B.; Turk, F. J.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Southeast Asia faces numerous climate change issues, and the interaction between aerosol particles, clouds, and precipitation is thought to impact the environment in this region at both weather and climate scales. Aerosol particles have direct radiative effects, indirect effects through interaction with clouds and precipitation, and also act as a tracer for other processes affecting the carbon cycle or atmospheric chemistry. Southeast Asia also hosts some of the most complex meteorological phenomenon of the world, challenging in situ, remote sensing and modeling systems. Indeed, there is more diversity in satellite based aerosol, fire, cloud, and precipitation products in Southeast Asia than perhaps anywhere else in the world outside of the poles. In addition to serious direct challenges to aerosol observability in Southeast Asia, such as persistent ubiquitous cloud cover, there are also contextual biases (such as for aerosol retrievals the classic clear sky bias). Contextual bias affects the representativeness of nearly all aerosol assessments in Southeast Asia. As part of the 7 Southeast Asian Studies (7SEAS) program, a small intensive study was conducted in Singapore and the Palawan Archipelago in September 2011 to study the flow of biomass burning smoke through the South China/East Sea and into the summertime monsoonal trough. Analysis of field data coupled with multiple satellite and model products allowed us to investigate questions on the representativeness of data and to what extent they capture the 'true' state of the meteorological and aerosol environment. Four specific representativeness issues are presented based on IOP examples: 1) Individual biases in retrievals or model simulations; 2) Sampling biases at short time scales based on product coverage; 3) Temporal and spatial scale biases inherent in large and point based measurements; 4) Contextual biases that develop from the aggregation of data products. Considering all four of these issues we

  10. Economic Consequences Of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlávik, János; Füle, Miklós

    2009-07-01

    Even though the climate conflict resulting from green houses gases (GHG) emissions was evident by the Nineties and the well-known agreements made, their enforcement is more difficult than that of other environmental agreements. That is because measures to reduce GHG emissions interfere with the heart of the economy and the market: energy (in a broader sense than the energy sector as defined by statistics) and economical growth. Analyzing the environmental policy responses to climate change the conclusion is that GHG emission reduction can only be achieved through intensive environmental policy. While extensive environmental protection complements production horizontally, intensive environmental protection integrates into production and the environment vertically. The latter eliminates the source of the pollution, preventing damage. It utilizes the biochemical processes and self-purification of the natural environment as well as technical development which not only aims to produce state-of-the-art goods, but to make production more environmentally friendly, securing a desired environmental state. While in extensive environmental protection the intervention comes from the outside for creating environmental balance, in intensive environmental protection the system recreates this balance itself. Instead of dealing with the consequences and the polluter pays principle, the emphasis is on prevention. It is important to emphasize that climate strategy decisions have complex effects regarding the aspects of sustainability (economical, social, ecological). Therefore, all decisions are political. At present, and in the near future, market economy decisions have little to do with sustainability values under normal circumstances. Taking social and ecological interests into consideration can only be successful through strategic political aims.

  11. Insulin resistance: definition and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovitz, H E

    2001-01-01

    Insulin resistance is defined clinically as the inability of a known quantity of exogenous or endogenous insulin to increase glucose uptake and utilization in an individual as much as it does in a normal population. Insulin action is the consequence of insulin binding to its plasma membrane receptor and is transmitted through the cell by a series of protein-protein interactions. Two major cascades of protein-protein interactions mediate intracellular insulin action: one pathway is involved in regulating intermediary metabolism and the other plays a role in controlling growth processes and mitoses. The regulation of these two distinct pathways can be dissociated. Indeed, some data suggest that the pathway regulating intermediary metabolism is diminished in type 2 diabetes while that regulating growth processes and mitoses is normal.--Several mechanisms have been proposed as possible causes underlying the development of insulin resistance and the insulin resistance syndrome. These include: (1) genetic abnormalities of one or more proteins of the insulin action cascade (2) fetal malnutrition (3) increases in visceral adiposity. Insulin resistance occurs as part of a cluster of cardiovascular-metabolic abnormalities commonly referred to as "The Insulin Resistance Syndrome" or "The Metabolic Syndrome". This cluster of abnormalities may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, accelerated atherosclerosis, hypertension or polycystic ovarian syndrome depending on the genetic background of the individual developing the insulin resistance.--In this context, we need to consider whether insulin resistance should be defined as a disease entity which needs to be diagnosed and treated with specific drugs to improve insulin action.

  12. Modelling fog in probabilistic consequence assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, B.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Earlier work examined the potential influence of foggy weather conditions on the probabilistic assessment of the consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material to the atmosphere (PCA), in particular the impact of a fraction of the released aerosol becoming incorporated into droplets. A major uncertainty emerging from the initial scoping study concerned estimation of the fraction of the released material that would be taken up into droplets. An objective is to construct a method for handling in a PCA context the effect of fog on deposition, basing the method on the experience gained from prior investigations. There are two aspects to explicitly including the effect of fog in PCA: estimating the probability of occurrence of various types of foggy condition and calculating the impact on the conventional end-points of consequence assessment. For the first, a brief outline is given of the use of meteorological data by PCA computer codes, followed by a discussion of some routinely-recorded meteorological parameters that are pertinent to fog, such as the presentweather code and horizontal visibility. Four stylized scenarios are defined to cover a wide range of situations in which particle growth by uptake of water may have an important impact on deposition. A description is then given of the way in which routine meteorological data could be used to flag the presence of each of these conditions in the meteorological data file used by the PCA code. The approach developed to calculate the impact on deposition is pitched at a level of complexity appropriate to the PCA context and reflects the physical constraints of the system and accounts for the specific characteristics of the released aerosol. (Author)

  13. Pester Power and its Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Christina Y.; Reisch, Lucia A.; Gwozdz, Wencke

    2016-01-01

    Objective Children may influence household spending through ‘pester power’. The present study examined pestering through parent–child food shopping behaviours in relation to children’s diet and weight status. Design Cross-sectional and prospective analyses drawn from the IDEFICS study, a cohort...... study of parents and their children. Children’s height and weight were measured and their recent diets were reported by parental proxy based on the Children’s Eating Habits Questionnaire-FFQ at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Parents also completed questionnaires at both time points about pestering...

  14. Consequences of altering rubisco regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvucci, Michael [US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Research examined the thermal stability and propensity for aggregation of wild type and the C- and N-terminally modified forms of activase to determine if loss of activity under heat stress is dependent on protein aggregation. The results showed that 1) loss of activity at high temperature is independent of aggregation; 2) activase with both C- and N-terminal S-Tags are more susceptible to aggregation than wild type activase, 3) aggregation is highly dependent on the concentration of Mg2+ and 4) the ATP analog, ATPgammaS, protects against both thermal inactivation and aggregation.

  15. Climatic Consequences of Nuclear Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2011-12-01

    A nuclear war between Russia and the United States could still produce nuclear winter, even using the reduced arsenals of about 4000 total nuclear weapons that will result by 2017 in response to the New START treaty. A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history. This scenario, using much less than 1% of the explosive power of the current global nuclear arsenal, would produce so much smoke from the resulting fires that it would plunge the planet to temperatures colder than those of the Little Ice Age of the 16th to 19th centuries, shortening the growing season around the world and threatening the global food supply. Crop model studies of agriculture in the U.S. and China show massive crop losses, even for this regional nuclear war scenario. Furthermore, there would be massive ozone depletion with enhanced ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface. These surprising conclusions are the result of recent research (see URL) by a team of scientists including those who produced the pioneering work on nuclear winter in the 1980s, using the NASA GISS ModelE and NCAR WACCM GCMs. The soot is self-lofted into the stratosphere, and the effects of regional and global nuclear war would last for more than a decade, much longer than previously thought. Nuclear proliferation continues, with nine nuclear states now, and more working to develop or acquire nuclear weapons. The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of the world.

  16. The positive and negative consequences of multiple-choice testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Henry L; Marsh, Elizabeth J

    2005-09-01

    Multiple-choice tests are commonly used in educational settings but with unknown effects on students' knowledge. The authors examined the consequences of taking a multiple-choice test on a later general knowledge test in which students were warned not to guess. A large positive testing effect was obtained: Prior testing of facts aided final cued-recall performance. However, prior testing also had negative consequences. Prior reading of a greater number of multiple-choice lures decreased the positive testing effect and increased production of multiple-choice lures as incorrect answers on the final test. Multiple-choice testing may inadvertently lead to the creation of false knowledge.

  17. A joint analysis of determinants and performance consequences of ambidexterity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M. Pertusa-Ortega

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: This paper simultaneously analyzes antecedents and consequences of organizational ambidexterity. Regarding antecedents, the paper examines the influence of internal antecedents (organizational structure and external antecedents (environmental dynamism. With regard to consequences, the paper analyzes the impact of ambidexterity on firm performance. Moreover, we use two different approaches to ambidexterity (structural and contextual perspectives. The findings show that a hybrid organizational structure, with organic (decentralization and mechanistic characteristics (differentiation and formalization, and environmental dynamism, influence ambidexterity, and there is a positive impact of ambidexterity on firm performance. Keywords: Organizational ambidexterity, Structural approach, Contextual approach, Organizational structure, Environmental dynamism, Firm performance

  18. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes

  19. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability

  20. Genetic consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oftedal, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the aftermath of a nuclear war, genetic effects may appear trivial in comparison with the enormity of the catastrophic development in the survivors' health and the environment. Gross effects are immediately or subtly demonstrable on the basis of diverse war scenarios. On the other hand, in a great number of organisms, genetic effects of radiation have been shown to occur according to a no-threshold dose-effect curve, thus implying that effects may be found even in situations and population groups where other direct effects are small. The discussions on the effects of nuclear war have indicated that whatever sector of effects is focused on, closer examination has, in each case - be it treatment of casualties, effects on climate, or effects on world trade - led to a picture of possible and often probable catastrophic collapse

  1. Signal Incongruence and its Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergne, Jean-Philippe; Wernicke, Maria Stokholm; Brenner, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    theory on signal incongruence, we find that firms engaged in philanthropy receive more media disapproval when they overcompensate their CEO, but they are also more likely to decrease CEO overcompensation as a response. Our study contributes to the signaling literature by theorizing about signal......We draw on the signaling and infomediary literatures to examine how media evaluations of CEO overcompensation (a negative cue associated with selfishness and greed) are affected by the presence of corporate philanthropy (a positive cue associated with altruism and generosity). In line with our...... incongruence, and to infomediary and corporate governance research by showing that media disapproval can lead to lower executive compensation. We also reconcile two conflicting views on firm prosocial behavior by showing that, in the presence of incongruent cues, philanthropy can simultaneously enhance...

  2. Are Namibian "fairy circles" the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Cramer

    Full Text Available Causes of over-dispersed barren "fairy circles" that are often surrounded by ca. 0.5 m tall peripheral grasses in a matrix of shorter (ca. 0.2 m tall grasses in Namibian grasslands remain mysterious. It was hypothesized that the fairy circles are the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning arising from resource competition and facilitation. We examined the edaphic properties of fairy circles and variation in fairy circle size, density and landscape occupancy (% land surface with edaphic properties and water availability at a local scale (<50 km and with climate and vegetation characteristics at a regional scale. Soil moisture in the barren fairy circles declines from the center towards the periphery and is inversely correlated with soil organic carbon, possibly indicating that the peripheral grass roots access soil moisture that persists into the dry season within fairy circles. Fairy circle landscape occupancy is negatively correlated with precipitation and soil [N], consistent with fairy circles being the product of resource-competition. Regional fairy circle presence/absence is highly predictable using an empirical model that includes narrow ranges of vegetation biomass, precipitation and temperature seasonality as predictor variables, indicating that fairy circles are likely a climate-dependent emergent phenomenon. This dependence of fairy circle occurrence on climate explains why fairy circles in some locations may appear and disappear over time. Fairy circles are only over-dispersed at high landscape occupancies, indicating that inter-circle competition may determine their spacing. We conclude that fairy circles are likely to be an emergent arid-grassland phenomenon that forms as a consequence of peripheral grass resource-competition and that the consequent barren circle may provide a resource-reservoir essential for the survival of the larger peripheral grasses and provides a habitat for fossicking fauna.

  3. Health Examination by PET. (1) Cancer Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Cancer examination by positron emission tomography (PET) started in Japan in 1994 and has been rapidly popularized. This paper describes author's experience of the examination in his hospital along the recent Japanese guideline for the PET cancer examination. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is intravenously injected at 3.7 (or 4.6, for diabetic patients) MBq/kg after 4-5 hr fasting and 40 min later, imaging is conducted with additional delayed scan at 2 hr to reduce the possible false positive. Image is taken by the equipment with PET-specific camera, of which quality assurance (QA) is maintained according to the guideline, and 3D image is constructed by the ordered subset expectation maximization method. Number of examinees during 4.5 years are 18,210 (M/F=9,735/8,475), and 236 (1.3%), together with use of other test measures like ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical marker and occult blood as well, are found to have cancer of thyroid, large bowel, lung, breast and others. The false negative rate by PET alone is 78/236 (33%) for cancer. PET examination has problems of image reading and specificity of organs, and tasks of informed consent, test cost, increased exchange of information and radiation exposure. However, PET cancer examination will be established as a routine diagnostic tool when the accumulated evidence of early cancer detection is shown useful for improving the survival rate and for reducing the medicare cost. (T.I.)

  4. Chernobyl and its consequences - no reason left to worry anymore?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen-Girmscheid, G.

    1986-01-01

    It is difficult to predict the evolution of radioactive contamination in food. Knowledge is scarce concerning the exposure levels in different regions, the behaviour of different plant species and the interactions with other pollutants. Hence, we need to continuously monitor by measurements, to ban the use of highly contaminated foods and feedstuffs and to identify radiation contents on all food commodities accurately. The author gives and demands recommendations for diets and political consequences after Chernobyl. (DG) [de

  5. Procrastination, consideration of future consequences, and episodic future thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebetez, Marie My Lien; Barsics, Catherine; Rochat, Lucien; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Van der Linden, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Despite the intrinsic temporal nature of procrastination, little research has examined the link between this form of self-regulatory failure and the consideration of future consequences, and no study has addressed the link between procrastination and episodic future thinking. The aim of the present study was to explore these relationships. Participants were asked to project themselves into possible future events and to rate the amount of sensory-perceptual details and autonoetic consciousness associated with their representations. They were also asked to complete questionnaires that assessed procrastination, the consideration of future consequences, and negative affect. Results showed that both the consideration of future consequences and episodic future thinking were associated with procrastination, and in particular with procrastination-related decision making abilities and procrastination-related motivational dispositions, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Causes, consequences, and therapy of the Radiophobia syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    2004-01-01

    The final storage of high-level radioactive waste, which is said to be still open while, in fact, it was solved technically a long time ago and is only being blocked for political reasons, as well as alleged technical risks of German nuclear power plants which have never been demonstrated or proven, are listed again and again as grounds for opting out of the use of nuclear power. There is hardly any doubt that one of the main causes underlying also these arguments, and thus the main reason for the insufficient public acceptance of nuclear power in Germany at the present time as a safe, inexpensive, and non-polluting source of primary energy, is the widespread fear of radiation (radiophobia). Consequently, solutions proposed for successfully managing this radiophobia must be examined. Continued scientific studies of the subject do not seem to be promising, as funds are available at present only for continuing the search for negative biological effects. Important preconditions for a change in attitude are the appropriate initiatives to be taken by the relatively small number of sufficiently independent experts of proven scientific repute. Initiatives of this kind can now be observed in numerous countries and regions in the world. It must be pointed out in this connection, as is underlined again and again by experienced experts, that risk acceptance is not a matter of factual arguments, but of emotions. Psychological and pedagogic sensitivity certainly are important elements in changing public opinion in the interest of a more realistic assessment of the radiation risk and the acceptance of nuclear power. (orig.) [de

  7. Metallographic examination in irradiated materials examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Lee, Key Soon; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Yoo, Byoung Ok

    1998-01-01

    It is very important to have equipment of metallographic examination in hot-cell to observe the micro-structure of nuclear fuels and materials irradiated at nuclear power and/or research reactor. Those equipment should be operated by master-slave manipulators, so they are designed, manufactured and modified to make exercise easy and no trouble. The metallographic examination equipment and techniques as well as its operation procedure are described, so an operator can practice the metallography in hot-cell. (author). 5 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs.

  8. The consequences of rapid deforestation: A North African example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaimeche, S.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the consequences of deforestation in Algeria. It focuses on the Wilaya region of Jijel, in the eastern part of the country, which has some of the last, dense, sub-humid Mediterranean forests. The issue of a possible connection between the recent widespread deforestation and the drier conditions affecting the region is discussed. It is also shown how rapid social and economic changes have induced deforestation on such a large scale that erosion and soil losses are reaching unprecedented levels. The paper also points to the loss of economic potential for Algeria's forests. 38 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs, 3 photos

  9. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  10. Consequences of Not Conserving Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.; Crawford, L.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of fresh water is not only local, but also global. In certain parts of the world, much needed rain is becoming less frequent, possibly due to the effects of global warming. The resources of clean fresh water on earth are very limited and are reducing every year due to pollution like industrial waste, oil spills, untreated sewage, inefficient irrigation systems, waste and leakage, etc. This is destroying the ecosystem of the entire planet. Of course, in some parts of world there is rain almost throughout the year. Regardless, major problems are still prevalent because of a variety of reasons such as drainage, storage, evaporation, cleanliness, etc. It is all too well known that evapotranspiration contributes to a significant water loss from drainage basins. Most of the citizens of this world are still careless about water usage and are unappreciative of the need for water conservation. This is a very unpleasant fact and needs to change. Cost expenditures for the development of infrastructure to supply water to households and industries are becoming prohibitively expensive. Many parts in this world have extremely dry terrain and rainfall is not as frequent as it should be. As a result, the underground water tables are not replenished properly, thereby turning regions to arid land and deserts. Unless effective irrigation methods are used, potential evapotranspiration may be actually greater than precipitation provided by nature. The soil therefore dries out creating an arid landmass. The earth and its inhabitants can sustain only if creative methods of clean water conservation ideas are effectively implemented. (Co-author: Dr. Mysore Narayanan) References: http://www.epa.gov/oaintrnt/water/http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=conservationhttp://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wr/ws/wtrcnsv.htmlhttp://www.sandiego.gov/water/conservation/http://www.swcs.org/http://www.awwa.org/resources-tools/water-knowledge/water-conservation.aspxhttp://www.benefits-of-recycling.com/waterconservationmethods/

  11. Climatic change in Germany. Development, consequences, risks and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Jacob, Daniela; Schuck-Zoeller, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    The book on the climatic change in Germany includes contributions to the following issues: global climate projections and regional projections in Germany and Europe: observation of the climatic change in Central Europe, regional climate modeling, limits and challenges of the regional climate modeling; climatic change in Germany - regional features and extremes: temperature and heat waves, precipitation, wind and cyclones, sea-level increase, tides, storm floods and sea state, floods, definition uncertainties, draughts, forest fires, natural risks; consequences of the climatic change in Germany: air quality, health, biodiversity, water resources, biochemical cycles, agriculture, forestry, soils, personal and commercial transport, cities and urban regions, tourism, infrastructure, energy and water supplies, cost of the climatic change and economic consequences; overall risks and uncertainties: assessment of vulnerabilities, literature review, climatic change as risk enhancement in complex systems, overall risks and uncertainties, decision making under uncertainties in complex systems; integrated strategies for the adaptation to the climatic change: the climate resilient society - transformations and system changes, adaptation to the climatic change as new political field, options for adaptation strategies.

  12. Medical consequences of Chernobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galstyan I.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the long-term effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS, developed at the victims of the Chernobyl accident. Material and Methods. 237 people were exposed during the accident, 134 of them were diagnosed with ARS. Dynamic observation implies a thorough annual examination in a hospital. Results. In the first 1.5-2 years after the ARS mean group indices of peripheral blood have returned to normal. However, many patients had transient expressed moderate cytopenias. Granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia and erythropenia were the most frequently observed things during the first 5 years after the accident. After 5 years their occurences lowered. In 11 patients the radiation cataract was detected. A threshold dose for its development is a dose of 3.2 Gy Long-term effects of local radiation lesions (LRL range from mild skin figure smoothing to a distinct fibrous scarring, contractures, persistently recurrent late radiation ulcers. During all years of observation we found 8 solid tumors, including 2 thyroid cancers. 5 hematologic diseases were found. During 29 years 26 ARS survivors died of various causes. Conclusion. The health of ones with long-term ARS effects is determined by the evolution of the LRL effects on skin, radiation cataracts, hema-tological diseases and the accession of of various somatic diseases, not caused by radiation.

  13. Global Warming: Claims, Science, and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Laurence I.

    2007-04-01

    Widespread (and seemingly dominant) claims about the dire consequences of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) have been propagated by both scientists and politicians and have been prominently featured by much of the mass media. This talk will examine some of those claims --- such as those made in the popular pro-AGW film, An Inconvenient Truth^1 --- from the perspectives of science^2 and scientific methodology^3. Some of the issues considered will be: What are the major ``greenhouse gases''? To what extent is global warming a result of human influences through an increase of ``greenhouse gases''? Is an increase in (1) global temperature and (2) carbon dioxide bad/good? What are some meanings that can be given to the term ``consensus'' in science? What are the estimated financial and other costs of governments implementing the Kyoto accords? Links to readings and videos will be given at the conclusion of the talk. ^1Gore, Al, An Inconvenient Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It -- (Rodale Press, May, 2006). ^2Marlo Lewis, ``A Skeptic's Guide to An Inconvenient Truth'' http://www.cei.org/pages/aitresponse-book.cfm ^3Aaron Wildavsky, But Is It True? A Citizen's Guide to Environmental Health and Safety Issues (Harvard University Press, 1995), Intro. and Chap. 11. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C1.6

  14. Environmental consequences of atmospheric krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    This project examines the thesis that atmospheric background ionization is relevant to the understanding of weather. Projections of future world-wide use of nuclear energy imply that sufficient krypton-85 will be produced and may be released to significantly alter the natural ionization background. The scope of the project includes an assessment of krypton-85 on the electrical aspects of the atmosphere as well as the consequences of an altered electrical state of the atmosphere. The results of a first approximation model for the effects of krypton-85 on the atmosphere show that the electric field at the surface of the ocean would be reduced by about 25 percent and at a continental station by about 15 percent. At about two kilometers altitude, the electric field would be reduced by about 14 percent over the oceans and 16 percent over the land. The effects decrease quickly with increasing altitude. Analytical studies of the equations for fair weather atmospheric electricity yield solutions suitable for the interpretation of time dependent phenomena with periods longer than a few seconds. A brief analysis shows that a perfect assessment is not necessary to make an error-free decision regarding krypton-85 control measures. From the viewpoint of a decision-maker, those aspects that could swing the decision from one alternative to another are priority areas for analysis

  15. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  16. Examining Communication Privacy Management in the Middle School Classroom: Perceived Gains and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Renee; Lane, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Background: From instructing students on curriculum content to helping their pupils to develop a wide range of skills, teachers in many educational settings make daily decisions about how and what to disclose to their students to build relationships and make connections with content. Purpose: The current study, applied to a North American middle…

  17. Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Nicole L; Zeder, Melinda A; Fuller, Dorian Q; Crowther, Alison; Larson, Greger; Erlandson, Jon M; Denham, Tim; Petraglia, Michael D

    2016-06-07

    The exhibition of increasingly intensive and complex niche construction behaviors through time is a key feature of human evolution, culminating in the advanced capacity for ecosystem engineering exhibited by Homo sapiens A crucial outcome of such behaviors has been the dramatic reshaping of the global biosphere, a transformation whose early origins are increasingly apparent from cumulative archaeological and paleoecological datasets. Such data suggest that, by the Late Pleistocene, humans had begun to engage in activities that have led to alterations in the distributions of a vast array of species across most, if not all, taxonomic groups. Changes to biodiversity have included extinctions, extirpations, and shifts in species composition, diversity, and community structure. We outline key examples of these changes, highlighting findings from the study of new datasets, like ancient DNA (aDNA), stable isotopes, and microfossils, as well as the application of new statistical and computational methods to datasets that have accumulated significantly in recent decades. We focus on four major phases that witnessed broad anthropogenic alterations to biodiversity-the Late Pleistocene global human expansion, the Neolithic spread of agriculture, the era of island colonization, and the emergence of early urbanized societies and commercial networks. Archaeological evidence documents millennia of anthropogenic transformations that have created novel ecosystems around the world. This record has implications for ecological and evolutionary research, conservation strategies, and the maintenance of ecosystem services, pointing to a significant need for broader cross-disciplinary engagement between archaeology and the biological and environmental sciences.

  18. A Mixed Methods Examination of Structural Bigenderism and the Consequences for Transgender and Gender Variant People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelman, Kristie L.

    2013-01-01

    For years, transgender activists and their allies have spoken out about the oppression that transgender and gender non-conforming people experience in relation to societal systems and institutions, due to policies and practices that do not acknowledge non-binary experiences of gender, that do not recognize that one's gender may change over time or…

  19. Examining Massification Policies and Their Consequences for Equality in Chinese Higher Education: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    This study extends the theoretical perspectives in policy studies on the issue of educational equality by analyzing the influence of cultural values on policies and policy processes. The present paper first teases out the key cultural values regarding education and equality, and then explores how these values shape the institution and policy…

  20. Using E-Z Reader to Examine the Consequences of Fixation-Location Measurement Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Erik D.; Drieghe, Denis

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about whether fixation durations during reading are only influenced by the processing difficulty of the words being fixated (i.e., the serial-attention hypothesis) or whether they are also influenced by the processing difficulty of the previous and/or upcoming words (i.e., the attention-gradient hypothesis). This article…

  1. The Antecedents and Consequences of Academic Excuse-Making: Examining Individual Differences in Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Keane, Sabrina M.; Wolfe, Raymond N.; Beck, Brett L.

    1998-01-01

    Study of students (n=546) from two colleges found selective college students procrastinated more. Academic procrastination was motivated by task aversion at selective college, by fear of task failure at nonselective college. Nonselective college procrastinators more often used both legitimate and nonlegitimate excuses. Excuses were self-generated…

  2. Clinical features, proximate causes, and consequences of active convulsive epilepsy in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Symon M; Matuja, William; Akpalu, Albert; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Chabi, Martin; Wagner, Ryan G; Connor, Myles; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Bottomley, Christian; White, Steven; Sander, Josemir W; Neville, Brian G R; Newton, Charles R J C; Twine, Rhian; Gómez Olivé, F Xavier; Collinson, Mark; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen; Masanja, Honratio; Mathew, Alexander; Pariyo, George; Peterson, Stefan; Ndyomughenyi, Donald; Bauni, Evasius; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Odera, Victor Mung'ala; Mageto, James O; Ae-Ngibise, Ken; Akpalu, Bright; Agbokey, Francis; Adjei, Patrick; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Doku, Victor C K; Odermatt, Peter; Nutman, Thomas; Wilkins, Patricia; Noh, John

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the clinical features and consequences are poorly characterized. Most studies are hospital-based, and few studies have compared different ecological sites in SSA. We described active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in cross-sectional community-based surveys in SSA, to understand the proximate causes, features, and consequences. We performed a detailed clinical and neurophysiologic description of ACE cases identified from a community survey of 584,586 people using medical history, neurologic examination, and electroencephalography (EEG) data from five sites in Africa: South Africa; Tanzania; Uganda; Kenya; and Ghana. The cases were examined by clinicians to discover risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of epilepsy. We used logistic regression to determine the epilepsy factors associated with medical comorbidities. Half (51%) of the 2,170 people with ACE were children and 69% of seizures began in childhood. Focal features (EEG, seizure types, and neurologic deficits) were present in 58% of ACE cases, and these varied significantly with site. Status epilepticus occurred in 25% of people with ACE. Only 36% received antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital was the most common drug [95%]), and the proportion varied significantly with the site. Proximate causes of ACE were adverse perinatal events (11%) for onset of seizures before 18 years; and acute encephalopathy (10%) and head injury prior to seizure onset (3%). Important comorbidities were malnutrition (15%), cognitive impairment (23%), and neurologic deficits (15%). The consequences of ACE were burns (16%), head injuries (postseizure) (1%), lack of education (43%), and being unmarried (67%) or unemployed (57%) in adults, all significantly more common than in those without epilepsy. There were significant differences in the comorbidities across sites. Focal features are common in ACE, suggesting identifiable and preventable causes. Malnutrition and

  3. Clinical features, proximate causes, and consequences of active convulsive epilepsy in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Symon M; Matuja, William; Akpalu, Albert; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Chabi, Martin; Wagner, Ryan G; Connor, Myles; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Bottomley, Christian; White, Steven; Sander, Josemir W; Neville, Brian G R; Newton, Charles R J C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Epilepsy is common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the clinical features and consequences are poorly characterized. Most studies are hospital-based, and few studies have compared different ecological sites in SSA. We described active convulsive epilepsy (ACE) identified in cross-sectional community-based surveys in SSA, to understand the proximate causes, features, and consequences. Methods We performed a detailed clinical and neurophysiologic description of ACE cases identified from a community survey of 584,586 people using medical history, neurologic examination, and electroencephalography (EEG) data from five sites in Africa: South Africa; Tanzania; Uganda; Kenya; and Ghana. The cases were examined by clinicians to discover risk factors, clinical features, and consequences of epilepsy. We used logistic regression to determine the epilepsy factors associated with medical comorbidities. Key Findings Half (51%) of the 2,170 people with ACE were children and 69% of seizures began in childhood. Focal features (EEG, seizure types, and neurologic deficits) were present in 58% of ACE cases, and these varied significantly with site. Status epilepticus occurred in 25% of people with ACE. Only 36% received antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital was the most common drug [95%]), and the proportion varied significantly with the site. Proximate causes of ACE were adverse perinatal events (11%) for onset of seizures before 18 years; and acute encephalopathy (10%) and head injury prior to seizure onset (3%). Important comorbidities were malnutrition (15%), cognitive impairment (23%), and neurologic deficits (15%). The consequences of ACE were burns (16%), head injuries (postseizure) (1%), lack of education (43%), and being unmarried (67%) or unemployed (57%) in adults, all significantly more common than in those without epilepsy. Significance There were significant differences in the comorbidities across sites. Focal features are common in ACE, suggesting identifiable and

  4. Violence and its injury consequences in American movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, David L; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Webb, Theresa; Fisher, Kevin; Cook, Bernard; Browne, Nick; Kraus, Jess

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the seriousness and frequency of violence and the degree of associated injury depicted in the 100 top-grossing American films of 1994. Methods Each scene in each film was examined for the presentation of violent actions on persons and coded by a systematic context-sensitive analytic scheme. Specific degrees of violence and indices of injury severity were abstracted. Only actually depicted, not implied, actions were coded, although both explicit and implied consequences were examined. Results The median number of violent actions per film was 16 (range, 0-110). Intentional violence outnumbered unintentional violence by a factor of 10. Almost 90% of violent actions showed no consequences to the recipient's body, although more than 80% of the violent actions were executed with lethal or moderate force. Fewer than 1% of violent actions were accompanied by injuries that were then medically attended. Conclusions Violent force in American films of 1994 was overwhelmingly intentional and in 4 of 5 cases was executed at levels likely to cause significant bodily injury. Not only action films but movies of all genres contained scenes in which the intensity of the action was not matched by correspondingly severe injury consequences. Many American films, regardless of genre, tend to minimize the consequences of violence to human beings. PMID:10986175

  5. Distributional consequences of environmental taxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinge Jacobsen, H.; Birr-Pedersen, K.; Wier, M.

    2001-11-01

    Environmental taxes imposed on households have been introduced in many countries. However, few countries have reached the level of environmental taxation that is seen in Denmark today, although many are considering shifting the tax burden towards the consumption that is harming the environment. The total tax burden imposed on households in Denmark in the form of taxes on energy use of all kinds, water consumption and waste production, etc., is considerable. This paper analyses the individual taxes as well as the combination of all these taxes and duties related to environmental concerns, including taxes on heating, transport fuels, electricity, water, waste, plastic bags, registration of cars, annual car use, pesticides, etc. The distributional effect of taxes is examined in relation to household income, socio-economic class, residential location and family status. The shifting of the tax structure from high marginal income tax to consumption-based taxes, especially environmental taxes, might have distributional impacts amongst income groups which have not been considered part of the tax policy. The taxes are compared with respect to distributional impact. Do the effects of the different taxes vary to such an extent that this should be considered when designing tax policies? The hypothesis is that some environmental taxes associated with luxury income are less regressive than the average environmental tax. The results suggest that in Denmark taxes on petrol and registration duties for cars are progressive, whereas most other environmental taxes are regressive, especially the green taxes on water, retail containers and CO 2 . The distributional impacts are illustrated using household consumption survey data and data covering household expenditures on energy. The energy taxes and the more recently introduced green taxes are compared. The project is combining the direct and the indirect effect of taxes. The direct effect considers the taxes imposed directly on

  6. Growth-based Theories for Declining Regions? A Note on Conceptualisations of Demographic Change for Regional Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Matuschewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to critically assess the economic growth paradigm, which typically underlies most approaches to regional policymaking for demographic change. While population losses, ageing and outmigration – i.e. phenomena that are addressed as demographic change – have become a matter of urgency for many European regions, most regional economic development theories remain silent about the population decline affecting the economic growth and development prospects of regions. Consequently, regional policies usually rely on the concept of economic growth, yet neglect the complexity and importance of demographic change and how it relates to the economic sphere. Due to this lack in nuance, we argue that regional policymaking fails to design adequate policy support for regions facing persistent demographic change and economic stagnation or decline as a result. Based on these observations, the paper examines a selection of regional economic development theories in search for alternative concepts of growth and development in the context of demographic change. To this aim, globalisation peripheries are introduced as a fruitful conceptual point of reference and, in combination with endogenous regional development theories, discussed as an alternative approach for regional policymaking.

  7. A region in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proulx, M.U.; Nicolet, R.; Dufour, J.

    1998-01-01

    On July 19 and 20 of 1996, torrential rains provoked catastrophic floods in the Saguenay Region of Quebec. The overflowing waters of the region's rivers damaged 3000 residential buildings, completely destroyed another 426, and seriously affected the activities of 850 business establishments. In this comprehensive report, the physical causes and the social, economic, psychological, cultural, political and administrative consequences of this natural catastrophe are discussed by several experts. The report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the actual flooding conditions and the immediate response of local emergency services such as the Red Cross and the Saint-Vincent-de-Paul agencies. Reactions of the various public agencies and governments to the disaster are described in Part Two. Part Three of the document focuses on lessons to be drawn from this natural disaster, in particular the need to improve emergency relief strategies. The legal implications and consequences of the disaster are also discussed. refs., tabs., figs

  8. Health consequences of ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalci, D.; Dorter, G.; Guclu, I.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing use of ionizing radiations all over the world induces an ever increasing interest of the professionals as well as of the whole society in health protection and the risk due to these practices. Shortly after its discovery, it was recognized that ionizing radiation can have adverse health effects and knowledge of its detrimental effects has accumulated. The fact that ionizing radiation produces biological damage has been known for many years. The biological effects of ionizing radiation for radiation protection considerations are grouped into two categories: The deterministic and the stochastic ones. Deterministic radiation effects can be clinically diagnosed in the exposed individual and occur when above a certain 'threshold' an appropriately high dose is absorbed in the tissues and organs to cause the death of a large number of cells and consequently to impair tissue or organ functions early after exposure. A clinically observable biological effect (Acute Radiation Syndromes, ARS) that occurs days to months after an acute radiation dose. ARS is a complex of acute injury manifestations that occur after a sufficiently large portion of a person's body is exposed to a high dose of ionizing radiation. Such irradiation initially injures all organs to some extent, but the timing and extent of the injury manifestations depend upon the type, rate, and dose of radiation received. Stochastic radiation effects are the chronic effects of radiation result from relatively low exposure levels delivered over long periods of time. These are sort of effects that might result from occupational exposure, or to the background exposure levels (includes radioactive pollution). Such late effects might be the development of malignant (cancerous) disease and of the hereditary consequences. These effects may be observed many years after the radiation exposure. There is a latent period between the initial radiation exposure and the development of the biological effect. In this

  9. Jose Cabrera (Zorita) tube examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchirka, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Jose Cabrera (Zorita) tube examination procedures are discussed. This plant continues to use phosphate water chemistry (sodium/phosphate ratio = 2.1). Three hot leg tube segments were pulled from the Jose Cabera (Zorita) plant in 1985. One tube had a field EC indication on the OD at the first tube support plate and the other two had field EC indications on their ID about 3 inches above the bottom of the tube sheet. All three tubes were initially sent to Battelle for preliminary NDE and decontamination. Segments of two tubes were sent to Westinghouse for destructive examination. The results of the laboratory eddy current and radiographic examinations are given. The results of the visual examinations are also given. The tube with OD indications was destructively examined and shallow intergranular pitting and intergranular attack, up to 2 mils deep, were found on the OD in the tube sheet region. Local areas of IGA, up to 5 mils deep, were found on the OD within the tube support plate region. A summary of this information together with supporting micrographs is given. It was hypothesized that a caustic crevice environment was the cause of this mild degradation. Shallow areas of thinning or wastage, up to 3 mils, were found just above the top of the tube sheet in the sludge pile region. Even more shallow wastage was found at the edges of support plate locations. This wastage is believed to be the remnant of early plant chemistry when a higher sodium/phosphate ratio and higher phosphate concentration were allowed

  10. Examine Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  11. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  12. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  13. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ...

  14. Wood's lamp examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003386.htm Wood lamp examination To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A Wood lamp examination is a test that uses ultraviolet ( ...

  15. General Logic-Systems and Consequence Operators

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, general logic-systems are investigated. It is shown that there are infinitely many finite consequence operators defined on a fixed language L that cannot be generated from a finite logic-system. It is shown that a set map is a finite consequence operator iff it is defined by a general logic-system.

  16. Obesity: Prevalence, Theories, Medical Consequences, Management, and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassar Erika

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity and its associated disorders are a growing epidemic across the world. Many genetic, physiological, and behavioral factors play a role in the etiology of obesity. Diet and exercise are known to play a valuable role in the treatment and prevention of obesity and associated disorders such as hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the prevalence, etiology, consequences, and treatment of obesity.

  17. Medical Consequences of Marijuana Use: A Review of Current Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Adam J.; Conley, James W.; Gordon, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of legalization of marijuana for medicinal and recreational purposes, and the increase use of marijuana, healthcare providers will be increasingly confronted with marijuana users as patients in clinical environments. While there is vast literature regarding the societal and mental health harms associated with marijuana use, there is a paucity of reviews of the potential consequences of marijuana use on physical health or medical conditions. We examine the recent literature on ...

  18. Fast Times During Spring Breaks: Are Traffic Fatalities Another Consequence?

    OpenAIRE

    French, Michael; Gumus, Gulcin

    2014-01-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of college students travel for spring break, spending billions of dollars. We examine a potential adverse consequence of spring break that has received little attention in the literature - traffic safety. In particular, we estimate the impact of spring break season on fatal passenger vehicle crashes. Using daily county-level longitudinal data on traffic fatalities in popular spring break destinations from 1982-2011, we conduct separate analyses by age...

  19. A description of nuclear reactor accidents and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear reactor accidents which have caused core damage, released a significant amount of radioactivity, or caused death or serious injury are described. The reactor accidents discussed in detail include Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, SL-1 and Windscale, although information on other less consequential accidents is also provided. The consequences of these accidents are examined in terms of the amounts of radioactivity released, the radiation doses received, and remedial actions and interventions taken following the accident. 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  1. Measuring regional authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, G.W.; Hooghe, E.A.E.B.; Schakel, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    This article sets out a conceptual basis for measuring regional authority and engages basic measurement issues. Regional authority is disaggregated into two domains (self-rule and shared rule) and these are operationalised in eight dimensions. The article concludes by examining the robustness of

  2. Entrepreneurship and regional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine

    This literature review examines how entrepreneurship and regional development has been previously addressed theoretically and empirically. Regional Science and Entrepreneurship are two fields with their own distinct literature's. The question is therefore, how do these two fields talk about...... the respective other? What are the commonalities and differences? The purpose of this article is to create an analytical synthesis by combining the insights of the two literature's in order to gain a fuller understanding of the relation between entrepreneurship and regional development....

  3. Regions Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Masciarelli, Francesca; Prencipe, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    capital at the regional level, with a large-scale data set of the innovative activities of a representative sample of 2,413 Italian manufacturing firms from 21 regions, and controlling for a large set of firm and regional characteristics, we find that being located in a region characterized by a high...

  4. The Outpatient Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artandi, Maja K; Stewart, Rosalyn W

    2018-05-01

    The physical examination in the outpatient setting is a valuable tool. Even in settings where there is lack of evidence, such as the annual physical examination of an asymptomatic adult, the physical examination is beneficial for the physician-patient relationship. When a patient has specific symptoms, the physical examination-in addition to a thorough history-can help narrow down, or in many cases establish, a diagnosis. In a time where imaging and laboratory tests are easily available, but are expensive and can be invasive, a skilled physical examination remains an important component of patient evaluation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  6. Climate change and the Lower Weser region: Direct and indirect consequences of a climate change for the ecological situation in the Weser, the forelands and in the diked marshes. Final report; Klimaaenderung und Unterweserregion (KLIMU) 'Fallstudie Weseraestuar'. Direkte und indirekte Auswirkungen eines Klimawandels auf die oekologischen Verhaeltnisse in Weser, Vorland und Binnendeichsmarschen. Teilprojekt Oekologischer Komplex. T. A: Binnenland. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, D.; Schirmer, M.

    2001-03-01

    In the subproject 'Ecological Complex' within the combined project 'Climate Change and the Lower Weser Region' (KLIMU), formerly 'Case Study Weser Estuary', the ecological effects of a climate change for the Lower Weser, the tidal forelands and the marshes protected by dikes are assessed. For the description of the ecological situation of the research area the biotope types acc. to DRACHENFELS are assessed and processed using a GIS (ARC View/ARC Info), complemented by relief data, status of protection, agricultural utilization and soil parameters. When a defined future climate (climate scenario) with +55 cm sea-level, +30 cm tidal rise, increased precipitation (but with -6% in summer.) and +2.7 C mean annual temperature acts upon this landscape, the following consequences will arise (without morphological adaptation), which are described in the final report part A for the marshes and in part B for the Lower Weser and the forelands: the shallow water areas of the Lower Weser increase by 29%, tidal areas by 55% and the tidal reeds by 250%; the grassland outside the summerdikes looses it's agricultural value and decreases by 30%. CO{sub 2}- and temperature-increase will rise the biomass production of the reeds by up to 25%, the invasion of neophytes and neozoans will be accelerated. In general the conditions in the foreland will become more natural. In the marshes protected by dikes the raised temperature will promote the invasion of thermophilic species as well; raised temperature and CO{sub 2}-contents of the atmosphere will allow an increase in productivity by 25% and thus help the agriculture. The biotope types of the moist grassland will remain dominated by agriculture, areas within 2 km from the dikes will tend to become more moist, areas far from there will in parts suffer from considerable drought during summer. The reaction options of the coastal protection result in the consumption of highly valued nature-areas (e.g. for a

  7. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  8. Drug abuse: consequences in terms of family pathology and disintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, L

    1991-01-01

    This article examines some of the consequences of drug addiction in terms of family pathology and family disintegration. It briefly elucidates the role of the family in developing and maintaining drug addiction in family members. The concept of 'secondary' sufferers of the illness of drug addiction is examined. An actual case history will be presented in order to facilitate analysis of some of the forms of pathology and disintegration so often seen in the family of the drug addict. Within the family context, the question of who, if anyone, is the victim of drug addiction, is raised.

  9. Can adverse effects of dietary fat intake be overestimated as a consequence of dietary fat underreporting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal; Lissner, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the consequences of systematic reporting bias by the obese for diet-disease relationships. DESIGN: The present report used 24-hour urinary nitrogen and estimates of 24-hour energy expenditure to assess error in diet reporting, and examined the consequence of accounting...

  10. Alcohol-Related Consequences among Intercollegiate Student Athletes: The Role of Drinking Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Diana M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined drinking motives as predictors of alcohol-related consequences among student athletes and nonathletes. Results indicated that the highest level of alcohol-related consequences was reported by student athletes with high levels of both coping and conformity motives. (Contains 2 tables and 2 figures.)

  11. Applicability of Avery's coupled reactor theory to estimate subcriticality of test region in two region system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Teruhiko

    1992-01-01

    The author examined the validity to estimate the subcriticality of a test region in a coupled reactor system using only measurable quantities on the basis of Avery's coupled reactor theory. For the purpose, we analyzed coupled reactor experiments performed at the Tank-type Critical Assembly in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute by using two region systems and evaluated the subcriticality of the test region through a numerical study. Coupling coefficients were redefined at the quasi-static state because their definitions by Avery were not clear. With the coupling coefficients obtained by the numerical calculation, the multiplication factor of the test region was evaluated by two formulas; one for the evaluation using only the measurable quantities and the other for the accurate evaluation which contains the terms dropped in the former formula by assuming the unchangeableness for the perturbation induced in a driver region. From the comparison between the results of the evaluations, it was found that the estimation using only the measurable quantities is valid only for the coupled reactor system where the subcriticality of the test region was very small within a few dollars in reactivity. Consequently, it is concluded that the estimation using only the measurable quantities is not applicable to a general coupled reactor system. (author)

  12. [Violence and health. Symptoms, consequences and treatment of victimized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Ute; Wagels, Lisa; Ellendt, Sinika; Scheller, Maryse; Evler, Aynur; Bergs, René; Clemens, Benjamin; Pütz, Annette; Kohn, Nils; Schneider, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Violence has many faces and often results in a variety of consequences. Some studies indicated different types of violence and health consequences in men and women. However, it is still unclear whether this is reflected in clinical context, for example in a patient sample of a German university hospital. The primary goal of the present study was to analyze associations of violence with health, gender and social, economic, job-related, psychological and physical consequences. In addition, the effects of psychological treatment were examined. One line of research refers to the survey of more than 5000 patients of the university hospital Aachen, evaluating violence experience and several health complaints anonymously. Another line of research deals with detailed interviews with victims of violence and their experienced consequences. A final data source stems from the evaluation of psychological counseling of patients with prior experience of violence. Changes in subjectively perceived depressive symptoms and acceptance of the treatment are evaluated. Experience of violence increases the risk for several health problems, especially the experience of multiple types of violence. The interviews showed that more than 60% of the victims had a clinical diagnosis--independent of sex. The risk for a clinical diagnosis increased with multiple violence experiences during childhood. Patients with a clinical diagnosis indicated more subjective consequences of violence, and consequences of violence were more pronounced in patients that experienced multiple types of violence. The good acceptance as well as the effects on symptomatology and other relevant therapeutic variables provides a first indication for a successful treatment of victims of violence in a clinical context.

  13. Consequences of forest energy for flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruuse, A.

    1992-01-01

    The report examines the effects of forest energy on the field layer vegetation, and includes whole-tree harvesting, liming, fertilization, wood ash distribution and the importance of broadleaved trees. Whole-tree harvesting is negative for some of the vascular plant species, and positive for others, and can have a drastically negative effect on lichens, mosses and decomposing fungi. Whole-tree harvesting can be accepted from the viewpoint of the flora if: - between 10 and 30 % of the slash is left on the clearcut area, - hardwood stands or mixed stands with hardwood are excepted from whole-tree harvesting, - dead lying or standing trees, a few broadleaved trees and old trees, are left on the clearcut area. Liming has some effects on the flora, especially a very negative effect on lichens and mosses. Liming can be accepted if; - it only takes place where whole-tree harvesting has been used or where acidification caused by air pollution has been observed, - the amounts are moderate, 2 to 4 tonnes/ha, and the liming material has a rather large grain size, - it is unevenly distributed, and - it is avoided in naturally acid stands with a special vegetation. Fertilization has negative effects on all the considered vegetation groups. It can only be accepted as compensation for whole-tree harvesting, and no more nitrogen must be added than is taken away in the harvest. In southern Sweden even the compensatory fertilization should be avoided. The consequences of wood ash distribution are little known. Until more facts are presented, only enough wood ash as to compensate for the loss through whole-tree harvesting should be distributed. If the use of forest energy would lead to an increase of the broadleaved tree ratio it would be positive. (54 refs.)

  14. Criminological problems of studying crime consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitov R.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of crime consequences is studied as a total social and not social, direct and indirect damage caused by crime. The quantitative and qualitative indicators of these consequences are shown. It is determined that concept of crime does not embrace its consequences and victims. The qualitative indicators of crime consequences imply the consequences’ character and structure; the quantitative indicators imply cumulative consequences of certain kinds of crime, the dynamics of certain kinds of consequences and coefficient of certain crime consequences. It is proved that not only physical and juridical persons, but also the public, authorities and associations (groups of people having no indication of juridical person must be recognized as crime sufferers. It is argued that crimes can cause property and moral damage (goodwill damage, ecological damage, considerable damage of interests protected by the law, information, managerial damage and other kinds of damage. Theoretically according to criminal law a crime sufferer is a physical, juridical person, an authority, the public, group of people who suffered from physical, property, moral or other kind of damage caused by a completed or uncompleted crime. The author proves the necessity to fix the concept of crime sufferer in criminal law. The concept of victim should include Russian criminal actualities, foreign experience and embrace not only physical but also juridical persons and groups of people suffered from crimes.

  15. Regional Sociological Research Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Vladimirovich Morev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of the Institute of Socio-Economic Development of Territories of RAS in conducting sociological research on the territory of the Vologda Oblast and the Northwestern Federal District. It describes the historical aspects of formation of the system for public opinion monitoring and examines its theoretical and methodological foundations. The author of the article analyzes the structure of monitoring indicators and provides a brief interpretation of research findings that reflect social wellbeing and social perception trends. In addition, the paper analyzes people’s attitude toward the activities of federal and regional authorities, trends in social well-being, consumer sentiment and also the complex indicator – the index of public sentiment in the region – developed by ISEDT RAS researchers. The results of sociological studies carried out at ISEDT RAS correlate with the dynamics of the all-Russian public opinion polls conducted by the Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM, Levada-Center, etc. They indicate that Russian society gradually adapts to new conditions of life after the collapse of the USSR. Besides, opinion polls show the most important features of the post-Soviet Russian history at its present stage; they are associated with the intensification of international political relations, the consequences of the “Crimean spring” and the new challenges Russia’s economy is facing now. The article concludes that as global community, of which Russian society is part, is evolving, sociological knowledge begins to play an increasingly important role in administration and national security; this is associated with the greater importance attached to intangible development factors. Therefore, a necessary prerequisite for administration effectiveness in all its stages is to implement the results of sociological research on social

  16. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Komeda, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  17. Assessing ultrasonic examination results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, V.; Vogt, M.

    1977-01-01

    Amongst nondestructive examination methods, the ultrasonic examination plays an important role. The reason why its scope of application is so wide is because the sound conducting capacity is the only property the material of a test specimen has to have. As the fields are so manifold, only main aspects can be described briefly. The list of references, however, is very extensive and gives plenty of information of all the problems concerning the assessment of ultrasonic examination results. (orig./RW) [de

  18. Unintended consequences of changing accounting standards: the case of fair value accounting and mandatory dividends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncharov, I.; van Triest, S.

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature investigates the interaction of changes in accounting standards with institutions such as investor protection laws and corporate governance mechanisms. We examine the unintended consequences of fair value accounting in determining mandated preferred dividends. We study

  19. The Utility and Consequences of Using Impressed Child Soldiers in Africa's Contemporary Wars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woguwale, Jasom

    2000-01-01

    .... The purpose of this paper titled, "The Utility and Consequences of Using Impressed Child Soldiers in Africa's Contemporary Wars," is to examine the practice of using children as soldiers by various...

  20. Dose from radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Uji, Teruyuki; Sakuyama, Keiko; Fujikawa, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    Relatively high gonad doses, several hundred to one thousand mR, have been observed in case of pelvis, hip-joint, coccyx, lower abdomen and lumber examination. Dose to the ovary is especially high in barium enema and I.V.P. examinations. About 12 per cent of the 4-ray examination are high-dose. The gonad dose is relatively high in examination of abdomen and lower extremities, in infants. The dose to the eyes is especially high, 1.0 to 2.5R per exposure, in temporal bone and nasal sinuses tomography. X-ray doses have been compared with dose limits recommended by ICRP and with the gonad dose from natural radiations. The gonad dose in lumbar examination, barium enema, I.V.P. etc. is as high as the maximum permissible dose per year recommended by ICRP. Several devices have been made for dose reduction in the daily examinations: (1) separating the radiation field from the gonad by one centimeter decreases the gonad dose about one-half. (2) using sensitive screens and films. In pelvimetry and in infant hip-joint examination, the most sensitive screen and film are used. In the I.V.P. examination of adult, use of MS screen in place of FS screen decreases the dose to one-third, in combination with careful setting of radiation field, (3) use of grid increases the dose about 50 percent and the lead rubber protection (0.1mm lead equivalent) decreases the gonad dose to one-thirtieth in the spinal column examination of infant, (4) A lead protector, 1mm thickness and 2.5cm in diameter, on the eyes decreases the dose to about one-eighth in the face and nead examinations. These simple and effective methods for dose reduction. Should be carried out in as many examinations as possible in addition to observing dose limits recommended by ICRP. (Evans, J.)

  1. Anticipated affective consequences of physical activity adoption and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Vaughan, Elaine

    2008-11-01

    The expected emotional consequences of future actions are thought to play an important role in health behavior change. This research examined whether anticipated affective consequences of success and failure vary across stages of physical activity change and differentially predict physical activity adoption as compared to maintenance. Using a prospective design over a 3-month period, a community sample of 329 healthy, middle-aged adults were assessed at 2 time points. Anticipated positive and negative emotions, stage of behavior change (precontemplation [PC], contemplation [C], preparation [P], action [A], maintenance [M]), and level of physical activity. At baseline, anticipated positive emotions were greater in C versus PC, whereas anticipated negative emotions were greater in M versus A and in M versus P. Higher anticipated positive but not negative emotions predicted physical activity adoption and maintenance after 3 months. Although the expected affective consequences of future success and failure differentiated among individuals in the early and later stages of physical activity change, respectively; only the anticipated affective consequences of success predicted future behavior.

  2. Pharmacovigilance: the devastating consequences of not thinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacovigilance: the devastating consequences of not thinking about adverse drug reactions: The burden of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) on patient care has been found to be high globally and is particularly high in South Africa.

  3. Consequence Reasoning in Multilevel Flow Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten; Ravn, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Consequence reasoning is a major element for operation support system to assess the plant situations. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate how Multilevel Flow Models can be used to reason about consequences of disturbances in complex engineering systems. MFM is a modelling methodology...... for representing process knowledge for complex systems. It represents the system by using means-end and part-whole decompositions, and describes not only the purposes and functions of the system but also the causal relations between them. Thus MFM is a tool for causal reasoning. The paper introduces MFM modelling...... syntax and gives detailed reasoning formulas for consequence reasoning. The reasoning formulas offers basis for developing rule-based system to perform consequence reasoning based on MFM, which can be used for alarm design, risk monitoring, and supervision and operation support system design....

  4. Malabsorption: causes, consequences, diagnosis and treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... Review Article: Malabsorption: causes, consequences, diagnosis and treatment. 2011;24(3) ... and osteopenia (malabsorption of calcium, vitamin D, phosphate and magnesium .... A lipase dosage in excess of 75 000 IU per.

  5. Antecedents and Consequences of Affective Commitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemer, J.M.M.; Odekerken-Schröder, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the impact of three psychological antecedents (position involvement, volitional choice and informational complexity) on affective commitment in a financial service setting. Furthermore, this study addresses the consequences of affective commitment on

  6. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  7. INTER-EXAMINER VARIABILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish whether inter-examiner variability is still a significant factor for the undergraduate orthopaedic clinical ... D. The scores for each student were tabulated and the range, mean, and pass rate determined for each of the examiners. ... has not the heart to reject the man”, consistently gave higher scores (1).

  8. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, Brown University, for permission to use this video. UPDATED: ... Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention ...

  9. Causes, consequences, and policy responses to the migration of health workers: key findings from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Roberts, Margaret; Runnels, Vivien; Rajan, S Irudaya; Sood, Atul; Nair, Sreelekha; Thomas, Philomina; Packer, Corinne; MacKenzie, Adrian; Tomblin Murphy, Gail; Labonté, Ronald; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2017-04-05

    This study sought to better understand the drivers of skilled health professional migration, its consequences, and the various strategies countries have employed to mitigate its negative impacts. The study was conducted in four countries-Jamaica, India, the Philippines, and South Africa-that have historically been "sources" of health workers migrating to other countries. The aim of this paper is to present the findings from the Indian portion of the study. Data were collected using surveys of Indian generalist and specialist physicians, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, dieticians, and other allied health therapists. We also conducted structured interviews with key stakeholders representing government ministries, professional associations, regional health authorities, health care facilities, and educational institutions. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression models. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Shortages of health workers are evident in certain parts of India and in certain specialty areas, but the degree and nature of such shortages are difficult to determine due to the lack of evidence and health information. The relationship of such shortages to international migration is not clear. Policy responses to health worker migration are also similarly embedded in wider processes aimed at health workforce management, but overall, there is no clear policy agenda to manage health worker migration. Decision-makers in India present conflicting options about the need or desirability of curtailing migration. Consequences of health work migration on the Indian health care system are not easily discernable from other compounding factors. Research suggests that shortages of skilled health workers in India must be examined in relation to domestic policies on training, recruitment, and retention rather than viewed as a direct consequence of the international migration of health workers.

  10. International climate policy : consequences for shipping

    OpenAIRE

    Mæstad, Ottar; Evensen, Annika Jaersen; Mathiesen, Lars; Olsen, Kristian

    2000-01-01

    This report summarises the main results from the project Norwegian and international climate policy consequences for shipping. The aim of the project has been to shed light on how climate policies might affect shipping, both from the cost side and from the demand side. The project has been divided into three sub-projects, investigating the consequences of climate policies for 1. Optimal shipping operations and management 2. The competitiveness of shipping relative to land transport 3. The tra...

  11. Assessing economic consequences of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.D.; Lee, J.C.; Grimshaw, C.A.; Kalb, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    This project reviewed the literature on the economic consequences of accidents to determine the availability of assessment methods and data and their applicability to the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system before closure; determined needs for expansion, revision, or adaptation of methods and data for modeling economic consequences of accidents of the scale projected for the disposal system; and gathered data that might be useful for the needed revisions. 8 refs., 1 tab

  12. Chernobylsk accident (Causes and Consequences)- Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, D.

    1986-09-01

    The causes and consequences of the nuclear accident at Chernobylsk-4 reactor are shortly described. The informations were provided by Russian during the specialist meeting, carried out at seat of IAEA. The Russian nuclear panorama; the site, nuclear power plant characteristics and sequence of events; the immediate measurements after accident; monitoring/radioactive releases; environmental contamination and ecological consequences; measurements of emergency; recommendations to increase the nuclear safety; and recommendations of work groups, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Physical examination of swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, B J; Hamilton, M; Masters, P G

    1992-07-01

    Swine may be examined to evaluate a disease state or a lowered economic performance or as a herd health consultation. As much of the examination as possible should be performed without handling the animal. A thorough history, evaluation of herd records, environmental examination, and herd examination should be performed prior to the evaluation of an individual animal. All necessary equipment should be available when starting the individual examination. The animals is then restrained and examined, and necessary samples are taken. Post-mortem examinations or slaughter house evaluations are a very frequent part of a health examination on swine. All samples taken should be in accordance with the standards of the laboratory that you use. You should work closely with the laboratory to obtain the best results. Physical examination of swine can be rewarding for the veterinarian as well as the producer. The most important aspect to remember is to have enough information and the proper equipment available to handle the animals for the minimal amount of time to gain the maximum benefits. Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs are similar to domestic swine in terms of their diseases and health but are dissimilar in management; pot-bellied pigs are frequently brought to the veterinarian for individual examinations. History is the most valuable part of the examination, followed by observation. Pot-bellied pigs prefer to be held securely with a hand under the chin and rump. The examination is conducted similarly to the examination of any companion animal. Chemical restraint often is necessary for sampling or minor surgical procedures. Owners should be consulted prior to the use of any restraint. This will help win their approval and confidence when working on their pets. While performing the physical examination, look at the pig's overall health as well as specific breed characteristics. Try to stay abreast of swine vaccination recommendations; you may be consulted in this regard. Most

  14. Structural region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Structural region. The two groups had 4 substitutions similar to Yawat strain. The Yawat strain had 5 unique mutations. 3 in the E2 region and 2 in the E1 region. The mutation, I702V (E2), though different from all the recent Indian and Reunion sequences was similar ...

  15. Dosimetry in endoscopic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldred, Martha Aurelia; Paes, Walter Siqueira; Fausto, Agnes M.F.; Nucci, Jose Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Okuno, Emico; Maruta, Luis Massuo

    1996-01-01

    Equivalent and effective doses in occupational exposures are evaluated considering that some specific endoscopic examinations, radiographic and fluoroscopic images of patients are taken with the medical staff near to the radiation field. Examinations are simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom as a member of the medical staff. Thermoluminescent dosemeters are attached in several positions of the phantom in order to determine some organ doses. From the comparison between the doses experimentally determined and the International and the Brazilian recommended occupational dose limits, the maximum number of examination that any member of the staff can perform was calculated

  16. THE REGIONAL STRUCTURE OF SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina TODOROVIC

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches some of the characteristics of the regional development of Serbia, from the perspective of two models of territorial organization: one is governmental (administrative and statistical, and the other is functional. The imbalances in the levels of development of various territorial units of Serbia (regional disproportions are the consequence of many structural disharmonies, material limitations, and problems with populationstructure, during many years, all worsened by political and economic events at the end of the twentieth century. Also, in this paper we point out the main characteristics of undeveloped regions, the criteria with which we can define them, and a typology of the municipalities inside each such region.

  17. Radiation consequences of fire in Chornobyl NPP exclusive zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorad, V.I.; Litvinskaya, T.V.; Shevchenko, I.A.; Dybach, A.M.; Slepchenko, A.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    In April and June 2015, the population of the Kyiv region in Ukraine was alarmed by information on possible negative radiation consequences of the serious forest fires that broke out in the 30-kilometer zone of Chornobyl NPP Exclusion Zone. The paper describes analytical research related to the assessment of radiation impact of fire in contaminated territories of Chornobylska Pushcha on the public in Kyiv applying the model assessment using JRODOS and Hot Spot computer systems. The paper presents direct radiation research carried out at the same time

  18. Primary disability of the Chernobyl Accident consequences liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubritskij, M.K.; Plakhotya, L.P.; Kalinina, T.V.; Zhilinskaya, E.I.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of courses of the primary invalidism of the Chernobyl accident consequences liquidators is studies. The main reasons of the loss of a capacity for work are blood circulation diseases (41.9%), neoplasms (19.9%), diseases of the nervous system and sense organs (9.7%), mental disorders (5.9%) and endocrine diseases (5.5%). The invalids distribution in the different regions and in different age groups according to the disease forms is analysed. The average durations of the diseases resulting in the primary invalidism are about 2.8 years. In average the illnesses began in the 3.1 years. 6 refs

  19. Ecological and demographic consequences of a nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svirezhev, Y.M.

    1987-01-01

    The impact of a nuclear war upon ecological and demographic processes is estimated. The direct effect of nuclear detonations, the radioactive contamination of territories, the pollution by heavy metals and acid rain, as well as the effect of the sharp decline in temperature of the atmosphere ('nuclear winter') are taken into consideration. Estimated is the extent of destruction for the ecosystems of different types. The recovery of ecosystems is shown to be extremely slow or impossible. Demographic and genetic predictions for the nuclear war consequences are presented for various regions of the world. (author)

  20. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY AND ITS HEALTH CONSEQUENCES – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Jyoti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The world is currently facing an unrecognized and untreated pandemic of Vitamin D Deficiency (VDD1. VDD is a significant public health problem in both developed and developing countries, including India2. It is highly prevalent across all age groups. Vitamin D (VD is a prehormone that humans obtain from foods and dietary supplements and by endogenous skin synthesis from7-dehydrocholesterol with sunlight exposure3. The present article reviews the etiology of VDD, physiological functions, sources, health consequences and prevalence of VDD in different regions of India.

  1. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY AND ITS HEALTH CONSEQUENCES – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Jyoti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The world is currently facing an unrecognized and untreated pandemic of Vitamin D Deficiency (VDD1. VDD is a significant public health problem in both developed and developing countries, including India2. It is highly prevalent across all age groups. Vitamin D (VD is a prehormone that humans obtain from foods and dietary supplements and by endogenous skin synthesis from7-dehydrocholesterol with sunlight exposure3. The present article reviews the etiology of VDD, physiological functions, sources, health consequences and prevalence of VDD in different regions of India.

  2. Factor Structure of Individual Consequences for Teleworking Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Campbell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of telework, little is known about individual outcomes that arise particularly for teleworking professionals. We build on earlier research by examining the conceptual constructs of individual consequences from telework. We initially categorized consequences identified in the extant literature into five areas. However, this model was not supported by confirmatory factor analysis of survey data collected from 250 teleworking accounting professionals. Subsequent exploratory factor analysis revealed a more complex six-factor structure relating to (1 Effectiveness; (2 Self-assurance; (3 Working with Others; (4 Work Pressure; (5 Professional Image; and (6 Physicality. The results extend our understanding of latent constructs underlying telework by professional knowledge workers, and provide a basis for further refinement of our model based on empirical research and theoretical development.

  3. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma Treatment: Stages I & II Melanoma Treatment: Stage III Melanoma ...

  4. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Are Be On Our PAGE MIF Staff Programs & Services Scientific Advisory Board Advisory Board Patrons & Sponsors ... us for One-on-One Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video ...

  5. Breast Self- Examination Contradiction

    OpenAIRE

    Ayla Akkas Gursoy

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is very important health problem among women in the World and Turkey. Although treatment chance is very rising and survival is getting longer thanks to early diagnosis in breast cancer. Some discussion is making related to breast self examination which is one of the early detection methods in recent years. This article consider the discussions about breast self examination under the historical development light. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(3.000): 257-260

  6. Breast Self- Examination Contradiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Akkas Gursoy

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is very important health problem among women in the World and Turkey. Although treatment chance is very rising and survival is getting longer thanks to early diagnosis in breast cancer. Some discussion is making related to breast self examination which is one of the early detection methods in recent years. This article consider the discussions about breast self examination under the historical development light. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(3.000: 257-260

  7. Derivation of the source term, dose results and associated radiological consequences for the Greek Research Reactor – 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, Charalampos, E-mail: chpappas@ipta.demokritos.gr; Ikonomopoulos, Andreas; Sfetsos, Athanasios; Andronopoulos, Spyros; Varvayanni, Melpomeni; Catsaros, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Source term derivation of postulated accident sequences in a research reactor. • Various containment ventilation scenarios considered for source term calculations. • Source term parametric analysis performed in case of lack of ventilation. • JRODOS employed for dose calculations under eighteen modeled scenarios. • Estimation of radiological consequences during typical and adverse weather scenarios. - Abstract: The estimated source term, dose results and radiological consequences of selected accident sequences in the Greek Research Reactor – 1 are presented and discussed. A systematic approach has been adopted to perform the necessary calculations in accordance with the latest computational developments and IAEA recommendations. Loss-of-coolant, reactivity insertion and fuel channel blockage accident sequences have been selected to derive the associated source terms under three distinct containment ventilation scenarios. Core damage has been conservatively assessed for each accident sequence while the ventilation has been assumed to function within the efficiency limits defined at the Safety Analysis Report. In case of lack of ventilation a parametric analysis is also performed to examine the dependency of the source term on the containment leakage rate. A typical as well as an adverse meteorological scenario have been defined in the JRODOS computational platform in order to predict the effective, lung and thyroid doses within a region defined by a 15 km radius downwind from the reactor building. The radiological consequences of the eighteen scenarios associated with the accident sequences are presented and discussed.

  8. Industrial Restructuring and Urban Change in the Pittsburgh Region: Developmental, Ecological, and Socioeconomic Trade-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Haller

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the steel industry's restructuring during the 1980s and its consequences for older industrial regions tied historically to steel production. These regions contained large working-class communities that declined because of deindustrialization and restructuring. This article first examines the transition of the steel industry from its roots in extractive and primary manufacturing to a scrap-recycling industry that minimizes labor and raw material inputs. This transition parallels the structural changes in other industries addressed by political economic perspectives, such as the new international division of labor and globalization of production. The article then focuses on the socioeconomic and structural changes, using the Pittsburgh region as an example, including the employment and land-use consequences of deindustrialization and the relationship between losses in manufacturing employment and increases in persistent joblessness and poverty associated with growth of the urban underclass.

  9. The reality of life safety consequence classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, D.N.D.; Assaf, H.; Kerr, I.R.

    1999-01-01

    Because empirical methods of consequence estimation were not designed for application in risk analysis for dam safety, BC Hydro developed its own method for determining loss of life due to dam failures as part of the development of the risk analysis process. Because loss of life estimation for consequence classification entails the generation of essentially the same information, the method can also be used to determine the consequence category of the dam for life safety considerations, and the model can be extended to third party property damage. The methodology adopted for dealing with life safety differs considerably from the empirical approach by modelling the response of the downstream population to a dam failure flood. The algorithm simulates the response of various groups of populations to the warnings of dam failure and the physical process of fleeing from the areas of potential innundation. Assessing the life safety consequences of dam failure is a first step in estimating dam safety in terms of CDA Guidelines, and empirical methods in use are not suitable for determining loss of life due to dam failures. The process described herein is the only physically based method available for estimating loss of life due to dam failures required by the Dam Safety Guidelines. The model is transparent, logically sound, and has been peer reviewed. The method provides a rational basis for the first step in performing safety assessments of dams in terms of the Guidelines, particularly high consequence dams. 8 refs., 3 figs

  10. Assessing economic consequences of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.D.; Lee, J.C.; Grimshaw, C.A.; Kalb, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    A recent review of existing models and methods for assessing potential consequences of accidents in the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system identifies economic consequence assessment methods as a weak point. Existing methods have mostly been designed to assess economic consequences of reactor accidents, the possible scale of which can be several orders of magnitude greater than anything possible in the HLW disposal system. There is therefore some question about the applicability of these methods, their assumptions, and their level of detail to assessments of smaller accidents. The US Dept. of Energy funded this study to determine needs for code modifications or model development for assessing economic costs of accidents in the HLW disposal system. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) review the literature on economic consequences of accidents to determine the availability of assessment methods and data and their applicability to the HLW disposal system before closure. (2) Determine needs for expansion, revision, or adaptation of methods and data for modeling economic consequences of accidents of the scale projected for the disposal system. (3) Gather data that might be useful for the needed revisions for modeling economic impacts on this scale

  11. Urban and regional change in Australia: an empirical introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'connor, K

    1984-08-01

    Recent changes in the spatial distribution of the population in Australia are examined. In particular, changes in population by state are analyzed for the period 1971-1981. The relationship of these changes to shifts in economic activity, private investment, and banking activity is considered. "Results show there have been only small shifts toward population growth areas. These results are interpreted in part as a consequence of nonlocal multipliers and linkages back to established areas, but also as a reflection of the unique features of the Australian urban and regional system." excerpt

  12. Psychological consequences caused by nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyankov, I.

    2009-01-01

    The psychological consequences caused by eventual nuclear terrorist act are believed to be some of the most: serious. in this article are presented the issues concerning psychological effects as psychological suffering, alteration of risk estimation, changes of individual and social behavior, etc. The most common psychological consequences as a result of the most popular large-scale nuclear accidents in Chernobyl, TMI (USA), Goiania (Brazil) are described. Some of the main factors, such as sex, age, health status, social status and etc, are analyzed. These factors determine the expression of psychological reactions provoked by nuclear accidents or eventual act of nuclear terrorism. In addition, the main precautions to cope with psychological consequences caused by nuclear terrorism are listed

  13. Different drinking motives, different adverse consequences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wicki, Matthias; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Eichenberger, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND AIM: This study, which builds on previous research demonstrating that drinking motives are associated with adverse consequences, investigates the associations between drinking motives and non-alcohol-attributed adverse consequences and disentangles alcohol-related and direct......, differences across countries were tested in a multigroup analysis. RESULTS: The indirect effect (via alcohol use) was greater for injuries and academic problems than for more general outcomes such as life dissatisfaction and negative body image. For social, enhancement and coping motives, we found positive...... indirect effects (via alcohol use) on injuries and academic problems; the association was negative for conformity motives. The direct effect, that is, the effect above and beyond alcohol use, indicated more negative consequences among those who tended to drink more frequently for coping motives. More...

  14. Diagnosis delay in tuberculosis and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibullah, S.; Sheikh, M.A.; Sadiq, A.; Anwar, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To find out the average duration from onset of symptoms to the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis, reasons for diagnostic delay, its consequences, association of variables and formulation of recommendations. Results: In this study it was found that average time from onset of initial symptoms to diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis was 120 days. In 64% of the patients medical practitioners were responsible for delaying the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Loss of weight in 40% and haemoptysis is 21% were the consequences of diagnostic delay of tuberculosis. Delay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis was statistically significant in those patients who consulted private practitioners, and consequences of tuberculosis were severe in those patients who consulted late. (author)

  15. Slow, bursty dynamics as a consequence of quenched network topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ådor, Géza

    2014-04-01

    Bursty dynamics of agents is shown to appear at criticality or in extended Griffiths phases, even in case of Poisson processes. I provide numerical evidence for a power-law type of intercommunication time distributions by simulating the contact process and the susceptible-infected-susceptible model. This observation suggests that in the case of nonstationary bursty systems, the observed non-Poissonian behavior can emerge as a consequence of an underlying hidden Poissonian network process, which is either critical or exhibits strong rare-region effects. On the contrary, in time-varying networks, rare-region effects do not cause deviation from the mean-field behavior, and heterogeneity-induced burstyness is absent.

  16. Slow, bursty dynamics as a consequence of quenched network topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ódor, Géza

    2014-04-01

    Bursty dynamics of agents is shown to appear at criticality or in extended Griffiths phases, even in case of Poisson processes. I provide numerical evidence for a power-law type of intercommunication time distributions by simulating the contact process and the susceptible-infected-susceptible model. This observation suggests that in the case of nonstationary bursty systems, the observed non-Poissonian behavior can emerge as a consequence of an underlying hidden Poissonian network process, which is either critical or exhibits strong rare-region effects. On the contrary, in time-varying networks, rare-region effects do not cause deviation from the mean-field behavior, and heterogeneity-induced burstyness is absent.

  17. Geographic variation in resistance to nectar robbing and consequences for pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lynn S; Leege, Lissa M; Irwin, Rebecca E

    2016-10-01

    Floral evolution is frequently ascribed to selection by pollinators, but may also be shaped by antagonists. However, remarkably few studies have examined geographic mosaics in resistance to floral antagonists or the consequences for other floral interactions. Gelsemium sempervirens experiences frequent nectar robbing in northern Georgia, but rarely in southern Georgia. We conducted common-garden experiments in both locations using genotypes from each region and measured robbing, pollinator attraction, floral attractive and defensive traits, and plant reproduction. Nectar robbing was more than four times higher in the north vs. south, and pollinator visits did not differ between gardens. Across both gardens, northern genotypes were half as likely to be nectar-robbed but received half as many pollinator visits as southern genotypes, suggesting evolution of resistance to robbing at a cost of reduced pollinator attraction. Plant-level traits, such as height and number of flowers, were more closely associated with resistance to robbing than floral size, shape, or chemistry. Northern genotypes had lower female and estimated male reproduction compared to southern genotypes at both locations, which could be due to costs of resistance to nectar robbing, or costs of adaptations to other biotic or abiotic differences between regions. Our study indicates that geographic variation can play a strong role structuring interactions with floral antagonists and mutualists and provides evidence consistent with the hypothesis that local resistance to nectar robbing imposes costs in terms of decreased pollinator attraction and reproduction. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  18. Online video examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    have large influence on their own teaching, learning and curriculum. The programme offers streamed videos in combination with other learning resources. It is a concept which offers video as pure presentation - video lectures - but also as an instructional tool which gives the students the possibility...... to construct their knowledge, collaboration and communication. In its first years the programme has used Skype video communication for collaboration and communication within and between groups, group members and their facilitators. Also exams have been mediated with the help of Skype and have for all students......, examiners and external examiners been a challenge and opportunity and has brought new knowledge and experience. This paper brings results from a questionnaire focusing on how the students experience the video examination....

  19. Panel on atmospheric and climatic consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews some of the important details and undergirding of the presentations on the atmospheric, climatic and biological consequences of nuclear war. The discussion focuses on two questions that have been raised: whether the scenerios that have been presented are a credible basis for analysis of the consequences of possible nuclear wars, given the sizes of the existing arsenals and the available knowledge about how these arsenals might be used; and, whether the various numbers that were given for radiation doses from fallout are in fact internally consistent and compatible with those calculated by other analysts

  20. Child sexual abuse: consequences and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornor, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Sexual abuse is a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States. Given the sheer numbers of sexually abused children, it is vital for pediatric nurse practitioners to understand both short-term and long-term consequences of sexual abuse. Understanding consequences of sexual abuse can assist the pediatric nurse practitioner in anticipating the physical and mental health needs of patients and also may assist in the identification of sexual abuse victims. Sexual abuse typically does not occur in isolation. Implications for practice will be discussed. Copyright © 2010 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Three consequences of the 2012 general elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Buti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article represents an analysis of the 2012 general elections and their consequences on the Romanian political system. The variables analysed in the study are: the effective number of parties (N, the level of electoral disproportionality (G and the nature of bicameralism. Although measured indicators appear to call for an institutional approach and a formal analysis, the article tries to capture and simultaneously takes into account the functional dimension of the political system too. Thus, the consequences of the 2012 parliamentary elections reveal not necessarily the imbalance in the party system or the improvisation of a delegitimized electoral formula, but rather the current makeshift relationships between actors.

  2. The Chernobyl accidents: Causes and Consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chihab-Eddine, A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this communication is to discuss the causes and the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. To facilitate the understanding of the events that led to the accident, the author gave a simplified introduction to the important physics that goes on in a nuclear reactor and he presented a brief description and features of chernobyl reactor. The accident scenario and consequences have been presented. The common contribution factors that led to both Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents have been pointed out.(author)

  3. Observational Consequences of an Interacting Multiverse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Robles-Pérez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The observability of the multiverse is at the very root of its physical significance as a scientific proposal. In this conference we present, within the third quantization formalism, an interacting scheme between the wave functions of different universes and analyze the effects of some particular values of the coupling function. One of the main consequences of the interaction between universes can be the appearance of a pre-inflationary stage in the evolution of the universes that might leave observable consequences in the properties of the CMB.

  4. Observational Consequences of an Interacting Multiverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Pérez, Salvador

    2017-05-01

    The observability of the multiverse is at the very root of its physical significance as a scientific proposal. In this conference we present, within the third quantization formalism, an interacting scheme between the wave functions of different universes and analyze the effects of some particular values of the coupling function. One of the main consequences of the interaction between universes can be the appearance of a pre-inflationary stage in the evolution of the universes that might leave observable consequences in the properties of the CMB.

  5. The Chernobyl nuclear accident and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    An AAEC Task Group was set up shortly after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant to monitor and evaluate initial reports and to assess the implications for Australia. The Task Group issued a preliminary report on 9 May 1986. On 25-29 August 1986, the USSR released details of the accident and its consequences and further information has become available from the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the World Health Organisation. The Task Group now presents a revised report summarising this information and commenting on the consequences from the Australian viewpoint

  6. Radionuclide examination in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streda, A.; Kolar, J.; Valesova, M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of twenty years of experience with the use of radionuclides in bone and articular rheumatic diseases indications for such examinations are summed up. The main advantage of the use of radionuclide methods is that they bring forward early diagnosis of tissue reconstruction which can thus be detected at the stage of microstructural changes. They also provide earlier and more reliable detection of the degree of the pathological process than is provided by X-ray examination. In some cases scintiscan may also be found useful as a method for following up the results of treatment of rheumatic diseases. (author)

  7. Internal examination of CAGR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, P.J.; Langley, J.P.; Simons, C.R.; Hart, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    During selected reactor maintenance periods it will be necessary to conduct examinations of reactor internal components to gain assurance of their continuing integrity throughout the design life. Equipment for remote examination is being developed that will measure the distortions of the graphite moderator bricks and extract samples from them for analysis. Other remotely operated equipment will allow closed circuit TV viewing inside the reactors: the equipment provides both wide field and detailed inspection facilities within a single compact unit. Manipulators are being developed to ring the viewing units to the best vantage points. Reeling and handling gear will be operated from outside the vessels and these provide full containment at all times. (author)

  8. Mini mental state examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørner, Ejnar Alex; Lauritzen, Lise; Wang, August

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) is widely used in Denmark, but often in non-validated versions. In 2000 a cross-sectional workgroup decided on a new common version of the MMSE with a corresponding manual, which is validated for the first time in the present study. MATERIALS...... the severity of dementia disorders. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb-25...

  9. Scintigraphic examinations in neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emde, H [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    1979-06-01

    The introduction of CT in neuroradiological diagnostics has clearly lowered the interest in nuclear examinations. Frequently, these are carried only out of a lack of CT capacity. Still, some examples are given to show how useful cerebral, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid scintiscanning can be in every day routine diagnostics.

  10. Present State Examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Bertelsen, Aksel

    Present State Examination (PSE) 5. udgave er en revideret version af speciallæge i psykiatri Aksel Bertelsens oprindelige materiale. Aksel Bertelsen er ophavsmand til PSE og til den danske udgave af ICD-10. Revisionen omfatter et forbedret layout, en modernisering af sproget, tilføjelse af...

  11. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... us for One-on-One Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video ... 29498 © 2013 Melanoma International Foundation. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Use Toll-free: 866-463- ...

  12. The paediatric ophthalmic examination

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vision improves with the pinhole, then it is most probably a refractive error and can be corrected with glasses. If the vision does not improve the child should be investigated for a cause. Pupil examination in bright light and dim light, looking for anisocoria or a poorly reactive pupil is vital. Watching a child reading a page with.

  13. Consequence Management: A Disconnect Between National Security Policy and Force Structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-15

    effects or the consequences of a detonated and/or released weapon(s) has only recently been given much attention. Despite several warnings of the...with the exposure ? Second, the time required to establish and field a regional JTF would prevent the force from having a strong positive effect on the... outcome of the situation. One of the critical missions of a successful consequence management force is its ability to provide a strong deterrent

  14. Safety consequences of local initiating events in an LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, R.M.; Marr, W.W.; Padilla, A. Jr.; Wang, P.Y.

    1975-12-01

    The potential for fuel-failure propagation in an LMFBR at or near normal conditions is examined. Results are presented to support the conclusion that although individual fuel-pin failure may occur, rapid failure-propagation spreading among a large number of fuel pins in a subassembly is unlikely in an operating LMFBR. This conclusion is supported by operating experience, mechanistic analyses of failure-propagation phenomena, and experiments. In addition, some of the consequences of continued operation with defected fuel are considered.

  15. Consequences of electricity restructuring on the environment: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevi, Benoit

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess theoretical consequences of restructuring electricity markets on the environment. We examine changes in potential behaviours in consumption-side as well as in supply-side. We show that restructuring and following access to competition is not neutral from an environmental standpoint. Deregulation could induce some negative externalities due to requirements in cost-efficiency. The principal result of this paper is the need of strong incentives in public policies to compensate the new short-term horizon in which energy sector's firms are evolving, particularly concerning R and D. (author)

  16. Safety consequences of local initiating events in an LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.M.; Marr, W.W.; Padilla, A. Jr.; Wang, P.Y.

    1975-12-01

    The potential for fuel-failure propagation in an LMFBR at or near normal conditions is examined. Results are presented to support the conclusion that although individual fuel-pin failure may occur, rapid failure-propagation spreading among a large number of fuel pins in a subassembly is unlikely in an operating LMFBR. This conclusion is supported by operating experience, mechanistic analyses of failure-propagation phenomena, and experiments. In addition, some of the consequences of continued operation with defected fuel are considered

  17. Regional Externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, W.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The book offers practical and theoretical insights in regional externalities. Regional externalities are a specific subset of externalities that can be defined as externalities where space plays a dominant role. This class of externalities can be divided into three categories: (1) externalities

  18. Psychosocial consequences of leprosy and the related deformity in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qazi Azad-uz-zaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the psychosocial condition and consequences of the people affected by leprosy and the related deformity in some selected areas of Bangladesh. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from July to December 2015 among 92 leprosy-affected people. A pretested semi-structure questionnaire was used for collecting data by face to face interview from both the low prevalent areas of Khulna and the high prevalent area of Rangpur Division in Bangladesh. Results: Nearly two-fifth of respondents were observed having deformity. Among them, around four-fifth was from Khulna region, about half were above 50 years of age and more than half had monthly family income lower than 5 000 BDT. The development of deformity is found having highly significant association with region (P < 0.001, residence (P < 0.004, and family income (P < 0.004. Differences in consequences between ‘with deformity’ and ‘without deformity’ were found very high. About 65% of the respondents with deformity ‘think less’ of himself, and nearly 60% felt ashamed or embarrassed, 53% had to change job, and 47% was used to think having less respect in the society where the percentage was much lower in all cases to ‘without deformity’ group. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and start multidrug therapy at the earliest stages have chanced to reduce the leprosy-resulted deformity, disfigurement and disability. For those who already have had some nerve damages, health education is highly important to prevent further injury and hence psychosocial consequences.

  19. Dosimeters examinations in a system of radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polsky, O.; Zaytsev, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    The development of an atomic industry and atomic engineering was accompanied scientifically - are justified by conceptual approaches, directional on security of a radiation safety of the personnel and occupied items, where the serving staff lived. It has allowed receiving the enough complete information on radiation doses, comparative performances of illnesses and is brave origins of stochastic effects. Last years on the foreground began to go out problems of influence on the population of ionizing radiation natural, and also engineering changed hum noise. The probability of origin of negative consequences at origin concerning small doses, characteristic for the term, which has usually to the present time, of an exposure of the population of large industrial canters and cities, depends not only from individual, but also on collective doses considerable on number of groups of the people in view of duration of action of the radiation factor. The generalized material of long-term examinations on medial individual doses obtained by population from natural radionuclide, medical procedures in long-term dynamic is obtained. On the basis of long-term data the calculations of stochastic effects among the population of the Moscow region of Russia are given. These effects come from technological radiances of radiation, medical examinations and procedures, from radiation incidents and other radiances of an exposure of the population. It is shown, that nominal coefficient of probability of aggregate stochastic effect matters 5,9 unities on 0,01 inverse Sv that is compounded with literary data

  20. Animal personalities : consequences for ecology and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Max; Weissing, Franz J.

    Personality differences are a widespread phenomenon throughout the animal kingdom. Past research has focused on the characterization of such differences and a quest for their proximate and ultimate causation. However, the consequences of these differences for ecology and evolution received much less

  1. Workplace bullying: a tale of adverse consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying is defined as the repetitive and systematic engagement of interpersonally abusive behaviors that negatively affect both the targeted individual and the work organization. According to the findings of 12 studies, being bullied in the workplace affects approximately 11 percent of workers. Victims are frequently blue-collar and unskilled workers. However, there also appear to be gender and milieu/management factors. Emotional/psychological consequences of workplace bullying may include increased mental distress, sleep disturbances, fatigue in women and lack of vigor in men, depression and anxiety, adjustment disorders, and even work-related suicide. Medical consequences of workplace bullying may include an increase in health complaints such as neck pain, musculoskeletal complaints, acute pain, fibromyalgia, and cardiovascular symptoms. Finally, socioeconomic consequences of workplace bullying may include absenteeism due to sick days and unemployment. Clinicians in both mental health and primary care settings need to be alert to the associations between bullying in the workplace and these potential negative consequences, as patients may not disclose workplace maltreatment due to embarrassment or fears of retribution.

  2. Low-Incidence, High-Consequence Pathogens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-21

    Dr. Stephan Monroe, a deputy director at CDC, discusses the impact of low-incidence, high-consequence pathogens globally.  Created: 2/21/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  3. Paternal Alcoholism: Consequences for Female Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of substance abuse and addiction are profound and depredating. The desolation is incalculable in estimating the psychological damage and trauma inflicted on the children of addicted parents. According to studies and statistics gathered by the National Association for Children of Alcoholics, "there are more than 20 million children…

  4. Tracking reason proof, consequence, and truth

    CERN Document Server

    Azzouni, Jody

    2006-01-01

    When ordinary people - mathematicians among them - take something to follow (deductively) from something else, they are exposing the backbone of our self-ascribed ability to reason. This book investigates the connection between that ordinary notion of consequence and the formal analogues invented by logicians.

  5. Chernobyl: the actual facts and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    In a first part, a Power Point presentation explains the technical reasons of the Chernobyl accident and recalls the environmental and health consequences on a short, middle and long term. In a second part, the author analyses the treatment by the media in France and shows how the population has been manipulated by nuclear opponents with the active complicity of some media

  6. Neurodevelopmental consequences of being born SGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wassenaer, Aleid

    2005-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation is associated with postnatal growth retardation and cardio-vascular and metabolic problems later on in life. Less well described are the consequences of neurodevelopmental outcome. The term SGA is associated with mild to moderate school problems, still present in late

  7. Gravitational consequences of modern field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    1989-01-01

    Some gravitational consequences of certain extensions of Einstein's general theory of relativity are discussed. These theories are not alternative theories of gravity in the usual sense. It is assumed that general relativity is the appropriate description of all gravitational phenomena which were observed to date.

  8. A Computational Model of Selection by Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    Darwinian selection by consequences was instantiated in a computational model that consisted of a repertoire of behaviors undergoing selection, reproduction, and mutation over many generations. The model in effect created a digital organism that emitted behavior continuously. The behavior of this digital organism was studied in three series of…

  9. Consequences in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    It summarizes the consequences in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident, describes the emergency response, the basis for decisions and countermeasures, the measurement strategies, the activity levels and doses and countermeasures and action levels used. Past and remaining problems are discussed and the major investigations and improvements are given. (author)

  10. Liver Hypertension: Causes, Consequences and Prevention

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Liver Hypertension: Causes, Consequences and Prevention · Heart Pressure : Blood Pressure · Slide 3 · If you continue to have high BP · Doctor Measures Blood Pressure (BP): Medicines to Decrease BP · LIVER ~ ~ LIFE Rightists vs. Leftists · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Liver Spleen - Splanchnic ...

  11. Consequences of hadron-nucleus multiplicity parametrization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.P.; Shyam, M.

    1986-01-01

    Some interesting consequences are analyzed of a new parametrization for the hadron-nucleus multiplicity distributions and they are compared with the experimental data. Further, it is illustrated how the scaling property for the average multiplicity will be modified and it is found that the experimental data support this behaviour. (orig.)

  12. Sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, H. A H; de Vet, Henrica C W; Picavet, H. Susan J

    STUDY DESIGN. Cross-sectional population-based study. OBJECTIVE. To study sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain (MP): limited functioning, work leave or disability, and healthcare use. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. MP is a major public health problem in developed countries due to

  13. The Professional Consequences of Whistleblowing by Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sally; Ahern, Kathy

    2000-01-01

    A study of 70 nurses self-described as whistleblowers and 25 who did not repot misconduct showed that whistleblowers experienced severe reprisals (demotion, reprimand, threats, rejection, pressure to resign). There were few professional consequences for those who remained silent. (SK)

  14. Workplace Bullying: A Tale of Adverse Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying is defined as the repetitive and systematic engagement of interpersonally abusive behaviors that negatively affect both the targeted individual and the work organization. According to the findings of 12 studies, being bullied in the workplace affects approximately 11 percent of workers. Victims are frequently blue-collar and unskilled workers. However, there also appear to be gender and milieu/management factors. Emotional/psychological consequences of workplace bullying may include increased mental distress, sleep disturbances, fatigue in women and lack of vigor in men, depression and anxiety, adjustment disorders, and even work-related suicide. Medical consequences of workplace bullying may include an increase in health complaints such as neck pain, musculoskeletal complaints, acute pain, fibromyalgia, and cardiovascular symptoms. Finally, socioeconomic consequences of workplace bullying may include absenteeism due to sick days and unemployment. Clinicians in both mental health and primary care settings need to be alert to the associations between bullying in the workplace and these potential negative consequences, as patients may not disclose workplace maltreatment due to embarrassment or fears of retribution. PMID:25852978

  15. Metabolic Consequences of Changing Dietary Patterns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    should be eaten well, lunch must be in one's fill, and food for dinner should be little', there has lately been a neglect of breakfast, whereas the use of fast foods and large dinners has become the trend. In the Australian Aboriginal population and in South Africa, the consequences of shifts from the hunter-gatherer dietary.

  16. US oil revolution: what strategic consequences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    The US energy revolution will have profound and longstanding repercussions on its national economy and on the world market. What are the strategic consequences of this evolution? Some have suggested that US policy in the Middle East could undergo a deep transformation. Don't hold your breath. (author)

  17. Globalisation; Its Implications and Consequences for Developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attempts to look at the concept of globalisations and analyse its implications and consequences for developing nations in Africa. It is premised on the general perception that globalisations is a positive and powerful force for the improved material well-being of humankind, that would aid the developing countries ...

  18. Stress in College Athletics: Causes, Consequences, Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, James H.; Yow, Deborah A.; Bowden, William W.

    This book addresses the causes and consequences of stress in college sports and offers effective coping mechanisms to help individuals understand and control stressors and emotions in their environment. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Stress"; (2) "Perceptions of Stress in College Athletics"; (3) "Stress among College Athletes"; (4) "Stress…

  19. Separation: consequences for wealth in later life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewilde, C.; van den Bosch, K.; van den Heede, A.; Börsch-Supan, A.; Brandt, M.; Hank, K.; Schröder, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the course of their lives, a substantial minority of elderly European men and women have experienced the dissolution of one or more partner relationships through divorce or the ending of cohabitation. So far, most research into the economic consequences of (marital) separation has been based on

  20. Climate change consequences for the indoor environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariës, M.B.C.; Bluyssen, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists warn us about climate change and its effects on the outdoor environment. These effects can have significant consequences for the indoor environment, also in the Netherlands. Climate changes will affect different aspects of the indoor environment as well as the stakeholders of that indoor