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Sample records for regional blood spinal

  1. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Spinal Cord Blood Flow after Ischemic Preconditioning in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Ischemia

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    David Zvara

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord blood flow after ischemic preconditioning is poorly characterized. This study is designed to evaluate spinal cord blood flow patterns in animals after acute ischemic preconditioning. Experiment 1: After a laminectomy and placement of a laser Doppler probe over the lumbar spinal cord to measure spinal cord blood flow, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups: ischemic preconditioning (IPC, n = 8, and control (CTRL, n = 8. Rats in the CTRL and the IPC groups were subjected to 12 min of ischemia directly followed by 60 min of reperfusion. IPC rats received 3 min of IPC and 30 min of reperfusion prior to the 12-min insult period. Experiment 2: After instrumentation, the rats were randomized into three groups: control (CTRL, n = 7, ischemic preconditioning (IPC, n = 7, and time control (TC, n = 4. Rats in the CTRL and the IPC groups were subjected to the same ischemia and reperfusion protocol as above. The TC group was anesthetized for the same time period as the CTRL and the IPC groups, but had no ischemic intervention. Microspheres were injected at baseline and at 15 and 60 min into the final reperfusion. All rats were euthanized and tissue harvested for spinal cord blood flow analysis. In Experiment 1, there was a slight, significant difference in spinal cord blood flow during the ischemic period; however, this difference soon disappeared during reperfusion. In experiment 2, there was no difference in blood flow at any experimental time. The results of these experiments demonstrate that IPC slightly enhances blood flow to the spinal cord during ischemia; however, this effect is not sustained during the reperfusion period.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound to increase localized blood-spinal cord barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Allison H; Hawryluk, Gregory W; Anzai, Yoshimi; Odéen, Henrik; Ostlie, Megan A; Reichert, Ethan C; Stump, Amanda J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of people every year in the USA, and most patients are left with some permanent paralysis. Therapeutic options are limited and only modestly affect outcome. To address this issue, we used magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) as a non-invasive approach to increase permeability in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We hypothesize that localized, controlled sonoporation of the BSCB by MRgFUS will aid delivery of therapeutics to the injury. Here, we report our preliminary findings for the ability of MRgFUS to increase BSCB permeability in the thoracic spinal cord of a normal rat model. First, an excised portion of normal rat spinal column was used to characterize the acoustic field and to estimate the insertion losses that could be expected in an MRgFUS blood spinal cord barrier opening. Then, in normal rats, MRgFUS was applied in combination with intravenously administered microbubbles to the spinal cord region. Permeability of the BSCB was indicated as signal enhancement by contrast administered prior to T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and verified by Evans blue dye. Neurological testing using the Basso, Beattie, and Breshnahan scale and the ladder walk was normal in 8 of 10 rats tested. Two rats showed minor impairment indicating need for further refinement of parameters. No gross tissue damage was evident by histology. In this study, we have opened successfully the blood spinal cord barrier in the thoracic region of the normal rat spine using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

  4. Effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord injury in mice.

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    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jianbo; Gu, Zhengsong; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Hong

    2016-09-05

    The current study aimed to investigate the effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a mouse model. Lycopene inhibited lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage as a highly efficient antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Lycopene (4 mg/kg/d) was administrated immediately following SCI. The permeability of the BSCB and water content in the spinal cord tissue were evaluated. Additionally, levels of expression of tight junction proteins and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were determined with Western blotting. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of spinal cord tissue homogenates was performed 48 h after SCI to evaluate the expression of inflammation-related cytokines. In addition, recovery of motor function was assessed 1 d, 2 d, 5 d, 10 d, and 15 d after SCI using the Basso Mouse Scale to score locomotion. Compared to the group with an untreated SCI, mice with an SCI treated with lycopene had significantly reduced spinal cord tissue water content and BSCB permeability. Furthermore, motor function of mice with an SCI was also greatly improved by lycopene administration. The expression of the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and NF-kB increased markedly 48 h after SCI, and their upregulation was significantly attenuated by lycopene treatment. The expression of molecules that protect tight junctions, zonula occluden-1 and claudin-5, was upregulated by lycopene treatment after SCI. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that lycopene attenuated SCI by promoting repair of the damaged BSCB, so lycopene is a novel and promising treatment for SCI in humans.

  5. Ischemic Preconditioning Protects against Spinal Cord Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits by Attenuating Blood Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption

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    Bo Fang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic preconditioning has been reported to protect against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion (I-R injury, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To investigate this, Japanese white rabbits underwent I-R (30 min aortic occlusion followed by reperfusion, ischemic preconditioning (three cycles of 5 min aortic occlusion plus 5 min reperfusion followed by I-R, or sham surgery. At 4 and 24 h following reperfusion, neurological function was assessed using Tarlov scores, blood spinal cord barrier permeability was measured by Evan’s Blue extravasation, spinal cord edema was evaluated using the wet-dry method, and spinal cord expression of zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were measured by Western blot and a real-time polymerase chain reaction. ZO-1 was also assessed using immunofluorescence. Spinal cord I-R injury reduced neurologic scores, and ischemic preconditioning treatment ameliorated this effect. Ischemic preconditioning inhibited I-R-induced increases in blood spinal cord barrier permeability and water content, increased ZO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and reduced MMP-9 and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest that ischemic preconditioning attenuates the increase in blood spinal cord barrier permeability due to spinal cord I-R injury by preservation of tight junction protein ZO-1 and reducing MMP-9 and TNF-α expression.

  6. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption Induced by Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

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    Bo Fang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dexmedetomidine has beneficial effects on ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury to the spinal cord, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of dexmedetomidine on blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB disruption induced by spinal cord I/R injury. Methods: Rats were intrathecally pretreated with dexmedetomidine or PBS control 30 minutes before undergoing 14-minute occlusion of aortic arch. Hind-limb motor function was assessed using Tarlov criteria, and motor neurons in the ventral gray matter were counted by histological examination. The permeability of the BSCB was examined using Evans blue (EB as a vascular tracer. The spinal cord edema was evaluated using the wet-dry method. The expression and localization of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1 and Tie2 were assessed by western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Results: Intrathecal preconditioning with dexmedetomidine minimized the neuromotor dysfunction and histopathological deficits, and attenuated EB extravasation after spinal cord I/R injury. In addition, dexmedetomidine preconditioning suppressed I/R-induced increase in MMP-9. Finally, Dexmedetomidine preconditioning enhanced the Ang1-Tie2 system activity after spinal cord I/R injury. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine preconditioning stabilized the BSCB integrity against spinal cord I/R injury by inhibition of MMP-9, and enhancing the Ang1-Tie2 system.

  7. Effect of spinal cord compression on local vascular blood flow and perfusion capacity.

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    Mohammed Alshareef

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI can induce prolonged spinal cord compression that may result in a reduction of local tissue perfusion, progressive ischemia, and potentially irreversible tissue necrosis. Due to the combination of risk factors and the varied presentation of symptoms, the appropriate method and time course for clinical intervention following SCI are not always evident. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element fluid-structure interaction model of the cervical spinal cord was developed to examine how traditionally sub-clinical compressive mechanical loads impact spinal arterial blood flow. The spinal cord and surrounding dura mater were modeled as linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible solids, while blood was modeled as a single-phased, incompressible Newtonian fluid. Simulation results indicate that anterior, posterior, and anteroposterior compressions of the cervical spinal cord have significantly different ischemic potentials, with prediction that the posterior component of loading elevates patient risk due to the concomitant reduction of blood flow in the arterial branches. Conversely, anterior loading compromises flow through the anterior spinal artery but minimally impacts branch flow rates. The findings of this study provide novel insight into how sub-clinical spinal cord compression could give rise to certain disease states, and suggest a need to monitor spinal artery perfusion following even mild compressive loading.

  8. Spinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - spinal cord ... tissue) Myeloma (blood cancer that starts in the plasma cells of the bone marrow) A small number of spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Tumors that start in spinal tissue are ...

  9. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier

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    Dorota Sulejczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB. This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an ‘empty’ (i.e., carrying no glutamate nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo­lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less

  10. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

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    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A [Biomedical Engineering Research Group, City University London, Northampton Square, London (United Kingdom); George, K J [Neuroscience Centre, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End, London (United Kingdom); Langford, R M, E-mail: justin.phillips.1@city.ac.u [Pain and Anaesthesia Research Centre, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  11. The Blood-testis-barrier and Male Sexual Dysfunction Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    dependent male infertility is characterized by a significant reduction in numbers and quality of functional sperm. The mechanism(s) underlying this...stem cells from the immune system. We reported that a contusive injury to the rat spinal cord causes a profound and sustained loss of BTB integrity...term effects on the blood-testis-barrier as a mechanism underlying male infertility following spinal cord injury. Goals/Milestones (Example) CY12/13

  12. Melatonin prevents blood vessel loss and neurological impairment induced by spinal cord injury in rats.

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    Jing, Yingli; Bai, Fan; Chen, Hui; Dong, Hao

    2017-03-01

    Melatonin can be neuroprotective in models of neurological injury, but its effects on blood vessel loss and neurological impairment following spinal cord injury (SCI) are unclear. Our goal herein was to evaluate the possible protective action of melatonin on the above SCI-induced damage in rats. Sixty-three female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three equal groups: sham, SCI and melatonin groups. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally and further administered twice a day at indicated time after a moderate injury at T10 in melatonin group. Blood vessel was assessed by CD31staining and FITC-LEA, the permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) was detected by Evan's Blue. Neuron was assessed by NeuN staining and the expression of Nissl bodies in the neurons was assessed by Nissl staining. The expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin I, or growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in the spinal cord and hippocampus were evaluated by Western blotting. At 7 days post-injury, melatonin treatment rescued blood vessels, increased CD31 levels, ameliorated BSCB permeability. Additionally, melatonin significantly increased the number of neurons and the expression of Nissl bodies in neurons at the injury epicenter. Furthermore, our data showed that SCI reduced levels of the molecular substrates of neurological plasticity, including BDNF, synapsin I, or GAP-43 in the spinal cord and hippocampus. Melatonin treatment partially prevented these reductions. The neuroprotective effect of melatonin was associated with melioration of the microcirculation in the spinal cord and reduction of neurological impairment in the spinal cord and brain.

  13. The Blood Testis Barrier and Male Sexual Dysfunction following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    lines represent the injured animals, the blue bars represent sham animals and the gray bars are naïve animals. The hollow red bar means significant... Queen JH, Grill RJ. Spinal cord injury causes sustained disruption of the blood-testis barrier in the rat. PloS one. 2011;6(1):e16456. PubMed PMID

  14. Increased blood pressure can reduce fatigue of thenar muscles paralyzed after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, JE; Ribot-Ciscar, E; Zijdewind, Inge; Thomas, CK

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether increases in blood pressure, and presumably muscle perfusion pressure, improve the endurance of thenar muscles paralyzed chronically by cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Resting mean arterial pressure (MAP) was low in all eight subjects (64 +/- 2 mmHg).

  15. Perioperative blood transfusion does not decrease survival after surgical treatment of spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Caroline; Lönn, Lars; Morgen, Søren Schmidt

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusions in patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases independently influence patient survival. METHODS: A retrospective study including 170 consecutive patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases...... in 2009 and 2010 at a tertiary referral center. Variables related to postoperative survival were all included in the same multivariable logistic regression analysis with either 3- or 12-month survival as the dependent variable. The independent variables were: transfusion of allogenic red blood cells, age...... at surgery, gender, preoperative hemoglobin, revised Tokuhashi score and no. of instrumented levels. RESULTS: Perioperative allogenic blood transfusion of 1-2 units was associated with increased 12-month survival [p = 0.049, odds ratio 2.619 (confidence interval 1.004-6.831)], but not with 3-month survival...

  16. Delayed detection of motor pathway dysfunction after selective reduction of thoracic spinal cord blood flow in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, Jeroen; de Haan, Peter; Bouma, Gerrit J.; Jacobs, Michael J.; Kalkman, Cor J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Clinical monitoring of myogenic motor evoked potentials to transcranial stimulation provides rapid evaluation of motor-pathway function during surgical procedures in which spinal cord ischemia can occur. However, a severe reduction of spinal cord blood flow that remains confined to the

  17. Blood wastage management in a regional blood transfusion centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh Shahshahani, H; Taghvai, N

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of blood component wastage before and after interventions at Yazd Blood Transfusion Center. The growing need for blood components along with blood safety issues and rising costs constantly pressurise blood centres to improve their efficiency. Reducing the quantity of discarded blood at all stages of the supply chain can decrease the total costs. Data on discarded blood components were extracted from the database of Yazd Blood Transfusion Center. Multiple interventions, including implementation of wastage management standard operating procedures and reduction of red blood cells (RBCs) inventory level, were implemented. Discard rates of blood components in the 3 years after intervention (2013-2015) were compared with the discard rates in the 3 years before interventions. The total wastage rate of blood components decreased by almost 60%. Discard rates of RBCs, platelets and plasma decreased from 9·7%, 18·5% and 5·4% to 2·9%, 10·5% and 2·3%, (P < 0·001) after intervention, respectively. The most prevalent reason for discarding units was expiration of RBCs and platelets. Plasma units were discarded mostly due to technical faults during processing. The cost saving of reduction in blood wastage was estimated to be 1,500,000 dollars. Interventions had a significant impact on the reduction of blood wastage with respect to both cost and blood supply saving. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

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    Roach, E.S.; Stump, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical.

  19. Blood donor haematology parameters in two regions of Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in Kenya and to assess the potential role of automated haematology in National blood bank process control. Design: A cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: Two regional blood banks - Nairobi and its environs (Blood Transfusion Services, Nairobi) and Western Region (National Blood Transfusion Services, Kisumu).

  20. Selective Increase of Two ABC Drug Efflux Transporters at the Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Suggests Induced Pharmacoresistance in ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Michael R.; Jacob, Dena A.; Campos, Christopher; Miller, David S.; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters in the CNS are predominantly localized to the luminal surface of endothelial cells in capillaries to impede CNS accumulation of xenobiotics. Inflammatory mediators and cellular stressors regulate their activity. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motor neurons characterized by extensive neuroinflammation. Here we tested the hypothesis that disease-driven changes in ABC transporter expression and function occur in ALS. Given the multitude of ABC transporters with their widespread substrate recognition, we began by examining expression levels of several ABC transporters. We found a selective increase in only two transporters; P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) both at mRNA and protein levels, in the SOD1-G93A mouse model of ALS, specifically in disease-affected CNS regions. Detailed analysis revealed a similar disease-driven increase in P-gp and BCRP levels in spinal cord microvessels, indicating that their altered expression occurs at the blood spinal cord barrier. Transport activity of P-gp and BCRP increased with disease progression in spinal cord and cerebral cortex capillaries. Finally, P-gp and BCRP protein expression also increased in spinal cords of ALS patients. Preclinical drug trials in the mouse model of ALS have failed to decisively slow or arrest disease progression; pharmacoresistance imparted by ABC transporters is one possible explanation for these failures. Our observations have large implications for ALS therapeutics in humans and suggest that the obstacle provided by these transporters to drug treatments must be overcome to develop effective ALS pharmacotherapies. PMID:22521463

  1. Urine Test Strips to Exclude Cerebral Spinal Fluid Blood

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    Marshall, Robin A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Determining the presence or absence of red blood cells (RBC or their breakdown products in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is essential for the evaluation of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in headache patients. Current methodology for finding blood in the CSF is either spectrophotometric detection of pigment, which is time consuming and labor intensive, or visual assesment of samples for color change (xanthochromia, which is inaccurate. Bayer Multistix® urine test strips are designed to test urine for RBC by detecting the presence of hemoglobin. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the perfomance of urine reagent test strips for ruling out the presence of RBC in CSF.Methods: We compared color changes on Multistix® urine test strips to the standard of spectrophotometric absorbtion at 415nm and initial RBC counts in 138 visually clear CSF samples.Results: We performed Pearson Chi-Square and likelihood ratios on the results and found a correlation between a negative result on the urine test strip and less than 5 RBC per high power field and a spectrophotometric absorbance of less than 0.02% at 415nm in a CSF sample.Conclusion: These results warrant further investigation in the form of a prospective clinical validation as it may alter the emergency department evaluation for SAH. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:63-66.

  2. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

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    Lindberg, Paavel G. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Inserm U894, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, APHP, CHU Cochin, Paris (France); INSERM U1153 Epidemiologie Clinique des Maladies Osteo-Articulaires, Paris (France); Ozcan, Fidan [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Feydy, Antoine [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Maier, Marc A. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  3. Fluoxetine and vitamin C synergistically inhibits blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and improves functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Y; Choi, Hae Y; Yune, Tae Y

    2016-10-01

    Recently we reported that fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) improves functional recovery by attenuating blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here we investigated whether a low-dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) and vitamin C (100 mg/kg), separately not possessing any protective effect, prevents BSCB disruption and improves functional recovery when combined. After a moderate contusion injury at T9 in rat, a low-dose of fluoxetine and vitamin C, or the combination of both was administered intraperitoneally immediately after SCI and further treated once a day for 14 d. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C significantly attenuated BSCB permeability at 1 d after SCI. When only fluoxetine or vitamin C was treated after injury, however, there was no effect on BSCB disruption. Co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C also significantly inhibited the expression and activation of MMP-9 at 8 h and 1 d after injury, respectively, and the infiltration of neutrophils (at 1 d) and macrophages (at 5 d) and the expression of inflammatory mediators (at 2 h, 6 h, 8 h or 24 h after injury) were significantly inhibited by co-treatment with fluoxetine and vitamin C. Furthermore, the combination of fluoxetine and vitamin C attenuated apoptotic cell death at 1 d and 5 d and improved locomotor function at 5 weeks after SCI. These results demonstrate the synergistic effect combination of low-dose fluoxetine and vitamin C on BSCB disruption after SCI and furthermore support the effectiveness of the combination treatment regimen for the management of acute SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutant huntingtin protein expression and blood-spinal cord barrier dysfunction in huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacca, Giacomo; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the distribution, frequency, and specific location of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) aggregates-the pathological hallmark of Huntington disease (HD)-within the various compartments of the spinal cord and their potential impact on the local vasculature and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We performed a series of postmortem immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent stainings, as well as Western blot analyses, on cervical and lumbar sections of the spinal cord in patients diagnosed with HD (n = 11 of all grades of disease severity) along with sex- and age-matched healthy controls (n = 9). We observed that mHTT was preferably expressed within the anterior horn of the gray matter, in both cervical and lumbar sections. At the cellular level, mHTT aggregates were more often encountered in the extracellular matrix but could also be observed within cell bodies and neurites as well as within the endothelium of blood vessels with an increase in the density of small blood vessels in cervical sections of HD cases. These vasculature changes were accompanied with features of BSCB leakage, as assessed by the presence of increased levels of fibrinogen in the surrounding parenchyma and enhanced leukocyte infiltration. This alteration in BSCB integrity may be explained, in part, by the dysregulation we found in some of the main proteins associated with it such as junctional adhesion molecule-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin. These observations have important implications for our understanding of HD pathology and may also have significant therapeutic implications. Ann Neurol 2017;82:981-994. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  5. A PROVISIONAL TRANSCRIPT MAP OF THE SPINAL MUSCULAR-ATROPHY (SMA) CRITICAL REGION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSTEEGE, G; DRAAIJERS, TG; GROOTSCHOLTEN, PM; OSINGA, J; ANZEVINO, R; VELONA, [No Value; DENDUNNEN, JT; SCHEFFER, H; BRAHE, C; VANOMMEN, GJB; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    YACs from the region containing the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus at 5q12 have been used as probes in a direct screening of cDNA libraries to isolate 8 cDNAs, mapped to different YAC fragments. Three clones showed complete identity to the genes for cyclin B1 (CCNB1), the p44 subunit of the

  6. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood or amniotic epithelial stem cells alleviates mechanical allodynia after spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Min-Soo; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Bum; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), and a variety of different stem cell types have been grafted into humans suffering from spinal cord trauma or into animal models of spinal injury. Although several studies have reported functional motor improvement after transplantation of stem cells into injured spinal cord, the benefit of these cells for treating SCI-induced neuropathic pain is not clear. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplanting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) or amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) on SCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in T13 spinal cord hemisected rats. Two weeks after SCI, hUCB-MSCs or hAESCs were transplanted around the spinal cord lesion site, and behavioral tests were performed to evaluate changes in SCI-induced MA and TH. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were also performed to evaluate possible therapeutic effects on SCI-induced inflammation and the nociceptive-related phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 receptor subunit. While transplantation of hUCB-MSCs showed a tendency to reduce MA, transplantation of hAESCs significantly reduced MA. Neither hUCB-MSC nor hAESC transplantation had any effect on SCI-induced TH. Transplantation of hAESCs also significantly reduced the SCI-induced increase in NMDA receptor NR1 subunit phosphorylation (pNR1) expression in the spinal cord. Both hUCB-MSCs and hAESCs reduced the SCI-induced increase in spinal cord expression of the microglial marker, F4/80, but not the increased expression of GFAP or iNOS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the transplantation of hAESCs into the injured spinal cord can suppress mechanical allodynia, and this effect seems to be closely associated with the modulation of spinal cord microglia activity and NR1 phosphorylation.

  7. Aspirin therapy discontinuation and intraoperative blood loss in spinal surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ann; Poon, Michael T C; Demetriades, Andreas K

    2018-01-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin therapy discontinuation on intraoperative blood loss in spinal surgery. We searched Medline and Google Scholar 1946 to January 2017 inclusive for case-control studies, cohort studies, and controlled trials reporting intraoperative blood loss during spinal surgery in patients on pre-operative aspirin. Other outcome measures reported in the eligible studies were collected as secondary outcomes. Two reviewers independently screened and extracted data from each study. Five retrospective cohort and two case-control studies were eligible for inclusion. Of the 1173 patients identified, 587 patients were never on aspirin (Ax), 416 patients had aspirin discontinued before surgery (Ad), ranging from 3 to 10 days, and 170 patients had aspirin continued until surgery (Ac). Six out of seven studies reported no statistically significant difference in intraoperative blood loss irrespective of aspirin discontinuation. Meta-analysis was not possible due to high risk of bias. Of the secondary outcome measures, operative time and postoperative complications were most commonly reported. One of six studies evaluating operative time reported a significantly longer operative time in the Ad group compared with the Ac group. The overall risk of postoperative haematoma in Ax, Ad, and Ac groups is 0.2% (n/N = 1/587), 0.2% (n/N = 1/416), and 1.2% (n/N = 2/170), respectively. No study reported a statistically significant difference in postoperative complications. There is no strong evidence demonstrating a difference in intraoperative blood loss, operation time, and postoperative complications, irrespective of aspirin discontinuation. This is, however, based on a limited number of studies and higher-quality research is required to answer this question with a higher degree of confidence.

  8. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnett Angus F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. Methods One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx, Upper lumbar (ULx and total lumbar (TLx spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Results Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638, but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p Conclusion This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  9. Chronic effects of simultaneous electromyostimulation and vibration on leg blood flow in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, H; Ferrero, C; Martín-Hernández, J; Figueroa, A; Marín, P J; Herrero, A J

    2016-12-01

    Randomized two-group parallel. The objective of this study was to analyze the adaptations on the popliteal artery (mean blood velocity (MBV), peak blood velocity (PBV), arterial resting diameter (RD) and blood flow (BF)) induced by 12 weeks of simultaneous application of whole-body vibration and electromyostimulation (WBV+ES) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondarily, the musculoskeletal effects of this therapy on the gastrocnemius muscle thickness (MT) and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) were analyzed. Valladolid, Spain. Seventeen SCI patients (American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A or B) were randomly assigned to the experimental group (EG=9) or the control group (CG=8). Each subject was assessed in four different occasions: at baseline, after 6 weeks (Post-6) and 12 weeks of the treatment (Post-12) and 8 weeks after the end of the treatment (Post-20). Subjects in the EG performed 30 10-min sessions of WBV+ES during 12 weeks. In the EG, RD increased compared with the baseline value at Post-6 (9.5%, P<0.01), Post-12 (19.0%, P<0.001) and Post-20 (16.7%, P<0.001). Similarly, in the EG, BF increased compared with the baseline value and with CG only at Post-12 ((33.9%, P<0.01) and (72.5%, P<0.05), respectively). Similarly, WBV+ES increased the MT of the gastrocnemius. BMD of both hips remained invariable during the study. CG showed no change at any point. WBV+ES improved popliteal artery BF, RD and MT after 12 weeks in SCI patients. This increase in RD remained above baseline after 8 weeks. The combination of WBV and ES could be considered a promising alternative to reverse the musculoskeletal atrophy and improve peripheral vascular properties in SCI patients.

  10. Spinal cord injury in rats: inability of nimodipine or anti-neutrophil serum to improve spinal cord blood flow or neurologic status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B. (Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Gerdin, B. (Department of General Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1989-01-01

    The role of a calcium-mediated increase in vascular resistance and of vascular damage caused by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) in the development of neurologic deficit and disturbance of spinal cord circulation following spinal cord compression was studied in the rat. Spinal cord injury was induced by 5 min of compression with a load of 35 g on a 2.2 x 5.0 mm compression plate. This caused transient paraparesis. The rats received either the calcium receptor antagonist nimodipine or an anti-rat neutrophil serum (ANS). Nimodipine was infused i.v. for 4 h in an amount of 1.5 {mu}g/kg/min starting 60 min after trauma. The number of circulating PMNLs was depleted by intraperiotoneal injection of an ANS raised in sheep given 12 h before trauma. This caused a reduction to about 2% of the pre-ANS value. Controls received saline or normal sheep serum. The motor performance was assessed daily on the inclined plane. On day one, the day after injury, the capacity angle had decreased from about 63 deg. preoperatively to close to 32 deg. in the experimental groups. There was then a slow improvement in both the control and experimental groups and on day 4 the capacity angle was close to 43 deg. in all 3 groups. Spinal cord blood flow, as measured with the {sup 14}C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography method, was similar in all groups on day 4. As neither the neurologic dysfunction nor the spinal cord blood flow was affected by post-trauma treatment with nimodipine or pretreatment with ANS, the possibility that calcium-mediated vasoconstriction or PMNLs play a role in the development of posttraumatic neuroligic disability was not supported by this study. (author).

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow in aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, K; Larsen, B; Skinhøj, E

    1978-01-01

    , the abnormalities included both regions consistently involved in the other types of aphasia. The 133Xe injection method for mapping abnormalities relevant for localizing the cortical speech areas was superior to the classical neuroradiological methods in that several cases failed to show any relevant lesion...

  12. Evidence of compromised blood-spinal cord barrier in early and late symptomatic SOD1 mice modeling ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB control cerebral/spinal cord homeostasis by selective transport of molecules and cells from the systemic compartment. In the spinal cord and brain of both ALS patients and animal models, infiltration of T-cell lymphocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, and IgG deposits have been observed that may have a critical role in motor neuron damage. Additionally, increased levels of albumin and IgG have been found in the cerebrospinal fluid in ALS patients. These findings suggest altered barrier permeability in ALS. Recently, we showed disruption of the BBB and BSCB in areas of motor neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord in G93A SOD1 mice modeling ALS at both early and late stages of disease using electron microscopy. Examination of capillary ultrastructure revealed endothelial cell degeneration, which, along with astrocyte alteration, compromised the BBB and BSCB. However, the effect of these alterations upon barrier function in ALS is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the functional competence of the BSCB in G93A mice at different stages of disease.Evans Blue (EB dye was intravenously injected into ALS mice at early or late stage disease. Vascular leakage and the condition of basement membranes, endothelial cells, and astrocytes were investigated in cervical and lumbar spinal cords using immunohistochemistry. Results showed EB leakage in spinal cord microvessels from all G93A mice, indicating dysfunction in endothelia and basement membranes and confirming our previous ultrastructural findings on BSCB disruption. Additionally, downregulation of Glut-1 and CD146 expressions in the endothelial cells of the BSCB were found which may relate to vascular leakage.Results suggest that the BSCB is compromised in areas of motor neuron degeneration in ALS mice at both early and late stages of the disease.

  13. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tim; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Burnett, Angus F; Straker, Leon; Smith, Anne

    2008-11-18

    Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP) patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx), Upper lumbar (ULx) and total lumbar (TLx) spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638), but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p postures in sitting and standing were evident. BMI accounted for regional differences found in all sitting and some standing measures. LBP was not associated with differences in regional lumbar spine angles or range of motion, with the exception of maximal backward bending range of motion (F = 5.18, p = 0.007). This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow in focal cortical epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristina Dupont; Oikawa, T; Sveinsdottir, E

    1976-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in ten patients with focal cortical epilepsy. The blood flow was measured by the intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 (133Xe), and the isotope clearance was recorded by a multidetector scintillation camera with 254 detectors. Three patients were st...

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guecueyener, K. (Dept. of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Goekcora, N. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Ilgin, N. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Buyan, N. (Dept. of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Sayli, A. (Dept. of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1993-07-01

    A patient with typical features of Angelman syndrome - a genetically inherited disorder involving developmental delay, ataxia, episodes of paroxysmal laughter and brachiocephaly - was studied with single-photon emission tomography. Hyperfusion found in the left frontal and left temporoparietal regions can provide insights into the functional cerebral pathology, which may be due to a disturbance of the developmental process related to a chromosomal abnormality. (orig.)

  16. Electroencephalographic evoked pain response is suppressed by spinal cord stimulation in complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylands-White, Nicholas; Duarte, Rui V; Beeson, Paul; Mayhew, Stephen D; Raphael, Jon H

    2016-12-01

    Pain is a subjective response that limits assessment. The purpose of this case report was to explore how the objectivity of the electroencephalographic response to thermal stimuli would be affected by concurrent spinal cord stimulation. A patient had been implanted with a spinal cord stimulator for the management of complex regional pain syndrome of both hands for 8 years. Following ethical approval and written informed consent we induced thermal stimuli using the Medoc PATHWAY Pain & Sensory Evaluation System on the right hand of the patient with the spinal cord stimulator switched off and with the spinal cord stimulator switched on. The patient reported a clinically significant reduction in thermal induced pain using the numerical rating scale (71.4 % reduction) with spinal cord stimulator switched on. Analysis of electroencephalogram recordings indicated the occurrence of contact heat evoked potentials (N2-P2) with spinal cord stimulator off, but not with spinal cord stimulator on. This case report suggests that thermal pain can be reduced in complex regional pain syndrome patients with the use of spinal cord stimulation and offers objective validation of the reported outcomes with this treatment.

  17. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of myelopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. Many references about spinal cord tissue ischemic damage can be found in the literature, but not detailed studies about spinal cord microvasculature damage related to congestion or blood permeability. This study investigates the effect of ischemia and congestion on the spinal cord using an in vivo model. The aorta was clamped as an ischemia model of the spinal cord and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the 6th costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and conduction velocity in the spinal cord were repeated over a period of 1 h after release of clamping. Finally, we examined the status of blood-spinal cord barrier under fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. Immediately after clamping of the inferior vena cava, the central venous pressure increased by about four times. Blood flow, oxygen tension and action potential were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; but this ischemic model did not show any changes of blood permeability in the spinal cord. The intramedullar edema was more easily produced by venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. In conclusions, venous congestion may be a preceding and essential factor of circulatory disturbance in the compressed spinal cord inducing myelopathy. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  18. Reduced regional cerebral blood flow in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Kristin H; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Krabbe, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) linked to the spastic gait gene 4 (SPG4) is controversial, as the "pure" form traditionally has been considered confined to the long axons of the spinal cord. However, recent immunolabeling experiments have demonstrated extensive Spastin expression in the cortex...... and striatum. This could indicate a more widespread neuropathology from mutations in the SPG4 gene than previously assumed. The aim of this study was therefore to ascertain the extent of cerebral involvement in SPG4 linked HSP by neuropsychological examination and measurement of the regional cerebral blood...... flow (rCBF) as an indirect marker of regional neuronal activity. Eighteen SPG4 patients and 18 matched control subjects were studied. Resting state rCBF was measured using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and the (15)O-labelled water bolus technique and relative group differences were explored using...

  19. Can tranexamic acid conserve blood and save operative time in spinal surgeries? a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Shangyi; Xu, Derong; Ren, Zhinan; Chen, Xin; Sheng, Lin; Zhuang, Qianyu; Li, Shugang

    2017-12-12

    and operative time, while low dose of the drug does not convey such effects. With the most comprehensive literature inclusion up to the present, this meta-analysis suggests that intravenous TXA use constitutes an important measure for conserving blood and saving operative time in spinal surgeries. High dose TXA significantly reduces intraoperative/ perioperative allogeneic transfusion rates and operative time, while low dose TXA does not convey such efficacies. Larger prospective trials are still required to define ththe optimal regimen and to confirm the safety of TXA use in such surgeries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow in fibromyalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatek, R.; Barnden, L.; Rowe, C.; McKinnon, J.; Pile, K. [The Queen Elizabeth Hospital , Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Little is known of the aetiology of fibromyalgia (FM), a condition diagnosed on the basis of widespread chronic pain and multiple tender points. We have used Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT to compare regional cerebral bloodflow (rCBF) in 17 women who fulfill American College of Rheumatology criteria for FM to 22 age, sex and education matched controls. Both Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM95) and coregistered MRI guided ROI were used for analysis. SPM95 revealed statistically significant hypoperfusion in the pontine tegmentum (p=0.048) and a trend to hypoperfusion in the left putamen (p=0.07). MRI guided ROI placement by an operator blinded to clinical information and the coregistered SPECT images, confirmed significant hypoperfusion of the left thalamus (p<0.0001) and the pontine tegmentum (p=0.001) and revealed trends towards hypoperfusion in the caudate nuclei and right thalamus. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that FM is due to dysfunction of central pain pathways. Spinothalamic neurones are known to be involved in pain perception and there are synapse connections to the thalamus in the gigantocellular part of the medulla and pons

  1. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, L.P. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Neurociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Iglesias, D. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Nicola, F.C. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Steffens, D. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Achaval, M. [Departamento de Ciências Morfológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pranke, P. [Laboratório de Hematologia e Células-Tronco, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Netto, C.A. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2011-12-23

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10{sup 6} cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10{sup 6} cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation.

  2. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Christensen, Mark Schram; Barthélemy, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    in the tibialis anterior muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but this did not reach statistical significance. There was no correlation between motor score or spinal cord dimensions and the volume of the cortical motor areas. The observations show that lesion of descending tracts in the lateral......Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19...... to the width of the spinal cord in the left-right direction, where the corticospinal tract is located, but not in the antero-posterior direction. There was a tendency for a negative correlation between cerebral activation in ipsilateral S1, M1 and PMC and the amplitude of motor evoked potentials...

  3. Spinal cord stimulation reduces ventricular arrhythmias during acute ischemia by attenuation of regional myocardial excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Quijano, Kimberly; Takamiya, Tatsuo; Dale, Erica A; Kipke, Jasmine; Kubo, Yukiko; Grogan, Tristan; Afyouni, Andyshea; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Mahajan, Aman

    2017-08-01

    Myocardial ischemia creates autonomic nervous system imbalance and can trigger cardiac arrhythmias. We hypothesized that neuromodulation by spinal cord stimulation (SCS) will attenuate local cardiac sympathoexcitation from ischemia-induced increases in afferent signaling, reduce ventricular arrhythmias, and improve myocardial function during acute ischemia. Yorkshire pigs ( n = 20) were randomized to SCS (50 Hz at 200-μs duration, current 90% motor threshold) or sham operation (sham) for 30 min before ischemia. A four-pole SCS lead was placed percutaneously in the epidural space (T 1 -T 4 ), and a 56-electrode mesh was placed over the heart for high-resolution electrophysiological recordings, including activation recovery intervals (ARIs), activation time, repolarization time, and dispersion of repolarization. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic measures were recorded at baseline, after SCS/sham, during acute ischemia (300-s coronary artery ligation), and throughout reperfusion. SCS 1 ) reduced sympathoexcitation-induced ARI and repolarization time shortening in the ischemic myocardium; 2 ) attenuated increases in the dispersion of repolarization; 3 ) reduced ventricular tachyarrythmias [nonsustained ventricular tachycardias: 24 events (3 sham animals) vs. 1 event (1 SCS animal), P spinal cord stimulation decreased sympathetic nerve activation regionally in ischemic myocardium with no effect on normal myocardium, demonstrating that the antiarrhythmic effects of spinal cord stimulation are likely due to attenuation of local sympathoexcitation in the ischemic myocardium and not changes in global myocardial electrophysiology. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Intravenous Infusion of Magnesium Chloride Improves Epicenter Blood Flow during the Acute Stage of Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Johongir M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels at the site of contusive or compressive spinal cord injury lead to infarction and initiate secondary degeneration. Here, we used intravenous injection of endothelial-binding lectin followed by histology to show that the number of perfused microvessels at the injury site is decreased by 80–90% as early as 20 min following a moderate T9 contusion in adult female rats. Hemorrhage within the spinal cord also was maximal at 20 min, consistent with its vasoconstrictive actions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microvascular blood flow recovered to up to 50% of normal volume in the injury penumbra by 6 h, but not at the epicenter. A comparison with an endothelial cell marker suggested that many microvessels fail to be reperfused up to 48 h post-injury. The ischemia was probably caused by vasospasm of vessels penetrating the parenchyma, because repeated Doppler measurements over the spinal cord showed a doubling of total blood flow over the first 12 h. Moreover, intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride, used clinically to treat CNS vasospasm, greatly improved the number of perfused microvessels at 24 and 48 h. The magnesium treatment seemed safe as it did not increase hemorrhage, despite the improved parenchymal blood flow. However, the treatment did not reduce acute microvessel, motor neuron or oligodendrocyte loss, and when infused for 7 days did not affect functional recovery or spared epicenter white matter over a 4 week period. These data suggest that microvascular blood flow can be restored with a clinically relevant treatment following spinal cord injury. PMID:23302047

  5. Assessment of skin blood flow following spinal manual therapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegarra-Parodi, Rafael; Park, Peter Yong Soo; Heath, Deborah M; Makin, Inder Raj S; Degenhardt, Brian F; Roustit, Matthieu

    2015-04-01

    Skin blood flow (SBF) indexes have been used to describe physiological mechanisms associated with spinal manual therapy (SMT). The aims of the current review were to assess methods for data collection, assess how investigators interpreted SBF changes, and formulate recommendations to advance manual medicine research. A database search was performed in PubMed, Cochrane Library, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature through April 2014. Articles were included if at least 1 outcome measure was changes in 1 SBF index following SMT. The database search yielded 344 records. Two independent authors applied the inclusion criteria. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. Selected studies used heterogeneous methods to assess short-term post-SMT changes in SBF, usually vasoconstriction, which was interpreted as a general sympathoexcitatory effect through central mechanisms. However, this conclusion might be challenged by the current understanding of skin sympathetic nervous activity over local endothelial mechanisms that are specifically controlling SBF. Evaluation of SBF measurements in peripheral tissues following SMT may document physiological responses that are beyond peripheral sympathetic function. Based on the current use of SBF indexes in clinical and physiological research, 14 recommendations for advancing manual medicine research using laser Doppler flowmetry are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Blood pressure changes during sexual stimulation, ejaculation and midodrine treatment in men with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Frédérique J; Charvier, Kathleen F; Leriche, Albert; Vézina, Jean-Guy; Côté, Magalie; Bélanger, Marc

    2008-02-01

    To explore the effectiveness of various sources of self-stimulation, including oral midodrine, in triggering ejaculation in men with spinal cord injury (SCI), and to document the systematic variations in blood pressure at ejaculation and consider a revised definition of autonomic dysreflexia. The study included 62 men with SCI lesions from C2 to L2. Ejaculation potential was assessed with various sources of stimulation, beginning with natural stimulation, followed, if the test was negative, by penile vibrator stimulation (PVS) followed, if the test was again negative, by PVS combined with oral midodrine, started at 5 mg and increased in 5 mg steps up to 25 mg. The success rate of ejaculation was recorded, as were blood pressure (BP) changes measured at baseline and at ejaculation (or on the last trial if the test was negative). Reported sensations were also recorded and compared during positive and negative tests. Overall, 89% of the patients reached ejaculation with one mode or another of stimulation. When patients had a negative result with natural stimulation, 56% were salvaged by PVS, and when PVS was negative, another 22% were salvaged by midodrine combined with PVS. The mean systolic BP increased by 35 mmHg at ejaculation during PVS and by 11 mmHg after midodrine, and a subsequent 29 mmHg at ejaculation during PVS combined with midodrine. By contrast, negative tests showed a relatively stable BP; the difference in changes in BP during positive and negative tests was significant (P definition of autonomic dysreflexia should be considered to encourage safe experiences with ejaculation and safe use of midodrine.

  7. Disparity in regional cerebral blood flow during electrically induced seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sestoft, D; Meden, P; Hemmingsen, R

    1993-01-01

    This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on electroencepha......This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized...

  8. Effects of preoperative β-blocker on blood loss and blood transfusion during spinal surgeries with sodium nitroprusside-controlled hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Mohamed Amr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study sought to determine whether premedication with oral β-blocker before hypotensive anesthesia with sodium nitroprusside could improve the quality of surgical field, decrease the blood loss, and decrease the need for homologous blood transfusion and duration of surgery. Methods: Eighty patients scheduled for spinal fixation surgery were included in a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Patients were classified into two groups: Group I received oral atenolol 50 mg twice one day before surgery; and Group II received placebo tablets identical in appearance to atenolol tablets for the same period and interval. All patients in both the groups received intraoperative sodium nitroprusside (SNP as a hypotensive agent. Hemodynamic variables, amount of sodium nitroprusside used, quality of surgical field, and the amount of homologous blood transfusion and blood loss were compared between groups. Results: Heart rate and amount of SNP used were significantly less (P<0.0001 in the atenolol group, but no significant difference was found in intraoperative mean arterial blood pressure (MABP between the two groups. The time of surgeries was significantly shorter in Group I than in Group II (185±15.21 vs 225±12.61 min, P<0.0001. The quality of surgical field was better in Group I than in Group II in all times of measurements, P<0.0001. The amount of blood loss and the amount of packed red blood cells transfused were significantly less in Group I than in Group II, P<0.0001. No clinically significant complications were observed in either group. Conclusion: Premedication with oral atenolol 50 mg twice/day for one day before hypotensive anesthesia with SNP during spinal surgeries seems to be clinically safe and effective to reduce heart rate, amount of SNP used, amount of blood loss, and amount of blood transfused with better quality of surgical field.

  9. Barriers to Implementing Intermittent Catheterisation in Spinal Cord Injury Patients in Northwest Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, U.K.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent catheterisation is the preferred method of managing the neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury. However, spinal cord physicians experienced problems when trying to implement an intermittent catheterisation regime in some spinal cord injury patients in the northwest of England. We present illustrative cases to describe practical difficulties encountered by patients while trying to adopt an intermittent catheterisation regime. Barriers to intermittent catheterisation are (1 caregivers or nurses are not available to carry out five or six catheterisations a day; (2 lack of time to perform intermittent catheterisations; (3 unavailability of suitable toilet facilities in public places, including restaurants and offices; (4 redundant prepuce in a male patient, which prevents ready access to urethral meatus; (5 urethral false passage; (6 urethral sphincter spasm requiring the use of flexible-tip catheters and α-drenoceptor–blocking drugs; (7 reluctance to perform intermittent catheterisation in patients >60 years by some health professionals; and (8 difficulty in accessing the urethral meatus for catheterisation while the patient is sitting up, especially in female patients. These cases demonstrate the urgent need for provision of trained caregivers who can perform intermittent catheterisation, and improvement in public facilities that are suitable for performing catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients. Further, vigilance should be exercised during each catheterisation in order to prevent complications, such as urethral trauma and consequent false passages. Health professionals should make additional efforts to implement intermittent catheterisation in female spinal cord injury patients and in those >60 years.

  10. Antiallodynic effect through spinal endothelin-B receptor antagonism in rat models of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeo Ok; Kim, In Ji; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a very complicated chronic pain disorder that has been classified into two types (I and II). Endothelin (ET) receptors are involved in pain conditions at the spinal level. We investigated the role of spinal ET receptors in CRPS. Chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP) was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats as a model for CRPS-I by placing a tourniquet (O-ring) at the ankle joint for 3h, and removing it to allow reperfusion. Ligation of L5 and L6 spinal nerves to induce neuropathic pain was performed as a model for CRPS-II. After O-ring application and spinal nerve ligation, the paw withdrawal threshold was significantly decreased at injured sites. Intrathecal administration of the selective ET-B receptor antagonist BQ 788 dose-dependently increased the withdrawal threshold in both CRPS-I and CRPS-II. In contrast, ET-A receptor antagonist BQ 123 did not affect the withdrawal threshold in either CRPS type. The ET-1 levels of plasma and spinal cord increased in both CRPS types. Intrathecal BQ 788 decreased the spinal ET-1 level. These results suggest that ET-1 is involved in the development of mechanical allodynia in CRPS. Furthermore, the ET-B receptor appears to be involved in spinal cord-related CRPS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disparity in regional cerebral blood flow during electrically induced seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sestoft, D; Meden, P; Hemmingsen, R

    1993-01-01

    This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on electroencepha...

  12. Patterns of regional cerebral blood flow in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Skriver, E B

    1981-01-01

    In a consecutive group of 56 stroke patients the regional cerebral blood flow was measured within 84 hours after stroke. A 254 multidetector scintillation camera and the intracarotid Xenon-133 injection method was used to study rCBF. Typical rCBF-patterns are described and compared to the findings...

  13. Regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy in early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa J; Craven, Paul D; Lakkundi, Anil; Foster, Jann P; Badawi, Nadia

    2015-06-09

    With improvements in neonatal intensive care, more preterm infants are surviving the neonatal period and presenting for surgery in early infancy. Inguinal hernia is the most common condition requiring early surgery, appearing in 38% of infants whose birth weight is between 751 grams and 1000 grams. Approximately 20% to 30% of otherwise healthy preterm infants having general anaesthesia for inguinal hernia surgery at a postmature age have at least one apnoeic episode within the postoperative period. Research studies have failed to adequately distinguish the effects of apnoeic episodes from other complications of extreme preterm gestation on the risk of brain injury, or to investigate the potential impact of postoperative apnoea upon longer term neurodevelopment. In addition to episodes of apnoea, there are concerns that anaesthetic and sedative agents may have a direct toxic effect on the developing brain of preterm infants even after reaching postmature age. It is proposed that regional anaesthesia may reduce the risk of postoperative apnoea, avoid the risk of anaesthetic-related neurotoxicity and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants requiring surgery for inguinal hernia at a postmature age. To determine if regional anaesthesia reduces postoperative apnoea, bradycardia, the use of assisted ventilation, and neurological impairment, in comparison to general anaesthesia, in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy at a postmature age. The following databases and resources were searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), EMBASE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), controlled-trials.com and clinicaltrials.gov, reference lists of published trials and abstracts published in Pediatric Research and Pediatric Anesthesia. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia, or

  14. Acute effects of simultaneous electromyostimulation and vibration on leg blood flow in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, H; Ferrero, C; Martín-Hernández, J; Figueroa, A; Marín, P J; Herrero, A J

    2016-05-01

    Randomized crossover. To analyze the acute effects of isolated and simultaneous application of whole-body vibration (WBV) and electromyostimulation (ES) on popliteal artery blood velocity (BV) and skin temperature (ST) of the calf in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI). Valladolid, Spain. Ten subjects with SCI were assessed in five different sessions. After a familiarization session, four interventions were applied in random order; WBV, ES, simultaneous WBV and ES (WBV+ES), and 30 s of WBV followed by 30 s of ES (WBV30/ES30). Each intervention consisted of 10 sets × 1 min ON+1 min OFF. Subjects were seated on their own wheelchairs with their feet on the vibration platform (10 Hz, 5 mm peak-to-peak), and ES was applied on the gastrocnemius muscle of both legs (8 Hz, 400 μs). The simultaneous application (WBV+ES) produced the greatest increase in mean BV (MBV; 36% and 42%, respectively) and peak BV (PBV; 30% and 36%, respectively) during the intervention. This intervention produced the greatest mean increases in MBV (21%) and PBV (19%) during the recovery period. Last, this intervention produced the highest increase in ST during the intervention (2.1 °C). The simultaneous application of WBV+ES seems to produce a greater increase in MBV and PBV of the popliteal artery and ST of the calf than the isolated (WBV or ES) or consecutive application of both stimuli (WBV30/ES30). This study provides an efficient therapeutic methodology to improve peripheral arterial properties, which is pivotal in SCI patient's rehabilitation.

  15. Quantification of regional blood flow to canine flexor tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidman, K.A.; Simonet, W.T.; Wood, M.B.; Cooney, W.P.; Ilstrup, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Although the blood supply and the microcirculation of flexor tendons have been studied and defined extensively using qualitative methods, the quantitative assessment of blood flow has been lacking because of the limitations of the available experimental techniques. The authors studied the regional blood supply to the flexor tendons of dogs by the technique of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Seven adult mongrel dogs were used. Microsphere injection and tissue-counting techniques previously used for other tissues were applied. Samples of proximal, isthmus, and distal portions of the profundus and superficialis flexor tendons were harvested from each digital unit of available limbs from each dog. Mean (+/- SE) flows (ml/100 g dry tissue/min) were proximal profundus 1.78 +/- 0.60 and superficialis 7.10 +/- 1.50. The differences were significant. The study suggests that regional variation in blood flow to canine digital flexor tendons exists, so that a single value for blood flow to these tendons is not relevant. Furthermore, the study supports the concept of dual (vascular and synovial) nutrition to the digital flexor tendons in dogs. These observations may have implications regarding tendon repair techniques.

  16. Quantification of regional blood flow to canine flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, K A; Simonet, W T; Wood, M B; Cooney, W P; Ilstrup, D M

    1984-01-01

    Although the blood supply and the microcirculation of flexor tendons have been studied and defined extensively using qualitative methods, the quantitative assessment of blood flow has been lacking because of the limitations of the available experimental techniques. We studied the regional blood supply to the flexor tendons of dogs by the technique of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Seven adult mongrel dogs were used. Microsphere injection and tissue-counting techniques previously used for other tissues were applied. Samples of proximal, isthmus, and distal portions of the profundus and superficialis flexor tendons were harvested from each digital unit of available limbs from each dog. Mean (+/- SE) flows (ml/100 g dry tissue/min) were proximal profundus 1.78 +/- 0.60 and superficialis 7.10 +/- 1.50. The differences were significant (p less than 0.01). The study suggests that regional variation in blood flow to canine digital flexor tendons exists, so that a single value for blood flow to these tendons is not relevant. Furthermore, the study supports the concept of dual (vascular and synovial) nutrition to the digital flexor tendons in dogs. These observations may have implications regarding tendon repair techniques.

  17. Bilateral complex regional pain syndrome following spinal cord injury and bilateral calcaneus fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Boyacı

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a disease affectingone or more extremities, characterized by spontaneouspain, allodynia, hyperpathia and hyperalgesia.CRPS is separated into Type 1 and Type 2. CRPS whichdevelops after a nociceptive event is labeled as Type 1and when it develops following peripheral nerve damage,Type 2. Although the pathogenesis is not fully understood,peripheral and central sensitivity are held responsible.Bilateral lower extremity involvement is extremely rare.However, it should be borne in mind that it can develop intraumatic injuries which occur in more than one area anddiagnosis and commencement of a rehabilitation programshould be made in the early period. The case is presentedhere of bilateral Type 1 CRPS developing after incompletespinal cord injury and bilateral calcaneus fracture. JClin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3: 360-363Key words: complex regional pain syndrome, calcaneusfracture, spinal cord injury

  18. Spinal stab injury with retained knife blades: 51 Consecutive patients managed at a regional referral unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enicker, Basil; Gonya, Sonwabile; Hardcastle, Timothy C

    2015-09-01

    Spinal stab wounds presenting with retained knife blades (RKB) are uncommon, often resulting in spinal cord injury (SCI) with catastrophic neurological consequences. The purpose of this study is to report a single unit's experience in management of this pattern of injury at this regional referral centre. Retrospective review of medical records identified 51 consecutive patients with spinal stabs presenting with a RKB at the Neurosurgery Department at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital between January 2003 and February 2015. The data was analyzed for patient characteristics, level of the RKB, neurological status using the ASIA impairment scale, associated injuries, radiological investigations, management, hospital length of stay, complications and mortality. The mean age was 28±10.9 years (range 14-69), with 45 (88%) males (M: F=7.5:1). The median Injury Severity Score was 16 (range 4-26). RKB were located in the cervical [9,18%], thoracic [38,74%], lumbar [2,4%] and sacral [2,4%] spine. Twelve patients (24%) sustained complete SCI (ASIA A), while 21 (41%) had incomplete (ASIA B, C, D), of which 17 had features of Brown-Sequard syndrome. Eighteen (35%) patients were neurologically intact (ASIA E). There were 8 (16%) associated pneumothoraces and one vertebral artery injury. Length of hospital stay was 10±7.1 days (range 1-27). One patient (2%) died during this period. Stab injuries to the spine presenting with RKB are still prevalent in South Africa. Resources should be allocated to prevention strategies that decrease the incidence of inter-personal violence. All RKBs should be removed in the operating theatre by experienced surgeons to minimise complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deformed spinal needle causing PDPH and dry tap due to blood clot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rakesh; Kumar, Ashwani; Pandey, Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a significant complication of spinal anesthesia. There is considerable variability in the incidence of PDPH, which is affected by a number of factors including age, gender, pregnancy, and needle type and size. We present a case where a patient had PDPH after a spinal block with a deformed spinal needle due to calcified interspinous ligaments. We suggest, in the elderly patient with possible ligament calcification, an introducer needle should be used to achieve the spinal block and if there are multiple attempts then the needle should be checked for damage in between. Also, change in the resistance from previous tries or a gritting sensation during needle insertion should be taken seriously and the needle checked before further attempts are made.

  20. Chronic mild hypoxia promotes profound vascular remodeling in spinal cord blood vessels, preferentially in white matter, via an α5β1 integrin-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sebok K; Kant, Ravi; Milner, Richard

    2018-01-03

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to rapid destruction of neuronal tissue, resulting in devastating motor and sensory deficits. This is exacerbated by damage to spinal cord blood vessels and loss of vascular integrity. Thus, approaches that protect existing blood vessels or stimulate the growth of new blood vessels might present a novel approach to minimize loss or promote regeneration of spinal cord tissue following SCI. In light of the remarkable power of chronic mild hypoxia (CMH) to stimulate vascular remodeling in the brain, the goal of this study was to examine how CMH (8% O2 for up to 7 days) affects blood vessel remodeling in the spinal cord. We found that CMH promoted the following: (1) endothelial proliferation and increased vascularity as a result of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, (2) increased vascular expression of the angiogenic extracellular matrix protein fibronectin as well as concomitant increases in endothelial expression of the fibronectin receptor α5β1 integrin, (3) strongly upregulated endothelial expression of the tight junction proteins claudin-5, ZO-1 and occludin and (4) astrocyte activation. Of note, the vascular remodeling changes induced by CMH were more extensive in white matter. Interestingly, hypoxic-induced vascular remodeling in spinal cord blood vessels was markedly attenuated in mice lacking endothelial α5 integrin expression (α5-EC-KO mice). Taken together, these studies demonstrate the considerable remodeling potential of spinal cord blood vessels and highlight an important angiogenic role for the α5β1 integrin in promoting endothelial proliferation. They also imply that stimulation of the α5β1 integrin or controlled use of mild hypoxia might provide new approaches for promoting angiogenesis and improving vascular integrity in spinal cord blood vessels.

  1. Narcolepsy: regional cerebral blood flow during sleep and wakefulness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, F.; Meyer, J.S.; Karacan, I.; Yamaguchi, F.; Yamamoto, M.

    1979-01-01

    Serial measurements of regional cerebral blood flow were made by the 135Xe inhalation method during the early stages of sleep and wakefulness in eight normal volunteers and 12 patients with narcolepsy. Electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram, and submental electromyogram were recorded simultaneously. In normals, mean hemispheric gray matter blood flow (Fg) during stages I and II sleep was significantly less than waking values. Maximum regional blood flow decreases during sleep occurred in the brainstem-cerebellar, right inferior temporal, and bilateral frontal regions. In patients with narcolepsy, mean hemispheric Fg while awake was 80.5 +- 13 ml per 100 gm brain per minute. During REM sleep, mean hemispheric Fg increased concurrently with large increases in brainstem-cerebellar region flow. During stages I and II sleep without REM, there were significant increases in mean hemispheric Fg and brainstem-cerebellar Fg, just the opposite of changes in normals. In narcolepsy, there appears to be a reversal of normal cerebral deactivation patterns, particularly involving the brainstem, during stages I and II sleep.

  2. Telephoning of interim blood culture results: a regional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkar, H M; Breathnach, A S

    2008-10-01

    Most staphylococci grown from blood cultures are contaminants. Since they are microscopically indistinguishable from non-contaminants, considerable time and resources may be spent following up all patients with positive blood cultures before the identification is made the following day. Since there is no formal guidance or standard available in this area, this report surveyed practice in our region. An interview was conducted by telephone, using a standardised questionnaire. Results were analysed using descriptive techniques. The majority of microbiologists did not communicate all presumptive staphylococci but waited for identification in some cases. There is a range of practice in laboratories due to conflicting pressures: limited time, fear of criticism if results are not phoned, fear of causing confusion with provisional information and lack of clarity concerning what is "good practice." This survey concludes that a decision not to telephone every presumptive Staphylococcus in blood cultures on Day 1 is reasonable.

  3. Construction of a yeast artifical chromosome contig spanning the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleyn, P.W.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.; Pan, J.; Ross, B.M.; Grunn, A.; Palmer, D.A.; Warburton, D.; Brzustowicz, L.M.; Gilliam, T.G. (New York State Psychiatric Institute, NY (United States)); Lien, L.L.; Kunkel, L.M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The childhood spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are the most common, serious neuromuscular disorders of childhood second to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A single locus for these disorders has been mapped by recombination events to a region of 0.7 centimorgan (range, 0.1-2.1 centimorgans) between loci D5S435 and MAP1B on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. By using PCR amplification to screen yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) DNA pools and the PCR-vectorette method to amplify YAC ends, a YAC contig was constructed across the disease gene region. Nine walk steps identified 32 YACs, including a minimum of seven overlapping YAC clones (average size, 460 kb) that span the SMA region. The contig is characterized by a collection of 30 YAC-end sequence tag sites together with seven genetic markers. The entire YAC contig spans a minimum of 3.2 Mb; the SMA locus is confined to roughly half of this region. Microsatellite markers generated along the YAC contig segregate with the SMA locus in all families where the flanking markers (D5S435 and MAP1B) recombine. Construction of a YAC contig across the disease gene region is an essential step in isolation of the SMA-encoding gene. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Regional blood volume in man determined by radiolabelled erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissing, S.F.; Nielsen, S.L.

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a non-invasive method capable of measuring the regional blood volume in the peripheral circulation. External counting of autologous radiolabelled erythrocytes was performed by dynamic scintigraphy of the calf. During short venous stasis, synchronous changes in segmental blood volumes were recorded by plethysmography, thereby obtaining a calibration factor. The recordings were performed with the position of the calf varying between elevated, horizontal and lowered before and after 4.5 min venous stasis with a tourniquet pressure of 57 mmHg applied above the knee. The mean blood volume comprised 3.2 (1.2) ml per 100 ml tissue in the elevated position, 6.0 (1.6) in the horizontal position and 9.8 (2.6) in the lowered position. Correspondingly, the blood volume increase during venous stasis was 120%, 60% and 20% in the three positions. Studies of the reproducibility showed a coefficient of variation of 13.5%. The present study suggests that the method of blood volume measuring should be further evaluated to study the function of capacitance vessels.

  5. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells for spinal cord injury: early transplantation results in better local angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Guangzhi; Tang, Liang; Wu, Qiang; Li, Yulin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Shiqing

    2013-05-01

    We aim to explore the repair mechanism after the transplantation of CD34(+) human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) in traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Wistar rats with SCI were randomly divided into three groups: DMEM injection (group A); CD34(+) HUCBC transplantation on the first day after injury (group B); and CD34(+) HUCBC transplantation on the sixth day after injury (group C). The Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores were used to evaluate motor behavior. At the injured site, the infarct size, blood vessel density, and survival and neural differentiation of transplanted cells were analyzed. It was found that the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score in group B was significantly higher than other groups (p transplanted cells survived at least 3 weeks at the injured site, but did not differentiate into neural cells. These results suggested transplantation of CD34(+) HUCBCs during the acute phase could promote the functional recovery better than during the subacute phase after SCI by raising blood vessel density, suggesting the possible clinical application for the treatment of spinal injury.

  6. Continuous Thoracic Sympathetic Ganglion Block in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Patients with Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EungDon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic block is widely used for treating neuropathic pain such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. However, single sympathetic block often provides only short-term effect. Moreover, frequent procedures for sympathetic block may increase the risk of complications. The use of epidural route may be limited by concern of infection in case of previous implantation of the spinal cord stimulation (SCS. In contrast, a continuous sympathetic block can be administered without such concerns. The continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSGB has been used to treat the ischemic disease and other neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia. We administered continuous thoracic sympathetic block using catheter in CRPS patients who underwent SCS implantations and achieved desirable outcomes. We believe a continuous sympathetic block is a considerable option before performing neurolysis or radiofrequency rhizotomy and even after SCS implantation.

  7. Management of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with total spinal block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Se Jin; Yang, Jong Yeun; Son, Ju Hyung; Jeong, Won Ju; Lee, Yoon Sook; Kim, Woon Young; Park, Young Cheol

    2010-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful and disabling disorder that can affect one or more extremities. Unfortunately, the knowledge concerning its natural history and mechanism is very limited and many current rationales in treatment of CRPS are mainly dependent on efficacy originated in other common conditions of neuropathic pain. Therefore, in this study, we present a case using a total spinal block (TSB) for the refractory pain management of a 16-year-old male CRPS patient, who suffered from constant stabbing and squeezing pain, with severe touch allodynia in the left upper extremity following an operation of chondroblastoma. After the TSB, the patient's continuous and spontaneous pain became mild and the allodynia disappeared and maintained decreased for 1 month.

  8. Modelling the endothelial blood-CNS barriers: a method for the production of robust in vitro models of the rat blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P Marc D; Paterson, Judy C; Thom, George; Ginman, Ulrika; Lundquist, Stefan; Webster, Carl I

    2013-06-18

    Modelling the blood-CNS barriers of the brain and spinal cord in vitro continues to provide a considerable challenge for research studying the passage of large and small molecules in and out of the central nervous system, both within the context of basic biology and for pharmaceutical drug discovery. Although there has been considerable success over the previous two decades in establishing useful in vitro primary endothelial cell cultures from the blood-CNS barriers, no model fully mimics the high electrical resistance, low paracellular permeability and selective influx/efflux characteristics of the in vivo situation. Furthermore, such primary-derived cultures are typically labour-intensive and generate low yields of cells, limiting scope for experimental work. We thus aimed to establish protocols for the high yield isolation and culture of endothelial cells from both rat brain and spinal cord. Our aim was to optimise in vitro conditions for inducing phenotypic characteristics in these cells that were reminiscent of the in vivo situation, such that they developed into tight endothelial barriers suitable for performing investigative biology and permeability studies. Brain and spinal cord tissue was taken from the same rats and used to specifically isolate endothelial cells to reconstitute as in vitro blood-CNS barrier models. Isolated endothelial cells were cultured to expand the cellular yield and then passaged onto cell culture inserts for further investigation. Cell culture conditions were optimised using commercially available reagents and the resulting barrier-forming endothelial monolayers were characterised by functional permeability experiments and in vitro phenotyping by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Using a combination of modified handling techniques and cell culture conditions, we have established and optimised a protocol for the in vitro culture of brain and, for the first time in rat, spinal cord endothelial cells. High yields of both CNS

  9. Analysis of inventory strategies for blood components in a regional blood center using process simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesler, Felipe; Nemeth, Matías; Martínez, Cristina; Bastías, Alfonso

    2014-02-01

    The storage of blood components is an important concern in the blood supply chain. Because these are perishable products, the definition of good inventory policies is crucial to reduce shortages and spills. To analyze and propose inventory policies in a regional blood center, a discrete event simulation model was created using simulation software (Arena 12.0, Rockwell Software). The model replicates the activities that are performed along the supply chain including donation arrivals, testing, production, inventory management, and dispatching. Twelve different scenarios were analyzed, with each one representing different inventory policies composed of a combination of an optimal inventory, a reorder point, and a level of extra donations. The best scenario demonstrates that it is possible to decrease unsatisfied demand and wastage of red blood cell units by 2.5 and 3%, respectively, when compared to current practices. This study shows that simulation is an alternative that can be used to model inventory components in blood centers. A responsible selection of inventory variables can improve the capability of the system to respond to the final patient requirements. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Biomarker for Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Expression of SMN in Peripheral Blood of SMA Patients and Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Czech

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by a functional deletion of SMN1 on Chromosome 5, which leads to a progressive loss of motor function in affected patients. SMA patients have at least one copy of a similar gene, SMN2, which produces functional SMN protein, although in reduced quantities. The severity of SMA is variable, partially due to differences in SMN2 copy numbers. Here, we report the results of a biomarker study characterizing SMA patients of varying disease severity. SMN copy number, mRNA and Protein levels in whole blood of patients were measured and compared against a cohort of healthy controls. The results show differential regulation of expression of SMN2 in peripheral blood between patients and healthy subjects.

  11. Alterations of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Major Depressive Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Hyoung; Chung, Yong An; Seo, Ye Young; Yoo, Ik Dong; Na, Sae Jung; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Ki Jun [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    The authors analyzed how the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings of patients with major depression differ from the normal control, and our results were compared to previous reports. Twelve patients fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for major depression who were off all psychotropic medications for > 4 weeks (male: 7, female: 5, age range: 19approx52 years, average age: 29.3+-9.9 years) and 14 normal volunteers (male: 8, female: 6, age range: 19approx53 years, average age: 31.4+-9.2 years) were recruited. Images of brain perfusion SPECT were obtained using Tc-99m ECD and patterns of the rCBF were compared between patients with major depression and the healthy control subjects. The patients with major depression showed increase of the r-CBF in right lingual gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, left lingual gyrus, left precuneus, and left superior temporal gyrus, and showed decrease of r-CBF in right pons, left medial frontal gyrus, cingulate gyrus of left limbic lobe, cingulate gyrus of right frontal lobe, and cingulate gyrus of right limbic lobe compared to the normal control. The Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT findings in our study did not differ from the previously reported regional cerebral blood flow pattern of patients with major depression. Especially, decreased rCBF pattern typical to major depression patients in the right pons, left medial frontal gyrus, and cingulate regions was clearly demonstrated

  12. Investigation of effect of blood pressure and heart rate changes in different positions (lying and sitting on hypotension incidence rate after spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Manouchehrian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the relatively high prevalence of hypotension (20% -40% after spinal anesthesia as well as the adverse effects of hypotension on mother and baby, it is better to prevent hypotension as much as possible. Therefore, this study is aimed to determine the relationship between postural blood pressure and heart rate changes and hypotension incidence rate after spinal anesthesia in cesarean section.63 women aging18 to 45years old with fullterm pregnancy, who were candidate for caesarean section with spinal anesthesia, entered the study. Afterwards, the diastolic, systolic, and mean arterial pressures as well as the heart rate (pulse in different positions (sitting, lying, and left lateral were measured. After spinal anesthesia, the patients' blood pressure was measured and recorded every minute until the10thmin, then every 3 minute until the15thmin, and then every 5 minute until the end of cesarean section. Data analysis was performed using SPSS (ver. 19 software, descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and post hoc Bonferroni test. In this study, the hypotension incidence rate was 30% and the orthostatic variation rate of the systolic blood pressure in more than half of the people was between 4.39 to 13.49psi, which showed the highest variation compared to the diastolic pressure, mean arterial blood pressure (or: mean arterial pressure [MAP], and heart(pulse. Considering the correlation coefficient of 0.27, the systolic blood pressure in the lateral position has the highest relationship with the incidence of hypotension. The postural systolic blood pressure changes in patients prior to the spinal anesthesia can be a predictive factor for the post-spinal hypotension incidence.

  13. Selective activation of microglia in spinal cord but not higher cortical regions following nerve injury in adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yuze

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal plasticity along the pathway for sensory transmission including the spinal cord and cortex plays an important role in chronic pain, including inflammatory and neuropathic pain. While recent studies indicate that microglia in the spinal cord are involved in neuropathic pain, a systematic study has not been performed in other regions of the central nervous system (CNS. In the present study, we used heterozygous Cx3cr1GFP/+mice to characterize the morphological phenotypes of microglia following common peroneal nerve (CPN ligation. We found that microglia showed a uniform distribution throughout the CNS, and peripheral nerve injury selectively activated microglia in the spinal cord dorsal horn and related ventral horn. In contrast, microglia was not activated in supraspinal regions of the CNS, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, prefrontal cortex (PFC, primary and secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 and S2, insular cortex (IC, amygdala, hippocampus, periaqueductal gray (PAG and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM. Our results provide strong evidence that nerve injury primarily activates microglia in the spinal cord of adult mice, and pain-related cortical plasticity is likely mediated by neurons.

  14. Steadiness of Spinal Regions during Single-Leg Standing in Older Adults with and without Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Liang Kuo

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to compare the steadiness index of spinal regions during single-leg standing in older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP and to correlate measurements of steadiness index with the performance of clinical balance tests. Thirteen community-dwelling older adults (aged 55 years or above with chronic LBP and 13 age- and gender-matched asymptomatic volunteers participated in this study. Data collection was conducted in a university research laboratory. Measurements were steadiness index of spinal regions (trunk, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and pelvis during single-leg standing including relative holding time (RHT and relative standstill time (RST, and clinical balance tests (timed up and go test and 5-repetition sit to stand test. The LBP group had a statistically significantly smaller RHT than the control group, regardless of one leg stance on the painful or non-painful sides. The RSTs on the painful side leg in the LBP group were not statistically significantly different from the average RSTs of both legs in the control group; however, the RSTs on the non-painful side leg in the LBP group were statistically significantly smaller than those in the control group for the trunk, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. No statistically significant intra-group differences were found in the RHTs and RSTs between the painful and non-painful side legs in the LBP group. Measurements of clinical balance tests also showed insignificant weak to moderate correlations with steadiness index. In conclusion, older adults with chronic LBP demonstrated decreased spinal steadiness not only in the symptomatic lumbar spine but also in the other spinal regions within the kinetic chain of the spine. When treating older adults with chronic LBP, clinicians may also need to examine their balance performance and spinal steadiness during balance challenging tests.

  15. Steadiness of Spinal Regions during Single-Leg Standing in Older Adults with and without Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Liang; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Chiang, Pei-Tzu; Lee, Pei-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the steadiness index of spinal regions during single-leg standing in older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP) and to correlate measurements of steadiness index with the performance of clinical balance tests. Thirteen community-dwelling older adults (aged 55 years or above) with chronic LBP and 13 age- and gender-matched asymptomatic volunteers participated in this study. Data collection was conducted in a university research laboratory. Measurements were steadiness index of spinal regions (trunk, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and pelvis) during single-leg standing including relative holding time (RHT) and relative standstill time (RST), and clinical balance tests (timed up and go test and 5-repetition sit to stand test). The LBP group had a statistically significantly smaller RHT than the control group, regardless of one leg stance on the painful or non-painful sides. The RSTs on the painful side leg in the LBP group were not statistically significantly different from the average RSTs of both legs in the control group; however, the RSTs on the non-painful side leg in the LBP group were statistically significantly smaller than those in the control group for the trunk, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. No statistically significant intra-group differences were found in the RHTs and RSTs between the painful and non-painful side legs in the LBP group. Measurements of clinical balance tests also showed insignificant weak to moderate correlations with steadiness index. In conclusion, older adults with chronic LBP demonstrated decreased spinal steadiness not only in the symptomatic lumbar spine but also in the other spinal regions within the kinetic chain of the spine. When treating older adults with chronic LBP, clinicians may also need to examine their balance performance and spinal steadiness during balance challenging tests.

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermik, Tevfik F. [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Trakya Universitesi Hastanesi, Nukleer Tip Anabilim Dali, Gullapoglu Yerleskesi, Edirne (Turkey); Kaya, Meryem; Bedel, Deniz; Berkarda, Sakir; Yigitbasi, Oemer N. [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Ugur-Altun, Betuel [Hospital of the University of Trakya, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Edirne (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We assessed the alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) before parathyroidectomy by semiquantitative analysis of brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Included in this prospective study were 14 patients (mean age 47.6 {+-} 10.4 years; 3 male, 11 female) and 10 control subjects (mean age 36.0 {+-} 8.5 years, 6 male, 4 female) were SPECT imaging was performed using a dual-headed gamma camera 60-90 min after intravenous administration of 925 MBq Tc-99m HMPAO. The corticocerebellar rCBF ratios were calculated from 52 brain areas and reference lower values (RLVs) were calculated from the rCBF ratios of control subjects. The regional ratios that were below the corresponding RLV were considered abnormal (hypoperfused). Hypoperfusion was shown in 171 out of 728 regions (23%) and there was a significant correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions in the patient group (R = 0.75 and P = 0.001, and R = 0.75, P = 0.001, respectively). Significantly reduced rCBF were found in the following cortical regions: bilateral cingulate cortex, superior and inferior frontal cortex, anterior temporal cortex, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus and parietal cortex, and right posterior temporal cortex. Our results indicate that alterations in rCBF in patients with PHP can be demonstrated with brain SPECT. The correlation between serum calcium, PTH levels and the sum of hypoperfused regions indicates that there may be a strong relationship between rCBF abnormalities and increased levels of serum calcium and PTH. In addition, the degree of rCBF abnormalities could be determined by brain SPECT in PHP patients with or without psychiatric symptoms. (orig.)

  17. Patients' perceptions of their roles in goal setting in a spinal cord injury regional rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draaistra, Harriett; Singh, Mina D; Ireland, Sandra; Harper, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    Goal setting is a common practice in rehabilitation, yet there is a paucity of literature exploring patients' perceptions of their roles in this process. This study was conducted using a qualitative descriptive methodology to explore patients' perceptions of their roles in setting goals in a spinal cord injury regional rehabilitation program. Imogene King's theory of goal attainment was used to frame the study. Data were collected through interviews and analyzed using a content analysis. The results revealed four themes: Visioning, Redefining, Brainstorming, and Rebuilding Participants (n = 13) envisioned their roles as setting an overarching priority goal, defining detailed rehabilitation goals, sharing knowledge with the team, and rebuilding skills to attain goals. Implications for nursing practice include the need to understand patients' experiences and perceptions, share knowledge, and support effective communication to promote collaborative goal setting. A need to enhance health professionals' education to fully understand factors influencing patients' abilities to set rehabilitation goals, and future research in methods to promote patients' engagement in goal setting was also clearly indicated.

  18. Altered Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Whiplash Associated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vállez García

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of central hyperexcitability in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (cWAD. However, little is known about how an apparently simple cervical spine injury can induce changes in cerebral processes. The present study was designed (1 to validate previous results showing alterations of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in cWAD, (2 to test if central hyperexcitability reflects changes in rCBF upon non-painful stimulation of the neck, and (3 to verify our hypothesis that the missing link in understanding the underlying pathophysiology could be the close interaction between the neck and midbrain structures. For this purpose, alterations of rCBF were explored in a case-control study using H215O positron emission tomography, where each group was exposed to four different conditions, including rest and different levels of non-painful electrical stimulation of the neck. rCBF was found to be elevated in patients with cWAD in the posterior cingulate and precuneus, and decreased in the superior temporal, parahippocampal, and inferior frontal gyri, the thalamus and the insular cortex when compared with rCBF in healthy controls. No differences in rCBF were observed between different levels of electrical stimulation. The alterations in regions directly involved with pain perception and interoceptive processing indicate that cWAD symptoms might be the consequence of a mismatch during the integration of information in brain regions involved in pain processing.

  19. Effect of spinal sympathetic blockade upon postural changes of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, K; Haxholdt, O; Henriksen, O

    1982-01-01

    in subcutaneous tissue and skeletal muscle to head-up tilt whereas local blockade was able to prevent the response. Local mechanisms including the local veno-arteriolar reflex appear to play an important role for the observed maintenance of arterial blood pressure in the tilted position during central sympathetic......The effect of head-up tilt upon subcutaneous and skeletal muscle blood flow in the crus was studied before and during epidural blockade in 10 subjects. Relative changes in blood flow were estimated by the local 133Xe washout technique. In subcutaneous tissue head-up tilt induced a decrease in blood...... local nervous blockade was induced by Lidocaine in 133Xe labelled subcutaneous tissue on one side. During epidural blockade and tilt blood flow increased by 12% whereas blood flow decreased by 30% on the control side. Thus epidural blockade had no influence on the vasoconstrictor response...

  20. Total knee replacement induces peripheral blood lymphocytes apoptosis and it is not prevented by regional anesthesia - a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosel, Juliusz; Rusak, Małgorzata; Gołembiewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowska, Milena; Siemiątkowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Among the many changes caused by a surgical insult one of the least studied is postoperative immunosuppression. This phenomenon is an important cause of infectious complications of surgery such as surgical site infection or hospital acquired pneumonia. One of the mechanisms leading to postoperative immunosuppression is the apoptosis of immunological cells. Anesthesia during surgery is intended to minimize harmful changes and maintain perioperative homeostasis. The aim of the study was evaluation of the effect of the anesthetic technique used for total knee replacement on postoperative peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis. 34 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were randomly assigned to two regional anesthetic protocols: spinal anesthesia and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 11 patients undergoing total knee replacement under general anesthesia served as control group. Before surgery, immediately after surgery, during first postoperative day and seven days after the surgery venous blood samples were taken and the immunological status of the patient was assessed with the use of flow cytometry, along with lymphocyte apoptosis using fluorescent microscopy. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis was seen immediately in the postoperative period and was accompanied by a decrease of the number of T cells and B cells. There were no significant differences in the number of apoptotic lymphocytes according to the anesthetic protocol. Changes in the number of T CD3/8 cells and the number of apoptotic lymphocytes were seen on the seventh day after surgery. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis is an early event in the postoperative period that lasts up to seven days and is not affected by the choice of the anesthetic technique. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Total knee replacement induces peripheral blood lymphocytes apoptosis and it is not prevented by regional anesthesia - a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliusz Kosel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Among the many changes caused by a surgical insult one of the least studied is postoperative immunosuppression. This phenomenon is an important cause of infectious complications of surgery such as surgical site infection or hospital acquired pneumonia. One of the mechanisms leading to postoperative immunosuppression is the apoptosis of immunological cells. Anesthesia during surgery is intended to minimize harmful changes and maintain perioperative homeostasis. The aim of the study was evaluation of the effect of the anesthetic technique used for total knee replacement on postoperative peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis. METHODS: 34 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were randomly assigned to two regional anesthetic protocols: spinal anesthesia and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 11 patients undergoing total knee replacement under general anesthesia served as control group. Before surgery, immediately after surgery, during first postoperative day and seven days after the surgery venous blood samples were taken and the immunological status of the patient was assessed with the use of flow cytometry, along with lymphocyte apoptosis using fluorescent microscopy. RESULTS: Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis was seen immediately in the postoperative period and was accompanied by a decrease of the number of T cells and B cells. There were no significant differences in the number of apoptotic lymphocytes according to the anesthetic protocol. Changes in the number of T CD3/8 cells and the number of apoptotic lymphocytes were seen on the seventh day after surgery. CONCLUSION: Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis is an early event in the postoperative period that lasts up to seven days and is not affected by the choice of the anesthetic technique.

  2. Gelatine matrix with human thrombin decreases blood loss in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis: a multicentre, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, I; Keskinen, H; Syvänen, J; Lukkarinen, H; Mattila, M; Välipakka, J; Pajulo, O

    2016-03-01

    In a multicentre, randomised study of adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis, we investigated the effect of adding gelatine matrix with human thrombin to the standard surgical methods of controlling blood loss. Patients in the intervention group (n = 30) were randomised to receive a minimum of two and a maximum of four units of gelatine matrix with thrombin in addition to conventional surgical methods of achieving haemostasis. Only conventional surgical methods were used in the control group (n = 30). We measured the intra-operative and total blood loss (intra-operative blood loss plus post-operative drain output). Each additional hour of operating time increased the intra-operative blood loss by 356.9 ml (p gelatine matrix with human thrombin to conventional methods of achieving haemostasis reduces both the intra-operative blood loss and the decrease in haemoglobin concentration post-operatively in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis. A randomised clinical trial showed that gelatine matrix with human thrombin decreases intra-operative blood loss by 30% when added to traditional surgical haemostatic methods in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. Monoamine Release in the Cat Lumbar Spinal Cord during Fictive Locomotion Evoked by the Mesencephalic Locomotor Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Noga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord neurons active during locomotion are innervated by descending axons that release the monoamines serotonin (5-HT and norepinephrine (NE and these neurons express monoaminergic receptor subtypes implicated in the control of locomotion. The timing, level and spinal locations of release of these two substances during centrally-generated locomotor activity should therefore be critical to this control. These variables were measured in real time by fast-cyclic voltammetry in the decerebrate cat’s lumbar spinal cord during fictive locomotion, which was evoked by electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR and registered as integrated activity in bilateral peripheral nerves to hindlimb muscles. Monoamine release was observed in dorsal horn (DH, intermediate zone/ventral horn (IZ/VH and adjacent white matter (WM during evoked locomotion. Extracellular peak levels (all sites increased above baseline by 138 ± 232.5 nM and 35.6 ± 94.4 nM (mean ± SD for NE and 5-HT, respectively. For both substances, release usually began prior to the onset of locomotion typically earliest in the IZ/VH and peaks were positively correlated with net activity in peripheral nerves. Monoamine levels gradually returned to baseline levels or below at the end of stimulation in most trials. Monoamine oxidase and uptake inhibitors increased the release magnitude, time-to-peak (TTP and decline-to-baseline. These results demonstrate that spinal monoamine release is modulated on a timescale of seconds, in tandem with centrally-generated locomotion and indicate that MLR-evoked locomotor activity involves concurrent activation of descending monoaminergic and reticulospinal pathways. These gradual changes in space and time of monoamine concentrations high enough to strongly activate various receptors subtypes on locomotor activated neurons further suggest that during MLR-evoked locomotion, monoamine action is, in part, mediated by extrasynaptic

  4. Spinal cord stimulation in adolescents with complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Gunnar L; Meyerson, Björn A; Linderoth, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is not uncommon in children, particularly in adolescent girls. Most often, the condition involves a foot and is characterized by spontaneous pain, tactile allodynia and dysautonomic signs. There is usually a history of a minor, local trauma but sometimes no reasonable cause can be identified, and there are no signs of persistent tissue injury giving rise to ongoing nociception. Common analgesics are generally of no benefit, and the standard treatment includes sociopsychological support, physiotherapy, tricyclic antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs, sympathetic blocks (SB), and cognitive-behavioural therapy. For a minority of patients who prove to be resistant to such therapies, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be tried. The present study comprises seven girls, 11-14 years of age, presenting with severe, incapacitating and therapy-resistant CRPS-I, who were subjected to SCS. In two of them, percutaneous electrode implantation had to be performed in general anaesthesia. Trial stimulation was performed in all, but one. In two cases, it was not possible to produce paraesthesias that entirely covered the pain area. A pain relieving effect of SCS was usually not reported until after 1-2 weeks of trial stimulation. After another 2-6 weeks, pain alleviation was complete in five of the seven patients, one to eight years after the intervention. In one case, a local infection necessitated the removal of the electrode; nevertheless a few days of trial stimulation produced substantial pain relief that still persists. In four patients, the SCS use was gradually diminished and eventually the device could be removed. The favourable outcome in all seven cases with no or minor remaining symptoms and without severe recurrences illustrates that SCS may also be an efficient treatment in paediatric cases with exceptionally therapy resistant forms of CRPS I.

  5. Effects of intravascular laser irradiation of blood in mitochondria dysfunction and oxidative stress in adults with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Fong; Tsai, Yun-An; Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei; Tsai, Po-Yi; Chuang, Tien-Yow

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the clinical effects of intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) therapy on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in subjects with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) resulting from trauma. Little is known about how ILIB may generate antioxidant defenses in humans, and there is still a lack of randomized, sham-control studies to indicate its influence on different metabolic pathways. Twenty-four chronic SCI subjects (assigned to a sham and a study group), and 12 normal subjects were recruited. The study group underwent 1 h daily of ILIB for 15 days over 3 weeks. The sham group underwent ILIB with no laser power. Baseline measurements established higher oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the SCI subjects than in the normal subjects. At day 15 of therapy, the study group revealed a significantly higher mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, white blood cell adenosine triphosphate (WBC ATP) synthesis, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) with significantly reduced malondialdehyde (MDA), than did the sham group. The study group intragroup comparison revealed significantly increased mtDNA copy numbers, WBC ATP synthesis, and TAC, with significantly reduced MDA, compared with its baseline measurements. The sham group intragroup comparisons demonstrated no statistical differences. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the study group was significantly reduced at days 10 and 15, with significantly higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) at day 45. Our study results contribute to the knowledge about the effectiveness of ILIB in alleviating oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in chronic SCI patients.

  6. Conventional Spinal Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were monitored over 1hour. RESULTS: Three ... Patients in the conventional group had statistically significant greater fall in the systolic blood pressures at 15, 30 and 45 ..... cardiovascular homeostasis during spinal anaesthesia, unilateral spinal anaesthesia ...

  7. Exploring daily blood pressure fluctuations and cardiovascular risk among individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Derry L; Chopra, Amit; Campbell, Kent; Ditor, David S; Hassouna, Magdy; Craven, B Catharine

    2017-07-01

    Clinically silent autonomic dysfunction with bowel and bladder care, are postulated to contribute to cardiovascular disease after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). We describe the frequency and severity of dysreflexic episodes, termed transient blood pressure elevations (T-BPE) over 48 hours in adults with cervical or high-thoracic motor-complete SCI. Tertiary SCI Rehabilitation Centre in Toronto, Canada. Individuals with chronic SCI, C1-T3 AIS A or B, >1 year post-injury, living in the community (n=19). Data were obtained via 48-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring, with data captured at 10-minute intervals and a concurrent diary describing activities of daily living, and bladder/bowel routines. T-BPE were defined as a ≥ 40 mmHg elevation in systolic blood pressure (SBP) above the participant's supine baseline. Severe (≥ 60-79 mmHg) and Extreme ≥80 mmHg elevations in SBP were described. Thirteen participants experienced T-BPE within the assessment period, with 7/13 experiencing "severe", and 3/13 experiencing "extreme" SBP elevations. The median number of T-BPE was 8 (IQR = 3), and the mean ± SD SBP during T-BPE was 150 ± 16 mmHg, These T-BPE were verified as dysreflexic events using a conservative definition of a >40 mmHg increase in SBP, with a concurrent 10 bpm decrease in HR, above the 48-hour average SBP, yielding 12/19 participants with T-BPE. T-BPE were frequent, often with severe or extreme elevations in SBP, despite few reported symptoms. Recognition and management of these dysreflexic events associated with T-BPE are needed, which may ameliorate cardiovascular disease risk.

  8. The beneficial effect of Batroxobin on blood loss reduction in spinal fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hui-Min; Chen, Li; Frary, Charles Edward

    2015-01-01

    . There were no cases of superficial wound infection. None of the subjects died during the study. Conclusions In this study, prophylactic use of Batroxobin provided an effective and cheap method for reducing blood loss without coagulopathy during or after operations. The use of Batroxobin for patients...

  9. Topacheous gout as a rare cause of spinal stenosis in the lumbar region. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Joseph

    2012-02-03

    Despite the fact that gout is a common metabolic disorder, because its involvement of the axial skeleton is rare the diagnosis is often delayed, even in patients with long-standing gout who present with neurological deficits. The authors report the case of a woman with a history of extensive gout, emphasizing the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of a lumbar spinal stenosis.

  10. Predictive Modeling for Blood Transfusion Following Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery: A Tree-Based Machine Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-12-05

    Retrospective cohort study. Blood transfusion is frequently necessary following adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. We sought to develop predictive models for blood transfusion following ASD surgery, utilizing both classification tree and random forest machine-learning approaches. Past models for transfusion risk among spine surgery patients are disadvantaged through use of single-institutional data, potentially limiting generalizability. This investigation was conducted utilizing the ACS NSQIP dataset years 2012-2015. Patients undergoing surgery for ASD were identified using primary-listed CPT codes. In total, 1,029 patients were analyzed. The primary outcome measure was intra-/post-operative blood transfusion. Patients were divided into training (n = 824) and validation (n = 205) datasets. Single classification tree and random forest models were developed. Both models were tested on the validation dataset using AUC, which was compared between models. Overall, 46.5% (n = 479) of patients received a transfusion intraoperatively or within 72 h postoperatively. The final classification tree model utilized operative duration, hematocrit, and weight, exhibiting AUC = 0.79 (95%CI 0.73-0.85) on the validation set. The most influential variables in the random forest model were operative duration, surgical invasiveness, hematocrit, weight, and age. The random forest model exhibited AUC = 0.85 (95%CI 0.80-0.90). The difference between the classification tree and random forest AUCs was non-significant at the validation cohort size of 205 patients (p = 0.1551). This investigation produced tree-based machine-learning models of blood transfusion risk following ASD surgery. The random forest model offered very good predictive capability as measured by AUC. Our single classification tree model offered superior ease of implementation, but a lower AUC as compared to the random forest approach, though this difference was not statistically significant at

  11. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... g/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V-mean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart...

  12. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  13. Quantitative assessment of spinal cord perfusion by using contrast-enhanced ultrasound in a porcine model with acute spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Lin, X; Tang, Y; Yang, R; Li, A-H; Ye, J-C; Chen, K; Wang, P; Shen, H-Y

    2013-03-01

    To quantify spinal cord perfusion by using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in a porcine model with acute spinal cord injury. Microcirculatory changes of acute spinal cord injury were shown by CEUS in a porcine model with spinal cord contusion at three selected time points, coupling with conventional ultrasound (US) and Color Doppler US (CDFI). Time-intensity curves and perfusion parameters were also obtained by autotracking contrast quantification (ACQ) software in the epicenter of contusion site, adjacent region and distant region, respectively. Neurologic and histologic examinations were used to confirm the severity of injury. Conventional US revealed the spinal cord was hypoechoic and homogeneous, whereas the dura mater, pia mater and cerebral aqueduct were hyperechoic. On CDFI intramedullary blood vessels were displayed as segmental and columnar. It was homogeneous on CEUS. After spinal cord contusion, the injured region on gray scale US was hyperechoic. CDFI demonstrated intramedullary blood vessels of adjacent region had increased and dilated during the observation period. On CEUS the epicenter of contusion site was hypoperfusion, whereas its adjacent region was hyperperfusion compared with the distant region. Quantitative analysis showed that peak intensity decreased in epicenters of contusion but increased in adjacent regions significantly at all time points (P<0.05). Evaluation of neurological function for post-contusion demonstrated significantly deterioration in comparison before injury (P<0.05). CEUS is a practical technique that provides overall views for evaluating microcirculatory pattern in spinal cord injury. Quantitative analysis shows the efficacy in assessment of perfusion changes after spinal cord injury.

  14. A comparison of three vasopressors for tight control of maternal blood pressure during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia: Effect on maternal and fetal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Bhardwaj

    2013-01-01

    Results: The umbilical pH was comparable in all the three groups (P > 0.05. The mean SBP from spinal block until delivery was similar over time for all the three groups. The incidence of reactive hypertension was more in group M (P < 0.05 than in group E and group P. Total drug consumption to meet target blood pressure till delivery was 39.3 ± 14.6 mg in group E, 1.7 ± 0.9 mg in group M, and 283.6 ± 99.8 mcg in group P. The incidence of nausea and vomiting was comparable in the three groups. Conclusion: All the three vasopressors were equally effective in maintaining maternal blood pressure as well as umbilical pH during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section without any detrimental effects on fetal and maternal outcome.

  15. Regional catecholamine concentrations in brain and spinal cord of male albino rats treated with the synthetic pyrethroid cyfluthrine

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, N. A. [نوال عبد الحي احمد; Ibrahim, Nagi A.; Al-Zahaby, Al-Ahmady S.; Al-Zawahry, Safaa A.

    1997-01-01

    The principal objective of this study was to determine the modifications induced by the synthetic pyrethroid insecticide cyfluthrin in the concentrations of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine(E) in selected brain and spinal cord regions of male albino rats. A group of 30 rats were injected intraperitoneally every other day with cyfluthrin at 1/4 LD50 dose level for 18 days. Other two groups (30 rats each) were daily given cyfluthrin intraperitoneally at the dose levels of 1/8 ...

  16. EFFECT OF INCREASED WHOLE-BLOOD VISCOSITY ON REGIONAL BLOOD FLOWS IN CHRONICALLY HYPOXEMIC LAMBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DALINGHAUS, M; KNOESTER, H; GRATAMA, JWC; VANDERMEER, J; ZIJLSTRA, WG; KUIPERS, JRG

    In chronic hypoxemia blood flow and oxygen supply to vital organs are maintained, but to nonvital organs they are decreased. We measured organ blood flows (microspheres) and whole blood viscosity in 10 chronically hypoxemic lambs, with an atrial septal defect and pulmonary stenosis, and in 8 control

  17. Seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in blood donors: A study from regional blood transfusion services of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, B R; Ghimire, P; Kandel, S R; Rajkarnikar, M

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are significant health problems that might involve the late sequel of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in blood donors poses an increased risk of window period transmission through blood transfusion. The present study aimed to know the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among blood donors in regional blood transfusion services of Nepal. This was a retrospective study conducted among blood donors in Banke (5,211), Morang (5,351), and Kaski (5,995) blood transfusion services. Serum samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibodies using rapid enzyme immunoassays. The donors information was collected via the donor record register through their respective blood transfusion services. The software "Winpepi ver 3.8" was used for statistical analysis. The seroprevalence rate of HBV was highest in the Banke (1.2%) followed by Biratnagar (0.87%) and Kaski (0.35%) (P 0.05). The seroprevalence of HBV was significantly higher than HCV in all three blood transfusion services. The burden of HBV as well as HCV seems to be higher in male donors (P > 0.05). The study revealed that the seroprevalence of HBV was alarmingly higher in two of the three blood transfusion services. Implementation of community-based preventive measures and improved strategies for safe blood supply might prove useful to decrease the seroprevalence.

  18. The modulatory role of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone administered spinally in the regulation of blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lim, Su-Min; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is known as a regulator of the blood glucose homeostasis and food intake. In the present study, the possible roles of α-MSH located in the spinal cord in the regulation of the blood glucose level were investigated in d-glucose-fed and immobilization stress (IMO) mouse models. We found in the present study that intrathecal (i.t.) injection with α-MSH alone did not affect the blood glucose level. However, i.t. administration with α-MSH reduced the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed model. The plasma insulin level was increased in d-glucose-fed model and was further increased by α-MSH, whereas α-MSH did not affect plasma corticosterone level in d-glucose-fed model. In addition, i.t. administration with glucagon alone enhanced blood glucose level and, i.t. injection with glucagon also increased the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed model. In contrasted to results observed in d-glucose-fed model, i.t. treatment with α-MSH caused enhancement of the blood glucose level in IMO model. The plasma insulin level was increased in IMO model. The increased plasma insulin level by IMO was reduced by i.t. treatment with α-MSH, whereas i.t. pretreatment with α-MSH did not affect plasma corticosterone level in IMO model. Taken together, although spinally located α-MSH itself does not alter the blood glucose level, our results suggest that the activation of α-MSH system located in the spinal cord play important modulatory roles for the reduction of the blood glucose level in d-glucose fed model whereas α-MSH is responsible for the up-regulation of the blood glucose level in IMO model. The enhancement of insulin release may be responsible for modulatory action of α-MSH in down-regulation of the blood glucose in d-glucose fed model whereas reduction of insulin release may be responsible for modulatory action of α-MSH in up-regulation of the blood glucose in IMO model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of Neuroprotective Properties of Melissa officinalis in Combination With Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells After Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ruhollah Hosseini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI has a classically bad prognosis. It has been demonstrated that human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSCs and Melissa officinalis (MO are useful for the prevention of neurological disease. Methods Thirty-six adult male rats were randomly divided into intact, sham, control (SCI, MO, hUCBSC, and MO-hUCBSC groups. Intraperitoneal injection of MO (150 mg/kg was commenced 24 hr post-SCI and continued once a day for 14 days. Intraspinal grafting of hUCBSCs was commenced immediately in the next day. The motor and sensory functions of all animals were evaluated once a week after the commencement of SCI. Electromyography (EMG was performed in the last day in order to measure the recruitment index. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and transmission electron microscopy evaluations were performed to determine the level of astrogliosis and myelination. Results The results revealed that motor function (MO-hUCBSC: 15 ± 0.3, SCI: 8.2 ± 0.37, p < .001, sensory function (MO-hUCBSC: 3.57 ± 0.19, SCI: 6.38 ± 0.23, p < .001, and EMG recruitment index (MO-hUCBSC: 3.71 ± 0.18, SCI: 1.6 ± 0.1, p < .001 were significantly improved in the MO-hUCBSC group compared with SCI group. Mean cavity area (MO-hUCBSC: 0.03 ± 0.03, SCI: 0.07 ± 0.004, p < .001 was reduced and loss of lower motor neurons (MO-hUCBSC: 7.6 ± 0.43, SCI: 3 ± 0.12, p < .001 and astrogliosis density (MO-hUCBSC: 3.1 ± 0.15, SCI: 6.25 ± 1.42, p < 0.001 in the ventral horn of spinal cord were prevented in MO-hUCBSC group compared with SCI group. Conclusion The results revealed that the combination of MO and hUCBSCs in comparison with the control group has neuroprotective effects in SCI.

  20. Immediate effects of spinal manipulative therapy on regional antinociceptive effects in myofascial tissues in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srbely, John Z; Vernon, Howard; Lee, David; Polgar, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) can evoke immediate regional antinociceptive effects in myofascial tissues by increasing pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over myofascial trigger points in healthy young adults. A total of 36 participants (19 men, 17 women; age, 28.0 [5.3] years; body mass index, 26.5 [5.7] kg/m(2)) with clinically identifiable myofascial trigger points in the infraspinatus and gluteus medius muscles were recruited from the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Participants were randomly allocated to 2 groups. Participants in the test group received chiropractic SMT targeted to the C5-C6 spinal segment. Participants in the control group received sham SMT. The PPT was recorded from the right infraspinatus and gluteus medius muscles at baseline (preintervention) and 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes postintervention. Three participants were disqualified, resulting in a total of 33 participants analyzed. Significant increases in the PPT (decreased pain sensitivity) were observed in the test infraspinatus group when compared with test gluteus medius, control infraspinatus, and control gluteus medius groups (P .05). This study showed that SMT evokes short-term regional increases in PPT within myofascial tissues in healthy young adults. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Expressions of Spinal Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor and Its Receptor CSF-1R in the Development ofComplicated Regional Pain Symptom I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhi-Min; Tang, Yu-Ying; Zheng, Yang-Chun; Xu, Dan

    2016-09-01

    To study the changes of mechanical allodynia and temperature hyperalgesia, as well as the expression of the spinal macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and its receptor CSF-1R during the development of complicated regional pain symptom I(CRPS I). The animal model of CRPS I was established using prolonged ischemia-reperfusion injury of rodent left hindpaw. The mechanical allodynia and temperature hyperalgesia of ipsilateral hindpaw were continuously measured for 14 d after reperfusion, and the expressions of spinal M-CSF and CSF-1R in ipsilateral spinal cord horn were measured with immunofluorescence technique on day 3, day 7 and day 14 after reperfusion. The thresholds of mechanical allodynia and temperature hyperalgesia of ipsilateral hindpaw were significantly decreased (PCSF-1R was primarily distributed on the microglia. The immunofluorescence intensities of M-CSF and CSF-1R in ipsilateral spinal cord horn were significantly increased on day 7 and day 14 after reperfusion (PCSF-1R.

  2. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded single-site control study comparing blood loss prevention of tranexamic acid (TXA) to epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) for corrective spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kushagra; Errico, Thomas J; Vaz, Kenneth M; Lonner, Baron S

    2010-04-06

    Multilevel spinal fusion surgery has typically been associated with significant blood loss. To limit both the need for transfusions and co-morbidities associated with blood loss, the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents has been proposed. While there is some literature comparing the effectiveness of tranexamic acid (TXA) to epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) in cardiac procedures, there is currently no literature directly comparing TXA to EACA in orthopedic surgery. Here we propose a prospective, randomized, double-blinded control study evaluating the effects of TXA, EACA, and placebo for treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS), and adult deformity (AD) via corrective spinal surgery. Efficacy will be determined by intraoperative and postoperative blood loss. Other clinical outcomes that will be compared include transfusion rates, preoperative and postoperative hemodynamic values, and length of hospital stay after the procedure. The primary goal of the study is to determine perioperative blood loss as a measure of the efficacy of TXA, EACA, and placebo. Based on current literature and the mechanism by which the medications act, we hypothesize that TXA will be more effective at reducing blood loss than EACA or placebo and result in improved patient outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00958581.

  3. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded single-site control study comparing blood loss prevention of tranexamic acid (TXA to epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA for corrective spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaz Kenneth M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multilevel spinal fusion surgery has typically been associated with significant blood loss. To limit both the need for transfusions and co-morbidities associated with blood loss, the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents has been proposed. While there is some literature comparing the effectiveness of tranexamic acid (TXA to epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA in cardiac procedures, there is currently no literature directly comparing TXA to EACA in orthopedic surgery. Methods/Design Here we propose a prospective, randomized, double-blinded control study evaluating the effects of TXA, EACA, and placebo for treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS, neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS, and adult deformity (AD via corrective spinal surgery. Efficacy will be determined by intraoperative and postoperative blood loss. Other clinical outcomes that will be compared include transfusion rates, preoperative and postoperative hemodynamic values, and length of hospital stay after the procedure. Discussion The primary goal of the study is to determine perioperative blood loss as a measure of the efficacy of TXA, EACA, and placebo. Based on current literature and the mechanism by which the medications act, we hypothesize that TXA will be more effective at reducing blood loss than EACA or placebo and result in improved patient outcomes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00958581

  4. Optical monitoring of spinal cord hemodynamics, a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Kwon, Brian K.; Streijger, Femke; Manouchehri, Neda; So, Kitty; Shortt, Katelyn; Cripton, Peter A.; Macnab, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Background: After an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia, hypoxia, and increased hydrostatic pressure which exacerbate further secondary damage and neuronal deficit. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for non-invasive and real-time monitoring of these changes within the injured spinal cord in an animal model. NIRS is a non-invasive optical technique that utilizes light in the near infrared spectrum to monitor changes in the concentration of tissue chromophores from which alterations in tissues oxygenation and perfusion can be inferred in real time. Methods: A custom-made miniaturized NIRS sensor was developed to monitor spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation noninvasively and in real time simultaneously with invasive, intraparenchymal monitoring in a pig model of SCI. The spinal cord around the T10 injury site was instrumented with intraparenchymal probes inserted directly into the spinal cord to measure oxygen pressure, blood flow, and hydrostatic pressure, and the same region of the spinal cord was monitored with the custom-designed extradural NIRS probe. We investigated how well the extradural NIRS probe detected intraparenchymal changes adjacent to the injury site after alterations in systemic blood pressure, global hypoxia, and traumatic injury generated by a weight-drop contusion. Results: The NIRS sensor successfully identified periods of systemic hypoxia, re-ventilation and changes in spinal cord perfusion and oxygenation during alterations of mean arterial pressure and following spinal cord injury. Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that extradural NIRS monitoring of the spinal cord is feasible as a non-invasive optical method to identify changes in spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation in real time. Further development of this technique would allow clinicians to monitor real-time physiologic changes within the injured spinal cord during the

  5. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

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    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  6. Remote Ischemia Preconditioning Attenuates Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Breakdown in Rats Undergoing Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury: Associated with Activation and Upregulation of CB1 and CB2 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Na; Fang, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Lin; Ma, Hong

    2017-10-31

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has protective effects on spinal cord ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the potential mechanisms remain unclear. In our study, the effects and underlying mechanisms of RIPC on blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) breakdown following I/R injury were investigated. animals underwent intraperitoneal administration with cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor antagonist AM251, cannabinoid-2 (CB2) receptor antagonist AM630 or vehicle 15 minutes before three 3-minute occlusion-reperfusion cycles on the right femoral artery or a sham operation. 30 minutes after the preconditioning, aortic arch was exposed with or without 14-minute occlusion. Neurological function was assessed with Tarlov scoring system. The disruption of BSCB was assessed by measuring Evans Blue (EB) extravasation. The expression of tight junction protein occludin was determined by western blot analyses. The expression and localization of CB1 and CB2 receptors were assessed by western blot and immunofluorescence. RIPC attenuated the motor dysfunction, BSCB disruption and downregulation of occludin after I/R injury, which were impaired by blocking CB1 and CB2 receptors. Moreover, RIPC upregulated the elevated perivascular expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors following I/R injury. These results indicated that RIPC, through activation and upregulation of CB1 and CB2 receptors, was involved in preserving the integrity of BSCB after spinal cord I/R injury. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Remote Ischemia Preconditioning Attenuates Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Breakdown in Rats Undergoing Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury: Associated with Activation and Upregulation of CB1 and CB2 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Jing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC has protective effects on spinal cord ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury, but the potential mechanisms remain unclear. In our study, the effects and underlying mechanisms of RIPC on blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB breakdown following I/R injury were investigated. Methods: animals underwent intraperitoneal administration with cannabinoid-1 (CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, cannabinoid-2 (CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 or vehicle 15 minutes before three 3-minute occlusion-reperfusion cycles on the right femoral artery or a sham operation. 30 minutes after the preconditioning, aortic arch was exposed with or without 14-minute occlusion. Neurological function was assessed with Tarlov scoring system. The disruption of BSCB was assessed by measuring Evans Blue (EB extravasation. The expression of tight junction protein occludin was determined by western blot analyses. The expression and localization of CB1 and CB2 receptors were assessed by western blot and immunofluorescence. Results: RIPC attenuated the motor dysfunction, BSCB disruption and downregulation of occludin after I/R injury, which were impaired by blocking CB1 and CB2 receptors. Moreover, RIPC upregulated the elevated perivascular expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors following I/R injury. Conclusions: These results indicated that RIPC, through activation and upregulation of CB1 and CB2 receptors, was involved in preserving the integrity of BSCB after spinal cord I/R injury.

  8. Epidemiology of Syphilis in regional blood transfusion centres in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Syphilis remains a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso. However, few published data are available on the prevalence of syphilis in the population. This study had two main objectives: to determine the seroprevalence of syphilis in a cohort of 37,210 first time blood donors ...

  9. Dermatomes and the central organization of dermatomes and body surface regions in the spinal cord dorsal horn in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuzuru; Chiba, Tanemichi; Kurokawa, Masahiro; Aoki, Yasuchika

    2003-07-14

    Dermatomes and the associated central projection fields were studied with the application of fluorescent neurotracer, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), to 21 reference points on rat trunk and hindlimb skin. Segmental distribution and rostrocaudal central level of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons innervating reference points were examined and DiI-induced fluorescent areas were mapped in the horizontal plane through lamina II of the dorsal horn. Segmental levels of DRG neurons innervating reference points were generally identical to the level determined using dye-extravasation methods. However, innervation of the first digit was situated in the L4 dermatome, not the L3 reported previously using those methods. Generally, afferents from a reference point projected to a single field in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. Reference points on ventral and dorsal median lines of the trunk were represented bilaterally. Afferents from reference points located on the ventral median line of the hindlimb projected to two separate fields: one on the medial margin of spinal cord segments L2-L5 and the other on the medial half of spinal cord segment L5. From the distribution of central projection fields of reference points, central projection fields of dermatomes were revealed as even in shape and located within corresponding spinal cord segments. The arrangement of peripheral and central fields of dermatomes and body surface regions suggests that peripheral and central projection fields of cutaneous afferent fibers are reshaped from the common prototypical pattern that exhibits an orderly and evenly sequenced arrangement. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The Sur1-Trpm4 Channel in Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Simard, J. Marc; Woo, Seung Kyoon; Aarabi, Bizhan; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major unsolved challenge in medicine. Impact trauma to the spinal cord shears blood vessels, causing an immediate ‘primary hemorrhage’. During the hours following trauma, the region of hemorrhage enlarges progressively, with delayed or ‘secondary hemorrhage’ adding to the primary hemorrhage, and effectively doubling its volume. The process responsible for the secondary hemorrhage that results in early expansion of the hemorrhagic lesion is termed ‘progressive hem...

  11. The development of whole blood titanium levels after instrumented spinal fusion – Is there a correlation between the number of fused segments and titanium levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Most modern spinal implants contain titanium and remain in the patient’s body permanently. Local and systemic effects such as tissue necrosis, osteolysis and malignant cell transformation caused by implants have been described. Increasing tissue concentration and whole blood levels of ions are necessary before a disease caused by a contaminant develops. The aim of the present study was the measurement of whole blood titanium levels and the evaluation of a possible correlation between these changes and the number of fused segments. Methods A prospective study was designed to determine changes in whole blood titanium levels after spinal fusion and to analyze the correlation to the number of pedicle screws, cross connectors and interbody devices implanted. Blood samples were taken preoperatively in group I (n = 15), on the first, second and 10th day postoperatively, as well as 3 and 12 months after surgery. Group II (n = 16) served as a control group of volunteers who did not have any metal implants in the body. Blood samples were taken once in this group. The number of screw-rod-connections and the length of the spinal fusion were determined using radiographic pictures. This study was checked and approved by the ethical committee of the University of Tuebingen. Results The mean age in group I was 47 ± 22 years (range 16 - 85 years). There were three male (20%) and twelve female (80%) patients. The median number of fused segments was 5 (range 1 to 11 segments). No statistically significant increase in the titanium level was seen 12 months after surgery (mean difference: -7.2 μg/l, 95% CI: -26.9 to 12.5 μg/l, p = 0.446). By observing the individual titanium levels, 4 out of 15 patients demonstrated an increase in titanium levels 12 months after surgery. No statistically significant correlation between fused segments (r = -0.188, p = 0.503) length of instrumentation (r = -0.329, p = 0.231), number of

  12. Influence of halothane and methoxyflurane on regional brain and spinal cord concentrations of methionine-enkephalin in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, R K; Court, M; Chandna, V K; Mohan, A; Engelking, L R; Kumar, A M

    1994-01-01

    Rats were exposed to either oxygen (controls), 1.5% halothane in oxygen, or methoxyflurane (0.5%) in oxygen over a period of 2 h, then sacrificed at the end of exposure (2-h group), 4 h after removal from environmental chamber (4-h group), or at 24 h following anesthetic exposure (24-h group). Pituitary (excluding the neural lobe, Pit), brain, and spinal cord areas were isolated and processed with Met-enkephalin tissue concentrations determined. In halothane-exposed animals, Met-enkephalin concentrations in pit and across CNS areas studied were significantly lower at 2 h following anesthetic exposure than in control animals. Concentrations of Met-enkephalin in many areas of CNS and Pit of 4-h group approached control levels. Concentrations of Met-enkephalin in all areas studied except spinal cord returned to basal levels by 24 h following halothane exposure. Exposure to methoxyflurane resulted in less dramatic changes in Met-enkephalin concentrations across CNS regions examined. Exposure to methoxyflurane resulted in significant decreases in Met-enkephalin levels in olfactory bulb, thalamus, and hippocampus only. Met-Enkephalin levels did not change significantly in other areas of the central nervous system following methoxyflurane exposure. These results indicate that halothane and methoxyflurane may have differential effects on the endogenous opioid system.

  13. Sustained delivery of activated Rho GTPases and BDNF promotes axon growth in CSPG-rich regions following spinal cord injury.

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    Anjana Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI often results in permanent functional loss. This physical trauma leads to secondary events, such as the deposition of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG within astroglial scar tissue at the lesion.We examined whether local delivery of constitutively active (CA Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1 to the lesion site alleviated CSPG-mediated inhibition of regenerating axons. A dorsal over-hemisection lesion was created in the rat spinal cord and the resulting cavity was conformally filled with an in situ gelling hydrogel combined with lipid microtubes that slowly released constitutively active (CA Cdc42, Rac1, or Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Treatment with BDNF, CA-Cdc42, or CA-Rac1 reduced the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes, as well as CSPG deposition, at the interface of the implanted hydrogel and host tissue. Neurofilament 160kDa positively stained axons traversed the glial scar extensively, entering the hydrogel-filled cavity in the treatments with BDNF and CA-Rho GTPases. The treated animals had a higher percentage of axons from the corticospinal tract that traversed the CSPG-rich regions located proximal to the lesion site.Local delivery of CA-Cdc42, CA-Rac1, and BDNF may have a significant therapeutic role in overcoming CSPG-mediated regenerative failure after SCI.

  14. Spine segmentation from C-arm CT data sets: application to region-of-interest volumes for spinal interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerger, C.; Lorenz, C.; Babic, D.; Hoppenbrouwers, J.; Homan, R.; Nachabe, R.; Racadio, J. M.; Grass, M.

    2017-03-01

    Spinal fusion is a common procedure to stabilize the spinal column by fixating parts of the spine. In such procedures, metal screws are inserted through the patients back into a vertebra, and the screws of adjacent vertebrae are connected by metal rods to generate a fixed bridge. In these procedures, 3D image guidance for intervention planning and outcome control is required. Here, for anatomical guidance, an automated approach for vertebra segmentation from C-arm CT images of the spine is introduced and evaluated. As a prerequisite, 3D C-arm CT images are acquired covering the vertebrae of interest. An automatic model-based segmentation approach is applied to delineate the outline of the vertebrae of interest. The segmentation approach is based on 24 partial models of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae which aggregate information about (i) the basic shape itself, (ii) trained features for image based adaptation, and (iii) potential shape variations. Since the volume data sets generated by the C-arm system are limited to a certain region of the spine the target vertebra and hence initial model position is assigned interactively. The approach was trained and tested on 21 human cadaver scans. A 3-fold cross validation to ground truth annotations yields overall mean segmentation errors of 0.5 mm for T1 to 1.1 mm for C6. The results are promising and show potential to support the clinician in pedicle screw path and rod planning to allow accurate and reproducible insertions.

  15. Material basis for inhibition of Dragon's Blood on evoked discharges of wide dynamic range neurons in spinal dorsal horn of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Chen, Su; Liu, Xiangming

    2008-11-01

    In vivo experiments were designed to verify the analgesic effect of Dragon's Blood and the material basis for this effect. Extracellular microelectrode recordings were used to observe the effects of Dragon's Blood and various combinations of the three components (cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B) extracted from Dragon's Blood on the discharge activities of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) of intact male Wistar rats evoked by electric stimulation at sciatic nerve. When the Hill's coefficients describing the dose-response relations of drugs were different, based on the concept of dose equivalence, the equations of additivity surfaces which can be applied to assess the interaction between three drugs were derived. Adopting the equations and Tallarida's isobole equations used to assess the interaction between two drugs with dissimilar dose-response relations, the effects produced by various combinations of the three components in modulating the evoked discharge activities of WDR neurons were evaluated. Results showed that Dragon's Blood and its three components could inhibit the evoked discharge frequencies of WDR neurons in a concentration-dependent way. The Hill's coefficients describing dose-response relations of three components were different. Only the combined effect of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B and loureirin B was similar to that of Dragons Blood. Furthermore, the combined effect was synergistic. This investigation demonstrated that through the synergistic interaction of the three components Dragon's Blood could interfere with the transmission and processing of pain signals in spinal dorsal horn. All these further proved that the combination of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B was the material basis for the analgesic effect of Dragon's Blood.

  16. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants after General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study - A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCANN, M.E.; Withington, Davinia E.; Arnup, Sarah J.; Davidson, Andrew J.; DISMA, N.; FRAWLEY, G.; Morton, Neil S.; BELL, G.; Hunt, Rodney W.; Bellinger, David C; Polaner, D. M.; Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Absalom, Anthony R.; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Izzo, Francesca; Szmuk, Peter; Young, Vanessa; Soriano, S. G.; De Graaff, J. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/249966271

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  17. Seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in blood donors: A study from regional blood transfusion services of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective : Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are significant health problems that might involve the late sequel of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in blood donors poses an increased risk of window period transmission through blood transfusion. The present study aimed to know the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV among blood donors in regional blood transfusion services of Nepal. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study conducted among blood donors in Banke (5,211, Morang (5,351, and Kaski (5,995 blood transfusion services. Serum samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and anti-HCV antibodies using rapid enzyme immunoassays. The donors information was collected via the donor record register through their respective blood transfusion services. The software "Winpepi ver 3.8" was used for statistical analysis. Results: The seroprevalence rate of HBV was highest in the Banke (1.2% followed by Biratnagar (0.87% and Kaski (0.35% (P < 0.0001. The seroprevalence of HCV was highest in the Morang (0.26% followed by Kaski (0.16% and Banke (0.11% (P > 0.05. The seroprevalence of HBV was significantly higher than HCV in all three blood transfusion services. The burden of HBV as well as HCV seems to be higher in male donors (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The study revealed that the seroprevalence of HBV was alarmingly higher in two of the three blood transfusion services. Implementation of community-based preventive measures and improved strategies for safe blood supply might prove useful to decrease the seroprevalence.

  18. Profile of malignant spinal cord compression: One year study at regional cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Results: Most of the patients were in the age group of 41–60 years and there was no gender preponderance in patients. Female breast cancer was the most common incident (15.5% malignancy followed by multiple myeloma, lung, and prostatic carcinoma. Lower dorsal spine was the most common site of compression (35% followed by lumbar (31% and mid-dorsal (26% spine. 70 (91% patients had cord compression subsequent to bone metastasis while as other patients had leptomeningeal metastasis. In 31 (40% patients, spinal cord compression was the presenting symptom. Overall, only 26 patients had motor improvement after treatment. Conclusion: Grade of power before treatment was predictive of response to treatment and overall outcome of motor or sensory functions. Neurodeficit of more than 10 days duration was associated with poor outcome in neurological function.

  19. Identification of B(2)-bradykinin receptors in guinea pig brain regions, spinal cord and peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, N A; Whiting, R L

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the biochemical and pharmacological properties of bradykinin receptors in the guinea pig central and peripheral tissues using radioligand binding techniques. Specific [(3)H]bradykinin ([(3)H]BK) receptor binding to homogenates of guinea pig cerebral cortex, hippocampus, spinal cord, ileum, kidney, heart, vas deferens and uterus was of high affinity, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of saturation (0.005-1 nM) data revealed the presence of a single population of non-interacting nanomolar affinity (generally 0.14-0.38 nM) binding sites in all these tissues, with the ileum having the highest affinity (K(D) = 0.02 nM) and the greatest density of sites (B(max) = 5.8 +/- 1.8 pmol/g tissue). The rank order of tissue enrichment in terms of [(3)H]BK binding sites was: ileum > uterus > kidney > heart > vas deferens > spinal cord > cerebral cortex > hippocampus. Unlabelled BK and its analogs inhibited [(3)H]BK binding in the above tissues in a concentration-dependent manner and with the same rank order of potency: BK > Lys-BK > Met-Lys-BK > [ d -Arg (0)-Hyp (3)- d -Phe (7)]BK ? [ d -Arg (0)-Hyp (3)-Thi (5,8)- d -Phe (7)]BK ? Des-Arg (9)-BK . A similar rank order of potency of agonists was observed for their ability to contract guinea pig uterine and ileal smooth muscle strips. The pharmacological profile of [(3)H]BK receptor binding, using BK agonists and antagonists, and that of functional responses was consistent with the identification of BK receptors of the B(2)-type in the guinea pig central nervous system and peripheral tissues.

  20. A Comprehensive Outcome-Specific Review of the Use of Spinal Cord Stimulation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visnjevac, Ognjen; Costandi, Shrif; Patel, Bimal A; Azer, Girgis; Agarwal, Priya; Bolash, Robert; Mekhail, Nagy A

    2017-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful, debilitating affliction that is often difficult to treat. It has become common international practice to use spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of CRPS as other therapies fail to provide adequate relief, quality of life, or improvement in function. This comprehensive outcome-specific systematic review of the use of SCS for CRPS was performed to elucidate the available evidence with focus on clinically relevant patient-specific outcomes. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to evaluate the effects of SCS on patients with CRPS for the following outcomes and provide summary levels of evidence in regard to each outcome: perceived pain relief, pain score, resolution of CRPS signs, functional status, quality of life, psychological impact, sleep hygiene, analgesic medication utilization, and patient satisfaction with SCS therapy. Search terms included "complex regional pain syndrome," "spinal cord stimulation," and "reflex sympathetic dystrophy," without restriction of language, date, or type of publication, albeit only original data were included in analyses. Of 30 studies selected, seven systematic reviews were excluded, as were four studies reporting combination therapy that included SCS and other therapies (ie, concurrent peripheral nerve stimulation, intrathecal therapy) without clear delineation to the effect of SCS alone on outcomes. A total of 19 manuscripts were evaluated. Perceived pain relief, pain score improvement, quality of life, and satisfaction with SCS were all rated 1B+, reflecting positive high-level (randomized controlled trial) evidence favoring SCS use for the treatment of CRPS. Evidence for functional status improvements and psychological effects of SCS was inconclusive, albeit emanating from a randomized controlled trial (evidence level 2B±), and outcomes evidence for both sleep hygiene and resolution of CRPS signs was either nonexistent or of too low quality from

  1. Apnea after Awake Regional and General Anesthesia in Infants : The General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes, a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; De Graaff, Jurgen C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/249966271; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; Von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen; Lee, Katherine; Sheppard, Suzette; Hartmann, Penelope; Ragg, Philip; Backstrom, Marie; Costi, David; Von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.; Knottenbelt, Graham; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mameli, Leila; Giribaldi, Gaia; Prato, Alessio Pini; Mattioli, Girolamo; Wolfler, Andrea; Izzo, Francesca; Sonzogni, Valter; Van Gool, Jose T D G; Numan, Sandra C.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Hagenaars, J. H M; Absalom, Anthony R.; Hoekstra, Frouckje M.; Volkers, Martin J.; Furue, Koto; Gaudreault, Josee; Berde, Charles; Soriano, Sulpicio; Young, Vanessa; Sethna, Navil; Kovatsis, Pete; Cravero, Joseph P.; Bellinger, David; Marmor, Jacki; Lynn, Anne; Ivanova, Iskra; Hunyady, Agnes; Verma, Shilpa; Polaner, David; Thomas, Joss; Meuller, Martin; Haret, Denisa; Szmuk, Peter; Steiner, Jeffery; Kravitz, Brian; Suresh, Santhanam; Hays, Stephen R.; Taenzer, Andreas H.; Maxwell, Lynne G.; Williams, Robert K.; Bell, Graham T.; Dorris, Liam; Adey, Claire; Bagshaw, Oliver; Chisakuta, Anthony; Eissa, Ayman; Stoddart, Peter; Davis, Annette; Myles, Paul; Wolf, Andy; McIntosh, Neil; Carlin, John; Leslie, Kate; De Lima, Jonathan; Hammer, Greg; Field, David; Gebski, Val; Tibboel, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however, the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia study is a randomized, controlled trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia

  2. Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 identifies a specific subpopulation of angiogenic blood vessels following contusive spinal cord injury in the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Richard L; Maddie, Melissa A; Minnillo, Danielle R; Hagg, Theo; Whittemore, Scott R

    2008-03-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), disruption and plasticity of the microvasculature within injured spinal tissue contribute to the pathological cascades associated with the evolution of both primary and secondary injury. Conversely, preserved vascular function most likely results in tissue sparing and subsequent functional recovery. It has been difficult to identify subclasses of damaged or regenerating blood vessels at the cellular level. Here, adult mice received a single intravenous injection of the Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (IB4) at 1-28 days following a moderate thoracic (T9) contusion. Vascular binding of IB4 was maximally observed 7 days following injury, a time associated with multiple pathologic aspects of the intrinsic adaptive angiogenesis, with numbers of IB4 vascular profiles decreasing by 21 days postinjury. Quantitative assessment of IB4 binding shows that it occurs within the evolving lesion epicenter, with affected vessels expressing a temporally specific dysfunctional tight junctional phenotype as assessed by occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 immunoreactivities. Taken together, these results demonstrate that intravascular lectin delivery following SCI is a useful approach not only for observing the functional status of neovascular formation but also for definitively identifying specific subpopulations of reactive spinal microvascular elements. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate values and white blood cell counts after spinal deformity surgery in the early (≤3 months) post-operative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Margaret G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Bridwell, Keith H; O'Donnell, June C; Luhmann, Scott J

    2012-03-01

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and white blood cell (WBC) count are frequently obtained in the work-up of post-operative fever. However, their diagnostic utility depends upon comparison with normative peri-operative trends which have not yet been described. The purpose of this study is to define a range of erythrocyte sedimentation rates and white blood cell counts following spinal instrumentation and fusion in non-infected patients. Seventy-five patients underwent spinal instrumentation and fusion. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and white blood cell count were recorded pre-operatively, at 3 and 7 days post-operatively, and at 1 and 3 months post-operatively. Both erythrocyte sedimentation rate and white blood cell count trends demonstrated an early peak, followed by a gradual return to normal. Peak erythrocyte sedimentation rates occurred within the first week post-operatively in 98% of patients. Peak white blood cell counts occurred with the first week in 85% of patients. In the absence of infection, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was abnormally elevated in 78% of patients at 1 month and in 53% of patients at 3 months post-operatively. The white blood cell count was abnormally elevated in only 6% of patients at 1 month post-operatively. Longer surgical time was associated with elevated white cell count at 1 week post-operatively. The fusion of more vertebral levels had a negative relationship with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate at 1 week post-operatively. The anterior surgical approach was associated with significantly lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate at 1 month post-operatively and with lower white cell count at 1 week post-operatively. In non-infected spinal fusion surgeries, erythrocyte sedimentation rates are in the abnormal range in 78% of patients at 1 month and in 53% of patients at 3 months post-operatively, suggesting that the erythrocyte sedimentation rate is of limited diagnostic value in the early post

  4. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  5. Combination of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and cord blood mononuclear cells in the treatment of chronic thoracic spinal cord injury in 27 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-zhong WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate and evaluate therapeutic effects of transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells for late thoracic spinal cord injury. Methods Data from 27 patients with late thoracic spinal cord injury who received transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in conjunction with cord blood mononuclear cells in Neurosurgery Department of 463rd Hospital of PLA between July 2006 and July 2008 were collected and analyzed. The full treatment course consisted of 4 consecutive injections at one week apart. Indicators for evaluation followed that of the American Spiral Injury Association (ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS grade, ASIA motor and sensory scores, ASIA visual analog score, and the Ashworth score. The follow-up period was 6 months. Evaluations were made 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment. Results Improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found in 4 patients. In one patient, improvement from AIS A to AIS C and in one patient from AIS B to AIS C was found 6 weeks after the treatment. The AIS improvement rate was 22.2%. In one patient improvement from AIS A to AIS B was found after 6 months. The overall AIS improvement rate was 25.9%. ASIA baseline motor scores of lower extremties were 0.5±1.5, 1.7±2.9, 3.1±3.6 before the treatment, 6 weeks and 6 months after the treatment, respectively, and showed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05. ASIA sensory scores including light touch and pinprick were 66.6±13.7 and 67.0±13.6 respectively before treatment, and they became 68.8±14.4, 68.4±14.7 and 70.5±14.4, 70.2±14.4 six weeks and six months after the treatment. The changes were statistically significant (P < 0.05; Modified Ashworth Scale scores were 1.8±1.5, 1.6±1.2,1.1±0.8 respectively at baseline, 6 weeks and 6months after the treatment, and showed a statistically significant descending trend (P < 0.05. Conclusion Transplantation of

  6. Manipulation Peak Forces Across Spinal Regions for Children Using Mannequin Simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triano, John J; Lester, Steven; Starmer, David; Hewitt, Elise G

    The purpose of this work was to create an exploratory database of manipulation treatment force variability as a function of the intent of an experienced clinician sub-specializing in the care of children to match treatment to childhood category. Data of this type are necessary for realistic planning of dose-response and safety studies on therapeutic benefit. The project evaluated the transmitted peak forces of procedures applied to mannequins of different stature for younger and older children. Common procedures for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint were administered to estimate variability by a single experienced practitioner and educator in pediatric manipulation attempting to modulate for childhood category. Results described for peak components in the cardinal axes and for peak total forces were cataloged and compared with consensus estimates of force from the literature. Mean force values for both components and total force peaks monotonically increased with childhood category analogous to consensus expectations. However, a mismatch was observed between peak values measured and consensus predictions that ranged by a factor of 2 to 3.5, particularly in the upper categories. Quantitative data permit a first estimate of effect size for future clinical studies. The findings of this study indicate that recalibration of spinal manipulation performance of experienced clinicians toward arbitrary target values similar to consensus estimates is feasible. What is unclear from the literature or these results is the identity of legitimate target values that are both safe and clinically effective based on childhood categories in actual practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with clitorally induced orgasm in healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Kortekaas, Rudie; Kuipers, Rutger; Nieuwenburg, Arie; Pruim, Jan; Reinders, A. A. T. Simone; Holstege, Gert

    2006-01-01

    There is a severe lack of knowledge regarding the brain regions involved in human sexual performance in general, and female orgasm in particular. We used [(15)O]-H(2)O positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 12 healthy women during a nonsexual resting state,

  8. Experimental syringohydromyelia induced by adhesive arachnoiditis in the rabbit: changes in the blood-spinal cord barrier, neuroinflammatory foci, and syrinx formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Kato, Katsura; Rodríguez Guerrero, Alexander; Baba, Hisatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidezo

    2012-06-10

    There are many histological examinations of syringohydromyelia in the literature. However, there has been very little experimental work on blood permeability in the spinal cord vessels and ultrastructural changes. We prepared an animal model of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis by injecting kaolin into the subarachnoid space at the eighth thoracic vertebra of rabbits. The animals were evaluated 4 months later. Of the 30 rabbits given kaolin injection into the cerebrospinal fluid, 23 showed complete circumferential obstruction. In the 7 animals with partial obstruction of the subarachnoid space, intramedullary changes were not observed. However, among the 23 animals showing complete obstruction of the subarachnoid space, dilatation of the central canal (hydromyelia) occurred in 21, and intramedullary syrinx (syringomyelia) was observed in 11. In animals with complete obstruction, fluorescence microscopy revealed intramedullary edema around the central canal, extending to the posterior columns. Electron microscopy of hydromyelia revealed a marked reduction of villi on the ependymal cells, separation of the ependymal cells, and cavitation of the subependymal layer. The dilated perivascular spaces indicate alterations of fluid exchange between the subarachnoid and extracellular spaces. Syringomyelia revealed that nerve fibers and nerve cells were exposed on the surface of the syrinx, and necrotic tissue was removed by macrophages to leave a syrinx. Both pathologies differ in their mechanism of development: hydromyelia is attributed to disturbed reflux of cerebrospinal fluid, while tissue necrosis due to disturbed intramedullary blood flow is considered to be involved in formation of the syrinx in syringomyelia.

  9. Ability of non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring and a continuous non-invasive arterial pressure monitor (CNAP™) to provide new readings in each 1-min interval during elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T; Telec, N; Dennis, A; Griffiths, J; Buettner, A

    2012-03-01

    We compared the ability of automated non-invasive intermittent oscillometric blood pressure monitoring with a new device, CNAP(TM) (continuous non-invasive arterial pressure) to provide a new blood pressure reading in each 1-min interval between spinal anaesthesia and delivery during caesarean section. We also compared the accuracy of continuous non-invasive arterial pressure readings with non-invasive blood pressure measurements before spinal anaesthesia. Fifty-nine women participated. The non-invasive and continuous non-invasive monitors displayed new blood pressure readings in a mean of 82% (11%) and 83% (13%) (p = 0.97) of the one-minute intervals between spinal anaesthesia and delivery, respectively. Continuous non-invasive arterial pressure was more likely to fail on two or more consecutive minutes (p=0.001). From the pre-spinal readings, the mean bias, defined as non-invasive-continuous non-invasive arterial pressure, and limits of agreement (±2SD mean bias) for systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure respectively were +1.3 (±26.0), -2.9 (±21.8) and +2.6 (±20.4) mmHg. The new monitor has disadvantages compared with conventional non-invasive intermittent blood pressure monitoring. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with lumbar segmental stenosis treated with XLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Carpineta, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Literature review of adults TCS associated with lumbar spinal degenerative disease as lumbar canal stenosis or disc herniation, is reported. Moderate entity of traction of spinal cord may remain asymptomatic in childhood and may result in delayed neurological deficits in adult life. The stretching of conus medullaris and spinal nerves of cauda equina, reduces regional blood flow and causes neural death and fibrous tissue replacement. Sudden or progressive onset of paraparesis with spastic gait, bladder dysfunction and acute low back pain in patient with history of spinal dysraphism must be considered as possible lumbar spinal cord compression caused by low lying cord related to TCS. Surgical decompression should be performed as early as possible to ensure neurological recovery. XLIF approach seems to be safe and fast and represent an excellent surgical option to obtain spinal cord indirect decompression and lumbar interbody fusion.

  11. Not Just the Brain: Methamphetamine Disrupts Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier and Induces Acute Glial Activation and Structural Damage of Spinal Cord Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene A Kiyatkin; Sharma, Hari S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier (BBB), acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potent...

  12. Transfusion Transmissible Infections Among Walk-In Blood Donors at Kisumu Regional Blood Transfusion Centre, Kisumu County, Kenya, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamamba, Dominic; Onyango, Dickens; Oyugi, Elvis; Kanyina, Evalyne; Obonyo, Mark; Githuku, Jane; Ransom, James

    2017-11-08

    Transfusion transmissible infections (TTIs) are threats to blood safety. This study investigated TTIs among volunteer blood donors at the Kisumu Regional Blood Transfusion Centre (KRBTC) in Kenya. We performed a retrospective record review of blood donor registers at KRBTC, 2015. Walk-in donors accepted for donation were analyzed to determine prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and syphilis. Descriptive and associative statistics were calculated using Microsoft Excel and Open-Epi software. The records of a total of 3690 walk-in donors were reviewed, and 2046 were included in the analysis. Mean age was 30 ± 9.6 years, 76% male, 51% married, and 80% were Kisumu residents. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis was 2.4%, 3.1%, 2.3%, and 1%, respectively. HBV was the most common TTI among the volunteers. KRBTC should be proactive and address issues of donor self-exclusion, strict adherence to donor selection criteria, and vaccination.

  13. Angiographic abnormalities associated with alterations in regional myocardial blood flow in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, J R; Cohn, P F; Holman, B L; Roberts,, B H; Adams, D F

    1976-01-01

    To evaluate the association between alterations in myocardial blood flow and angiographic findings, myocardial blood flow was compared in 26 patients with asymergy, 15 patients with a similar extent of coronary artery disease but without asynergy, and 10 patients without coronary artery disease or obvious myocardial or valvular disease. Myocardial blood flow was measured at rest with an Anger camera and PDP-11/20 computer after the intracoronary injection of 133xenon. In comparison with the normal subjects, whole heart blood flow was significantly reduced in patients with asynergy. In addition, myocardial blood flow in regions of anteroapical asynergy was reduced (85-7 +/- 7-0 ml/min per 100 g3 in controls to 65-4 +/- 4-5, P less than 0-05) and a similar reduction was noted in regions of posterolateral asymergy (91-5 +/- 8-8 in controls to 66-8 +/- 5-0, P less than 0-05). In general, regional myocardial blood flow was reduced distal to left anterior descending or left circumflex stenosis of less than 50 per cent, with a trend toward further reduction distal to less than 75 per cent stenosis. In these same patients, the presence of anteroapical or posterolateral asynergy resulted in a similar trend to even greater reduction of flow. The effect of collaterals was variable: 7 of 8 patients without asynergy but with less than 75 per cent left anterior descending stenosis and collateral circulation to the lower left anterior descending quadrant had minimally reduced flows. However, in the 17 patients with anteroapical asynergy, regional myocardial blood flow was very similar in the 9 patients with collaterals compared with the 8 patients without them. This study suggests that the degree of coronary artery stenosis and presence of asynergy are both important in evaluating alterations in myocardial blood flow in coronary artery disease, while the role of collaterals remains uncertain. Images PMID:1008970

  14. Regulation of regional cerebral blood flow during and between migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, M; Olsen, T S; Lassen, N A

    1983-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity to voluntary hyperventilation, moderate hypertension, and physiological activation was studied in nine patients during induced migraine attacks and in four patients between their attacks. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by the xenon 133 injection technique in ...... abnormalities to the area of the oligemia supports our suggestion that the blood flow changes are caused by a change in local metabolism. Between attacks of migraine, the patients had normal regulation of brain circulation....

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in stroke by 133Xenon inhalation and emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Henriksen, L; Paulson, O

    1981-01-01

    A rapidly rotating single-photon emission tomograph was used to study regional cerebral blood flow by 133Xenon inhalation. Using a rotation speed of 180 degrees/5 sec a tomographic picture of the average Xenon concentration in 3 slices is obtained. By taking a sequence of 4 one-minute tomograms...... cerebral blood flow measured tomographically by 133Xenon inhalation circumvents the extra-cranial contamination and the superposition of intracranial tissues that hamper 133Xenon inhalation flow studies using stationary detectors....

  16. Dosimetric comparison between proton and photon beams in the moving gap region in cranio-spinal irradiation (CSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J; Srivastava, Shiv P; Zhao, Li; Wolanski, Mark; Simmons, Joseph; Johnstone, Peter A S; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the moving gap region dosimetry in proton beam cranio-spinal irradiation (CSI) to provide optimal dose uniformity across the treatment volume. Proton beams of ranges 11.6 cm and 16 cm are used for the spine and the brain fields, respectively. Beam profiles for a 30 cm snout are first matched at the 50% level (hot match) on the computer. Feathering is simulated by shifting the dose profiles by a known distance two successive times to simulate a 2 × feathering scheme. The process is repeated for 2 mm and 4 mm gaps. Similar procedures are used to determine the dose profiles in the moving gap for a series of gap widths, 0-10 mm, and feathering step sizes, 4-10 mm, for a Varian iX 6MV beam. The proton and photon dose profiles in the moving gap region are compared. The dose profiles in the moving gap exhibit valleys and peaks in both proton and photon beam CSI. The dose in the moving gap for protons is around 100% or higher for 0 mm gap, for both 5 and 10 mm feathering step sizes. When the field gap is comparable or larger than the penumbra, dose minima as low as 66% is obtained. The dosimetric characteristics for 6 MV photon beams can be made similar to those of the protons by appropriately combining gap width and feathering step size. The dose in the moving gap region is determined by the lateral penumbras, the width of the gap and the feathering step size. The dose decreases with increasing gap width or decreasing feathering step size. The dosimetric characteristics are similar for photon and proton beams. However, proton CSI has virtually no exit dose and is beneficial for pediatric patients, whereas with photon beams the whole lung and abdomen receive non-negligible exit dose.

  17. An Inter-regional US Blood Supply Simulation Model to Evaluate Blood Availability to Support Planning for Emergency Preparedness and Medical Countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Arianna; Ezzeldin, Hussein; Walderhaug, Mark; Anderson, Steven A; Forshee, Richard A

    2017-08-23

    Planning for a response to threats like pandemics or mass casualty events is a national priority. The US blood supply system can be particularly vulnerable to such events. It is important to understand the impacts of emergency situations on blood availability and the resiliency of the US blood supply system. On the basis of the Stock-and-Flow simulation model of the US blood supply system, we developed an inter-regional blood transfer system representing the action of multiple blood collectors and distributors to enable effective planning of strategies to minimize collection and donation disruptions to the blood supply system in the event of a national emergency. We simulated a pandemic or mass casualty event on both a national and an inter-regional blood supply system. Differences in the estimated impacts demonstrated the importance of incorporating spatial and temporal variations of blood collection and utilization across US regions. The absence of blood shortage in both emergency scenarios highlighted the resilience of the inter-regional system to meet the potential associated blood demand. Our inter-regional model considered complex factors and can be a valuable tool to assist regulatory decision-making and strategic planning for emergency preparedness to avoid and mitigate associated adverse health consequences. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;page 1 of 10).

  18. Regional variations of skin blood flow response to histamine: evaluation by spectrophotometry and laser Doppler flowmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, Ethel; Aviram, Guy; Zeltser, D.; Brenner, Sarah; Maibach, Howard I.

    1996-01-01

    To study inherent differences in skin function related to regional variation, we tested the hypothesis that different reactivities of small blood vessels via their direct and indirect activation by histamine play an important role in the observed regional variation of processes. Histamine was administered to three cutaneous regions in 20 volunteers, and the induced response was quantified utilizing spectrophotometry and laser Doppler flowmetry. The back exhibited the greatest response, followed by the forearm and ankle in decreasing order of responsiveness. We suggest that the intensity of the wheal and flare response may partly be related to the local reactivity of the blood vessels once the histamine actually reached them, and to their indirect dilatation via the axonal reflex. These blood vessel response observations may provide initial insight into inherent functional differences influencing cutaneous manifestations of endogenous and exogenous diseases.

  19. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and allows you to stand and bend. Spinal stenosis causes narrowing in your spine. The narrowing puts ... and spinal cord and can cause pain. Spinal stenosis occurs mostly in people older than 50. Younger ...

  20. Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia: a case report and discussion of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Caroline; le Polain de Waroux, Bernard; Forget, Patrice; Deumens, Ronald; Masquelier, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder, the physiopathology of which can lead to dystonia associated with changes in the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous system. An interdisciplinary approach (pharmacological, interventional and psychological therapies in conjunction with a rehabilitation pathway) is central to progress towards pain reduction and restoration of function. Aim: This case report aims to stimulate reflection and development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies concerning CRPS associated with dystonia. Case description: A 31 year old female CRPS-1 patient presented with dystonia of the right foot following ligamentoplasty for chronic ankle instability. She did not have a satisfactory response to the usual therapies. Multiple anesthetic blocks (popliteal, epidural and intrathecal) were not associated with significant anesthesia and analgesia. Mobilization of the foot by a physiotherapist was not possible. A multidisciplinary approach with psychological support, physiotherapy and spinal cord stimulation (SCS) brought pain relief, rehabilitation and improvement in the quality of life. Conclusion: The present case report demonstrates the occurrence of multilevel (peripheral and central) pathological modifications in the nervous system of a CRPS-1 patient with dystonia. This conclusion is based on the patient’s pain being resistant to anesthetic blocks at different levels and the favourable, at least initially, response to SCS. The importance of the bio-psycho-social model is also suggested, permitting behavioural change. PMID:25254100

  1. [The practice of neonatal umbilical blood gas analysis in the "Alsace" regional French perinatal network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, F; Akladios, C Y; Sananes, N; Gaudineau, A; Langer, B

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of neonatal well-being is paramount in delivery rooms. For that purpose, it is recommended in France to carry out a systematic neonatal umbilical cord blood gas analysis. The aim of this study is to evaluate how umbilical cord blood gas sampling is realised, analysed and interpreted by midwives in a French regional perinatal network. We conducted a survey focused on randomly selected midwives partitioning in different maternities that constitute the "Alsace" regional perinatal network. A questionnaire concerning the modalities of umbilical cord blood sampling, its analysis and the interpretation of results was used during interviews with included midwives. Fifty-one midwives were included in the study (15.8% of whom were working in delivery rooms). Only 13% of maternities constituting the perinatal network did not realise systematic neonatal umbilical cord blood analysis. Among interviewed midwives, 78.4% reported umbilical cord clamping after the first breath of the child. Among the midwives included, 86.3% of them realise sampling from the umbilical artery and 29.4% from both umbilical artery and vein. For 86.3% of interviewed midwives, the leitmotif of realising umbilical blood sampling was medico-legal. More than two third of included midwives interpret blood gas taking into account two parameters (either pH and base excess, or lactate). They settled at 7.0-7.2, the limit below which a newborn might present sequelae. This study shows that the neonatal umbilical cord blood gas analysis at birth is almost systematic in this regional French perinatal network. It is realised primarily for medico-legal purpose. However, there are significant variations in sampling procedures and interpretation. This should lead to the establishment within each maternity of a neonatal umbilical cord blood gas sampling protocol along with a midwifery training program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Junctional neurulation: a unique developmental program shaping a discrete region of the spinal cord highly susceptible to neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dady, Alwyn; Havis, Emmanuelle; Escriou, Virginie; Catala, Martin; Duband, Jean-Loup

    2014-09-24

    In higher vertebrates, the primordium of the nervous system, the neural tube, is shaped along the rostrocaudal axis through two consecutive, radically different processes referred to as primary and secondary neurulation. Failures in neurulation lead to severe anomalies of the nervous system, called neural tube defects (NTDs), which are among the most common congenital malformations in humans. Mechanisms causing NTDs in humans remain ill-defined. Of particular interest, the thoracolumbar region, which encompasses many NTD cases in the spine, corresponds to the junction between primary and secondary neurulations. Elucidating which developmental processes operate during neurulation in this region is therefore pivotal to unraveling the etiology of NTDs. Here, using the chick embryo as a model, we show that, at the junction, the neural tube is elaborated by a unique developmental program involving concerted movements of elevation and folding combined with local cell ingression and accretion. This process ensures the topological continuity between the primary and secondary neural tubes while supplying all neural progenitors of both the junctional and secondary neural tubes. Because it is distinct from the other neurulation events, we term this phenomenon junctional neurulation. Moreover, the planar-cell-polarity member, Prickle-1, is recruited specifically during junctional neurulation and its misexpression within a limited time period suffices to cause anomalies that phenocopy lower spine NTDs in human. Our study thus provides a molecular and cellular basis for understanding the causality of NTD prevalence in humans and ascribes to Prickle-1 a critical role in lower spinal cord formation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413208-14$15.00/0.

  3. [Role of quality control for improvement of blood components in the Regional Blood Centre of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebie, K; Sawadogo, S; Kafando, E; Bationo, E M; Dahourou, H; Ouattara, S; Kienou, K; Nana, S; Kaba, L; Fretz, C; Murphy, E L

    2017-11-01

    In Burkina Faso, blood components must comply with national standards. Then, all Transfusion services must implement a quality control process to ensure compliance. Our study aims to establish the main characteristics of blood components of the regional transfusion center of Ouagadougou, and evaluate the capability of this center to improve its manufacturing process. We conducted from marsh to December 2014 a pre-post study, assessing blood components' characteristics before and after the implementation of a six months' improvement plan. The assessed parameters were: volume, hematocrit (Ht) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels in RBCs; volume and the number of platelets in PPCs; and volume and concentration of clotting factor VIII in fresh frozen plasma (FFP), respectively. Three hundred and twelve RBCs and 280 PCs were randomly selected for the first series of controls, and 215 RBCs, 54 PCs and 60 FFP were selected for the second series of controls. We compared the mean values of the components parameters and the overall non-compliance rates for each series. The average Hb level of RBCs was respectively 47.8±8.9g and 54.7±7.2g in the first and second series compare to a standard of≥40g. Non-compliance rates of Hb level decreased significantly from 17.6% to 1.4%. For PCs units, the mean number of platelets was 0.14±0.10×1011 and 0.30±0.15×1011 in the first and second period compare to a standard of 0.5×1011. Non-compliance rates for platelets number were high 97.1% and 72.2%. The study demonstrates that only RBCs complied with national standards. The study also demonstrates the capability of CRTSO to improve blood components' processing even if for PCs and FFP, NC rates remain high. QC must be maintained and expanded to the others regional blood centers of the country. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Regional variations in nocturnal fluctuations in subcutaneous blood flow rate in the lower leg of man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Jørgensen, B

    1991-01-01

    hyperaemic response was demonstrated at both the medial and lateral aspect of the leg. As for the degree of hyperaemia and the absolute blood flow rates in the different phases, there were some deviations between the medial and the lateral locations. However, a highly significant positive correlation......The purpose of the study was to investigate possible regional variations in recently discovered nocturnal fluctuations in subcutaneous blood flow rates. Approximately 90 min after going to sleep, a 100% blood flow rate increment, lasting about 100 min, has been demonstrated in the distal and medial...... aspect of the right lower leg of normal human subjects. In the present study subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rates were measured simultaneously in the right and left lower legs of 16 normal human subjects over 12-20 h ambulatory conditions. The 133Xe wash-out technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors...

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow distribution in newly diagnosed schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, P; Holm, S; Madsen, P L

    1994-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow distribution (rCBF) in 24 first admissions with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder and in 17 healthy volunteers was examined. Single photon emission computed tomography with a brain-retained tracer, technetium-99m-d,l-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime, was used...

  6. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...

  7. Cognitive profiles and regional cerebral blood flow patterns in dementia of the Alzheimer type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, G; Bruhn, P; Schmidt, E

    1994-01-01

    Individual cognitive profiles and correlations between cognitive functions and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were analyzed in 20 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). CBF was measured with high resolution single photon emission computed...

  8. A method for calculating regional cerebral blood flow from emission computed tomography of inert gas concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celsis, P; Goldman, T; Henriksen, L

    1981-01-01

    Emission tomography of positron or gamma emitting inert gases allows calculation of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in cross-sectional slices of human brain. An algorithm is presented for rCBF calculations from a sequence of time averaged tomograms using inhaled 133Xe. The approach is designed...

  9. Uneven Distribution of Regional Blood Supply Prompts the Cystic Change of Pituitary Adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhe; Gu, Jianjun; Ma, Yiming; Huang, Yinxing; Wang, Jiaxing; Wu, Zhifeng; Zhong, Qun; Wang, Shousen

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the cystic change of pituitary adenoma might be related to the blood supply and metabolism of the tumor; however, the exact pathologic mechanism underlying the cystic change remains unknown. We aimed to assess the features of regional blood supply of pituitary adenoma and examine its relationship with the cystic change of pituitary adenoma. Patients (N = 79) with pituitary adenoma admitted to our hospital were divided into the parenchyma group (n = 40) or the cystic change group (n = 39). Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary adenoma was conducted for the parenchyma group and the steepest slopes (SSmax, reflecting regional blood supply) at different areas were calculated. The location of cystic change of the pituitary adenoma was recorded and analyzed for the cystic change group. The parenchyma group showed an upper SSmax of 2.52 ± 1.18, a lower SSmax of 2.89 ± 1.46, a left SSmax of 2.71 ± 1.31, and a right SSmax of 2.66 ± 1.29. The difference between the upper and lower SSmax was statistically significant (P supply is unevenly distributed in the parenchymal pituitary adenoma, with reduced blood supply in the upper than the lower region. Cystic change mainly occurs in the upper region of pituitary adenoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and show how well treatments are working. Problems with your blood may include bleeding disorders, excessive clotting and platelet disorders. If you lose too much blood, you may need a transfusion. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow during mechanical hyperventilation in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Høgh, Peter; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical hyperventilation is often instituted in patients with acute bacterial meningitis when increased intracranial pressure is suspected. However, the effect on regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) is unknown. In this study, we measured regional CBF (rCBF) in patients with acute bacterial...... meningitis before and during short-term hyperventilation. In 17 patients with acute bacterial meningitis, absolute rCBF (in ml/100 g min-1) was measured during baseline ventilation and hyperventilation by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using intravenous 133Xe bolus injection. Intravenous...... in the frontal and parietal cortex as well as in the basal ganglia. Focal perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of 12 patients. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities are frequent in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Short-term hyperventilation does not enhance these abnormalities....

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenic patients; In relation to the subtypes of the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagawa, Katsuo; Sibuya, Isoo; Oiji, Arata; Kawakatsu, Sinobu; Morinobu, Shigeru; Totsuka, Shiro (Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Kinoshita, Osami; Yazaki, Mitsuyasu

    1990-03-01

    Seventy-six schizophrenic patients were examined by a Xe-133 inhalation method to determine regional cerebral blood flow. A decreased blood flow was observed in the frontal lobe, especially in the right inferior part. In a study on the relationship between disease subtypes and regional cerebral blood flow, negative symptoms were found more predominantly associated with dissolution type than delusion type. In the group of dissolution type, a decreased blood flow was observed in both the right inferior frontal lobe and the right upper hemisphere, in comparison to the group of delution type. Patients presenting with auditory hallucination had a significantly higher incidence of both negative and positive symptoms, as compared with those not presenting with it. In such patients, a significantly decreased blood flow was also seen in the left upper frontal lobe and the bilateral parietal lobe. Xe-133 inhalation method should assist in evaluating brain function in schizophrenic patients, thus leading to the likelihood of developing a new treatment modality. (N.K.).

  13. [Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) as a treatment for the spread phenomenon related to complex regional pain syndrome type- I (CRPS-I )].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shinichi; Taira, Takaomi; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2009-09-01

    The authors describe an experience of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in a 30-year-old woman who developed complex regional pain syndrome type-I (CRPS-I) with spread phenomenon. She had received lumbar SCS under a diagnosis of CRPS-I in her left leg for 8 years. She had refractory pain in her right arm for the recent two years. There was no new lesion explaining her refractory pain on physical or radiological examination. Thus, the pain in her right upper arm was considered as spread phenomenon of CRPS-I. Test stimulation with cervical epidural spinal electrode showed good results and the pulse generator was implanted. It is suggested that the symptom of CRPS-I involving spread phenomenon was possibly due to a cortical reorganization. But a certain effect of SCS may be contributing to the favorable results of test stimulation for the treatment of CRPS-I with spread phenomenon in this case.

  14. Assessing regional cerebral blood flow in depression using 320-slice computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Wang

    Full Text Available While there is evidence that the development and course of major depressive disorder (MDD symptomatology is associated with vascular disease, and that there are changes in energy utilization in the disorder, the extent to which cerebral blood flow is changed in this condition is not clear. This study utilized a novel imaging technique previously used in coronary and stroke patients, 320-slice Computed-Tomography (CT, to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in those with MDD and examine the pattern of regional cerebral perfusion. Thirty nine participants with depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 24 (HAMD24 score > 20, and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS score > 53 and 41 healthy volunteers were studied. For all subjects, 3 ml of venous blood was collected to assess hematological parameters. Transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasound was utilized to measure parameters of cerebral artery rCBFV and analyse the Pulsatility Index (PI. 16 subjects (8 =  MDD; 8 =  healthy also had rCBF measured in different cerebral artery regions using 320-slice CT. Differences among groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Pearson's tests were employed in our statistical analyses. Compared with the control group, whole blood viscosity (including high\\middle\\low shear rateand hematocrit (HCT were significantly increased in the MDD group. PI values in different cerebral artery regions and parameters of rCBFV in the cerebral arteries were decreased in depressive participants, and there was a positive relationship between rCBFV and the corresponding vascular rCBF in both gray and white matter. rCBF of the left gray matter was lower than that of the right in MDD. Major depression is characterized by a wide range of CBF impairments and prominent changes in gray matter blood flow. 320-slice CT appears to be a valid and promising tool for measuring rCBF, and could thus be employed in psychiatric settings for biomarker and treatment response purposes.

  15. Relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Taku; Mori, Takaaki; Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Sonobe, Naomi; Shimizu, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-10-01

    This aim of this study was to examine the mechanisms underlying the neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies by investigating regional cerebral blood flow. Participants were 27 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for probable dementia with Lewy bodies. All subjects underwent single-photon emission computed tomography scans using technetium-99 m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were evaluated by neuropsychiatric inventory. Multiple regression analyses using neuropsychiatric inventory and voxel-based analyses of covariance of the regional cerebral blood flow images between subjects with or without each neuropsychiatric symptom were performed. Additionally, similar voxel-based analyses of covariance between subjects with each neuropsychiatric symptom and normal subjects were performed. There were no significant correlations in any psychiatric symptoms in multiple regression analyses. All subjects had hallucination but none had euphoria. We analyzed eight neuropsychiatric symptom scores with the exception of hallucination and euphoria using voxel-based analyses of covariance. Significant differences of regional cerebral blood flow were shown in groups with agitation, disinhibition, and irritability. Subjects with agitation showed hypoperfusion in the parietal lobule, the precuneus, and the angular gyrus, and hyperperfusion in the fusiform gyrus, the lingual gyrus, and the thalamus. Subjects with disinhibition showed hypoperfusion in the left frontal gyrus. Subjects with irritability showed hyperperfusion in the right frontal gyrus. There were no significant differences in regional cerebral blood flow between subjects with any neuropsychiatric symptoms and normal subjects. This study reveals that dysfunction of specific brain regions is associated with various neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The effects of sustained hyperventilation on regional cerebral blood volume in thiopental-anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broux, Christophe; Tropres, Irène; Montigon, Olivier; Julien, Cécile; Decorps, Michel; Payen, Jean-François

    2002-12-01

    Sustained hyperventilation has a time-limited effect on cerebrovascular dynamics. We investigated whether this effect was similar among brain regions by measuring regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) with steady-state susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging during 3 h of hyperventilation. Regional CBV was determined in nine thiopental-anesthetized, mechanically-ventilated rats every 30 min in the dorsoparietal neocortex, the corpus striatum, and the cerebellum. The corpus striatum was the only brain region showing a stable reduction in CBV during the hypocapnic episode (PaCO(2), 24 +/- 3 mm Hg). In contrast, neocortex and, to a lesser extent, cerebellum exhibited a progressive return toward normal values despite continued hypocapnia. No evidence of a rebound in CBV was found on return to normal ventilation in the three brain regions. We conclude that sustained hyperventilation can lead to an uneven change in the reduction of CBV, possibly because of differences of brain vessels in their sensitivity to extracellular pH. Our results in neocortex confirm the transient effect of sustained hyperventilation on cerebral hemodynamics. Sustained hyperventilation has a transient effect in decreasing cerebral blood volume (CBV). Using susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging in thiopental-anesthetized rats, we found differences between brain regions in their transient CBV response to sustained hyperventilation.

  17. Infiltrating blood-derived macrophages are vital cells playing an anti-inflammatory role in recovery from spinal cord injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravid Shechter

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although macrophages (MPhi are known as essential players in wound healing, their contribution to recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI is a subject of debate. The difficulties in distinguishing between different MPhi subpopulations at the lesion site have further contributed to the controversy and led to the common view of MPhi as functionally homogenous. Given the massive accumulation in the injured spinal cord of activated resident microglia, which are the native immune occupants of the central nervous system (CNS, the recruitment of additional infiltrating monocytes from the peripheral blood seems puzzling. A key question that remains is whether the infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi contribute to repair, or represent an unavoidable detrimental response. The hypothesis of the current study is that a specific population of infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi is functionally distinct from the inflammatory resident microglia and is essential for recovery from SCI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We inflicted SCI in adult mice, and tested the effect of infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi on the recovery process. Adoptive transfer experiments and bone marrow chimeras were used to functionally distinguish between the resident microglia and the infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi. We followed the infiltration of the monocyte-derived MPhi to the injured site and characterized their spatial distribution and phenotype. Increasing the naïve monocyte pool by either adoptive transfer or CNS-specific vaccination resulted in a higher number of spontaneously recruited cells and improved recovery. Selective ablation of infiltrating monocyte-derived MPhi following SCI while sparing the resident microglia, using either antibody-mediated depletion or conditional ablation by diphtheria toxin, impaired recovery. Reconstitution of the peripheral blood with monocytes resistant to ablation restored the lost motor functions. Importantly, the infiltrating monocyte

  18. Nutritional blood parameters and nutritional risk screening in patients with spinal cord injury and deep pressure ulcer-a retrospective chart analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Cristina; Frotzler, Angela; Jenny, Andreas; Schaefer, Dirk J; Kressig, Reto W; Scheel-Sailer, Anke

    2017-10-23

    Retrospective chart review. To describe (i) the nutritional blood parameters (NBP) and the nutritional risk screening (NRS) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and pressure ulcers (PU) III and IV according to the EPUAP classification, and (ii) the relationship between both NBP and NRS. SCI acute care and rehabilitation clinic in Switzerland. The NBPs were measured upon the admission of patients treated for PU III and IV between 11/2011 and 12/2014. Descriptive analyses and group comparisons were done. A total of 170 patients, including 42 (25%) women, 19 (12%) people with paraplegia and 104 (61%) people with traumatic SCI, were admitted and analyzed. Pathologic blood values and NBP were found for c-reactive protein (83%), vitamin D (73%), protein (41%), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (41%), albumin (34%), hemoglobin (34%), zinc (29%), folic acid (22%), transferrin (15.3%), and copper (1.2%). Overall, the NRS was >3 in 39% of the patients, wherefrom 28% in patients with PU III and 44% with PU IV (p=0.07). No statistical significant differences were found between patients with PU III and IV in terms of NBP and NRS. We found abnormal values in NBP and in NRS in a significant number of patients with SCI and PU of both III and IV. Both laboratory examinations and nutritional assessments at admission can help to detect and correct the nutritional deficits in patients at risk. Neither the grade of the PUs, nor the NBP or the NRS can replace one another.

  19. Usutu Virus Antibodies in Blood Donors and Healthy Forestry Workers in the Lombardy Region, Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percivalle, Elena; Sassera, Davide; Rovida, Francesca; Isernia, Paola; Fabbi, Massimo; Baldanti, Fausto; Marone, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Usutu virus (USUV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, is known to circulate at low prevalence in Northern Italy, and has been reported to cause overt infection. USUV was first reported in Europe in 2001, but a retrospective study showed that it has been present in Italy at least since 1996. Seroprevalence data for USUV antibodies in sera are being collected in different European countries, showing circulation at low prevalence in human populations. Interestingly, two consecutive studies in Northern Italy indicate a possible increase in the presence of the virus, from 0% to 0.23% seroprevalence in blood donors. In this study, antibodies against USUV were measured in 3 consecutive blood samples collected from October 2014 to December 2015 from 33 forestry workers in the Po river valley, while samples from 200 blood donors from the same geographical area were tested in parallel. Neutralizing and IgG antibodies were found in six forestry workers (18.1%) and in two blood donors (1%). Our results indicate that USUV circulation in the examined area, part of a highly populated region in Northern Italy, is higher than expected. Healthy subjects exhibit a higher prevalence than what was found in a previous report in an adjoining region (0.23%), while the population at risk shows a much higher prevalence value (18.1%).

  20. Differences between hospital- and community-acquired blood exposure incidents revealed by a regional expert counseling center.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, P.T. van; Pelk-Jongen, M.; Boer, E. de; Voss, A.; Wijkmans, C.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One year (2003) regional analysis of all blood exposure incidents from hospitals as well as from the community. DESIGN: Establishment of an easily accessible regional expert counseling center, operating 24 h a day, for all accidental blood exposures. Tasks of the center were to register

  1. Appearance of burning abdominal pain during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Jitsu; Gokan, Dai; Hirose, Noriya; Iida, Ryoji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ogawa, Setsuro

    2013-02-01

    The mechanism of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) was reported as being related to both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recurrence of CRPS was, reportedly, induced by hand surgery in a patient with upper limb CRPS. However, there is no documentation of mechanical allodynia and burning abdominal pain induced by Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia in patients with upper limb CRPS. We report the case of a patient who suffered from burning abdominal pain during Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia 13 years after the occurrence of venipuncture-induced CRPS of the upper arm. The patient's pain characteristics were similar to the pain characteristics of her right arm during her previous CRPS episode 13 years earlier. In addition, mechanical allodynia around the incision area was confirmed after surgery. We provided ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block using 20 mL of 0.4% ropivacaine under ultrasound guidance twice, which resulted in the disappearance of the spontaneous pain and allodynia. The pain relief was probably related to blockade of the peripheral input by this block, which in turn would have improved her central sensitization. Our report shows that attention should be paid to the appearance of neuropathic pain of the abdomen during Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia in patients with a history of CRPS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Two methods for calculating regional cerebral blood flow from emission computed tomography of inert gas concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanno, I; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    Two methods are described for calculation of regional cerebral blood flow from completed tomographic data of radioactive inert gas distribution in a slice of brain tissue. It is assumed that the tomographic picture gives the average inert gas concentration in each pixel over data collection perio...... are implemented using synthetic data of xenon-133 emission computed tomography and some of the difficulties likely to be encountered in practice are stressed....

  3. Apparent gene conversions involving the SMN gene in the region of the spinal muscular atrophy locus on chromosome 5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderSteege, G; Grootscholten, PM; Cobben, JM; Zappata, S; Scheffer, H; denDunnen, JT; vanOmmen, GJB; Brahe, C; Buys, CHCM

    1996-01-01

    The survival motor neuron (SMN) gene has been described as a determining gene for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). SMN has a closely flanking, nearly identical copy ((C)BCD541). Gene and copy gene can be discriminated by sequence differences in exons 7 and 8. The large majority of SMA patients show

  4. Serious Adverse Events and Spinal Manipulative Therapy of the Low Back Region: A Systematic Review of Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hebert, J.J.; Stomski, N.J.; French, S.D.; Rubinstein, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to systematically search the literature for studies reporting serious adverse events following lumbopelvic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and to describe the case details. Methods A systematic search was conducted in PubMed including MEDLINE, EMBASE,

  5. Regional distribution of opiate alkaloids in experimental animals' brain tissue and blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurendić-Brenesel Maja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the regional distribution of opiate alkaloids from seized heroin in experimental animals' brain regions and blood. Results could be used in the examination of opiate alkaloids' distribution in human biological samples in order to contribute to the solution of the causes of death due to heroin intake. Experimental animals (Wistar rats were treated with seized heroin, and were sacrificed at different time periods: 5, 15, 45 and 120 min after treatment. Opiate alkaloids' (codeine, morphine, acetylcodeine, 6- acetylmorphine and 3,6-diacetylmorphine content was determined in the brain regions (cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia and blood of animals using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS method. The highest content of opiate alkaloids in the blood was measured 15 min, and in the brain tissue 45 min after the treatment with heroin. The maximal concentration of opiates was determined in the basal ganglia. The obtained results offer the possibility of selecting this part of the brain tissue as a representative sample for identifying and assessing the content of opiates.

  6. Serious Adverse Events and Spinal Manipulative Therapy of the Low Back Region: A Systematic Review of Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Stomski, Norman J; French, Simon D; Rubinstein, Sidney M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically search the literature for studies reporting serious adverse events following lumbopelvic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and to describe the case details. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library up to January 12, 2012, by an experienced reference librarian. Study selection was performed by 2 independent reviewers using predefined criteria. We included cases involving individuals 18 years or older who experienced a serious adverse event following SMT applied to the lumbar spine or pelvis by any type of provider (eg, chiropractic, medical, physical therapy, osteopathic, layperson). A serious adverse event was defined as an untoward occurrence that results in death or is life threatening, requires hospital admission, or results in significant or permanent disability. We included studies published in English, German, Dutch, and Swedish. A total of 2046 studies were screened, and 41 studies reporting on 77 cases were included. Important case details were frequently unreported, such as descriptions of SMT technique, the pre-SMT presentation of the patient, the specific details of the adverse event, time from SMT to the adverse event, factors contributing to the adverse event, and clinical outcome. Adverse events consisted of cauda equina syndrome (29 cases, 38% of total); lumbar disk herniation (23 cases, 30%); fracture (7 cases, 9%); hematoma or hemorrhagic cyst (6 cases, 8%); or other serious adverse events (12 cases, 16%) such as neurologic or vascular compromise, soft tissue trauma, muscle abscess formation, disrupted fracture healing, and esophageal rupture. This systematic review describes case details from published articles that describe serious adverse events that have been reported to occur following SMT of the lumbopelvic region. The anecdotal nature of these cases does not allow for causal inferences between SMT and the events identified in this

  7. Genetic screening of spinal muscular atrophy using a real-time modified COP-PCR technique with dried blood-spot DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ar Rochmah, Mawaddah; Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Nakanishi, Kenta; Awano, Hiroyuki; Morioka, Ichiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Saito, Toshio; Saito, Kayoko; Lai, Poh San; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Bouike, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Maya; Nishio, Hisahide; Shinohara, Masakazu

    2017-10-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in SMN1. More than 95% of SMA patients carry homozygous SMN1 deletion. SMA is the leading genetic cause of infant death, and has been considered an incurable disease. However, a recent clinical trial with an antisense oligonucleotide drug has shown encouraging clinical efficacy. Thus, early and accurate detection of SMN1 deletion may improve prognosis of many infantile SMA patients. A total of 88 DNA samples (37 SMA patients, 12 carriers and 39 controls) from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper were analyzed. All participants had previously been screened for SMN genes by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using DNA extracted from freshly collected blood. DNA was extracted from DBS that had been stored at room temperature (20-25°C) for 1week to 5years. To ensure sufficient quality and quantity of DNA samples, target sequences were pre-amplified by conventional PCR. Real-time modified competitive oligonucleotide priming-PCR (mCOP-PCR) with the pre-amplified PCR products was performed for the gene-specific amplification of SMN1 and SMN2 exon 7. Compared with PCR-RFLP using DNA from freshly collected blood, results from real-time mCOP-PCR using DBS-DNA for detection of SMN1 exon 7 deletion showed a sensitivity of 1.00 (CI [0.87, 1.00])] and specificity of 1.00 (CI [0.90, 1.00]), respectively. We combined DNA extraction from DBS on filter paper, pre-amplification of target DNA, and real-time mCOP-PCR to specifically detect SMN1 and SMN2 genes, thereby establishing a rapid, accurate, and high-throughput system for detecting SMN1-deletion with practical applications for newborn screening. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterizing the Severity of Autonomic Cardiovascular Dysfunction after Spinal Cord Injury Using a Novel 24 Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Analysis Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popok, David W; West, Christopher R; Hubli, Michele; Currie, Katharine D; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the spinal cord injury (SCI) population. SCI may disrupt autonomic cardiovascular homeostasis, which can lead to persistent hypotension, irregular diurnal rhythmicity, and the development of autonomic dysreflexia (AD). There is currently no software available to perform automated detection and evaluation of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction(s) such as those generated from 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) recordings in the clinical setting. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of a novel 24 h ABPM Autonomic Dysfunction Detection Software against manual detection and to use the software to demonstrate the relationships between level of injury and the degree of autonomic cardiovascular impairment in a large cohort of individuals with SCI. A total of 46 individuals with cervical (group 1, n = 37) or high thoracic (group 2, n = 9) SCI participated in the study. Outcome measures included the frequency and severity of AD, frequency of hypotensive events, and diurnal variations in blood pressure and heart rate. There was good agreement between the software and manual detection of AD events (Bland-Altman limits of agreement = ±1.458 events). Cervical SCI presented with more frequent (p = 0.0043) and severe AD (p = 0.0343) than did high thoracic SCI. Cervical SCI exhibited higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure during the night and lower heart rate during the day than high thoracic SCI. In conclusion, our ABPM AD Detection Software was equally as effective in detecting the frequency and severity of AD and hypotensive events as manual detection, suggesting that this software can be used in the clinical setting to expedite ABPM analyses.

  9. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and can affect people who have a diet ... 2015 More on this topic for: Teens Blood Types Donating Blood Blood Transfusions Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Hemophilia When Cancer Keeps You ...

  10. A kinematic and kinetic analysis of spinal region in subjects with and without recurrent low back pain during one leg standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Paul S; Leininger, Peter M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between normalized kinematic and kinetic stability indices for spinal regions with eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during non-dominant leg standing between subjects with recurrent low back pain and control subjects. The kinematic stability index for the spinal regions (core spine model, lumbar spine, lower and upper thorax) and the kinetic stability index from force plate were measured. All participants were asked to maintain non-dominant leg standing with the dominant hip and knee flexed approximately 90 degrees for 25 seconds. Forty-two participants enrolled in the study, including 22 subjects with low back pain (12 male, 10 female) and 20 control subjects (12 male, 8 female). For the kinematic index for stability, the visual condition (F=30.06, p=0.0001) and spinal region (F=10.82, p=0.002) were statistically significant. The post hoc test results indicated a significant difference in the lumbar spine compared with the upper and lower thorax and the core spine model. The kinetic stability (average [standard deviation]) during the eyes-closed condition significantly decreased in the low back pain group (t=-3.24, p=0.002). The subjects with recurrent low back pain demonstrated higher lumbar spine stability in eyes-open condition. This higher stability of the lumbar spine might be due to a possible pain avoiding strategy from the standing limb. The low back pain group also significantly decreased kinetic stability during the eyes-closed condition. Clinicians need to consider both kinetic and kinematic indices while considering visual condition for lumbar spine stability in subjects with recurrent low back pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  12. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to be considered. These include trauma, congenital spinal deformity such as scoliosis, and a genetic disease affecting bone and muscle development throughout the body. Spinal imaging can differentiate these causes. Complications Rarely, untreated ...

  13. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion; Spinal stenosis - fusion; Laminectomy - fusion ... be done: With other surgical procedures for spinal stenosis , such as foraminotomy or laminectomy After diskectomy in ...

  14. Spinal Tap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It? A spinal tap (also called a lumbar puncture) is a medical test that involves taking a small sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for examination. Cerebrospinal fluid is a clear, colorless liquid that delivers nutrients to the brain and spinal ...

  15. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000029.htm Spinal injury To use the sharing features on this page, ... move anyone who you think may have a spinal injury, unless it is absolutely necessary. For example, if ...

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezai, K.; Damasio, H.; Graff-Radford, N.; Eslinger, P.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-05-01

    In 37 patients (ages 58-81) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied utilizing a dedicated SPECT system (Tomomatic-64) that produces rCBF images from 4-minute clearance of Xenon-133 in the brain. The authors have modified the device to acquire 5 continuous tomographic slices simultaneously. A consistent pattern of diminished blood flow was seen in 33 patients in the posterior-temporal and lower-parietal brain regions. Computer programs were developed to quantitate the size of the affected brain tissue in the posterolateral brain areas (confined to the posterior 40% and the lateral 25% of the major and minor brain axes respectively). They have previously reported normal rCBF in 25 volunteers to be greater than 45 ml/min/100g with less than 10% regional variation. Hence, an area was considered abnormal if rCBF measured less than 40 ml/min/100g or was less than 70% of the mean rCBF value in the anterior temporal-frontal regions.

  17. Novel use of ultrasound to examine regional blood flow in the mouse kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jennifer C.; Wang, Bin; Boesen, Erika I.; D'Angelo, Gerard; Pollock, Jennifer S.; Pollock, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional methods used for measuring regional renal blood flow, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry, are highly invasive, and each measurement is restricted to a discrete location. The aim of this study was to determine whether ultrasound imaging in conjunction with enhanced contrast agent (microbubbles; Vevo MicroMarker, VisualSonics) could provide a viable noninvasive alternative. This was achieved by determining changes in renal cortical and medullary rate of perfusion in response to a bolus injection of endothelin-1 (ET-1; 0.6, 1.0, or 2.0 nmol/kg) and comparing these responses to those observed in separate groups of mice with conventional laser-Doppler methods. Intravenous infusion of ET-1 in anesthetized male C57bl/6 mice resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mean arterial pressure and a dose-dependent decrease in total renal blood flow as measured by pulse-wave Doppler. ET-1 infusion resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in regional kidney perfusion as measured by both ultrasound with enhanced contrast agent and laser-Doppler measurements, verifying the use of ultrasound to measure regional kidney perfusion. Noted limitations of ultrasound imaging compared with laser-Doppler flowmetry included a lower degree of sensitivity to changes in tissue perfusion and the inability to assess rapid or transient changes in tissue perfusion. In conclusion, ultrasound represents an effective and noninvasive method for the measurement of relatively short-term, steady-state changes in regional blood flow in the mouse kidney. PMID:19420115

  18. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vasculitis Enfermedades y Condiciones I Am A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Spinal Stenosis Spinal Stenosis Fast Facts Spinal ... weakness, since it greatly affects your ability to work and enjoy life. The natural course of the disease is one of slow progression over time. There ...

  19. Frequency Distribution of Blood Groups ABO, MN and Rh Factor in Philippine Cosmopolitan, Regional and the National Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Marian S. Guzman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Frequency distribution of blood groups is important as it is used in modern medicine, genetic research, anthropology, and tracing ancestral relations of humans. Blood groups include the ABO, Rh and the MN red cell antigens. The frequency distribution of these three blood groups were obtained and assessed for differences from three populations: (1 a regional population from the town of Cabagan located in Isabela province; (2 a cosmopolitan population from the University of the Philippines’ roster of students; and (3 the national population’s data obtained from blood banks all over the Philippines. This study sought to determine the frequency distribution of ABO, MN, and Rh factor blood groups to establish whether there exist differences in distribution among the three population categories. Standard blood agglutination sampling was conducted in these populations to determine blood types. Chi-square tests on the genetic frequencies reveal that there is no significant difference in the distribution of blood groups ABO and Rh. The blood group MN, however, displayed twice as many M blood type in the regional population than in the cosmopolitan population. This suggests a localized segregation of alleles responsible for the MN blood type within distinct populations in the Philippines. Computation of the allelic frequencies also revealed that both populations are not at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on the distribution of the different MN blood types.

  20. Differences in Blood Pressure in Infants After General Anesthesia Compared to Awake Regional Anesthesia (GAS Study-A Prospective Randomized Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Mary Ellen; Withington, D E; Arnup, S J; Davidson, A J; Disma, N; Frawley, G; Morton, N S; Bell, G; Hunt, R W; Bellinger, D C; Polaner, D M; Leo, A; Absalom, A R; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Izzo, F; Szmuk, P; Young, V; Soriano, S G; de Graaff, J C

    BACKGROUND: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a prospective randomized, controlled, multisite, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment at 5 years of age. A secondary aim obtained from the blood pressure data of the GAS

  1. Single-photon tomographic determination of regional cerebral blood flow in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonte, F.J.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Stokely, E.M.; Homan, R.W.

    Using a single-photon emission computed tomographic scanner (SPECT) the authors determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with inhaled xenon-133, a noninvasive procedure. Studies were performed in 40 normal individuals, and these were compared with rCBF determinations in 51 patients with seizure disorders. Although positive results were obtained in 15 of 16 patients with mass lesions, the group of principal interest comprised 25 patients suffering from ''temporal lobe'' epilepsy. Only one of these had a positive x-ray computed tomogram, but 16 had positive findings on rCBF study. These findings included increased local blood flow in the ictal state and reduced flow interictally.

  2. Evaluation of blood glucose concentration measurement using photoacoustic spectroscopy in near-infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namita, Takeshi; Sato, Mitsuki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes, a typical lifestyle-related disease, is an important disease presenting risks of various complications such as retinopathy, kidney failure, and nervous neuropathy. To treat diabetes, regular and continual self-measurement of blood glucose concentrations is necessary to maintain blood glucose levels and to prevent complications. Usually, daily measurements are taken using invasive methods such as finger-prick blood sampling. Some non-invasive optical techniques have been proposed to reduce pain and infection risk, however, few practical techniques exist today. To realize highly accurate and practical measurement of blood glucose concentrations, the feasibility of a photoacoustic method using near-infrared light was evaluated. A photoacoustic signal from a solution of glucose in water (+0-5 g/dl) or equine blood (+0-400 mg/dl) was measured using a hydrophone (9 mm diameter) at 800-1800 nm wavelengths. We investigated the relation between the glucose solution concentration and the photoacoustic signal intensity or peak position of the received photoacoustic signal (i.e. speed of sound in solutions). Results show that the signal intensity and sound speed of the glucose solution increase with increased glucose concentration for wavelengths at which light absorbance of glucose is high. For quantitative estimation of the glucose solution concentration, the photoacoustic signal intensity ratio between two wavelengths, at which dependence of the signal intensity on glucose concentration is high and low, was calculated. Results confirmed that the signal intensity ratios increase linearly with the glucose concentration. These analyses verified the feasibility of glucose level estimation using photoacoustic measurement in the near-infrared region.

  3. Regional cerebral and extracranial blood flow measurements in acutely and chronically implanted cats: hydrogen clearance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, J C; Carati, P; Van Delft, A M

    1981-05-01

    A technique is described for measuring regional blood flow concomitantly in the brain and in extracranial tissues of the cat. Hydrogen clearance using the tissue polarographic electrode appears to be a useful technique for intermittent measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in relatively small areas. H2 was administered by inhalation for 10 min. Both chronic and acutely implanted electrodes were placed at different depths in the cat brain, on the surface of the cortex, and in extracranial tissues. Clearance rates in gray matter of 75 to 119 ml/min/100 g tissue have been obtained and of 11 to 14 ml/min/100 g tissue in white matter. Clearance curves have invariably been monoexponential in character in white matter and biexponential in gray matter. Successful recordings of H2 clearance curves were obtained from both chronically (up to 5 months) and acutely implanted electrodes. A new type of electrode is described. The "paperclip" electrode is placed at the surface of the cortex, has a reactive surface much greater than that of needle electrodes, thus limiting the possible variations due to vascularization differences from one local area to the next, and induces no damage to the brain tissue. To test the reliability of the technique, blood flow was measured during hypercapnia and progressive exsanguination. All electrodes indicated increased rCBF following 5-7% CO2 inhalation. A marked decrease in blood flow was seen with peripheral electrodes during exsanguination, whereas it was necessary to lower arterial blood pressure by more than 60% of the baseline value to record decreased flow in brain tissues. The constancy of response from electrodes and the lack of obvious tissue damage on dissection of the brain renders the method an adequate one. It provides highly focal recording of both CBF and extracranial flow in chronically implanted animals.

  4. BLOOD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benefit (altruism). '35 An individual who gives blood in replacement for that which has been given to his relation is referred to as family replacement donor. '2 But when a person donates blood for the purpose of transfusing a. defined patient, such a person is referred to as. AHMED S. G. AND HASSAN A. W. a directed donor.

  5. High blood pressure and obesity in indigenous ashaninkas of Junin region, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Candice; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. Médico cirujano.; Zavaleta, Carol; Unidad Salud Indígena-Fundación Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.6 Departamento de Geografía, Universidad McGill. Montreal, Canadá. Médico cirujano.; Cabrera, Lilia; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. enfermera, especialista en Salud Pública.; Gilman, Robert H.; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Baltimore, EE. UU. médico, especialista en enfermedades infecciosas.; Miranda, J. Jaime; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster y doctor en Epidemiología.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure and obesity in indigenous Ashaninkas, with limited contact with Western culture, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 in five Ashaninka communities of the Junin region in the jungle of Peru. Individuals aged 35 or older were included. 76 subjects were evaluated (average age 47.4 years old, 52.6 % women) corresponding to 43.2% of the eligible population. The prevalence of hypertension was 14.5% (CI 95%: 6.4-22.6) and the prev...

  6. Closed-Loop Feedback Computer-Controlled Phenylephrine for Maintenance of Blood Pressure During Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Trial Comparing Automated Boluses Versus Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan Kee, Warwick D; Tam, Yuk-Ho; Khaw, Kim S; Ng, Floria F; Lee, Shara W Y

    2017-07-01

    We previously described the use of closed-loop feedback computer-controlled infusion of phenylephrine for maintaining blood pressure (BP) during spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery. In this study, we report a modified system in which phenylephrine is delivered by intermittent boluses rather than infusion. We hypothesized that the use of computer-controlled boluses would result in more precise control of BP compared with infusions. Two hundred fourteen healthy patients having spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery were randomized to have their systolic BP maintained by phenylephrine administered by computer-controlled continuous infusion or computer-controlled intermittent boluses. From induction of anesthesia until the time of uterine incision, a noninvasive BP monitor was set to cycle at 1-minute intervals. In the infusion group, the infusion rate was automatically adjusted after each BP measurement using a previously described algorithm. In the bolus group, the algorithm was modified so that the mass of drug that would have been delivered over 1 minute was instead injected as a rapid intravenous bolus after each BP measurement. The precision of BP control was assessed using performance error calculations and compared between groups, with the primary outcome defined as median absolute performance error, and the latter being a measure of inaccuracy showing an average of the magnitudes of the differences of measured BP values above or below the target values. The precision of BP control was greater, as shown by smaller values for median absolute performance error, in the bolus group (median 4.38 [quartiles 3.22, 6.25] %) versus the infusion group (5.39 [4.12, 7.04] %, P = .008). In the bolus group, phenylephrine consumption was smaller; this was associated with smaller values for median performance error compared with the continuous infusion group (P computer-controlled phenylephrine was delivered using intermittent boluses rather than continuous

  7. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    ... disturbance induced by venous congestion is not fully understood. Since Kadyi's first description of the venous system of the spinal cord, there have been few other studies on the subject. 3 Regarding the intramedullary vascular system, the central part of the spinal cord is supplied unilaterally by branches from the central artery enteri...

  8. Occult spinal dysraphism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in neural tube closure are involved in OSD. ... Several terms have been used to describe these conditions, including spina bifida occulta and closed neural tube defects. .... region (arrowed). Although the vast majority of occult spinal dysraphism lesions are in the lumbar and sacral regions, they may occasionally occur in.

  9. Regional cerebral blood flow during comprehension and speech (in cerebrally healthy subjects)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechevalier, B.; Petit, M.C.; Eustache, F.; Lambert, J.; Chapon, F.; Viader, F. (Service de Neurologie-Dejerine, Chu de Caen (France))

    1989-07-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by the xenon-133 inhalation method in 10 cerebrally healthy subjects at rest and during linguistic activation tests. These consisted of a comprehension test (binaural listening to a narrative text) and a speech test (making sentences from a list of words presented orally at 30-s intervals). The comprehension task induced a moderate increase in the mean right CBF and in both inferior parietal areas, whereas the speech test resulted in a diffuse increase in the mean CBF of both hemispheres, predominating regionally in both inferior parietal, left operculary, and right upper motor and premotor areas. It is proposed that the activation pattern induced by linguistic stimulation depends on not only specific factors, such as syntactic and semantic aspects of language, but also the contents of the material proposed and the attention required by the test situation.

  10. Effects of hypoglycaemia on working memory and regional cerebral blood flow in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Brock, Birgitte

    2018-01-01

    (PET) per session. Results: Working memory was impaired during hypoglycaemia as indicated by a statistically significantly lower mDSST score (estimated treatment difference [ETD] −0.63 [95% CI −1.13, −0.14], p = 0.014) and a statistically significantly longer response time (ETD 2.86 s [7%] [95% CI 0.......67, 5.05], p = 0.013) compared with euglycaemia. During hypoglycaemia, mDSST task performance was associated with increased activity in the frontal lobe regions, superior parietal lobe and thalamus, and decreased activity in the temporal lobe regions (p Working memory activation (mDSST − c......DSST) statistically significantly increased blood flow in the striatum during hypoglycaemia (ETD 0.0374% [95% CI 0.0157, 0.0590], p = 0.002). Conclusions/interpretation: During hypoglycaemia (mean PG 2.9 mmol/l), working memory performance was impaired. Altered performance was associated with significantly increased...

  11. Regional blood flow distribution and oxygen metabolism during mesenteric ischemia and congestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ruy J; Garrido, Alejandra G; Ribeiro, Cristiane M F; Harada, Tomoyuki; Rocha-e-Silva, Mauricio

    2010-06-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is a potentially fatal vascular emergency with mortality rates ranging between 60% and 80%. Several studies have extensively examined the hemodynamic and metabolic effects of superior mesenteric artery occlusion. On the other hand, the cardiocirculatory derangement and the tissue damage induced by intestinal outflow obstruction have not been investigated systematically. For these reasons we decided to assess the initial impact of venous mesenteric occlusion on intestinal blood flow distribution, and correlate these findings with other systemic and regional perfusion markers. Fourteen mongrel dogs were subjected to 45 min of superior mesenteric artery (SMAO) or vein occlusion (SMVO), and observed for 120 min after reperfusion. Systemic hemodynamics were evaluated using Swan-Ganz and arterial catheters. Regional blood flow (ultrasonic flow probes), intestinal O(2)-derived variables, and mesenteric-arterial and tonometric-arterial pCO(2) gradients (D(mv-a)pCO(2) and D(t-a)pCO(2)) were also calculated. SMVO was associated with hypotension and low cardiac output. A significant increase in the regional pCO(2) gradients was also observed in both groups during the ischemic period. After reperfusion, a progressive reduction in D(mv-a)pCO(2) occurred in the SMVO group; however, no improvement in D(t-a)pCO(2) was observed. The histopathologic injury scores were 2.7 +/- 0.5 and 4.8 +/- 0.2 for SMAO and SMVO, respectively. SMV occlusion promoted early and significant hemodynamic and metabolic derangement at systemic and regional levels. Additionally, systemic pCO(2) gradient is not a reliable parameter to evaluate the local intestinal oxygenation. Finally, the D(t-a)pCO(2) correlates with histologic changes during intestinal congestion or ischemia. However, minor histologic changes cannot be detected using this methodology. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pott's disease (PD) or spinal tuberculosis is a rare condition which accounts for less than 1% of total tuberculosis (TB) cases. The incidence of PD has recently increased in Europe and the United States, mainly due to immigration; however, it is still a rare diagnosis in Scandinavian...... countries, and if overlooked it might lead to significant neurologic complications. CASE REPORT A 78-year-old woman, originally from Eastern Europe, presented to the emergency department with a complaint of nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and severe back pain. On admission she was febrile and had...

  13. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  14. Reference range for T lymphocytes populations in blood donors from two different regions in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.L. Torres

    Full Text Available This study defined the normal variation range for different subsets of T-lymphocyte cells count in two different Brazilian regions. We analysed the T-lymphocytes subpopulations (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ in blood donors of two Brazilian cities, located in North (Belem, capital state of Para, indian background and Northeast (Salvador, capital state od Bahia, African background regions of Brazil. Results were compared according to gender, stress level (sleep time lower than 8 hours/day, smoking, and alcohol intake. Lymphocytes subpopulations were measured by flow cytometry. Five hundred twenty-six blood donors from two Brazilians cities participated in the study: 450 samples from Bahia and 76 samples from Pará. Most (60% were men, 59% reported alcohol intake, 12% were smokers, and 80% slept at least 8 h/day. Donors from Bahia presented with significantly higher counts for all parameters, compared with Para. Women had higher lymphocytes levels, in both states, but only CD4+ cells count was significantly higher than men's values. Smokers had higher CD4+ counts, but sleep time had effect on lymphocytes levels only for Para's donors (higher CD3+ and CD4+ counts. That state had also, a higher proportion of donors reporting sleep time <8 h/day. The values for CD3, CD4 and CD8+ cells count were significantly higher in blood donors from Bahia than among those from Pará. Female gender, alcohol intake, stress level, and smoking were associated with higher lymphocyte counts. The use of a single reference range for normal lymphocytes count is not appropriate for a country with such diversity, like Brazil is.

  15. Diurnal variation in baseline human regional cerebral blood flow demonstrated by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, D.J.; Mintun, M.A.; Moore, R.Y. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    We have previously described the diurnal variation in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) response to bright light in human subjects as demonstrated by the positron emission tomography (PET) activation method. In this abstract, we report the differences in rCBF (an indicator of differences in regional neuronal activity) between the evening and midday dim light baseline scans which served as the control states in the above bright light activation study. Five right-handed, healthy volunteers underwent both an evening (8pm) and a midday (12N) O-15 water PET scanning session. Each scanning session was preceded by one hour of dim light adaptation (50 lux) and consisted of six rCBF scans at three different light intensities in an AABBCC sequence (A=50 lux, B=2500 lux, C=7000lux). Significant differences in rCBF between the evening and midday 50 lux states were identified using the statistical parametric mapping method developed by Friston et al (p<.001). The evening scans demonstrated areas of greater relative blood flow in the pineal gland, the lateral temporal cortex bilaterally, the right lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior aspect of the anterior cingulate, and the left thalamus. The midday scans showed areas of greater relative blood flow in the visual cortex, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. the inferior aspect of the anterior cingulate, the left parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Our results demonstrate an extensive diurnal variation in baseline human rCBF. This indicates that time of day may be an important variable in conducting and interpreting functional brain imaging studies. Furthermore, these results suggest possible neuroanatomical substrates through which the circadian system may regulate the various physiologic and behavioral processes that manifest circadian rhythms.

  16. Correlation between changes in regional cerebral blood flow and pain relief in complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Tang; Fan, Yu-Ming; Sun, Chen-Ming; Borel, Cecil O; Yeh, Chun-Chang; Yang, Chih-Ping; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2006-06-01

    Analyzing changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with SPECT in complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1), formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy, is an optimal method for evaluating effective pain relief. We attempted to investigate the correlation of changes in rCBF with pain relief during treatments of sympathetic blockade and multimodal epidural pain control. We describe a patient with severe CRPS 1 in whom conventional treatment failed to relieve the pain. Combined repeated lumbar sympathetic blocks and long-term epidural morphine, bupivacaine, and ketamine administration provided satisfactory pain relief and functional activity recovery. Six normal control subjects having one Tc-99m HMPAO scan each and the patient with CRPS having 3 Tc-99m HMPAO scans (once before treatment and twice at 4 months and 6 months after treatment, respectively). The patient with CRPS showed lower rCBF than normal controls in the left thalamus and higher rCBF than normal controls in the right parietal lobe and left frontal lobe. After subsequent treatment, the subtraction images showed increased rCBF in the left thalamus and decreased rCBF in the right parietal and left frontal lobes. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT showed a relationship of rCBF in the thalamus, parietal lobe, and frontal lobe with pain relief. rCBF alterations may provide an indicator for the quality of pain management for neuropathic pains. Subtraction analysis between pre- and posttreatment, by using statistical parametric mapping (version 2), can be used as an objective indicator for the effectiveness of therapy.

  17. GDNF Schwann cells in hydrogel scaffolds promote regional axon regeneration, remyelination and functional improvement after spinal cord transection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingkun K; Madigan, Nicolas N; Hakim, Jeffrey S; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; McMahon, Siobhan S; Yaszemski, Michael J; Windebank, Anthony J

    2017-03-10

    Positively-charged oligo[poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate] (OPF+ ) is a biodegradable hydrogel used for spinal cord injury repair. We compared scaffolds containing primary Schwann cells (SCs) to scaffolds delivering SCs genetically modified to secrete high concentrations of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Multichannel OPF+ scaffolds loaded with SCs or GDNF-SCs were implanted into transected rat spinal cords for 4 weeks. GDNF-SCs promoted regeneration of more axons into OPF+ scaffolds (2773.0 ± 396.0) than primary SC OPF+ scaffolds (1666.0 ± 352.2) (p = 0.0491). This increase was most significant in central and ventral-midline channels of the scaffold. Axonal remyelination was quantitated by stereologic analysis. Increased myelination of regenerating axons was observed in the GDNF-SC group. Myelinating cell and axon complexes were formed by host SCs and not by implanted cells or host oligodendrocytes. Fast Blue retrograde tracing studies determined the rostral-caudal directionality of axonal growth. The number of neurons that projected axons rostrally through the GDNF-SC scaffolds was higher (7929 ± 1670) than in animals with SC OPF+ scaffolds (1069 ± 241.5) (p OPF+ scaffolds partially recovered locomotor function at weeks 3 and 4 following surgery. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Type of aphasia and regional cerebral blood flow. A study with /sup 133/Xe inhalation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagawa, Koichi; Sugimoto, Keiko; Minematsu, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Sawada, Tohru (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1982-11-01

    In 40 patients with aphasia due to cerebral infarction, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured after 2 months of ictus with /sup 133/Xe inhalation method. There were 18 cases with motor aphasia and 22 with sensory aphasia. On the measurements of rCBF, 3 detectors were placed over frontal region (group F), 3 over temporal region (group T), and remaining 3 over parietal region (group P), of the dominant hemisphere. The flow values were compared with the rCBF values obtained from 21 control subjects who had no abnormality in CT scan and on neurological examinations. The control subjects revealed the hyperfrontal pattern of flow distribution; rCBF values in groups F, T and P, which were expressed as an initial slope index, were 50.0 +- 4.8, 48.0 +- 5.1 and 47.4 +- 4.5, respectively. The hyperfrontal pattern was absent in cases with motor aphasia. In this group, rCBF in groups F, T and P were 42.0 +- 8.3, 44.7 +- 8.4 and 41.0 +- 8.5, respectively, and rCBF in frontal region was significantly reduced compared with that in the control group. In sensory aphasia, rCBF values in groups F, T and P were all significantly reduced compared to the controls showing 44.0 +- 5.7, 42.8 +- 5.1 and 40.6 +- 5.4, respectively. In this group, the hyperfrontal pattern was maintained at a low flow level. When absolute rCBF values were compared between motor and sensory aphasia, there was no significant difference between these 2 groups. However, regional flow distribution in motor aphasia was significantly different from that of sensory aphasia, and the cases having the lowest value in group F were more frequently found in the former than in the latter.

  19. Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) Recurrence after Amputation for CRPS, and Failure of Conventional Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Andreas; Lewis, Sarah; Phillip, Rhodri; Sharma, Manohar

    2017-04-18

    Limb amputation is sometimes being performed in long-standing complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), although little evidence is available guiding management decisions, including how CRPS recurrence should be managed. This report details the management of a young soldier with CRPS recurrence 2 years after midtibial amputation for CRPS. Conventional spinal cord stimulation did not achieve paraesthetic coverage, or pain relief in the stump, whereas L4 dorsal root ganglion stimulation achieved both coverage and initially modest pain relief, and over time, substantial pain relief. Current evidence does not support the use of amputation to improve either pain or function in CRPS. Before a decision is made, in exceptional cases, about referral for amputation, dorsal root ganglion stimulation should be considered as a potentially effective treatment, even where conventional spinal cord stimulator treatment has failed to achieve reliable paraesthetic cover. Furthermore, this treatment may provide pain relief in those patients with CRPS recurrence in the stump after amputation. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  20. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Jesse Goff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient’s rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  1. The influence of hyperoxia on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFVMCA) in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbitsch, Christian; Lorenz, Ingo H; Hörmann, Christoph; Hinteregger, Martin; Löckinger, Alexander; Moser, Patrizia L; Kremser, Christian; Schocke, Michael; Felber, Stephan; Pfeiffer, Karl P; Benzer, Arnulf

    2002-09-01

    Conflicting results reported on the effects of hyperoxia on cerebral hemodynamics have been attributed mainly to methodical and species differences. In the present study contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion measurement was used to analyze the influence of hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 1.0) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in awake, normoventilating volunteers (n = 19). Furthermore, the experiment was repeated in 20 volunteers for transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFV(MCA)). When compared to normoxia (FiO2 = 0.21), hyperoxia heterogeneously influenced rCBV (4.95 +/- 0.02 to 12.87 +/- 0.08 mL/100g (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 4.50 +/- 0.02 to 13.09 +/- 0.09 mL/100g (FiO2 = 1.0). In contrast, hyperoxia diminished rCBF in all regions (68.08 +/- 0.38 to 199.58 +/- 1.58 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 58.63 +/- 0.32 to 175.16 +/- 1.51 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 1.0)) except in parietal and left frontal gray matter. CBFV(MCA) remained unchanged regardless of the inspired oxygen fraction (62 +/- 9 cm/s (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 64 +/- 8 cm/s (FiO2 = 1.0)). Finding CBFV(MCA) unchanged during hyperoxia is consistent with the present study's unchanged rCBF in parietal and left frontal gray matter. In these fronto-parietal regions predominantly fed by the middle cerebral artery, the vasoconstrictor effect of oxygen was probably counteracted by increased perfusion of foci of neuronal activity controlling general behavior and arousal.

  2. Assessment of regional pulmonary blood flow using (68)Ga-DOTA PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Carlos; Mateo, Jesus; Santos, Arnoldo; Mota-Cobian, Adriana; Herranz, Fernando; Pellico, Juan; Mota, Ruben A; España, Samuel; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus

    2017-12-01

    In vivo determination of regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF) is a valuable tool for the evaluation of many lung diseases. In this study, the use of (68)Ga-DOTA PET for the in vivo quantitative determination of regional PBF is proposed. This methodology was implemented and tested in healthy pigs and validated using fluorescent microspheres. The study was performed on young large white pigs (n = 4). To assess the reproducibility and consistency of the method, three PET scans were obtained for each animal. Each radiotracer injection was performed simultaneously to the injection of fluorescent microspheres. PBF images were generated applying a two-compartment exchange model over the dynamic PET images. PET and microspheres values were compared by regression analysis and Bland-Altman plot. The capability of the proposed technique to produce 3D regional PBF images was demonstrated. The correlation evaluation between (68)Ga-DOTA PET and microspheres showed a good and significant correlation (r = 0.74, P PET imaging with the use of (68)Ga/(68)Ge generators. Thus, (68)Ga-DOTA PET emerges as a potential inexpensive method for measuring PBF in clinical settings with an extended use.

  3. Status of blood transfusion in World Health Organization-Eastern Mediterranean Region (WHO-EMR): Successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Arezoo; Mashati, Pargol; Yami, Amir; Gharehbaghian, Arshia; Namini, Mehdi Tabrizi; Gharehbaghian, Ahmad

    2017-06-01

    Blood products are used for patient treatment and survival in the cases of major surgery, hematological disorders or cancer therapy. Presently the main blood components are not yet replaceable by artificial products and all activities related to blood transfusion is highly dependent on the healthcare development of each country. The World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region (WHO-EMR) comprises of 21 member states with variable socio-economic status effective on blood transfusion activities. The fundamental motivation behind this research was to accumulate some data of blood practices in this region and to have an appropriate image of the WHO-EMR region. The data were collected through the published papers or data, blood transfusion services websites, and the other health official websites like WHO. Among WHO-EMR countries there are some with a nationally organized blood transfusion establishment such as Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Morocco, Oman, Pakistan, and Syria. In a few, blood transfusion administrations are hospital-based like Saudi Arabia. The others are run by Red Crescent such as Bahrain, Tunisia and UEA or by Red Cross like Lebanon. Only Iran and UAE succeed to have 100% voluntary non-remunerated blood donors; however, most of them are still under the weight of family/replacement blood donation such as Afghanistan, Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Sudan or even paid donors like Pakistan and Yemen. The haemovigilance and training programs have been implemented in some countries including Bahrain, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia and UAE. Unfortunately, there are rare and inaccessible information about some EMR states like Djibouti, Palestine and Somalia so that little data can be independently discovered. In these countries different measures ought to be additionally designated to ensure blood products adequacy and safety such as the development of well-coordinated national blood transfusion centers with

  4. Lower-extremity functional electrical stimulation decreases platelet aggregation and blood coagulation in persons with chronic spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Nighat N; Feldman, Susan P; Bauman, William A

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) develop premature cardiovascular disease. Regular exercise reduces the incidence and symptoms of cardiovascular disease in able-bodied individuals; these salutary effects of exercise have not been documented in persons with SCI. To evaluate the effects of functional electrical stimulation leg cycle ergometry (FES-LCE) exercise training on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation in persons with SCI. Subjects (n=14) with stable chronic (>1 year) paraplegia (T1-T10) or tetraplegia (C4-C8). Blood samples were collected before and after the first and eighth sessions (2 sessions per week for 4 weeks) of FES exercise. Platelet aggregation was inhibited by 20% after the first session and by 40% (P < 0.001) after the eighth session. Thrombin activity was unchanged after the first session (10.7 +/- 0.85 s to 10.43 +/- 0.56 s) and decreased after the eighth session (12.5 +/- 1.98 s to 11.1 +/- 1.7 s; P < 0.0003). Antithrombin III activity increased after the first (103.8% +/- 8.9% to 110% +/- 6.9%; P < 0.0008) and eighth sessions (107.8% +/- 12.1% to 120.4% +/- 13.1%; P < 0.0001). Cyclic adenosine monophosphate increased after the first (9.9% + 2.5% to 15.8% +/- 3%; P < 0.001) and eighth sessions (17.8% +/- 4.2% to 36.5% +/- 7.6%; P < 0.0001). After the eighth session, factors V and X increased significantly (88% +/- 27% to 103% +/- 23%, P < 0.0001; 100% +/- 40% to 105% +/- 7%, P < 0.01, respectively); factors VII and VIII and fibrinogen did not change significantly. A significant reduction in platelet activation/aggregation was demonstrated in response to FES-LCE. The decrease in thrombin level was caused by the simultaneous increase in antithrombin activity. These findings provide new insight into the potential protective effects of FES-LCE against the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and blood pressure in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goharian, Tina S; Gimsing, Anders N; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-01-01

    a standardized protocol, sexual maturity was assessed according to Tanner stage, and as a surrogate for atrial natriuretic peptide, we measured mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) in plasma. Compared with boys, girls had lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mean ± SD: 109.6 ± 9.9 mmHg vs 116.......9 ± 11.4 mmHg, p ANP concentrations [median (interquartile range): 42.1 pmol/l (31.9-50.2 pmol/l) vs 36.6 pmol/l (30.6-44.9 pmol/l), p = 0.0046]. When female adolescents were further subdivided according to Tanner stage, there were no differences in blood pressure...... and plasma MR-proANP concentrations between post-pubertal and pubertal girls (p > 0.17). In contrast, after similar subdivision, post-pubertal boys had higher SBP (mean ± SD: 117.7 ± 11.7 mmHg vs 111.4 ± 7.9 mmHg, p = 0.029) and lower plasma MR-proANP concentrations [median (interquartile range): 36.2 pmol...

  6. Numerical simulations of the blood flow in the patient-specific arterial cerebral circle region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reorowicz, Piotr; Obidowski, Damian; Klosinski, Przemyslaw; Szubert, Wojciech; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Jozwik, Krzysztof

    2014-05-07

    The Cerebral Circle Region, also known as the Circle of Willis (CoW), is a loop of arteries that form arterial connections between supply arteries to distribute blood throughout the cerebral mass. Among the population, only 25% to 50% have a complete system of arteries forming the CoW. 3D time-varying simulations for three different patient-specific artery anatomies of CoW were performed in order to gain a better insight into the phenomena existing in the cerebral blood flow. The models reconstructed on the basis of computer tomography images start from the aorta and include the largest arteries that supply the CoW and the arteries of CoW. Velocity values measured during the ultrasound examination have been compared with the results of simulations. It is shown that the flow in the right anterior artery in some cases may be supplied from the left internal carotid artery via the anterior communicating artery. The investigations conducted show that the computational fluid dynamic tool, which provides high resolution in both time and space domains, can be used to support physicians in diagnosing patients of different ages and various anatomical arterial structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of axillary blockade on regional cerebral blood flow during dynamic hand contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, D B; Friberg, L; Payne, G

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured at orbitomeatal (OM) plane +5.0 and +9.0 cm in 10 subjects at rest and during dynamic hand contractions before and after axillary blockade. Handgrip strength was significantly reduced, and rating of perceived exertion increased after blockade. During...... hand contractions before blockade, contralateral hemispheric cerebral blood flow (CBF) at OM +9.0 increased from a resting value of 58 (49-75) to 63 (52-82) ml.100 g-1.min-1; contralateral motor sensory rCBF at OM +9 from 58 (50-77) to 71 (64-84); motor sensory rCBF at OM +5 from 67 (54-76) to 77 (64......-87) and 70 (62-84) contralaterally and ipsilaterally, respectively; and supplementary motor area (SM) rCBF from 64 (53-69) to 75 (67-88) ml.100 g-1.min-1. During dynamic hand contractions after axillary blockade, CBF did not increase at OM +5 or in the SM. Furthermore, contralateral motor sensory rCBF at OM...

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow in various pediatric neurological patients using /sup 123/I-IMP SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Tohru; Naganuma, Yoshihiro; Hongou, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Miyako; Yamatani, Miwa; Okada, Toshio

    1988-03-01

    The recent development of a new radiopharmaceutical /sup 123/I-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine (IMP), which is taken up by the brain from the blood flow, has offered a possibility of constructing scintigraphy maps of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using single photon emission CT. We used this mehtod in various pediatric neurological diseases. Six patients with cerebro-vascular disorders (moya-moya disease 2, infarction 3 and HHE syndrome 1), 6 patients with infectious diseases of CNS (acute encephalitis 4, septic meningitis 1 and SSPE 1) and a miscellaneous group of six patients were studied. The rCBF abnormalities in cerebro-vascular diseases were more extensive and frequent than x-ray CT abnormalities. Repeated studies of IMP-SPECT revealed usefulness for the understanding of changeable hemodynamic pathophysiology and for the judgment of theraptic effectiveness and prognosis. The rCBF decrease in infectious diseases tended to be more diffuse and slight than that in cerebro-vascular diseases. In almost all patients, the area of rCBF decrease coincided with the area of EEG slowing evaluated by EEG topographic analysis. Brain imaging using /sup 123/I-IMP SPECT may reveal functional abnormalities as well as organic lesions. /sup 123/I-IMP SPECT has introduced a new era for the useful application of nuclear medicine to the investigation of pediatric neurological diseases.

  9. A study on measurement of the regional cerebral blood flow using autoradiographic method in moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tomohiro; Kiya, Katsuzo; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Kawamoto, Hitoshi; Mizoue, Tatsuya; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Uozumi, Tohru [Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital (Japan); Ikawa, Fusao

    1997-11-01

    Development of Autoradiographic method (ARG) has provided measurement of cerebral blood flow in moyamoya disease. We evaluate a cerebral vasodilatory capacity (CVC) for moyamoya disease using ARG method. We used 5 patients with moyamoya disease as a candidate for measurement of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) who admitted to Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital during the past one year. There were 3 patients in an adult age and 2 patients in a young age. We tried to measure the regional CBF (rCBF) using ARG method which was a easy way to estimate the rCBF on SPECT. The CVC was calculated from the difference of the rCBF between resting SPECT and Diamox-loading SPECT. Results were as follows; Reactivity of cerebral vessels to CO{sub 2} loading and CVC weakened in moyamoya disease. The rCBF and CVC in the territories of anterior and middle cerebral arteries reduced in comparison with those in the area supplied by the posterior cerebral artery. The CVC at the treated side with surgical reconstruction recovered somewhat in an adult type. From these results, measurement of CBF using ARG method seems to be useful for evaluation of the CVC in moyamoya disease. (author)

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow and vasoreactivity to acetazolamide in childhood moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Satoshi; Hohkin, Kiyohiro; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Abe, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Mitsumori, Kenji

    1995-04-01

    Using the 133-xenon inhalation method and single photon emission CT (SPECT), we measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and its reactivity to acetazolamide in 15 children with moyamoya disease (spontaneous occlusion of circle of Willis). In most of them, the mean hemispheric cerebral blood flow (mCBF) was similar to that of age-matched healthy children. However, their rCBF distribution was abnormal with low perfusion in the frontal and temporal lobes, and disturbed reactivity to acetazolamide in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. After surgical revascularization of the anterior circulation with STA-MCA anastomosis and encephalo-duro-myo-anterio-sysnangiosis (EDAMS) these abnormal hemodynamics improved dramatically in the anterior circulation, including the frontal lobe. Postoperative SPECT studies revealed that cerebral vasodilatory capacity also improved in the occipital lobe and the basal ganglia. These results suggest that surgical revascularization of the anterior circulation should be carried out in order to improve cerebral hemodynamics as much as possible, especially in the frontal lobe, and it could also improve cerebral perfusion reserve in the posterior circulation. (author).

  11. [Regional cerebral blood flow-SPECT "OFF-ON": a case report of catatonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Caballero, M; Corchos González, N; De Antonio Rubio, I; Gómez-Río, M; Guerrero Velázquez, J F; Rodríguez Fernández, A; Llamas Elvira, J M

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with a long history of dysthymia and major depressive episodes requiring repeated hospitalization. We describe the most recent episode, associated with catatonia symptomatology and features suggestive of cognitive impairment. The absence of a clear initial psychopharmacological response alongside the clinical severity made the patient a potential candidate for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A regional cerebral blood flow SPECT (SPECT-rCBF), performed to rule out concomitant Alzheimer disease (AD), revealed a markedly decreased neocortical uptake, with no definitive pattern of concomitant primary cognitive impairment. Because a gradual clinical improvement was observed in the patient, with evidence of enhanced cerebral reperfusion in a second SPECT-rCBF study at two weeks after admission, the application of ECT was discounted and an expectant attitude was adopted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow and cognitive function in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huirong Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (CBF and cognitive function in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Method: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT was performed for 139 OCD patients and 139 controls, and the radioactivity rate (RAR was calculated. Cognitive function was assessed by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST. Results: The RARs of the prefrontal, anterior temporal, and right occipital lobes were higher in patients than controls. For the WCST, correct and classification numbers were significantly lower, and errors and persistent errors were significantly higher in OCD patients. Right prefrontal lobe RAR was negatively correlated with correct numbers, right anterior temporal lobe RAR was positively correlated with errors, and the RARs of the right prefrontal lobe and left thalamus were positively correlated with persistent errors. Conclusion: OCD patients showed higher CBF in the prefrontal and anterior temporal lobes, suggesting that these areas may be related with cognitive impairment.

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with clitorally induced orgasm in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Janniko R; Kortekaas, Rudie; Kuipers, Rutger; Nieuwenburg, Arie; Pruim, Jan; Reinders, A A T Simone; Holstege, Gert

    2006-12-01

    There is a severe lack of knowledge regarding the brain regions involved in human sexual performance in general, and female orgasm in particular. We used [15O]-H2O positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 12 healthy women during a nonsexual resting state, clitorally induced orgasm, sexual clitoral stimulation (sexual arousal control) and imitation of orgasm (motor output control). Extracerebral markers of sexual performance and orgasm were rectal pressure variability (RPstd) and perceived level of sexual arousal (PSA). Sexual stimulation of the clitoris (compared to rest) significantly increased rCBF in the left secondary and right dorsal primary somatosensory cortex, providing the first account of neocortical processing of sexual clitoral information. In contrast, orgasm was mainly associated with profound rCBF decreases in the neocortex when compared with the control conditions (clitoral stimulation and imitation of orgasm), particularly in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex, inferior temporal gyrus and anterior temporal pole. Significant positive correlations were found between RPstd and rCBF in the left deep cerebellar nuclei, and between PSA and rCBF in the ventral midbrain and right caudate nucleus. We propose that decreased blood flow in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex signifies behavioural disinhibition during orgasm in women, and that deactivation of the temporal lobe is directly related to high sexual arousal. In addition, the deep cerebellar nuclei may be involved in orgasm-specific muscle contractions while the involvement of the ventral midbrain and right caudate nucleus suggests a role for dopamine in female sexual arousal and orgasm.

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with transcranial magnetic stimulation in refractory depressed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. H.; Chung, Y. A.; Chae, J. H.; Oh, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Sohn, H. S.; Chung, S. K. [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Imaging studies by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) demonstrates biological activities of the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after a series of therapeutic rTMS sessions. Nine patients with refractory depression who had not been responsive to appropriate pharmacotherapy over 1 year were randomly assigned to daily 1 Hz right-sided rTMS or 20 Hz left-sided rTMS sessions for over 3 weeks. Baseline and 3-week post-rTMS treatment SPECT images were obtained 40 minutes after intravenous injection of approximately 740925 MBq of Tc-99m ECD using a multi-detector scanner (ECAM plus; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) equipped with a low-energy, fan-beam collimator. All patients showed a good clinical outcome. Statistically significant common increase in rCBF patterns was found in the fusiform gyrus of left temporal lobe, left hippocampus, left superior parietal lobule, superior frontal gyrus of right frontal lobe, right lateral globus pallidus and cingulated gyrus of both limbic lobes. And in the fusiform gyrus of left occipital lobe and middle frontal gyrus of right frontal lobe decreased uptake was seen compared to controls. Low-frequency rTMS on the right prefrontal cortex and high-frequency rTMS on the left prefrontal cortex for 3 weeks as an add-on regimen have increased activity in specific brain regions in patients with treatment refractory depression. Therapeutic TMS seems to influence distinct cortical regions, as well as different pathways, affecting rCBF in a homogeneous manner that is probably region dependent and illness related.

  15. Biomaterials for revascularization and immunomodulation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Agnes E; Maldonado-Lasuncion, Ines; Oudega, Martin

    2018-01-23

    Spinal cord injury causes immediate damage to the nervous tissue accompanied by loss of motor and sensory function. The limited self-repair competence of injured nervous tissue underscores the need for reparative interventions to recover function after spinal cord injury. The vasculature of the spinal cord plays a crucial role in spinal cord injury and repair. Ruptured and sheared blood vessels in the injury epicenter and blood vessels with a breached blood-spinal cord barrier in the surrounding tissue cause bleeding and inflammation, which contribute to the overall tissue damage. The insufficient formation of new functional vasculature in and near the injury impedes endogenous tissue repair and limits the prospect of repair approaches. Limiting the loss of blood vessels, stabilizing the blood-spinal cord barrier, and promoting the formation of new blood vessels are therapeutic targets for spinal cord repair. Inflammation is an integral part of injury-mediated vascular damage, with deleterious and reparative consequences. Inflammation and the formation of new blood vessels are intricately interwoven. Biomaterials can be effectively used for promoting and guiding blood vessel formation or modulating the inflammatory response after spinal cord injury, thereby governing the extent of damage and the success of reparative interventions. This review deals with the vasculature after spinal cord injury, the reciprocal interactions between inflammation and blood vessel formation, and the potential of biomaterials to support revascularization and immunomodulation in damaged spinal cord nervous tissue. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Study of red blood cell alloimmunization in multitransfused thalassemic children of Jammu region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Dogra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thalassemia is one of the most common genetic disorder of hemoglobin synthesis in Jammu region. Although RBC transfusion is life saving for these patients, it may be associated with some complications like RBC alloimmunization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alloimmunization and the most common alloantibodies involved. Material and Methods: This was a descriptive study involving a total of 70 thalassemic patients in the age range of 2-17 years receiving regular blood transfusions, registered at SMGS Blood Bank, Jammu. Relevant clinical and laboratory data was collected with reference to age at the start of transfusions, total number of transfusions received and splenectomy status. Antibodies screening, antibody identification, and cross matching was done on allpatient samples included in the study, during the period between November 2009 and October 2010. Results: In this study, a total of six alloantibodies six patients (8.5% and one autoantibody (1.42% was detected. All identified alloantibodies belonged to Rh system (i.e. anti-E, in 3 patients (50%, anti D, in one patient (16.66% and Kell system (anti-K, in two patients (33.34%. Higher frequency of alloimmunization was found, with increase in number of transfusions and in those who received transfusions after 1 year of age. Alloimmunization was not significantly associated with gender and splenectomy status (P-value > 0.05. Conclusion: Red cell alloantibodies developed in 8.5% of thalassemic patients and 1.42% had autoantibodies. The most common alloantibodies identified were anti Rh system antibodies (anti-E and anti-D present in 50% and 16.66% of patients respectively. Alloimmunization is not an uncommon problem faced by blood banks and finding compatible units for regularly transfused thalassemic patients may become very difficult. In order to reduce alloimmunization, a policy for performing extended red cell phenotyping of these patients is

  17. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Gordon

    2014-12-01

    Our case illustrates rapid resolution of a posttraumatic spinal SDH after treatment with oral corticosteroids. Recognition of blood products on MRI is vital to diagnosis and expedient treatment. There is agreement that prompt laminectomy with evacuation of SDH should be performed before permanent damage to the spinal cord occurs. Including our patient, 4 of 11 reported cases of thoracic or lumbar SDH resolved with conservative treatment.

  18. Improved blood culture identification by FilmArray in cultures from regional hospitals compared with teaching hospital cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Bzdyl, Nicole; Chua, I-Ly Joanna; Urosevic, Nadezda M; Leung, Michael J; Geelhoed, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Rapid identification of bacteria isolated from blood cultures by direct matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is now in wide spread use in major centres but is not yet feasible in smaller hospital laboratories. A FilmArray multiplex PCR panel for blood culture isolate identification (BCID) provides an alternative approach to near point-of-care microbial identification in regional hospitals. We assessed the accuracy and time to identification of the BCID FilmArray in a consecutive series of 149 blood cultures from 143 patients in a teaching hospital and smaller regional hospitals, currently identified by direct MALDI-TOF and proprietary molecular methods. The BCID FilmArray contained 18 of 34 species and 20 of 23 species isolated from teaching and regional hospital, respectively. Overall, 85 % of the teaching hospital and 100 % of the regional hospital monomicrobial blood cultures were identified, compared with 60 and 68 %, respectively, for direct MALDI-TOF on the same cultures. There were no incorrect results from blood cultures containing Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterobacteriaceae. The three discrepant results were all in mixed cultures. The mean reduction in time to identification of blood culture isolates was 53 h, which did not include the time required to transport cultures from regional centres to a central laboratory. The overall performance of the BCID FilmArray is stronger in blood cultures from smaller regional hospitals that encounter a narrower range of bacterial species dominated by the commonest species. This approach is more suited to smaller clinical laboratories than the MALDI-TOF direct method.

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in late-life depression. Relation to refractoriness and chronification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, Shuichi; Konno, Michiko; Sato, Mitsumoto [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine; Ito, Hiroshi; Ono, Shuichi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    1998-02-01

    We examined patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in 18 patients with major depressive disorder in late life using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethyl-propylenamine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO). Compared with 13 age-matched controls, relative rCBF was significantly decreased bilaterally in the anterior cingulate gyrus, the prefrontal cortex, the temporal cortex, the parietal cortex, the hippocampus and the caudate nucleus. However, it was not correlated with the severity of depression or global cognitive dysfunction. In 10 patients with a prolonged depressive episode or prolonged residual symptoms (the refractory subgroup), robust and extensive decreases in rCBF were found compared with controls and the rCBF decreased significantly in the anterior cingulate gyrus and the prefrontal cortex compared with that in the non-refractory subgroup. In the non-reflactory subgroup, rCBF decreased significantly in the caudate nucleus and tended to decrease in the anterior cingulate gyrus compared with controls. These findings indicate that dysfunction of the limbic system, the cerebral association cortex and the caudate nucleus may be implicated in late-life depression and that robust and extensive hypoperfusion, especially in the anterior cingulate and the prefrontal regions, may relate to refractoriness or chronification of depression. (author). 60 refs.

  20. Effect of axillary blockade on regional cerebral blood flow during static handgrip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, D B; Friberg, L; Mitchell, J H

    1991-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined at rest and during static handgrip before and after regional blockade with lidocaine. A fast rotating single photon emission computer tomograph system with 133Xe inhalation was used at orbitomeatal plane (OM) +2.5 and +6.5 cm in eight subjects...... was 14 (10-16) exertion units before and 18 (15-20) after blockade (P less than 0.05). Hemispheric mean CBF did not change during handgrip. However, premotor rCBF increased from 55 (44-63) to 60 (50-69) ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P less than 0.05) and motor sensory rCBF from 57 (46-65) to 63 (55-71) ml.100 g-1...... static handgrip, there was no increase in rCBF after partial sensory and motor blockade. Thus bilateral activation occurs in the premotor and motor sensory cortex during static handgrip, and this activation requires neural feedback from the contracting muscles....

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow changes in early-onset anorexia nervosa before and after weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Hiroko; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Ozono, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yushiro; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in early-onset anorexia nervosa (AN) before and after weight gain, we examined resting rCBF using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [(123)I]iodoamphetamine ((123)I-IMP). Ten female children with AN (mean age 13.2 years old) participated in this study. SPECT examinations were performed in all patients twice at the beginning of treatment and after weight gain. The mean body mass index (BMI) was changed from 13.1 to 16.6 during 4 months treatment period. Automatic voxel-based analysis of the images was carried out using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software. Relatively increased rCBF in the bilateral parietal lobe and limbic lobe including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were observed after weight gain in early-onset AN. There was no significant decrease in the rCBF after weight gain. A significant positive correlation was observed between BMI and rCBF in the right thalamus, right parietal lobe, and right cerebellum. These results suggested that weight gain during the process of recovery from early-onset AN might activate specific brain regions which are possibly relevant to the pathophysiological aspects of the disorder. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Regional cerebral blood flow changes in female to male gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, Hideyuki; Ogomori, Koji; Tanaka, Mariko; Nishimura, Ryoji; Urashima, Hajime; Yano, Rika; Takano, Koichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo

    2010-04-01

    Despite a range of research on gender identity disorder (GID), at present there is no scientific consensus on whether the etiology of GID is mental or physical. In particular recent advances in the technology of neuroimaging research have led to an increased understanding of the biological basis of various mental disorders. GID also should be evaluated from this perspective. The aim of the present study was therefore to do the first trial to examine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in GID. Persons considered biologically male fulfilling the GID criteria are termed male to female (MTF) and, conversely, persons considered biological female are termed female to male (FTM). We compared 11 FTM subjects and nine age- and handedness-matched female control subjects. None of the subjects was regularly taking medication and none had any kind of physical or psychiatric comorbidity. To evaluate rCBF in GID subjects and control subjects, statistical parametric mapping analysis of (99m)Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography was used. GID subjects had a significant decrease in rCBF in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and a significant increase in the right insula compared to control subjects. The ACC and insula are regions that have been noted as being related to human sexual behavior and consciousness. From these findings, useful insights into the biological basis of GID were suggested.

  3. External quality assessment in blood group serology in the World Health Organization South-East Asia Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soisangwan, Patravee

    2012-01-01

    The quality of blood transfusion services (BTS) is essential for the treatment of patients who need blood or blood products. BTS involve several steps, including the acquisition of the donor's blood, blood grouping, unexpected antibody screening, blood storage, transfusion, etc. There is a need to check the effectiveness of all elements in the BTS can be assessed and monitored by an external quality assessment. To assess and evaluate the performance of ABO and Rh(D) blood grouping and unexpected antibody screening of the selected World Health Organization (WHO) South-East Asia Region Member country laboratories. WHO Collaborating Centre on Strengthening Quality of Health Laboratories (Thailand) organized a regional external quality assessment scheme for blood group serology (REQAS-BGS) between 2002 and 2008 for laboratories in countries of the WHO South-East Asia Region. Test items for ABO and Rh(D) blood groupings and unexpected antibody screening and identification were distributed three cycles per year to BTS laboratories in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand. By the end of the project, a total of 20 BTS laboratories had participated for differing lengths of time. It was found that 87.5%, 93.3%, 81.3%, 92.3%, 100% and 87.5% of laboratories returned the test results in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007 and 2008, respectively. Laboratories with excellent quality or a trend of quality improvement for ABO and Rh(D) blood grouping, unexpected antibody screening and identification during the six years were 60% (12/20), 50% (10/20), 52.9% (9/17) and 81.8% (9/11), respectively. At the initiation of the scheme, most laboratories were using substandard methods for ABO and Rh blood groupings, i.e. performing only direct blood grouping alone but subsequently adopted the standard methods, i.e. performing both direct and reverse blood groupings. REQAS-BGS in South-East Asia countries has been useful for assessing, monitoring and

  4. Cholinergic enhancement increases regional cerebral blood flow to the posterior cingulate cortex in mild Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Tomomichi; Kameyama, Masashi

    2017-06-01

    The brain region that shows reductions in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) earliest is the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), which is thought to have a relationship with cognitive function. We made a hypothesis that the PCC hypoperfusion is a result of cholinergic dysfunction and can be restored by cholinergic enhancement. This present longitudinal study aimed to detect the restoration of PCC rCBF in response to donepezil, an acetylcholine esterase inhibitor. We evaluated rCBF changes in the PCC, precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex using perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), statistical analysis and region of interest analysis, prospectively. We allocated 36 patients with mild AD to either the responder or non-responder groups based on changes in Mini-Mental State Examination scores. The patients were followed up for 18 months. The PCC rCBF significantly increased in responders after 6 months of donepezil therapy. Statistical maps at baseline showed a typical decreased pattern of mild AD and obvious rCBF restoration in the bilateral PCC at 6 months in responders. Changes in Mini-Mental State Examination scores and the AD assessment scale cognitive scores significantly correlated with rCBF changes in the PCC of responders. Cholinergic enhancement restored PCC rCBF under the three conditions of mild AD, responders and short follow-up interval, and that increase correlated with improved cognitive function. These findings support our hypothesis that PCC rCBF reflects cholinergic function in AD patients. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 951-958. © 2016 The Authors. Geriatrics & Gerontology International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. An audit of current practice and management of metastatic spinal cord compression at a regional cancer centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sui, J

    2012-02-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency requiring prompt recognition and management to preserve neurological function and mobility. We performed an audit to assess current practice of MSCC against current best practice as outlined by NICE. Our retrospective audit identified 10 patients from January to December 2009 with confirmed MSCC. The most common primary tumours were prostate 3 (30%), breast 3 (30%) and lung 2 (20%). Pain was the main presenting symptom 9 (90%), followed by weakness 7 (70%) and sensory changes 1 (10%). 5 (50%) had MRI within 24 hours and only 6 (60%) underwent full MRI scan. 8 (80%) had corticosteroids before MRI scan. 6 (60%) received radiotherapy within 24 hours. Only 4 (40%) were referred to orthopaedics and none of these patients had been recommended surgery. Up 14 days following radiological confirmation of MSCC, the number of patients who were unable to walk increased by 20%. Only 5 (50%) were discharged during this period of study. Our audit reported a number of variances in management compared to NICE guideline. These can be improved by following a\\'fast track\\' referral pathway and regular education for junior doctors and primary care doctors.

  6. Acute deep brain stimulation changes in regional cerebral blood flow in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Darin D; Chou, Tina; Corse, Andrew K; Arulpragasam, Amanda R; Widge, Alik S; Cusin, Cristina; Evans, Karleyton C; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Haber, Suzanne N; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a reversible, nonlesion-based treatment for patients with intractable obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The first studies on DBS for OCD stimulating the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) yielded encouraging results for this neuroanatomical site's therapeutic efficacy. This investigation was conducted to better understand which regions of the cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical network were acutely affected by VC/VS DBS for OCD. Furthermore, the objective was to identify which brain regions demonstrated changes in perfusion, as stimulation was applied across a dorsoventral lead axis that corresponded to different anatomical locations in the VC/VS. METHODS Six patients receiving VC/VS DBS for OCD underwent oxygen-15 positron emission tomography (15O-PET) scanning. Monopolar DBS was delivered at each of the 4 different electrodes on the stimulating lead in the VC/VS. The data were analyzed using SPM5. Paired t-tests were run in SPSS to identify significant changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between stimulation conditions. Pearson's r correlations were run between these significant changes in rCBF and changes in OCD and depressive symptom severity. RESULTS Perfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) significantly increased when monopolar DBS was turned on at the most ventral DBS contact, and this increase in dACC activity was correlated with reductions in depressive symptom severity (r(5) = -0.994, p = 0.001). Perfusion in the thalamus, striatum, and globus pallidus significantly increased when DBS was turned on at the most dorsal contact. CONCLUSIONS DBS of the VC/VS appears to modulate activity in the regions implicated in the pathophysiology of OCD. Different regions in the cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuit showed increased perfusion based on whether the stimulation was more ventral or dorsal along the lead axis in the VC/VS. Evidence was found that DBS at the most ventral site was

  7. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow In Dementia: Receiver-Operating-Characteristic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemcov, Alexander; Barclay, Laurie; Sansone, Joseph; Blass, John P.; Metz, Charles E.

    1985-06-01

    The coupling of mentation to regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) has prompted the application of the Xe-133 inhalation method of measuring rCBF in the differential diagnosis of the two most common dementing diseases, Alzheimer's disease and multi-infarct dementia (MID). In this study receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the effectiveness of a 32 detector Xe-133 inhalation system in discriminating between patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls, MID patients and normal controls and between patients with Alzheimer's disease and MID. The populations were clinically evaluated as 1) normal (age 63.1 + 13.1, n=23), 2) Alzheimer's disease (age 72.7 + 7.0, n=82), 3) MID (age 76.4 + 7.6, n=27): The mean flow values for all detectors were lowest for the Alzheimer's disease group, larger for the MID group and largest for the normal controls. The dynamic relationship between the correct identifications (true posi-tives) versus incorrect identifications (false positives) per detector for any 2 pairs of clinical groups varies as the cutoff value of flow is changed over the range of experimental blood flow values. Therefore a quantitative characterization of the "decision" or ROC curve (TP vs FP) for each detector and for each pair of clinical groups provides a measure of the overall diagnostic efficacy of the detector. Detectors directed approximately toward the speech, auditory and association cortices were most effective in disciminatinq between each of the dementia groups and the controls. Frontal detectors were diagnostically inefficient. The Xe-133 inhalation system provided virtually no diagnostic power in discriminating between the two forms of dementia, however. Therefore this imaging technology is most useful when assessing the general diagnostic state of dementia (Alz-heimer's disease and MID) from normal cognitive function.

  8. Changes in Regional Cerebral Blood Flow with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Panic Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, K. S.; Jun, S. K.; Kim, J. B.; Jang, E. J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Kyemyoung, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    This study attempted to prospectively investigate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) on SPECT and clinical response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with panic disorder with (PDA) and without (PD) agoraphobia. Using 99mTc-ECD brain SPECT, we assessed brain perfusion in 5 out patients at rest before and after CBT. The subjects received 12 weekly sessions of CBT. Subjects were assessed by Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, Body Sensations Questionnaire, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, Beck Depression Inventory-II, Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) and clinical global improvement (CGI) scale measurement were used as outcome measures. Patients were considered responders to CBT if they are much or very much improved on CGI scale and have a PDSS score at least 30% below their baseline. The scans were statistically analyzed by using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). The baseline scans were compared to the post-CBT scans by using the statistics option multi subject, different conditions. Of 5 subjects 4 were male, 3 diagnosed PDA, and 4 on anti-anxiety medication. All of the subjects were classified as CBT responders. Their mean pretreatment and posttreatment PDSS were 17.4 (SD=8.2) and 4.2 (SD=3.1), respectively. The results of SPM analysis showed a significant decrease in blood flow after CBT in the thalamus bilaterally and right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's area 6). All results were thresholded at an uncorrected p<0.001 (for voxel height) and a corrected p<0.04 (for spatial extent). These preliminary data suggest that SPM analysis of 99mTc-ECD brain SPECT can reveal the change of rCBF in patient with panic disorder before and after CBT and the CBT effect may be associated with limbic and thalamic networks. However this study was a short trial with small number of subjects. Further studies with larger patient cohorts are needed.

  9. Spinal cord compression injury in guinea pigs: structural changes of endothelium and its perivascular cell associations after blood-brain barrier breakdown and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, C B; Blight, A R

    1997-04-01

    This study examines morphological changes of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after spinal cord compression. The lowest thoracic segment (T13) of female guinea pigs was injured and the BBB was tested from 7 days to 5.5 months postinjury using intravenously injected horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a tracer. Tracer leakage in the injured segment was verified with the light microscope and the fine structure of capillaries was examined. Diffuse tissue staining was observed at T13 up to 2 weeks following injury. A leaky BBB correlated with expected changes in the fine structure of endothelial cell junctions. These were predominantly nonoverlapping cell junctions which, in many instances, were separated by clefts between adjacent cells. At early survival times, numerous capillary profiles with juxtaposed astrocyte foot processes were noted in addition to altered cell associations. Complete sealing of the BBB against interstitial HRP leakage was not observed until 17 days postinjury. After the first week, some of the endothelial cells were contacted by macrophages, processes of perivascular microglia, and processes of swollen and degenerating astrocytes. Perivascular spaces varied in extent and contained amorphous deposits of extracellular materials in addition to supernumerary layers of basal lamina. The early changes were followed by profound tissue restructuring due to loss of both neurons and glia. At longer survival times the BBB to HRP repaired. Endothelial cells formed complex overlapping junctions with zonulae occludentes. Most of the capillaries in the injured segment were no longer in direct contact with astrocyte foot processes, although reactive astrocytes constituted the predominant cell type in the remaining gray matter. Substantial expansion of perivascular spaces was evident. The cytoplasm of endothelial cells had numerous pinocytotic vesicles. Perivascular spaces contained layers of assembled collagen arranged perpendicularly to each other in addition to

  10. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  11. [Effects of therapeutic complexes including balneoradonokinesitherapy, electromyostimulation and low-frequency magnetotherapy on regional blood flow in patients with postrraumatic gonarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspopova, E A; Udartsev, E Iu

    2006-01-01

    Balneoradonokinesitherapy alone and its combination with electrostimulation and low-frequency magnetotherapy were used for the treatment of regional blood flow disorders in 76 patients with posttraumatic gonarthritis. Balneoradonokinesitherapy in combination with electromyostimulation improved blood circulation. When low-frequency magnetotherapy was added to the latter complex, the regress of regional blood flow disorders of a damaged extremity was most significant.

  12. Changes in cerebral blood flow and blood brain barrier in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region following repeated brief cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingtao, J.; Sato, S.; Yamanaka, N.

    1999-12-01

    Neuronal damage and changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following repeated brief periods of ischemia were studied in Mongolian gerbils. The cerebral ischemia was produced by three repeated occlusions of bilateral common carotid arteries for 3 min at 1-h intervals. CBF and permeability of the BBB were examined with tracers (China ink and silver nitrate) at 1, 3, and 7 days post ischemia using light and electron microscopy. Three days after the reperfusion, significant extravasation of tracers, consequential reduction of CBF, extensive neuronal destruction, and intravascular platelet aggregation were observed. Such vascular changes in the CA1 region were more severe than those in the frontal cortex. These findings strongly support the view that microcirculatory disturbance may be a mechanism responsible for delayed neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus.

  13. Intramedullary spinal melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meic H. Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a benign lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes that at times can mimic its malignant counterpart, melanoma. Lesions of the spine usually occur in extramedullary locations and present with spinal cord compression symptoms. Because most reported spinal cases occur in the thoracic region, these symptoms usually include lower extremity weakness or numbness. The authors present a case of primary intrame­dullary spinal meningeal melanocytoma presenting with bilateral lower extremity symptoms in which the patient had no known supratentorial primary lesions. Gross total surgical resection allowed for full recovery, but early recurrence of tumor was detected on close follow-up monitoring, allowing for elective local radiation without loss of neurological function. Case reports of such tumors discuss different treatment strategies, but just as important is the close follow-up monitoring in these patients even after gross total surgical resection, since these tumors can recur.

  14. Multivariate evaluation of brain function by measuring regional cerebral blood flow and event-related potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Masahiko; Shutara, Yoshikazu; Nakagawa, Kazumi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Nagata, Ken

    1998-07-01

    To measure the effect of events on human cognitive function, effects of odors by measurement regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and P300 were evaluated during the auditory odd-ball exercise. PET showed the increase in rCBF on the right hemisphere of the brain by coffee aroma. rCBF was measured by PET in 9 of right-handed healthy adults men, and P300 was by event-related potential (ERP) in each sex of 20 right-handed healthy adults. ERP showed the difference of the P300 amplitude between men and women, and showed the tendency, by odors except the lavender oil, that women had higher in the P300 amplitude than men. These results suggest the presence of effects on the cognitive function through emotional actions. Next, the relationship between rCBF and ERP were evaluated. The subjects were 9 of the right-handed healthy adults (average: 25.6{+-}3.4 years old). rCBF by PET and P300 amplitude by ERP were simultaneously recorded during the auditory odd-ball exercise using the tone-burst method (2 kHz of the low frequency aimed stimuli and 1 kHz of the high frequency non-aimed stimuli). The rCBF value was the highest at the transverse gyrus of Heschl and the lowest at the piriform cortex among 24 regions of interest (ROI) from both sides. The difference of P300 peak latent time among ROI was almost the same. The brain waves from Cz and Pz were similar and the average amplitude was highest at Pz. We found the high correlation in the right piriform cortex (Fz), and right (Fz, Cz) and left (Cz, Pz) transverse gyrus of Heschl between the P300 amplitude and rCBF. (K.H.)

  15. Spinal Cord Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoreza Ghoreishi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord is subject to many of the same vascular diseases that involve the brain, but its anatomy and embryology render it susceptible to some syndromes that do not have intracranial counterparts.The embryonic arterial supply to the spinal cord derives from intradural vessels that enter at each spinal level and divide to follow the dorsal and ventral roots. SPINAL CORD ISCHEMIA: The midthoracic levels of the spinal cord are traditionally considered to be the most vulnerable to compromise from hypoperfusion, but more recent evidence suggests that the lower thoracic cord is at greater risk . The actual prevalence of spinal cord infarction is unknown, but is generally cited as representing 1% to 2% of all central neurovascular events and 5% to 8% of all acute myelopathies. Weakness (100%, sensory loss (89%, back pain at onset (82%, and urinary complaints requiring catheterization (75% were the most common symptoms of cord ischemia at the time of presentation . Weakness most commonly affects both legs. Examination typically reveals flaccid paresis accompanied by diminished superficial and tendon reflexes below the level of the lesion. Preservation of strength and reflexes suggests the rare syndrome of posterior spinal artery territory infarction. Weakness most commonly affects both legs. Examination typically reveals flaccid paresis accompanied by diminished superficial and tendon reflexes below the level of the lesion. Preservation of strength and reflexes suggests the rare syndrome of posterior spinal artery territory infarction.   Aortic pathologies with regional hemodynamic compromise are the most common cause of spinal cord infarction, accounting for 30% to 40% of cases.                                                                                 The medical management of spinal cord ischemia is generally supportive and focused on reducing risk for

  16. Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Chad R. R. N.; Kemp, Robert A. de, E-mail: RAdeKemp@ottawaheart.ca [Physics Department, Room 3302 Herzberg Laboratories, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Cardiac Imaging, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada); Klein, Ran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4E9 (Canada); Beanlands, Rob S. [Cardiac Imaging, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Patient motion is a common problem during dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans for quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). The purpose of this study was to quantify the prevalence of body motion in a clinical setting and evaluate with realistic phantoms the effects of motion on blood flow quantification, including CT attenuation correction (CTAC) artifacts that result from PET–CT misalignment. Methods: A cohort of 236 sequential patients was analyzed for patient motion under resting and peak stress conditions by two independent observers. The presence of motion, affected time-frames, and direction of motion was recorded; discrepancy between observers was resolved by consensus review. Based on these results, patient body motion effects on MBF quantification were characterized using the digital NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom, with characteristic time activity curves (TACs) assigned to the heart wall (myocardium) and blood regions. Simulated projection data were corrected for attenuation and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. All simulations were performed without noise added, and a single CT image was used for attenuation correction and aligned to the early- or late-frame PET images. Results: In the patient cohort, mild motion of 0.5 ± 0.1 cm occurred in 24% and moderate motion of 1.0 ± 0.3 cm occurred in 38% of patients. Motion in the superior/inferior direction accounted for 45% of all detected motion, with 30% in the superior direction. Anterior/posterior motion was predominant (29%) in the posterior direction. Left/right motion occurred in 24% of cases, with similar proportions in the left and right directions. Computer simulation studies indicated that errors in MBF can approach 500% for scans with severe patient motion (up to 2 cm). The largest errors occurred when the heart wall was shifted left toward the adjacent lung region, resulting in a severe undercorrection for attenuation of the heart wall. Simulations

  17. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... are taking for other conditions, and your overall health can affect the rate of healing and fusion, ...

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow patterns and response to donepezil treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Shimizu, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Takasaki, Masaru; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Abe, Kimihiko

    2003-01-01

    We attempted to identify the characteristic patterns in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of patients with Alzheimer's disease who responded to donepezil therapy. Sixty-one patients treated with donepezil were divided into two groups (responders and nonresponders) on the basis of changes in their Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores from baseline to study endpoint. We analyzed single-photon emission computed tomography data (SPECT) at baseline using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections and compared differences in rCBF between the two groups. Statistical maps showed a significantly lower rCBF of the lateral and medial frontal lobes in the nonresponders than in the responders. There was a significant inverse correlation between the relative rCBF reduction in the frontal lobe and the MMSE change. These results suggest that frontal function, as assessed by SPECT, affects the patient's response to treatment with donepezil. Measuring rCBF may aid in the selection of possible treatment responders. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. The effect of amphetamine on regional cerebral blood flow during cognitive activation in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, D.G.; Weinberger, D.R.; Jones, D.W.; Zigun, J.R.; Coppola, R.; Handel, S.; Bigelow, L.B.; Goldberg, T.E.; Berman, K.F.; Kleinman, J.E. (Clinical Brain Disorders Branch, Saint Elizabeths, National Institute of of Mental Health, WA (USA))

    1991-07-01

    To explore the role of monoamines on cerebral function during specific prefrontal cognitive activation, we conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of the effects of 0.25 mg/kg oral dextroamphetamine on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) as determined by 133Xe dynamic single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) during performance of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and a sensorimotor control task. Ten patients with chronic schizophrenia who had been stabilized for at least 6 weeks on 0.4 mg/kg haloperidol participated. Amphetamine produced a modest, nonsignificant, task-independent, global reduction in rCBF. However, the effect of amphetamine on task-dependent activation of rCBF (i.e., WCST minus control task) was striking. Whereas on placebo no significant activation of rCBF was seen during the WCST compared with the control task, on amphetamine significant activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) occurred (p = 0.0006). Both the mean number of correct responses and the mean conceptual level increased (p less than 0.05) with amphetamine relative to placebo. In addition, with amphetamine, but not with placebo, a significant correlation (p = -0.71; p less than 0.05) emerged between activation of DLPFC rCBF and performance of the WCST task. These findings are consistent with animal models in which mesocortical catecholaminergic activity modulates and enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of evoked cortical activity.

  20. Spinal vascular malformations; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal vascular malformations are a group of rare diseases with different clinical presentations ranging from incidental asymptomatic findings to progressive tetraplegia. This article provides an overview about imaging features as well as clinical and therapeutic aspects of spinal arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas and capillary telangiectasia. (orig.) [German] Spinale Gefaessmalformationen sind eine Gruppe seltener Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlichen klinischen Praesentationen, die vom asymptomatischen Zufallsbefund bis zur progredienten Tetraparese reichen. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber radiologische Befunde sowie klinische und therapeutische Aspekte von spinalen arteriovenoesen Malformationen, Kavernomen und kapillaeren Teleangiektasien. (orig.)

  1. Normative evaluation of blood banks in the Brazilian Amazon region in respect to the prevention of transfusion-transmitted malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Daniel Roberto Coradi; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate blood banks in the Brazilian Amazon region with regard to structure and procedures directed toward the prevention of transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM). This was a normative evaluation based on the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) Resolution RDC No. 153/2004. Ten blood banks were included in the study and classified as 'adequate' (≥80 points), 'partially adequate' (from 50 to 80 points), or 'inadequate' (banks were classified as 'inadequate' and five as 'partially adequate'. The median clinical screening score was 26 (minimum=16; maximum=32). The median laboratory screening score was 20 (minimum=0; maximum=32). Eight blood banks performed laboratory tests for malaria; six tested all donations. Seven used thick smears, but only one performed this procedure in accordance with Ministry of Health requirements. One service had a Program of External Quality Evaluation for malaria testing. With regard to hemovigilance, two institutions reported having procedures to detect cases of transfusion-transmitted malaria. Malaria is neglected as a blood-borne disease in the blood banks of the Brazilian Amazon region. None of the institutions were classified as 'adequate' in the overall classification or with regard to clinical screening and laboratory screening. Blood bank professionals, the Ministry of Health and Health Surveillance service managers need to pay more attention to this matter so that the safety procedures required by law are complied with. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. [Effects of ablation of the hindlimb on the organization of the ventral horn of the spinal cord in the lumbar region of green lizard embryos (Lacerta viridis Laur.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, A; Clairambault, P

    1978-01-01

    After extirpation of an hind limb in embryos of Lacerta viridis, numerous motor neuroblasts degenerate on the operated side, in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord and the corresponding motor column is reduced or disappears. The lumbar spinal ganglia are affected and reduced on the operated side.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Toby Huston, ... Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ... and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  7. Blood zinc levels in nursing women from different regions of the West Bank of Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawahna, Ramzi; Zyoud, Ahed; Jallad, Donia; Hadwan, Labebah; Ihssan, Neeran; Hilal, Hikmat

    2017-07-06

    Pregnant and nursing women are at higher risk of zinc deficiency which can have detrimental consequences on health. We assessed blood zinc levels in 72 nursing women from the West Bank of Palestine and investigated the association between sociodemographic variables and blood zinc levels. Blood samples were analyzed for their zinc contents using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Blood and data collection were performed between July and December 2016. The median blood zinc level was 4.53 mg/L (interquartile range of 0.38 mg/L). In unadjusted analyses, blood zinc levels were higher in nursing women who lived in cities (p-value <.001), had higher household income (p-value <.001), whose husbands had a white collar job (p-value <.05), were nonsmokers (p-value <.05), did not use hair dyes (p-value <.05), and consumed energy beverages (p-value <.001). Multiple linear analysis showed that living in cities and consuming energy beverages remained significantly associated with higher blood zinc levels (p-value <.05). Blood zinc levels were in the range previously reported for similar non-malnourished populations. Nursing women living in cities and those consuming energy beverages tended to have higher blood zinc levels. Urbanized lifestyle might have enhanced blood zinc levels in nursing women.

  8. Blood Safety Status in WHO African Region Countries: Lessons Learnt from Mauritius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, Janaki; Musango, Laurent; Nikiema, Jean Baptiste; Lapnet-Moustapha, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In 2001, the WHO Office for Africa adopted a strategy for blood safety defining four targets. This paper describes the progress made by Mauritius in the implementation of this strategy. The blood safety indicators were collected and compared with the norms recommended by WHO. The country has formulated its blood policy and developed a strategic plan for its implementation since 2004. The total number of blood donations increased from 31,228 in 2002 to 43,742 in 2016, giving an annual blood collection rate evolving from 26.3 per 1000 inhabitants in 2002 to 34.2 per 1000 inhabitants in 2016. The percentage of voluntary donations rose from 60% to 82.5%. Since 2002, all the blood units collected have been tested for the mandatory infectious markers. The Blood Transfusion Service has been certified ISO2008-9001 and nucleic acid testing has been introduced. The preparation of blood components increased from 60% to 98.2%. The most transfused blood components were red cell concentrates, platelet concentrates, and fresh frozen plasma. In addition to transfusion activities, there were other departments performing antenatal serology, tissue typing, special investigations, and reagent preparation. Despite the progress made, some challenges remain, namely, legal framework and haemovigilance system. A regulatory system for blood needs to be established. PMID:29181226

  9. Blood Safety Status in WHO African Region Countries: Lessons Learnt from Mauritius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Loua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2001, the WHO Office for Africa adopted a strategy for blood safety defining four targets. This paper describes the progress made by Mauritius in the implementation of this strategy. The blood safety indicators were collected and compared with the norms recommended by WHO. The country has formulated its blood policy and developed a strategic plan for its implementation since 2004. The total number of blood donations increased from 31,228 in 2002 to 43,742 in 2016, giving an annual blood collection rate evolving from 26.3 per 1000 inhabitants in 2002 to 34.2 per 1000 inhabitants in 2016. The percentage of voluntary donations rose from 60% to 82.5%. Since 2002, all the blood units collected have been tested for the mandatory infectious markers. The Blood Transfusion Service has been certified ISO2008-9001 and nucleic acid testing has been introduced. The preparation of blood components increased from 60% to 98.2%. The most transfused blood components were red cell concentrates, platelet concentrates, and fresh frozen plasma. In addition to transfusion activities, there were other departments performing antenatal serology, tissue typing, special investigations, and reagent preparation. Despite the progress made, some challenges remain, namely, legal framework and haemovigilance system. A regulatory system for blood needs to be established.

  10. A Comparative Study of SMN Protein and mRNA in Blood and Fibroblasts in Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Healthy Controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadman, Renske I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341753637; Stam, Marloes; Jansen, Marc D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311460577; van der Weegen, Yana; Wijngaarde, Camiel A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Sodaar, Peter; Braun, Kees P J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/207237239; Dooijes, Dennis; Lemmink, Henny H.; Van Den Berg, Leonard H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288255216; van der Pol, W. Ludo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203721721

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical trials to test safety and efficacy of drugs for patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are currently underway. Biomarkers that document treatment-induced effects are needed because disease progression in childhood forms of SMA is slow and clinical outcome measures may lack

  11. Relationships between Regional Radiation Doses and Cognitive Decline in Children Treated with Cranio-Spinal Irradiation for Posterior Fossa Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Doger de Speville

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric posterior fossa tumor (PFT survivors who have been treated with cranial radiation therapy often suffer from cognitive impairments that might relate to IQ decline. Radiotherapy (RT distinctly affects brain regions involved in different cognitive functions. However, the relative contribution of regional irradiation to the different cognitive impairments still remains unclear. We investigated the relationships between the changes in different cognitive scores and radiation dose distribution in 30 children treated for a PFT. Our exploratory analysis was based on a principal component analysis (PCA and an ordinary least square regression approach. The use of a PCA was an innovative way to cluster correlated irradiated regions due to similar radiation therapy protocols across patients. Our results suggest an association between working memory decline and a high dose (equivalent uniform dose, EUD delivered to the orbitofrontal regions, whereas the decline of processing speed seemed more related to EUD in the temporal lobes and posterior fossa. To identify regional effects of RT on cognitive functions may help to propose a rehabilitation program adapted to the risk of cognitive impairment.

  12. Focal ischaemia caused by instability of cerebrovascular tone during attacks of hemiplegic migraine. A regional cerebral blood flow study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olsen, T S; Roland, P E

    1987-01-01

    During the course of hemiplegic migraine in 3 patients, changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were recorded by the intracarotid 133Xe method and a 254 multidetector camera covering one hemisphere. The rCBF measurements were performed in conjunction with cerebral angiography. During repea...

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow during rest and skilled hand movements by xenon-133 inhalation and emission computerized tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, M; Henriksen, L; Lassen, N A

    1981-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied in 16 normal adult volunteers during rest and in 10 the study was repeated during skilled hand movements. A fast-rotating ("dynamic"), single-photon emission computerized tomograph (ECT) with four detector heads was used. Xenon-133 was inhaled over a 1...

  14. Reduced and reversed temperature dependence of blood oxygenation in an ectothermic scombrid fish: implications for the evolution of regional heterothermy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Timothy Darren; Rummer, J L; Sepulveda, C A; Farrell, A P; Brauner, C J

    2010-01-01

    Tunas (family Scombridae) are exceptional among most teleost fishes in that they possess vascular heat exchangers which allow heat retention in specific regions of the body (termed 'regional heterothermy'). Seemingly exclusive to heterothermic fishes is a markedly reduced temperature dependence of blood-oxygen (blood-O(2)) binding, or even a reversed temperature dependence where increasing temperature increases blood-O(2) affinity. These unusual binding properties have been documented in whole blood and in haemoglobin (Hb) solutions, and they are hypothesised to prevent oxygen loss from arteries to veins within the vascular heat exchangers and/or to prevent excessive oxygen unloading to the warm tissues and ensure an adequate supply of oxygen to tissues positioned efferent to the heat exchangers. The temperature sensitivity of blood-O(2) binding has not been characterised in an ectothermic scombrid (mackerels and bonitos), but the existence of the unusual binding properties in these fishes would have clear implications for their proposed association with regional heterothermy. Accordingly, the present study examined oxygenation of whole blood of the chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) at 10, 20 and 30 degrees C and at 0.5, 1 and 2% CO(2). Oxygen affinity was generally highest at 20 degrees C for all levels of CO(2). Temperature-independent binding was observed at low (0.5%) CO(2), where the PO(2) at 50% blood-O(2) saturation (P (50)) was not statistically different at 10 and 30 degrees C (2.58 vs. 2.78 kPa, respectively) with an apparent heat of oxygenation (H degrees ) close to zero (-6 kJ mol(-1)). The most significant temperature-mediated difference occurred at high (2%) CO(2), where the P (50) at 10 degrees C was twofold higher than that at 20 degrees C with a corresponding H degrees of +43 kJ mol(-1). These results provide clear evidence of independent and reversed open-system temperature effects on blood oxygenation in S. japonicus, and it is therefore

  15. Augmenting regional cerebral blood flow using external-to-internal carotid artery flow diversion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divani, Afshin A; Berezina, Tamara L; Vazquez, Gabriela; Zaets, Sergey B; Tummala, Ramachandra; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of flow diversion by external carotid artery (ECA) occlusion on ipsilateral regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Local cerebral hyperperfusion in rats (n = 12) was induced by ligating the right ECA. Ipsilateral rCBF was determined pre- and post-ligation for 120 min using a laser Doppler flow meter. Sham animals (n = 6) were subjected to the craniotomy without ligation of the right ECA. In a separate series of rats (n = 5), brain tissue oxygen levels (pO(2)) in the right and left brain hemispheres were determined before and 90 min after ligation of the right ECA using a tissue oxygenation monitoring unit. We investigated the effect of ECA occlusion hemispheric changes in rCBF in one clinical case as a proof of concept. Ligation of ECA resulted in a statistically significant increase in rCBF on the ipsilateral side compared to the sham-operated rats (p group compared with sham-operated rats. There was no significant variation in MAP for the treated animals. Vascular permeability and cerebral water content in the right hemisphere after ligation of ECA did not significantly differ from the contralateral hemisphere. Ipsilateral hemisphere tissue pO(2) was significantly higher compared to the contralateral area (p ECA resulted in 3.6% and 12.1% increase in peak value and rise-time of the time-density curves. Flow diversion by temporary occlusion of the ECA can result in increased rCBF and cerebral pO(2) on the ipsilateral side. The strategy may represent a viable option to augment rCBF in focal cerebral ischemia.

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow in epileptic foci using (I-123) IMP-SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Tohru (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-09-01

    Fifty-six epileptic patients, whose ages ranged from 6 months to 16 years (a mean age, 8 years and 2 months), were examined by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with (I-123) N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP). Of these patients, 44 had partial seizures (PS) and 12 had generalized seizures (GS). SPECT revealed abnormality of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 24 PS patients (54.5%), being correlated with EEG abnormality. Among the 24 patients, 22 had a decreased rCBF and 2 others had an increased rCBF. According to the PS type, rCBF abnormality in the foci was less frequently observed for benign age-related partial epilepsy (2/9) than for the other types of partial epilepsy (22/35). Among 35 patients with the other types of partial epilepsy, SPECT showed foci in the frontal (12), central (3), parietal (4), temporal (6), and occipital (6) regions, and diffuse spike-wave or the lack of paroaxysmals (4). The EEG foci was of the left hemisphere in 12 patients, and of the right hemisphere in 18 patients. Higher incidence of rCBF abnormality was associated with the temporal, partietal, and frontal foci than with the occipital foci. There was no correlation between the incidence of rCBF abnormlaity and the frequency of seizure activities on EEG. Complex partial seizures had a tendency to be associated with rCBF abnormality. In comparing IMP uptake in evaluable 17 patients with a decreased rCBF, a mean %CBF in foci compared to that in the contralateral area was 91.9%. All of the 12 GS patients showed no focal reduction of rCBF around the cortex. Patients with tonic-clonic seizure and myoclonic seizure had almost normal IMP images. The IMP images of organic lesions were a marked reduction of rCBF. IMP-SPECT may also be suitable for evaluating the underlying organic and secondary involving disorders with epilepsy. (N.K.).

  17. Dual role of cerebral blood flow in regional brain temperature control in the healthy newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Sachiko; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Takashima, Sachio; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Robertson, Nicola J; Iwata, Osuke

    2014-10-01

    Small shifts in brain temperature after hypoxia-ischaemia affect cell viability. The main determinants of brain temperature are cerebral metabolism, which contributes to local heat production, and brain perfusion, which removes heat. However, few studies have addressed the effect of cerebral metabolism and perfusion on regional brain temperature in human neonates because of the lack of non-invasive cot-side monitors. This study aimed (i) to determine non-invasive monitoring tools of cerebral metabolism and perfusion by combining near-infrared spectroscopy and echocardiography, and (ii) to investigate the dependence of brain temperature on cerebral metabolism and perfusion in unsedated newborn infants. Thirty-two healthy newborn infants were recruited. They were studied with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, echocardiography, and a zero-heat flux tissue thermometer. A surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using superior vena cava flow adjusted for cerebral volume (rSVC flow). The tissue oxygenation index, fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen relative to rSVC flow (CMRO₂ index) were also estimated. A greater rSVC flow was positively associated with higher brain temperatures, particularly for superficial structures. The CMRO₂ index and rSVC flow were positively coupled. However, brain temperature was independent of FOE and the CMRO₂ index. A cooler ambient temperature was associated with a greater temperature gradient between the scalp surface and the body core. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and perfusion were monitored in newborn infants without using tracers. In these healthy newborn infants, cerebral perfusion and ambient temperature were significant independent variables of brain temperature. CBF has primarily been associated with heat removal from the brain. However, our results suggest that CBF is likely to deliver heat specifically to the superficial brain. Further studies are required to assess the

  18. Biodegradable radiopaque microspheres for the evaluation of regional pulmonary blood flow distribution using electron-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Michael J.; Tajik, Jehangir K.; Robinson, Miguel T.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate measurement of regional pulmonary blood flow distribution is of interest both as a research and diagnostic tool. Measurements of regional pulmonary perfusion via x-ray CT offer the possibility of detecting perfusion deficits due to pulmonary embolus while maintaining a high degree of anatomic detail. Use of bolus injection of conventional radiopaque contrast with associated short mean transit times (5 - 7 seconds), requires a high degree of temporal resolution offered clinically only by electron beam x-ray CT (Imatron). The present study was intended to characterize biodegradable radiopaque microspheres as an alternative contrast agent which would allow for measurement of regional pulmonary blood flow with scanning times associated with conventional or spiral thin slice, volumetric x-ray CT protocols. To test this, a dog was scanned at 6 slice levels and 13 time points with image acquisition gated to the cardiac cycle. Lung volumes were maintained at functional residual capacity.

  19. Vascular Steal Explains Early Paradoxical Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Cerebrovascular Response in Brain Regions with Delayed Arterial Transit Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Poublanc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during manipulation of inhaled carbon dioxide (CO2 can be used to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR and map regions of exhausted cerebrovascular reserve. These regions exhibit a reduced or negative BOLD response to inhaled CO2. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism behind the negative BOLD response by investigating its time delay (TD. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI with the injection of a contrast agent was used as the gold standard in order to provide measurement of the blood arrival time to which CVR TD could be compared. We hypothesize that if negative BOLD responses are the result of a steal phenomenon, they should be synchronized with positive BOLD responses from healthy brain tissue, even though the blood arrival time would be delayed. Methods: On a 3-tesla MRI system, BOLD CVR and DSC images were collected in a group of 19 patients with steno-occlusive cerebrovascular disease. For each patient, we generated a CVR magnitude map by regressing the BOLD signal with the end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2, and a CVR TD map by extracting the time of maximum cross-correlation between the BOLD signal and PETCO2. In addition, a blood arrival time map was generated by fitting the DSC signal with a gamma variate function. ROI masks corresponding to varying degrees of reactivity were constructed. Within these masks, the mean CVR magnitude, CVR TD and DSC blood arrival time were extracted and averaged over the 19 patients. CVR magnitude and CVR TD were then plotted against DSC blood arrival time. Results: The results show that CVR magnitude is highly correlated to DSC blood arrival time. As expected, the most compromised tissues with the longest blood arrival time have the lowest (most negative CVR magnitude. However, CVR TD shows a noncontinuous relationship with DSC blood arrival time. CVR TD is well correlated to DSC blood arrival time

  20. Cerebral oxygen extraction, oxygen consumption, and regional cerebral blood flow during the aura phase of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, Jes; Lassen, N A

    1994-01-01

    The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism.......The aura phase of migraine is associated with focal blood flow changes, but it has been largely unknown whether these changes are correlated to changes in the cerebral metabolism....

  1. Regional blood flow during exercise in humans measured by near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Langberg, Henning; Olesen, J

    2000-01-01

    Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and the tracer indocyanine green (ICG), we quantified blood flow in calf muscle and around the Achilles tendon during plantar flexion (1-9 W). For comparison, blood flow in calf muscle was determined by dye dilution in combination with magnetic resonance...

  2. Hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy involving deep supratentorial regions: does only blood pressure matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ho Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 42-year-old female patient who presented with high arterial blood pressure of 245/150 mmHg and hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy that involved the brainstem and extensive supratentorial deep gray and white matter. The lesions were nearly completely resolved several days after stabilization of the arterial blood pressure. Normal diffusion-weighted imaging findings and high apparent diffusion coefficient values suggested that the main pathomechanism was vasogenic edema owing to severe hypertension. On the basis of a literature review, the absolute value of blood pressure or whether the patient can control his/her blood pressure seems not to be associated with the degree of the lesions evident on magnetic resonance imaging. It remains to be determined if the acceleration rate and the duration of elevated arterial blood pressure might play a key role in the development of the hypertensive encephalopathy pattern.

  3. Pediatric blood transfusion practices at a regional referral hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabwera, Helen M; Fegan, Greg; Shavadia, Jay; Denje, Douglas; Mandaliya, Kishor; Bates, Imelda; Maitland, Kathryn; Hassall, Oliver W

    2016-11-01

    Severe anemia in children is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we describe clinical and operational aspects of blood transfusion in children admitted to Coast Provincial General Hospital, Kenya. This was an observational study where over a 2-year period, demographic and laboratory data were collected on all children for whom the hospital blood bank received a transfusion request. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective review of case notes over the first year. There were 2789 requests for blood for children (median age, 1.8 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.6-6.6 years); 70% (1950) of the samples were crossmatched with 85% (1663/1950) issued. Ninety percent (1505/1663) were presumed transfused. Median time from laboratory receipt of request to collection of blood was 3.6 hours (IQR, 1.4-12.8 hr). Case notes of 590 children were reviewed and median pretransfusion hemoglobin level was 6.0 g/dL (IQR, 4.2-9.1 g/dL). Ninety-four percent (186) were transfused "appropriately" while 52% (120) were transfused "inappropriately." There was significant disagreement between the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of severe anemia (exact McNemar's test; p blood transfusions but only 41% (106) of these had a positive blood film. In this setting, clinicians often order blood based on the clinical impression of "severe anemia." This has implications for laboratory workload and the blood supply itself. However, the majority of children with severe anemia were appropriately transfused. The use of antimalarials with blood transfusions irrespective of blood film results is common practice. © 2016 The Authors. Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  4. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  5. Dorsal Root Ganglion Stimulation as a Salvage Treatment for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Refractory to Dorsal Column Spinal Cord Stimulation: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ajax; Hunter, Corey W

    2017-10-01

    The efficacy of traditional spinal cord stimulation (t-SCS) tends to decay over time in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). While it has been shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation is extremely effective in t-SCS-naïve patients with CRPS, its efficacy in patients who had previously failed t-SCS is unknown. Given that DRG-SCS and t-SCS target different spinal pathways, a failure with t-SCS should not automatically preclude a patient from attempting DRG-SCS. Two patients with lower extremity CRPS, previously implanted with t-SCS systems, experienced relapses in the pain despite exhaustive reprogramming. Both patients were offered DRG stimulation as a means to salvage treatment. Patient 1 reported 90% pain reduction with significant gait improvement during the DRG stimulation trial. The patient subsequently proceeded to implant and have the t-SCS implantable pulse generator explanted. Patient 2 was unable to undergo a trial with DRG-SCS because of health insurance constraints, so she elected to undergo a surgical revision of her existing system whereby a DRG-SCS system was added to the existing t-SCS to create a hybrid system with two implantable pulse generators. The patient reported an immediate improvement in pain because of the introduction of the DRG-SCS. Additionally, she was instructed to document her pain scores with each system on individually, as well as with both on-her pain scores were at the lowest with the DRG-SCS on by itself. At eight-month follow-up, both patients reported sustained pain improvement and retained their functional gains. Our case series demonstrates that a failure of t-SCS is not necessarily a failure of neurostimulation as a whole. The efficacy of DRG-SCS is independent of prior t-SCS therapy outcomes in these two patients and a history of t-SCS failure serves no predictive value in these two patients for future DRG stimulation success. Therefore, DRG-SCS can be considered as a reasonable next-step to

  6. Hemovigilance survey of pathogen-reduced blood components in the Warsaw Region in the 2009 to 2013 period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łętowska, Magdalena; Przybylska, Zofia; Piotrowski, Dariusz; Lachert, Elżbieta; Rosiek, Aleksandra; Rzymkiewicz, Lech; Cardoso, Marcia

    2016-03-01

    In 2009 the Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology (PRT) was introduced to the routine blood component production of the Regional Blood Transfusion Center in Warsaw (RBTCW). The goal of this study was to investigate the safety of Mirasol-treated blood components. The accumulated passive hemovigilance data of Mirasol-treated blood components collected at the RBTCW are presented and compared to historical and contemporary data. Furthermore, active hemovigilance data collected from patients with different hematologic disorders transfused with Mirasol-treated or untreated blood components at the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine (IHTM) are presented and discussed. The adverse reaction (AR) reporting rate by hospitals to the RBTCW after the implementation of the Mirasol technology was 0.39% for Mirasol-treated platelet concentrates (M-PCs) and 0.05% for Mirasol-treated fresh-frozen plasma. When comparing contemporary rates of ARs recorded by RBTCW in the time period 2011 to 2012, no statistical difference was observed between Mirasol-treated and untreated blood components. No serious AR was attributed to Mirasol-treated components. At the IHTM a lower rate of ARs after transfusion of M-PCs was observed than with untreated PCs. Despite the fact that very large amounts of Mirasol-treated plasma have been transfused to patients with congenital or acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, no significant increase in AR rates was observed. Treatment of blood components with the Mirasol PRT System has proven to be safe for patients and is not associated with increased rates and grades of adverse events in patients of hospitals in the Warsaw Region. © 2015 AABB.

  7. Blood donor to inactive donor transition in the Basel region between 1996 and 2011: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volken, T; Buser, A; Holbro, A; Bart, T; Infanti, L

    2015-08-01

    For the prevention of blood shortages, it is essential for blood banks to design and implement donor recruitment and donor retention strategies that take into account the determinants of donor return. We studied the behaviour of first-time blood donors in the region of Basel, Switzerland, between 1996 and 2011 and described factors associated with transition from active to inactive donor in two successive first-time donor cohorts (1996-2002, 2003-2008). The risk of becoming an inactive donor was associated with being younger and female, not being a 0-negative donor and living in an urban area. Over time, hazards of becoming an inactive donor were converging for individuals living in non-urban and urban areas as were those of younger and older donors. After their first donation, 73.6% and 67.5% of males in the 1996-2002 and 2003-2008 cohorts, respectively, donated at least once in the following 24 months. The proportion of returning female donors was 71.8% and 65.4%, respectively. The increased volatility of first-time blood donors suggests that marketing actions and strategies aimed at increasing return rates should be reinforced, especially for younger and female blood donors. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  8. Left-right cortical asymmetries of regional cerebral blood flow during listening to words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishizawa, Y; Olsen, T S; Larsen, B

    1982-01-01

    of the entire hemisphere. The focal rCBF increases were localized to the superior part of the temporal regions, the prefrontal regions, the frontal eye fields, and the orbitofrontal regions. Significant asymmetries were found in particular in the superior temporal region with the left side showing a more...

  9. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Remote ischaemic conditioning decreases blood flow and improves oxygen extraction in patients with early complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelmaier, T; Kumowski, N; Mainka, T; Vollert, J; Goertz, O; Lehnhardt, M; Zahn, P K; Maier, C; Kolbenschlag, J

    2017-09-01

    Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) is the cyclic application of non-damaging ischaemia leading to an increased tissue perfusion, among others triggered by NO (monoxide). Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is known to have vascular alterations such as increased blood shunting and decreased NO blood-levels, which in turn lead to decreased tissue perfusion. We therefore hypothesized that RIC could improve tissue perfusion in CRPS. In this proof-of-concept study, RIC was applied in the following groups: in 21 patients with early CRPS with a clinical history less than a year, in 20 age/sex-matched controls and in 12 patients with unilateral nerve lesions via a tourniquet on the unaffected/non-dominant upper limb. Blood flow and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2 ) were assessed before, during and after RIC via laser Doppler and tissue spectroscopy on the affected extremity. The oxygen extraction fraction was calculated. After RIC, blood flow declined in CRPS (p CRPS and healthy controls (p CRPS, the oxygen extraction fraction correlated negatively with the decreasing blood flow (p CRPS, which led to a revised hypothesis: the decrease of blood flow might be due to an anti-inflammatory effect that attenuates vascular disturbances and reduces blood shunting, thus improving oxygen extraction. Further studies could determine whether a repeated application of RIC leads to a reduced hypoxia in chronic CRPS. Remote ischaemic conditioning leads to a decrease of blood flow. This decrease inversely correlates with the oxygen extraction in patients with CRPS. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  11. Blood pressure control and antihypertensive pharmacotherapy patterns in a hypertensive population of Eastern Central Region of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Luísa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions to improve blood pressure control in hypertension have had limited success in clinical practice despite evidence of cardiovascular disease prevention in randomised controlled trials. The objectives of this study were to evaluate blood pressure control and antihypertensive pharmacotherapy patterns in a population of Eastern Central Region of Portugal, attending a hospital outpatient clinic (ambulatory setting for routine follow-up. Methods Medical data of all patients that attended at least two medical appointments of hypertension/dyslipidemia in a university hospital over a one and a half year period (from January 2008 to June 2009 were retrospectively analysed. Demographic variables, clinical data and blood pressure values of hypertensive patients included in the study, as well as prescribing metrics were examined on a descriptive basis and expressed as the mean ± SD, frequency and percentages. Student's test and Mann-Whitney rank sum test were used to compare continuous variables and χ2 test and Fisher exact probability test were used to test for differences between categorical variables. Results In all, 37% of hypertensive patients (n = 76 had their blood pressure controlled according to international guidelines. About 45.5% of patients with a target blood pressure P P = 0.012. Thiazide-type diuretics were the most prescribed antihypertensive drugs (67% followed by angiotensin receptor blockers (60% and beta-blockers (43%. About 95.9% patients with comorbid diabetes were treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker. Conclusions Clinically important blood pressure decreases can be achieved soon after hypertension medical appointment initiation. However, many hypertensive patients prescribed with antihypertensive therapy fail to achieve blood pressure control in clinical practice, this control being worse among patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease. As

  12. The "pseudo-CT myelogram sign": an aid to the diagnosis of underlying brain stem and spinal cord trauma in the presence of major craniocervical region injury on post-mortem CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, F; Ali, Z; Daly, B

    2017-12-01

    To document the detection of underlying low-attenuation spinal cord or brain stem injuries in the presence of the "pseudo-CT myelogram sign" (PCMS) on post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT). The PCMS was identified on PMCT in 20 decedents (11 male, nine female; age 3-83 years, mean age 35.3 years) following fatal blunt trauma at a single forensic centre. Osseous and ligamentous craniocervical region injuries and brain stem or spinal cord trauma detectable on PMCT were recorded. PMCT findings were compared to conventional autopsy in all cases. PMCT-detected transection of the brain stem or high cervical cord in nine of 10 cases compared to autopsy (90% sensitivity). PMCT was 92.86% sensitive in detection of atlanto-occipital joint injuries (n=14), and 100% sensitive for atlanto-axial joint (n=8) injuries. PMCT detected more cervical spine and skull base fractures (n=22, and n=10, respectively) compared to autopsy (n=13, and n=5, respectively). The PCMS is a novel description of a diagnostic finding, which if present in fatal craniocervical region trauma, is very sensitive for underlying spinal cord and brain stem injuries not ordinarily visible on PMCT. Its presence may also predict major osseous and/or ligamentous injuries in this region when anatomical displacement is not evident on PMCT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Controlled hypotension for spinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dutton, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled, deliberate hypotension during anesthesia for major spinal surgery reduces intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirement. Hypotension may be achieved with increased doses of volatile anesthetic agents or by continuous infusion of vasodilating drugs. Safe application of this technique requires knowledge of the physiology of hemorrhagic shock and close intraoperative monitoring to avoid vasoconstriction and end-organ ischemia.

  14. Conditionally immortalized stem cell lines from human spinal cord retain regional identity and generate functional V2a interneurons and motorneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Graham; Romanyuk, Nataliya; Amemori, Takashi; Jendelova, Pavla; Forostyak, Oksana; Jeffries, Aaron R; Perfect, Leo; Thuret, Sandrine; Dayanithi, Govindan; Sykova, Eva; Price, Jack

    2013-06-07

    The use of immortalized neural stem cells either as models of neural development in vitro or as cellular therapies in central nervous system (CNS) disorders has been controversial. This controversy has centered on the capacity of immortalized cells to retain characteristic features of the progenitor cells resident in the tissue of origin from which they were derived, and the potential for tumorogenicity as a result of immortalization. Here, we report the generation of conditionally immortalized neural stem cell lines from human fetal spinal cord tissue, which addresses these issues. Clonal neural stem cell lines were derived from 10-week-old human fetal spinal cord and conditionally immortalized with an inducible form of cMyc. The derived lines were karyotyped, transcriptionally profiled by microarray, and assessed against a panel of spinal cord progenitor markers with immunocytochemistry. In addition, the lines were differentiated and assessed for the presence of neuronal fate markers and functional calcium channels. Finally, a clonal line expressing eGFP was grafted into lesioned rat spinal cord and assessed for survival, differentiation characteristics, and tumorogenicity. We demonstrate that these clonal lines (a) retain a clear transcriptional signature of ventral spinal cord progenitors and a normal karyotype after extensive propagation in vitro, (b) differentiate into relevant ventral neuronal subtypes with functional T-, L-, N-, and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels and spontaneous calcium oscillations, and (c) stably engraft into lesioned rat spinal cord without tumorogenicity. We propose that these cells represent a useful tool both for the in vitro study of differentiation into ventral spinal cord neuronal subtypes, and for examining the potential of conditionally immortalized neural stem cells to facilitate functional recovery after spinal cord injury or disease.

  15. Continuous Descending Modulation of the Spinal Cord Revealed by Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W Stroman

    Full Text Available Spontaneous variations in spinal cord activity may arise from regulation of any of a number of functions including sensory, motor, and autonomic control. Here, we use functional MRI (fMRI of healthy participants to identify properties of blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD variations in the spinal cord in response to knowledge that either a noxious stimulus is impending, or that no stimulus is to be expected. Expectation of a noxious stimulus, or no stimulus, is shown to have a significant effect on wide-spread BOLD signal variations in the spinal cord over the entire time period of the fMRI acquisition. Coordination of BOLD responses between/within spinal cord and brainstem regions are also influenced by this knowledge. We provide evidence that such signal variations are the result of continuous descending modulation of spinal cord function. BOLD signal variations in response to noxious stimulation of the hand are also shown, as in previous studies. The observation of both continuous and reactive BOLD responses to emotional/cognitive factors and noxious peripheral stimulation may have important implications, not only for our understanding of endogenous pain modulation, but also in showing that spinal cord activity is under continuous regulatory control.

  16. Effect of bupivacaine and adjuvant drugs for regional anesthesia on nerve tissue oximetry and nerve blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesmann T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Wiesmann,1 Stefan Müller,1,2 Hans-Helge Müller,3 Hinnerk Wulf,1 Thorsten Steinfeldt1,4 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Marburg, Philipps University, Marburg, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Giessen, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, 3Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Philipps University, Marburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Diakoniekrankenhaus Schwäbisch Hall, Schwäbisch Hall, Germany Background: Nerve blood flow has a critical role in acute and chronic pathologies in peripheral nerves. Influences of local anesthetics and adjuvants on tissue perfusion and oxygenation are deemed as relevant factors for nerve damage after peripheral regional anesthesia. The link between low tissue perfusion due to local anesthetics and resulting tissue oxygenation is unclear.Methods: Combined tissue spectrophotometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used to assess nerve blood flow in 40 surgically exposed median nerves in pigs, as well as nerve tissue oximetry for 60 min. After baseline measurements, test solutions saline (S, bupivacaine (Bupi, bupivacaine with epinephrine (BupiEpi, and bupivacaine with clonidine (BupiCloni were applied topically.Results: Bupivacaine resulted in significant decrease in nerve blood flow, as well as tissue oximetry values, compared with saline control. Addition of epinephrine resulted in a rapid, but nonsignificant, reduction of nerve blood flow and extensive lowering of tissue oximetry levels. The use of clonidine resulted in a reduction of nerve blood flow, comparable to bupivacaine alone (relative blood flow at T60 min compared with baseline, S: 0.86 (0.67–1.18, median (25th–75th percentile; Bupi: 0.33 (0.25–0.60; BupiCloni: 0.43 (0.38–0.63; and BupiEpi: 0.41(0.30–0.54. The use of adjuvants did not result in any relevant impairment of tissue oximetry

  17. The effects of epinine on arterial blood pressure and regional vascular resistances in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mir, I; Palop, V; Morales-Olivas, F J; Estañ, L; Rubio, E

    1998-07-01

    1. We carried out experiments in anesthetized rats to study the hemodynamic effects of intravenous injections of epinine. 2. Epinine (1-320 micrograms/kg) produced a biphasic effect on mean arterial blood pressure (n = 30). At doses lower than 40 micrograms/kg, arterial blood pressure decreased (by as much as 21.5 +/- 3.4%), though at higher doses it increased dose dependently (by as much as 73.2 +/- 14.5%). Epinine also produced bradicardia in a dose-dependent manner (by as much as 26.4 +/- 4.9%). Sulpiride (100 micrograms/kg) suppressed the hypotensive effect of epinine but did not change the hypertensive effect. In the presence of prazosin (1,000 micrograms/kg), arterial blood pressure remained significantly decreased at all doses of epinine. Neither sulpiride nor prazosin changed the bradycardic effect of epinine. 3. Prazosin produced a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance. Epinine (5 micrograms/kg) after prazosin reverted the effects of prazosin in renal vascular resistance, without any significant modification in the renal blood flows. However, 20 micrograms/kg epinine increased the renal vascular resistances and, moreover, produced a significant decrease in the blood flows of both kidneys. Neither prazosin nor epinine produced modifications in the intestinal vascular bed. 4. Although epinine possesses significant dopamine and alpha-adrenergic activities that are involved in the biphasic effect of the agent on mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats, in the presence of prazosin, it is not possible to manifest dopaminergic activity involved in the increase in renal or mesenteric blood flow; this may be due to the low tone of the vascular wall induced by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist, though an alpha 2-activity cannot be discarded.

  18. The Effect of Lumbar Disc Herniation on Musculoskeletal Loadings in the Spinal Region During Level Walking and Stair Climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Shengzheng; Liao, Zhenhua; Zhou, Wenyu; Guan, Xinyu; Ji, Run; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Daiqi; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-08-10

    BACKGROUND People with low back pain (LBP) alter their motion patterns during level walking and stair climbing due to pain or fear. However, the alternations of load sharing during the two activities are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of LBP caused by lumbar disc herniation (LDH) on the muscle activities of 17 main trunk muscle groups and the intradiscal forces acting on the five lumbar discs. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-six healthy adults and seven LDH patients were recruited to perform level walking and stair climbing in the Gait Analysis Laboratory. Eight optical markers were placed on the bony landmarks of the spinous process and pelvis, and the coordinates of these markers were captured during the two activities using motion capture system. The coordinates of the captured markers were applied to developed musculoskeletal model to calculate the kinetic variables. RESULTS LDH patients demonstrated higher muscle activities in most trunk muscle groups during both level walking and stair climbing. There were decreases in anteroposterior shear forces on the discs in the pathological region and increases in the compressive forces on all the lumbar discs during level walking. The symmetry of mediolateral shear forces was worse in LDH patients than healthy adults during stair climbing. CONCLUSIONS LDH patients exhibited different kinetic alternations during level walking and stair climbing. However, both adaptive strategies added extra burdens to the trunk system and further increased the risk for development of LDH.

  19. The Effect of Lumbar Disc Herniation on Musculoskeletal Loadings in the Spinal Region During Level Walking and Stair Climbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Shengzheng; Liao, Zhenhua; Zhou, Wenyu; Guan, Xinyu; Ji, Run; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Daiqi; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background People with low back pain (LBP) alter their motion patterns during level walking and stair climbing due to pain or fear. However, the alternations of load sharing during the two activities are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of LBP caused by lumbar disc herniation (LDH) on the muscle activities of 17 main trunk muscle groups and the intradiscal forces acting on the five lumbar discs. Material/Methods Twenty-six healthy adults and seven LDH patients were recruited to perform level walking and stair climbing in the Gait Analysis Laboratory. Eight optical markers were placed on the bony landmarks of the spinous process and pelvis, and the coordinates of these markers were captured during the two activities using motion capture system. The coordinates of the captured markers were applied to developed musculoskeletal model to calculate the kinetic variables. Results LDH patients demonstrated higher muscle activities in most trunk muscle groups during both level walking and stair climbing. There were decreases in anteroposterior shear forces on the discs in the pathological region and increases in the compressive forces on all the lumbar discs during level walking. The symmetry of mediolateral shear forces was worse in LDH patients than healthy adults during stair climbing. Conclusions LDH patients exhibited different kinetic alternations during level walking and stair climbing. However, both adaptive strategies added extra burdens to the trunk system and further increased the risk for development of LDH. PMID:28796755

  20. Assessment of Glial Scar, Tissue Sparing, Behavioral Recovery and Axonal Regeneration following Acute Transplantation of Genetically Modified Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamedshina, Yana O; Garanina, Ekaterina E; Masgutova, Galina A; Galieva, Luisa R; Sanatova, Elvira R; Chelyshev, Yurii A; Rizvanov, Albert A

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the potential for protective effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MCs) genetically modified with the VEGF and GNDF genes on contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. An adenoviral vector was constructed for targeted delivery of VEGF and GDNF to UCB-MCs. Using a rat contusion SCI model we examined the efficacy of the construct on tissue sparing, glial scar severity, the extent of axonal regeneration, recovery of motor function, and analyzed the expression of the recombinant genes VEGF and GNDF in vitro and in vivo. Transplantation of UCB-MCs transduced with adenoviral vectors expressing VEGF and GDNF at the site of SCI induced tissue sparing, behavioral recovery and axonal regeneration comparing to the other constructs tested. The adenovirus encoding VEGF and GDNF for transduction of UCB-MCs was shown to be an effective and stable vehicle for these cells in vivo following the transplantation into the contused spinal cord. Our results show that a gene delivery using UCB-MCs-expressing VEGF and GNDF genes improved both structural and functional parameters after SCI. Further histological and behavioral studies, especially at later time points, in animals with SCI after transplantation of genetically modified UCB-MCs (overexpressing VEGF and GDNF genes) will provide additional insight into therapeutic potential of such cells.

  1. Brain and spinal cord interaction: protective effects of exercise prior to spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gomez-Pinilla

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of a spinal cord injury on the brain and spinal cord, and whether exercise provided before the injury could organize a protective reaction across the neuroaxis. Animals were exposed to 21 days of voluntary exercise, followed by a full spinal transection (T7-T9 and sacrificed two days later. Here we show that the effects of spinal cord injury go beyond the spinal cord itself and influence the molecular substrates of synaptic plasticity and learning in the brain. The injury reduced BDNF levels in the hippocampus in conjunction with the activated forms of p-synapsin I, p-CREB and p-CaMK II, while exercise prior to injury prevented these reductions. Similar effects of the injury were observed in the lumbar enlargement region of the spinal cord, where exercise prevented the reductions in BDNF, and p-CREB. Furthermore, the response of the hippocampus to the spinal lesion appeared to be coordinated to that of the spinal cord, as evidenced by corresponding injury-related changes in BDNF levels in the brain and spinal cord. These results provide an indication for the increased vulnerability of brain centers after spinal cord injury. These findings also imply that the level of chronic activity prior to a spinal cord injury could determine the level of sensory-motor and cognitive recovery following the injury. In particular, exercise prior to the injury onset appears to foster protective mechanisms in the brain and spinal cord.

  2. Identification of differentially methylated BRCA1 and CRISP2 DNA regions as blood surrogate markers for cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Istas, Geoffrey; Declerck, Ken; Pudenz, Maria; Szic, Katarzyna Szarc vel; Lendinez-Tortajada, Veronica; Leon-Latre, Montserrat; Heyninck,Karen; Haegeman, Guy; Casasnovas, Jose A.; Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Heiss, Christian; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide Illumina InfiniumMethylation 450?K DNA methylation analysis was performed on blood samples from clinical atherosclerosis patients (n?=?8) and healthy donors (n?=?8) in the LVAD study (NCT02174133, NCT01799005). Multiple differentially methylated regions (DMR) could be identified in atherosclerosis patients, related to epigenetic control of cell adhesion, chemotaxis, cytoskeletal reorganisations, cell proliferation, cell death, estrogen receptor pathways and phagocytic immune respo...

  3. 'Spin, cool, and filter' red cells prepared in a regional blood center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicoat, P A; Hicks, M W; Smith, D M; Clark, D A

    1987-01-01

    Red cells depleted of leukocytes by the "spin, cool, and filter" (SCF) method are effective in preventing most febrile, nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR). To determine whether red cell concentrates may be centrifuged in a blood center and filtered subsequently at an outlying facility, the authors examined how leukocyte removal was affected by the transport and storage of centrifuged red cells before microaggregate filtration (MAF). One hundred fourteen red cell units were each divided into two aliquots. After centrifugation, one aliquot from each unit was retained in the blood center, and the other was transported on a truck for 2 to 12 hours. Aliquots were stored for variable periods, after which the residual leukocytes were counted. Neither transportation nor storage significantly affected leukocyte removal by MAF. However, an unacceptable proportion of all SCF units failed to meet American Red Cross standards for leukocyte-poor blood and studies of factors influencing leukocyte depletion were undertaken. A relative centrifugal force of 6700 X g was needed to produce consistently acceptable units when blood was 8 to 15 days old. These results show that making SCF red cells is a practical, inexpensive way for blood centers to provide hospitals with products that prevent most FNHTR; however, each facility that prepares these products must perform quality control carefully.

  4. Preservation or Restoration of Segmental and Regional Spinal Lordosis Using Minimally Invasive Interbody Fusion Techniques in Degenerative Lumbar Conditions: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Myhre, Sue Lynn; Youssef, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    A literature review. The purpose of this study was to review lumbar segmental and regional alignment changes following treatment with a variety of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) interbody fusion procedures for short-segment, degenerative conditions. An increasing number of lumbar fusions are being performed with minimally invasive exposures, despite a perception that minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion procedures are unable to affect segmental and regional lordosis. Through a MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, a total of 23 articles were identified that reported alignment following minimally invasive lumbar fusion for degenerative (nondeformity) lumbar spinal conditions to examine aggregate changes in postoperative alignment. Of the 23 studies identified, 28 study cohorts were included in the analysis. Procedural cohorts included MIS ALIF (two), extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) (16), and MIS posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (P/TLIF) (11). Across 19 study cohorts and 720 patients, weighted average of lumbar lordosis preoperatively for all procedures was 43.5° (range 28.4°-52.5°) and increased 3.4° (9%) (range -2° to 7.4°) postoperatively (P < 0.001). Segmental lordosis increased, on average, by 4° from a weighted average of 8.3° preoperatively (range -0.8° to 15.8°) to 11.2° at postoperative time points (range -0.2° to 22.8°) (P < 0.001) in 1182 patient from 24 study cohorts. Simple linear regression revealed a significant relationship between preoperative lumbar lordosis and change in lumbar lordosis (r = 0.413; P = 0.003), wherein lower preoperative lumbar lordosis predicted a greater increase in postoperative lumbar lordosis. Significant gains in both weighted average lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis were seen following MIS interbody fusion. None of the segmental lordosis cohorts and only two of the 19 lumbar lordosis cohorts showed decreases in lordosis postoperatively. These results suggest that

  5. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  6. Evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow in patient with atypical senile dementia with asymmetrical calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoyama, Masaru; Ukai, Satoshi; Shinosaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We report an 83-year-old woman with atypical senile dementia with Fahr-type calcification. Brain computed tomography demonstrated asymmetrical calcification predominant in the basal ganglia on the right side and pronounced diffuse cortical atrophy in the frontotemporal areas. The patient was clinically diagnosed with diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification. Brain single photon emission computed tomography findings revealed that cerebral blood flow was reduced on the right side, as compared with the left side, in widespread areas. Hemispheric asymmetry in both calcification and cerebral blood flow suggests a relationship between calcification and vascular changes. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  7. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow during the course of classic migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, M; Skyhøj Olsen, T; Lassen, N A

    1983-01-01

    and were examined by a series of rCBF studies, spaced by intervals of 5 to 10 minutes. A wave of reduced blood flow originating in the posterior part of the brain and progressing anteriorly was observed in eight of the nine patients. The oligemia advanced at a speed of 2 mm per minute over the hemisphere...

  8. Association of gene polymorphisms in ABO blood group chromosomal regions and menstrual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong; Kong, Gui-Lian; Su, Ya-Li; Zhou, Yan; Lv, Li-Fang; Wang, Qiong; Huang, Bao-Ping; Zheng, Rui-Zhi; Li, Quan-Zhong; Yuan, Hui-Juan; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located near the gene of the ABO blood group play an important role in the genetic aetiology of menstrual disorders (MDs). Polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction technology was used to detect eight SNPs near the ABO gene location on the chromosomes in 250 cases of MD and 250 cases of normal menstruation. The differences in the distribution of each genotype, as well as the allele frequency in the normal and control groups, were analysed using Pearson's χ 2 test to search for disease-associated loci. SHEsis software was used to analyse the linkage disequilibrium and haplotype frequencies and to inspect the correlation between haplotypes and the disease. Compared with the control group, the experimental group exhibited statistically significant differences in the genotype distribution frequencies of the rs657152 locus of the ABO blood group gene and the rs17250673 locus of the tumour necrosis factor cofactor 2 (TRAF2) gene, which is located downstream of the ABO gene. The allele distribution frequencies of rs657152 and rs495828 loci in the ABO blood group gene exhibited significant differences between the groups. Dominant and recessive genetic model analysis of each locus revealed that the experimental group exhibited statistically significant differences from the control group in the genotype distribution frequencies of rs657152 and rs495828 loci, respectively. These results indicate that the ABO blood group gene and TRAF2 gene may be a cause of MDs.

  9. Left ventricular performance, regional blood flow, wall motion, and lactate metabolism during transluminal angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); W. Wijns (William); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); S. Meij (Simon); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); P.W. Hugenholtz; R.W. Brower (Ronald); C.J. Slager (Cornelis)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe response of left ventricular function, coronary blood flow, and myocardial lactate metabolism during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) was studied in a series of patients undergoing the procedure. From four to six balloon inflation procedures per patient were

  10. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Using Fresh Blood Imaging in Oral and Maxillofacial Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Masafumi; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Kito, Shinji; Habu, Manabu; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Nogami, Shinnosuke; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Ishikawa, Ayataka; Nishida, Ikuko; Saeki, Katsura; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Matsuo, Kou; Seta, Yuji; Yamashita, Yoshihiro; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The present paper provides general dentists with an introduction to the clinical applications and significance of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the oral and maxillofacial regions. Specifically, the method and characteristics of MRA are first explained using the relevant MR sequences. Next, clinical applications to the oral and maxillofacial regions, such as identification of hemangiomas and surrounding vessels by MRA, are discussed. Moreover, the clinical significance of MRA for other regions is presented to elucidate future clinical applications of MRA in the oral and maxillofacial regions. PMID:23118751

  11. Assessment of semi-automated nucleic acid testing programme in a Regional Blood Transfusion Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Mishra, Kanchan Kumar; Trivedi, Apeksha; Sosa, Sheetal; Patel, Krima

    2017-01-01

    Detection of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), hepatitis-C (HCV) and hepatitis-B virus (HBV) in the blood donors is crucial. An efficient form of detection is nucleic acid testing (NAT) in blood screening. We assessed the suitability of commercial NAT testing in a developing country, focusing on the Altona RealStar assay and the method of Sacace Biotechnologies. We have standardised and validated commercially available NAT kits with a semi-automated system for detection of HBV, HCV and HIV-1 in blood donations. The MP-NAT (mini-pool) assay consists of pooling of sample, virus extraction, amplification and detection with commercially available NAT kits. An internal control (IC) is incorporated in the assay to monitor the extraction, target amplification and detection process. The sensitivity of the Altona RealStar assay at 10-MP for each viral target was evaluated, HBV showed amplification in all diluted positive samples of 100, 50, 25, 10 and 5 IU/ml. HIV and HCV infected samples showed amplification in all diluted positive samples of 500, 100, 50 and 30 IU/ml. For HIV, out of six diluted samples of 30 IU/ml, five were amplified. A total of 14,170 seronegative blood samples were tested by RealStar PCR kit in 10-MP and 6 (0.042%) samples/pools were positive. A total of 65,362 seronegative blood donations were also tested by kits of Sacace Biotechnologies, in 10-MP and 45 (0.075%) pools were positive. The prevalence of combined NAT yield cases among routine donors was 1 in 1559 donations tested for all the 3 viruses. The semi-automated combined system for NAT screening assays is robust, sensitive, reproducible, and this gives an additional layer of safety with affordable cost.

  12. Delayed Treatment with Sodium Hydrosulfide Improves Regional Blood Flow and Alleviates Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP)-Induced Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Akbar; Druzhyna, Nadiya; Szabo, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis is a serious medical condition, caused by a severe systemic infection resulting in a systemic inflammatory response. Recent studies have suggested the therapeutic potential of donors of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gasotransmitter and biological mediator in various diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of H2S supplementation in sepsis, with special reference to its effect on the modulation of regional blood flow. We infused sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a compound that produces H2S in aqueous solution (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg/h, for 1 h at each dose level) in control rats or rats 24 h after CLP, and measured blood flow using fluorescent microspheres. In normal control animals, NaHS induced a characteristic redistribution of blood flow, and reduced cardiac, hepatic, and renal blood flow in a dose-dependent fashion. In contrast, in rats subjected to CLP, cardiac, hepatic, and renal blood flow was significantly reduced; infusion of NaHS (1 mg/kg/h and 3 mg/kg/h) significantly increased organ blood flow. In other words, the effect of H2S on regional blood flow is dependent on the status of the animals (i.e., a decrease in blood flow in normal controls, but an increase in blood flow in CLP). We have also evaluated the effect of delayed treatment with NaHS on organ dysfunction and the inflammatory response by treating the animals with NaHS (3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (i.p.) at 24 h after the start of the CLP procedure; plasma levels of various cytokines and tissue indicators of inflammatory cell infiltration and oxidative stress were measured 6 h later. After 24 h of CLP, glomerular function was significantly impaired, as evidenced by markedly increased (over 4-fold over baseline) blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels; this increase was also significantly reduced by treatment with NaHS. NaHS also attenuated the CLP-induced increases in malondialdehyde levels (an index of

  13. Discrepant post filter ionized calcium concentrations by common blood gas analyzers in CRRT using regional citrate anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Patrik; Kuhn, Sven-Olaf; Stracke, Sylvia; Gründling, Matthias; Knigge, Stephan; Selleng, Sixten; Helm, Maximilian; Friesecke, Sigrun; Abel, Peter; Kallner, Anders; Nauck, Matthias; Petersmann, Astrid

    2015-09-08

    Ionized calcium (iCa) concentration is often used in critical care and measured using blood gas analyzers at the point of care. Controlling and adjusting regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) involves measuring the iCa concentration in two samples: systemic with physiological iCa concentrations and post filter samples with very low iCa concentrations. However, modern blood gas analyzers are optimized for physiological iCa concentrations which might make them less suitable for measuring low iCa in blood with a high concentration of citrate. We present results of iCa measurements from six different blood gas analyzers and the impact on clinical decisions based on the recommendations of the dialysis' device manufacturer. The iCa concentrations of systemic and post filter samples were measured using six distinct, frequently used blood gas analyzers. We obtained iCa results of 74 systemic and 84 post filter samples from patients undergoing RCA for CRRT at the University Medicine of Greifswald. The systemic samples showed concordant results on all analyzers with median iCa concentrations ranging from 1.07 to 1.16 mmol/L. The medians of iCa concentrations for post filter samples ranged from 0.21 to 0.50 mmol/L. Results of >70% of the post filter samples would lead to major differences in decisions regarding citrate flow depending on the instrument used. Measurements of iCa in post filter samples may give misleading information in monitoring the RCA. Recommendations of the dialysis manufacturer need to be revised. Meanwhile, little weight should be given to post filter iCa. Reference methods for low iCa in whole blood containing citrate should be established.

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  20. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back and ... the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  1. Quantification of regional myocardial blood flow using dynamic H2(15)O PET and factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J Y; Lee, D S; Lee, J S; Kim, S K; Cheon, G J; Yeo, J S; Shin, S A; Chung, J K; Lee, M C

    2001-05-01

    Because the use of factor analysis has been proposed for extracting pure physiologic temporal or spatial information from dynamic nuclear medicine images, factor analysis should be capable of robustly estimating regional myocardial blood flow (rMBF) using H2(15)O PET without additional C15O PET, which is a cumbersome procedure for patients. Therefore, we measured rMBF using time-activity curves (TACs) obtained from factor analysis of dynamic myocardial H2(15)O PET images without the aid of C15O PET. H2(15)O PET of six healthy dogs at rest and during stress was performed simultaneously with microsphere studies using 85Sr, 46Sc, and 113SN: We performed factor analysis in two steps after reorienting and masking the images to include only the cardiac region. The first step discriminated each factor in the spatial distribution and acquired the input functions, and the second step extracted regional-tissue TACS: Image-derived input functions obtained by factor analysis were compared with those obtained by the sampling method. rMBF calculated using a compartmental model with tissue TACs from the second step of the factor analysis was compared with rMBF measured by microsphere studies. Factor analysis was successful for all the dynamic H2(15)O PET images. The input functions obtained by factor analysis were nearly equal to those obtained by arterial blood sampling, except for the expected delay. The correlation between rMBF obtained by factor analysis and rMBF obtained by microsphere studies was good (r = 0.95). The correlation between rMBF obtained by the region-of-interest method and rMBF obtained by microsphere studies was also good (r = 0.93). rMBF can be measured robustly by factor analysis using dynamic myocardial H2(15)O PET images without additional C15O blood-pool PET.

  2. Identification of differentially methylated BRCA1 and CRISP2 DNA regions as blood surrogate markers for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istas, Geoffrey; Declerck, Ken; Pudenz, Maria; Szic, Katarzyna Szarc Vel; Lendinez-Tortajada, Veronica; Leon-Latre, Montserrat; Heyninck, Karen; Haegeman, Guy; Casasnovas, Jose A; Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Heiss, Christian; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2017-07-11

    Genome-wide Illumina InfiniumMethylation 450 K DNA methylation analysis was performed on blood samples from clinical atherosclerosis patients (n = 8) and healthy donors (n = 8) in the LVAD study (NCT02174133, NCT01799005). Multiple differentially methylated regions (DMR) could be identified in atherosclerosis patients, related to epigenetic control of cell adhesion, chemotaxis, cytoskeletal reorganisations, cell proliferation, cell death, estrogen receptor pathways and phagocytic immune responses. Furthermore, a subset of 34 DMRs related to impaired oxidative stress, DNA repair, and inflammatory pathways could be replicated in an independent cohort study of donor-matched healthy and atherosclerotic human aorta tissue (n = 15) and human carotid plaque samples (n = 19). Upon integrated network analysis, BRCA1 and CRISP2 DMRs were identified as most central disease-associated DNA methylation biomarkers. Differentially methylated BRCA1 and CRISP2 regions were verified by MassARRAY Epityper and pyrosequencing assays and could be further replicated in blood, aorta tissue and carotid plaque material of atherosclerosis patients. Moreover, methylation changes at BRCA1 and CRISP2 specific CpG sites were consistently associated with subclinical atherosclerosis measures (coronary calcium score and carotid intima media thickness) in an independent sample cohort of middle-aged men with subclinical cardiovascular disease in the Aragon Workers' Health Study (n = 24). Altogether, BRCA1 and CRISP2 DMRs hold promise as novel blood surrogate markers for early risk stratification and CVD prevention.

  3. Plasma Vitamin E and Blood Selenium Concentrations in Norwegian Dairy Cows: Regional Differences and Relations to Feeding and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivertsen T

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma α-tocopherol (vit E and blood selenium (Se concentrations in February were determined in samples from 314 dairy cows in Norway, selected to provide a representative subset of the Norwegian dairy cow population. Each sample was followed by a questionnaire with information about feeding of the cow at the time of sampling. The results were correlated to herd data and to calving and health data for each cow from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System and the Norwegian Cattle Health Recording System. The mean concentrations were 6.9 μg vit E per ml plasma and 0.16 μg Se per g blood. Both levels were highest in mid lactation. Plasma vit E varied with the amount of silage fed to the cow, while blood Se varied with the amount of concentrates and mineral supplements, and with geographical region. No differences in vit E or Se levels were found between cows with recorded treatments for mastitis, parturient paresis or reproductive disorders in the lactation during or immediately prior to sampling, and those without such treatments. For ketosis, a small difference in blood Se was found between the groups with or without recorded treatments. It is concluded that winter-fed lactating cows in Norway had an adequate plasma level of vit E and a marginal-to-adequate level of Se.

  4. Plasma Vitamin E and Blood Selenium Concentrations in Norwegian Dairy Cows: Regional Differences and Relations to Feeding and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østerås O

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma α-tocopherol (vit E and blood selenium (Se concentrations in February were determined in samples from 314 dairy cows in Norway, selected to provide a representative subset of the Norwegian dairy cow population. Each sample was followed by a questionnaire with information about feeding of the cow at the time of sampling. The results were correlated to herd data and to calving and health data for each cow from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System and the Norwegian Cattle Health Recording System. The mean concentrations were 6.9 μg vit E per ml plasma and 0.16 μg Se per g blood. Both levels were highest in mid lactation. Plasma vit E varied with the amount of silage fed to the cow, while blood Se varied with the amount of concentrates and mineral supplements, and with geographical region. No differences in vit E or Se levels were found between cows with recorded treatments for mastitis, parturient paresis or reproductive disorders in the lactation during or immediately prior to sampling, and those without such treatments. For ketosis, a small difference in blood Se was found between the groups with or without recorded treatments. It is concluded that winter-fed lactating cows in Norway had an adequate plasma level of vit E and a marginal-to-adequate level of Se.

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow assessed by 133Xe inhalation and emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirahata, N; Henriksen, L; Vorstrup, S

    1985-01-01

    was practically symmetrical with a side-to-side difference averaging 1.4 +/- 1.4 ml/100 g/min. This means that a difference exceeding 4.2 ml/100 g/min (approximately 9% of mean CBF) is abnormal with a confidence level of below 5%. The measured average CBF and cerebellar blood flow were 56 +/- 7 and 54 +/- 6 ml...

  6. Hybrid model of arm for analysis of regional blood oxygenation in non-invasive optical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowocień, Sylwester; Mroczka, Janusz

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a new comprehensive approach to modeling and analysis of processes occurring during the blood flow in the arm's small vessels as well as non-invasive measurement method of mixed venous oxygen saturation. During the work, a meta-analysis of available physiological data was performed and based on its result a hybrid model of forearm vascular tree was proposed. The model, in its structure, takes into account a classical nonlinear hydro-electric analogy in conjunction with light-tissue interaction. Several geometries of arm vascular tree obtained from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image were analyzed which allowed to proposed the structure of electrical analog network. Proposed model allows to simulate the behavior of forearm blood flow from the vascular tree mechanics point of view, as well as effects of the impact of cuff and vessel wall mechanics on the recorded photoplethysmographic signals. In particular, it allows to analyze the reaction and anatomical effects in small vessels and microcirculation caused by occlusive maneuver in selected techniques, what was of particular interest to authors and motivation to undertake research in this area. Preliminary studies using proposed model showed that inappropriate selection of occlusion maneuver parameters (e.g. occlusion time, cuff pressure etc.), cause dangerous turbulence of blood flow in the venous section of the vascular tree.

  7. Spinal cord contusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  8. Candida species distribution and fluconazole susceptibility of blood isolates at a regional hospital in Passo Fundo, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Giseli C. Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Candidemia is a bloodstream infection produced by Candida genus yeasts. Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize the epidemiology and the fluconazole susceptibility in Candida species isolated from patients at a regional hospital in Passo Fundo, RS. Methods: Records from the laboratory were used to identify patients with positive blood cultures for Candida between 2010 and 2011. The in vitro activity of fluconazole was determined using the disk diffusion method. Results: Were analyzed 24 positive blood cultures for Candida and found a 54.16% mortality rate. C. albicans was the most prevalent species, followed by C. parapsilosis and C. krusei. For susceptibility to fluconazole, C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis showed 100% sensitivity. However, C. krusei was 100% resistant; and C. glabrata, 50% resistant. Conclusion: The high mortality and fluconazole resistance rates emphasize the importance of the diagnosis of candidemia in a hospital environment.

  9. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coderre Terence J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS, impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  11. Study of Adverse Whole Blood Donor Reactions in Normal Healthy Blood Donors: Experience of Tertiary Health Care Centre in Jammu Region

    OpenAIRE

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2014-01-01

    Whole blood donation is generally a safe procedure, but sometimes adverse reactions of varying severity may occur during or at completion of blood donation process. The aim of the present study was to estimate the frequency and type of adverse events during blood donation. This retrospective study conducted from November 2011 to December 2012 at Department of Blood Transfusion Medicine GMC Jammu. All whole blood donations at our Department was analyzed. All adverse events occurring during or ...

  12. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  13. Serial measurement of regional cerebral blood flow in patients with SAH using 133Xe inhalation and emission computerized tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickey, B; Vorstrup, S; Voldby, Bo

    1984-01-01

    defined regional flow decrease in the vascular territories of the anterior or middle cerebral arteries. Severe vasospasm was noted in three of these patients in whom arteriography was performed in the 2nd week post SAH. Diffuse bihemispheric CBF decreases were noted later in the course of delayed......A noninvasive three-dimensional method for measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF), xenon-133 inhalation and emission computerized tomography, was used to investigate the CBF changes accompanying delayed neurological deterioration following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A total of 67 measurements were...

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow during light sleep--a H(2)(15)O-PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Law, Ian; Wiltschiøtz, Gordon

    2002-01-01

    This is the first report on the distribution of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes during stage-1 sleep or somnolence. Two hypotheses were tested: (A) that rCBF differed between the awake relaxed state and stage-1 sleep, (B) that hypnagogic hallucinations frequently experienced at sleep ...... onset would be accompanied by measurable changes in rCBF using positron emission tomography (PET). Eight subjects were PET-scanned with (15)O-labeled water injection in three conditions: awake, stage-1 sleep with reportable experiences and stage-1 sleep without reportable experiences...

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow alterations remote from the site of intracranial tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endo, H; Larsen, B; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    hyperemic). These remote rCBF abnormalities were found in the lower posterior part of the hemisphere in six cases, and in the frontal region in three. The location of the remote rCBF abnormality seemed to depend on the site of the tumor: cases with frontal and posterior fossa mass lesions had hyperemia...... in the lower part of the temporooccipital regions, cases with centroparietal mass lesions had hyperemia mostly in the frontal region. This may mean that the remote rCBF abnormality is due to local tissue compression against unyielding anatomical structures, namely, the tentorium and the falx. It is suggested...... that these abnormalities may constitute evidence of an early stage of a dangerous clinical condition: a state of preherniation....

  16. Performance, endoparasitary control and blood values of ewes locally adapted in semiarid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Josiel Borges; Bezerra, Ana Carla Diógenes Suassuna; Guilhermino, Magda Maria; Leite, Jacinara Hody Gurgel Morais; da Silva, Wilma Emanuela; Paiva, Renato Diógenes Macedo; Barbosa, Tallysson Nogueira; de Sousa, José Ernandes Rufino; Façanha, Débora Andréa Evangelista

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated the variation in the prevalence of endoparasitoses and their impact on body condition and blood values of sheep of the Morada Nova breed. A total of 138 ewes were examined for their morphology (body weight, BW; body condition score, BCS), parasitology (faecal egg count, FEC; Famacha© score; coproculture), hematology (red blood cell count,RBC); hemoglobin concentration, HE; packet cell volume, PCV; mean corpuscular volume, MCV,; mean corpuscular hemoglobin, MCH; mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, MCHC; leukocytes, WBC) and serum biochemistry (glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, creatinine, total protein, albumin, globulin, AST and ALT). Overall the animals presented higher BW and BCS in the months of September and December, however, with high FEC, in addition to a large number of animals with Famacha score 4 and 5. The results showed that the main hematophagous worm affecting the sheep, the genus Haemonchus ssp, appeared in a greater proportion (30-71.66%) than the other worms in all months of the study, except in March. About 30% of the hematological values found in the study are outside the reference ranges for suable sheep e 45.50% for serum biochemistry. These findings demonstrate the most healthy period of the year was from March to June for endoparasites control, however, in the months of September and December the animals showed better performance measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow measurements in schizophrenics by /sup 133/Xe inhalation and intra-venous injection method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Seki, Hiroyasu; Sumiya, Hisashi; Ishida, Hiroko; Taki, Junichi; Hisada, Kinichi; Kurachi, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Nariyoshi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow measurements were performed in 25 schizophrenic patients and 25 healthy volunteers by /sup 133/Xe inhalation and intra-venous injection method. Schizophrenic patients were classified into the following three groups. Group I: 8 patients without auditory hallucination measured by 2-dimensional /sup 133/Xe inhalation method. Group II: 6 patients with auditory hallucination measured by the same method as in Group I. Group III: 11 patients, including 2 patients with auditory hallucination measured by 3-dimensional /sup 133/Xe intra-venous injection method at the level of OM+5 cm. Bilateral regional percent values, which were obtained by dividing regional values by hemispheric mean or sectional mean values, for frontal lobes in Group I and II were significantly lower than those in the controls. In addition, bilateral regional percent values for bilateral temporal lobes in Group II were significantly higher than those in the controls. In Group III, regional percent values for right frontal lobes and those for posterior part of central gray matter showed significant decrease and increase, respectively. These findings would suggest that the negative symptoms of schizophrenia are related to the hypofrontal and positive ones to the hypertemporoparietal activity.

  18. Multi-regional investigation of the relationship between functional MRI blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD activation and GABA concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley D Harris

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have reported an inter-individual correlation between regional GABA concentration, as measured by MRS, and the amplitude of the functional blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD response in the same region. In this study, we set out to investigate whether this coupling generalizes across cortex. In 18 healthy participants, we performed edited MRS measurements of GABA and BOLD-fMRI experiments using regionally related activation paradigms. Regions and tasks were the: occipital cortex with a visual grating stimulus; auditory cortex with a white noise stimulus; sensorimotor cortex with a finger-tapping task; frontal eye field with a saccade task; and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with a working memory task. In contrast to the prior literature, no correlation between GABA concentration and BOLD activation was detected in any region. The origin of this discrepancy is not clear. Subtle differences in study design or insufficient power may cause differing results; these and other potential reasons for the discrepant results are discussed. This negative result, although it should be interpreted with caution, has a larger sample size than prior positive results, and suggests that the relationship between GABA and the BOLD response may be more complex than previously thought.

  19. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school......-based prospective cohort study. All 5th and 6th grade students (11-13 years) at 14 schools in the Region of Southern Denmark were invited to participate (N = 1,348). Data were collected in 2010 and again two years later, using an e-survey completed during school time. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain...... was 86% and 89% at baseline and follow-up, respectively. A group of 13.6% (95% CI: 11.8, 15.6) at baseline and 19.5% (95% CI: 17.1, 22.0) at follow-up reported that they had pain frequently. The frequency of pain was strongly associated with the intensity of pain, i.e., the majority of the participants...

  20. Capillary blood gas analysis in complex regional pain syndrome: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Keijzer, M.H. de; Goris, R.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1) is still a matter of debate. An inflammatory reaction may cause the syndrome. Increasing evidence points to a role for impairment of oxygen metabolism in the affected limb. METHODS: In this pilot study (16 patients) we

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Møller, Kirsten

    2000-01-01

    The absence of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) implies that changes in arterial pressure directly influence cerebral perfusion. It is assumed that dilatation of cerebral arterioles is responsible for the impaired autoregulation. Recently, frontal...... in the anterior cerebral artery would be less affected by an increase in mean arterial pressure compared with the brain area supplied by the middle cerebral artery. Relative changes in cerebral perfusion were determined by transcranial Doppler-measured mean flow velocity (V(mean)), and resistance was determined...... by pulsatility index in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated by concomitant measurements of mean arterial pressure and V(mean) in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries during norepinephrine infusion. Baseline V(mean) was lower in the brain area supplied...

  2. Regional cerebral blood flow in humans at high altitude: gradual ascent and 2 wk at 5,050 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, C K; Smith, K J; Day, T A; Ray, L A; Lewis, N C S; Bakker, A; Macleod, D B; Ainslie, P N

    2014-04-01

    The interindividual variation in ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude is likely reflected in variability in the cerebrovascular responses to high altitude, particularly between brain regions displaying disparate hypoxic sensitivity. We assessed regional differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with Duplex ultrasound of the left internal carotid and vertebral arteries. End-tidal Pco2, oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during a trekking ascent to, and during the first 2 wk at, 5,050 m. Transcranial color-coded Duplex ultrasound (TCCD) was employed to measure flow and diameter of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Measures were collected at 344 m (TCCD-baseline), 1,338 m (CBF-baseline), 3,440 m, and 4,371 m. Following arrival to 5,050 m, regional CBF was measured every 12 h during the first 3 days, once at 5-9 days, and once at 12-16 days. Total CBF was calculated as twice the sum of internal carotid and vertebral flow and increased steadily with ascent, reaching a maximum of 842 ± 110 ml/min (+53 ± 7.6% vs. 1,338 m; mean ± SE) at ∼ 60 h after arrival at 5,050 m. These changes returned to +15 ± 12% after 12-16 days at 5,050 m and were related to changes in SpO2 (R(2) = 0.36; P < 0.0001). TCCD-measured MCA flow paralleled the temporal changes in total CBF. Dilation of the MCA was sustained on days 2 (+12.6 ± 4.6%) and 8 (+12.9 ± 2.9%) after arrival at 5,050 m. We observed no significant differences in regional CBF at any time point. In conclusion, the variability in CBF during ascent and acclimatization is related to ventilatory acclimatization, as reflected in changes in SpO2.

  3. Study and therapeutic progress on spinal cord perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tiefeng; Guo, Yunbao; Shi, Lei; Yu, Jinlu

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas (PMAVFs) are rare and belong to type IV spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Little is known regarding the treatment and prognosis of spinal cord PMAVFs. In the present study the relevant literature from PubMed was reviewed, and it was found that these fistulas can occur at all ages but are more common in children. In children, most spinal cord PMAVFs are large and with high flow, begin with bleeding and are frequently associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. However, in adults, most spinal cord PMAVFs are small and with low flow and begin with progressive spinal cord dysfunction. The early diagnosis of spinal cord PMAVFs is generally difficult, and symptoms can be very severe at the time of diagnosis. Digital subtraction angiography remains the gold standard; however, computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography are also promising. Spinal cord PMAVFs can be treated by endovascular embolization, surgical removal or a combination of the two methods. Most spinal cord PMAVFs show good outcomes after the appropriate treatment, and the prognosis is primarily associated with the blood flow of the PMAVF. For high-flow spinal cord PMAVFs, endovascular embolization is more effective and can lead to a good outcome; however, for low-flow spinal cord PMAVFs, surgical removal or the combination with endovascular embolization is the optimal choice. The prognosis for low-flow types is slightly worse than for high-flow spinal cord PMAVFs in children, but the outcome is acceptable.

  4. Reproductive biology of blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Munawar; Yasin, Zulfigar; Hwai, Tan Shau

    2017-03-01

    A study on the reproductive cycle of the blood cockle Anadara granosa (Bivalvia: Arcidae) was conducted at three different areas in the northern region of the Strait of Malacca. A total of 1,920 samples of adult A. granosa (38-71 mm length) were collected from June 2009 until September 2010. Qualitative techniques (gonadal microscopic fresh smear test and histology analysis) as well as quantitative techniques (analysis of condition index and gonadal index) were used to predict monthly gonadal development stages of A. granosa. The gonadal index of A. granosa from Banda Aceh (Indonesia) ( r = 0.469, P > 0.05) and Pulau Pinang (Malaysia) ( r = 0.123, P > 0.05) did not show any correlation to their condition index, whereas the gonadal index of A. granosa from Lhokseumawe (Indonesia) ( r = 0.609, P reproductive cycles were observed: each from three to six months. The process of releasing gametes is termed dribble spawning, and is the same in all populations. The principle component analysis (PCA) indicated that A. granosa reproduction was affected by interaction between internal physiological factors and indigenous environmental factors. In all sampling areas, phytoplankton density played a key role in the reproductive cycle in A. granosa. Information on the reproductive biology of this species is essential for species management and to improve the sustainability practices of the fisheries industry. These findings will provide basic information on the biology of the blood cockle A. granosa for stock management in the region.

  5. Charcot spinal arthropathy in a paraplegic weight lifter: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, David M; Hilton, Andrew I; Tucker, Stewart K

    2006-05-15

    A case report of aggressive multilevel Charcot spinal arthropathy treated with staged spinal instrumentation. To report an unusual case of Charcot spinal arthropathy, given the rapidity of progression and extent of tissue destruction, and present the results of successful spinal instrumentation and stabilization. Charcot spinal arthropathy in the long-standing paraplegic patient is more commonly seen in those who have undergone prior spinal surgery and is usually restricted to 2 spinal levels. A 36-year-old amateur weight lifter with T6 complete paraplegia presented with lower thoracic back pain, a kyphotic deformity of the thoracolumbar region, and gross spinal instability on transferring. Imaging revealed extensive bony destruction from T10-T12 and complete absence of spinal tissue over the affected levels. Staged anterior and posterior spinal instrumentation from T3 to L4 was performed. Spinal stabilization was achieved, and the patient was pain free and able to resume light training at 6-month follow-up. We would advise a high index of suspicion of Charcot arthropathy in the active paraplegic patient presenting with back pain caudal to their sensory level. Staged spinal instrumentation is an effective treatment for multilevel Charcot spinal arthropathy.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical ... Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is ... spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_ ...

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow in various types of brain tumor. Effect of the space-occupying lesion on blood flow in brain tissue close to and remote from tumor site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, K; Skyhøj Olsen, T; Lassen, N A

    1982-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 23 patients with brain tumors using the 133Xe intra-carotid injection method and a 254 channel gamma camera. The glioblastomas (4) and astrocytomas (4) all showed hyperemia in the tumor and tumor-near region. This was also seen in several...

  9. The neurobiology of glucocerebrosidase-associated parkinsonism: a positron emission tomography study of dopamine synthesis and regional cerebral blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Masdeu, Joseph C.; Kohn, Philip D.; Ianni, Angela; Lopez, Grisel; Groden, Catherine; Chapman, Molly C.; Cropp, Brett; Eisenberg, Daniel P.; Maniwang, Emerson D.; Davis, Joie; Wiggs, Edythe; Berman, Karen F.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in GBA, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, are common risk factors for Parkinson disease, as patients with Parkinson disease are over five times more likely to carry GBA mutations than healthy controls. Patients with GBA mutations generally have an earlier onset of Parkinson disease and more cognitive impairment than those without GBA mutations. We investigated whether GBA mutations alter the neurobiology of Parkinson disease, studying brain dopamine synthesis and resting regional cerebral blood flow in 107 subjects (38 women, 69 men). We measured dopamine synthesis with 18F-fluorodopa positron emission tomography, and resting regional cerebral blood flow with H215O positron emission tomography in the wakeful, resting state in four study groups: (i) patients with Parkinson disease and Gaucher disease (n = 7, average age = 56.6 ± 9.2 years); (ii) patients with Parkinson disease without GBA mutations (n = 11, 62.1 ± 7.1 years); (iii) patients with Gaucher disease without parkinsonism, but with a family history of Parkinson disease (n = 14, 52.6 ± 12.4 years); and (iv) healthy GBA-mutation carriers with a family history of Parkinson disease (n = 7, 50.1 ± 18 years). We compared each study group with a matched control group. Data were analysed with region of interest and voxel-based methods. Disease duration and Parkinson disease functional and staging scores were similar in the two groups with parkinsonism, as was striatal dopamine synthesis: both had greatest loss in the caudal striatum (putamen Ki loss: 44 and 42%, respectively), with less reduction in the caudate (20 and 18% loss). However, the group with both Parkinson and Gaucher diseases showed decreased resting regional cerebral blood flow in the lateral parieto-occipital association cortex and precuneus bilaterally. Furthermore, two subjects with Gaucher disease without parkinsonian manifestations showed diminished striatal dopamine. In conclusion, the

  10. Auto-validation of complete blood counts in an outpatient's regional laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froom, Paul; Barak, Mira

    2015-02-01

    The rate of auto-validation is dependent on the ability of the laboratory information system (LIS) to integrate historical data, on the frequency and methods for identifying analyzer errors, and on the criteria for reflex testing, including the need for peripheral smear review. The rate of auto-validation in outpatient laboratories, however, is unclear. We examined 45,925 consecutive complete blood count (CBC) test results (1 January, 2014-31 January, 2014) from patients aged 50±24 years. The LIS auto-validates all samples according to set criteria. Technicians validated test results when previous CBC test results were required to determine: 1) the need for peripheral slide review and/or sample rerun or 2) the need for reflex testing to detect autoimmune hemolytic anemia or β-thalassemia minor. The auto-validation rates were 97.6% after rejecting results requiring validation to determine the need for a peripheral smear review and/or sample rerun. This decreased to 92.9% after including reflex testing to determine the reasons for normocytic and microcytic anemia. We estimated that auto-validation decreased the workload by 7.7-11.6 h per 3000 test results. We conclude that very high auto-validation rates are possible in outpatient general laboratories, leading to conformity in the validation process and a considerable estimated savings in technician time. Further studies are needed in other settings.

  11. Basal and hyperaemic myocardial blood flow in regionally denervated canine hearts: an in vivo study with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimoldi, Ornella E.; Camici, Paolo G. [Hammersmith Hospital, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Drake-Holland, Angela J. [Robert Gordon University, School of Pharmacy, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Noble, Mark I.M. [University of Aberdeen, Department of Cardiology, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) have demonstrated the impact of this disease on cardiac sympathetic innervation and myocardial blood flow (MBF). To investigate the effects of selective partial sympathetic denervation of the left ventricle (LV) on baseline and hyperaemic MBF, we measured myocardial presynaptic catecholamine re-uptake (uptake-1), {beta}-adrenoceptor ({beta}-AR) density and MBF non-invasively by means of PET in a canine model of regional sympathetic denervation. In 11 anaesthetised dogs, the sympathetic nerves of the free wall and septum of the LV were removed by means of dissection and phenol painting. Three weeks later, the animals were studied with PET. MBF was measured at baseline and following i.v. adenosine (140 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) and dobutamine (20 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) using{sup 15}O-labelled water. Sympathetic denervation was confirmed by an 80{+-}12% decrease in the volume of distribution (V{sub d}) of [{sup 11}C]hydroxyephedrine (HED) compared with innervated regions. Myocardial {beta}-AR density was measured using [{sup 11}C]CGP12177. Innervated and denervated regions showed no differences in MBF at baseline and during adenosine or dobutamine. [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}was inversely correlated with MBF in both regions at baseline, and the correlation was lost during hyperaemia in denervated regions. However, for any given value of MBF, [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}was significantly lower in the denervated regions. {beta}-AR density was comparable in denervated and innervated regions (17.9{+-}4.2 vs 18.4{+-}3.3 pmol g{sup -1};p=NS). In this experimental model, selective, regional sympathetic denervation of the LV, which results in a profound reduction in [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}, did not affect baseline or hyperaemic MBF. In addition, we demonstrated that, under baseline conditions, there was a significant inverse correlation between [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}and MBF in

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood autism: a SPET study with SPM evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroni, Luca; Orsi, Alessandra; Monti, Lucia; Hayek, Youssef; Rocchi, Raffaele; Vattimo, Angelo G

    2008-02-01

    To establish a link between rCBF assessed with Tc-ECD SPET and the clinical manifestation of the disease. We performed the study on 11 patients (five girls and six boys; mean age 11.2 years) displaying autistic behaviour and we compared their data with that of an age-matched reference group of eight normal children. A quantitative analysis of rCBF was performed calculating a perfusion index (PI) and an asymmetry index (AI) in each lobe. Images were analysed with statistical parametric mapping software, following the spatial normalization of SPET images for a standard brain. A statistically significant (P=0.003) global reduction of CBF was found in the group of autistic children (PI=1.07+/-0.07) when compared with the reference group (PI=1.25+/-0.12). Moreover, a significant difference was also observed for the right-to-left asymmetry of hemispheric perfusion between the control group and autistic patients (P=0.0085) with a right prevalence greater in autistic (2.90+/-1.68) with respect to normal children (1.12+/-0.49). Our data show a significant decrease of global cerebral perfusion in autistic children in comparison with their normal counterparts and the existence of left-hemispheric dysfunction, especially in the temporo-parietal areas devoted to language and the comprehension of music and sounds. We suggest that these abnormal areas are related to the cognitive impairment observed in autistic children, such as language deficits, impairment of cognitive development and object representation, and abnormal perception and responses to sensory stimuli. Tc-ECD SPET seems to be sensitive in revealing brain blood flow alterations and left-to-right asymmetries, when neuroradiological patterns are normal.

  13. A clinicopathological analysis of unusual extraventricular neurocytoma of spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhi

    2013-08-01

    attach the dura mater and invade the surrounding tissues. The tumor was removed totally. Microscopic examination showed that a moderate cellular tumor was composed of uniform cells and arranged in sheets. The tumor cells had round nuclei, finely speckled chromatin and clear cytoplasm. Some cells had perinuclear haloes resembling oligodendroglioma. In some areas, the tumor cells with elongated cytoplasmic processes arranged radially around the blood vessels with myxoid degeneration, forming a structure of "perivascular pseudorosette", resembling the ependymoma. Mitotic activity and necrotic area were not observed. The tumor cells were strongly immunopositive for Syn, focally positive for NSE, S-100 and Oligo-2, but negative for Vim, CK, EMA, NeuN and GFAP. Ki-67 index was less than 1% in our case. Based on clinical presentation and histological findings, a final histological diagnosis of primary EVN in spinal cord was made according to the criteria of WHO classification. The patient has not received radiotherapy and attended follow-up for 6 months, without any neurological deficit or signs of recurrence. Conclusion Spinal EVN is extremely rare and there are no more than 20 bona fide cases reported previously all over the world. It might originate from neuronal precursor cells surrounding the region of central canal in fetal life. The definite diagnosis of this tumor should be made under the microscopical examination because the preoperatively radiological appearance of the tumor does not differ from other tumors occurring in spinal cord. Although good prognosis obtained from gross total resection in most of reported patients with this tumor, adjuvant radiotherapy is recommend for those tumors with atypical histological features to avoid the tumor recurrence. Due to the rarity of its site, the tumor can easily be confused with other tumors of spinal cord with clear cells features and ependymoma-like structure. The strictly differential diagnosis should be made when the

  14. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  15. Brain activation during vaginocervical self-stimulation and orgasm in women with complete spinal cord injury: fMRI evidence of mediation by the vagus nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisaruk, Barry R; Whipple, Beverly; Crawford, Audrita; Liu, Wen-Ching; Kalnin, Andrew; Mosier, Kristine

    2004-10-22

    Women diagnosed with complete spinal cord injury (SCI) at T10 or above report vaginal-cervical perceptual awareness. To test whether the Vagus nerves, which bypass the spinal cord, provide the afferent pathway for this response, we hypothesized that the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii (NTS) region of the medulla oblongata, to which the Vagus nerves project, is activated by vaginal-cervical self-stimulation (CSS) in such women, as visualized by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Regional blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity was imaged during CSS and other motor and sensory procedures, using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis with head motion artifact correction. Physiatric examination and MRI established the location and extent of spinal cord injury. In order to demarcate the NTS, a gustatory stimulus and hand movement were used to activate the superior region of the NTS and the Nucleus Cuneatus adjacent to the inferior region of the NTS, respectively. Each of four women with interruption, or "complete" injury, of the spinal cord (ASIA criteria), and one woman with significant, but "incomplete" SCI, all at or above T10, showed activation of the inferior region of the NTS during CSS. Each woman showed analgesia, measured at the fingers, during CSS, confirming previous findings. Three women experienced orgasm during the CSS. The brain regions that showed activation during the orgasms included hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, medial amygdala, anterior cingulate, frontal, parietal, and insular cortices, and cerebellum. We conclude that the Vagus nerves provide a spinal cord-bypass pathway for vaginal-cervical sensibility in women with complete spinal cord injury above the level of entry into spinal cord of the known genitospinal nerves.

  16. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  17. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  18. [Evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in ethanol dependent patients: pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pach, Dorota; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Szurkowska, Magdalena; Kamenczak, Aleksandra; Targosz, Dorota; Gawlikowski, Tomasz; Huszno, Bohdan; Głowa, Bogusław

    2007-01-01

    The depressant actions of ethanol in the brain is known. SPECT is non invasive method to measure the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and to evaluate indirectly the brain metabolism. The aim of the study is to evaluate morphologic and functional status of CNS using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in chronic alcoholics. Examined group consisted of 18 male alcoholic patients aged from 28 to 52 years (x = 42.1 +/- 5.4) treated at the Ward of Toxicology and Environmental Diseaes (Detoxification Unit). Only patients without prior head injury, CNS inflammatory changes, epilepsy, migraine, diabetes mellitus or other systemic injury were included. Alcohol dependence was diagnosed according to ICD-10 criteria. The intensity of withdrawal syndrome was measured using CIWA-A scale. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured using 99mTc-ECD SPECT with the double head E.CAM Siemens gamma camera. The reference group, necessary to obtain a normal values for the gamma camera applied, consisted of 31 healthy subjects (33.32 +/- 10.99 y). The mean values of rCBF in all examined region of frontal and temporal lobes, and in basal ganglia bothsided were significantly lower in the group of alcoholic patients than in the control group. No significant difference between rCBF in occipital lobes except the occipital inferior region, and in parietal lobes except the parietal superior region. Symetrical hypoperfusion (rCBF-2SD) in the frontal lobes was stated in 11 (61.1%), in temporal lobes in 4 (22.2%), in parietal and occipital lobes in 3 (16.7%) of the patients examined. In 7 the patients examined rCBF disturbances in basal ganglia were found (bothsided in 4, leftsided in 2, and rightsided in 2 the patients). Focal rCBF changes in the parietal, frontal and temporal lobes localised mostly on the left hemisphere were stated in 27.8% of the alcoholics examined. In concusion, the metabolic disturbances and the brain morphological changes mostly in frontal and temporal lobes due to chronic

  19. The effect of coronary revascularization on regional myocardial blood flow as assessed by stress positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bober, Robert M; Thompson, Caleb D; Morin, Daniel P

    2017-06-01

    We examined whether regional improvement in stress myocardial blood flow (sMBF) following angiography-guided coronary revascularization depends on the existence of a perfusion defect on positron emission tomography (PET). Percent stenosis on coronary angiography often is the main factor when deciding whether to perform revascularization, but it does not reliably relate to maximum sMBF. PET is a validated method of assessing sMBF. 19 patients (79% M, 65 ± 12 years) underwent PET stress before and after revascularization (17 PCI, 2 CABG). Pre- and post-revascularization sMBF for each left ventricular quadrant (anterior, septal, lateral, and inferior) was stratified by the presence or absence of a baseline perfusion defect on PET and whether that region was revascularized. Intervention was performed on 40 of 76 quadrants. When a baseline perfusion defect existed in a region that was revascularized (n = 26), post-revascularization flow increased by 0.6 ± 0.7 cc/min/g (1.2 ± 0.4 vs 1.7 ± 0.8, P revascularization was performed (n = 14), sMBF did not change significantly (1.7 ± 0.3 vs 1.5 ± 0.4 cc/min/g, P = 0.16). In regions without a defect that were not revascularized (n = 29), sMBF did not significantly change (2.0 ± 0.6 vs 1.9 ± 0.7, P = 0.7). When a stress-induced perfusion defect exists on PET, revascularization improves sMBF in that region. When there is no such defect, sMBF shows no net change, whether or not intervention is performed in that area. PET stress may be useful for identifying areas of myocardium that could benefit from revascularization, and also areas in which intervention is unlikely to yield improvement in myocardial blood flow.

  20. Prophylactic neuroprotective efficiency of co-administration of Ginkgo biloba and Trifolium pretense against sodium arsenite-induced neurotoxicity and dementia in different regions of brain and spinal cord of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Heba M; Yousef, Mokhtar I; El Mekkawy, Desouki A; Al-Shami, Ahmed S

    2016-08-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential protective role of co-administration of Ginkgo biloba, Trifolium pretenseagainst sodium arsenite-induced neurotoxicity in different parts of brain (Cerebral cortex, Hippocampus, striatum and Hind brain) and in the spinal cord of rats. Sodium arsenite caused impairment in the acquisition and learning in all the behavioral tasks and caused significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-α,thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances andlipid profile, while caused significant decrease in glutathione, total thiol content, total antioxidant capacity, acetylcholinesterase, monoamine oxidase and ATPases activities. These results were confirmed by histopathological, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy examination of different regions of brain. From these results sodium arsenite-induced neurodegenerative disorder in different regions of brain and spinal cord and this could be mediated through modifying the intracellular brain ions homeostasis, cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative damage. The presence of Ginkgo biloba and/orTrifolium pretense with sodium arsenite minimized its neurological damages. It was pronounced that using Ginkgo biloba and Trifolium pretense in combination was more effective as protective agents compared to use eachone of them alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ochratoxin A in adult population of Lleida, Spain: presence in blood plasma and consumption in different regions and seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, M B; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J; Marin, S

    2011-10-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) levels in blood plasma, as well as the consumption of possibly contaminated foodstuffs by adult inhabitants, were determined in three seasons in the plain and the mountain regions of the province of Lleida (Spain). Daily intake of the toxin was estimated in order to evaluate the exposure of the studied population. OTA was extracted from plasma through liquid-liquid extraction followed by immunoaffinity chromatography columns clean-up. Detection was done through HPLC-fluorescence, and limit of detection was 0.018ng/mL. Consumption data of the participants were obtained by means of a food frequency questionnaire. Occurrence of OTA in plasma was 100%. Range was 0.06-10.92ng/mL, and median was 0.50ng/mL. Differences between genders, regions or seasons were not significant, whereas significant differences were found among age groups. Regarding food consumption, significant differences were found between genders, but not between age groups, regions, or seasons. OTA plasma levels were not correlated with food consumption. Distributions of the intake estimations based on plasma levels differed from those based on food consumption and contamination. Mean and median values of the daily intake estimations were below the latest provisional tolerable daily intake of 14ng/kgbw/day, but some high percentiles were above it. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation and characterization from human spinal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Toru; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Sunao; Kudo, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Gentaro; Motomura, Shigeru; Yagihashi, Soroku; Toh, Satoshi

    2012-01-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a fibroblast-like morphology, multilineage potential, long-term viability and capacity for self-renewal. While several articles describe isolating MSCs from various human tissues, there are no reports of isolating MSCs from human spinal ligaments, and their localization in situ. If MSCs are found in human spinal ligaments, they could be used to investigate hypertrophy or ossification of spinal ligaments. To isolate and characterize MSCs from human spinal ligaments, spinal ligaments were harvested aseptically from eight patients during surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. After collagenase digestion, nucleated cells were seeded at an appropriate density to avoid colony-to-colony contact. Cells were cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media to evaluate their multilineage differentiation potential. Immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface markers was performed by flow cytometry. Spinal ligaments were processed for immunostaining using MSC-related antibodies. Cells from human spinal ligaments could be extensively expanded with limited senescence. They were able to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that their phenotypic characteristics met the minimum criteria of MSCs. Immunohistochemistry revealed the localization of CD90-positive cells in the collagenous matrix of the ligament, and in adjacent small blood vessels. We isolated and expanded MSCs from human spinal ligaments and demonstrated localization of MSCs in spinal ligaments. These cells may play an indispensable role in elucidating the pathogenesis of numerous spinal diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma in a geriatric patient under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal subdural haematoma is rare and may be associated with blood dyscrasia, anticoagulant therapy, lumbar puncture, rupture of arteriovenous malformation, tumour bleeding and spinal trauma. We present a 65-year-old female with history of hypertension and atrial fibrillation. She was on anticoagulant. She presented ...

  5. Effects of W-CDMA 1950 MHz EMF emitted by mobile phones on regional cerebral blood flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yoko; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Hikage, Takashi; Terao, Yasuo; Ohnishi, Takashi; Nojima, Toshio; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2009-10-01

    Use of the third generation mobile phone system is increasing worldwide. This is the first study to investigate the effects of the third generation system on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in humans. We compared effects of the electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted from the Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) cellular system versus sham control exposure on rCBF in humans. Nine healthy male volunteers participated in this study. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans were obtained before, during, and after unilateral 30 min EMF exposure. The subtraction analysis revealed no significant rCBF changes caused by the EMF conditions compared with the sham exposure, suggesting that EMF emitted by a third generation mobile phone does not affect rCBF in humans.

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow during light sleep--a H(2)(15)O-PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Law, Ian; Wiltschiøtz, Gordon

    2002-01-01

    . Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed continuously during the experiment. Sleep interviews were performed after each scan. The EEG was scored blindly to determine sleep stage. The sleep interviews revealed a substantial increase in how unrealistic and how leaping the thoughts were during stage-1 sleep. During sleep......This is the first report on the distribution of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes during stage-1 sleep or somnolence. Two hypotheses were tested: (A) that rCBF differed between the awake relaxed state and stage-1 sleep, (B) that hypnagogic hallucinations frequently experienced at sleep...... onset would be accompanied by measurable changes in rCBF using positron emission tomography (PET). Eight subjects were PET-scanned with (15)O-labeled water injection in three conditions: awake, stage-1 sleep with reportable experiences and stage-1 sleep without reportable experiences...

  7. Interictal "patchy" regional cerebral blood flow patterns in migraine patients. A single photon emission computerized tomographic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    In 92 migraine patients and 44 healthy control subjects we recorded regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with single photon emission computerized tomography and (133) Xe inhalation or with i.v. (99m) Tc-HMPAO. Migraine patients were studied interictally. A quantitated analysis of right.......28). There was no correlation between visual or quantitated abnormalities and age, duration of migraine, frequency of attacks or prophylactic medication. No correlation could be established between asymmetries and the usual side of headache or aura symptoms. Two conclusions emerged: (1) visual evaluation of interictal migraine...... rCBF images is insufficient to pick up abnormalities; (2) almost 50% of the migraine sufferers had abnormal rCBF/asymmetries. However, these are discrete compared with those typically seen during the aura phase of a migraine attack. One explanation to the patchy rCBF patterns might...

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow during light sleep--a H(2)(15)O-PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Law, Ian; Wiltschiøtz, Gordon

    2002-01-01

    to other forms of altered awareness, for example, relaxation meditation than to deeper sleep stages. We are of the opinion that stage-1 sleep represents the dreaming state of wakefulness, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep reflects the dreaming state of the unaware, sleeping brain.......This is the first report on the distribution of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes during stage-1 sleep or somnolence. Two hypotheses were tested: (A) that rCBF differed between the awake relaxed state and stage-1 sleep, (B) that hypnagogic hallucinations frequently experienced at sleep...... onset would be accompanied by measurable changes in rCBF using positron emission tomography (PET). Eight subjects were PET-scanned with (15)O-labeled water injection in three conditions: awake, stage-1 sleep with reportable experiences and stage-1 sleep without reportable experiences...

  9. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than

  10. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  11. Influence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow and mental function in the normal aged volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Katsube, Tomoko; Kitani, Kohaku; Okada, Masanori (Shimane Medical University (Japan))

    1983-12-01

    The infuence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and mental function was studied by Xe133 inhalation method in normal aged volunteers. Subjects: The first group consisted of 33 aged volunteers living in nursing home and exposed to little social stimuli. There were 15 males (mean age of 77 years) and 18 females (77 years). The second group consisted of 49 aged community volunteers who were confirmed socially active. There were 25 males (76 years) and 24 females (72 years). All subjects were healthy persons without a past history of cerebral diseases and lung diseases. There were no difference in blood pressure and hematocrit between the two groups. The rCBF was measured by 16-ch-Novo-cerebrograph. Verbal intelligence was evaluated by the Hasegawa Simple Intelligence Scale for Aged. Performance intelligence was evaluated with the Kohs' Block Design Test. The mean rCBF in group I showed significantly lower value than that of group II, especially in the frontotemporal region. The performance intelligence was decreased in group I. However, there were no significant difference in the verbal intelligence between the two groups. 2) The aging effect on rCBF and intelligences was more prominent in group II. 3) In males, hemispheric rCBF of group I decreased bilaterally associated with the decrease of both intelligences. While the left hemispheric rCBF in females was relatively preserved as well as the preservation of verbal intelligence. These results indicate that the social environmental factors may have significant influence to aging of the brain especially in the males.

  12. Stimulus rate dependence of regional cerebral blood flow in human striate cortex, demonstrated by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, P.T.; Raichle, M.E.

    1984-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between the repetition rate of a simple sensory stimulus and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the human brain. Positron emission tomography (PET), using intravenously administered H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O as the diffusible blood-flow tracer, was employed for all CBF measurements. The use of H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O with PET allowed eight CBF measurements to be made in rapid sequence under multiple stimulation conditions without removing the subject from the tomograph. Nine normal volunteers each underwent a series of eight H2(/sup 15/)O PET measurements of CBF. Initial and final scans were made during visual deprivation. The six intervening scans were made during visual activation with patterned-flash stimuli given in random order at 1.0-, 3.9-, 7.8-, 15.5-, 33.1-, and 61-Hz repetition rates. The region of greatest rCBF increase was determined. Within this region the rCBF was determined for every test condition and then expressed as the percentage change from the value of the initial unstimulated scan (rCBF% delta). In every subject, striate cortex rCBF% delta varied systematically with stimulus rate. Between 0 and 7.8 Hz, rCBF% delta was a linear function of stimulus repetition rate. The rCBF response peaked at 7.8 Hz and then declined. The rCBF% delta during visual stimulation was significantly greater than that during visual deprivation for every stimulus rate except 1.0 Hz. The anatomical localization of the region of peak rCBF response was determined for every subject to be the mesial occipital lobes along the calcarine fissure, primary visual cortex. Stimulus rate is a significant determinant of rCBF response in the visual cortex. Investigators of brain responses to selective activation procedures should be aware of the potential effects of stimulus rate on rCBF and other measurements of cerebral metabolism.

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow in various types of brain tumor. Effect of the space-occupying lesion on blood flow in brain tissue close to and remote from tumor site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, K; Skyhøj Olsen, T; Lassen, N A

    1982-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 23 patients with brain tumors using the 133Xe intra-carotid injection method and a 254 channel gamma camera. The glioblastomas (4) and astrocytomas (4) all showed hyperemia in the tumor and tumor-near region. This was also seen in several...... meningiomas (4 of 7 cases) in which most of the tumor itself did not receive any isotope. Brain metastases (6) usually had a low flow in the tumor and tumor-near region. The glioblastomas tended to show markedly bending 133Xe wash-out curves pointing to pronounced heterogeneity of blood flow. Most of the flow...... maps, regardless of the tumor types, showed widespread abnormalities of rCBF not only in the tumor region but also in the region remote from the tumor. It is concluded that measurement of rCBF cannot yield accurate differential diagnostic information, but that the widespread derangement of the brain...

  14. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow during Wakeful Rest in Older Subjects with Mild to Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Andrée-Ann; Gagnon, Katia; Arbour, Caroline; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Montplaisir, Jacques; Gagnon, Jean-François; Gosselin, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during wakeful rest in older subjects with mild to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and healthy controls, and to identify markers of OSA severity that predict altered rCBF. High-resolution (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT imaging during wakeful rest. Research sleep laboratory affiliated with a University hospital. Fifty untreated OSA patients aged between 55 and 85 years, divided into mild, moderate, and severe OSA, and 20 age-matched healthy controls. N/A. Using statistical parametric mapping, rCBF was compared between groups and correlated with clinical, respiratory, and sleep variables. Whereas no rCBF change was observed in mild and moderate groups, participants with severe OSA had reduced rCBF compared to controls in the left parietal lobules, left precentral gyrus, bilateral postcentral gyri, and right precuneus. Reduced rCBF in these regions and in areas of the bilateral frontal and left temporal cortex was associated with more hypopneas, snoring, hypoxemia, and sleepiness. Higher apnea, microarousal, and body mass indexes were correlated to increased rCBF in the basal ganglia, insula, and limbic system. While older individuals with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) had hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor and parietal areas, respiratory variables and subjective sleepiness were correlated with extended regions of hypoperfusion in the lateral cortex. Interestingly, OSA severity, sleep fragmentation, and obesity correlated with increased perfusion in subcortical and medial cortical regions. Anomalies with such a distribution could result in cognitive deficits and reflect impaired vascular regulation, altered neuronal integrity, and/or undergoing neurodegenerative processes. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Effects of scatter and attenuation correction on quantitative assessment of regional cerebral blood flow with SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, H; Narita, Y; Kado, H; Kashikura, A; Sugawara, S; Shoji, Y; Kinoshita, T; Ogawa, T; Eberl, S

    1998-01-01

    Appropriate corrections for scatter and attenuation correction are prerequisites for quantitative SPECT studies. However, in most cerebral SPECT studies, uniform attenuation in the head is assumed, and scatter is usually neglected. This study evaluated the effect of attenuation correction and scatter correction on quantitative values and image contrast. Studies were performed in six normal volunteers (ages 22-26 yr) following intravenous 123I-IMP administration using a rotating, dual-head gamma camera. A transmission scan was acquired with a 99mTc rod source (74 MBq) placed at the focus of a symmetrical fanbeam collimator. Data were reconstructed using two attenuation coefficient (mu) maps: quantitative mu map from the transmission scan and a uniform mu map generated by edge detection of the reconstructed images. Narrow and broad beam mu values were used with and without scatter correction, respectively. Scatter was corrected with transmission-dependent convolution subtraction and triple-energy window techniques. Quantitative rCBF images were calculated by the previously validated IMP-autoradiographic technique, and they were compared with those obtained by (15)O-water and PET. SPECT and PET images were registered to MRI studies, and rCBF values were compared in 39 ROIs selected on MRI. Clear differences were observed in rCBF images between the measured and constant mu maps in the lower slices due to the airways and in the higher slices due to increased skull attenuation. However, differences were white matter regions by 10%-20% after scatter correction, increasing gray-to-white ratio to be close to that of PET measurement. The rCBF values from the two scatter correction were not significantly different, but the triple-energy window technique suffered from increased noise. After scatter correction, rCBF values were in good agreement with those measured by PET. This study shows little loss in accuracy results from assuming uniform mu map. However, scatter correction

  16. Spinal angiography. Anatomy, technique and indications; Spinale Angiographie. Anatomie, Technik und Indikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W.; Simgen, A.; Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal angiography is a diagnostic modality requiring detailed knowledge of spinal vascular anatomy. The cervical spinal cord is supplied by the vertebral arteries while segmental arteries which are preserved from fetal anatomy, supply the thoracic and lumbar regions. As spinal angiography carries the risk of paraplegia the indications have to be considered very carefully. Nevertheless, spinal angiography should be performed if there is reason to suspect a spinal vascular malformation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (orig.) [German] Indikationsstellung, Technik und Durchfuehrung der spinalen Angiographie erfordern detaillierte Kenntnisse der Gefaessversorgung des Spinalkanals und des Rueckenmarks. Die Gefaessversorgung des Rueckenmarks erfolgt im Bereich des Halsmarks aus den beiden Aa. vertebrales. Eine zusaetzliche arterielle Versorgung der Wirbelsaeule einschliesslich des Rueckenmarks wird ueber segmentale Arterien hergestellt, die im Bereich der Thorakal- und Lumbalregion aus der Embryonalphase als segmentale, interkostale und Lumbalarterien erhalten geblieben sind. Da die spinale Angiographie die Gefahr der Querschnittslaehmung birgt, ist eine strenge Indikation notwendig. Eine ueber laengere Zeit bestehende unklare klinische Symptomatik kann auch durch eine spinale Gefaessmalformation hervorgerufen werden. Ist durch die MRT-Bildgebung der Verdacht auf eine spinale Gefaessfehlbildung gegeben, sollte eine Angiographie durchgefuehrt werden, da diese Fehlbildungen oft kurabel sind. (orig.)

  17. Fully automated quantification of regional cerebral blood flow with three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template. Validation using magnetic resonance imaging. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Katayama, Shigenori; Takeda, Naoya; Fujita, Katsuzo [Nishi-Kobe Medical Center (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan); Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2003-03-01

    The previously reported three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest (ROI) template (3DSRT-t) for the analysis of anatomically standardized technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images was modified for use in a fully automated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantification software, 3DSRT, incorporating an anatomical standardization engine transplanted from statistical parametric mapping 99 and ROIs for quantification based on 3DSRT-t. Three-dimensional T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance images of 10 patients with localized infarcted areas were compared with the ROI contour of 3DSRT, and the positions of the central sulcus in the primary sensorimotor area were also estimated. All positions of the 20 lesions were in strict accordance with the ROI delineation of 3DSRT. The central sulcus was identified on at least one side of 210 paired ROIs and in the middle of 192 (91.4%) of these 210 paired ROIs among the 273 paired ROIs of the primary sensorimotor area. The central sulcus was recognized in the middle of more than 71.4% of the ROIs in which the central sulcus was identifiable in the respective 28 slices of the primary sensorimotor area. Fully automated accurate ROI delineation on anatomically standardized images is possible with 3DSRT, which enables objective quantification of rCBF and vascular reserve in only a few minutes using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT images obtained by the resting and vascular reserve (RVR) method. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) on regional cerebral blood flow in spinocerebellar degeneration using 3DSRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Noriyuki; Kumamoto, Toshihide; Masuda, Teruaki; Nomura, Yuki; Hanaoka, Takuya; Hazama, Yusuke; Okazaki, Toshio; Arakawa, Ryuki

    2009-06-15

    Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) therapy improves cerebellar ataxia in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). We investigated the effect of TRH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using the fully automated region of interest (ROI) technique, 3DSRT. Ten patients with SCD received TRH intravenously (2 mg/day) for 14 days and underwent brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography before and after therapy. Clinical efficacy was assessed using the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). The rCBF in each ROI was measured using the noninvasive Patlak plot method and calculated using 3DSRT. TRH significantly improved the ICARS scores and increased rCBF in the callosomarginal segment and cerebellum. Cerebellar rCBF increased in 4 of 5 patients with improved ICARS scores and in 3 of 5 patients without improved ICARS scores after TRH therapy. The correlation between the change in cerebellar rCBF and the improved ICARS score, however, was not significant. These findings indicate that TRH therapy may increase cerebellar rCBF in some patients with cerebellar forms of SCD and that 3DSRT may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of TRH for increasing CBF. The beneficial effects of TRH may be due to increased cerebellar rCBF or the increased rCBF may be a secondary effect of TRH therapy.

  19. Study of adverse whole blood donor reactions in normal healthy blood donors: experience of tertiary health care centre in jammu region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2015-03-01

    Whole blood donation is generally a safe procedure, but sometimes adverse reactions of varying severity may occur during or at completion of blood donation process. The aim of the present study was to estimate the frequency and type of adverse events during blood donation. This retrospective study conducted from November 2011 to December 2012 at Department of Blood Transfusion Medicine GMC Jammu. All whole blood donations at our Department was analyzed. All adverse events occurring during or at end of donation were noted using standardized format. Overall 108 adverse events were reported in relation to 29,524 donations, resulting in overall adverse event rate of 0.365 %. Presyncopal reactions in other words vasovagal reactions of mild intensity, were the most commonly observed adverse reactions and accounted for approximately 58/108 (53.70 %) of all adverse reactions noted. Only 0.365 % of blood donations were complicated by adverse events and most of these events were presyncopal symptoms. Our study reinforces that blood donation is a very safe procedure which could be made even more event free by following certain friendly, reassuring and tactful practices.

  20. Prevalence and prevalence trends of transfusion transmissible infections among blood donors at four chinese regional blood centers between 2000 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Changqing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In China, high prevalence of HBV and HCV parallels with the growing epidemic of syphilis and HIV in the general population poses a great threat to blood safety. This study investigated the prevalence of serologic markers for transfusion transmissible infections (TTIs among four Chinese blood centers. Methods We examined whole blood donations collected from January 2000 through December 2010 at four Chinese blood centers. Post-donation testing of TTIs (HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis were conducted using two different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for each seromarker. The prevalence of serologic markers for TTIs (% was calculated and additional analysis was conducted to examine donor characteristics associated with positive TTIs serology. Results Of the 4,366,283 donations, 60% were from first-time donors and 40% were from repeated donors. The overall prevalence of HIV, HBsAg, HCV and syphilis was 0.08%, 0.86%, 0.51% and 0.47%, respectively. The prevalence profile of TTIs varied among different blood centers and appeared at relatively high levels. Overall, the prevalence of HBsAg and HCV demonstrated a decline trend among four blood centers, while the prevalence of HIV and syphilis displayed three different trends: constantly steady, continually increasing and declining among different centers. Conclusions This study reflects the risk of TTIs has been greatly reduced in China, but blood transfusion remains an ongoing risk factor for the spread of blood-borne infections, and further work and improvements are needed to strengthen both safety and availability of blood in China.

  1. The changing pattern of spinal arachnoiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, M D; Russell, J A; Grossart, K W

    1978-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis is a rare condition. Eighty cases, diagnosed during a period when 7600 spinal contrast investigations were undertaken, have been reviewed. The majority had suffered a previous spinal condition, the most common being lumbar disc disease. There has been a change in the distribution of arahnoiditis with the lumbar region now most frequently involved. This accounts for the persistence of radicular symptoms and the relatively low incidence of paraplegia when compared with earlier series. Surgery does not appear to have any role in the treatment. Images PMID:632824

  2. Vertebral column decortication for the management of sharp angular spinal deformity in Pott disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Hong-Tao; Liu, Feng-Yu; Yu, Jin-He; Ren, Liang; Gu, Zhen-Fang; Sun, Xian-Ze

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Extremely sharp angular spinal deformity of healed tuberculosis can be corrected by vertebral column resection (VCR). However, the VCR techniques have many limitations including spinal column instability, greater blood loss, and greater risk of neurologic deficit. Patient concerns: We described a new spinal osteotomy technique to collect sharp angular spinal deformity in Pott disease. A 52-year-old woman presented with back pain and gait imbalance. Diagnosis: The kyphosis ...

  3. Ganglioside patterns in human spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwerk, C K

    2001-12-01

    To examine the distribution of gangliosides in human cervical and lumbar spinal cord. Magdeburg, Germany. The ganglioside distribution of human cervical and lumbar spinal cord enlargements from 10 neurological normal patients was analyzed. Gangliosides were isolated from different areas corresponding to the columna anterior, columna lateralis and columna posterior. Ganglioside GfD1b/GD1b and GD3 were the most abundant gangliosides in all examined tissues. The total concentration of sialic acid bound gangliosides GM2 and GM3 was less than 5%. The GD3 fraction constantly consisted of a double band as assessed by TLC after lipid extraction. There were significant differences in the ganglioside distribution when comparing tissue from the columna anterior, columna lateralis and columna posterior of the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. Differences in the ganglioside composition in human spinal cord regions may reflect the different function of those molecules in the two regions investigated.

  4. Correlated regions of cerebral blood flow with clinical parameters in Parkinson's disease; comparison using 'Anatomy' and 'Talairach Daemon' software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Jin; Cheon, Sang Myung; Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do-Young

    2012-02-01

    We assign the anatomical names of functional activation regions in the brain, based on the probabilistic cyto-architectonic atlas by Anatomy 1.7 from an analysis of correlations between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and clinical parameters of the non-demented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients by SPM8. We evaluated Anatomy 1.7 of SPM toolbox compared to 'Talairach Daemon' (TD) Client 2.4.2 software. One hundred and thirty-six patients (mean age 60.0 ± 9.09 years; 73 women and 63 men) with non-demented PD were selected. Tc-99m-HMPAO brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans were performed on the patients using a two-head gamma-camera. We analyzed the brain image of PD patients by SPM8 and found the anatomical names of correlated regions of rCBF perfusion with the clinical parameters using TD Client 2.4.2 and Anatomy 1.7. The SPM8 provided a correlation coefficient between clinical parameters and cerebral hypoperfusion by a simple regression method. To the clinical parameters were added age, duration of disease, education period, Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage and Korean mini-mental state examination (K-MMSE) score. Age was correlated with cerebral perfusion in the Brodmann area (BA) 6 and BA 3b assigned by Anatomy 1.7 and BA 6 and pyramis in gray matter by TD Client 2.4.2 with p maps, assigned the anatomical name by percentage value of the probability.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Toby Huston, PhD ... not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information found ...

  7. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord within the ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  11. Spinal Cord Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may be more likely to affect the spine include breast, lung, prostate and multiple myeloma. Complications Both noncancerous and cancerous spinal tumors can compress the spinal cord and nerves, leading ...

  12. Spinal Cord Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Spinal Cord Injuries Show More Show Less Search Disorders Search NINDS SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Spinal ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury ... Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New ...

  15. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Gravity Forms. FacingDisability.com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The ... Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord injuries Peer Counseling 312- ...

  18. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hips, legs, and feet. If you have a spinal injury you may need surgery, physical therapy , and other ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics ...

  3. Evaluation of the BioFire®FilmArray®Blood Culture Identification Panel on positive blood cultures in a regional hospital laboratory in KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fhooblall, Mokshanand; Nkwanyana, Fikile; Mlisana, Koleka P

    2016-01-01

    There are presently many non-culture-based methods commercially available to identify organisms and antimicrobial susceptibility from blood culture bottles. Each platform has its benefits and limitations. However, there is a need for an improved system with minimal hands-on requirements and short run times. In this study, the performance characteristics of the FilmArray ® BCID Panel kit were evaluated to assess the efficiency of the kit against an existing system used for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of organisms from blood cultures. Positive blood cultures that had initially been received from hospitalised patients of a large quaternary referral hospital in Durban, South Africa were processed as per routine protocol at its Medical Microbiology Laboratory. Positive blood cultures were processed on the FilmArray BCID Panel kit in parallel with the routine sample processing. Inferences were then drawn from results obtained. Organism detection by the FilmArray BCID panel was accurate at 92.6% when organisms that were on the repertoire of the kit were considered, compared to the combination methods (reference method used in the study laboratory). Detection of the antimicrobial resistance markers provided by the panel and reference method demonstrated 100% consistency. Blood cultures with a single organism were accurately identified at 93.8% by FilmArray, while blood cultures with more than one organism were identified at 85.7%. The FilmArray BCID Panel kit is valuable for detection of organisms and markers of antibiotic resistance for an extensive range of organisms.

  4. Article Commentary: Spinal Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Ekinci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal tuberculosis (TB is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri Tip Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries.

  5. Validation of transit-time flowmetry for chronic measurements of regional blood flow in resting and exercising rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Amaral

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to validate the transit-time technique for long-term measurements of iliac and renal blood flow in rats. Flow measured with ultrasonic probes was confirmed ex vivo using excised arteries perfused at varying flow rates. An implanted 1-mm probe reproduced with accuracy different patterns of flow relative to pressure in freely moving rats and accurately quantitated the resting iliac flow value (on average 10.43 ± 0.99 ml/min or 2.78 ± 0.3 ml min-1 100 g body weight-1. The measurements were stable over an experimental period of one week but were affected by probe size (resting flows were underestimated by 57% with a 2-mm probe when compared with a 1-mm probe and by anesthesia (in the same rats, iliac flow was reduced by 50-60% when compared to the conscious state. Instantaneous changes of iliac and renal flow during exercise and recovery were accurately measured by the transit-time technique. Iliac flow increased instantaneously at the beginning of mild exercise (from 12.03 ± 1.06 to 25.55 ± 3.89 ml/min at 15 s and showed a smaller increase when exercise intensity increased further, reaching a plateau of 38.43 ± 1.92 ml/min at the 4th min of moderate exercise intensity. In contrast, exercise-induced reduction of renal flow was smaller and slower, with 18% and 25% decreases at mild and moderate exercise intensities. Our data indicate that transit-time flowmetry is a reliable method for long-term and continuous measurements of regional blood flow at rest and can be used to quantitate the dynamic flow changes that characterize exercise and recovery

  6. Nicotine delivery to rats via lung alveolar region-targeted aerosol technology produces blood pharmacokinetics resembling human smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuesi M; Xu, Bin; Liang, Jing; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Zhu, Yifang; Feldman, Jack L

    2013-07-01

    Nicotine is a heavily used addictive drug acquired through smoking tobacco. Nicotine in cigarette smoke is deposited and absorbed in the lungs, which results in a rapidly peaked slowly declining arterial concentration. This pattern plays an important role in initiation of nicotine addiction. A method and device were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents with lung alveolar region-targeted aerosol technology. The dose of delivery can be controlled by the nicotine aerosol concentration and duration of exposure. Our data showed that, in the breathing zone of the nose-only exposure chamber, the aerosol droplet size distribution was within the respirable diameter range. Rats were exposed to nicotine aerosol for 2 min. The arterial blood nicotine concentration reached 43.2 ± 15.7 ng/ml (mean ± SD) within 1-4 min and declined over the next 20 min, closely resembling the magnitude and early pharmacokinetics of a human smoking a cigarette. The acute inhalation toxicity of nicotine: LC50 = 2.3mg/L was determined; it was affected by pH, suggesting that acidification decreases nicotine absorption and/or bioavailability. A noninvasive method and toolkit were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents that enable rapid delivery of a controllable amount of nicotine into the systemic circulation and brain-inducing dose-dependent pharmacological effects, even a lethal dose. Aerosol inhalation can produce nicotine kinetics in both arterial and venous blood resembling human smoking. This method can be applied to studies of the effects of chronic intermittent nicotine exposure, nicotine addiction, toxicology, tobacco-related diseases, teratogenicity, and for discovery of pharmacological therapeutics.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  11. Improvement of algorithm for quantification of regional myocardial blood flow using 15O-water with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Chietsugu; Morita, Koichi; Shiga, Tohru; Kubo, Naoki; Nakada, Kunihiro; Tamaki, Nagara

    2004-11-01

    (15)O-Water and dynamic PET allow noninvasive quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, complicated image analyzing procedures are required, which may limit the practicality of this approach. We have designed a new practical algorithm, which allows stable, rapid, and automated quantification of regional MBF (rMBF) using (15)O-water PET. We designed an algorithm for setting the 3-dimensional (3D) region of interest (ROI) of the whole myocardium semiautomatically. Subsequently, a uniform input function was calculated for each subject using a time-activity curve in the 3D whole myocardial ROI. The uniform input function allows the mathematically simple and robust algorithm to estimate rMBF. Thirty-six volunteers were used in the static (15)O-CO and dynamic (15)O-water PET studies. To evaluate the reproducibility of the estimates, a repeated (15)O-water scan was obtained under resting condition. In addition, to evaluate the stability of the new algorithm in the hyperemic state, a (15)O-water scan was obtained with adenosine triphosphate. This algorithm includes a procedure for positioning a 3D ROI of the whole myocardium from 3D images and dividing it into 16 segments. Subsequently, the uniform input function was calculated using time-activity curves in the whole myocardial ROI and in the LV ROI. The uniform input function allowed this simple and robust algorithm to estimate the rMBF, perfusable tissue fraction (PTF), and spillover fraction (Va) according to a single tissue compartment model. These estimates were compared with those calculated using the original method. A simulation study was performed to compare the effects of errors in PTF or Va on the MBF using the 2 methods. The average operating time for positioning a whole myocardial ROI and 16 regional myocardial ROIs was variability among the regions in the myocardium than with the original theory of the (15)O-water technique. The simulation study demonstrated fewer effects of error in the PTF or

  12. Diagnosis of suspected Alzheimer's disease is improved by automated analysis of regional cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Bich-Ngoc-Thanh [UCL-Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mont-Godinne University Hospital, Yvoir (Belgium); Free University of Brussels, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Erasme Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Minoshima, Satoshi [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle (United States); George, Jean; Borght, Thierry Vander [UCL-Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mont-Godinne University Hospital, Yvoir (Belgium); Robert, Annie [UCL-Universite Catholique de Louvain, Departments of PHS Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mont-Godinne University Hospital, Yvoir (Belgium); Swine, Christian [UCL-Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Geriatrics, Mont-Godinne University Hospital, Yvoir (Belgium); Laloux, Patrice [UCL-Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Neurology, Mont-Godinne University Hospital, Yvoir (Belgium)

    2004-11-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, remains difficult. In order to assess whether fully automated stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) presentation contributes to the diagnosis of AD by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), we investigated the diagnostic accuracy of transaxial display with and without 3D-SSP analysis as well as the correlation between cerebral perfusion in different cortical areas and the mini mental score (MMS). Seventy-two patients referred because of cognitive impairment were included in the study. According to the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke (NINCDS) and the Alzheimer's disease and Related Disorders Association (ADRDA) criteria, 27 patients were diagnosed as having probable AD while 45 were classified as non-AD patients. 3D-SSP was used to quantify the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) acquired from SPECT imaging. Compared with the transaxial section presentation alone, 3D-SSP presentation improved the area under the receiver operating curve (p<0.05) as well as intra-observer (k=0.73 vs 0.88) and inter-observer (k=0.50 vs 0.84) reproducibility. Upon normalisation of regional to thalamic activity, multiple regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between the MMS and rCBF in the right parietal cortex (p=0.002). Addition of 3D-SSP to the transaxial section display of ECD-SPECT studies improves the reproducibility and the diagnostic performance in respect of AD in patients with cognitive impairment and provides a valid tool for assessment of the severity of cortical perfusion abnormalities in such patients. (orig.)

  13. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow in nondominant hemisphere during speech task in aphasics. A PET activation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Masashi; Kitamura, Shin; Mishina, Masahiro; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Senda, Michio; Ishii, Kenji

    1995-08-01

    To investigate the patients with language disorder and to detect the activated areas in language processing, we measured the changes in the regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) during speech task (`counting` task) using O-15 water PET activation technique in six normal subjects (age 58.3 {+-}8.1, mean{+-}SD), ten fluent aphasics (age 60.3{+-}12.5) and six nonfluent aphasics (age 50.5{+-}8.3). In `counting` task, the subjects were instructed to count the number aloud from 1 to 10 and repeat the sequence over and over in the native language (Japanese) at the rate of one number per 2.5 sec. The data were analyzed with stereotactic intersubject averaging analysis for the normal subjects. Apart from it, the regions of interest (ROI) analysis (a circular ROI of 12 mm diameter) was performed in the language-related area for each subject. In the normal subjects, the language-related areas: posteroinferofrontal areas (PIF), posterosuperotemporal area (PST), and Rolandic areas (related to the mouth and lips) were significantly activated bilaterally in the `counting` task. PIF were activated with a dominance in the left side. In the resting state, rCBF in the left PIF and left PST was reduced in both fluent and nonfluent aphasics. In nonfluent aphasics, the magnitude of activation in the right PIF by `counting` task was significantly greater than normal subjects and patients with fluent aphasia (ANOVA). It suggests the importance of the right PIF in the simple language processing in the nonfluent aphasia. In the sixteen aphasic patients, the increase in rCBF in the right PST during the `counting` task was negatively correlated with the score of comprehension (WAB) in the Spearman ranked correlation (p<0.05). It suggests that, while the activity of the right PST is minimal for the `counting` in normal subjects, it plays an important and compensatory role in aphasic patients. (author).

  14. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Quantitative ex-vivo micro-computed tomographic imaging of blood vessels and necrotic regions within tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene M Downey

    Full Text Available Techniques for visualizing and quantifying the microvasculature of tumors are essential not only for studying angiogenic processes but also for monitoring the effects of anti-angiogenic treatments. Given the relatively limited information that can be gleaned from conventional 2-D histological analyses, there has been considerable interest in methods that enable the 3-D assessment of the vasculature. To this end, we employed a polymerizing intravascular contrast medium (Microfil and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT in combination with a maximal spheres direct 3-D analysis method to visualize and quantify ex-vivo vessel structural features, and to define regions of hypoperfusion within tumors that would be indicative of necrosis. Employing these techniques we quantified the effects of a vascular disrupting agent on the tumor vasculature. The methods described herein for quantifying whole tumor vascularity represent a significant advance in the 3-D study of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of novel therapeutics, and will also find potential application in other fields where quantification of blood vessel structure and necrosis are important outcome parameters.

  16. Automatic determination of regions of interest in gated blood pool study; Determinacao automatica das regioes de interesse em estudos de ventriculografia radioisotopica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzianello, Luiz Claudio; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Div. de Informatica; Moura, Lincoln [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Superintendencia do Hospital das Clinicas

    1996-12-31

    A method for the automatic determination of regions of interest in gated blood pool studies is presented. The method uses a priori information about left ventricle location, and a modified version of the Laplacian of Gaussian operator is applied with some mathematical morphology operations, yielding the final regions. The algorithm showed to be highly correlated to the manual procedure, besides being to be fast and robust

  17. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, S.M.; Wrigley, P.J.; Youssef, A.M.; McIndoe, L.; Wilcox, S.L.; Rae, C.D.; Edden, R; Siddall, P.J.; Henderson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury to 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age and gender matched healthy controls. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  18. Spinal Arteriolosclerosis Is Common in Older Adults and Associated With Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Aron S; Leurgans, Sue E; Nag, Sukriti; VanderHorst, Veronique G J M; Kapasi, Alifiya; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A

    2017-10-01

    There are few studies of spinal microvascular pathologies in older adults. We characterized spinal cord microvascular pathologies and examined their associations with other spinal and brain postmortem indices and parkinsonism in older adults. We documented 3 features of microvascular pathologies in spinal cord and brain specimens from 165 deceased older participants. We also measured spinal white matter pallor. Parkinsonian signs were assessed with a modified version of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. We examined the associations of spinal arteriolosclerosis with other spinal and brain postmortem indices and parkinsonism proximate to death using regression models which controlled for age and sex. Microinfarcts and cerebral amyloid angiopathy were not observed within the spinal cord parenchyma. Spinal arteriolosclerosis was observed at all spinal levels (C7, T7, L4, S4) examined and was more severe posteriorly than anteriorly (posterior: 4.3, SD=0.72 versus anterior: 3.9, SD=0.74; t =14.58; P associated with spinal white matter pallor ( r =0.47; P age, sex, brain arteriolosclerosis, and cerebrovascular disease pathologies. Further models showed that the association of spinal arteriolosclerosis and parkinsonism was not mediated via spinal white matter pallor. Although the regional distribution of microvascular pathologies varies within the central nervous system, spinal arteriolosclerosis is common and may contribute to the severity of spinal white matter pallor and parkinsonism in older adults. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. SPECT with [99mTc]-d,l-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (HM-PAO) compared with regional cerebral blood flow measured by PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yonekura, Y; Nishizawa, S; Mukai, Thomas Søgaard

    1988-01-01

    In order to validate the use of technetium-99m-d,l-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) as a flow tracer, a total of 21 cases were studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and compared to regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measured by position emission tomography...

  20. Species composition, activity patterns and blood meal analysis of sand fly populations (Diptera: Psychodidae) in the metropolitan region of Thessaloniki, an endemic focus of canine leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species composition, activity patterns and blood meal analysis of sand fly populations were investigated in the metropolitan region of Thessaloniki, North Greece from May to October 2011. Sampling was conducted weekly in 3 different environments (animal facilities, open fields, residential areas) al...

  1. Beta-3 adrenergic agonist, BRL-26830A, and alpha/beta blocker, arotinolol, markedly increase regional blood flow in the brown adipose tissue in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Yoshida, T; Nishimura, M; Nakanishi, T; Kondo, M; Yoshimura, M

    1992-09-01

    Regional vascular effects of some adrenergic agents, focussing on brown adipose tissue (BAT), were investigated using tracer microspheres with a reference sample method in the anesthetized rat. Intravenous injections of 0.5 mg/kg BRL-26830A, a beta 3-adrenergic agonist, increased heart rate, but changes in blood pressure and cardiac output were not significant. The drug decreased blood flow in the brain, the spleen and the kidneys, but markedly increased it in BAT. At 2 mg/kg, arotinolol, an alpha/beta-adrenergic blocker, decreased blood pressure by 20 mmHg and increased cardiac output by 95 ml/min/kg. It slightly but significantly decreased blood flow in the liver and the spleen, but markedly increased the flow in BAT. Acebutolol, a beta 1-adrenergic blocker, decreased blood flow in the liver, the spleen, the pancreas, the kidneys, the adrenals, the skeletal muscle and the skin. Bunazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic blocker, decreased it in all organs and tissue expect the brain and BAT. The pattern of redistribution of blood flow by arotinolol was very similar to that caused by BRL-26830A. Acebutolol and bunazosin rather decreased the blood flow in the BAT. These results indicate that stimulation of beta 3-adrenergic receptors, in BAT results in vasodilation, and that arotinolol may bind to those beta 3-adrenergic receptors.

  2. PP084. Magnetic resonance imaging measurements of T2 relaxation times within contrasting regions of murine placenta is dependent upon blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, G; Stait-Gardner, T; Surmon, L; Makris, A; Price, W S; Hennessy, A

    2012-07-01

    It has been postulated that reduced placental perfusion as a result of abnormal placental implantation is the initiating event that leads to the maternal symptoms of preeclampsia. To be able to directly measure blood flow and perfusion in the placenta in experimental models of preeclampsia would provide valuable insight into the structural abnormalities of this syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers visualization of anatomy and analysis of changes in tissue morphology and function including blood flow and perfusion. The major source of image contrast in MRI comes from the variation in relaxation times between tissues. Previously, human placenta has appeared as fairly homogeneous in studies of T1 and T2 relaxation times, with no internal morphology apparent. The aim of this study was to investigate, using much higher field strengths (11.7Tesla) and much higher resolution than have been used previously, whether structural inhomogeneities in the placenta can be discerned by T2 mapping and whether T2 mapping is capable of detecting structural abnormalities that may affect blood flow in a preeclamptic placenta. Magnetic resonance images were acquired on an anaesthetised C57BL/6JArc mouse placed in a vertical animal probe using a Bruker Avance 11.7Tesla wide-bore spectrometer with micro-imaging probe capable of generating gradients of 0.45T/m. T2 measurements were acquired using an MSME sequence protocol (Bruker MSME-T2-map) with an in-plane resolution of 0.1-0.2mm. Matlab was used to generate R2 (i.e., 1/T2) maps from the acquired data with the T2 values being calculated from selected regions of interest within 5 individual placenta. Additional T2 measurements were acquired on the same slices immediately after blood flow was reduced to zero. Three distinct regions of T2 contrast were discerned in the mouse placenta, likely correlating to the labrynthine, junctional and decidual zones. The contrast between the inner two regions was substantially abrogated when

  3. A quantitative index of regional blood flow in canine myocardium derived noninvasively with N-13 ammonia and dynamic positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nienaber, C.A.; Ratib, O.; Gambhir, S.S.; Krivokapich, J.; Huang, S.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine (USA))

    1991-01-01

    To derive a quantitative index of regional myocardial blood flow, the arterial input function of the flow tracer N-13 ammonia and the regional myocardial N-13 activity concentrations were noninvasively determined in 29 experiments in eight dogs. N-13 ammonia was administered intravenously and cross-sectional images were acquired dynamically using an ECAT III positron emission tomograph with an effective in-plane resolution of 13.46 mm full-width half-maximum. Time-activity curves were derived from the serial images by assigning regions of interest to the left ventricular myocardium and left ventricular blood pool. Tracer net extractions were estimated from the myocardial time-activity concentrations at various times after tracer injection and the integral of the arterial input function. Myocardial blood flow was altered by intravenous dipyridamole, morphine, propranolol and partial or complete occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, and ranged from 9 to 860 ml/min per 100 g. Estimates of tracer net extractions were most accurate when determined from the myocardial N-13 activity concentrations at 60 s divided by the integral of the arterial input function to that time. These estimates correlated with regional myocardial blood flows determined independently by the microsphere technique by y = x (1 - 0.64(e-114/x); SEE = 22.9; r = 0.94). First pass extraction fractions of N-13 ammonia determined noninvasively with this approach declined with higher flows in a nonlinear fashion and were similar to those determined invasively by direct intracoronary N-13 ammonia injections. The findings indicate that an accurate index of regional myocardial blood flow can be obtained noninvasively by high temporal sampling of arterial and myocardial tracer activity concentrations with positron emission tomography.

  4. The changes of regional cerebral blood flow: successful pain relief of intractable CRPS type II patients by motor cortex stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J. A.; Son, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Jung, S. G [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Authors report the effectiveness of MCS in extraordinarily extended pain due to intractable CRPS type II and rCBF study result for mechanism of pain control by MCS. A 43-year-old male presented severe spontaneous burning pain in his left hand and forearm and allodynia over the left arm and left hemibody. Authors planned MCS as a neuromodulation therapy for this intractable peripheral neuropathic pain patient because further neurodestructive procedure did not work anymore and have a potential risk of further aggrevation of neuopathic pain. We performed baseline and stimulation brain perfusion SPECT using 20 mCi of Tc-99m ECD. The baseline CBD studies were done with stimulator 'off' state and stimulation studies were done after stimulator 'on' with satisfactory pain relief. For the stimulation study, the radioisotope was injected immediately after pain-relief and the images were taken about 50 minutes after injection of radioisotope. In resting rCBF in the patient was compared with normal control datas, we found significant increase in rCBF in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right superior temporal gyrus, left temporooccipital area. When rCBF datas obtained after alleviation of pain with stimulator 'on' . there were significant increase in rCBF in bilateral prefrontal cortex and left temporoocipital area. After subtraction of ECD SPECT, we found significant increase in rCBF in the right premotor and supplementary motor cortex left sensorimotor cortex, right cingulated cortex, right posterior insular cortex, right anterior limb of internal capsule. left orbitofrontal cortex and right pyramidal tract in cerebral peduncle. Authors report exellent pain control by MCS in a case of severe CRPS type II with hemibody involvement and regional cerebral blood flow changes according to successful pain control.

  5. Electromagnetic fields, such as those from mobile phones, alter regional cerebral blood flow and sleep and waking EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R; Treyer, V; Borbély, A A; Schuderer, J; Gottselig, J M; Landolt, H-P; Werth, E; Berthold, T; Kuster, N; Buck, A; Achermann, P

    2002-12-01

    Usage of mobile phones is rapidly increasing, but there is limited data on the possible effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on brain physiology. We investigated the effect of EMF vs. sham control exposure on waking regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and on waking and sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in humans. In Experiment 1, positron emission tomography (PET) scans were taken after unilateral head exposure to 30-min pulse-modulated 900 MHz electromagnetic field (pm-EMF). In Experiment 2, night-time sleep was polysomnographically recorded after EMF exposure. Pulse-modulated EMF exposure increased relative rCBF in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex ipsilateral to exposure. Also, pm-EMF exposure enhanced EEG power in the alpha frequency range prior to sleep onset and in the spindle frequency range during stage 2 sleep. Exposure to EMF without pulse modulation did not enhance power in the waking or sleep EEG. We previously observed EMF effects on the sleep EEG (A. A. Borbély, R. Huber, T. Graf, B. Fuchs, E. Gallmann and P. Achermann. Neurosci. Lett., 1999, 275: 207-210; R. Huber, T. Graf, K. A. Cote, L. Wittmann, E. Gallmann, D. Matter, J. Schuderer, N. Kuster, A. A. Borbély, and P. Achermann. Neuroreport, 2000, 11: 3321-3325), but the basis for these effects was unknown. The present results show for the first time that (1) pm-EMF alters waking rCBF and (2) pulse modulation of EMF is necessary to induce waking and sleep EEG changes. Pulse-modulated EMF exposure may provide a new, non-invasive method for modifying brain function for experimental, diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  6. The phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol dilates large cerebral arteries in humans without affecting regional cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, Steffen; Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Petersen, Kenneth A

    2004-01-01

    in the middle cerebral arteries (VMCA) was measured with transcranial Doppler, and the superficial temporal and radial arteries diameters were measured with ultrasonography. During the 4-hour observation period, there was no effect on systolic blood pressure (P = 0.28), but diastolic blood pressure decreased...

  7. Non-detection of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA in HHV-8-seropositive blood donors from three Brazilian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Souza, Vanda Akico Ueda Fick; Freire, Wilton S; Mayaud, Philippe; Pannuti, Claudio S

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia) who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140).

  8. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation of the lumbar and sacral spinal cord: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sofia R; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; de Carvalho, M; Miranda, Pedro C

    2018-02-09

    Our aim was to perform a computational study of the electric field (E-field) generated by transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) applied over the thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal cord, in order to assess possible neuromodulatory effects on spinal cord circuitry related with lower limb functions. A realistic volume conductor model of the human body consisting of 14 tissues was obtained from available databases. Rubber pad electrodes with a metallic connector and a conductive gel layer were modelled. The finite element method was used to calculate the E-field when a current of 2.5 mA was passed between two electrodes. The main characteristics of the E-field distributions in the spinal grey matter (spinal-GM) and spinal white matter (spinal-WM) were compared for seven montages, with the anode placed either over T10, T8 or L2 spinous processes (s.p.), and the cathode placed over right deltoid (rD), umbilicus (U) and right iliac crest (rIC) areas or T8 s.p. Anisotropic conductivity of spinal-WM and of a group of dorsal muscles near the vertebral column was considered. The average E-field magnitude was predicted to be above 0.15 V/m in spinal cord regions located between the electrodes. L2-T8 and T8-rIC montages resulted in the highest E-field magnitudes in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (> 0.30 V/m). E-field longitudinal component is 3 to 6 times higher than the ventral-dorsal and right-left components in both the spinal-GM and WM. Anatomical features such as CSF narrowing due to vertebrae bony edges or disks intrusions in the spinal canal correlate with local maxima positions. Computational modelling studies can provide detailed information regarding the electric field in the spinal cord during tsDCS. They are important to guide the design of clinical tsDCS protocols that optimize stimulation of application-specific spinal targets. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. One-step (standard) versus two-step surgical approach in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis posterior spinal fusion: Which is better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Norman; Valentin, Pablo; García-Cartagena, Manuel; Samalot, Solais; Iriarte, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective cohort study with IRB approval. Significant blood loss remains an important concern in terms of the performance of the posterior spinal fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Several strategies have been reported to minimize blood loss during surgery. In order to address the need to minimize blood loss without sacrificing the quality of the fusion, in our hospital, we adopted a two-step surgical approach. This surgical approach consist of the exposure and instrumentation of the lumbar region prior to and followed by an extension of the surgical incision to the thoracic region for its subsequent instrumentation. The main purpose of this study was to compare a two-step surgical approach with the one-step (standard) approach. This study was a review of all the data on consecutive posterior spinal fusion surgeries performed by a specific two-surgeon team during 2004-2013. Demographics, surgical variables, radiographic findings, and outcomes regarding blood loss, morbidity, and the duration of the procedure were evaluated. Eighty-five patients underwent the standard surgical exposure, and 41 patients underwent the two-step surgical technique. With the exception of BMI, neither group showed any statistically preoperative variable significant differences. None of the postoperative outcome variables were statistically significant between both surgical approaches. No differences were detected in terms of using a two-step surgical approach versus the one-step standard surgical approach regarding perioperative blood loss, surgical time, or complications. Level of evidence III.

  10. Assessment of changes in regional cerebral blood flow in patients with major depression using the [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO single photon emission tomography method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, K.; Kapucu, Oe.; Erbas, B.; Varoglu, E.; Guelec, C.; Bekdik, C.F. (Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Psychiatry)

    1992-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow was investigated in 14 patients with major depression diagnosed according to the DSM-III-R criteria (six patients with single and eight patients with recurrent episodes) and in ten healthy volunteers. The mean ages of the patients and the controls were 33.5[+-]2.7 and 31.6[+-]2.6 years, respectively. The severity of the depression was assessed using the 17-item Hamiltonian Depression Scale (mean: 23.2[+-]1.5). None of the patients was under medication. After administration of 500 MBq technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime, a single photon emission tomography study was performed and then transaxial, sagittal and coronal slices were obtained. For the semiquantitative analysis of the data, the ratios of the mean counts/pixel to the whole slice were calculated for 24 regions on three consecutive transaxial slices in the orbitomeatal plane. Additionally, left/right and frontal/occipital ratios were calculated. Both sides of the temporal region had a significantly decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) when compared to the controls. The left/right ratio of the prefrontal region was also significantly lower in the patients than in the controls. The Hamilton score had a negative correlation with blood flow in the anterofrontal and left prefrontal regions. According to our results, regional CBF seems to be decreased in the left prefrontal and in both temporal regions in major depression. The severity of depression is correlated with the reduction in CBF in the regions of the anterofrontal and left prefrontal cortex. (orig.).

  11. Seropositivity for anti-trypanosoma cruzi antibodies among blood donors of the "Hospital Universitário Regional do Norte do Paraná", Londrina, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, E M; Inouye, M M; Pontello, R; Morimoto, H K; Itow Jankevicius, S; Matsuo, T; Jankevicius, J V

    1996-01-01

    The most frequent form of acquisition of Chagas' disease in endemic areas was the transmission through the feces of contaminated triatominae. However, special attention should be paid in urban areas to transmission by blood transfusion, justifying the compulsory screening of blood donors. Early investigations at blood banks in the town of Londrina, Brazil, demonstrated that the seroprevalence of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies among blood donors was approximately 7.0% in the fifties. Further studies demonstrated practically the same seroprevalence until the eighties. In an attempt to obtain data about the real dimension of the seropositivity for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in the region, the authors carried out a large-scale study on 45,774 serum samples from blood donors of the Hemocentro of Hospital Univesitário Regional do Norte do Paraná (HURNP), Universidade Estadual de Londrina. The immunological tests were done at the Division of Clinical Immunology of HURNP from May 1990 to December 1994. The serum samples were studied by the indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA, using kits commercially obtained from EBRAM) and by indirect immunofluorescence (IFI, using kits from LIO SERUM) with anti-human IgG conjugate (LABORCLIN). The results demonstrated that 643 serum samples were positive in both assay corresponding to a seroprevalence of 1.4%, i.e., a significant decrease in anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in the region in comparison with the previously mentioned rates. Data correlating sex and age of seropositive blood donors are presented, as well as the possible factors that may have contributed to the results observed.

  12. Hepatitis E virus in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa region: an awareness of an infectious threat to blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazbek, Soha; Kreidieh, Khalil; Ramia, Sami

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is mainly transmitted through contaminated water supplies which make the virus endemic in developing countries including countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Recent reports suggest potential risk of HEV transmission via blood transfusion. Related articles on HEV were collected by searching through the 25 countries of the MENA region using Pubmed and Medline within the past 14 years: January 2000-August 2014. One hundred articles were extracted, of which 25 were not eligible. The articles discussed the seroprevalence of HEV and HEV markers in 12 countries. Eight articles provided data on HEV in blood donors. The seroprevalence of HEV in the general MENA population ranged from 2.0 to 37.5% and was higher in males than in females. Prevalence increased with age, but exposure seems to be in early life. In the MENA region, the role of HEV as an infectious threat to blood safety is under-investigated. More data are needed to quantify the risk of transmission and to assess clinical outcomes. This requires, at least, surveillance screening of donors and recipients for HEV markers using sensitive and specific serological tests. At the present time, serious consideration should be given to selective screening for certain groups of patients (e.g., immunocompromised, pregnant women and others) who commonly require blood transfusion and are at high risk of hepatic failure or chronicity from HEV infection.

  13. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... the final version. RESULTS: The data set consists of nine variables: (1) Intervention/Procedure Date and start time (2) Non-surgical bed rest and external immobilization, (3) Spinal intervention-closed manipulation and/or reduction of spinal elements, (4) Surgical procedure-approach, (5) Date and time...

  14. Effects of halothane and methoxyflurane on regional brain and spinal cord substance P-like and beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivities in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, A R; Agarwal, R K; Engelking, L R; Kumar, M S

    1998-03-15

    Effects of acute exposure (2 hr) to either 1.5% halothane or 0.5% methoxyflurane were investigated in the Sprague Dawley rat. Pituitary (PIT) and central nervous system (CNS) substance P (SP)-like and beta-endorphin (beta-end)-like immunoreactivities were evaluated immediately after anesthetic exposure (2 h), after righting reflex (4 h) or 24 hr postexposure (24 h). Only halothane significantly reduced SP-like immunoreactivity in olfactory bulbs in both the 2-h and 4-h groups. Halothane elevated SP-like immunoreactivity of hippocampus at all three time periods, and in the hypothalamus at 2 h. Both anesthetics significantly depleted thalamic concentrations of SP-like immunoreactivity. Methoxyflurane anesthesia resulted in a drastic decrease in SP-like immunoreactivity in PIT at all three time periods periods, while halothane elevated PIT concentrations of this peptide at 4 h. Both anesthetics significantly decreased beta-end-like immunoreactivity in the olfactory bulbs and thalami at 2, 4, and 24 h. However, halothane alone significantly elevated beta-end-like immunoreactivity in the spinal cord at 24 h. Halothane significantly elevated PIT beta-end-like immunoreactivity at 2 and 24 h, while methoxyflurane significantly lowered it in the 4-h group, but elevated the levels of the same in the 24-h group. Brain stem beta-end immunoreactivity were significantly reduced at 2 h by both anesthetics, and at 4 h by methoxyflurane. Results indicate that halothane and methoxyflurane may differ significantly in their actions on SP and beta-end secreting neurons in the CNS.

  15. Preoperative embolization in surgical treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    An increasing number of patients develop symptomatic spinal metastasis and increasing evidence supports the benefit of surgical decompression and spinal stabilization combined with radiation therapy. However, surgery for metastatic spinal disease is known to be associated with a risk of substantial intraoperative blood loss and perioperative allogenic blood transfusion. Anemia is known to increase morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing surgery, but studies also indicate that transfusion with allogenic red blood cells (RBC) may lead to worse outcomes. To reduce intraoperative bleeding preoperative embolization has been used in selected cases suspected for hypervascular spinal metastases, but no randomized trial has examined the effect. The final decision on whether preoperative embolization should be performed is based on the preoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) tumor blush, and as such considered the "gold standard" for determining the vascularity of spinal metastases. Reliability studies evaluating vascularity ratings of DSA tumor blush have not been published before. This PhD thesis is based on three studies with the following aims: I. To assess whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusions in patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases independently influence patient survival (Study 1). II. To assess whether preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization of spinal metastases reduces blood loss, the need for transfusion with allogenic RBC and surgery time in the surgical treatment of patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression (Study 2). III. To describe the vascularity of metastasis causing spinal cord compression (Study 2). IV. To evaluate inter- and intra-observer agreement in the assessment of the vascularity of spinal metastases using DSA tumor blush (Study 3). In conclusion the findings of this thesis demonstrate that preoperative embolization in patients with symptomatic spinal metastasis

  16. Blood-brain barrier to peptides: (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone accumulation by eighteen regions of the rat brain and by anterior pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermisch, A.; Ruehle, H.J. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Biowissenschaften); Klauschenz, E.; Kretzschmar, R. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Inst. fuer Wirkstofforschung)

    1984-01-01

    After intracarotid injection of (/sup 3/H)gonadotropin-releasing hormone ((/sup 3/H)GnRH) the mean accumulation of radioactivity per unit wet weight of 18 brain samples investigated and the anterior pituitary was 0.38 +- 0.11% g/sup -1/ of the injected tracer dose. This indicates a low but measurable brain uptake of the peptide. The brain uptake of (/sup 3/H)GnRH in blood-brain barrier (BBB)-protected regions is 5% of that of separately investigated (/sup 3/H)OH. In BBB-free regions the accumulation of radioactivity was more than 25-fold higher than in BBB-protected regions. The accumulation of (/sup 3/H)GnRH among regions with BBB varies less than among regions with leaky endothelia. The data presented for (/sup 3/H)GnRH are similar to those for other peptides so far investigated.

  17. Increased 30-Day Complication Rates Associated with Laminectomy in 874 Adult Patients with Spinal Deformity Undergoing Elective Spinal Fusion: A Single Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Adogwa, Owoicho; Warwick, Hunter; Sergesketter, Amanda; Lydon, Emily; Shammas, Ronnie L; Mehta, Ankit I; Vasquez, Raul A; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A; Karikari, Isaac O

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have reported that decompression with fusion leads to superior outcomes in correction of spinal deformity. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a difference in intraoperative and 30-day postoperative complication rates in patients undergoing spinal fusion with and without decompression. Medical records of 874 adult (≥18 years old) patients with spinal deformity undergoing elective spinal fusion at a major academic institution from 2005 to 2015 were reviewed; 374 (42.8%) patients underwent laminectomy in addition to spinal fusion. The primary outcome investigated was the rate of intraoperative and 30-day complications. Patient demographics and comorbidities were similar between groups. The laminectomy cohort had significantly higher estimated blood loss (P spinal fusion with laminectomy may have higher complication rates than patients undergoing spinal fusion alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Spasticity following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekand, Tiina; Hagen, Ellen Merete; Grønning, Marit

    2012-04-30

    Up to 70% of patients with spinal cord injuries develop spasticity. The main aim of the paper is to provide an overview of spasticity management, primarily in patients with spinal cord injuries. The article is based on literature searches in PubMed using the keyphrases «spasticity» and «spasticity AND spinal cord injury», and own clinical experience and research. Spasticity may be general, regional or localised. Factors such as an over-filled bladder, obstipation, acute infections, syringomyelia or bone fractures may substantially influence the degree of spasticity and must be determined. An assessment of the clinical and functional consequences for the patient is decisive before management. Active exercise, physiotherapy and peroral drugs are the simplest and cheapest options. Baclofen is the only centrally acting spasmolytic registered in Norway and is the first choice for peroral treatment. Benzodiazepines can also be used. The effect of the tablets is generally limited and there are often pronounced side effects. Local spasticity can be treated with botulinum toxin injections. The effect is time-limited and the treatment must be repeated. International guidelines recommend a combination of botulinum toxin injections and physiotherapy. In cases of regional spasticity, particularly in the lower limbs, intrathecal baclofen administered via a programmable pump may provide a continuous spasm-reducing effect. Orthopaedic surgery or neurosurgery may be an option for selected patients with intractable spasticity. Spasticity following a spinal cord injury must be assessed regularly. The treatment strategy depends on the degree of functional failure caused by the spasticity and its location.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation Psychological Realities ... play_arrow What factors are important in choosing a rehabilitation facility after ...

  20. Thermoregulatory responses and blood parameters of locally adapted ewes under natural weather conditions of Brazilian semiarid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirton Peixoto Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the natural weather conditions on respiratory rate, rectal temperature and hematologic parameters such as glucose, total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, total protein, albumin, globulin, red blood cells, microhematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, serum triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4 levels was evaluated in red (RMN and white (WMN coat colored Morada Nova ewes, of different class of body condition score (CBCS, during the dry (from july to december and wet (from january to june seasons, which exhibited different (P<0.05 air temperature, relative humidity and radiant thermal load averages. Tukey’s test was used and the difference considered was to P<0.05. Significant greater averages of respiratory rate were observed in the dry period compared to the rainy period (42.26±8.96 and 36.89±8.20 breaths min-1, respectively, mainly in the RMN (45.54±8.23 breaths min-1 compared with the WMN (39.27±8.57 breaths min-1. No differences were observed in rectal temperature measurements between the dry and the wet periods (38.59±0.58 and 38.60±0.56 oC, respectively, but the WMN had higher values than the RMN (38.77±0.54 and 38.40±0.54 oC, respectively. The glucose and total cholesterol were higher in the wet season, with no variation due to breed variety and CBCS. The triacylglycerol did not change between breed varieties and seasons. The albumin was similar between varieties and in different seasons, being different in CBCS. Total protein and globulin serum were higher during the wet season, but total protein was higher and globulin was lower in better CBCS. T3 and T4 levels were higher in the rainy season (0.25±0.07 and 6.74±11.37 ?g dL-1, for T3 and T4, respectively than in the dry season (0.18±0.08 and 6.31±1.64 ?g dL-1, for T3 and T4, respectively. The red blood cells showed no difference, but microhematocrit was higher in WMN and in the better CBCS and mean corpuscular volume was higher in the dry season. The concentration

  1. Effects of Upper and Lower Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability in Volunteers and Patients With Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled, Cross-Over, Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Ni Ni; Jorgensen, Anna Maria S; Chen, Yu Sui; Haneline, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to examine autonomic nervous system responses by using heart rate variability analysis (HRV), hemodynamic parameters and numeric pain scale (NPS) when either upper (C1 and C2) or lower (C6 and C7) cervical segments were manipulated in volunteers, and whether such response would be altered in acute mechanical neck pain patients after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). A randomized controlled, cross-over, preliminary study was conducted on 10 asymptomatic normotensive volunteers and 10 normotensive patients complaining of acute neck pain. HRV, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), and NPS were recorded after upper cervical and lower cervical segments SMT in volunteer and patient groups. The standard deviation of average normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN) increased (83.54 ± 22 vs. 105.41 ± 20; P = .02) after upper cervical SMT. The normalized unit of high frequency (nuHF), which shows parasympathetic activity, was predominant (40.18 ± 9 vs. 46.08 ± 14) after upper cervical SMT (P = .03) with a significant decrease (109 ± 10 vs. 98 ± 5) in systolic BP (P = .002). Low frequency to high frequency (LF/HF) ratio, which shows predominance of sympathetic activity increased (1.05 ± 0.7 vs. 1.51 ± 0.5; P = .02) after lower cervical SMT in the healthy volunteers group. However, there was an increase in SDNN (70.48 ± 18 vs. 90.23 ± 20; P = .02 and 75.19 ± 16 vs 97.52 ± 22; P = .01), a decrease in LF/HF ratio (1.33 ± 0.3 vs. 0.81 ± 0.2; P = .001 and 1.22 ± 0.4 vs. 0.86 ± 0.3; P = .02), which was associated with decreased systolic BP (105 ± 10 vs. 95 ± 9; P = .01 and 102 ± 9 vs. 91 ± 10; P = .02) and NPS scores (3 ± 1 vs. 0; P = .01 and 3 ± 1 vs. 1 ± 1; P = .03) following both upper and lower cervical SMT in the patient's group. The baseline HR was 67 ± 9 vs 64 ± 5 (upper cervical) and 65 ± 7 vs 69 ± 11 (lower cervical) in both the healthy volunteer' and patient' groups. Upper cervical SMT enhances dominance of

  2. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maternity. Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Components Whole Blood and Red Blood Cells Platelets Plasma ... About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood and Diversity ...

  3. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study--Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive

  4. Predictors of Failure of Awake Regional Anesthesia for Neonatal Hernia Repair : Data from the General Anesthesia Compared to Spinal Anesthesia Study-Comparing Apnea and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Morton, Neil S; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J; Absalom, Anthony

    BACKGROUND: Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive

  5. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H......]Epibatidine in concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 nM was dissolved in Ringer's solution and administered through the dialysis membrane into the dorsal region of the cervical spinal cord. First, the outflow of [(3)H]epibatidine from the probe into the spinal cord was examined with respect to different concentrations and changes....... The administered [(3)H]epibatidine was found to be distributed to the area closest to the dialysis probe and not dispersed along the spinal cord, and the distribution was equal for all concentrations. The data presented in this investigation provide information, which is important for interpretation of data from...

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow in senile dementia of Alzheimer's type and multiple infarct dementia. Study with Xe-133 single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Shinohara, Masao; Morinobu, Shigeru

    1987-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Xe-133 inhalation method was undertaken in 13 patients with mild or moderate senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT), 9 patients with multiple infarct demantia (MID), and 7 normal controls. Mean blood flow of the hemisphere was significantly decreased in both SDAT and MID groups than the control group. The decreased blood flow was correlated with the severity of SDAT, but not with MID. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the SDAT group was significantly decreased in moderate cases than the control group, especially in the bilateral perietal areas, although this did not differ in the mild SDAT cases and the control cases. For MID, rCBF was significantly decreased in the bilateral frontal, basal nucleus, and left lateral areas. The findings led to the conclusion that SPECT is useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and elucidation of the pathogenesis. (Namekawa, K.).

  7. Retrospective study of spinal cord injury patients admitted to spinal injury rehabilitation center, Sanga, Banepa, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, P; Shrestha, S; Shrestha, R K

    2014-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is a serious problem that affects many facets of an individual's life. This was a retrospective study which included data from all patients admitted to the Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Center (SIRC), Sanga with spinal injuries over a 4 year period between January 2008 and January 2011. The overall objective of the study was to determine the epidemiology of spinal injury patients admitted at the center. Socio-demographic details, mechanism of injury, level of injury, ASIA score and length of hospital stay of the subjects were recorded and analyzed. An incremental pattern was observed in the number of spinal injury patients attending SIRC. In the year 2008, 81 patients of spinal injury were recorded which increased to 122 in 2011. A total of 381 spinal injury patients were included in the study out of which a majority, 73.50% were male, 30.45% belonged to the 21-30 years age group and 23.10% belonged to the 31-40 years age group. A majority of Spinal injury patients, 189 (49.60%), were from the Central region followed by 89 (23.36%) from the Western region. Fall from height (68.24%) was the predominant cause of spinal injury followed by road traffic accident (18.63%). In the study, 213 subjects (55.91%) had ASIA A scoring and thoracic injury (49.34%) was most common followed by lumbar injury (29.66%), cervical injury (17.84%) and sacral injury (3.15%). About Two-fifths (40.42%) of the spinal injury patients were conservatively managed whereas three-fifths (59.58%) underwent surgery and length of stay of patients ranged from 2 to 305 days. This study shows that the young adults, predominantly males in their most productive years of life, are prone to traumatic spinal cord injury which results in personal and family tragedies along with socioeconomic burden to the nation. Thus, recognizing the pattern of traumatic spinal cord injuries, relevant etiological factors and identification of high-risk groups is necessary in designing better methods of

  8. Analysis of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Senile Dementia of Alzheimer Type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Hae; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Roh, Jae Kyu; Woo, Chong In [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-03-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT studies were performed in 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 7 patients with psychological depression and 12 normal controls. Changes of regional cerebral blood flow was semiquantitatively analyzed and the results were as follows. 1) In 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, significant reduction of regional cerebral blood flow was found In both temporoparietal areas. 2) Relative perfusion between cerebral hemispheres was rather symmetrical in patient with Alzheimer's disease. 3) All patients with depression showed normal SPECT findings. As for conclusion, {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT seemed to be a valuable method for clinical assessment and management of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  9. 7 Tesla 22-channel wrap-around coil array for cervical spinal cord and brainstem imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Seifert, Alan C; Kim, Joo-Won; Borrello, Joseph; Xu, Junqian

    2017-10-01

    Increased signal-to-noise ratio and blood oxygenation level-dependent sensitivity at 7 Tesla (T) have the potential to enable high-resolution imaging of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem. We propose a new two-panel radiofrequency coil design for these regions to fully exploit the advantages of ultra-high field. A two-panel array, containing four transmit/receive and 18 receive-only elements fully encircling the head and neck, was constructed following simulations demonstrating the B1+ and specific absorption rate (SAR) benefits of two-panel over one-panel arrays. This array was compared with a previously reported posterior-only array and tested for safety using a phantom. Its anatomical, functional, and diffusion MRI performance was demonstrated in vivo. The two-panel array produced more uniform B1+ across the brainstem and cervical spinal cord without compromising SAR, and achieved 70% greater receive sensitivity than the posterior-only array. The two-panel design enabled acceleration of R = 2 × 2 in two dimensions or R = 3 in a single dimension. High quality in vivo anatomical, functional, and diffusion images of the human cervical spinal cord and brainstem were acquired. We have designed and constructed a wrap-around coil array with excellent performance for cervical spinal cord and brainstem MRI at 7T, which enables simultaneous human cervical spinal cord and brainstem functional MRI. Magn Reson Med 78:1623-1634, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Increase in oxytocin and vasopressin concentration in the blood outflowing from sella turcica region after superior cervical ganglion stimulation in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinska, S.; Orlowska-Majdak, M.; Traczyk, W.Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Lodz (Poland). Katedra Fizjologii

    1996-12-31

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether the stimulation of the superior cervical ganglion influences the oxytocin and vasopressin release into the blood in condition of the of the sella turcica integrity. The experiments were performed on male rats under urethane-chloralose anaesthesia. Four 0.7 ml samples of the blood from the sella turcica region flowing through a tube inserted in the maxillary interna vein were collected in the 30, 35, 60 and 90 min of the experiments. The animals were divided into three groups: 1) control, 2) after the exposition of superior cervical ganglion. 3) after the collection of the 1-st sample of the blood the superior cervical ganglion was electrically stimulated for 30 min with trains of pulses. Vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXY) were determined in the blood plasma by radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior cervical ganglion evoked an significant increase of AVP and OXY release into the blood. The increase of AVP release occurred after 30 min longer latency than the increase of OXY release. (author). 32 refs, 2 figs.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ... PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago play_arrow What is ... What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord injuries Peer Counseling 312-284- ... of Use FacingDisability.com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury ... Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN ...

  17. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  18. The safe spinal anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and complications. To perform a safe procedure, the anaesthetist must have adequate knowledge of the indications and contra-indications, and of the relevant anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of spinal anaesthesia. The patient must be assessed before administration of the spinal anaesthetic and the theatre must be.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  1. Non-Detection of Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA in HHV-8-Seropositive Blood Donors from Three Brazilian Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Souza, Vanda Akico Ueda Fick; Freire, Wilton S.; Mayaud, Philippe; Pannuti, Claudio S.

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia) who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140). PMID:21858163

  2. An unusual spinal arachnoiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Abhishek; Agrawal, Anushree; Agrawal, Chandrashekhar; Rohtagi, Anshu

    2006-12-01

    Cryptococcal spinal arachnoiditis occurs in patients with meningitis and usually when they are immunocompromised. Spinal symptoms in cryptococcosis are rare and a very exceptional entity in the immunocompetent population. We present a young immunocompetent male who developed progressively increasing paraparesis due to primary cryptococcal arachnoiditis, who showed significant improvement after antifungal therapy. Although extremely rare, spinal arachnoiditis in an immunocompetent individual can be caused due to cryptococcus, as in our case. This case illustrates and emphasizes the necessity for an exhaustive and complete investigation, with a high index of suspicion for fungal etiology in patients presenting with spinal arachnoiditis or other disabling, progressive spinal cord syndromes of unknown etiology. Awareness of this presentation is necessary to avoid delay in diagnosis and management of this potentially curable condition.

  3. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  4. Regional disturbances in blood flow and metabolism in equine limb wound healing with formation of exuberant granulation tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette A.; Petersen, Lars; Bundgaard, Louise

    2014-01-01

    a significant difference between body and limb wounds. In conclusion, the metabolic disturbances may suggest an inadequate oxygen supply during the wound healing process in equine limb wounds healing with EGT. This may be related to the inherently decreased perfusion in the wound bed of limb wounds.......As in other fibroproliferative disorders, hypoxia has been suggested to play a key role in the pathogenesis of exuberant granulation tissue (EGT). The purpose of this study was to investigate metabolism and blood flow locally in full-thickness wounds healing with (limb wounds) and without (body...... wounds) formation of EGT. Microdialysis was used to recover endogenous metabolites from the wounds, and laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure blood flow. Measurements were performed before wounding and 1-28 days after wounding. Blood flow was consistently lower in limb wounds than in body wounds...

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow single photon emission computed tomography for detection of Frontotemporal dementia in people with suspected dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Hilary A; Smailagic, Nadja; John, Christeena; Holmes, Robin B; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Coulthard, Elizabeth J; Cullum, Sarah

    2015-06-23

    In the UK, dementia affects 5% of the population aged over 65 years and 25% of those over 85 years. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) represents one subtype and is thought to account for up to 16% of all degenerative dementias. Although the core of the diagnostic process in dementia rests firmly on clinical and cognitive assessments, a wide range of investigations are available to aid diagnosis.Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an established clinical tool that uses an intravenously injected radiolabelled tracer to map blood flow in the brain. In FTD the characteristic pattern seen is hypoperfusion of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. This pattern of blood flow is different to patterns seen in other subtypes of dementia and so can be used to differentiate FTD.It has been proposed that a diagnosis of FTD, (particularly early stage), should be made not only on the basis of clinical criteria but using a combination of other diagnostic findings, including rCBF SPECT. However, more extensive testing comes at a financial cost, and with a potential risk to patient safety and comfort. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of rCBF SPECT for diagnosing FTD in populations with suspected dementia in secondary/tertiary healthcare settings and in the differential diagnosis of FTD from other dementia subtypes. Our search strategy used two concepts: (a) the index test and (b) the condition of interest. We searched citation databases, including MEDLINE (Ovid SP), EMBASE (Ovid SP), BIOSIS (Ovid SP), Web of Science Core Collection (ISI Web of Science), PsycINFO (Ovid SP), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) and LILACS (Bireme), using structured search strategies appropriate for each database. In addition we searched specialised sources of diagnostic test accuracy studies and reviews including: MEDION (Universities of Maastricht and Leuven), DARE (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects) and HTA (Health Technology Assessment) database

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia: a case report and discussion of the literature [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/348

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Voet

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1 is a debilitating chronic pain disorder, the physiopathology of which can lead to dystonia associated with changes in the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous system. An interdisciplinary approach (pharmacological, interventional and psychological therapies in conjunction with a rehabilitation pathway is central to progress towards pain reduction and restoration of function. Aim: This case report aims to stimulate reflection and development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies concerning CRPS associated with dystonia. Case description: A 31 year old female CRPS-1 patient presented with dystonia of the right foot following ligamentoplasty for chronic ankle instability. She did not have a satisfactory response to the usual therapies. Multiple anesthetic blocks (popliteal, epidural and intrathecal were not associated with significant anesthesia and analgesia. Mobilization of the foot by a physiotherapist was not possible. A multidisciplinary approach with psychological support, physiotherapy and spinal cord stimulation (SCS brought pain relief, rehabilitation and improvement in the quality of life. Conclusion: The present case report demonstrates the occurrence of multilevel (peripheral and central pathological modifications in the nervous system of a CRPS-1 patient with dystonia. This conclusion is based on the patient’s pain being resistant to anesthetic blocks at different levels and the favourable, at least initially, response to SCS. The importance of the bio-psycho-social model is also suggested, permitting behavioural change.

  7. Physiological activation of the human cerebral cortex during auditory perception and speech revealed by regional increases in cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Friberg, L

    1988-01-01

    Specific types of brain activity as sensory perception auditory, somato-sensory or visual -or the performance of movements are accompanied by increases of blood flow and oxygen consumption in the cortical areas involved with performing the respective tasks. The activation patterns observed by mea...

  8. The prognostic role of blood lymphocyte subset distribution in patients with resected high-risk primary or regionally metastatic melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernberg, Micaela; Mattila, Petri S; Rissanen, Marjo

    2007-01-01

    Cooperative Group adjuvant interferon study. The frequencies of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets were monitored by flow cytometry using CD3, CD4, CD8, CD56, and CD69 monoclonal antibodies. Patients with low proportions of CD3+CD4+CD69+ cells and of CD3+CD56+ cells before treatment had an improved disease...

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Blood Donor’s Status of HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis in this Region of Marathwada, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangrao H. Deshpande

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims & Objectives: Blood transfusion can cause the transmission of infections to recipients. This is an important mode of infection. The aim of study was to assess the prevalence of such type of infections among blood donors and to compare the seroprevalence of transfusion transmitted diseases in voluntary donors and replacement donors. Retrospective study of five years from Jan. 2007 to Dec. 2011 was done. This study was conducted at Blood bank, MIMSR Medical College Latur, Govt. Medical College, Latur and Bhalchandra Blood bank, Latur. Material & Methods: Total 10, 4925 donors were tested. Donors were screened for seroprevalence of HIV, HBC, HCV and Syphilis. Screening of HIV, HBV & HCV was done by ELISA method & Syphilis was screened by RPR type. Results: The comparison of seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV & Syphilis in voluntary donors and replacement donors showed significant difference only for HIV in the years 2007, 2010, and 2011. Conclusion: The seroprevalence of transfusion transmitted diseases in the study is very low or negligible in voluntary donors as compared to replacement donors. There was a declining trend of seroprevalence for all the disease screened. But in our study the difference is not significant, which indicates that the selection of donors is of low quality. The selection of high quality voluntary donors should be achieved by creation of awareness by education of the prospective donor populations.

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow in patients with transient ischemic attacks studied by Xenon-133 inhalation and emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Hemmingsen, R; Henriksen, L

    1983-01-01

    with no abnormality on the CT-scan. The abnormal blood flow pattern was found to be unchanged after clinically successful reconstructive vascular surgery. This suggests the presence of irreversible ischemic tissue damage without gross emollition (incomplete infarction). It is concluded, that TIAs are often harmful...

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow before and after vascular surgery in patients with transient ischemic attacks with 133-xenon inhalation tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Hemmingsen, Ralf; Lindewald, H

    1982-01-01

    with no abnormality on the CT-scan. The abnormal blood flow pattern was found to be unchanged after clinically successful reconstructive vascular surgery. This suggests the presence of irreversible ischemic tissue damage without gross emollition (incomplete infarction). It is concluded, that TIAs are often harmful...

  12. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    a number of contacts capable of delivering a weak electrical current to the spinal cord, evoking a feeling of peripheral paresthesia. With correct indication and if implanted by an experienced implanter, success rates generally are in the range of about 50–75%. Common indications include complex regional...... and theoretical background, practical implantation technique, and clinical application....

  13. Freqüência de anticorpos irregulares em politransfundidos no Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba-MG, de 1997 a 2005 Frequency of irregular antibodies in multiple-transfused patients at the Regional Blood Bank of Uberaba, from 1997 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto J. Martins

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A fenotipagem eritrocitária pré-transfusional é um importante procedimento para aumentar a segurança das transfusões sangüíneas, sendo realizada rotineiramente no Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba-MG (HRU desde 1996. O presente trabalho tem como objetivo geral avaliar a freqüência de anticorpos antieritrocitários irregulares em politransfundidos, de 1997 a 2005. Através de estudo retrospectivo foram levantados dados no arquivo do HRU de todos os pacientes aloimunizados, realizou-se análise estatística descritiva e comparam-se as proporções pelo teste "Z". Dos 23.220 transfundidos no período, com média de 5,7 transfusões por paciente, observou-se a ocorrência de aloimunização em 173 (0,75%. Os sistemas Rh e Kell juntos tiveram freqüência superior a 70%. A proporção do anti-D foi significativamente maior nas mulheres (pTesting of the pre-transfusional blood phenotype, which has been carried out at the Regional Blood Bank in Uberaba since 1996, is an important procedure to improve safety of blood transfusions. This study aims to describe the frequency of irregular red blood cell antibodies in multiple-transfused patients from 1997 to 2005. In a retrospective study, data from all alloimmunized patients were collected from the blood bank files. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed and a comparison of proportions was made using the Z test. Alloimmunization was observed in 173 (0.75% of the 23,220 transfused patients, with an average of 5.7 transfusions per patient. The frequency of the Rh and Kell systems jointly was over 70%. The proportion of anti-D was significantly higher in women (p<0.05 and no difference was noted in the Rh system between Caucasians and non-Caucasians. Seventy percent (70% of the patients were over 30 years of age. Out of the 73 patients with registered diseases, 39.73% had acute anemias, 31.51% chronic anemias and 28.77% oncological or onco-hematologic diseases. Approximately 70% of antibodies

  14. Regions of homozygosity identified by SNP microarray analysis aid in the diagnosis of autosomal recessive disease and incidentally detect parental blood relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, Kristen Lipscomb; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Thomas, Cameron; Mitchell, Anna L; Prada, Carlos E; Grote, Lauren; Bao, Liming; Martin, Lisa J; Smolarek, Teresa A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the ability of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray to identify copy-neutral regions of homozygosity, demonstrate clinical utility of regions of homozygosity, and discuss ethical/legal implications when regions of homozygosity are associated with a parental blood relationship. Study data were compiled from consecutive samples sent to our clinical laboratory over a 3-year period. A cytogenetics database identified patients with at least two regions of homozygosity >10 Mb on two separate chromosomes. A chart review was conducted on patients who met the criteria. Of 3,217 single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays, 59 (1.8%) patients met inclusion criteria. The percentage of homozygosity ranged from 0.9 to 30.1%, indicating parental relationships from distant to first-degree relatives. First-degree kinship was suspected in the parents of at least 11 patients with regions of homozygosity covering >21.3% of their autosome. In four patients from two families, homozygosity mapping discovered a candidate gene that was sequenced to identify a clinically significant mutation. This study demonstrates clinical utility in the identification of regions of homozygosity, as these regions may aid in diagnosis of the patient. This study establishes the need for careful reporting, thorough pretest counseling, and careful electronic documentation, as microarray has the capability of detecting previously unknown/unreported relationships.

  15. Expression alterations define unique molecular characteristics of spinal ependymomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Rahman, Ruman; Grundy, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors that originate in either intracranial or spinal regions. Although tumors from different regions are histologically similar, they are biologically distinct. We therefore sought to identify molecular characteristics of spinal ependymomas (SEPN) in order to better understand the disease biology of these tumors. Using gene expression profiles of 256 tumor samples, we identified increased expression of 1,866 genes in SEPN when compared to intracranial ependymomas. Thes...

  16. Spinal tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Ghizoni, Enrico; Valadares, Marcelo Gomes Cordeiro; Appenzeller, Simone; Aguiar, Simone Dos Santos; Tedeschi, Helder

    2017-05-01

    Spinal tumors are rare in the pediatric population, presenting many specific peculiarities when compared to adults. We have performed a broad narrative review to describe the most common spinal tumors in children, discussing their main characteristics and management options. The authors have performed an extensive review of the peer-reviewed literature addressing the aforementioned objectives. Multimodality radiological studies (plain films, 3D computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging) are necessary for proper evaluation and differential diagnosis of spinal tumors in children. In selected cases nuclear medicine imaging is used to improve the chances of a more accurate diagnosis. As a general rule, a fine needle biopsy is recommended after radiological evaluation to confirm the tumor's histology. Primary bone tumors can be divided into benign bone tumors, mostly represented by vertebral hemangiomas, osteoid osteomas, osteoblastomas, aneurismal bone cysts, and eosinophilic granulomas, and malign or aggressive tumors, such as Ewing's or osteogenic sarcomas. Secondary bone tumors (spinal metastases) comprise different tumor histologies, and treatment is mainly based on tumor's radiosensitivity. The characteristics and treatment options of the main spinal tumors are discussed in details. Spinal tumors in children are rare lesions that demand a thorough understanding of their main characteristics for their proper management. Understanding the nuances of spinal tumors in children is of paramount importance for improving outcomes and chances of cure.

  17. Spinal tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Fernandes Joaquim

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Spinal tumors are rare in the pediatric population, presenting many specific peculiarities when compared to adults. We have performed a broad narrative review to describe the most common spinal tumors in children, discussing their main characteristics and management options. Method: The authors have performed an extensive review of the peer-reviewed literature addressing the aforementioned objectives. Results: Multimodality radiological studies (plain films, 3D computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging are necessary for proper evaluation and differential diagnosis of spinal tumors in children. In selected cases nuclear medicine imaging is used to improve the chances of a more accurate diagnosis. As a general rule, a fine needle biopsy is recommended after radiological evaluation to confirm the tumor's histology. Primary bone tumors can be divided into benign bone tumors, mostly represented by vertebral hemangiomas, osteoid osteomas, osteoblastomas, aneurismal bone cysts, and eosinophilic granulomas, and malign or aggressive tumors, such as Ewing's or osteogenic sarcomas. Secondary bone tumors (spinal metastases comprise different tumor histologies, and treatment is mainly based on tumor's radiosensitivity. The characteristics and treatment options of the main spinal tumors are discussed in details. Conclusion: Spinal tumors in children are rare lesions that demand a thorough understanding of their main characteristics for their proper management. Understanding the nuances of spinal tumors in children is of paramount importance for improving outcomes and chances of cure.

  18. The gene for spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is located in a region of {approximately} 3 cM on chromosome 14q24.3-q32.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanin, G.; Cancel, G.; Duerr, A.; Dubourg, O.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France); Chneiweiss, H.; Weissenbach, J.; Cann, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    SCA3, the gene for spinal cerebellar ataxia 3, was recently mapped to a 15-cM interval between D14S67 and D14S81 on chromosome 14q, by linkage analysis in two families of French ancestry. The SCA3 candidate region has now been refined by linkage analysis with four new microsatellite markers (D14S256, D14S291, D14S280, and AFM343vf1) in the same two families, in which 19 additional individuals were genotyped, and in a third French family. Combined two-point linkage analyses show that the new markers, D14S280 and AFM343vf1, are tightly linked to the SCA3 locus, with maximal lod scores, at recombination fraction, ({theta}) = .00, of 7.05 and 13.70, respectively. Combined multipoint and recombinant haplotype analyses localize the SCA3 locus to a 3-cM interval flanked by D14S291 and D14S81. The same allele for D14S280 segregates with the disease locus in the three kindreds. This allele is frequent in the French population, however, and linkage disequilibrium is not clearly established. The SCA3 locus remains within the 29-cM region on 14q24.3-q32.2 containing the gene for the Machado-Joseph disease, which is clinically related to the phenotype determined by SCA3, but it cannot yet be concluded that both diseases result from alterations of the same gene. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. [The influence of non-invasive electrical stimulation of the spinal cord on the locomotor function of patients presenting with movement disorders of central genesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balykin, M V; Yakupov, R N; Mashin, V V; Kotova, E Yu; Balykin, Yu M; Gerasimenko, Yu P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of non-invasive (transcutaneous) electrical spinal cord stimulation on the locomotor function of the patients suffering from movement disorders. The study involved 10 patients of both sexes at the age from 32 to 70 years (including 40% of men and 60% of women) presenting with the compromised locomotor function of varying severity associated with the disturbances of cerebral blood circulation caused either by an injury to the brain and spinal cord or by stroke. The transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation was applied using different frequency regimes with the placement of the electrodes in the projection onto the region of TXI-TXII vertebrae. The active factors were bipolar electrical stimuli 0.5 ms in duration; the current strength was chosen for each patient on an individual basis taking into consideration its threshold level. Electromyograms and evoked motor responses of selected muscles, viz. m. rectus femoris, m.biceps femoris, m. tibialis anterior, and m.gastrocnemius were recorded with the use of the 'Neuro-MVP-8 eight-channel electromyography' ('Neurosoft', Russia). The data obtained give evidence that the stimulation of the spinal cord with a frequency of 1 Hz induces reflectory responses with monosynaptic and polysynaptic components in the muscles of the lower extremities, with the thresholds of these responses being significantly higher in the patients presenting with serious neurological problems. Stimulation with the frequencies of 5 and 30 Hz caused in the patients with paresis the involuntary movement of the legs the characteristics of which were similar to those of the locomotor movements. It has been demonstrated that the application of transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation leads to increased excitability of the lumbar spinal neural structures of the patients. The study has shown the possibility of regulation of the locomotor functions in the patients presenting

  20. Serological and molecular investigation of Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. in ticks and blood of dogs, in the Thrace Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetinkaya, Handan; Matur, Erdal; Akyazi, İbrahim; Ekiz, Elif Ergul; Aydin, Levent; Toparlak, Mufit

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, tick-borne diseases like ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis became widespread worldwide threatening the health of both human and companion animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. A total of 400 blood samples and 912 ticks were collected from dogs living in shelters that are located in four cities (Istanbul, Edirne, Tekirdag and Kirklareli) of the Thrace Region. Blood and buffy coat smears were prepared for microscopic examination. Hematologic and serologic analyses were performed using cell counter and commercial Snap3Dx test kit, respectively. Eight hundred fifty of collected ticks were classified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 33 as Rhipicephalus turanicus and 29 as Ixodes ricinus. After DNA extraction from blood samples and pooled ticks (127 tick pools, in total), nested PCR was performed to detect the DNA of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. The seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis was 27.25% (109) by Snap3Dx test and the total molecular positivity was 11.75% (47) in dog blood samples and 21.25% (27) in tick pools by nested PCR. The frequencies of the infected blood samples with E. canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma platys were detected as 6%, 4% and 6%, respectively. E. canis and A. platys were detected in R. sanguineus pools with a ratio of 15.75% and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, A. platys was also detected in R. turanicus pools (0.7%). A. phagocytophilum was found only in I. ricinus pools (3.93%). Morulae of three species were detected in buffy coat and blood smears. While anemia was observed in dogs infected with E. canis and co-infected (with one or more species), thrombocytopenia was observed only in co-infected dogs. This is the first study providing evidence for the presence of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. Based on the results of the tests used in this study

  1. Common surgical complications in degenerative spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Aggeliki, Lianou; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Girardi, Federico P

    2013-04-18

    The rapid growth of spine degenerative surgery has led to unrelenting efforts to define and prevent possible complications, the incidence of which is probably higher than that reported and varies according to the region of the spine involved (cervical and thoracolumbar) and the severity of the surgery. Several issues are becoming progressively clearer, such as complication rates in primary versus revision spinal surgery, complications in the elderly, the contribution of minimally invasive surgery to the reduction of complication rate. In this paper the most common surgical complications in degenerative spinal surgery are outlined and discussed.

  2. Patterns of regional cerebral blood flow related to memorizing of high and low imagery words--an emission computer tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, G; Podreka, I; Steiner, M; Willmes, K

    1987-01-01

    Patterns of regional cerebral blood flow were investigated in healthy volunteers who were either resting or memorizing meaningless words, abstract nouns, or concrete nouns, the latter being given either with or without an instruction to use visual imagery. Relative regional count rates were subjected to smallest space analysis (SAA) to study the structure of covariations. Memorizing of concrete nouns gave rise to the formation of a continuous correlational subspace which comprised inferior temporal and occipital regions. When concrete nouns were memorized without an imagery instruction the mean hemispheric count rate was higher on the right side, whereas the intentional use of imagery gave rise to a left preponderance. Analysis of correlational structures, however, suggests that in both cases the left hemisphere was predominantly engaged in task solution, and that the difference in hemispheric asymmetries is to be attributed to different modes of interhemispheric collaboration.

  3. A quantitative study of regional cerebral blood flow in childhood using {sup 123}I-IMP-SPECT. With emphasis on age-related changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayame; Kishi, Kazuko; Sejima, Hitoshi; Haneda, Noriyuki; Uchida, Nobue; Sugimura, Kazuro; Ito, Masatoshi; Shiraishi, Hideyuki [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1996-11-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), using N-isopropyl-p-={sup 123}I= iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) was used for quantitative analysis of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) on 26 individuals between 0 and 19 years of age. The rCBF showed age-related changes; it was low in early infancy, increased in late infancy through early childhood, and decreased and remained constant after puberty. The rCBF through cerebral cortex varied more greatly than through thalamus and cerebellum, and seemed to depend more closely on age. In the case of 4 months of age rCBF was very low at the frontal region and was very high at the occipital region. In more older cases, rCBF in the cerebral cortex was higher than in the thalamus. In childhood, rCBF was very inconsistent and showed a great inter-individual variance. (author)

  4. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Huhndorf

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization.We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections.In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology.Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development.

  5. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav; Boretius, Susann

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development.

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT). Comparing with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and aged control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kitani, M.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1987-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by /sup 133/Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID.

  7. Abdominal aorta: characterisation of blood flow and measurement of its regional distribution by cine magnetic resonance phase-shift velocity mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanuma, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Mohiaddin, R.H. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hasegawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Heshiki, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Longmore, D.B. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1992-12-01

    Magnetic resonance phase-shift-induced velocity mapping is a powerful technique for measuring in vivo blood velocity and flow non-invasively. Using this method we examined dimensions, distensibility, blood flow and its regional distribution in the abdominal aorta in 10 normal volunteers. Data were acquired at three levels of the descending aorta. Thirty percent reduction in diastolic cross sectional area was observed in the caudal direction between these levels. Total blood flow (ml/min) in the abdominal aorta at the three sites was 4094{+-}1600, 2339{+-}910 and 1602{+-}549 respectively. Flows in the coeliac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries were also calculated. The net flow in the abdominal aorta above the coeliac trunk was persistently forward, while there was considerable backflow (13% of total instantaneous flow) below the renal arteries during early diastole. Magnetic resonance imaging is a non-invasive technique for quantitative assessment of blood flow in the abdominal aorta and its main branches. (orig.)

  8. Spinal injuries in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2009-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury.

  9. [Prevalence of dyslipidemia and normal blood lipids level in Uygur population in Kashgar area of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z B; Xue, Z X; Wu, X J; Wang, T M; Li, Y H; Song, X L; Chao, X F; Wang, G; Nazibam, Nurmamat; Ayxamgul, Bawudun; Gulbahar, Elyas; Zhou, Z Y; Sun, B S; Wang, Y Z; Wang, M

    2017-06-10

    Objective: To understand the prevalence of dyslipidemia and normal blood lipids level in Uygur diabetes patients in Kashgar prefecture in southern area of Xinjiang. Methods: A total of 5 078 local residents aged ≥18 years (42.56% were men) selected through cluster random sampling in Kashgar were surveyed by means of questionnaire survey, physical examination and laboratory test, and 521 diabetes patients were screened. Results: The overall prevalence of dyslipidemia in diabetes patients was 59.50% (310/521) with adjusted rate as 49.39%. Age ≥65 years, overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity increased the risk for dyslipidemia by 0.771 times (95% CI: 1.015-3.088), 1.132 times (95% CI: 1.290-3.523), 1.688 times (95% CI: 1.573-4.592) and 0.801 times (95% CI: 1.028-3.155) respectively. Compared with males, female was a protective factor for dyslipidemia (OR=0.507, 95%CI: 0.334-0.769). The overall normal rate of blood lipids level including total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) for type 2 diabetes patients was 11.13%. Female, higher BMI and abdominal obesity were the factors influencing the overall normal blood lipids level. The normal rate of LDL-C level decreased with increase of age, BMI and waist circumferences (trend test χ(2)=18.049, Pdyslipidemia in Uygur diabetes patients in Kashgar was high, however, the overall normal rate of blood lipid level was relatively low. Obesity was the most important risk factor for dyslipidemia in this area. More attention should be paid to dyslipidemia prevention in women.

  10. Regional disturbances in blood flow and metabolism in equine limb wound healing with formation of exuberant granulation tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mette A; Petersen, Lars J; Bundgaard, Louise; Toft, Nils; Jacobsen, Stine

    2014-01-01

    As in other fibroproliferative disorders, hypoxia has been suggested to play a key role in the pathogenesis of exuberant granulation tissue (EGT). The purpose of this study was to investigate metabolism and blood flow locally in full-thickness wounds healing with (limb wounds) and without (body wounds) formation of EGT. Microdialysis was used to recover endogenous metabolites from the wounds, and laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure blood flow. Measurements were performed before wounding and 1-28 days after wounding. Blood flow was consistently lower in limb wounds than in body wounds throughout the study period with no change over time. After wounding and throughout the study period, the glucose concentration was significantly lower in limb wounds than in body wounds, whereas the lactate level showed a significantly higher concentration in limb wounds. The lactate/glucose ratio displayed a significant difference between body and limb wounds. In conclusion, the metabolic disturbances may suggest an inadequate oxygen supply during the wound healing process in equine limb wounds healing with EGT. This may be related to the inherently decreased perfusion in the wound bed of limb wounds. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. Hemichorea in a diabetes mellitus patient following acute ischemic stroke with changes in regional cerebral blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Suzuki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is not unusual to observe hemichorea in patients with diabetes mellitus, with origins attributable to recent ischemia. Our patient was a 66-year-old female with diabetes mellitus who suddenly developed right hemichorea, mild muscle weakness of the right upper extremity, ideational apraxia, and acalculia. Her blood glucose was 600 mg/dL, and HbA1c was 13.3%. After the patient underwent head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, a new cerebral infarction was observed in the left frontal lobe, and treatment was started with edaravone and cilostazol. At the same time, insulin treatment was also started for hyperglycemia. The acalculia and ideational apraxia improved approximately 1 week after treatment initiated, and the hemichorea also decreased. ECD-SPECT was performed on admission, and it was observed that blood flow was decreased in the left frontal lobe and striatum, but increased in the thalamus; two weeks later on follow-up ECD-SPECT, blood flow had increased slightly in the left forebrain and striatum, while it had decreased slightly in the thalamus. This suggests that the cause of hemichorea was related to ischemia. When the activity of the pallidum is impaired, it is presumed that the inhibitory activity towards the thalamus weakens and the thalamic cells become over-excited, causing chorea.

  12. Characterization of subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Cordula; Urech, Karin; Hügle, Thomas; Benz, Robyn Melanie; Geurts, Jeroen; Schären, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis may be a cause of low back pain in degenerative spine diseases including lumbar spinal stenosis. Subchondral bone is regarded as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize subchondral bone histopathology in osteoarthritic facet joints from lumbar spinal stenosis patients. Fifteen patients with degenerative spinal stenosis scheduled for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery were recruited for this study. Osteoarthritis severity was graded on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images using Weishaupt scoring system. Dissected osteoarthritic facet joints were subjected to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses to study relative abundance of osteoblast, osteoclasts, and macrophages using van Gieson's, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CD68-antibody staining, respectively. Presence of nerve fibers was evaluated by PGP9.5-antibody staining. Differential bone histopathology, independent from radiological osteoarthritis grade, was observed in facet joints. Extensive de novo bone formation was found in subchondral bone tissues of eight of fifteen specimens. Regions of bone formation showed high abundance of blood vessels and CD68-positive macrophages, but were devoid of multinucleated osteoclasts. Additional pathological changes in subchondral marrow spaces, including inflammatory infiltration and enhanced osteoclast activity, were characterized by macrophage-rich tissues. PGP9.5-positive nerve fibers were detected near arterioles, but not in regions displaying bone pathology. Individual histopathological parameters did not associate with clinical features or radiological osteoarthritis severity. Subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis is characterized by marrow infiltration by macrophage-rich tissues and enhanced de novo bone formation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34

  13. Blood-feeding patterns of native mosquitoes and insights into their potential role as pathogen vectors in the Thames estuary region of the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, V A; Hernández-Triana, L M; England, M E; Medlock, J M; Mertens, P P C; Logan, J G; Wilson, A J; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N; Carpenter, S

    2017-03-27

    The range of vertebrate hosts on which species of mosquito blood-feed is an important parameter for identifying potential vectors and in assessing the risk of incursion and establishment of vector-borne pathogens. In the United Kingdom, studies of mosquito host range have collected relatively few specimens and used techniques that could only broadly identify host species. This study conducted intensive collection and analysis of mosquitoes from a grazing marsh environment in southeast England. This site provides extensive wetland habitat for resident and migratory birds and has abundant human nuisance biting mosquitoes. The aim was to identify the blood-feeding patterns of mosquito species present at the site which could contribute to the transmission of pathogens. Twice-weekly collections of mosquitoes were made from Elmley Nature Reserve, Kent, between June and October 2014. Mosquitoes were collected using resting boxes, by aspiration from man-made structures and using a Mosquito Magnet Pro baited with 1-octen-3-ol. Blood-fed specimens were classified according to the degree of blood meal digestion using the Sella scale and vertebrate origin determined using sequencing of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I gene. Mosquitoes that were morphologically cryptic were identified to species level using multiplex PCR and sequencing methods. A total of 20,666 mosquitoes of 11 species were collected, and 2,159 (10.4%) were blood-fed (Sella scale II-VI); of these 1,341 blood-fed specimens were selected for blood meal analysis. Vertebrate origin was successfully identified in 964 specimens (72%). Collections of blood-fed individuals were dominated by Anopheles maculipennis complex (73.5%), Culiseta annulata (21.2%) and Culex pipiens form pipiens (10.4%). Nineteen vertebrate hosts comprising five mammals and 14 birds were identified as hosts for mosquitoes, including two migratory bird species. Feeding on birds by Culex modestus and Anopheles

  14. Brainstem projections to spinal motoneurons: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, J C; Kuypers, H G

    1987-12-01

    1. The existence of direct projections to spinal motoneurons and interneurons from the raphe pallidus and obscurus, the adjoining ventral medial reticular formation and the locus coeruleus and subcoeruleus is now well substantiated by various anatomical techniques. 2. The spinal projections from the raphe nuclei and the adjoining medial reticular formation contain serotonergic and non-serotonergic fibres. These projections also contain various peptides, several of which are contained within the serotonergic fibres. Whether still other transmitter substances (e.g. acetylcholine) are present in the various descending brainstem projections to motoneurons remains to be determined. 3. The spinal projections from the locus coeruleus and subcoeruleus are mainly noradrenergic, but there also exists a non-noradrenergic spinal projection. 4. Pharmacological, physiological and behavioural studies indicate an overall facilitatory action of noradrenaline and serotonin (including several peptides) on motoneurons. This may lead to an enhanced susceptibility for excitatory inputs from other sources. 5. The brainstem areas in question receive an important projection from several components of the limbic system. This suggests that the emotional brain can exert a powerful influence on all regions of the spinal cord and may thus control both its sensory input and motor output.

  15. Alterations in cardiac autonomic control in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Liu, Nan; Malmqvist, Lasse; Wecht, Jill Maria; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2018-01-01

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) interferes with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect on the cardiovascular system will depend on the extent of damage to the spinal/central component of ANS. The cardiac changes are caused by loss of supraspinal sympathetic control and relatively increased parasympathetic cardiac control. Decreases in sympathetic activity result in heart rate and the arterial blood pressure changes, and may cause arrhythmias, in particular bradycardia, with the risk of cardiac arrest in those with cervical or high thoracic injuries. The objective of this review is to give an update of the current knowledge related to the alterations in cardiac autonomic control following SCI. With this purpose the review includes the following subheadings: 2. Neuro-anatomical plasticity and cardiac control 2.1 Autonomic nervous system and the heart 2.2 Alteration in autonomic control of the heart following spinal cord injury 3. Spinal shock and neurogenic shock 3.1 Pathophysiology of spinal shock 3.2 Pathophysiology of neurogenic shock 4. Autonomic dysreflexia 4.1 Pathophysiology of autonomic dysreflexia 4.2 Diagnosis of autonomic dysreflexia 5. Heart rate/electrocardiography following spinal cord injury 5.1 Acute phase 5.2 Chronic phase 6. Heart rate variability 6.1 Time domain analysis 6.2 Frequency domain analysis 6.3 QT-variability index 6.4 Nonlinear (fractal) indexes 7. Echocardiography 7.1 Changes in cardiac structure following spinal cord injury 7.2 Changes in cardiac function following spinal cord injury 8. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular basic data set and international standards to document the remaining autonomic function in spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Blood meal identification in off-host cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) from a plague-endemic region of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christine B; Borchert, Jeff N; Black, William C; Atiku, Linda A; Mpanga, Joseph T; Boegler, Karen A; Moore, Sean M; Gage, Kenneth L; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2013-02-01

    The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, is an inefficient vector of the plague bacterium (Yersinia pestis) and is the predominant off-host flea species in human habitations in the West Nile region, an established plague focus in northwest Uganda. To determine if C. felis might serve as a Y. pestis bridging vector in the West Nile region, we collected on- and off-host fleas from human habitations and used a real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assay to estimate the proportion of off-host C. felis that had fed on humans and the proportion that had fed on potentially infectious rodents or shrews. Our findings indicate that cat fleas in human habitations in the West Nile region feed primarily on domesticated species. We conclude that C. felis is unlikely to serve as a Y. pestis bridging vector in this region.

  17. Plasticity of the injured human spinal cord: insights revealed by spinal cord functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, David W; Bosma, Rachael; Mikulis, David; Nugaeva, Natalia; Smith, Karen; Pokrupa, Ronald; Islam, Omar; Stroman, Patrick W; Fehlings, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    While numerous studies have documented evidence for plasticity of the human brain there is little evidence that the human spinal cord can change after injury. Here, we employ a novel spinal fMRI design where we stimulate normal and abnormal sensory dermatomes in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury and perform a connectivity analysis to understand how spinal networks process information. Spinal fMRI data was collected at 3 Tesla at two institutions from 38 individuals using the standard SEEP functional MR imaging techniques. Thermal stimulation was applied to four dermatomes in an interleaved timing pattern during each fMRI acquisition. SCI patients were stimulated in dermatomes both above (normal sensation) and below the level of their injury. Sub-group analysis was performed on healthy controls (n = 20), complete SCI (n = 3), incomplete SCI (n = 9) and SCI patients who recovered full function (n = 6). Patients with chronic incomplete SCI, when stimulated in a dermatome of normal sensation, showed an increased number of active voxels relative to controls (p = 0.025). There was an inverse relationship between the degree of sensory impairment and the number of active voxels in the region of the spinal cord corresponding to that dermatome of abnormal sensation (R(2) = 0.93, pdermatomes of normal sensation in chronic SCI patients and an increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete SCI patients relative to healthy controls.

  18. Epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection in first-time blood donors in the southwestern region of Goiás, central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulena Rosa Leite Cardoso dos Anjos

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection in populations from inner cities, especially in Central Brazil. Thus the objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HBV infection, and to analyze the factors associated with HBV infection, in a population of first-time blood donors in the southwestern region of Goiás, Central Brazil. METHODS: A total of 984 individuals were interviewed and gave blood samples to detect serological markers of HBV (HBsAg, anti-HBs, and anti-HBc by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: An overall prevalence of 6.9% was found for HBV, with constituent prevalence rates of 3.6% and 11.6%, in subjects classified as fit and unfit to donate blood according the epidemiological screening, respectively. Only three individuals were positive for anti-HBs alone, suggesting previous vaccination against HBV. The variables of prior blood transfusion (OR = 2.3, tattoo/piercing (OR = 2.1, illicit drug use (OR = 2.3, sex with a partner with hepatitis (OR = 14.7, and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR = 2.9 were independently associated with HBV-positivity. These data suggested a low endemicity of hepatitis B in the studied population. CONCLUSION: The findings of low hepatitis B immunization coverage and the association of hepatitis B with risky behavior highlight that there is a need to intensify hepatitis B prevention programs in the southwest region of Goiás.

  19. Leishmania infection and host-blood feeding preferences of phlebotomine sandflies and canine leishmaniasis in an endemic European area, the Algarve Region in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Maia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Algarve Region (AR in southern Portugal, which is an international tourist destination, has been considered an endemic region of zoonotic leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum since the 1980s. In the present study, phlebotomine and canine surveys were conducted to identify sandfly blood meal sources and to update the occurrence of Leishmania infection in vectors and dogs. Four sandfly species were captured: Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus ariasi, Phlebotomus sergenti and Sergentomyia minuta. In one P. perniciosus female, L. infantum DNA was detected. Blood meal tests showed that this species had no host preferences and was an opportunistic feeder. An overall canine leishmaniasis (CanL seroprevalence of 16.06% was found; the seroprevalence was 3.88% in dogs housed in kennels and 40.63% in dogs that attended veterinary clinics. The simultaneous occurrence of dogs and P. perniciosus infected with L. infantum in the AR indicates that the region continues to be an endemic area for CanL. Our results reinforce the need for the systematic spatial distribution of phlebotomine populations and their Leishmania infection rates and the need to simultaneously perform pathogen monitoring in both invertebrate and vertebrate hosts to investigate the transmission, distribution and spreading of Leishmania infection.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ...

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    Full Text Available ... com is an informational and support website for families facing spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

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    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy with multiple spinal arachnoid cysts and paraplegia, and 37 similar cases in the literature are reviewed by neurosurgeons and radiologist at Univ of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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