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Sample records for regenerative periodontal therapy

  1. Emdogain in regenerative periodontal therapy. A review of the literature.

    Sculean, A.; Windisch, P.; Dori, F.; Keglevich, T.; Molnar, B.; Gera, I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i.e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of the enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in the

  2. Periodontal Regenerative Therapy in Patient with Chronic Periodontitis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    Seshima, Fumi; Nishina, Makiko; Namba, Takashi; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus requiring periodontal treatment including regenerative therapy. The patient was a 66-year-old man who presented with the chief complaint of gingival inflammation and mobile teeth in the molar region. He had been being treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus since 1999. His glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.8%. An initial examination revealed sites with a probing depth of ≥7 mm in the molar region, and radiography revealed angular bone defects in this area. Based on a clinical diagnosis of generalized chronic periodontitis, the patient underwent initial periodontal therapy. An improvement was observed in periodontal conditions on reevaluation, and his HbA1c level showed a reduction to 6.9%. Periodontal regenerative therapy with enamel matrix derivative was then performed on #16, 26, and 27. Following another reevaluation, a removable partial denture was fabricated for #47 and the patient placed on supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). To date, periodontal conditions have remained stable and the patient's HbA1c level has increased to 7.5% during SPT. The results show the importance of collaboration between dentist and physician in managing periodontal and diabetic conditions in such patients.

  3. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    Sculean, A.; Schwarz, F.; Becker, J.; Brecx, M.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing.

  4. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases.

    Larsson, L; Decker, A M; Nibali, L; Pilipchuk, S P; Berglundh, T; Giannobile, W V

    2016-03-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  5. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  6. Results after replantation of avulsed permanent teeth. II. Periodontal healing and the role of physiologic storage and antiresorptive-regenerative therapy.

    Pohl, Yango; Filippi, Andreas; Kirschner, Horst

    2005-04-01

    The status of the periodontal ligament (PDL) and of the pulp are decisive for the healing of avulsed and replanted teeth. A tooth rescue box was developed and distributed to offer optimal storage conditions for avulsed teeth. The therapy comprised extraoral endodontic treatment and applications of medicaments to enhance periodontal healing. In this long-term clinical study the healing results following avulsion and replantation were investigated. Twenty-eight permanent teeth in 24 patients were evaluated. The extraoral storage media and periods varied considerably. Soon after avulsion six teeth were stored in a cell culture medium (tooth rescue box Dentosafe) for 1-53 h; the PDL was defined as not compromised. Sixteen teeth were stored in a non-physiologic situation temporarily, the PDL was considered as compromised. Six teeth were stored in non-physiologic conditions for longer periods; the condition of the PDL was defined as hopeless. On 14 teeth antiresorptive-regenerative therapy (ART) with the local application of glucocorticoids and enamel matrix derivative and the systemic administration of doxycyclin was used. In all teeth extraoral endodontic treatment by retrograde insertion of posts was performed. The mean observation period was 31.2 months (+/-24.1; 5.1-100.2; median: 23.8). All six teeth rescued physiologically healed with a functional PDL (functional healing, FH) irrespective of the storage period. Of eight teeth with a compromised PDL on which ART was used, three teeth healed with a functional PDL. All other teeth showed replacement resorption, in three teeth additionally infection-related resorption was recorded. The predominant influence on the healing results was the immediate physiologic rescue of avulsed teeth (chi-square, P = 0.0001). The use of ART seemed to support FH (chi-square, P = 0.0547) in teeth with a compromised PDL. No other factors (maturity of roots, crown fractures, gender, age, antibiotics) were related to healing. In a linear

  7. Laser therapy for periodontitis

    Efanov, O. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying pulsed (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometers laser radiation in the treatment for early diagnosed periodontitis. The investigation was made on 65 patients (47 patients constituted the experimental group and 18 patients constituted a control group) affected by periodontitis. Clinical and functional tests revealed that laser therapy produced a string effect on the course of the illness. It reduced bleeding, inflammation, and pruritus. However, it did not produce an affect on electroexcitation. Biomicroscopic examinations and periodontium rheography revealed that the gingival blood flow became normal after the course of laser therapy. The capillary permeability and venous congestion decreased, which was confirmed by the increased time of vacuum tests, raised gingival temperature, reduced tissue clearance, and increased oxygen tension. Apart from that, laser therapy subsided fibrinolysis, proteolytic tissue activity, and decreased the exudative inflammation of periodontium.

  8. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  9. Orthodontic-periodontal interactions: Orthodontic extrusion in interdisciplinary regenerative treatments.

    Paolone, Maria Giacinta; Kaitsas, Roberto

    2018-06-01

    Orthodontics is a periodontal treatment. "Guided orthodontic regeneration" (GOR) procedures use orthodontic movements in perio-restorative patients. The GOR technique includes a guided orthodontic "soft tissue" regeneration (GOTR) and a guided orthodontic "bone" regeneration (GOBR) with a plastic soft tissue approach and a regenerating reality. The increased amount of soft tissue gained with orthodontic movement can be used for subsequent periodontal regenerative techniques. The increased amount of bone can as well improve primary implant stability and, eventually, simplify a GTR technique to regenerate soft tissues, to restore tooth with external resorption in aesthetic zone or to extract a tooth to create new hard-soft tissue for adjacent teeth. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Regenerative Therapies for Diabetic Microangiopathy

    Roberto Bassi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycaemia occurring in diabetes is responsible for accelerated arterial remodeling and atherosclerosis, affecting the macro- and the microcirculatory system. Vessel injury is mainly related to deregulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin/insulin-precursors production, generation of advanced glycation end-products, reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, and oxidative and reductive stress. It occurs both at extracellular level with increased calcium and matrix proteins deposition and at intracellular level, with abnormalities of intracellular pathways and increased cell death. Peripheral arterial disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke are the main causes of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients representing a major clinical and economic issue. Pharmacological therapies, administration of growth factors, and stem cellular strategies are the most effective approaches and will be discussed in depth in this comprehensive review covering the regenerative therapies of diabetic microangiopathy.

  11. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  12. Clinical concepts for regenerative therapy in intrabony defects.

    Cortellini, Pierpaolo; Tonetti, Maurizio S

    2015-06-01

    Evidence indicates that periodontal regeneration is an efficacious and predictable procedure for the treatment of isolated and multiple intrabony defects. Meta-analyses from systematic reviews indicate an added benefit, in terms of clinical attachment level gain, when demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft, barrier membranes and active biologic products/compounds are applied in addition to open flap debridement. On the other hand, a consistent amount of variability of the outcomes is evident among different studies and within the experimental population of each study. This variability is explained, at least in part, by different patient and defect characteristics. Patient-related factors include smoking habit, compliance with home oral hygiene and residual inflammation after cause-related therapy. Defect-associated factors include defect depth and radiographic angle, the number of residual bony walls, pocket depth and the degree of hypermobility. In addition, surgical-related variables, such as surgical skill, clinical experience and knowledge, and application of the different regenerative materials, have a significant impact on clinical outcomes. This paper presents a strategy to optimize the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. The surgical design of the flap, the use of different regenerative materials and the application of appropriate passive sutures are discussed in this review along with the scientific foundations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    Mahale, Swapna; Dani, Nitin; Ansari, Shumaila S.; Kale, Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense mechanism against infection by transfecting host cells with an antimicrobial peptide protein-encoding gene. -Periodontal vaccination. Gene therapy is one of the recent entrants and its applications in the field of periodontics are reviewed in general here. PMID:20376232

  14. Longitudinal supportive periodontal therapy for severe chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement: a 12-year follow-up report.

    Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Tomita, Sachiyo; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Masatake; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    We report a case involving a 12-year follow-up after treatment for chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement. A 54-year-old woman presented with the chief complaint of hypersensitivity. Clinical examination at the first visit revealed 15% of sites with a probing depth ≥4 mm and 35% of sites with bleeding on probing. Initial periodontal therapy was implemented based on a clinical diagnosis of severe chronic periodontitis. Surgical periodontal therapy was subsequently performed at selected sites. For #44, regenerative periodontal therapy using enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain(®)) was selected. For #16, which exhibited a 2- to 3-wall vertical bony defect and class III (mesio-distal) furcation involvement, bone graft was scheduled. Other sites with residual periodontal pockets were treated by open flap debridement. For #37, with a gutter-shaped root, odontoplasty was performed. After reevaluation, the patient was placed on supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). During 12 years of SPT, the periodontal condition remained uneventful in most of the teeth. However, bone resorption was observed in the distal aspect of #37, making the prognosis poor. This indicates the need to continuously monitor risk factors, including inflammation and traumatic occlusion, during SPT. Although some problems still remain, severe periodontitis with furcation involvement was successfully maintained longitudinally with an adequate level of patient compliance and careful SPT.

  15. Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Dental Therapy

    Hiral Jhaveri-Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is amongst the latest exciting technologies having impacted the field of dentistry. Initially considered as a futuristic approach, tissue engineering is now being successfully applied in regenerative surgery. This article reviews the important determinants of tissue engineering and how they contribute to the improvement of wound healing and surgical outcomes in the oral region. Furthermore, we shall address the clinical applications of engineering involving oral and maxillofacial surgical and periodontal procedures along with other concepts that are still in experimental phase of development. This knowledge will aid the surgical and engineering researchers to comprehend the collaboration between these fields leading to extounding dental applications and to ever-continuing man-made miracles in the field of human science.

  16. Efficiency of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in moderate chronic periodontitis.

    Mlachkova, Antoaneta M; Popova, Christina L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and microflora compatible with periodontal health. The AIM of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy (scaling and root planning) in the treatment of moderate chronic periodontitis. The study included 30 patients aged between 33 and 75 years, of which 46.7% women and 53.3% men, diagnosed with moderate and, at some sites, severe periodontitis. They were treated with non-surgical periodontal therapy methods (scaling and root planning and curettage if indicated). Additionally, chemical plaque control with rinse water containing chlorhexidine was applied. The diagnostic and reassessment procedures included measuring the periodontal indices of 601 periodontal units before and after the therapy. The indices measured were the papillary bleeding index (PBI), the hygiene index (HI), the probing pocket depth (PPD) and the clinical attachment level (CAL). Significant reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation was found in all treated patients; we also found a statistically significant reduction of periodontal pockets with clinically measured depth 5 mm did not show statistically significant lower incidence rates probably due to the initially small percentage of deep pockets in the patients studied. There was a statistically significant reduction of all sites with attachment loss, the highest significance found at sites where the attachment loss was greater than 5 mm. The results of the study suggest that nonsurgical periodontal therapy is effective in managing the moderate

  17. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    Anoop Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP, can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  18. An overview of periodontal regenerative procedures for the general dental practitioner

    M. Siaili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete regeneration of the periodontal tissues following periodontal disease remains an unmet challenge, and has presented clinicians with a remarkably difficult clinical challenge to solve given the extensive research in this area and our current understanding of the biology of the periodontal tissues. In particular as clinicians we look for treatments that will improve the predictability of the procedure, improve the magnitude of the effect of treatment, and perhaps most importantly in the long term would extend the indications for treatment beyond the need for single enclosed bony defects to allow for suprabony regeneration, preferably with beneficial effects on the gingival soft tissues. A rapid development in both innovative methods and products for the correction of periodontal deficiencies have been reported during the last three decades. For example, guided tissue regeneration with or without the use of bone supplements has been a well-proven treatment modality for the reconstruction of bony defects prior to the tissue engineering era. Active biomaterials have been subsequently introduced to the periodontal community with supporting dental literature suggesting that certain factors should be taken into consideration when undertaking periodontal regenerative procedures. These factors as well as a number of other translational research issues will need to be addressed, and ultimately it is vital that we do not extrapolate results from pre-clinical and animal studies without conducting extensive randomized clinical trials to substantiate outcomes from these procedures. Whatever the outcomes, the pursuit of regeneration of the periodontal tissues remains a goal worth pursuing for our patients. The aim of the review, therefore is to update clinicians on the recent advances in both materials and techniques in periodontal regenerative procedures and to highlight the importance of both patient factors and the technical aspects of

  19. Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    2015-11-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0593 TITLE: Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis PRINCIPAL...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/15/2011 - 08/14/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis 5a...4 Title of the Grant: Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis Award number: W81XWH-11-1-0593 Principal Investigator

  20. New tools in regenerative medicine: gene therapy.

    Muñoz Ruiz, Miguel; Regueiro, José R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy aims to transfer genetic material into cells to provide them with new functions. A gene transfer agent has to be safe, capable of expressing the desired gene for a sustained period of time in a sufficiently large population of cells to produce a biological effect. Identifying a gene transfer tool that meets all of these criteria has proven to be a difficult objective. Viral and nonviral vectors, in vivo, ex vivo and in situ strategies co-exist at present, although ex vivo lenti-or retroviral vectors are presently the most popular.Natural stem cells (from embryonic, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, or adult tissues) or induced progenitor stem (iPS) cells can be modified by gene therapy for use in regenerative medicine. Among them, hematopoietic stem cells have shown clear clinical benefit, but iPS cells hold humongous potential with no ethical concerns.

  1. Photodynamic therapy for periodontal disease

    Weersink, Robert A.

    2002-05-01

    Periodontal disease is a family of chronic inflammatory conditions caused by bacterial infections.' It is manifested in red, swollen gingiva (gums) and can lead to destruction of the connective tissue and bone that hold teeth in place. Conventional treatments typically require some form of invasive surgery, depending on the disease stage at time of detection. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is the use of light-activated drugs (photosensitizers) for treatment of a variety of conditions 2 such as solid tumors, pre-malignancies, macular degeneration and actinic keratitis. There have been a number of studies of PDT as an antibacterial agent. 3'4 Depending on the photosensitizer and strain of bacteria, significant killing (several LOGS) can be achieved.

  2. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics

    Vivek Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  3. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  4. Platelet rich fibrin - a novel acumen into regenerative endodontic therapy

    Kavita Hotwani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research into regenerative dentistry has added impetus onto the field of molecular biology. It can be documented as a prototype shift in the therapeutic armamentarium for dental disease. Regenerative endodontic procedures are widely being added to the current armamentarium of pulp therapy procedures. The regenerative potential of platelets has been deliberated. A new family of platelet concentrates called the platelet rich fibrin (PRF has been recently used by several investigators and has shown application in diverse disciplines of dentistry. This paper is intended to add light on the various prospects of PRF and clinical insights to regenerative endodontic therapy.

  5. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics

    Vivek Kumar; Jolly Sinha; Neelu Verma; Kamal Nayan; C S Saimbi; Amitandra K Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is...

  6. Hyaluronic Acid: A Boon in Periodontal Therapy

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring linear polysaccharide of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue, synovial fluid, and other tissues. Its use in the treatment of the inflammatory process is established in medical areas such as orthopedics, dermatology, and ophthalmology. The Pubmed/Medline database was searched for keywords “Hyaluronic acid and periodontal disease” and “Hyaluronic acid and gingivitis” which resulted in 89 and 22 articles respectively. Only highly relevant articles from electronic and manual search in English literature were selected for the present review article. In the field of dentistry, hyaluronic acid has shown anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects in the treatment of periodontal diseases. Due to its tissue healing properties, it could be used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the treatment of periodontitis. Further studies are required to determine the clinical efficacy of hyaluronic acid in healing of periodontal lesion. The aim of the present review, article is to discuss the role of hyaluronic acid in periodontal therapy. PMID:23814761

  7. Local and systemic antimicrobial therapy in periodontics.

    Herrera, David; Matesanz, Paula; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Sanz, Mariano

    2012-09-01

    This review aimed to update the current evidence on the efficacy of the adjunctive use of local and systemic antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis and to assess whether it might improve the clinical limitations and shortcomings of standard nonsurgical treatment in the management of periodontitis. Relevant randomized clinical trials (RCT) with more than 3 months of follow-up, published from 2010 to 2012 for systemic antimicrobials and from 2008 to 2012 for local antimicrobials, were searched in Medline and critically analyzed. Scientific evidence evaluated in different systematic reviews and reviews presented at European and World Workshops were also included. Only adjunctive therapies were considered in the present review: articles comparing debridement alone or plus placebo, versus debridement plus systemic or local antimicrobials were included. Adjunctive systemic antimicrobials have been evaluated both in aggressive and chronic periodontitis: in aggressive periodontitis, amoxicillin and metronidazole have been extensively studied, reporting clinical and microbiological benefits; in chronic periodontitis, different products are under scrutiny, such as azithromycin. The clinical efficacy of local antimicrobials, although extensively demonstrated, is still surrounded by a constant debate on the cost-effectiveness evaluation and on its adequate indications. Despite the clinical efficacy of the adjunctive use of local and systemic antimicrobials, demonstrated in RCTs and in systematic reviews, there is a lack of evidence to support well-defined clinical protocols, including products and dosages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in periodontal diseases

    Swapna A. Mahale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO 2 has been successfully used in several medical fields. The therapeutic effect is related to elevated partial oxygen pressure in the tissues. The pressure itself enhances oxygen solubility in the tissue fluids. HBO 2 has shown to affect angiogenesis, bone metabolism and bone turnover. Studies have been conducted to analyze the effects of HBO 2 therapy on periodontal disease. HBO 2 increases local oxygen distribution, especially at the base of the periodontal pocket, which inhibits the growth of anaerobic bacteria and allows the ischemic tissues to receive an adequate intake of oxygen sufficient for a rapid recovery of cell metabolism. It is increasingly being accepted as a beneficial adjunct to diverse clinical conditions. Nonhealing ulcers, chronic wounds and refractory osteomyelitis are a few conditions for which HBO therapy (HBOT has been extensively tried out. The dental surgeons have found a good ally in HBOT in managing dental condition.

  9. Probiotics and prebiotics in periodontal therapy

    Rekha Rani Koduganti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a paradigm shift toward ecological and microbial community-based approach in understanding oral diseases. A marked improvement in gastrointestinal health has been reported after using probiotic bacteria and/or prebiotic supplements,which has prompted much interest in the use of this approach for oral applications. Treatment of periodontal disease in recent years has moved toward an antibiotic/antimicrobial model of disease management. With increase in the incidence of resistance to antibiotics, probiotics may be a promising area of research in periodontal therapy. This paper reviews the evidences for the use of probiotics or prebiotics for the prevention of dental caries or periodontal diseases, and also adresses the risk associated with their prolonged use. Many questions have been raised pertaining to the benefits of probiotic administration, as the role of probiotics in periodontics is still in infancy, and a complete understanding of the broad ecological changes induced in the mouth by probiotics or prebiotics is essential to assess their long-term consequences for oral health and disease.

  10. Regenerative potential and healing dynamics of the periodontium: a critical-size supra-alveolar periodontal defect study.

    Polimeni, Giuseppe; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2009-03-01

    The nature and characteristics of the newly formed periodontium obtained following regenerative procedures remain a matter of controversy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regenerative potential of the periodontal attachment and healing dynamics as observed from the spatial distribution of newly formed cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone following optimal circumstances for wound healing/regeneration in a discriminating animal model. Critical-size, 6-mm, supra-alveolar, periodontal defects were surgically created in six young adult Beagle dogs. Space-providing ePTFE devices with 300-microm laser-drilled pores were implanted to support wound stability and space provision in one jaw quadrant/animal. Treatments were alternated between left and right jaw quadrants in subsequent animals. The gingival flaps were advanced to submerge the defect sites for primary intention healing. Histometric analysis followed an 8-week healing interval. Healing was uneventful in all animals. The histometric analysis showed that cementum regeneration (2.99 +/- 0.22 mm) was significantly greater than PDL (2.54 +/- 0.18 mm, p=0.03) and bone regeneration (2.46 +/- 0.26 mm, p=0.03). The wound area showed significant positive non-linear effect on cementum (log beta=1.25, palveolar bone virtually regenerate in parallel under optimal circumstances for periodontal wound healing/regeneration. Moreover, space provision positively influences the extent of periodontal regeneration.

  11. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy: A review

    Jyotsana Tanwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsurgical therapy aims to eliminate both living bacteria in the microbial biofilm and calcified biofilm microorganisms from the tooth surface and adjacent soft tissues. Complete elimination of such pathogenic microorganisms is perhaps over-ambitious. However, a reduction in inflammation of the periodontium due to a lesser bacterial load leads to beneficial clinical changes. In addition, nonsurgical therapy aims to create an environment in which the host can more effectively prevent pathogenic microbial recolonization using personal oral hygiene methods. The concept of critical probing depth was consistently found to be greater for the surgical approach than for the nonsurgical treatment. The various methods used in nonsurgical therapy, such as hand instrumentation, ultrasonic and sonic scalers, and ablative laser therapy.

  12. Regenerative Endodontics Versus Apexification in Immature Permanent Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    Lin, Jiacheng; Zeng, Qian; Wei, Xi; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Minyi; Gu, Jing; Lu, Jiaxuan; Yang, Maobin; Ling, Junqi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the outcomes of regenerative endodontic treatment (RET) and apexification on immature permanent teeth with pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis. A total of 118 patients (118 teeth) were recruited and randomly assigned to either RET or apexification treatment. Each treatment group was divided into 2 subgroups according to the etiology: dens evaginatus or trauma. Clinical symptoms and complications were recorded, and cone-beam computed tomographic imaging with a limited field of view was used to measure the change of root length, root thickness, and apical foramen size at the 12-month follow-up. The t test/rank sum test and Fisher exact test were applied to compare the change of root morphology between RET and apexification. One hundred three of 118 cases were completed at the 12-month follow-up. The survival rate was 100% for both treatment groups. All cases were asymptomatic with apical healing. The RET group showed a significant increase in root length and root thickness compared with the apexification group (P apical healing. RET showed a better outcome than apexification regarding increased root thickness and root length. The etiology had an impact on the outcome of RET. Dens evaginatus cases showed better prognoses than trauma cases after RET. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Periodontal abscess during supportive periodontal therapy: a review of the literature.

    Silva, Geraldo L M; Soares, Rodrigo V; Zenóbio, Elton G

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current status of the occurrence and management of a periodontal abscess during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). A periodontal abscess depicts typical features and has been described in patients under SPT in clinical trials. Common periodontal pathogens have been observed in this lesion and some etiologic factors may be responsible for its recurrence. This condition can be isolated or associated with factors that can change the prognosis of affected teeth. Although it has been frequently noticed in untreated periodontitis, the periodontal abscess can also occur in patients under SPT and has been regarded as one of the possible complications of SPT. Patients with a high susceptibility to periodontal disease lost more teeth than those with a healthy periodontium. Early diagnosis and appropriate intervention for periodontal abscesses in patients under SPT are extremely important for the management of the periodontal abscess since this condition can lead to loss of the involved tooth. A single case of a tooth diagnosed with periodontal abscess that responds favorably to adequate treatment does not seem to affect its longevity. An accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment can preserve the longevity of affected teeth.

  14. Dental Investigations: Efficiency of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy in Moderate Chronic Periodontitis

    Mlachkova Antoaneta M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and microflora compatible with periodontal health. The AIM of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy (scaling and root planning in the treatment of moderate chronic periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 30 patients aged between 33 and 75 years, of which 46.7% women and 53.3% men, diagnosed with moderate and, at some sites, severe periodontitis. They were treated with non-surgical periodontal therapy methods (scaling and root planning and curettage if indicated. Additionally, chemical plaque control with rinse water containing chlorhexidine was applied. The diagnostic and reassessment procedures included measuring the periodontal indices of 601 periodontal units before and after the therapy. The indices measured were the papillary bleeding index (PBI, the hygiene index (HI, the probing pocket depth (PPD and the clinical attachment level (CAL. RESULTS: Significant reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation was found in all treated patients; we also found a statistically significant reduction of periodontal pockets with clinically measured depth ⋋ 5 mm (PD ⋋ 5 mm. Pockets with PD > 5 mm did not show statistically significant lower incidence rates probably due to the initially small percentage of deep pockets in the patients studied. There was a statistically significant reduction of all sites with attachment loss, the highest significance found at sites where the attachment loss was greater than 5 mm. CONCLUSION

  15. Photodynamic therapy: A new vista in management of periodontal diseases

    Yogesh Doshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT for periodontitis. This review also elucidates application of photodynamic therapy for noninvasive management of periodontitis without leading to bacterial resistance. Background: Periodontal diseases are one of the major causes of tooth loss in adults and are considered primarily an anaerobic bacterial infections caused by the so-called red complex species. Bacteria present in a biofilm community, enzymes, endotoxins, and other cytotoxic factors lead to tissue destruction and initiate chronic inflammation. Since many years pioneers have been working to provide logical and cost-effective therapy for management of periodontitis. Periodontal researchers have found that PDT is advantageous to suppress anaerobic bacteria. Clinical Significance: Applications of PDT in dentistry are growing rapidly. PDT application has an adjunctive benefit besides mechanical treatment at sites with difficult access. Necessity for flap surgery may be reduced, patient comfort may increase, and treatment time may decrease. The application of photosensitizing dyes and their excitation by visible light enables effective killing of periodonto-pathogens. The introduction of laser along with photosensitizers has brought a revolutionary change. Conclusion: The application of photodynamic therapy in management of periodontal diseases is very valuable. The therapy should be combined with nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Proper clinical application of photodynamic therapy can and will help patients who are systemically compromised and cannot undergo surgical therapy.

  16. Perioceutics: Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as an adjunctive therapy for inflammatory periodontal disease

    Esther Nalini Honibald

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs form a group of more than 20 zinc-dependent enzymes that are crucial in the degradation of the main components in the extracellular matrix, and thereby play important roles in cell migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. MMPs have outgrown the field of extracellular matrix biology and have progressed toward being important regulatory molecules in inflammation, and hence are key components in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. This rise in status has led to the development of MMP inhibitors which can act as switches or delicate tuners in acute and chronic inflammation and the regenerative phase after inflammation. The new challenge in MMP research is to better understand the complex role these enzymes play in periodontal disease and to design inhibitors that are successful in the clinic. Perioceutics or the use of the pharmacological agents specifically developed to manage periodontitis is an interesting and emerging aid in the management of periodontal diseases along with mechanical debridement. The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to MMPs and their inhibitors, the pathologic effects of a disturbance in the functions of enzyme cascades in balance with natural inhibitors, and highlight on the adjunctive use of MMP inhibitors in periodontal therapy and some of the current challenges with an overview of what has been achieved till date.

  17. Effect of Periodontal Therapy on Crevicular Fluid Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-8 Levels in Chronic Periodontitis

    Paschalina Goutoudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to analyse the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of patients with chronic periodontitis prior to and following surgical and/or nonsurgical periodontal therapy for a period of 32 weeks. Methods. GCF samples were obtained from 24 nondiseased and 72 diseased sites of 12 periodontal patients prior to as well as at 6, 16, and 32 weeks following non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy. IL-6 and IL-8 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results. Periodontal treatment improved all clinical parameters. Both treatment modalities resulted in similar IL-6 as well as IL-8 levels. Mean IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were significantly higher in non-diseased compared to diseased sites and increased significantly following treatment in diseased sites. Mean total amounts of IL-6 and IL-8 (TAIL-6, TAIL-8 did not differ significantly between diseased and nondiseased sites, while following therapy TAIL-8 levels decreased significantly. Conclusions. The data suggest that periodontal therapy reduced the levels of IL-8 in GCF. However, a strong relationship between IL-6, IL-8 amounts in GCF and periodontal destruction and inflammation was not found.

  18. Free radical scavenging injectable hydrogels for regenerative therapy

    Komeri, Remya; Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2017-01-01

    Pathological free radicals generated from inflamed and infarcted cardiac tissues interferes natural tissue repair mechanisms. Hypoxic microenvironment at the injured zone of non-regenerating cardiac tissues hinders the therapeutic attempts including cell therapy. Here we report an injectable, cytocompatible, free radical scavenging synthetic hydrogel formulation for regenerative therapy. New hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared with D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer (PEAX) and PEGDiacrylate. PEAX-P hydrogel swells 4.9 times the initial weight and retains 100.07 kPa Young modulus at equilibrium swelling, which is suitable for cardiac applications. PEAX-P hydrogel retains elastic nature even at 60% compressive strain, which is favorable to fit with the dynamic and elastic natural tissue counterparts. PEAX-P hydrogel scavenges 51% DPPH radical, 40% hydroxyl radicals 41% nitrate radicals with 31% reducing power. The presence of hydrogel protects 62% cardiomyoblast cells treated with stress inducing media at LD 50 concentration. The free hydroxyl groups in sugar alcohols of the comacromer influence the free radical scavenging. Comparatively, PEAX-P hydrogel based on xylitol evinces slightly lower scavenging characteristics than with previously reported PEAM-P hydrogel containing mannitol having more hydroxyl groups. The possible free radical scavenging mechanism of the present hydrogel relies on the free π electrons associated with uncrosslinked fumarate bonds, hydrogen atoms associated with sugar alcohols/PEG and radical dilution by free water in the matrix. Briefly, the present PEAX-P hydrogel is a potential injectable system for combined antioxidant and regenerative therapy. - Graphical abstract: Injectable hydrogel with inherent free radical scavenging property for regenerative tissue engineering application. - Highlights: • Novel injectable hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared using D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer

  19. Free radical scavenging injectable hydrogels for regenerative therapy

    Komeri, Remya [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Polymer Science Division, BMT Wing, Thiruvananthapuram 695 012, Kerala State (India); Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam [Dept. of Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha NE68178 (United States); Muthu, Jayabalan, E-mail: mjayabalan52@gmail.com [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Polymer Science Division, BMT Wing, Thiruvananthapuram 695 012, Kerala State (India)

    2017-02-01

    Pathological free radicals generated from inflamed and infarcted cardiac tissues interferes natural tissue repair mechanisms. Hypoxic microenvironment at the injured zone of non-regenerating cardiac tissues hinders the therapeutic attempts including cell therapy. Here we report an injectable, cytocompatible, free radical scavenging synthetic hydrogel formulation for regenerative therapy. New hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared with D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer (PEAX) and PEGDiacrylate. PEAX-P hydrogel swells 4.9 times the initial weight and retains 100.07 kPa Young modulus at equilibrium swelling, which is suitable for cardiac applications. PEAX-P hydrogel retains elastic nature even at 60% compressive strain, which is favorable to fit with the dynamic and elastic natural tissue counterparts. PEAX-P hydrogel scavenges 51% DPPH radical, 40% hydroxyl radicals 41% nitrate radicals with 31% reducing power. The presence of hydrogel protects 62% cardiomyoblast cells treated with stress inducing media at LD 50 concentration. The free hydroxyl groups in sugar alcohols of the comacromer influence the free radical scavenging. Comparatively, PEAX-P hydrogel based on xylitol evinces slightly lower scavenging characteristics than with previously reported PEAM-P hydrogel containing mannitol having more hydroxyl groups. The possible free radical scavenging mechanism of the present hydrogel relies on the free π electrons associated with uncrosslinked fumarate bonds, hydrogen atoms associated with sugar alcohols/PEG and radical dilution by free water in the matrix. Briefly, the present PEAX-P hydrogel is a potential injectable system for combined antioxidant and regenerative therapy. - Graphical abstract: Injectable hydrogel with inherent free radical scavenging property for regenerative tissue engineering application. - Highlights: • Novel injectable hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared using D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer

  20. [Magnetic therapy for complex treatment of chronic periodontal disease].

    P'yanzina, A V

    The aim of the study was to elaborate the methodology of magnetic therapy for complex treatment of chronic periodontal disease (CPD). The study included 60 patients aged 35 to 65 years with moderate CPD divided in 2 groups. Patients in group 1 (controls) received impulse carbonate irrigation for 12 min №10, group 2 additionally received magnetic therapy for 5 min №10 in maxillary and mandibular areas. periodontal and rheological indices proved magnetic therapy to be useful tool for eradication of inflammation, periodontal tissue functional recovery and stabilization.

  1. Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Reduces Saliva Adipokine and Matrix Metalloproteinase Levels in Periodontitis.

    Özcan, Erkan; Işıl Saygun, N; Serdar, Muhittin A; Umut Bengi, V; Kantarcı, Alpdoğan

    2016-08-01

    Adipokines enhance the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which play a role in extracellular matrix degeneration. The aim of this study is to determine the levels of some adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs in the saliva of patients with periodontitis and healthy individuals and to evaluate the changes after non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Of 32 individuals included in the study, 17 had periodontitis and 15 had healthy gingiva. Saliva samples were obtained from all individuals. In patients with periodontitis, samples were recollected 3 and 6 months after NSPT. Visfatin, chemerin, progranulin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, MMP-8, and MMP-13 levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In patients with periodontitis, all of the parameters measured in the saliva were higher than those of healthy individuals. At 3 months, visfatin, progranulin, IL-8, and MMP-8 levels were significantly decreased compared with baseline values. The levels of other biochemical parameters, chemerin and IL-1β, were significantly decreased compared with baseline values at 6 months, and the levels became similar to those in healthy individuals. In the periodontitis group, positive correlations were found among visfatin and IL-8 (r = 0.909, P periodontal tissue in periodontitis by stimulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs.

  2. Gingival cyst of the adult: regenerative therapy of associated root exposure. A case report and literature review.

    Kelsey, W Patrick; Kalmar, John R; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2009-12-01

    The gingival cyst of the adult (GCA) is an uncommon developmental cyst of odontogenic origin most frequently seen near mandibular canines and premolars and is routinely treated with excisional biopsy. This article presents a case of a GCA treated with a combined regenerative approach and reviews the GCA literature with an emphasis on the clinical aspects of this lesion. A 54 year-old man presented for treatment of generalized severe chronic periodontitis. Clinical examination revealed a cystic lesion in the gingiva of the mandibular canine-premolar area. Radiographs revealed a well-defined radiolucency in the coronal one-third of the tooth roots. Surgical enucleation of the lesion revealed root exposure of the second premolar. Because of the anatomy of the lesion-associated defect, regenerative treatment, using a combination of freeze-dried bone allograft and a collagen membrane, was considered the therapeutic approach of choice. The biopsy revealed histologic features consistent with a GCA. Clinical and radiographic examinations 1 year post-surgery indicated uneventful soft tissue healing and bone fill of the initial defect. The review of the literature revealed only one other case of root exposure associated with GCA and no previous report of regenerative therapy. In rare instances, a GCA lesion may result in tooth-root exposure. In such cases, a combined regenerative treatment approach may be used to achieve resolution.

  3. [The use of Emdogain in periodontal and osseous regeneration

    Sculean, A.; Rathe, F.; Junker, R.; Becker, J.; Schwarz, F.; Arweiler, N.B.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i. e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of an enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in

  4. Host modulation therapeutics in periodontics: role as an adjunctive periodontal therapy.

    Shinwari, Muhammad Saad; Tanwir, Farzeen; Hyder, Pakiza Raza; Bin Saeed, Muhammad Humza

    2014-09-01

    Host Modulation Therapy (HMT) is a treatment concept that reduces tissue destruction and stabilizes or even regenerates inflammatory tissue by modifying host response factors. It has been used for treating osteoporosis and arthritis for several decades. However, its use in dentistry has only been recently reported. The objective of this article is to present a review of the various literatures available on HMT and also its role as adjunct therapy in periodontics. For identifying studies for this review, a PUBMED search was carried out in 2013 for all articles published till December 2012. The search was restricted to English language publications only. Longitudinal prospective and retrospective studies were included in the search. The key words used were: Host Modulation Therapy; Sub antimicrobial dose doxycycline and Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy. The main outcomes sought were host modulation therapeutics in periodontics. Exclusion criteria included cross sectional studies, short case series as well as studies with short follow-up periods. There is a paucity of literature on HMT in periodontics although the only drug approved by United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a subantimicrobial dose of doxycycline (SDD) with highly predictable results as a host modulating agent in periodontal diseases and also an effective adjunctive therapy in various diseases of periodontium. However, more randomized controlled trials are needed to obtain clinical guidelines on the usage of other host modulating agents as adjunct as well as definite therapy for periodontal diseases. SDD is an effective adjunct therapy when used in dosage of 20mg twice daily for minimum 3 months duration in various periodontal diseases with predictable clinical outcomes. It is also recommended that future clinical research on anti cytokine drugs, chemically modified tetracycline and other HMT agents should be conducted so that new drugs are available with highly predictable results.

  5. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    Fahmy, Mina D.; Luepke, Paul G.; Ibrahim, Mohamed S.; Guentsch, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different tr...

  6. Improvement of an anterior infrabone defect using combined periodontal and orthodontic therapy: A 6-year follow-up case report.

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Kim, Yeon Jung; Dos Santos-Pinto, Ary; Cirelli, Joni Augusto

    2014-07-01

    Extensive intraosseous lesions represent a clinical challenge for the periodontist. Sites with bone defects have been shown to be at higher risk of periodontitis progression in patients who had not received periodontal therapy. Thus, the aim of this case report was to describe a novel approach for the treatment of 1-walled intraosseous defect by combining nonsurgical periodontal therapy and orthodontic movement toward the bone defect, avoiding regenerative and surgical procedures. A 47-year-old woman underwent the proposed procedures for the treatment of her left central incisor with 9 mm probing depth and 1-walled intraosseous defect in its mesial aspect. Initially, basic periodontal therapy with scaling and root planning was accomplished. Two months later, an orthodontic treatment was planned to eliminate the intraosseous lesion and to improve the interproximal papillary area. Orthodontic root movement toward the osseous defect was performed for 13 months with light forces. After 6 years postoperative it was concluded that combined basic periodontal therapy and orthodontic movement was capable of eliminating the intraosseous defect and improve the esthetics in the interproximal papillary area between the central incisors.

  7. Effect of periodontal therapy on pregnancy outcome in women affected by periodontitis.

    Tarannum, Fouzia; Faizuddin, Mohamed

    2007-11-01

    There is convincing evidence to suggest that infections affecting the mother during pregnancy may produce alterations in the normal cytokine- and hormone-regulated gestation, which could result in preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, and preterm birth (PTB). Studies in the late 1990s associated periodontitis with preterm low birth weight (PLBW) deliveries, and this may have similar pathogenic mechanisms as other maternal infections. This study determined the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on pregnancy outcome. A total of 200 pregnant women with periodontitis were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Detailed data about previous and current pregnancies were obtained. All women received a full-mouth periodontal examination, including oral hygiene index-simplified, bleeding index, and clinical attachment level. The women in the treatment group received non-surgical periodontal therapy during the gestational period, and those in the control group received periodontal treatment after delivery. Periodontal therapy included plaque control instructions and scaling and root planing performed under local anesthesia. The outcome measures assessed were gestational age and birth weight of the infant. PTB was recorded when delivery occurred at PTBs in the treatment group and 68 PTBs in the control group. Twenty-six LBW infants were recorded in the treatment group, and 48 LBW infants were noted in the control group. The mean gestational ages were 33.8+/-2.8 weeks and 32.7+/-2.8 weeks in the treatment and control groups, respectively. The difference was statistically significant at P<0.006. The mean birth weight was 2,565.3+/-331.2 g in the treatment group and 2,459.6+/-380.7 g in the control group, with the difference being statistically significant at P<0.044. A multiple regression model showed a significant effect of periodontal treatment on birth outcomes. Non-surgical periodontal therapy can reduce the risk for preterm births in mothers who

  8. Free radical scavenging injectable hydrogels for regenerative therapy.

    Komeri, Remya; Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2017-02-01

    Pathological free radicals generated from inflamed and infarcted cardiac tissues interferes natural tissue repair mechanisms. Hypoxic microenvironment at the injured zone of non-regenerating cardiac tissues hinders the therapeutic attempts including cell therapy. Here we report an injectable, cytocompatible, free radical scavenging synthetic hydrogel formulation for regenerative therapy. New hydrogel (PEAX-P) is prepared with D-xylitol-co-fumarate-co-poly ethylene adipate-co-PEG comaromer (PEAX) and PEGDiacrylate. PEAX-P hydrogel swells 4.9 times the initial weight and retains 100.07kPa Young modulus at equilibrium swelling, which is suitable for cardiac applications. PEAX-P hydrogel retains elastic nature even at 60% compressive strain, which is favorable to fit with the dynamic and elastic natural tissue counterparts. PEAX-P hydrogel scavenges 51% DPPH radical, 40% hydroxyl radicals 41% nitrate radicals with 31% reducing power. The presence of hydrogel protects 62% cardiomyoblast cells treated with stress inducing media at LD 50 concentration. The free hydroxyl groups in sugar alcohols of the comacromer influence the free radical scavenging. Comparatively, PEAX-P hydrogel based on xylitol evinces slightly lower scavenging characteristics than with previously reported PEAM-P hydrogel containing mannitol having more hydroxyl groups. The possible free radical scavenging mechanism of the present hydrogel relies on the free π electrons associated with uncrosslinked fumarate bonds, hydrogen atoms associated with sugar alcohols/PEG and radical dilution by free water in the matrix. Briefly, the present PEAX-P hydrogel is a potential injectable system for combined antioxidant and regenerative therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Regenerative potential and anti-bacterial activity of tetracycline loaded apatitic nanocarriers for the treatment of periodontitis

    Madhumathi, K; Sampath Kumar, T S

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of periodontal infections includes mechanical debridement, administration of antibiotics and bone grafting. Oral administration of antibiotics results in undesirable side effects, while current modes of local administration are affected by problems concerning allergic response to the polymeric carrier agents. We have developed an osteoconductive drug delivery system composed of apatitic nanocarriers capable of providing sustained delivery of drugs in the periodontium. Calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanocarriers of different Ca/P ratios were synthesized and characterized using the x-ray diffraction method, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the BET gas isotherm method. Loading and release studies performed with tetracycline showed a sustained release of up to 88% in phosphate buffered saline over a period of five days. Antibacterial activity studies showed that the tetracycline loaded CDHA (TC-CDHA) nanocarriers were effective against S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. The biocompatibility of the TC-CDHA nanocarriers was demonstrated using an alamar blue assay and further characterized by cell uptake studies. Interestingly, cell uptake of drug loaded CDHA also increased the cellular proliferation of human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells. Hence, it can be concluded that the CDHA nanocarriers are ideal drug delivery agents and have bone regenerative potential for local periodontal applications. (paper)

  10. Management of a Periodontal Pocket Using a Removable Orthodontic Appliance and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    Köseoğlu, Serhat; Fidancıoğlu, Ahmet; Sağlam, Mehmet; Savran, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As documented in the literature, bony defects can be managed by an orthodontic approach. Methods. This case report describes the treatment of a bony defect caused by orthodontic malposition through phase I periodontal therapy and a simple removable orthodontic appliance used for the first time in a 20-year-old girl. Results. The periodontal pocket was reduced from 8 mm to 3 mm shortly after treatment. Conclusion. This case report concludes that orthodontic therapy can be used success...

  11. Management of a Periodontal Pocket Using a Removable Orthodontic Appliance and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy.

    Köseoğlu, Serhat; Fidancıoğlu, Ahmet; Sağlam, Mehmet; Savran, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. As documented in the literature, bony defects can be managed by an orthodontic approach. Methods. This case report describes the treatment of a bony defect caused by orthodontic malposition through phase I periodontal therapy and a simple removable orthodontic appliance used for the first time in a 20-year-old girl. Results. The periodontal pocket was reduced from 8 mm to 3 mm shortly after treatment. Conclusion. This case report concludes that orthodontic therapy can be used successfully in treatment of bony defects caused by mesially tilted molars.

  12. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis.

    Fahmy, Mina D; Luepke, Paul G; Ibrahim, Mohamed S; Guentsch, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases.

  13. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    Mina D. Fahmy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases.

  14. The Relation of Endodontic-Periodontal Lesion and Therapy

    Trijani Suwandi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between endodontic-periodontal lesion has been documented well be researches. Endodontic lesion originates from pulp, while periodontal lesion originates from periodontal tissues. Anatomically they are connected by apical foramen, lateral canal and accessories, as well as dentin tubules. The correlation appeared as the endodontic defect can be from periodontal lesion, or a periodontal defect is from a pulp tissue. Together they can emerge and form a combination lesion. Endodontic infections have been highly correlated with deeper periodontal pockets and furcation involvement in mandibular, the causal relationship between the two pathoses has not yet been established. This consensus supports the influence of degenerated or inflamed pulp that can happen on the periodontium; but not all researchers agree about the effect of periodontal disease on the pulp. Conclusion: The mechanism of endo-perio lesion need to taken care in order to have appropriate diagnostic so that the right therapy would be able to keep the teeth in the oral cavity.

  15. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy to treat a case of severe periodontitis: A 12-year follow-up.

    Carnio, João; Moreira, Ana Karina; Jenny, Todd; Camargo, Paulo M; Pirih, Flavia Q

    2015-08-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of a severe chronic periodontitis case by nonsurgical therapy and a strict maintenance program over a 12-year period. A 38-year-old man concerned about the protrusion of his maxillary incisors was referred for periodontal treatment. The teeth in the maxillary arch had generalized severe chronic periodontitis. Several treatment options were presented to the patient including the most aggressive, extraction of all maxillary teeth, and the most conservative, scaling and root planing. The patient opted to having the most conservative approach, even though the prognoses for the maxillary teeth were unfavorable. Therefore, he received nonsurgical therapy via scaling and root planing combined with systemic antibiotics before referral to an orthodontist to address the esthetic concerns. The maxillary dentition was treated with orthodontic therapy to retract and align the maxillary anterior segment. Periodontal maintenance (1-hour session), including subgingival instrumentation, was performed 4 times per year until the end of the 12-year follow-up period. The patient only missed 2 appointments in 12 years. Twelve years later, the results revealed that all but 1 maxillary tooth were maintained in a state of acceptable health, function, and esthetics. Although most would agree with the initial poor prognosis of this patient's case, nonsurgical periodontal therapy was utilized with a 3-month periodontal maintenance program and demonstrated long-term success. The outcome presented in this case report may only have been possible because of patient compliance, professional experience, skill, and supervision throughout the course of treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Periodontal therapy for the management of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Li, Chunjie; Lv, Zongkai; Shi, Zongdao; Zhu, Ye; Wu, Yafei; Li, Longjiang; Iheozor-Ejiofor, Zipporah

    2014-08-15

    There is an association between chronic periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, it is not known whether periodontal therapy could prevent or manage CVD in patients with chronic periodontitis. The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of periodontal therapy in preventing the occurrence of, and management or recurrence of, CVD in patients with chronic periodontitis. The electronic databases that were searched were the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 7 April 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 3), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 7 April 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 7 April 2014), CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 7 April 2014), OpenGrey (to 7 April 2014), the Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (1978 to April 2014), the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1994 to April 2014) and the VIP database (1989 to April 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register, the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform and Sciencepaper Online for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs were considered eligible. Studies were selected if they included patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis and previous CVD (secondary prevention studies) or no CVD (primary prevention studies); patients in the intervention group received active periodontal therapy compared to maintenance therapy, no periodontal treatment or another kind of periodontal treatment in the control group. Two review authors carried out the study identification, data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently and in duplicate. Any discrepancies between the two authors were resolved by discussion or with a third review author. A formal pilot-tested data extraction form was adopted for the data extraction

  17. Combination therapy in chronic periodontitis: a case report

    Omid Taherpour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of periodontal treatment is to provide healthy and functional dentition for the whole life.Cases Report: A 42 year old female with sever chronic periodontitis, treated medically and surgically, is reported. She initially received antibiotic, Scaling and root planning in addition to oral hygiene instruction. After four weeks, periodontal Surgery, root canal Therapy, extraction of excess tooth and restoration of some teeth were performed, because of remaining residual pockets, and bone loss, flap Surgery and Access flap, with papilla preservation flap method, also modified Widmann flap, were done. After one month, favorable clinical improvement was obtained.Conclusion: It can be concluded that high oral hygiene level in accompanied with Suitable medical and surgical treatment, enhanced the success of periodontal treatment outcomes even in sever disease. 

  18. Various methods for isolation of multipotent human periodontal ligament cells for regenerative medicine.

    Tran, Ha Le Bao; Doan, Vu Nguyen; Le, Huong Thi Ngoc; Ngo, Lan Thi Quynh

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) is a specialized connective tissue that connects cementum and alveolar bone to maintain and support the teeth in situ and preserve tissue homeostasis. Recent studies have revealed the existence of stem cells in human dental tissues including periodontal ligament that play an important role, not only in the maintenance of the periodontium but also in promoting periodontal regeneration. In this study, human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) were isolated by outgrowth and enzymatic dissociation methods. Expression of surface markers on PDLCs as human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was identified by flow cytometry. In addition, proliferation and differentiation capacity of cultured cells to osteoblasts, adipocytes were evaluated. As a result, we successfully cultured cells from the human periodontal ligament tissues. PDLCs express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers such as CD44, CD73, and CD90 and do not express CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. PDLCs also possess the multipotential to differentiate into various types of cells, such as osteoblast and adipocytes, in vitro. Therefore, these cells have high potential to serve as materials for tissue engineering, especially dental tissue engineering.

  19. Regenerative Rehabilitation: Combining Stem Cell Therapies and Activity-Dependent Stimulation.

    Moritz, Chet T; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2017-07-01

    The number of clinical trials in regenerative medicine is burgeoning, and stem cell/tissue engineering technologies hold the possibility of becoming the standard of care for a multitude of diseases and injuries. Advances in regenerative biology reveal novel molecular and cellular targets, with potential to optimize tissue healing and functional recovery, thereby refining rehabilitation clinical practice. The purpose of this review is to (1) highlight the potential for synergy between the fields of regenerative medicine and rehabilitation, a convergence of disciplines known as regenerative rehabilitation; (2) provide translational examples of regenerative rehabilitation within the context of neuromuscular injuries and diseases; and (3) offer recommendations for ways to leverage activity dependence via combined therapy and technology, with the goal of enhancing long-term recovery. The potential clinical benefits of regenerative rehabilitation will likely become a critical aspect in the standard of care for many neurological and musculoskeletal disorders.

  20. Is Photodynamic Therapy with Adjunctive Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Effective in the Treatment of Periodontal Disease under Immunocompromised Conditions

    Javed, F.; Hezaimi, K.A.; Qadri, T.; Ahmed, H.B.; Corbet, F.E.; Romanos, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to assess whether or not photodynamic therapy (PDT) with adjunctive scaling-and-root-planing (SRP) is effective in the treatment of periodontitis under immunocompromised conditions. PubMed/Medline and Google-Scholar databases were searched from 1967 to May 2013 using various key words. Six studies (five experimental and one clinical) were included. In the clinical study, SRP with PDT was reported to be ineffective in treating chronic periodontitis in T2DM patients. All experimental studies reported significantly less bone loss in periodontal defects treated with SRP+PDT than those treated with SRP alone. Efficacy of PDT+SRP in the treatment of periodontal disease under immunocompromised conditions remains unclear. (author)

  1. Is Photodynamic Therapy with Adjunctive Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Effective in the Treatment of Periodontal Disease under Immunocompromised Conditions

    Javed, F.; Hezaimi, K. A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). College of Applied Medical Sciences; Qadri, T. [Karolinska Inst., Huddinge (Sweden). Dept. of Dental Medicine; Ahmed, H. B. [Al-Farabi Dental College, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Dentistry; Corbet, F. E. [University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Periodontology; Romanos, G. E. [Stony Brook University, New York (United States). School of Dental Medicine

    2013-10-15

    The aim was to assess whether or not photodynamic therapy (PDT) with adjunctive scaling-and-root-planing (SRP) is effective in the treatment of periodontitis under immunocompromised conditions. PubMed/Medline and Google-Scholar databases were searched from 1967 to May 2013 using various key words. Six studies (five experimental and one clinical) were included. In the clinical study, SRP with PDT was reported to be ineffective in treating chronic periodontitis in T2DM patients. All experimental studies reported significantly less bone loss in periodontal defects treated with SRP+PDT than those treated with SRP alone. Efficacy of PDT+SRP in the treatment of periodontal disease under immunocompromised conditions remains unclear. (author)

  2. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Regenerative therapies in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Gan, Earn H; Pearce, Simon H

    2017-03-01

    The treatment for autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) has remained virtually unchanged in the last 60 years. Most patients have symptoms that are relatively well controlled with exogenous steroid replacement, but there may be persistent symptoms, recurrent adrenal crisis and poor quality of life, despite good compliance with optimal current treatments. Treatment with conventional exogenous steroid therapy is also associated with premature mortality, increased cardiovascular risk and complications related to excessive steroid replacement. Hence, novel therapeutic approaches have emerged in the last decade attempting to improve the long-term outcome and quality of life of patients with AAD. This review discusses the recent developments in treatment innovations for AAD, including the novel exogenous steroid formulations with the intention of mimicking the physiological biorhythm of cortisol secretion. Our group has also carried out a few studies attempting to restore endogenous glucocorticoid production via immunomodulatory and regenerative medicine approaches. The recent advances in the understanding of adrenocortical stem cell biology, and adrenal plasticity will also be discussed to help comprehend the science behind the therapeutic approaches adopted. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. Prediction of loss to follow-up in long-term supportive periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Di Wu

    Full Text Available This study examined the predictors of loss to follow-up in long-term supportive periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis.A total of 280 patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis in a tertiary care hospital in China were investigated and followed over the course of study. Questionnaires on clinical and demographic characteristics, self-efficacy for oral self-care and dental fear at baseline were completed. Participants were followed to determine whether they could adhere to long-term supportive periodontal therapy. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between clinical and demographic characteristics, self-efficacy for oral self-care, dental fear and loss to follow-up in long-term supportive periodontal therapy.The loss to follow-up in long-term supportive periodontal therapy was significantly associated with age [adjusted OR = 1.042, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.012-1.074, p = 0.006], severe periodontitis [adjusted OR = 4.892, 95%CI: 2.280-10.499, p<0.001], periodontal surgery [adjusted OR = 11.334, 95% CI: 2.235-57.472, p = 0.003], and middle and low-scoring of self-efficacy scale for self-care groups. The adjusted ORs of loss to follow-up for the middle- (54-59 and low-scoring groups (15-53 were 71.899 (95%CI: 23.926-216.062, p<0.001 and 4.800 (95% CI: 2.263-10.182, p<0.001, respectively, compared with the high-scoring SESS group (60-75.Age, severity of periodontitis, periodontal surgery and the level of self-efficacy for self-care may be effective predictors of loss to follow-up in long-term supportive periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis.

  4. Regenerative therapies for equine degenerative joint disease: a preliminary study.

    Sarah Broeckx

    Full Text Available Degenerative joint disease (DJD is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injected with the following: 1 PRP; 2 MSCs; 3 MSCs and PRP; or 4 chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. The horses were then evaluated by means of a clinical scoring system after 6 weeks (T1, 12 weeks (T2, 6 months (T3 and 12 months (T4 post injection. In a second study, 30 horses with the same medical background were randomly assigned to one of the two combination therapies and evaluated at T1. The protein expression profile of native MSCs was found to be negative for major histocompatibility (MHC II and p63, low in MHC I and positive for Ki67, collagen type II (Col II and Vimentin. Chondrogenic induction resulted in increased mRNA expression of aggrecan, Col II and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP as well as in increased protein expression of p63 and glycosaminoglycan, but in decreased protein expression of Ki67. The combined use of PRP and MSCs significantly improved the functionality and sustainability of damaged joints from 6 weeks until 12 months after treatment, compared to PRP treatment alone. The highest short-term clinical evolution scores were obtained with chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. This study reports successful in vitro chondrogenic induction of equine MSCs. In vivo application of (induced MSCs together with PRP in horses suffering from DJD in the fetlock joint resulted in a significant clinical improvement until 12 months after treatment.

  5. Clinical and histologic evaluation of non-surgical periodontal therapy with enamel matrix derivative: a report of four cases.

    Mellonig, James T; Valderrama, Pilar; Gregory, Holly J; Cochran, David L

    2009-09-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is a composite of proteins that was demonstrated histologically to work as an adjunct to periodontal regenerative surgical therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and histologic effects of EMD as an adjunct to scaling and root planing. Four patients with severe chronic periodontitis and scheduled to receive complete dentures were accrued. Probing depth and clinical attachment levels were obtained. Unlimited time was allowed for hand and ultrasonic instrumentation. A notch was placed in the root >or=1 to 2 mm from the apical extent of root planing. EMD was inserted into the pocket, and a periodontal dressing was placed. Patients were seen every 2 weeks for plaque control. At 6 months post-treatment, soft tissue measurements were repeated, and the teeth were removed en bloc and prepared for histomorphologic analysis. Probing depth reduction and clinical attachment level gain were obtained in three-fourths of the specimens. Three of the four specimens analyzed histologically demonstrated new cementum, bone, periodontal ligament, and connective tissue attachment coronal to the notch. In one specimen, the gingival margin had receded below the notch. The results were unexpected and may represent an aberration. However, the substantial reduction in deep probing depths and clinical attachment level gain in three of four specimens, in addition to the histologic findings of new cementum, new bone, a new periodontal ligament, and a new connective tissue attachment, suggest that EMD may be useful as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in single-rooted teeth.

  6. Effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and serum lipids in Jordanian adults with advanced periodontitis.

    Kamil, W; Al Habashneh, R; Khader, Y; Al Bayati, L; Taani, D

    2011-10-01

    Data on whether periodontal therapy affects serum CRP levels are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine if nonsurgical periodontal therapy has any effect on CRP and serum lipid levels in patients with advanced periodontitis. Thirty-six systemically healthy patients, ≥ 40 years of age and with advanced periodontitis, were recruited for the study. Patients were randomized consecutively to one of two groups: the treatment group (n = 18) or the control group (n = 18). Treated subjects received nonsurgical periodontal therapy, which included oral hygiene instructions and subgingival scaling and root planing. Systemic levels of inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein (CRP) and the lipid profile] were measured at baseline and 3 mo after periodontal therapy. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy in the treatment group resulted in a significant reduction in the serum CRP level. The average CRP level decreased from 2.3 mg/dL at baseline to 1.8 mg/dL (p periodontal therapy. The average reduction (95% confidence interval) in CRP was 0.498 (95% confidence interval = 0.265-0.731). In the treatment group, the reduction in CRP was significantly, linearly and directly correlated with the reduction in the plaque index, the gingival index and the percentage of sites with pocket depth ≥ 7 mm (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.746, 0.425 and 0.621, respectively). Nonsurgical periodontal therapy had no effect on the lipid parameters. This study demonstrated that nonsurgical periodontal therapy results in a significant reduction in the serum CRP level. The effect of this outcome on systemic disease is still unknown. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma homocysteine levels in Indian population with chronic periodontitis: a pilot study.

    Bhardwaj, Smiti; Prabhuji, M L Venkatesh; Karthikeyan, Bangalore Vardhan

    2015-03-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The effect of periodontal disease and periodontal therapy on plasma Hcy remains controversial. Hence, in this pilot study we assessed the effect of periodontal disease and non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on plasma Hcy in systemically healthy Indian subjects. Forty participants (30 to 39 years) were enrolled in the study and were divided into two groups based on gingival index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL): Healthy (control group; n = 20) and Chronic Periodontitis (test group; n = 20). Plasma samples were collected and quantified at baseline and 12 weeks after scaling and root planing (SRP) for Hcy using High Performance Liquid Chromatography with fluorescent detection (HPLC-fld). Plasma Hcy levels of chronic periodontitis (17.87 ± 1.21 μmol/l) subjects was significantly higher than healthy subjects (9.09 ± 2.11 μmol/l). Post-therapy, the plasma Hcy concentration reduced significantly (11.34 ± 1.87 μmol/l) (p periodontal inflammation and therapy, respectively, indicate a direct relationship of Hcy with chronic periodontitis. NSPT may be employed as an adjunctive Hcy Lowering Therapy, contributing towards primary prevention against CVD's. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on HNP1-3 Level in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Chronic Periodontitis Patients.

    Dolińska, Ewa; Skurska, Anna; Pietruska, Małgorzata; Dymicka-Piekarska, Violetta; Milewski, Robert; Pietruski, Jan; Sculean, Anton

    2017-08-01

    The rich bacterial flora of oral cavity is controlled by innate immune response, including antibacterial peptides and among them human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3). The knowledge of the involvement of HNPs in innate and acquired immunity of the periodontium is fragmentary. The aim of the study was to assess alterations in HNP1-3 levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of chronic periodontitis patients before and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Nineteen patients with chronic periodontitis were qualified to the study. After periodontal examination, one site with pocket depth (PD) ≥4 mm was selected. All the patients received periodontal treatment involving scaling and root planing with additional systemic antibiotic therapy (Amoxicillin 375 mg three times daily and Metronidazole 250 mg three times daily for 7 days). Prior to therapy, 3 and 6 months after it, clinical periodontal parameters were measured and GCF was collected from previously chosen site. The level of HNP1-3 in GCF was determined by means of a commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassay kit. The periodontal therapy caused a statistically significant (p periodontal therapy with additional systemic administration of Amoxicillin and Metronidazole increases the level of HNP1-3 in GCF.

  9. Laser therapy in the periodontitis treatment

    Pinto Nancassa, Raul; Quintana Gonzalez, Julio; Rodriguez de Bernardo, Carlos; Hernandez Cruz, Hector; Hernandez Alvarez, Victor

    2009-01-01

    We performed a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser surgery combined with parodontal in the treatment of periodontitis in patients undergoing surgical treatment for this condition in the municipality of Moron North Clinic from February to July 2006. The world of work consisted of all patients diagnosed with periodontitis in this period of time were operated on at the Clinic of North County Moron (N = 86), leaving the sample for 80 patients. In patients where surgery was applied parodontal combined with low power laser radiation pain appeared in only a small number of cases 48 hours and none required the use of analgesics. For seven days the largest percentage of individuals submitted a total healing of soft tissue. No side effects to treatment. Patients treated with surgery parodontal, in whole required the use of analgesics in the first 24 hours and even at 72 hours after surgery in some patients, the seven days the number of patients with partial healing of the soft tissues was although the prevailing high total healing. There was no bone gain, the patients were stable, resulting in only stop. Statistically significant differences were found between groups suggesting that allowing the treatment of low-power laser in the surgery of periodontitis as well as being easy to apply proved to be effective. (Author)

  10. Effect of Non‑Surgical Periodontal Therapy on the Concentration of ...

    Non‑surgical periodontal therapy refers to the conventional and conservative way of ... the surface and root of the tooth that promote plaque retention, through mechanical means. ... presence of periodontal diseases, were involved in this study.

  11. EFFECTIVNESS OF TARGET ANTIMICROBIAL THERAPY OF SEVERE CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS PART I: REDUCTION OF GINGIVAL INFLAMATION AND ACTIVE PERIODONTAL DISEASE SITES

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between recurrent bleeding on probing and the progression of periodontal destruction is suggested in many studies. One of the main goals of the periodontal treatment is the achievement of good control of the gingival inflammation and the reduction of the active periodontal sites.Aim: Evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment of severe chronic periodontitis with additional target antibiotic administration in comparison with the therapy with adjunctive antimicrobial combination amoxicillin + metronidazole and conventional mechanical periodontal treatment regarding the achieved control of the gingival inflammation and BoP.Results: Significant reduction of the gingival bleeding and the BoP is achieved in all groups. In the group with target antibiotic administration the final mean values of the GB (gingival bleeding and BoP (bleeding on probing are the lowest and could suggest a low risk for progression of the periodontal disease.

  12. Effect of Periodontal Therapy on Crevicular Fluid Interleukin-18 Level in Periodontal Health and Disease in Central Maharashtra (India) Population.

    Mahajani, Monica J; Jadhao, Varsha A; Wankhade, Pooja S; Samson, Emmanuel; Acharya, Vishwas D; Tekale, Pawankumar D

    2017-11-01

    The incidence and progression of the periodontal disease depend on periodontal microflora and the multifaceted response of the host, and these interactions are mediated by cytokines and chemokines. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine of the IL-1 superfamily. The aim of the present study was the assessment of the periodontal therapy in IL-18 level in periodontal disease and health. Based on clinical attachment loss (CAL), probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival index (GI), and plaque index (PI) patients were divided into three groups: Group I with healthy patients, group II with chronic periodontitis, and group III with posttreatment patients having periodontitis. Mean PI, PPD, CAL, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) volume were significantly higher in groups II and III compared with group I. However, there were no significant differences between GI in groups I, II, and III. The total amount of IL-18 in GCF was significantly higher in group II when compared with groups I and III (p periodontally involved patients, and reduced at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. The IL-18 might be hypothetically beneficial in distinguishing health from disease and monitoring periodontal disease activity.

  13. Gingiva as a new and the most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells from the oral cavity to be used in regenerative therapies

    Bartłomiej Górski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, many researchers have focused their attention on new sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Consequently, MSCs that display self-renewal capacity, multidifferentiation potential and immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from human oral tissues, including tooth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Oral MSCs involve dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, dental follicle stem cells (DFCs, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP and gingival stem cells (GMSCs. Current research on oral stem cells is expanding at an unprecedented rate. That being the case, a plethora of in vitro differentiation assays, immunodeficient animal transplantations and preclinical trials have demonstrated that these cells exhibit strong potential for both regenerative dentistry and medicine. Oral MSCs have proved their capability to repair cornea, dental pulp, periodontal, bone, cartilage, tendon, neural, muscle and endothelial tissues without neoplasm formation as well as to treat inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. This article describes the current understanding of oral MSCs and their prospective applications in cell-based therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Special attention is placed on GMSCs as they are easily accessible and may be obtained in a convenient and minimally invasive way.

  14. Bioactive Polymeric Nanoparticles for Periodontal Therapy.

    Osorio, Raquel; Alfonso-Rodríguez, Camilo Andrés; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Alaminos, Miguel; Toledano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    to design calcium and zinc-loaded bioactive and cytocompatible nanoparticles for the treatment of periodontal disease. PolymP-nActive nanoparticles were zinc or calcium loaded. Biomimetic calcium phosphate precipitation on polymeric particles was assessed after 7 days immersion in simulated body fluid, by scanning electron microscopy attached to an energy dispersive analysis system. Amorphous mineral deposition was probed by X-ray diffraction. Cell viability analysis was performed using oral mucosa fibroblasts by: 1) quantifying the liberated deoxyribonucleic acid from dead cells, 2) detecting the amount of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme released by cells with damaged membranes, and 3) by examining the cytoplasmic esterase function and cell membranes integrity with a fluorescence-based method using the Live/Dead commercial kit. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Precipitation of calcium and phosphate on the nanoparticles surfaces was observed in calcium-loaded nanoparticles. Non-loaded nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic in all the assays, calcium and zinc-loaded particles presented a dose dependent but very low cytotoxic effect. The ability of calcium-loaded nanoparticles to promote precipitation of calcium phosphate deposits, together with their observed non-toxicity may offer new strategies for periodontal disease treatment.

  15. Periodontitis

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001059.htm Periodontitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Periodontitis is inflammation and infection of the ligaments and ...

  16. Preclinical imaging methods for assessing the safety and efficacy of regenerative medicine therapies

    Scarfe, Lauren; Brillant, Nathalie; Kumar, J. Dinesh; Ali, Noura; Alrumayh, Ahmed; Amali, Mohammed; Barbellion, Stephane; Jones, Vendula; Niemeijer, Marije; Potdevin, Sophie; Roussignol, Gautier; Vaganov, Anatoly; Barbaric, Ivana; Barrow, Michael; Burton, Neal C.; Connell, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Edsbagge, Josefina; French, Neil S.; Holder, Julie; Hutchinson, Claire; Jones, David R.; Kalber, Tammy; Lovatt, Cerys; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Patel, Sara; Patrick, P. Stephen; Piner, Jacqueline; Reinhardt, Jens; Ricci, Emanuelle; Sidaway, James; Stacey, Glyn N.; Starkey Lewis, Philip J.; Sullivan, Gareth; Taylor, Arthur; Wilm, Bettina; Poptani, Harish; Murray, Patricia; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Park, B. Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Regenerative medicine therapies hold enormous potential for a variety of currently incurable conditions with high unmet clinical need. Most progress in this field to date has been achieved with cell-based regenerative medicine therapies, with over a thousand clinical trials performed up to 2015. However, lack of adequate safety and efficacy data is currently limiting wider uptake of these therapies. To facilitate clinical translation, non-invasive in vivo imaging technologies that enable careful evaluation and characterisation of the administered cells and their effects on host tissues are critically required to evaluate their safety and efficacy in relevant preclinical models. This article reviews the most common imaging technologies available and how they can be applied to regenerative medicine research. We cover details of how each technology works, which cell labels are most appropriate for different applications, and the value of multi-modal imaging approaches to gain a comprehensive understanding of the responses to cell therapy in vivo.

  17. Comparison of Salivary TIMP-1 Levels in Periodontally Involved and Healthy Controls and the Response to Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy

    Angel Fenol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. Periodontal destruction is an outcome of the imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs. We wanted to prove the hypothesis that salivary TIPM-1 level will vary in different people. A decrease in TIMP-1 level could make them more susceptible to periodontitis whereas a normal level could prevent increased tissue destruction thereby inhibiting the progression from gingivitis to periodontitis. This could probably pave the way for TIPM-1 to be a specific salivary biomarker and serve as a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in periodontitis. Methods. Whole unstimulated saliva of 2 ml was collected from twenty-five periodontally healthy and twenty-seven systemically healthy subjects with periodontitis. Clinical parameters recorded at baseline and reevaluated after four weeks in subjects with periodontitis following nonsurgical periodontal therapy were gingival index (GI, oral hygiene index-Simplified (OHI-S, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL. Salivary TIMP-1 levels in both were analyzed using a commercially available ELISA kit.

  18. Effect of Non‑Surgical Periodontal Therapy on the Concentration of ...

    Results: The results revealed that at baseline, 78.7% (48/61) of the subjects who had VSC concentration more than 250 parts per billion (ppb) were from the group with periodontal disease. Immediately after non‑surgical periodontal therapy, only 8.5% (17/200) of the subjects with periodontal disease had VSC concentration ...

  19. The effectiveness of mangosteen rind extract as additional therapy on chronic periodontitis (Clinical trials)

    Ina Hendiani; Dede Hadidjah; Agus Susanto; Indra Mustika Setia Pribadi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Introduction: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that attacks the periodontal tissue comprises the gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone caused mainly by plaque bacteriophage or other specific dominant type of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of clinical application of mangosteen peel extract gel as adjunctive therapy scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. This research was expect...

  20. Regenerative treatment of an immature, traumatized tooth with apical periodontitis: report of a case.

    Cotti, Elisabetta; Mereu, Manuela; Lusso, Daniela

    2008-05-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a necrotic immature permanent central incisor with complete crown fracture, suspected root fracture, and sinus tract, which was not treated with conventional apexification techniques. Instead, a regenerative approach based on the trauma literature's methods for revascularization was provided. The root canal was gently debrided of necrotic tissue with a sharp spoon excavator and irrigated for only one third of its length with NaOCl and then medicated with calcium hydroxide. After 15 days the sinus tract had healed, and the tooth was asymptomatic. The tooth was accessed, calcium hydroxide was removed, bleeding was stimulated to form an intracanal blood clot, and mineral trioxide aggregate was placed coronally to the blood clot. After 8 months, a coronal calcified barrier was radiographically evident and accompanied with progressive thickening of the root wall and apical closure. Two and a half years after treatment was initiated, the tooth remained asymptomatic, and the sinus tract had not reappeared. The progressive increase in the thickness of the dentinal walls and subsequent apical development suggest that appropriate biologic responses can occur with this type of treatment of the necrotic immature permanent tooth with sinus tract.

  1. Effects of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and HDL in serum of subjects with periodontitis.

    Leite, Anne Carolina Eleutério; Carneiro, Valéria Martins de Araújo; Guimarães, Maria do Carmo Machado

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in the sera and its association with body mass index and high density lipoprotein in subjects with severe periodontitis. Sera from 28 subjects (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) with severe periodontitis and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to periodontal therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9-12 months). Oral and systemic parameters such as the number of blood cells, glucose examination, lipid profile, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels accessed by high-sensitivity immunonephelometry assay, were included. Before therapy, in the periodontitis group, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein C-reactive protein C-reactive protein C-reactive protein >0.3 mg/dL (28.91±6.03) (Pperiodontitis, periodontal therapy was associated with decreased levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and increase of high density lipoprotein in serum. The clinical trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.br/, No. RBR-24T799.

  2. [Translational/regulatory science researches of NIHS for regenerative medicine and cellular therapy products].

    Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Japanese Diet passed the Regenerative Medicine Promotion Act and the revisions to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, which was also renamed as the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA). One of the aims of the new/revised Acts is to promote the development and translation of and access to regenerative/cellular therapies. In the TPA, a product derived from processing cells is categorized as a subgroup of "regenerative medicine, cellular therapy and gene therapy products" (RCGPs), products distinct from pharmaceuticals and medical devices, allowing RCGPs to obtain a conditional and time- limited marketing authorization much earlier than that under the conventional system. To foster not only RCGPs, but also innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recently launched Translational Research Program for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and RCGPs. This mini-review introduces contributions of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) to research projects on RCGPs in the Program.

  3. Supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for maintaining the dentition in adults treated for periodontitis.

    Manresa, Carolina; Sanz-Miralles, Elena C; Twigg, Joshua; Bravo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Periodontitis is a bacterially-induced, chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the connective tissues and bone that support teeth. Active periodontal treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory response, primarily through eradication of bacterial deposits. Following completion of treatment and arrest of inflammation, supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) is employed to reduce the probability of re-infection and progression of the disease; to maintain teeth without pain, excessive mobility or persistent infection in the long term, and to prevent related oral diseases.According to the American Academy of Periodontology, SPT should include all components of a typical dental recall examination, and importantly should also include periodontal re-evaluation and risk assessment, supragingival and subgingival removal of bacterial plaque and calculus, and re-treatment of any sites showing recurrent or persistent disease. While the first four points might be expected to form part of the routine examination appointment for periodontally healthy patients, the inclusion of thorough periodontal evaluation, risk assessment and subsequent treatment - normally including mechanical debridement of any plaque or calculus deposits - differentiates SPT from routine care.Success of SPT has been reported in a number of long-term, retrospective studies. This review aimed to assess the evidence available from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). To determine the effects of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) in the maintenance of the dentition of adults treated for periodontitis. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 8 May 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 8 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 8 May 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization

  4. Human periodontal ligament stem cells cultured onto cortico-cancellous scaffold drive bone regenerative process

    F Diomede

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to test, in vitro and in vivo, a new tissue-engineered construct constituted by porcine cortico-cancellous scaffold (Osteobiol Dual Block (DB and xeno-free ex vivo culture of human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs. hPDLSCs cultured in xeno-free media formulation preserved the stem cells’ morphological features, the expression of stemness and pluripotency markers, and their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal lineage. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that after one week of culture, both noninduced and osteogenic differentiation induced cells joined and grew on DB secreting extracellular matrix (ECM that in osteogenic induced samples was hierarchically assembled in fibrils. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR showed the upregulation of key genes involved in the bone differentiation pathway in both differentiated and undifferentiated hPDLSCs cultured with DB (hPDLSCs/DB. Functional studies revealed a significant increased response of calcium transients in the presence of DB, both in undifferentiated and differentiated cells stimulated with calcitonin and parathormone, suggesting that the biomaterial could drive the osteogenic differentiation process of hPDLSCs. These data were confirmed by the increase of gene expression of L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ (VDCCL, subunits α1C and α2D1 in undifferentiated cells in the presence of DB. In vivo implantation of the hPDLSCs/DB living construct in the mouse calvaria evidenced a precocious osteointegration and vascularisation process. Our results suggest consideration of DB as a biocompatible, osteoinductive and osteoconductive biomaterial, making it a promising tool to regulate cell activities in biological environments and for a potential use in the development of new custom-made tissue engineering.

  5. Regenerative therapy and tissue engineering for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure

    Finosh, G.T.; Jayabalan, Muthu

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of myocardium through regenerative therapy and tissue engineering is appearing as a prospective treatment modality for patients with end-stage heart failure. Focusing on this area, this review highlights the new developments and challenges in the regeneration of myocardial tissue. The role of various cell sources, calcium ion and cytokine on the functional performance of regenerative therapy is discussed. The evolution of tissue engineering and the role of tissue matrix/scaffold, cell adhesion and vascularisation on tissue engineering of cardiac tissue implant are also discussed. PMID:23507781

  6. Cardiovascular disease: primary prevention, disease modulation and regenerative therapy.

    Sultan, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs are the contemporary frontiers in functional metabolic vascular medicine. This novel science perspective harnesses our inherent ability to modulate the interface between specialized gene receptors and bioavailable nutrients in what is labeled as the nutrient-gene interaction. By mimicking a natural process through the conveyance of highly absorbable receptor specific nutrients, it is feasible to accelerate cell repair and optimize mitochondrial function, thereby achieving cardiovascular cure. We performed a comprehensive review of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Review databases for articles relating to cardiovascular regenerative medicine, nutrigenomics and primary prevention, with the aim of harmonizing their roles within contemporary clinical practice. We searched in particular for large-scale randomized controlled trials on contemporary cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and their specific adverse effects on metabolic pathways which feature prominently in cardiovascular regenerative programs, such as nitric oxide and glucose metabolism. Scientific research on \\'cardiovascular-free\\' centenarians delineated that low sugar and low insulin are consistent findings. As we age, our insulin level increases. Those who can decelerate the rapidity of this process are prompting their cardiovascular rejuvenation. It is beginning to dawn on some clinicians that contemporary treatments are not only failing to impact on our most prevalent diseases, but they may be causing more damage than good. Primary prevention programs are crucial elements for a better outcome. Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs have enhanced clinical efficacy and quality of life and complement our conventional endovascular practice.

  7. Biomaterials and Culture Technologies for Regenerative Therapy of Liver Tissue.

    Perez, Roman A; Jung, Cho-Rok; Kim, Hae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative approach has emerged to substitute the current extracorporeal technologies for the treatment of diseased and damaged liver tissue. This is based on the use of biomaterials that modulate the responses of hepatic cells through the unique matrix properties tuned to recapitulate regenerative functions. Cells in liver preserve their phenotype or differentiate through the interactions with extracellular matrix molecules. Therefore, the intrinsic properties of the engineered biomaterials, such as stiffness and surface topography, need to be tailored to induce appropriate cellular functions. The matrix physical stimuli can be combined with biochemical cues, such as immobilized functional groups or the delivered actions of signaling molecules. Furthermore, the external modulation of cells, through cocultures with nonparenchymal cells (e.g., endothelial cells) that can signal bioactive molecules, is another promising avenue to regenerate liver tissue. This review disseminates the recent approaches of regenerating liver tissue, with a focus on the development of biomaterials and the related culture technologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. PENYEMBUHAN LUKA SETELAH PERAWATAN BEDAH PERIODONTAL (Studi Pustaka

    Natalina Natalina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Periodontal therapy for treatment of periodontitis involves the elimination of anatomic defect. There are two primary approaches to eliminating these anatomic defects : resective (gingivectomy, osseous resection, and apically positioned flaps, and regenerative surgery (osseous graft, guided tissue regeneration, resorbable barriers, coronally position flaps. Aims. The dentist know the outcomes after periodontal surgery. References. Periodontal regeneration means healing after periodontal surgery that results in the formation of a new attachment apparatus, consisting of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Periodontal repair implies healing without restoration of the normal attachment apparatus. Histologic evaluation is the only reliable method to determine the true efficacy of periodontal therapies. Discussion. The variables involved in periodontal wound healing to solve how to achieve periodontal regeneration are manipulation of progenitor cell, alteration of pathologically exposed root surfaces, exclusion of gingival epithelium, and wound stabilization. Conclusions. Periodontal surgery usually do not result in periodontal regeneration. Gingival epithelium that proliferates apically can be inhibited by stabilization of the flap margin and regenerative surgery.

  9. Compositional Stability of a Salivary Bacterial Population against Supragingival Microbiota Shift following Periodontal Therapy

    山中, 渉

    2013-01-01

    Supragingival plaque is permanently in contact with saliva. However, the extent to which the microbiota contributes to the salivary bacterial population remains unclear. We compared the compositional shift in the salivary bacterial population with that in supragingival plaque following periodontal therapy. Samples were collected from 19 patients with periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy (mean sample collection interval, 25.862.6 months), and their bacterial composition was inves...

  10. Effect of smoking cessation on non-surgical periodontal therapy: Results after 24 months

    Francisca Rosa, Ecinele; Corraini, Priscila; Inoue, Gislene

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this 24-month prospective study was to assess the effect of smoking cessation on non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) in adult subjects with chronic periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Relative to a previous 12-month follow-up study, recruitment and follow-up period were.......05). CONCLUSION: Smoking cessation promoted additional benefits on NSPT in chronic periodontitis subjects....... extended, resulting in 116 eligible among the 286 screened subjects. They received NSPT and concurrent smoking cessation interventions. Periodontal maintenance was performed every three months. A calibrated examined, blinded to smoking status, performed full-mouth periodontal examination in six sites per...

  11. Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum and Salivary Concentrations of Visfatin in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    Nader Abolfazli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Visfatin, mainly secreted by visceral adipose tissue, especially by macrophages, plays an impor-tant role in regulating the defense and immune functions, and functions as a growth factor, a cytokine, an enzyme and more importantly as a proinflammatory mediator. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of non-surgical perio-dontal treatment on serum and salivary levels of visfatin in patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodonti-tis. Materials and methods. Eighteen patients with generalized moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were selected based on periodontal parameters of gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL and radio-graphic parameters. Serum and salivary samples were collected at baseline and one month following non-surgical periodon-tal therapy (scaling and root planing ([SRP]. Visfatin levels were measured using an ELISA kit. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15, using paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results. Mean salivary and serum levels of visfatin significantly decreased after non-surgical periodontal treatment (P<0.05. Changes in salivary visfatin levels were more prominent. Conclusion. According to the findings of this study it seems that there is a direct relationship between periodontal tissue inflammation and disease activity with salivary and serum visfatin levels.

  12. Progressing a human embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy towards the clinic.

    Whiting, Paul; Kerby, Julie; Coffey, Peter; da Cruz, Lyndon; McKernan, Ruth

    2015-10-19

    Since the first publication of the derivation of human embryonic stem cells in 1998, there has been hope and expectation that this technology will lead to a wave of regenerative medicine therapies with the potential to revolutionize our approach to managing certain diseases. Despite significant resources in this direction, the path to the clinic for an embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy has not proven straightforward, though in the past few years progress has been made. Here, with a focus upon retinal disease, we discuss the current status of the development of such therapies. We also highlight some of our own experiences of progressing a retinal pigment epithelium cell replacement therapy towards the clinic. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Effect of periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein levels in patients with gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: a clinicobiochemical study.

    Patil, Veena A; Desai, Manthan H

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. A total of 60 subjects (30 males and 30 females) were included in the study with 20 subjects in each of the groups classified based on community periodontal index (CPI) scores: I: Healthy, II: Gingivitis, III: Mild periodontitis. Periodontal therapy was performed on groups II and III patients. Venous blood was collected from each subject at baseline and 3 months after periodontal therapy. The collected sample was subjected to biochemical analysis to detect CRP levels by using immunoturbidimetric method. The present study demonstrated that the periodontitis group had a higher mean CRP levels (2.49 ± 0.47 ng/ml) as compared to the gingivitis group (1.40 ± 0.32 ng/ml) and healthy group (0.56 ± 0.20 ng/ml). The mean CRP values after periodontal therapy were found to be reduced to 0.44 ± 0.23 ng/ml in group II and 1.30 ± 0.36 ng/ml in group III patients. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that CRP level progressively increases from periodontal health to disease. A decrease in CRP levels with periodontal treatment was also observed. Due to its opsonizing abilities CRP plays an important role in the innate host defence. It can be hypothesized that CRP is a potential biomarker of periodontal disease. A number of studies have reported elevated serum CRP levels in periodontitis subjects. Long standing periodontal disease and raised CRP levels enhance the risk of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular accidents and preterm low birth weight infants. There is also evidence that effective periodontal therapy can lower serum CRP levels. However, the data of interventional studies on CRP in gingivitis and periodontitis is scarce.

  14. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Interleukin-29 Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Chronic Periodontitis and Aggressive Periodontitis Patients

    B. M. Shivaprasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently discovered interleukin 29 (IL-29 has antiviral properties and its production is induced by herpes viruses. This study was aimed at analyzing the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on IL-29 levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF of chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients. A total of 60 participants were divided into healthy group (group 1; n = 20, chronic periodontitis group (group 2; n = 20, and aggressive periodontitis group (group 3; n = 20. GCF samples collected from each subject at baseline and 6–8 weeks after scaling and root planing were quantified for IL-29 levels using ELISA. The mean IL-29 concentration in GCF was found to be highest in group 3 (92.37 pg/μl. The mean IL-29 level in group 1 and group 2 was 36.88 pg/μl and 69.35 pg/μl respectively. After scaling and root planing, the mean concentration of IL-29 in GCF was increased to 85.99 pg/μl in group 2 and to 114.64 pg/μl in group 3. Results of the present study indicate that antiviral IL-29 level was highest in GCF of aggressive periodontitis patients and least in subjects with healthy periodontium, while that of chronic periodontitis lying in between. After non-surgical periodontal therapy, IL-29 levels increased both in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients and deserve further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent in treating periodontitis.

  15. [The supportive outcome of periodontal non-surgical therapy to severe chronic periodontitis accompanied with malformed lingual groove in lateral incisor for 6 years: a case report].

    Li, Zheng; Kang, Jun

    2011-06-01

    To track the initiating and developing process of one case diagnosed as chronic periodontitis accompanied with malformed lingual groove in maxillary lateral incisor and report the long-term prognosis to the periodontal conservative and supportive therapy. The patient was diagnosed with mild chronic periodontitis 6 years ago and accepted routine periodontal scaling and root planning (SRP) plus supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) one time. Two years later the periodontal condition deteriorated by deep pockets in molars and severe bone destruction around the maxillary lateral incisor with malformed lingual groove. After SRP in sites which pocket depth more than 4mm plus root canal therapy and lingual groove plasty of maxillary right lateral incisor, the SPT regularly proceeded at 3rd, 6th and 12th month. At present the whole periodontal tissue was healthy, the bone lesion around maxillary lateral incisor recovered well, the tooth had no mobile, the cosmetic effect andtooth function was in good state, and the patient was very satisfied.

  16. Translating stem cell therapies: the role of companion animals in regenerative medicine

    Volk, Susan W.; Theoret, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians and veterinary medicine have been integral to the development of stem cell therapies. The contributions of large animal experimental models to the development and refinement of modern hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were noted nearly five decades ago. More recent advances in adult stem cell/regenerative cell therapies continue to expand knowledge of the basic biology and clinical applications of stem cells. A relatively liberal legal and ethical regulation of stem cell r...

  17. Prospective regenerative medicine therapies for obstetric trauma-induced fecal incontinence.

    Parmar, Nina; Kumar, Lalit; Emmanuel, Anton; Day, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a major public health issue that has yet to be adequately addressed. Obstetric trauma and injury to the anal sphincter muscles are the most common cause of fecal incontinence. New therapies are emerging aimed at repair or regeneration of sphincter muscle and restoration of continence. While regenerative medicine offers an attractive option for fecal incontinence there are currently no validated techniques using this approach. Although many challenges are yet to be resolved, the advent of regenerative medicine is likely to offer disruptive technologies to treat and possibly prevent the onset of this devastating condition. This article provides a review on regenerative medicine approaches for treating fecal incontinence and a critique of the current landscape in this area.

  18. Perkembangan Terkini Membran Guided Tissue Regeneration/Guided Bone Regeneration sebagai Terapi Regenerasi Jaringan Periodontal

    Cindy Cahaya

    2015-06-01

    kombinasi prosedur-prosedur di atas, termasuk prosedur bedah restoratif yang berhubungan dengan rehabilitasi oral dengan penempatan dental implan. Pada tingkat selular, regenerasi periodontal adalah proses kompleks yang membutuhkan proliferasi yang terorganisasi, differensiasi dan pengembangan berbagai tipe sel untuk membentuk perlekatan periodontal. Rasionalisasi penggunaan guided tissue regeneration sebagai membran pembatas adalah menahan epitel dan gingiva jaringan pendukung, sebagai barrier membrane mempertahankan ruang dan gigi serta menstabilkan bekuan darah. Pada makalah ini akan dibahas sekilas mengenai 1. Proses penyembuhan terapi periodontal meliputi regenerasi, repair ataupun pembentukan perlekatan baru. 2. Periodontal spesific tissue engineering. 3. Berbagai jenis membran/guided tissue regeneration yang beredar di pasaran dengan keuntungan dan kerugian sekaligus karakteristik masing-masing membran. 4. Perkembangan membran terbaru sebagai terapi regenerasi penyakit periodontal. Tujuan penulisan untuk memberi gambaran masa depan mengenai terapi regenerasi yang menjanjikan sebagai perkembangan terapi penyakit periodontal.   Latest Development of Guided Tissue Regeneration and Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane as Regenerative Therapy on Periodontal Tissue. Periodontitis is a patological state which influences the integrity of periodontal system that could lead to the destruction of the periodontal tissue and end up with tooth loss. Currently, there are so many researches and efforts to regenerate periodontal tissue, not only to stop the process of the disease but also to reconstruct the periodontal tissue. Periodontal regenerative therapy aims at directing the growth of new bone, cementum and periodontal ligament on the affected teeth. Regenerative procedures consist of soft tissue graft, bone graft, roots biomodification, guided tissue regeneration and combination of the procedures, including restorative surgical procedure that is

  19. Periodontal regeneration.

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  20. Homeopathy and Isopathy in the periodontal maintenance therapy of aggressive periodontitis patients - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p243

    Edivaldo Barbosa da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal maintenance care is an essential part of periodontal therapy for patients diagnosed with Aggressive Periodontitis, being, however, hard to instruct and to motivate these patients to follow a careful and effective program of maintenance for all their lives. A literature review was done, by means of relevant papers published on the last four decades, pointing out the importance of individual susceptibility for the appearance of aggressive periodontitis and to discuss the importance of a maintenance therapy on its treatment, applying Homeopathy and Isopathy. Homeopathy consists on a complex therapeutic system mainly based on the “Law of Similarity”, that is, the illness may be healed by drugs that produce similar symptoms in a healthy organism and, in this conception, the disease is understood as an energetic unbalance, in which internal and external factors acting on the subject’s susceptibility are considered and can be expressed by an individual symptomathology that goes from the rational sphere to the somatic sphere. On the other hand, Isopathy is the method of treatment with therapeutic agent, which actions on a healthy subject consist on pharmacodynamic manifestations similar to those observed in a sick person. Based on these concepts, the authors establish a hypothesis of the effectiveness of Homeopathy and Isopathy, the latter through auto-medications or auto-biotherapies, that are products which the active principal is obtained from the patient himself (gingival tissue and secretions, and that may be used as auxiliary treatments in the maintenance therapy of Aggressive Periodontitis.

  1. Effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in patients with moderately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis in Nepalese population

    Goel K

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Khushboo Goel,1 Shaili Pradhan,2 Madhur Dev Bhattarai3 1Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, College of Dental Surgery, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, 2Department of Dental Surgery, Periodontics Unit, Bir Hospital, 3Nepal Diabetes Association, Kathmandu, Nepal Objectives: Despite several investigations, evidence is still controversial regarding the effect of periodontal treatment on diabetes. This study evaluates and compares the effect on glycemic control and periodontal status with or without nonsurgical periodontal therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis in a Nepalese population. Materials and methods: A total of 82 patients attending the diabetes clinic and fulfilling enrollment criteria with moderate to severe periodontitis were selected. They were assigned in an alternative sequence, into test and control group. Both groups were instructed to continue with their medical treatment without modifications. Scaling and root surface debridement were performed in the test group whereas the control group received oral hygiene instructions with no treatment during the 3-month study period. Results: There were 41 participants in each group with the mean age of 50.66±7.70 and 53.80±9.16 years, average diabetes duration of 6.32±4.21 and 6.24±4.00 years, mean body mass index of 24.78±1.85 and 24.6±1.79 kg/m2, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level of 6.71±0.50% and 6.80±0.45%, in the test and control group, respectively. After 3 months, there was significant reduction in HbA1c levels in the test group compared to the control group (p=0.029. Clinical periodontal parameters of gingival index, probing depth (PD, and clinical attachment level (CAL significantly improved in the test group (p<0.001 with PD reduction by 0.9 mm and gain in CAL by 0.3 mm compared to the control group (p>0.001 who showed an increase by 0.05 mm. Conclusion: This study showed that nonsurgical periodontal

  2. Effect of Non Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Serum Visfatin Concentration in Periodontal Health and Disease

    N.M. Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visfatin is a pleiotropic mediator which acts as growth factor, cytokine, enzyme involved in energy including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism and has been recently demonstrated to exert several pro-inflammatory functions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the Visfatin concentration in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF and serum in patients with chronic periodontitis, and to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the GCF and serum visfatin concentration. 30 subjects (age range: 25 to 52 years were selected and divided into two groups based on the gingival index, probing depth, periodontal attachment level, and radiologic parameters (bone loss: group 1 (15 subjects with healthy periodontium, group 2 (15 subjects with chronic periodontitis, while, Group 2 patients after 8 weeks of the treatment (scaling and root planning, SRP constituted group 3. GCF samples (by microcapillary pipettes and serum samples (by venipuncture were collected to estimate the levels of Visfatin using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kit. The mean Visfatin concentration in GCF and serum was observed to be the highest in group 2 and lowest in group 1. While concentration in group 3 was similar to group 1. The concentration of Visfatin in GCF and serum decreased after SRP. The Visfatin concentration in GCF and serum found to be highest in chronic periodontitis group and decreases after treatment. Hence Visfatin values can be considered as an “inflammatory marker” can be explored in future as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of periodontal disease.

  3. Is obesity associated with healing after non-surgical periodontal therapy? A local vs. systemic evaluation.

    Duzagac, E; Cifcibasi, E; Erdem, M G; Karabey, V; Kasali, K; Badur, S; Cintan, S

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to detect the role of obesity on the healing response to periodontal therapy in terms of serum lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP) and both serum and gingival crevicular fluid adipocytokines. Thirty patients with periodontitis with (CPO) (n = 15) and without (n = 15) obesity and 15 healthy controls were included. Serum high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, CRP levels and levels of adiponectin, interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-10 were evaluated before and 3 mo after initial periodontal therapy. Clinical periodontal measurements were also recorded at baseline and 3 mo. Periodontal parameters improved significantly in both periodontitis groups with or without obesity (p 0.05) and change in numbers of sites with probing depth ≥ 4 mm. High-density lipoprotein significantly increased in both groups (p > 0.05). CRP decreased significantly solely in the normal weight group. IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels in gingival crevicular fluid improved significantly based on therapy in both groups (p periodontitis without obesity. Patients with CPO respond to periodontal therapy as well as the non-obese controls. This similar response is accompanied with consistent adipokine levels in gingival crevicular fluid. However, obesity affects the CRP and serum adipocytokine levels in response to therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effectiveness of a diode laser in addition to non-surgical periodontal therapy: study of intervention.

    Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Iovane, Claudio; Del Giudice, Teresa; Lomanno, Simona; Pacifico, Delfina; Fortunato, Leonzio; Del Giudice, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis affects 47% of adult population over the age of 30. The first phase of periodontal treatment is always represented by scaling and root planning (SRP), that is a causal, non-surgical therapy that recognizes as primary aims the control of bacterial infection and the reduction of periodontal plaque-associated inflammation. Yet, another innovative causal therapy is represented by the irradiation of periodontal pockets with laser. To evaluate the effect of a 940-nm diode laser as an adjunct to SRP in patients affected by periodontitis. Sixty-eight adult patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis were sequentially enrolled and undergone to periodontal examination (V1) in order to detect gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and probing depth (PD). The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first (n=34) received SRP treatment alone, the control group (n=34) received SRP and 940-nm diode laser therapy. Data were analyzed by Student's t-test, with two tails; for all clinical parameters, both groups reported statistically significant differences compared to basal values (pdiode laser was associated with more evident results. Considered the better clinical outcomes, diode laser can be routinely associated with SRP in the treatment of periodontal pockets of patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis.

  5. Effect of compliance during periodontal maintenance therapy on levels of bacteria associated with periodontitis: A 6-year prospective study.

    Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Vieira, Thaís Riberal; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Costa, José Eustáquio; Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Cortelli, José Roberto

    2018-05-01

    It is well established that regular compliance during periodontal maintenance therapy (PMT) maintains the stability of periodontal clinical parameters obtained after active periodontal therapy (APT). However, compliance during PMT has not yet been related to subgingival bacterial levels. Thus, this study followed individuals in PMT over 6 years and longitudinally evaluated the effects of compliance on periodontitis-associated bacterial levels and its relation to periodontal status. From a 6-year prospective cohort study with 212 individuals in PMT, 91 were determined to be eligible. From this total, 28 regular compliers (RC) were randomly selected and matched for age and sex with 28 irregular compliers (IC). Complete periodontal examination and microbiological samples were obtained 5 times: T1 (prior to APT), T2 (after APT), T3 (2 years), T4 (4 years), and T5 (6 years). Total bacteria counts and levels of Actinomyces naeslundii, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola were evaluated through quantitative polymerase chain reaction. RC had less tooth loss and better clinical and microbiological conditions over time when compared with IC. IC had higher total bacterial counts and higher levels of T. denticola. Moreover, among IC, total bacterial counts were positively associated with plaque index and bleeding on probing, while levels of A. naeslundii, T. forsythia, and T. denticola were negatively associated with clinical attachment loss (4 to 5 mm) among RC. Compliance positively influenced subgingival microbiota and contributed to stability of periodontal clinical status. Regular visits during PMT sustained microbiological benefits provided by APT over a 6-year period. © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology.

  6. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Tsuno, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nogami, Makiko; Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori; Noto, Zenko; Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto; Nikaido, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAMα cells and induced to osteogenic status—their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAMα cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAMα cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAMα cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAMα cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: ► Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAMα cells) that have the properties of MSCs. ► HAMα cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. ► Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAMα was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. ► HAMα cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  7. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  8. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules

    Sanjeev Kumar Salaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively.

  9. Management of localized advance loss of periodontal support associated Grade II furcation and intrabony defect in chronic periodontitis patient through amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules.

    Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghuman, Simrat Kaur; Kumar, Saurabh; Sharma, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is infectious, complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disease of supporting periodontal tissues that not only alters the bone morphology but also leads to the reduction in bone height. Different types of bony deformities such as horizontal, vertical, craters, and furcation result from periodontal disease, but vertical and Grade II furcation defects are more amenable to regenerative periodontal therapy. The present case report describes the current concept of periodontal diagnosis and the clinical radiographical efficiency of platelet-rich fibrin and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass composite granules graft combination in the management of localized advance osseous defects with respect to tooth number 36 in chronic periodontitis patient at 1 year postoperatively.

  10. Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Crevicular Fluid and Serum Glutathione Peroxidase Levels

    Swati Pradeep Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plasma glutathione peroxidase (eGPx is an important selenium containing antioxidant in human defense against oxidative stress. While crevicular fluid (GCF eGPx levels and its association with periodontal disease is well documented, there is no data on correlation of GCF and serum eGPx levels in chronic periodontitis. Hence this study was undertaken to further probe into the role of oxidative stress in periodontal diseases and effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy (NSPT by correlating GCF and serum levels of eGPx.

  11. Non-surgical periodontal therapy decreases serum elastase levels in aggressive but not in chronic periodontitis.

    Eickholz, Peter; Siegelin, Yasemin; Scharf, Susanne; Schacher, Beate; Oremek, Gerhard M; Sauer-Eppel, Hildegund; Schubert, Ralf; Wohlfeil, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy (SRP) on serum inflammatory parameters in patients with untreated aggressive (AgP) and chronic (ChP) periodontitis. Overall, 31 ChP and 29 AgP were examined clinically prior to and 12 weeks after SRP (subgingival scaling of all pockets within 2 days) with systemic antibiotics for patients positive for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (14 AgP, 9 ChP). Blood was sampled prior to, one day, 6, and 12 weeks after the first SRP visit. Serum elastase, C-reactive protein (CRP), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), interleukin (IL) 6, 8, and leukocyte counts were assessed. At baseline, serum elastase, CRP, and LBP were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in AgP than ChP. Serum elastase, CRP, LBP, and IL-6 were significantly (p < 0.001) elevated one day after scaling in both groups. Both groups showed significant clinical improvement (p < 0.001). A significant difference was observed regarding change of serum elastase 12 weeks after SRP between AgP and ChP (p = 0.015). Multiple regression analysis revealed AgP, African origin, and bleeding on probing to be associated with more pronounced elastase reduction. CRP reduction was associated with African origin, systemic antibiotics, and baseline probing pocket depth. SRP results in serum elastase reduction in AgP but not in ChP. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. The early career researcher's toolkit:translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products

    Rafiq, Qasim A.; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I.; Wilson, Samantha L.; Patel, Asha K.; Barnes, Amanda L.; Adams, Christopher F.; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in...

  13. Understanding positional cues in salamander limb regeneration: implications for optimizing cell-based regenerative therapies

    Catherine D. McCusker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine has reached the point where we are performing clinical trials with stem-cell-derived cell populations in an effort to treat numerous human pathologies. However, many of these efforts have been challenged by the inability of the engrafted populations to properly integrate into the host environment to make a functional biological unit. It is apparent that we must understand the basic biology of tissue integration in order to apply these principles to the development of regenerative therapies in humans. Studying tissue integration in model organisms, where the process of integration between the newly regenerated tissues and the ‘old’ existing structures can be observed and manipulated, can provide valuable insights. Embryonic and adult cells have a memory of their original position, and this positional information can modify surrounding tissues and drive the formation of new structures. In this Review, we discuss the positional interactions that control the ability of grafted cells to integrate into existing tissues during the process of salamander limb regeneration, and discuss how these insights could explain the integration defects observed in current cell-based regenerative therapies. Additionally, we describe potential molecular tools that can be used to manipulate the positional information in grafted cell populations, and to promote the communication of positional cues in the host environment to facilitate the integration of engrafted cells. Lastly, we explain how studying positional information in current cell-based therapies and in regenerating limbs could provide key insights to improve the integration of cell-based regenerative therapies in the future.

  14. State of the Art on the Evidence Base in Cardiac Regenerative Therapy: Overview of 41 Systematic Reviews

    Peruzzi, Mariangela; de Falco, Elena; Abbate, Antonio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Chimenti, Isotta; Lotrionte, Marzia; Benedetto, Umberto; Delewi, Ronak; Marullo, Antonino G. M.; Frati, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive appraisal of the evidence from secondary research on cardiac regenerative therapy. Overview of systematic reviews of controlled clinical trials concerning stem cell administration or mobilization in patients with cardiovascular disease. After a systematic database search,

  15. Dental Investigations: Efficiency of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy in Moderate Chronic Periodontitis

    Mlachkova Antoaneta M.; Popova Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and mic...

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome. PMID:25024562

  17. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm.

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K

    2014-05-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome.

  18. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm

    Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah Venkatesh Prabhuji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome.

  19. Regenerative Therapies for Central Nervous System Diseases: a Biomaterials Approach

    Tam, Roger Y; Fuehrmann, Tobias; Mitrousis, Nikolaos; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a limited capacity to spontaneously regenerate following traumatic injury or disease, requiring innovative strategies to promote tissue and functional repair. Tissue regeneration strategies, such as cell and/or drug delivery, have demonstrated promising results in experimental animal models, but have been difficult to translate clinically. The efficacy of cell therapy, which involves stem cell transplantation into the CNS to replace damaged tissue, has been limited due to low cell survival and integration upon transplantation, while delivery of therapeutic molecules to the CNS using conventional methods, such as oral and intravenous administration, have been limited by diffusion across the blood–brain/spinal cord-barrier. The use of biomaterials to promote graft survival and integration as well as localized and sustained delivery of biologics to CNS injury sites is actively being pursued. This review will highlight recent advances using biomaterials as cell- and drug-delivery vehicles for CNS repair. PMID:24002187

  20. Reactive correction of a maxillary incisor in single-tooth crossbite following periodontal therapy.

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Brunsvold, Michael A

    2005-05-01

    The reactive correction of a single tooth anterior crossbite following periodontal therapy is described. This case report provides new information regarding correction of a crossbite relationship and con- firms existing reports of tooth movement following periodontal therapy. A 39-year-old woman in good general health presented with a history of recurrent periodontal abscesses of a maxillary incisor. Probing depths of the abscessed tooth ranged from 5 to 12 mm, and class 1 mobility was noted. Radiographs revealed that the tooth had previously been treated endodontically. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was generalized chronic moderate to severe periodontitis. Treatment considerations were complicated by a single-tooth crossbite relationship of the involved incisor and clinical evidence that the periodontal abscess communicated with an apical infection. Treatment of the abscess consisted of cause-related therapy, bone grafting, and occlusal adjustment. Five months after surgical treatment, an edge-to-edge incisal relationship was observed, the first indicator of tooth movement. Further correction to a normal incisal relationship resulted 1 year after modification of the proximal contact. At this time, there was normal probing depth with only slight recession and mobility. Bone fill was radiographically noted. It appears that some cases of maxillary incisor crossbite that are complicated by periodontal disease may be corrected, without orthodontic appliances, following periodontal treatment.

  1. A Comparison of Impact of Chronic Periodontal Diseases and Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life

    Khushboo Goel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the impact of chronic periodontal diseases (PDs and compare phases of nonsurgical periodontal therapy (NSPT on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL in patients attending a tertiary care center of eastern Nepal. Materials and Methods. Matched for socioeconomic status, participants were recruited in two groups: moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis (n=24, 43±46 years and chronic gingivitis (n=25, 30±96 years. The treatment modalities were scaling and root surface debridement (RSD and supragingival scaling, respectively. The impact of periodontal disease treatment status was assessed by a self-reported questionnaire of Nepali Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14 at baseline and 9–12 weeks after NSPT. Results. The median (IQR OHIP-14 total scores for PDs reduced from 7 (3–11 to 3 (1–7.5 after NSPT. Both groups showed a significant improvement on OHRQoL (p value < 0.001. The periodontitis group showed an increased median (IQR reduction of 52% (35.22–86.15 compared with the gingivitis group with 27% (0.00–50.00. The impact on orofacial pain, orofacial appearance, and psychosocial dimensions was observed, which improved after NSPT in both groups. Conclusion. PDs are directly associated with OHRQoL and treatment of the disease may enhance quality of life from a patient’s perspective. Scaling and RSD provided better influence on OHRQoL than supragingival scaling.

  2. Effect of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein levels in gingival crevicular fluid of patients with gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: A clinical and biochemical study.

    Jayaprakash, Deepika; Aghanashini, Suchetha; Vijayendra, Ranganatha Rao; Chatterjee, Anirban; Rosh, Radhika Mohan; Bharwani, Ashit

    2014-07-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a type I acute phase reactant. A number of studies have reported elevated serum CRP levels in periodontitis subjects, which decrease following periodontal therapy. However, the data of interventional studies on gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of CRP is very scarce. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of periodontal therapy on GCF CRP levels in patients with gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. A total of 60 subjects were included in the study with 20 subjects each in following groups: I-Healthy, II-Gingivitis, III-Mild periodontitis based on community periodontal index scores. Periodontal therapy was performed on Group II and Group III patients. GCF was collected from each subject at baseline and 3 months after periodontal therapy. The collected sample was subjected to biochemical analysis to detect CRP levels by using commercially available chemiluminescence immunoassay kit. The present study demonstrated that the periodontitis group had a higher mean CRP level (2.49 ± 0.47 ng/ml) when compared with the Gingivitis group (1.40 ± 0.32 ng/ml) and Healthy group (0.56 ± 0.20 ng/ml). The mean CRP values after periodontal therapy were found to be reduced to 0.44 ± 0.23 ng/ml in Group II and 1.30 ± 0.36 ng/ml in Group III patients. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that GCF CRP level progressively increases from periodontal health to disease. It can also be stated that there is a decrease in GCF CRP levels with periodontal treatment.

  3. Impact of periodontal therapy on the subgingival microbiota of severe periodontitis: comparison between good responders and individuals with refractory periodontitis using the human oral microbe identification microarray.

    Colombo, Ana Paula V; Bennet, Susan; Cotton, Sean L; Goodson, J Max; Kent, Ralph; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Paster, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    This study compares the changes to the subgingival microbiota of individuals with "refractory" periodontitis (RP) or treatable periodontitis (good responders [GR]) before and after periodontal therapy by using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) analysis. Individuals with chronic periodontitis were classified as RP (n = 17) based on mean attachment loss (AL) and/or >3 sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after scaling and root planing, surgery, and systemically administered amoxicillin and metronidazole or as GR (n = 30) based on mean attachment gain and no sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after treatment. Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and 15 months after treatment and analyzed for the presence of 300 species by HOMIM analysis. Significant differences in taxa before and post-therapy were sought using the Wilcoxon test. The majority of species evaluated decreased in prevalence in both groups after treatment; however, only a small subset of organisms was significantly affected. Species that increased or persisted in high frequency in RP but were significantly reduced in GR included Bacteroidetes sp., Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Tannerella forsythia, Dialister spp., Selenomonas spp., Catonella morbi, Eubacterium spp., Filifactor alocis, Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus sp. OT113, Fusobacterium sp. OT203, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Streptococcus intermedius or Streptococcus constellatus, and Shuttlesworthia satelles. In contrast, Capnocytophaga sputigena, Cardiobacterium hominis, Gemella haemolysans, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Kingella oralis, Lautropia mirabilis, Neisseria elongata, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus australis, and Veillonella spp. were more associated with therapeutic success. Persistence of putative and novel periodontal pathogens, as well as low prevalence of beneficial species was associated with chronic refractory periodontitis.

  4. Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) trial design.

    Bartunek, Jozef; Davison, Beth; Sherman, Warren; Povsic, Thomas; Henry, Timothy D; Gersh, Bernard; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hajjar, Roger; Behfar, Atta; Homsy, Christian; Cotter, Gad; Wijns, William; Tendera, Michal; Terzic, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Cardiopoiesis is a conditioning programme that aims to upgrade the cardioregenerative aptitude of patient-derived stem cells through lineage specification. Cardiopoietic stem cells tested initially for feasibility and safety exhibited signs of clinical benefit in patients with ischaemic heart failure (HF) warranting definitive evaluation. Accordingly, CHART-1 is designed as a large randomized, sham-controlled multicentre study aimed to validate cardiopoietic stem cell therapy. Patients (n = 240) with chronic HF secondary to ischaemic heart disease, reduced LVEF (Heart Failure Questionnaire score, 6 min walk test, LV end-systolic volume, and LVEF at 9 months. The secondary efficacy endpoint is the time to cardiovascular death or worsening HF at 12 months. Safety endpoints include mortality, readmissions, aborted sudden deaths, and serious adverse events at 12 and 24 months. The CHART-1 clinical trial is powered to examine the therapeutic impact of lineage-directed stem cells as a strategy to achieve cardiac regeneration in HF populations. On completion, CHART-1 will offer a definitive evaluation of the efficacy and safety of cardiopoietic stem cells in the treatment of chronic ischaemic HF. NCT01768702. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  5. The Combination of Light and Stem Cell Therapies: A Novel Approach in Regenerative Medicine

    Anders, Juanita; Moges, Helina; Wu, Xingjia; Ilev, Ilko; Waynant, Ronald; Longo, Leonardo

    2010-01-01

    Light therapy commonly referred to as low level laser therapy can alter cellular functions and clinical conditions. Some of the commonly reported in vitro and in vivo effects of light therapy include cellular proliferation, alterations in the inflammatory response to injury, and increases in mitochondrial respiration and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Based on the known effects of light on cells and tissues in general and on reports in the last 5 years on the interaction of light with stem cells, evidence is mounting indicating that light therapy could greatly benefit stem cell regenerative medicine. Experiments on a variety of harvested adult stem cells demonstrate that light therapy enhances differentiation and proliferation of the cells and alters the expression of growth factors in a number of different types of adult stem cells and progenitors in vitro. It also has the potential to attenuate cytotoxic effects of drugs used to purge harvested autologous stem cells and to increase survival of transplanted cells.

  6. The early career researcher's toolkit: translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products.

    Rafiq, Qasim A; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I; Wilson, Samantha L; Patel, Asha K; Barnes, Amanda L; Adams, Christopher F; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine translation, we discuss common pitfalls associated with translational research, providing practical solutions and important considerations which will aid process and product development. Suggestions range from effective project management, consideration of key manufacturing, clinical and regulatory matters and means of exploiting research for successful commercialization.

  7. Placenta and Placental Derivatives in Regenerative Therapies: Experimental Studies, History, and Prospects

    Olena Pogozhykh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Placental structures, capable to persist in a genetically foreign organism, are a natural model of allogeneic engraftment carrying a number of distinctive properties. In this review, the main features of the placenta and its derivatives such as structure, cellular composition, immunological and endocrine aspects, and the ability to invasion and deportation are discussed. These features are considered from a perspective that determines the placental material as a unique source for regenerative cell therapies and a lesson for immunological tolerance. A historical overview of clinical applications of placental extracts, cells, and tissue components is described. Empirically accumulated data are summarized and compared with modern research. Furthermore, we define scopes and outlooks of application of placental cells and tissues in the rapidly progressing field of regenerative medicine.

  8. Placenta and Placental Derivatives in Regenerative Therapies: Experimental Studies, History, and Prospects.

    Pogozhykh, Olena; Prokopyuk, Volodymyr; Figueiredo, Constança; Pogozhykh, Denys

    2018-01-01

    Placental structures, capable to persist in a genetically foreign organism, are a natural model of allogeneic engraftment carrying a number of distinctive properties. In this review, the main features of the placenta and its derivatives such as structure, cellular composition, immunological and endocrine aspects, and the ability to invasion and deportation are discussed. These features are considered from a perspective that determines the placental material as a unique source for regenerative cell therapies and a lesson for immunological tolerance. A historical overview of clinical applications of placental extracts, cells, and tissue components is described. Empirically accumulated data are summarized and compared with modern research. Furthermore, we define scopes and outlooks of application of placental cells and tissues in the rapidly progressing field of regenerative medicine.

  9. The effects of photodynamic laser therapy in the treatment of marginal chronic periodontitis

    Chifor, Radu; Badea, Iulia; Avram, Ramona; Chifor, Ioana; Badea, Mîndra Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the antimicrobial photodynamic laser therapy performed during the treatment of deep periodontal disease by using 40 MHz high frequency ultrasonography. The periodontal data recorded during the clinical examination before each treatment session were compared with volumetric changes of the gingiva measured on periodontal ultrasound images. The results show a significant decrease of gingival tissue inflammation proved both by a significant decrease of bleeding on probing as well as by a decrease of the gingival tissues volume on sites where the laser therapy was performed. Periodontal tissues that benefit of laser therapy besides classical non-surgical treatment showed a significant clinical improvement of periodontal status. Based on these findings we were able to conclude that the antimicrobial photodynamic laser therapy applied on marginal periodontium has important anti-inflamatory effect. The periodontal ultrasonography is a method which can provide useful data for assessing the volume changes of gingival tissues, allowing a precise monitoring of marginal periodontitis.

  10. The effectiveness of mangosteen rind extract as additional therapy on chronic periodontitis (Clinical trials

    Ina Hendiani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   Introduction: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that attacks the periodontal tissue comprises the gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone caused mainly by plaque bacteriophage or other specific dominant type of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of clinical application of mangosteen peel extract gel as adjunctive therapy scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. This research was expected to developed new treatment in the field of dentistry, particularly in periodontics, which can be used as supporting material for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Methods: Quasi-experimental research, split mouth, with as many as 14 chronic periodontitis patients. Mangosteen rind was prepared to be formed into extract gel, dried at room temperature, then the dried samples were macerated by using ethanol, then evaporated and decanted for 3 days until obtained condensed extract. The samples were patients with chronic periodontitis in at least 2 teeth with pockets ≥ 5 mm. Clinical parameters of pocket depth, gingival bleeding, and clinical epithelial attachment level were measured at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Analysis of data using the t-test. Results: The comparison of average gap ratio of pockets depth, gingival index, gingival bleeding and epithelium attachment levels, before and after treatment showed significant differences, such as in the test and control sides. Conclusion: The mangosteen rind gel as adjunctive therapy for scaling and root planing is able to reduce pockets depth, gingival index, and gingival bleeding, and improve clinical epithelial attachment.

  11. CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS ON THE EVALUATION OF PERIODONTAL THERAPY IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS

    Anca Mihaela Stupu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the periodontal pathology of the pediatric pacient, the therapeutical management depends on an early, as precise as possible diagnosis, as well as on a correct evaluation of the causes and risk factors involved in such processes. The aim of the study: The paper discusses a clinicostatistical study devoted to the evaluation and comparison of the periodontal health condition of a group of children and teenagers subjected to a local etiological treatment. Materials and method: The experimental study was formed of 70 patients selected from the total number of patients having addressed a dentist. Over the whole period of the therapy, oral hygiene, the aspect of marginal gingiva, and the vitality of the teeth under treatment were carefully monitored. Comparisons between the initial and the final moment were based on: periodontal diagnosis, condition of marginal gingiva, number and depth of periodontal pockets, hygiene and dental mobility. Results: Improvement of the periodontal condition or its maintaining at the initial level was observed in patients with good or satisfactory oral hygiene, which was not the case of those with a scarce hygiene, in whom the periodontal problems evolved. Conclusions: Periodontal management should observe the basic principles of the initial causal, corrective and maintainance therapy. The main elements to be here considered are: age, the extent of patient’s involvement, his / her cooperation and motivation, and the support expressed by the family, all of them reflecting the periodontal diagnosis.

  12. Evaluation of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia by estimating hematological parameters and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels.

    Musalaiah, S V V S; Anupama, M; Nagasree, M; Krishna, Ch Murali; Kumar, Aravind; Kumar, P Mohan

    2014-07-01

    Periodontal tissues mount an immune inflammatory response to bacteria and their products. Certain inflammatory cytokines produced during periodontal inflammation increase the production of acute phase proteins like high‑sensitivity C‑reactive protein (hs‑CRP) and can depress erythropoietin production leading to the development of anemia. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on red blood cell (RBC) parameters and hs-CRP in chronic periodontitis patients with anemia. This is a longitudinal, interventional study with 6-month follow-up. A total of 30 subjects with anemia and chronic periodontitis with age group of 33-55 years were selected by screening hemoglobin (Hb) levels and examining periodontal findings. The clinical parameters plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded at baseline. Laboratory blood investigations were performed to evaluate RBC count, Hb, packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and red cell indices, hs-CRP at baseline. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy was performed for all patients. Patients were recalled after 6 months. The clinical and hematological parameters were re-evaluated to analyze the changes after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. The results showed that there was a significant increase in Hb levels, RBC count and PCV from baseline to 6 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. There is significant decrease in levels of ESR and hs-CRP levels after nonsurgical periodontal therapy indicating resolution of periodontal inflammation. There is a significant decrease in PPD, scores of PI and GI and significant increase in CAL gain. Minimal changes in mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and MCH concentration indicated that the lower values of red cell parameters are not due to any vitamin and mineral deficiencies, but secondary to the chronic inflammatory changes

  13. Periodontal therapy reduces plasma levels of interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen in patients with severe periodontitis and refractory arterial hypertension.

    Vidal, Fábio; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo S; Cordovil, Ivan; Fischer, Ricardo G

    2009-05-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies suggest that inflammation is the link between periodontal diseases and cardiovascular complications. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on plasma levels of inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6, C-reactive protein [CRP], and fibrinogen) in patients with severe periodontitis and refractory arterial hypertension. Twenty-two patients were examined and randomly divided into two groups. The test group was composed of 11 patients (mean age, 48.9 +/- 3.9 years) who received periodontal treatment, whereas the control group had 11 patients (mean age, 49.7 +/- 6.0 years) whose treatment was delayed for 3 months. Demographic and clinical periodontal data were collected, and blood tests were performed to measure the levels of IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen at baseline and 3 months later. The clinical results showed that the mean percentages of sites with bleeding on probing, probing depth (PD) 4 to 5 mm, PD > or =6 mm, clinical attachment loss (CAL) 4 to 5 mm, and CAL > or =6 mm were significantly reduced in the test group 3 months after periodontal treatment. There were no significant differences between the data at baseline and 3 months in the control group. Periodontal treatment significantly reduced the blood levels of fibrinogen, CRP, and IL-6 in the test group. Non-surgical periodontal therapy was effective in improving periodontal clinical data and in reducing the plasma levels of IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen in hypertensive patients with severe periodontitis.

  14. Maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess following periodontal therapy: a case report using three-dimensional evaluation.

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Brunsvold, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis may develop from the extension of periodontal disease. In this case, reconstructed three-dimensional images from multidetector spiral computed tomographs were helpful in evaluating periodontal bony defects and their relationship with the maxillary sinus. A 42-year-old woman in good general health presented with a chronic deep periodontal pocket on the palatal and interproximal aspects of tooth #14. Probing depths of the tooth ranged from 2 to 9 mm, and it exhibited a Class 1 mobility. Radiographs revealed a close relationship between the root apex and the maxillary sinus. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was localized severe chronic periodontitis. Treatment of the tooth consisted of cause-related therapy, surgical exploration, and bone grafting. A very deep circumferential bony defect at the palatal root of tooth #14 was noted during surgery. After the operation, the wound healed without incidence, but 10 days later, a maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess developed. To control the infection, an evaluation of sinus and alveolus using computed tomographs was performed, systemic antibiotics were prescribed, and endodontic treatment was initiated. Two weeks after surgical treatment, the infection was relieved with the help of antibiotics and endodontic treatment. Bilateral bony communications between the maxillary sinus and periodontal bony defect of maxillary first molars were shown on three-dimensional computed tomographs. The digitally reconstructed images added valuable information for evaluating the periodontal defects. Three-dimensional images from spiral computed tomographs (CT) aided in evaluating and treating the close relationship between maxillary sinus disease and adjacent periodontal defects.

  15. [Oxidative stress and antioxitant therapy of chronic periodontitis].

    Shen, Y X; Guo, S J; Wu, Y F

    2016-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a progressive, infectious inflammation disease, caused by the dysbiosis of oral resident flora, leading to the destruction of periodontium. The onset of pathogenic microorganisms is the etiological factor of periodontitis, while the immuno-inflammatory response affects the progression of the disease. Under chronic periodontitis, oxidative stress occurs when excessive reactive oxygen species are produced and exceed the compensative capacity of the organism. Oxidative stress leads to the destruction of periodontium, in a direct way(damaging the biomolecule) or an indirect way(enhancing the produce of inflammatory cytokine and destructive enzymes). Therefore, as the antagonist of the reactive oxygen species, antioxidants may be helpful to treat the chronic periodontitis. This paper reviewed relevant literatures about the destructive role of excessive reactive oxygen species and protective role of antioxidants in chronic periodontitis.

  16. The short-term effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    George, Annie Kitty; Janam, Prasanthila

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have shown that periodontal infection is a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases and conditions. In addition to the conventional risk factors, chronic infection and the subsequent generation of a systemic inflammatory response may be associated with this increased risk. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of chronic periodontitis and subsequent non-surgical periodontal therapy could influence the serum levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with severe chronic generalized periodontitis. Participants were selected from subjects who attended the Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantololgy, Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram. Sera were obtained from 25 patients with periodontitis for baseline examination and reassessment after completion of treatment. As a control, sera were also obtained from 20 subjects without periodontitis. Interleukin-6 was determined by sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) was measured using latex turbidometric immunoassay. Data were analyzed using computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 10. The level of interleukin-6 and hsCRP in the sera of periodontitis patients was seen to be higher than those of healthy controls. Interleukin-6 level tended to decrease with improvement of the periodontal condition following treatment and approached that of control subjects, and this decline was statistically significant. The hsCRP levels also showed a decreasing trend following periodontal treatment. In this study, we were able to show that periodontal disease significantly affects the serum levels of systemic inflammatory markers and that non-surgical periodontal therapy could bring about a decrease in the levels of these inflammatory markers.

  17. The short-term effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in patients with chronic periodontitis

    George, Annie Kitty; Janam, Prasanthila

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent epidemiological studies have shown that periodontal infection is a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases and conditions. In addition to the conventional risk factors, chronic infection and the subsequent generation of a systemic inflammatory response may be associated with this increased risk. Aims: This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of chronic periodontitis and subsequent non-surgical periodontal therapy could influence the serum levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with severe chronic generalized periodontitis. Settings and Design: Participants were selected from subjects who attended the Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantololgy, Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram. Materials and Methods: Sera were obtained from 25 patients with periodontitis for baseline examination and reassessment after completion of treatment. As a control, sera were also obtained from 20 subjects without periodontitis. Interleukin-6 was determined by sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) was measured using latex turbidometric immunoassay. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 10. Results: The level of interleukin-6 and hsCRP in the sera of periodontitis patients was seen to be higher than those of healthy controls. Interleukin-6 level tended to decrease with improvement of the periodontal condition following treatment and approached that of control subjects, and this decline was statistically significant. The hsCRP levels also showed a decreasing trend following periodontal treatment. Conclusions: In this study, we were able to show that periodontal disease significantly affects the serum levels of systemic inflammatory markers and that non-surgical periodontal therapy could bring about a decrease in the levels of these inflammatory markers. PMID:23633770

  18. The short-term effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in patients with chronic periodontitis

    Annie Kitty George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent epidemiological studies have shown that periodontal infection is a risk factor for a number of systemic diseases and conditions. In addition to the conventional risk factors, chronic infection and the subsequent generation of a systemic inflammatory response may be associated with this increased risk. Aims: This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of chronic periodontitis and subsequent non-surgical periodontal therapy could influence the serum levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP in patients with severe chronic generalized periodontitis. Settings and Design: Participants were selected from subjects who attended the Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantololgy, Government Dental College, Thiruvananthapuram. Materials and Methods: Sera were obtained from 25 patients with periodontitis for baseline examination and reassessment after completion of treatment. As a control, sera were also obtained from 20 subjects without periodontitis. Interleukin-6 was determined by sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP was measured using latex turbidometric immunoassay. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 10. Results: The level of interleukin-6 and hsCRP in the sera of periodontitis patients was seen to be higher than those of healthy controls. Interleukin-6 level tended to decrease with improvement of the periodontal condition following treatment and approached that of control subjects, and this decline was statistically significant. The hsCRP levels also showed a decreasing trend following periodontal treatment. Conclusions: In this study, we were able to show that periodontal disease significantly affects the serum levels of systemic inflammatory markers and that non-surgical periodontal therapy could bring about a decrease in the levels of these inflammatory markers.

  19. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  20. Patient compliance and supportive periodontal therapy: Study among young adults of Namakkal district

    Subramanium Gokulanathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the patient compliance to supportive and maintenance periodontal therapy and to determine the reason for noncompliance among young adult patients of Namakkal district, India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 400 patients who underwent periodontal therapy and subsequently recalled for supportive and maintenance periodontal treatment in the Department of Periodontics, Vivekanandha Dental College for Women, Namakkal. Patients age group 25-35 years and of both gender were equally selected and grouped by occupation and socioeconomic status. According to their compliance with appointments, they are categorized as complete compliance, partially compliance and insufficient or noncompliance. Noncompliance and partially compliance patients were contacted and asked to rate their experience and reason for noncompliance. Results: In this study, 80% of patients showed complete compliance and were regular for supportive periodontal therapy appointments. Women were more regular in maintaining recall appointments than men. Salaried employers showed 84.3% complete compliance, while self-employed personals showed 77% complete compliance and 75% of nonworking personals were regular to the appointment schedule. Noncompliance person has quoted lack of time and forgetting the appointment date as a major reason for missed appointments. Conclusions: This study recommends the need for improvement in communication skills of practitioners and weekend appointment for patient undergoing periodontal maintenance therapy.

  1. Platelet-rich fibrin: a boon in regenerative endodontics.

    Rebentish, Priyanka D; Umashetty, Girish; Kaur, Harpreet; Doizode, Trupthi; Kaslekar, Mithun; Chowdhury, Shouvik

    2016-12-01

    Research into regenerative dentistry has contributed momentum to the field of molecular biology. Periapical surgery aims at removing periapical pathology to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of bone and periodontal tissue. Regenerative endodontic procedures are widely being added to the current armamentarium of pulp therapy procedures. The regenerative potential of platelets has been deliberated. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a wonderful tissue-engineering product and has recently gained much popularity due its promising results in wound healing bone induction. The features of this product are an attribute of platelets which, after cellular interactions, release growth factors and have shown application in diverse disciplines of dentistry. This paper is intended to shed light onto the various prospects of PRF and to provide clinical insight into regenerative endodontic therapy.

  2. Adjunctive Non-Surgical Therapy of Inflamed Periodontal Pockets During Maintenance Therapy Using Diode Laser: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Nguyen, Naomi-Trang; Byarlay, Matthew R; Reinhardt, Richard A; Marx, David B; Meinberg, Trudy A; Kaldahl, Wayne B

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have documented the clinical outcomes of laser therapy for untreated periodontitis, but very few have reported on lasers treating inflamed pockets during maintenance therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) plus the adjunctive use of diode laser therapy to SRP alone on changes in the clinical parameters of disease and on the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy. This single-masked and randomized, controlled, prospective study includes 22 patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy who had one or more periodontal sites with a probing depth (PD) ≥ 5 mm with bleeding on probing (BOP). Fifty-six sites were treated with SRP and adjunctive laser therapy (SRP + L). Fifty-eight sites were treated with SRP alone. Clinical parameters, including PD, clinical attachment level (CAL), and BOP, and GCF IL-1β levels were measured immediately before treatment (baseline) and 3 months after treatment. Sites treated with SRP + L and SRP alone resulted in statistically significant reductions in PD and BOP and gains in CAL. These changes were not significantly different between the two therapies. Similarly, differences in GCF IL-1β levels between SRP + L and SRP alone were not statistically significant. In periodontal maintenance patients, SRP + L did not enhance clinical outcomes compared to SRP alone in the treatment of inflamed sites with ≥ 5 mm PD.

  3. Nano-sized calcium phosphate particles for periodontal gene therapy.

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Jain, Shardool; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Margolis, Henry C; Amiji, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) have significantly enhanced periodontal therapy outcomes with a high degree of variability, mostly due to the lack of continual supply for a required period of time. One method to overcome this barrier is gene therapy. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate PDGF-B gene delivery in fibroblasts using nano-sized calcium phosphate particles (NCaPP) as vectors. NCaPP incorporating green fluorescent protein (NCaPP-GFP) and PDGF-B (NCaPP-PDGF-B) plasmids were synthesized using an established precipitation system and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and 1.2% agarose gel electrophoresis. Biocompatibility and transfection of the nanoplexes in fibroblasts were evaluated using cytotoxicity assay and florescence microscopy, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed to evaluate PDGF-B transfection after different time points of treatments, and the functionality of PDGF-B transfection was evaluated using the cell proliferation assay. Synthesized NCaPP nanoplexes incorporating the genes of GFP and PDGF-B were spherical in shape and measured about 30 to 50 nm in diameter. Gel electrophoresis confirmed DNA incorporation and stability within the nanoplexes, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium reagent assay demonstrated their biocompatibility in fibroblasts. In vitro transfection studies revealed a higher and longer lasting transfection after NCaPP-PDGF-B treatment, which lasted up to 96 hours. Significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation observed in NCaPP-PDGF-B-treated cells confirmed the functionality of these nanoplexes. NCaPP demonstrated higher levels of biocompatibility and efficiently transfected PDGF plasmids into fibroblasts under described in vitro conditions.

  4. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30-70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy - oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent "t" test and within-group analysis was done using dependent "t" test. At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care.

  5. Regenerative medicine in dental and oral tissues: Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell

    Janti Sudiono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative medicine is a new therapeutic modality using cell, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies. Purpose. To describe the regenerative capacity of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell. Review. In dentistry, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies develop incredibly and attract great interest, due to the capacity to facilitate innovation in dental material and regeneration of dental and oral tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp, periodontal ligament and dental follicle, can be isolated, cultured and differentiated into various cells, so that can be useful for regeneration of dental, nerves, periodontal and bone tissues. Tissue engineering is a technology in reconstructive biology, which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biological mediators to facilitate regeneration or reconstruction of a particular tissue. The multipotency, high proliferation rates and accessibility, make dental pulp as an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. Revitalized dental pulp and continued root development is the focus of regenerative endodontic while biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum is the focus of regenerative periodontic. Conclucion. Dentin-derived morphogens such as BMP are known to be involved in the regulation of odontogenesis. The multipotency and angiogenic capacity of DPSCs as the regenerative capacity of human dentin / pulp complex indicated that dental pulp may contain progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. The human periodontal ligament is a viable alternative source for possible primitive precursors to be used in stem cell therapy.

  6. ECM and ECM-like materials - Biomaterials for applications in regenerative medicine and cancer therapy.

    Hinderer, Svenja; Layland, Shannon Lee; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2016-02-01

    Regenerative strategies such as stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering applications are being developed with the aim to replace, remodel, regenerate or support damaged tissues and organs. In addition to careful cell type selection, the design of appropriate three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is essential for the generation of bio-inspired replacement tissues. Such scaffolds are usually made of degradable or non-degradable biomaterials and can serve as cell or drug carriers. The development of more effective and efficient drug carrier systems is also highly relevant for novel cancer treatment strategies. In this review, we provide a summary of current approaches that employ ECM and ECM-like materials, or ECM-synthetic polymer hybrids, as biomaterials in the field of regenerative medicine. We further discuss the utilization of such materials for cell and drug delivery, and highlight strategies for their use as vehicles for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Regenerative endodontics: a comprehensive review.

    Kim, S G; Malek, M; Sigurdsson, A; Lin, L M; Kahler, B

    2018-05-19

    The European Society of Endodontology and the American Association for Endodontists have released position statements and clinical considerations for regenerative endodontics. There is increasing literature on this field since the initial reports of Iwaya et al. (Dental Traumatology, 17, 2001, 185) and Banchs & Trope (Journal of Endodontics, 30, 2004, 196). Endogenous stem cells from an induced periapical bleeding and scaffolds using blood clot, platelet rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin have been utilized in regenerative endodontics. This approach has been described as a 'paradigm shift' and considered the first treatment option for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. There are three treatment outcomes of regenerative endodontics; (i) resolution of clinical signs and symptoms; (ii) further root maturation; and (iii) return of neurogenesis. It is known that results are variable for these objectives, and true regeneration of the pulp/dentine complex is not achieved. Repair derived primarily from the periodontal and osseous tissues has been shown histologically. It is hoped that with the concept of tissue engineering, namely stem cells, scaffolds and signalling molecules, that true pulp regeneration is an achievable goal. This review discusses current knowledge as well as future directions for regenerative endodontics. Patient-centred outcomes such as tooth discolouration and possibly more appointments with the potential for adverse effects needs to be discussed with patients and parents. Based on the classification of Cvek (Endodontics and Dental Traumatology, 8, 1992, 45), it is proposed that regenerative endodontics should be considered for teeth with incomplete root formation although teeth with near or complete root formation may be more suited for conventional endodontic therapy or MTA barrier techniques. However, much is still not known about clinical and biological aspects of regenerative endodontics. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by

  8. Application of transtheoretical model to assess the compliance of chronic periodontitis patients to periodontal therapy

    Shilpa Emani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to assess whether the transtheoretical model for oral hygiene behavior was interrelated in theoretically consistent directions in chronic periodontitis patients and its applicability to assess the compliance of the chronic periodontitis patients to the treatment suggested. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 chronic periodontitis patients were selected for the proposed study. The selected patients were given four questionnaires that were constructed based on transtheoretical model (TTM, and the patients were divided subsequently into five different groups (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance groups based on their answers to the questionnaires. Then, each patient was given four appointments for their periodontal treatment spaced with a time gap of 10 days. The patients visit for each appointments scheduled to them was documented. The results obtained were assessed using TTM. Results: Higher mean pro scores of decisional balance, self-efficacy, and process of change scores was recorded in maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group, respectively, whereas higher mean cons score was recorded in precontemplation group followed by contemplation group, preparation group, action group, and maintenance group, respectively. The difference scores of TTM constructs were statistically highly significant between all the five groups. Furthermore, the number of appointment attended in were significantly more than maintenance group followed by action group, preparation group, contemplation group, and precontemplation group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that transtheoretical model can be successfully applied to chronic periodontitis patients to assess their compliance to the suggested periodontal treatment.

  9. The future of replacement and restorative therapies: from organ transplantation to regenerative medicine.

    Daar, A S

    2013-01-01

    As we continue to have severe shortages of organs for transplantation, we need to consider alternatives for the future. The most likely to make a real difference in the long term is regenerative medicine (RM), a field that has emerged from the conjunction of stem cell biology and cell therapies; gene therapy; biomaterials and tissue engineering; and organ transplantation. Transplantation and RM share the same essential goal: to replace or restore organ function. Herein I briefly review some major breakthroughs of RM that are relevant to the future of organ transplantation, with a focus on the needs of people in the developing world. A definition of RM is provided and the ethical, legal, and social issues are briefly highlighted. In conclusion, I provide a projection of what the future may be for RM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Circulating interleukin-6 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein decrease after periodontal therapy in otherwise healthy subjects.

    Marcaccini, Andrea M; Meschiari, César A; Sorgi, Carlos A; Saraiva, Maria C P; de Souza, Ana M; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Tanus-Santos, José E; Novaes, Arthur B; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2009-04-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with many chronic inflammatory systemic diseases, and a common chronic inflammation pathway has been suggested for these conditions. However, few studies have evaluated whether periodontal disease, in the absence of other known inflammatory conditions and smoking, affects circulating markers of chronic inflammation. This study compared chronic inflammation markers in control individuals and patients with periodontal disease and observed whether non-surgical periodontal therapy affected inflammatory disease markers after 3 months. Plasma and serum of 20 controls and 25 patients with periodontal disease were obtained prior to and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal therapy. All patients were non-smokers, they did not use any medication, and they had no history or detectable signs and symptoms of systemic diseases. Periodontal and systemic parameters included probing depth, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, hematologic parameters, as well as the following inflammatory markers: interleukin (IL)-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), CD40 ligand, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin), soluble vascular adhesion molecule (sVCAM)-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1. There were no differences in the hematologic parameters of the patients in the control and periodontal disease groups. Among the tested inflammatory markers, IL-6 concentrations were higher in the periodontal disease group at baseline compared to the controls (P = 0.006). Therapy was highly effective (P periodontal disease groups prior to the therapy (P = 0.009). In apparently otherwise healthy patients, periodontal disease is associated with increased circulating concentrations of IL-6 and hs-CRP, which decreased 3 months after non-surgical periodontal therapy. With regard to the CD40 ligand, MCP-1, sP-selectin, sVCAM-1, and sICAM-1, no changes were seen in the periodontal disease group

  11. Periodontal regenerative management of residual tunnel osseous defect results from the enucleation of lateral periodontal cyst in anterior maxilla: A rare case report

    Sanjeev Kumar Salaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral periodontal cyst (LPC is a nonkeratinized, noninflammatory developmental cyst occurring adjacent or lateral to tooth root. It is a relatively uncommon lesion found in the maxillary incisors and found mostly in adults during 5th to 7th decades. In this case, 45-year-old male patient reported with occasional mild discomfort between left maxillary central and lateral incisor region since 1 year. Interproximally, a well-defined round radiolucent area with corticated borders was determined radiographically between vital tooth #21 and #22. Preliminary diagnosis of LPC was established based on clinical and radiographical findings. Following enucleation of the lesion, an anticipated residual tunnel osseous defect was observed, which was managed successfully utilizing bone graft and guided tissue regeneration-assisted technique. Cystic tissue removed was examined histologically; hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections showed features suggestive of LPC. Complete healing of tunnel defect was achieved at 1 year follow-up.

  12. Compositional stability of a salivary bacterial population against supragingival microbiota shift following periodontal therapy.

    Wataru Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Supragingival plaque is permanently in contact with saliva. However, the extent to which the microbiota contributes to the salivary bacterial population remains unclear. We compared the compositional shift in the salivary bacterial population with that in supragingival plaque following periodontal therapy. Samples were collected from 19 patients with periodontitis before and after periodontal therapy (mean sample collection interval, 25.8 ± 2.6 months, and their bacterial composition was investigated using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic community analysis using the UniFrac distance metric revealed that the overall bacterial community composition of saliva is distinct from that of supragingival plaque, both pre- and post-therapy. Temporal variation following therapy in the salivary bacterial population was significantly smaller than in the plaque microbiota, and the post-therapy saliva sample was significantly more similar to that pre-therapy from the same individual than to those from other subjects. Following periodontal therapy, microbial richness and biodiversity were significantly decreased in the plaque microbiota, but not in the salivary bacterial population. The operational taxonomic units whose relative abundances changed significantly after therapy were not common to the two microbiotae. These results reveal the compositional stability of salivary bacterial populations against shifts in the supragingival microbiota, suggesting that the effect of the supragingival plaque microbiota on salivary bacterial population composition is limited.

  13. Long-term efficacy of microbiology-driven periodontal laser-assisted therapy.

    Martelli, F S; Fanti, E; Rosati, C; Martelli, M; Bacci, G; Martelli, M L; Medico, E

    2016-03-01

    Periodontitis represents a highly prevalent health problem, causing severe functional impairment, reduced quality of life and increased risk of systemic disorders, including respiratory, cardiovascular and osteoarticular diseases, diabetes and fertility problems. It is a typical example of a multifactorial disease, where a polymicrobial infection inducing chronic inflammation of periodontal tissues is favoured by environmental factors, life style and genetic background. Since periodontal pathogens can colonise poorly vascularised niches, antiseptics and antibiotics are typically associated with local treatments to manage the defects, with unstable outcomes especially in early-onset cases. Here, the results of a retrospective study are reported, evaluating the efficacy of a protocol (Periodontal Biological Laser-Assisted Therapy, Perioblast™) by which microbial profiling of periodontal pockets is used to determine the extent and duration of local neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation plus conventional treatment. The protocol was applied multicentrically on 2683 patients, and found to produce a significant and enduring improvement of all clinical and bacteriological parameters, even in aggressive cases. Microbiome sequencing of selected pockets revealed major population shifts after treatment, as well as strains potentially associated with periodontitis in the absence of known pathogens. This study, conducted for the first time on such a large series, clearly demonstrates long-term efficacy of microbiology-driven non-invasive treatment of periodontal disease.

  14. Regenerative therapy and tissue engineering for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure: new developments and challenges.

    Finosh, G T; Jayabalan, Muthu

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of myocardium through regenerative therapy and tissue engineering is appearing as a prospective treatment modality for patients with end-stage heart failure. Focusing on this area, this review highlights the new developments and challenges in the regeneration of myocardial tissue. The role of various cell sources, calcium ion and cytokine on the functional performance of regenerative therapy is discussed. The evolution of tissue engineering and the role of tissue matrix/scaffold, cell adhesion and vascularisation on tissue engineering of cardiac tissue implant are also discussed.

  15. Gene therapy with growth factors for periodontal tissue engineering–A review

    Gupta, Shipra; Mahendra, Aneet

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of oral and periodontal diseases and associated anomalies accounts for a significant proportion of the healthcare burden, with the manifestations of these conditions being functionally and psychologically debilitating. A challenge faced by periodontal therapy is the predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues lost as a consequence of disease. Growth factors are critical to the development, maturation, maintenance and repair of oral tissues as they establish an extra-cellular environment that is conducive to cell and tissue growth. Tissue engineering principles aim to exploit these properties in the development of biomimetic materials that can provide an appropriate microenvironment for tissue development. The aim of this paper is to review emerging periodontal therapies in the areas of materials science, growth factor biology and cell/gene therapy. Various such materials have been formulated into devices that can be used as vehicles for delivery of cells, growth factors and DNA. Different mechanisms of drug delivery are addressed in the context of novel approaches to reconstruct and engineer oral and tooth supporting structure. Key words: Periodontal disease, gene therapy, regeneration, tissue repair, growth factors, tissue engineering. PMID:22143705

  16. Evaluation of efficacy of photodynamic therapy as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in treatment of chronic periodontitis patients: A clinico-microbiological study.

    Raj, K Ravi; Musalaiah, Svvs; Nagasri, M; Kumar, P Aravind; Reddy, P Indeevar; Greeshma, M

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a local noninvasive treatment modality without side effects caused by antibiotics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjunctive use of PDT with scaling and root planing as compared with SRP alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Twenty participants with chronic periodontitis having probing pocket depths (PDs) of ≥5 mm were selected for the study. Patients were randomly divided into control group and test group with ten patients in each group. Full-mouth SRP was performed in both the groups, followed by PDT in test group. Assessment of plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), PD, and clinical attachment level (CAL) was done at baseline and after 3 months. Microbiological assessment of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at baseline and 3 months after the therapy. There was a significant reduction in PI, GI, PD, CAL, and microbiologic parameters in test group, following SRP and PDT, when compared with SRP alone in control group. PDT in conjunction with SRP has shown additional improvement in periodontal parameters when compared to SRP alone and has a beneficial effect in chronic periodontitis patients.

  17. Tooth loss in well-maintained patients with chronic periodontitis during long-term supportive therapy in Brazil.

    Chambrone, Luiz A; Chambrone, Leandro

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the reasons for tooth loss in a sample of patients who underwent periodontal therapy and supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) in a Brazilian private periodontal practice. A sample of 120 subjects who had been treated and maintained for 10 years or longer was selected from patients attending a periodontal practice. All patients followed a similar treatment: basic procedures, re-evaluation and periodontal surgery where indicated. Reasons for tooth loss were categorized as periodontal, caries, endodontal, root fractures and extraction of retained or partially erupted third molars. Of the 2927 teeth present at the completion of active periodontal treatment, 53 (1.8%) were lost due to periodontal disease, 16 (0.5%) for root fracture, six (0.2%) to caries, five (0.2%) for endodontic reasons and 31 (1.0%) were lost to extraction of retained or partially erupted third molars. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between five independent variables with tooth loss due to periodontitis. Only age (> 60 years) and smoking were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The findings of this survey were consistent with previous studies. Older subjects and smokers were more susceptible to periodontal tooth loss. In addition, patients with generalized chronic periodontitis were treated and maintained for long-term periods with low rates of tooth loss.

  18. The effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in persons with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Engebretson, Steven P; Hyman, Leslie G; Michalowicz, Bryan S; Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Gelato, Marie C; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Reddy, Michael S; Lewis, Cora E; Oates, Thomas W; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A; Orlander, Philip R; Paquette, David W; Hanson, Naomi Q; Tsai, Michael Y

    2013-12-18

    Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. To determine if nonsurgical periodontal treatment reduces levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), a 6-month, single-masked, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Participants had type 2 diabetes, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c levels between 7% and less than 9%, and untreated chronic periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with 5 academic medical centers. The treatment group (n = 257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline and supportive periodontal therapy at 3 and 6 months. The control group (n = 257) received no treatment for 6 months. Difference in change in HbA1c level from baseline between groups at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose level, and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) score. Enrollment was stopped early because of futility. At 6 months, mean HbA1c levels in the periodontal therapy group increased 0.17% (SD, 1.0), compared with 0.11% (SD, 1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference, -0.05% [95% CI, -0.23% to 0.12%]; P = .55). Periodontal measures improved in the treatment group compared with the control group at 6 months, with adjusted between-group differences of 0.28 mm (95% CI, 0.18 to 0.37) for probing depth, 0.25 mm (95% CI, 0.14 to 0.36) for clinical attachment loss, 13.1% (95% CI, 8

  19. Clinical effect of a dentifrice containing three kinds of bactericidal ingredients on periodontal disease: a pilot study in patients undergoing supportive periodontal therapy.

    Kita, Daichi; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Yokomizo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Miki; Egawa, Masahiro; Makino-Oi, Asako; Tomita, Sachiyo; Saito, Atsushi

    2018-02-09

    This study aimed to evaluate clinically the effect of a novel dentifrice containing three kinds of bactericidal ingredients on periodontal disease. This was a single-arm, prospective clinical study that enrolled patients with periodontitis undergoing supportive periodontal therapy. Periodontal examination, microbiological testing of saliva samples, and evaluation of inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) in gingival crevicular fluid were performed. After 4 weeks of the use of test dentifrice, these parameters were re-evaluated. The use of dentifrice was also subjectively evaluated by clinicians and participants. Among 30 participants, there were significant improvements in the periodontal and microbiological parameters, and the level of interleukin-1β in the gingival crevicular fluid, following the use of the test dentifrice. In clinicians' subjective evaluation of the overall usefulness of the dentifrice, 'mild' and 'moderate' improvement accounted for 83% of the total responses. In the participants' subjective evaluation, the majority indicated their experience of the use as favorable. Within the limitations of this study, it is suggested that the progression of periodontal disease during the supportive periodontal therapy can be prevented by the use of the test dentifrice. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) 000023175. Date of formal registration: July 14, 2016 ( https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000026716 ).

  20. Advances in regenerative therapies for spinal cord injury: a biomaterials approach

    Magdalini Tsintou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury results in the permanent loss of function, causing enormous personal, social and economic problems. Even though neural regeneration has been proven to be a natural mechanism, central nervous system repair mechanisms are ineffective due to the imbalance of the inhibitory and excitatory factors implicated in neuroregeneration. Therefore, there is growing research interest on discovering a novel therapeutic strategy for effective spinal cord injury repair. To this direction, cell-based delivery strategies, biomolecule delivery strategies as well as scaffold-based therapeutic strategies have been developed with a tendency to seek for the answer to a combinatorial approach of all the above. Here we review the recent advances on regenerative/neural engineering therapies for spinal cord injury, aiming at providing an insight to the most promising repair strategies, in order to facilitate future research conduction.

  1. Different strategies to improve the use of the umbilical cord and cord blood for hematopoietic and other regenerative cell therapies

    Garde, Mark Paul van der

    2016-01-01

    The umbilical cord and cord blood contain stem cells that can be used for regenerative cell therapies such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the application of cord blood is hindered by the slow engraftment of the cells and delayed immune reconstitution compared to stem cells of

  2. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on periodontal laboratory and clinical data as well as on disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Cosgarea, Raluca; Tristiu, Roxana; Dumitru, Raluca Bianca; Arweiler, Nicole Birgit; Rednic, Simona; Sirbu, Cristina Ioana; Lascu, Liana; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2018-03-27

    To compare the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on clinical and inflammatory parameters in patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis (CP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (RA-CP) with that in CP patients without RA. Eighteen patients with RA-CP and 18 systemically healthy patients with CP were treated with scaling and root planing (SRP) within 24 h. At baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after SRP, clinical periodontal parameters, inflammatory markers, and microorganisms in subgingival biofilm were assessed. In addition, disease activity markers of RA (DAS28, CRP, ESR) and specific antibodies (RF) were monitored in the RA-CP group. In both groups, non-surgical therapy yielded to statistically significant improvements in all investigated clinical periodontal variables; in RA patients, a statistically significant decrease in serum-CRP was seen at 3 months. At all time-points, levels of inflammatory markers in GCF were higher in RA-CP than in CP patients. Counts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola decreased statistically significantly in CP but not in the RA-CP group. Changes of DAS28 correlated positively with those of P. gingivalis and negatively with the plaque index. Within their limits, the present data suggest that (a) non-surgical periodontal therapy improves periodontal conditions in CP patients with and without RA and (b) in patients with RA, eradication of P. gingivalis in conjunction with a high level oral hygiene may transiently decrease disease activity of RA. In patients with RA and CP, non-surgical periodontal therapy is a relevant modality not only to improve the periodontal condition but also to decrease RA activity.

  3. Efficacy therapy in a nonsurgical periodontal treatment in aggressive periodontitisno

    Nelly Garcia-Madueño

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available La terapia periodontal no quirúrgica es la clave para el control y el mantenimiento de la enfermedad periodontal logrando evitar la fase quirúrgica en muchos casos. Paciente de sexo masculino de 46 años de edad con diagnóstico de periodontitis agresiva generalizada se realizó el control mecánico de placa bacteriana, motivación e instrucción de higiene oral, raspado y alisado radicular manual por cuadrantes, clorhexidina al 0.12% en colutorio 15 ml por 30s dos veces al día por siete días; se complementó con terapia antibiótica sistémica clindamicina de 300mg tres veces al día por siete días. Durante un año de seguimiento con tratamiento periodontal de soporte se observó una reducción de los parámetros clínicos como sangrado al sondaje, disminución de la perdida de inserción y estabilidad del nivel óseo.

  4. Evaluation of micronutrient (Zinc, Magnesium, and Copper levels in serum and glycemic status after nonsurgical periodontal therapy in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis

    Gopalakrishnan Sundaram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To find out the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on serum zinc (Zn, magnesium (Mg, and copper (Cu concentration and glycemic status in type 2 diabetes with chronic periodontitis (CP. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients were included in this study, which was further divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of forty patients with CP, Group 2 consisted of forty patients of CP with controlled diabetes, and Group 3 consisted of forty patients of CP with uncontrolled diabetes. Periodontal parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, and clinical attachment levels (CALs were evaluated. Blood samples were collected to assess the levels of fasting blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin, Zn, Mg, and Cu. All parameters were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Results: The results showed statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters within the groups except for the CAL in group 1 patients (P = 0.05. The glycemic status also showed a statistically significant reduction after treatment (P < 0.001. The intragroup comparison was taken between the values of micronutrients, showed substantial increase in the levels of both Zn and Mg and decrease in the level of Cu after nonsurgical periodontal treatment (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with diabetes and periodontitis had altered metabolism of Zn, Mg, and Cu contributing to the progression and complication of diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment improved the variation and concentration of plasma micronutrients and also the periodontal status and glycemic level.

  5. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Washio, Kaoru; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy. PMID:22315604

  6. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Toshiyuki Yoshida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy.

  7. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Adjunctive Application of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment: A Review of Literature

    Takeshi Kikuchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is caused by dental plaque biofilms, and the removal of these biofilms from the root surface of teeth plays a central part in its treatment. The conventional treatment for periodontal disease fails to remove periodontal infection in a subset of cases, such as those with complicated root morphology. Adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT has been proposed as an additional treatment for this infectious disease. Many periodontal pathogenic bacteria are susceptible to low-power lasers in the presence of dyes, such as methylene blue, toluidine blue O, malachite green, and indocyanine green. aPDT uses these light-activated photosensitizer that is incorporated selectively by bacteria and absorbs a low-power laser/light with an appropriate wavelength to induce singlet oxygen and free radicals, which are toxic to bacteria. While this technique has been evaluated by many clinical studies, some systematic reviews and meta-analyses have reported controversial results about the benefits of aPDT for periodontal treatment. In the light of these previous reports, the aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information about aPDT and help extend knowledge of advanced laser therapy.

  9. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita: clinical manifestations, microscopic findings, and surgical periodontal therapy. A case report.

    Hakki, S S; Celenligil-Nazliel, H; Karaduman, A; Usubütün, A; Ertoy, D; Ayhan, A; Ruacan, S

    2001-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an uncommon, acquired, chronic subepidermal bullous disease. This report describes a case of EBA with gingival involvement. A 43-year-old woman with EBA was referred to our clinic for periodontal therapy because of gingival tenderness and bleeding. She has been on cyclosporin A therapy for the last 2 years. Clinical findings were analyzed. Anterior gingivectomy operations were performed in 2 stages. The samples obtained during the surgery were examined using histopathologic, immunohistologic, and electronmicroscopic methods. Long-term effects of the surgical periodontal treatment on gingiva were evaluated both clinically and microscopically. The dentition displayed minimal enamel hypoplasia. Decayed, missing, and filled surfaces score was found to be elevated. Periodontal examination showed generalized diffuse gingival inflammation and gingival enlargement localized mainly to the anterior region. Nikolsky's sign was positive. However, wound healing was uneventful after the operations. Microscopic findings were similar to those obtained from the skin. Twenty-one months after the operations, Nikolsky's sign was negative and no remarkable gingival inflammation was noted. Microscopic examination revealed that the blisters were fewer in number and smaller in size. These results indicate that gingival tissues may also be involved in EBA. Uneventful wound healing after periodontal surgery in this case suggests that periodontal surgery can be performed in patients with EBA. Moreover, both our clinical and histopathologic findings imply that gingivectomy proves useful in maintaining gingival integrity in these patients. Our data may also suggest that the patients with EBA are highly likely to develop dental caries.

  10. Prevention and therapy of periodontal diseases and oral malodour : Brush, rinse and cool

    van der Sluijs, E.

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the two most important oral diseases that contributes to the global burden of chronic disease, the prevalence of which increases with age and represents a significant burden to public health. Maintaining a healthy oral cavity involves the prevention and therapy of gingival

  11. Regenerative endodontics: A way forward.

    Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B; Shiloah, Yoav; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Immature teeth are susceptible to infections due to trauma, anatomic anomalies, and caries. Traditional endodontic therapies for immature teeth, such as apexification procedures, promote resolution of the disease and prevent future infections. However, these procedures fail to promote continued root development, leaving teeth susceptible to fractures. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) have evolved in the past decade, being incorporated into endodontic practice and becoming a viable treatment alternative for immature teeth. The authors have summarized the status of regenerative endodontics on the basis of the available published studies and provide insight into the different levels of clinical outcomes expected from these procedures. Substantial advances in regenerative endodontics are allowing a better understanding of a multitude of factors that govern stem cell-mediated regeneration and repair of the damaged pulp-dentin complex. REPs promote healing of apical periodontitis, continued radiographic root development, and, in certain cases, vitality responses. Despite the clinical success of these procedures, they appear to promote a guided endodontic repair process rather than a true regeneration of physiological-like tissue. Immature teeth with pulpal necrosis with otherwise poor prognosis can be treated with REPs. These procedures do not preclude the possibility of apexification procedures if attempts are unsuccessful. Therefore, REPs may be considered first treatment options for immature teeth with pulpal necrosis. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adjunctive use of the diode laser in non-surgical periodontal therapy: exploring the controversy.

    Porteous, Mary Sornborger; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the controversy regarding clinical efficacy, dental hygienists use the diode laser as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy. The technique to maximize successful laser therapy outcome is controversial as well. The purpose of this review is to explore the scientific foundation of the controversy surrounding the use of the diode laser as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy. Further, this paper addresses the weaknesses in study design, the heterogeneity of methodology in the published clinical studies, especially the laser parameters, and how these issues impact the collective clinical and microbial data, and thus conclusions regarding clinical efficacy. Evaluation of the literature identifies possible mechanisms that could contribute to the varied, often conflicting results among laser studies that are the foundation of the controversy surrounding clinical efficacy. These mechanisms include current paradigms of periodontal biofilm behavior, tissue response to laser therapy being dependent on tissue type and health, and that the successful therapeutic treatment window is specific to the target tissue, biofilm composition, laser wavelength, and laser energy delivered. Lastly, this paper discusses laser parameters used in the various clinical studies, and how their diversity contributes to the controversy. Although this review does not establish clinical efficacy, it does reveal the scientific foundation of the controversy and the need for standardized, well designed randomized controlled clinical trials to develop specific guidelines for using the laser as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy. Using evidence-based laser guidelines would allow dental hygienists to provide more effective non-surgical periodontal care.

  13. Brain tumour stem cells: implications for cancer therapy and regenerative medicine.

    Sanchez-Martin, Manuel

    2008-09-01

    The cancer relapse and mortality rate suggest that current therapies do not eradicate all malignant cells. Currently, it is accepted that tumorigenesis and organogenesis are similar in many respects, as for example, homeostasis is governed by a distinct sub-population of stem cells in both situations. There is increasing evidence that many types of cancer contain their own stem cells: cancer stem cells (CSC), which are characterized by their self-renewing capacity and differentiation ability. The investigation of solid tumour stem cells has gained momentum particularly in the area of brain tumours. Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumours. Nearly two-thirds of gliomas are highly malignant lesions with fast progression and unfortunate prognosis. Despite recent advances, two-year survival for glioblastoma (GBM) with optimal therapy is less than 30%. Even among patients with low-grade gliomas that confer a relatively good prognosis, treatment is almost never curative. Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a small fraction of glioma cells endowed with features of primitive neural progenitor cells and a tumour-initiating function. In general, this fraction is characterized for forming neurospheres, being endowed with drug resistance properties and often, we can isolate some of them using sorting methods with specific antibodies. The molecular characterization of these stem populations will be critical to developing an effective therapy for these tumours with very dismal prognosis. To achieve this aim, the development of a mouse model which recapitulates the nature of these tumours is essential. This review will focus on glioma stem cell knowledge and discuss future implications in brain cancer therapy and regenerative medicine.

  14. Multidisciplinary therapy for the treatment of malocclusion in a patient with chronic periodontitis with a five-year follow-up: A case report.

    Zhang, Dongmei; Lin, Li; Tang, Xiaoling; Li, Chen; Liu, Jingbo; Wang, Hongyang; Pan, Yaping

    2017-10-01

    Multidisciplinary therapy is essential in dental practice to achieve optimized outcomes. The present case report describes the application of periodontal surgery with a five-year follow-up in a patient with malocclusion and chronic periodontitis. In the presence of periodontal inflammation, orthodontic therapy may result in further periodontal breakdown due to plaque accumulation. In order to prevent this progression, scaling and root planning with a periodontal endoscope was applied, and continuous clinical monitoring and risk assessment was performed every 3 months using a Florida Probe. This combined treatment supports the long-term maintenance of periodontal conditions, functional occlusion and harmony of the facial profile.

  15. The Effect of Orthodontic Therapy on Periodontal Health: A Review of the Literature

    Samah Alfuriji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This review aims to evaluate the effect of orthodontic therapy on periodontal health. Data. Original articles that reported on the effect of orthodontic therapy on periodontal health were included. The reference lists of potentially relevant review articles were also sought. Sources. A literature search was conducted using the databases, Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases for relevant studies. The search was carried out by using a combined text and the MeSH search strategies: using the key words in different combinations: “periodontal disease,” “orthodontics” and “root resorption.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Articles published only in English language were included. Letters to the Editor, historical reviews and unpublished articles were not sought. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the present literature review, it was observed that there is a very close inter-relationship between the periodontal health and the outcome of orthodontic therapy.

  16. The Effect of Orthodontic Therapy on Periodontal Health: A Review of the Literature

    Alfuriji, Samah; Alhazmi, Nora; Alhamlan, Nasir; Al-Ehaideb, Ali; Alruwaithi, Moatazbellah; Alkatheeri, Nasser; Geevarghese, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This review aims to evaluate the effect of orthodontic therapy on periodontal health. Data. Original articles that reported on the effect of orthodontic therapy on periodontal health were included. The reference lists of potentially relevant review articles were also sought. Sources. A literature search was conducted using the databases, Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases for relevant studies. The search was carried out by using a combined text and the MeSH search strategies: using the key words in different combinations: “periodontal disease,” “orthodontics” and “root resorption.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Articles published only in English language were included. Letters to the Editor, historical reviews and unpublished articles were not sought. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the present literature review, it was observed that there is a very close inter-relationship between the periodontal health and the outcome of orthodontic therapy. PMID:24991214

  17. Journey of bone graft materials in periodontal therapy: A chronological review

    Jitendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone, the basic building block of the healthy periodontium, is affected in most of the periodontal diseases and can be managed either by mechanically recontouring it or by grafting techniques, which encourages regeneration where it has been lost. Bone replacement grafts are widely used to promote bone formation and periodontal regeneration. Bone grafting, placing bone or bone substitutes into defects created by the disease process, acts like a scaffold upon which the body generates its own, new bone. A wide range of bone grafting materials, including bone grafts and bone graft substitutes, have been applied and evaluated clinically, including autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts. This review provides an overview of the clinical application, biologic function, and advantages and disadvantages of various types of bone graft materials used in periodontal therapy till date with emphasis on recent advances in this field.

  18. Impact of periodontal therapy on general health: evidence from insurance data for five systemic conditions.

    Jeffcoat, Marjorie K; Jeffcoat, Robert L; Gladowski, Patricia A; Bramson, James B; Blum, Jerome J

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of periodontal (gum) disease may lessen the adverse consequences of some chronic systemic conditions. To estimate the effects of periodontal therapy on medical costs and hospitalizations among individuals with diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D); coronary artery disease (CAD); cerebral vascular disease (CVD); rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and pregnancy in a retrospective observational cohort study. Insurance claims data from 338,891 individuals with both medical and dental insurance coverage were analyzed in 2011-2013. Inclusion criteria were (1) a diagnosis of at least one of the five specified systemic conditions and (2) evidence of periodontal disease. Subjects were categorized according to whether they had completed treatment for periodontal disease in the baseline year, 2005. Outcomes were (1) total allowed medical costs and (2) number of hospitalizations, per subscriber per year, in 2005-2009. Except in the case of pregnancy, outcomes were aggregated without regard to reported cause. Individuals who were treated and untreated for periodontal disease were compared independently for the two outcomes and five systemic conditions using ANCOVA; age, gender, and T2D status were covariates. Statistically significant reductions in both outcomes (ppregnancy, for which costs were lower by 40.2%, 40.9%, 10.7%, and 73.7%, respectively; results for hospital admissions were comparable. No treatment effect was observed in the RA cohorts. These cost-based results provide new, independent, and potentially valuable evidence that simple, noninvasive periodontal therapy may improve health outcomes in pregnancy and other systemic conditions. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Potential feasibility of dental stem cells for regenerative therapies: stem cell transplantation and whole-tooth engineering.

    Nakahara, Taka

    2011-07-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow are expected to be a somatic stem cell source for the development of new cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, dental clinicians are unlikely to carry out autologous cell/tissue collection from patients (i.e., marrow aspiration) as a routine procedure in their clinics; hence, the utilization of bone marrow stem cells seems impractical in the dental field. Dental tissues harvested from extracted human teeth are well known to contain highly proliferative and multipotent stem cell compartments and are considered to be an alternative autologous cell source in cell-based medicine. This article provides a short overview of the ongoing studies for the potential application of dental stem cells and suggests the utilization of 2 concepts in future regenerative medicine: (1) dental stem cell-based therapy for hepatic and other systemic diseases and (2) tooth replacement therapy using the bioengineered human whole tooth, called the "test-tube dental implant." Regenerative therapies will bring new insights and benefits to the fields of clinical medicine and dentistry.

  20. Advances toward regenerative medicine in the central nervous system: challenges in making stem cell therapy a viable clinical strategy.

    Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the prospects of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of nervous system disorders. The eagerness of scientists, clinicians, and spin-out companies to develop new therapies led to premature clinical trials in human patients, and now the initial excitement has largely turned to skepticism. Rather than embracing a defeatist attitude or pressing blindly ahead, I argue it is time to evaluate the challenges encountered by regenerative medicine in the central nervous system and the progress that is being made to solve these problems. In the twenty years since the adult brain was discovered to have an endogenous regenerative capacity, much basic research has been done to elucidate mechanisms controlling proliferation and cellular identity; how stem cells may be directed into neuronal lineages; genetic, pharmacological, and behavioral interventions that modulate neurogenic activity; and the exact nature of limitations to regeneration in the adult, aged, diseased and injured CNS. These findings should prove valuable in designing realistic clinical strategies to improve the prospects of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, I discuss how basic research continues to play a critical role in identifying both barriers and potential routes to regenerative therapy in the CNS.

  1. Combined endodontic-periodontic treatment of a palatal groove: a case report.

    Schwartz, Scott A; Koch, Michael A; Deas, David E; Powell, Charles A

    2006-06-01

    The palatal groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the tooth involved to a severe periodontal defect. When further complicated by pulp necrosis, these grooves often present a diagnostic and treatment planning challenge that requires an interdisciplinary treatment approach. This case report describes the successful collaborative management of a maxillary lateral incisor with an extensive palatal groove using a combination of nonsurgical endodontic therapy, odontoplasty, and periodontal regenerative techniques.

  2. Imperative role of dental pulp stem cells in regenerative therapies: A systematic review

    Ramchandra Kabir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are primitive cells that can differentiate and regenerate organs in different parts of the body such as heart, bones, muscles and nervous system. This has been a field of great clinical interest with immense possibilities of using the stem cells in regeneration of human organ those are damaged due to disease, developmental defects and accident. The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and validation. Long-term preservation of SHED cells or DPSC is becoming a popular consideration, similar to the banking of umbilical cord blood. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are the adult multipotent cells that reside in the cell rich zone of the dental pulp. The multipotent nature of these DPSCs may be utilized in both dental and medical applications. A systematic review of the literature was performed using various internet based search engines (PubMed, Medline Plus, Cochrane, Medknow, Ebsco, Science Direct, Hinari, WebMD, IndMed, Embase using keywords like "dental pulp stem cells", "regeneration", "medical applications", "tissue engineering". DPSCs appears to be a promising innovation for the re-growth of tissues however, long term clinical studies need to be carried out that could establish some authentic guidelines in this perspective.

  3. Imperative role of dental pulp stem cells in regenerative therapies: a systematic review.

    Kabir, Ramchandra; Gupta, Manish; Aggarwal, Avanti; Sharma, Deepak; Sarin, Anurag; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive cells that can differentiate and regenerate organs in different parts of the body such as heart, bones, muscles and nervous system. This has been a field of great clinical interest with immense possibilities of using the stem cells in regeneration of human organ those are damaged due to disease, developmental defects and accident. The knowledge of stem cell technology is increasing quickly in all medical specialties and in dental field too. Stem cells of dental origin appears to hold the key to various cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine, but most avenues are in experimental stages and many procedures are undergoing standardization and validation. Long-term preservation of SHED cells or DPSC is becoming a popular consideration, similar to the banking of umbilical cord blood. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are the adult multipotent cells that reside in the cell rich zone of the dental pulp. The multipotent nature of these DPSCs may be utilized in both dental and medical applications. A systematic review of the literature was performed using various internet based search engines (PubMed, Medline Plus, Cochrane, Medknow, Ebsco, Science Direct, Hinari, WebMD, IndMed, Embase) using keywords like "dental pulp stem cells", "regeneration", "medical applications", "tissue engineering". DPSCs appears to be a promising innovation for the re-growth of tissues however, long term clinical studies need to be carried out that could establish some authentic guidelines in this perspective.

  4. Phenotypic characterization of the bone marrow stem cells used in regenerative cellular therapy

    Macias Abraham, Consuelo; Valle Perez, Lazaro O del; Baganet Cobas, Aymara

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a novel therapeutic method with broad potential for the treatment of various illnesses, based on the use of bone marrow (BM) stem cells, whose phenotypic characterization is limited. The paper deals with the expression of different cell membrane markers in mononuclear BM cells from 14 patients who underwent autologous cell therapy, obtained by medullary puncture and mobilization to peripheral blood, with the purpose of characterizing the different types of cells present in that heterogeneous cellular population and identifying the adhesion molecules involved in their adhesion. A greater presence was observed of adherent stem cells from the marrow stroma in mononuclear cells obtained directly from the BM; a larger population of CD90 +c ells in mononuclear cells from CD34 -/ CD45 -p eripheral blood with a high expression of molecules CD44 and CD62L, which suggests a greater presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in mobilized cells from the marrow stroma. The higher levels of CD34 +c ells in peripheral blood stem cells with a low expression of molecules CD117 -a nd DR -s uggests the presence of hematopoietic stem cells, hemangioblasts and progenitor endothelial cells mobilized to peripheral circulation. It was found that mononuclear cells from both the BM and peripheral blood show a high presence of stem cells with expression of adhesion molecule CD44 (MMC marker), probably involved in their migration, settling and differentiation

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative cardiovascular therapies and biomedical discovery.

    Nsair, Ali; MacLellan, W Robb

    2011-04-30

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) has, in the short time since their discovery, revolutionized the field of stem cell biology. This technology allows the generation of a virtually unlimited supply of cells with pluripotent potential similar to that of embryonic stem cells (ESC). However, in contrast to ESC, iPSC are not subject to the same ethical concerns and can be easily generated from living individuals. For the first time, patient-specific iPSC can be generated and offer a supply of genetically identical cells that can be differentiated into all somatic cell types for potential use in regenerative therapies or drug screening and testing. As the techniques for generation of iPSC lines are constantly evolving, new uses for human iPSC are emerging from in-vitro disease modeling to high throughput drug discovery and screening. This technology promises to revolutionize the field of medicine and offers new hope for understanding and treatment of numerous diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Hippo Pathway as Drug Targets in Cancer Therapy and Regenerative Medicine.

    Nagashima, Shunta; Bao, Yijun; Hata, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) co-operate with numerous transcription factors to regulate gene transcriptions. YAP1 and TAZ are negatively regulated by the tumor suppressive Hippo pathway. In human cancers, the Hippo pathway is frequently deregulated and YAP1 and TAZ escape the inhibition by the Hippo pathway. The upregulation of YAP1 and TAZ induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and increases drug resistance in cancer cells. TAZ is implicated in cancer stemness. In consequence cancers with hyperactive YAP1 and TAZ are associated with poor clinical prognosis. Inhibitors of YAP1 and TAZ are reasoned to be beneficial in cancer therapy. On the other hand, since YAP1 and TAZ play important roles in the regulation of various tissue stem cells and in tissue repair, activators of YAP1 and TAZ are useful in the regenerative medicine. We discuss the potential application of inhibitors and activators of YAP1 and TAZ in human diseases and review the progress of drug screenings to search for them. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Potential sources of stem cells as a regenerative therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Abir Oueida El-Sadik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abir Oueida El-SadikDepartment of Anatomy and Embryology, Scientific Research Unit, Female Health Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Stem cells are believed to hold enormous promise as potential replacement therapy in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. Stem cells were investigated to be the alternative therapeutic source capable of differentiating into dopamine (DA neurons. Multiple important signaling factors were recorded for the induction of DA neuronal traits from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs such as fibroblast growth factor 8, sonic hedgehog, and Wnt 1. Recent protocols were described for the differentiation of human ESCs into DA neurons, achieving high efficiency of DA neuronal derivation. Despite that, the use of human ESCs is still ethically controversial. The transcription factors necessary for DA neuron development from adult neural stem cells (NSCs, such as Pitx3, Nurr1, En-1, En-2, Lmx1a, Lmx1b, Msx1, and Ngn2, were investigated. In addition to replacement of lost DA neurons, adult NSCs were recorded to provide neuroprotective and neurogenic factors for the mesencephalon. In addition, induced pluripotent stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells represent reliable stem cell sources of DA neurons. Future studies are recommended to provide further insight into the regenerative capacity of stem cells needed for the treatment of PD.Keywords: dopamine, embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, Parkinson's disease, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells

  8. Evaluation of commercially available biodegradable tetracycline fiber therapy in chronic periodontitis

    Sachdeva, Surinder; Agarwal, Vipin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disorder caused by dental plaque having mixed microbial flora. The different treatment modalities available to treat this disease are aimed at removal of micro-organisms from both hard and soft tissues. Systemic as well as local anti-microbial agents are helpful adjuncts in reducing microbes especially in inaccessible areas along with mechanical debridement therapy. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a split mouth design. Thirty-five patients having at least two non-adjacent sites in different quadrants with periodontal pockets ≥5 mm and with bleeding on probing at initial visit were selected. The selected sites were treated with both scaling and root planing plus tetracycline fibers or with scaling and root planing alone. Baseline and follow-up measurements included plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level. Result: Both treatment modalities were affective in improving clinical parameters over three months’ observation period. The combined antimicrobial and mechanical debridement therapy has shown better results as compared with scaling and root planing alone. Conclusion: Application of tetracycline in modified collagen matrix following scaling and root planing might be beneficial in treatment of chronic periodontitis and improving periodontal parameters for 3-month duration. PMID:21976836

  9. Evaluation of IL-1β, IL-1ra, and IL-10 levels and outcome of periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Bostanci, Vildan; Toker, Hulya; Senel, Soner; Poyraz, Omer; Akpinar, Aysun; Görgün, Emine Pirim; Bakar, Olcay

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the IL-1β, IL-1ra, and IL-10 cytokine levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and chronic periodontitis (CP) patients, and their response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. A total of 50 patients, 15 FMF patients with generalized chronic periodontitis (FMF-CP), 15 systemically healthy patients with generalized chronic periodontitis (CP), ten systemically and periodontal healthy controls (HC), and ten periodontally healthy FMF patients (FMF-HC) were enrolled in the study. The cytokine levels in GCF and serum were determined by ELISA. Probing depth, clinical attachment level, and gingival and plaque indices in each participant were also measured. The GCF and clinical parameters at baseline and 6 weeks were recorded. The study indicated statistically significant healing of the clinical parameters in both FMF-CP and CP groups after periodontal treatment. GCF IL-1β levels at 6 weeks in FMF-CP group were significantly lower than the CP group (p  0.05). The results of our study suggested that there was a positive correlation between gingival inflammation and serum cytokine levels in FMF patients and also colchicine treatment showed protective effects on GCF cytokine levels in FMF-CP group. Following treatment, GCF IL-1β and GCF IL-1ra levels were decreased in FMF-CP group. GCF IL-10 levels were increased in FMF-CP group compared to other groups. Also, the serum cytokine levels associated with periodontal inflammation in FMF patients.

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with photosensitizer in ethanol improves oxidative status and gingival collagen in a short-term in periodontitis.

    Pillusky, Fernanda Maia; Barcelos, Raquel Cristine Silva; Vey, Luciana Taschetto; Barin, Luisa Machado; de Mello Palma, Victor; Maciel, Roberto Marinho; Kantorski, Karla Zanini; Bürger, Marilise Escobar; Danesi, Cristiane Cademartori

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) effects using the methylene blue (MB) in ethanol 20% on systemic oxidative status and collagen content from gingiva of rats with periodontitis. Rats were divided into five experimental groups: NC (negative control; no periodontitis); PC (positive control; periodontitis without any treatment); SRP (periodontitis and scaling and root planing), aPDT I (periodontitis and SRP+aPDT+MB solubilized in water), and aPDT II (periodontitis and SRP+aPDT+MB solubilized in ethanol 20%). After 7days of removal of the ligature, the periodontal treatments were performed. At 7/15/30days, gingival tissue was removed for morphometric analysis. The erythrocytes were used to evaluate systemic oxidative status. PC group showed higher lipoperoxidation levels at 7/15/30days. aPDT indicated a protective influence in erythrocytes at 15days observed by the elevation in levels of systemic antioxidant defense. aPDT II group was the only one that restored the total collagen area in 15days, and recovered the type I collagen area at the same time point. aPDT as an adjunct to the SRP can induce the systemic protective response against oxidative stress periodontitis-induced and recover the gingival collagen, thus promoting the healing periodontal, particularly when the MB is dissolved in ethanol 20%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy and safety of regenerative cell therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension in animal models: a preclinical systematic review protocol.

    Suen, Colin M; Zhai, Alex; Lalu, Manoj M; Welsh, Christopher; Levac, Brendan M; Fergusson, Dean; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Stewart, Duncan J

    2016-05-25

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease (15 cases per million) that is characterized by widespread loss of the pulmonary microcirculation and elevated pulmonary vascular resistance leading to pathological right ventricular remodeling and ultimately right heart failure. Regenerative cell therapies (i.e., therapies involving cells with stem or progenitor-like properties) could potentially restore the effective lung microcirculation and provide a curative therapy for PAH. Preclinical evidence suggests that regenerative cell therapy using endothelial progenitor cells or mesenchymal stem cells may be beneficial in the treatment of PAH. These findings have led to the completion of a small number of human clinical trials, albeit with modest effect compared to animal studies. The objective of this systematic review is to compare the efficacy and safety of regenerative cell therapies in preclinical models of PAH as well as assess study quality to inform future clinical studies. We will include preclinical studies of PAH in which a regenerative cell type was administered and outcomes compared to a disease control. The primary outcome will be pulmonary hemodynamics as assessed by measurement of right ventricular systolic pressure and/or mean pulmonary arterial pressure. Secondary outcomes will include mortality, survival, right ventricular remodeling, pulmonary vascular resistance, cardiac output, cardiac index, pulmonary acceleration time, tricuspid annular systolic excursion, and right ventricular wall thickness. Electronic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases will be constructed and reviewed by the Peer Review of Electronic Search Strategies (PRESS) process. Search results will be screened independently in duplicate. Data from eligible studies will be extracted, pooled, and analyzed using random effects models. Risk of bias will be assessed using the SYstematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation (SYRCLE) risk of bias tool, and

  12. Correlative analysis of plasma and urine neopterin levels in the pre- and post-menopausal women with periodontitis, following nonsurgical periodontal therapy

    Jammula Surya Prasanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Periodontitis is an inflammatory condition which is distinguished by the devastation of the supported tooth structures. In such inflammatory conditions, some biomarkers such as neopterin will be secreted and elevated in the body fluids, which can be used as a diagnostic marker for the present and future disease activity. Aims: Assessment of the neopterin as a biomarker in inflammatory conditions such as menopause and periodontitis. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional interventional study. Materials and Methods: Sixty female individuals with a mean age of 40–60 years with chronic periodontitis were included in this study. All were categorized into two groups of thirty each, depending on their menstrual history: Group I – thirty premenopausal women and Group II – thirty postmenopausal women. Urine and plasma were collected from both groups to estimate neopterin levels. ELISA kit was used to assess the neopterin levels at baseline and after 3 months of nonsurgical periodontal therapy (NSPT. Statistical Analysis Used: IBM SPSS version 21 software. Results: A significant depreciation in the mean values of all the parameters from baseline to 3 months (P < 0.001, in the intragroup analysis, was observed. Plasma (0.006 and urine (0.004 reduction was seen. Conclusions: In both the groups, in 3 months after NSPT, decreased neopterin levels were found, suggesting that the NSPT is the definitive therapy. Further, suggesting that, neopterin levels in the plasma and urine can be used as an index to identify the periodontal inflammation and destruction.

  13. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  14. [Effects of periodontal mechanical therapy with local and systemic drugs on carotid artery and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in rats with chronic periodontitis associated with atherosclerosis].

    Ren, Xiuyun; Chang, Le; Yue, Zijie; Lin, Mu; Shi, Xuexue; Sun, Lili

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and the pathological changes in the carotid artery after periodontal mechanical therapy with local and systemic drugs in SD rats with chronic periodontitis (CP) associated with atherosclerosis (As). Thirty-five SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group (group A) and CP+As group (group B). Group B was further divided into the natural process group (B1), the periodontal mechanical treatment group (B2), the periodontal mechanical treatment plus local drugs group (B3), and the periodontal mechanical treatment plus local and systemic drugs group (B4). Each group comprised seven rats. Serum hsCRP levels were evaluated at baseline 1 week after the first periodontal therapy and 1, 3, and 5 weeks after the second periodontal therapy by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The pathological lesion in the carotid artery plaque was stained with hematine and eosin. The levels of serum hsCRP in group B1 increased gradually as time passed and became significantly higher than that of the other groups five weeks after periodontal therapy (P periodontal therapy. After that, the levels of serum hsCRP decreased gradually but were still higher than that of group A (P periodontal therapy (P periodontal mechanical treatment results in acute, short-term, systemic inflammation and might increase the risk of atherosclerosis in SD rats. However, the levels of serum hsCRP decreased gradually 3 to 5 weeks after therapy. With periodontal mechanical treatment, the benefits of local and systemic drugs are associated with improvement in atherosclerotic lesion progression.

  15. 78 FR 43889 - Synergizing Efforts in Standards Development for Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine...

    2013-07-22

    ... regenerative medicine products have generated a great deal of interest. These efforts include standards... is done to coordinate the various existing efforts. In the public workshop, FDA hopes to bring...

  16. Stem Cell Therapy: Repurposing Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine Beyond Cell Replacement.

    Napoli, Eleonora; Lippert, Trenton; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2018-02-27

    Stem cells exhibit simple and naive cellular features, yet their exact purpose for regenerative medicine continues to elude even the most elegantly designed research paradigms from developmental biology to clinical therapeutics. Based on their capacity to divide indefinitely and their dynamic differentiation into any type of tissue, the advent of transplantable stem cells has offered a potential treatment for aging-related and injury-mediated diseases. Recent laboratory evidence has demonstrated that transplanted human neural stem cells facilitate endogenous reparative mechanisms by initiating multiple regenerative processes in the brain neurogenic areas. Within these highly proliferative niches reside a myriad of potent regenerative molecules, including anti-inflammatory cytokines, proteomes, and neurotrophic factors, altogether representing a biochemical cocktail vital for restoring brain function in the aging and diseased brain. Here, we advance the concept of therapeutically repurposing stem cells not towards cell replacement per se, but rather exploiting the cells' intrinsic properties to serve as the host brain regenerative catalysts.

  17. The effect of the thermal diode laser (wavelength 808-980 nm) in non-surgical periodontal therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Slot, D.E.; Jorritsma, K.H.; Cobb, C.M.; van der Weijden, F.A.

    2014-01-01

    Focused question What is the adjunctive effect of a diode laser (DL) following non-surgical periodontal debridement (SRP) during the initial phase of periodontal therapy on the clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation. Material and Methods The MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-Central Register of

  18. Management of cannabis-induced periodontitis via resective surgical therapy: A clinical report.

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kang, Philip

    2017-03-01

    There is a lack of clinical research on the potential effect of cannabis use on the periodontium as well as its effect on treatment outcomes. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the clinical presentation of periodontal disease in a young woman who was a chronic cannabis user, as well as successful treatment involving motivating the patient to quit cannabis use and undergo nonsurgical and surgical therapy. A 23-year-old woman sought care at the dental clinic for periodontal treatment. During a review of her medical history, the patient reported using cannabis frequently during a 3-year period, which coincided with the occurrence of gingival inflammation. She used cannabis in the form of cigarettes that were placed at the mandibular anterior region of her mouth for prolonged periods. Localized prominent papillary and marginal gingival enlargement of the anterior mandible were present. The mandibular anterior teeth showed localized severe chronic periodontitis. The clinicians informed the patient about the potentially detrimental consequences of continued cannabis use; she was encouraged to quit, which she did. The clinicians performed nonsurgical therapy (scaling and root planing) and osseous surgery. The treatment outcome was evaluated over 6 months; improved radiographic and clinical results were observed throughout the follow-up period. Substantial availability and usage of cannabis, specifically among young adults, requires dentists to be vigilant about clinical indications of cannabis use and to provide appropriate treatments. Behavioral modification, nonsurgical therapy, and surgical therapy offer the potential for successful management of cannabis-related periodontitis. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical and Microbiological Effects of Photodynamic Therapy Associated with Non-surgical Treatment in Aggressive Periodontitis

    Mohammad Taghi Chitsazi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of adjunctive photodynamic therapy (PDT in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis. Materials and methods. A total of 24 patients with clinical diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis received scaling and root planing (SRP for periodontal treatment. In a split-mouth design study, the teeth of one quadrant of each arch with ≥4 mm of probing depth were selected randomly for additional treatment with PDT (test group. PDT was performed with a diode laser beam with a wavelength of 670-690 nm and a power of 75 Mw. The control group consisted of selected teeth of the contralateral quadrant (SRP only. Before any treatment, subgingival plaque samples were collected by an endodontic paper cone for microbiological analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of Aggregatibacter actinomy-cetecommitans. Clinical parameters including clinical attachment loss (CAL as primary outcome, plaque index (PI, bleed-ing on probing (BOP, probing depth (PD and gingival recession (REC were measured at baseline and after 90 days. Inter-group and intra-group statistical analyses were performed. Results. Treatment groups showed an improvement in all the clinical parameters and a significant reduction in the counts of A. actinomycetecommitans at 90 days compared to baseline (P 0.05. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, the results did not show additional benefits from PDT as an adjunctive treatment for patients with aggressive periodontitis.

  20. Periodontal Therapy Effects on Nitrite Related to Oral Bacteria: A 6-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Cortelli, Sheila C; Costa, Fernando O; Rodrigues, Edson; Cota, Luis O M; Cortelli, Jose R

    2015-08-01

    Nitrite is a biologic factor relevant to oral and systemic homeostasis. Through an oral bacteria reduction process, it was suggested that periodontal therapy and chlorhexidine (CHX) rinse could affect nitrite levels, leading to negative effects, such as an increase in blood pressure. This 6-month randomized clinical trial evaluated the effects of periodontal therapeutic protocols on salivary nitrite and its relation to subgingival bacteria. One hundred patients with periodontitis were allocated randomly to debridement procedures in four weekly sections (quadrant scaling [QS]) or within 24 hours (full-mouth scaling [FMS]) in conjunction with a 60-day CHX (QS + CHX and FMS + CHX), placebo (QS + placebo and FMS + placebo), or no mouthrinse (QS + none and FMS + none) use. Real-time polymerase chain reaction determined total bacterial, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii levels. Salivary nitrite concentration was determined with Griess reagent. Data were analyzed statistically at baseline and 3 and 6 months by analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman correlation tests (P periodontal pockets. The relationship between nitrite and bacterial levels appears weak. Short-term scaling exhibited a greater influence on nitrite concentrations then long-term CHX use.

  1. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on serum and gingival crevicular fluid cytokine levels during pregnancy and postpartum.

    Fiorini, T; Susin, C; da Rocha, J M; Weidlich, P; Vianna, P; Moreira, C H C; Bogo Chies, J A; Rösing, C K; Oppermann, R V

    2013-02-01

    A low-grade systemic inflammatory status originating from periodontal infection has been proposed to explain the association between periodontal disease and systemic conditions, including adverse obstetric outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of periodontal therapy during pregnancy on the gingival crevicular fluid and serum levels of six cytokines associated with periodontal disease and preterm birth. A subsample of 60 women (18-35 years of age) up to 20 gestational weeks, previously enrolled in a larger randomized clinical trial, was recruited for the present study. Participants were randomly allocated to receive either comprehensive nonsurgical periodontal therapy before 24 gestational weeks (n = 30, test group) or only one appointment for supragingival calculus removal (n = 30, control group). Clinical data, and samples of blood and gingival crevicular fluid, were collected at baseline, at 26-28 gestational weeks and 30 d after delivery. The levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70 and tumor necrosis factor-α were analyzed by flow cytometry. After treatment, a major reduction in periodontal inflammation was observed in the test group, with bleeding on probing decreasing from 49.62% of sites to 11.66% of sites (p Periodontal therapy significantly reduced the levels of IL-1β and IL-8 in gingival crevicular fluid (p periodontal therapy during pregnancy successfully reduced periodontal inflammation and gingival crevicular fluid cytokine levels, it did not have a significant impact on serum biomarkers. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Template mediated protein self-assembly as a valuable tool in regenerative therapy.

    Kundu, B; Eltohamy, M; Yadavalli, V K; Reis, R L; Kim, H W

    2018-04-11

    The assembly of natural proteinaceous biopolymers into macro-scale architectures is of great importance in synthetic biology, soft-material science and regenerative therapy. The self-assembly of protein tends to be limited due to anisotropic interactions among protein molecules, poor solubility and stability. Here, we introduce a unique platform to self-immobilize diverse proteins (fibrous and globular, positively and negatively charged, low and high molecular weight) using silicon surfaces with pendant -NH 2 groups via a facile one step diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) method. All the experimental proteins (type I collagen, bovine serum albumin and cytochrome C) self-assemble into seaweed-like branched dendritic architectures via classical DLA in the absence of any electrolytes. The notable differences in branching architectures are due to dissimilarities in protein colloidal sub-units, which is typical for each protein type, along with the heterogeneous distribution of surface -NH 2 groups. Fractal analysis of assembled structures is used to explain the underlying route of fractal deposition; which concludes how proteins with different functionality can yield similar assembly. Further, the nano-micro-structured surfaces can be used to provide functional topographical cues to study cellular responses, as demonstrated using rat bone marrow stem cells. The results indicate that the immobilization of proteins via DLA does not affect functionality, instead serving as topographical cues to guide cell morphology. This indicates a promising design strategy at the tissue-material interface and is anticipated to guide future surface modifications. A cost-effective standard templating strategy is therefore proposed for fundamental and applied particle aggregation studies, which can be used at multiple length scales for biomaterial design and surface reformation.

  3. Effect of periodontal therapy on type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with chronic periodontitis with the evaluation of HbA1c

    Manvi Chandra Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In the recent years, a two-way correlation has been postulated between periodontitis and systemic conditions. One such condition is diabetes mellitus (DM. Several studies have demonstrated a close relationship between DM and chronic periodontitis. Aims: To assess the effect of periodontal therapy and scaling and root planing (SRP on the metabolic control in type 2 DM patients with chronic periodontitis based on the estimation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Settings and Design: A prospective, comparative, clinical study was performed on 50 patients suffering from type 2 DM with moderate, generalized chronic periodontitis. The study period was 6 months. Type 2 moderately controlled diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin values within the range of 6-8% were selected. Patients with major diabetic complications, history of any antibiotic intake or periodontal treatment within the last 4 months, and smoking habits were excluded. Materials and Methods: The parameters recorded were gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, sulcus bleeding index (SBI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, and glycated hemoglobin. The recordings were done at baseline and 6 months after scaling and root planing procedures. HbA1c was measured by NycoCard Reader. Statistical Analysis Used: Karl-Pearson coefficient test, Z-test, and paired t-test. Results: Reductions in all the clinical parameters were observed and were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.005. Conclusions: Scaling and root planing resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the clinical parameters and HbA1c. So, periodontal treatment should be included in the management of diabetic patients.

  4. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid: Applications and Future Prospects for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Xiaoyu Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue regeneration is the ultimate goal of the treatment for periodontitis-affected teeth. The success of regenerative modalities relies heavily on the utilization of appropriate biomaterials with specific properties. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, a synthetic aliphatic polyester, has been actively investigated for periodontal therapy due to its favorable mechanical properties, tunable degradation rates, and high biocompatibility. Despite the attractive characteristics, certain constraints associated with PLGA, in terms of its hydrophobicity and limited bioactivity, have led to the introduction of modification strategies that aimed to improve the biological performance of the polymer. Here, we summarize the features of the polymer and update views on progress of its applications as barrier membranes, bone grafts, and drug delivery carriers, which indicate that PLGA can be a good candidate material in the field of periodontal regenerative medicine.

  5. Gingival crevicular fluid tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    Kurgan, Ş; Önder, C; Balcı, N; Fentoğlu, Ö; Eser, F; Balseven, M; Serdar, M A; Tatakis, D N; Günhan, M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid levels of tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) in patients with periodontitis, with or without rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fifteen patients with RA and chronic periodontitis (RA-P), 15 systemically healthy patients with chronic periodontitis (H-P) and 15 periodontally and systemically healthy volunteers (C) were included in the study. Plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, gingival crevicular fluid t-PA and PAI-2 levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein and disease activity score were evaluated at baseline and 3 mo after mechanical nonsurgical periodontal therapy. All periodontal clinical parameters were significantly higher in the RA-P and H-P groups compared with the C group (p periodontitis groups (p periodontitis and RA, nonsurgical periodontal therapy reduced the pretreatment gingival crevicular fluid t-PA levels, which were significantly correlated with gingival crevicular fluid PAI-2 levels. The significantly higher t-PA and PAI-2 gingival crevicular fluid levels in periodontal patients, regardless of systemic status, suggest that the plasminogen activating system plays a role in the disease process of periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Photodynamic therapy as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Christodoulides, Nicos; Nikolidakis, Dimitris; Chondros, Panagiotis; Becker, Jürgen; Schwarz, Frank; Rössler, Ralf; Sculean, Anton

    2008-09-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data have suggested a potential benefit of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontitis. However, there are very limited data from controlled clinical trials evaluating the effect of PDT in the treatment of periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiologic effects of the adjunctive use of PDT to non-surgical periodontal treatment. Twenty-four subjects with chronic periodontitis were randomly treated with scaling and root planing followed by a single episode of PDT (test) or scaling and root planing alone (control). Full-mouth plaque score (FMPS), full-mouth bleeding score (FMBS), probing depth (PD), gingival recession, and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured at baseline and 3 and 6 months after therapy. Primary outcome variables were changes in PD and CAL. Microbiologic evaluation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis), Treponema denticola, Parvimonas micra (previously Peptostreptococcus micros or Micromonas micros), Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium nodatum, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. was performed at baseline and 3 and 6 months following therapy by using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test. At 3 and 6 months after treatment, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to CAL, PD, FMPS, or microbiologic changes. At 3 and 6 months, a statistically significantly greater improvement in FMBS was found in the test group. The additional application of a single episode of PDT to scaling and root planing failed to result in an additional improvement in terms of PD reduction and CAL gain, but it resulted in a significantly higher reduction in bleeding scores compared to scaling and root planing alone.

  7. Impact of Periodontal Therapy on the Subgingival Microbiota of Severe Periodontitis: Comparison between Good Responders and “Refractory” Subjects by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM)

    Colombo, Ana Paula V.; Bennet, Susan; Cotton, Sean L.; Goodson, J. Max; Kent, Ralph; Haffajee, Anne D.; Socransky, Sigmund S.; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Paster, Bruce J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study compared the changes on the subgingival microbiota of subjects with “refractory” periodontitis (RP) or treatable periodontitis (GR) before and after periodontal therapy by using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Methods Individuals with chronic periodontitis were classified as RP (n=17) based on mean attachment loss (AL) and/or >3 sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after scaling and root planing, surgery and systemically administered amoxicillin and metronidazole or as GR (n=30) based on mean attachment gain and no sites with AL ≥2.5 mm after treatment. Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and 15 months after treatment and analyzed for the presence of 300 species by HOMIM analysis. Significant differences in taxa before and after therapy were sought using the Wilcoxon test. Results The majority of species evaluated decreased in prevalence in both groups after treatment; however, only a small subset of organisms was significantly affected. Species that increased or persisted in high frequency in RP but were significantly reduced in GR included Bacteroidetes sp., Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Tannerella forsythia, Dialister spp., Selenomonas spp., Catonella morbi, Eubacterium spp., Filifactor alocis, Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus sp. OT113, Fusobacterium sp. OT203, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, Streptococcus intermedius or Streptococcus constellatus and Shuttlesworthia satelles. In contrast, Capnocytophaga sputigena, Cardiobacterium hominis, Gemella haemolysans, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Kingella oralis, Lautropia mirabilis, Neisseria elongata, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus australis and Veillonella spp. were more associated with therapeutic success. Conclusion Persistence of putative and novel periodontal pathogens, as well as low prevalence of beneficial species was associated with chronic “refractory” periodontitis. PMID:22324467

  8. Estimation of changes in C-reactive protein level and pregnancy outcome after nonsurgical supportive periodontal therapy in women affected with periodontitis in a rural set up of India

    Mayur S Khairnar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Estimation of changes in C-reactive protein (CRP level and pregnancy outcome after nonsurgical supportive periodontal therapy in pregnant women affected with Periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 pregnant females with periodontitis were assigned to treatment and control groups. All the details about previous and current pregnancies were obtained. Full-mouth periodontal examination was done at baseline, which included oral hygiene index simplified plaque index, gingival index, and clinical attachment loss. CRP level was also measured from collected blood sample initially at baseline and later after the delivery in both the group. Subjects in the treatment group received nonsurgical periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestational period, and those in the control group did not receive any periodontal therapy during this period. Periodontal therapy included mechanical plaque control instructions and scaling and root planning. Outcome measures assessed were changes in CRP levels, gestational age, and birth weight of the infants. When delivery occurred at 0.05. Conclusion: Nonsurgical supportive periodontal therapy may lower the risk of preterm delivery in females affected with periodontitis by reducing CRP level.

  9. Effects of periodontitis on the development of asthma: The role of photodynamic therapy.

    Candeo, Larissa Carbonera; Rigonato-Oliveira, Nicole Cristine; Brito, Aurileia Aparecida; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; França, Cristiane Miranda; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Lino-Dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Ligeiro-Oliveira, Ana Paula; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whether periodontitis modulates lung inflammation in an experimental model of asthma as well as the photodynamic therapy (PDT) is associated with a reduction of lung inflammation. Seventy-two BALB/c male mice (~2 months) were randomly divided into 8 groups (n = 9): Basal, Periodontitis (P), P+PT, P+PT+PDT, Asthma (A), A+P, A+P+PT, and A+P+PT+PDT. Periodontitis was induced by using the ligature technique and asthma was induced by ovalbumin (OVA). PT was performed with curettes and PDT with methylene blue (0.005%), λ = 660nm, with a radiant exposure of 318J/cm2. After 43 days, euthanasia was carried out prior to lung and mandible morphological analyzes. All of the manipulations of the animals were performed by only one operator. The total and differential cell counts and cytokines IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were evaluated in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and in the serum. Mucus and alkaline phosphatase were also quantified. Statistical analyzes were performed by a blinded statistician. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed, followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls test. Periodontitis group (P) increased alkaline phosphatase and bone resorption (pperiodontitis. The A group and the P group increased the total amount of cells (p periodontitis in the asthmatic mice reduced the inflammatory migrated cells in the BAL (eosinophils, lymphocytes, macrophages). In addition, it reduced the levels of the IL-4 and TNF-α cytokines, which was also accompanied by a decreased mucus production. After PDT treatment the total cell count increased however, this increase was not accompanied by a pro-inflammatory cytokines release. Only in PDT group the anti-inflammatory IL-10 was increased. Further studies are needed to understand this mechanism of action.

  10. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis, as assessed by C-peptide and the Homeostasis Assessment Index.

    Mammen, Jerry; Vadakkekuttical, Rosamma Joseph; George, Joseraj Manaloor; Kaziyarakath, Jaishid Ahadal; Radhakrishnan, Chandni

    2017-08-01

    A bidirectional relationship exists between diabetes and periodontitis. In the present clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis. Forty chronic periodontitis patients with type II DM were selected and equally allocated to case and control groups. All patients were assessed for periodontal parameters and systemic parameters. The case group received NSPT, and both groups were re-evaluated after 3 months. All periodontal parameters were found to be significantly improved in the case group compared to the control group 3 months after NSPT. The mean differences in systemic parameters, such as fasting serum C-peptide, Homeostasis Assessment (HOMA) Index-insulin resistance, and HOMA-insulin sensitivity, from baseline to 3 months for the case group were 0.544 ± 0.73, 0.54 ± 0.63, and -25.44 ± 36.81, respectively; for the control group, they were significant at -1.66 ± 1.89, -1.48 ± 1.86, and 31.42 ± 38.82 respectively (P periodontal inflammation could affect glycemic control and insulin resistance. Effective periodontal therapy reduced insulin resistance and improved periodontal health status and insulin sensitivity in patients with type II DM and chronic periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics.

    Gupta, Akanksha; Kedige, Suresh D; Jain, Kanu

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics.

  12. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for the treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis: a histopathological evaluation.

    Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Novaes, Arthur B; de Oliveira, Rafael R; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Santamaria, Milton; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo response of apical and periapical tissues of dogs' teeth with apical periodontitis after one-session endodontic treatment with and without antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT). Sixty root canals with experimentally induced apical periodontitis were instrumented and assigned to 4 groups receiving aPDT and root canal filling (RCF) or not: group aPDT+/RCF+ (n = 20): aPDT (photosensitizer phenothiazine chloride at 10 mg/mL for 3 minutes and diode laser [λ = 660 nm, 60 mW/cm(2)] for 1 minute) and RCF in the same session; group aPDT+/RCF- (n = 10); group aPDT-/RCF+ (n = 20), and group aPDT-/RCF- (n = 10). Teeth were restored, and the animals were killed after 90 days. Sections from the maxillas and mandibles were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Mallory trichrome and examined under light microscopy. Descriptive (ie, newly formed apical mineralized tissue, periapical inflammatory infiltrate, apical periodontal ligament thickness, and mineralized tissue resorption) and quantitative (ie, periapical lesion size and number of inflammatory cells) microscopic analysis was performed. Quantitative data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (α = .05). In the aPDT-treated groups, the periapical region was moderately/severely enlarged with no inflammatory cells, moderate neoangiogenesis and fibrogenesis, and the smallest periapical lesions. Although apical closure by mineralized tissue deposition was not achieved, the absence of inflammatory cells, moderate neoangiogenesis, and fibrogenesis in the periapical region in the groups treated with aPDT indicate that this can be a promising adjunct therapy to cleaning and shaping procedures in teeth with apical periodontitis undergoing one-session endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. REAL TIME PCR IDENTIFICATION FOR TARGET ADJUNCTIVE ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF SEVERE CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS. PART II - MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS.

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic use in chronic periodontitis may result in improvement in periodontal status, although many questions regarding the indications for this therapy remain unanswered. The polymicrobial etiology of the periodontal infection hinders the choice of the proper antibiotic agent. Furthermore the indiscriminate use of antibiotics could lead to high levels of resistance and to various adverse reactions. In the recent years a various molecular diagnostics protocols were proposed in order to facilitate the decision for adjunctive antibiotic administration. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the microbiological effectiveness of adjunctive antibiotic administration with the mechanical periodontal therapy. METHODS: 30 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were enrolled in this study and were divided in 3 groups: Control group – with mechanical debridement only. Test group 1 – with combined adjunctive antibiotic administration using Amoxicillin+ Metronidazole. Test group 2 – with target antibiotic administration according to the resuts from the Real Time PCR identification. RESULTS: The prevalence of all the isolated microorganisms (exept. E.nodatum and C.gingivalis in Test Group 2 demonstrates statistically significant reduction compared with the other treatment approaches. Almost complete elimination was registered for the consensus pathogens from the red and orange complexes (above 99% and 100% for P.intemedia. CONCLUSION: The adjunct antibiotic treatment targeted with Real-Time PCR identification demonstrates almost complete elimination of the putative periodontal pathogens in the deep periodontal pockets in patients with severe chronic periodontitis. This result suggests slower recolonisation of these habitats thus limiting the risk for progression of the periodontal destruction.

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a true regenerative environment, the regenerating limb of the axolotl

    Hansen, Kasper; Lauridsen, Henrik; Pedersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    vertebrates such as the urodele amphibians (salamanders and newts), are excellent animal models for regenerative studies. The iconic Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) is capable of regenerating whole limbs, tail, jaw, and many inner organs, by dedifferentiation of cells to form a blastema (collection...

  15. Micro-computed tomography (CT) based assessment of dental regenerative therapy in the canine mandible model

    Khobragade, P.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Andreana, S.; Dziak, R.; Sunkara, S. K.; Sunkara, S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution 3D bone-tissue structure measurements may provide information critical to the understanding of the bone regeneration processes and to the bone strength assessment. Tissue engineering studies rely on such nondestructive measurements to monitor bone graft regeneration area. In this study, we measured bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness through micro-CT slices for different grafts and controls. Eight canines underwent surgery to remove a bone volume (defect) in the canine's jaw at a total of 44 different locations. We kept 11 defects empty for control and filled the remaining ones with three regenerative materials; NanoGen (NG), a FDA-approved material (n=11), a novel NanoCalcium Sulfate (NCS) material (n=11) and NCS alginate (NCS+alg) material (n=11). After a minimum of four and eight weeks, the canines were sacrificed and the jaw samples were extracted. We used a custombuilt micro-CT system to acquire the data volume and developed software to measure the bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness. The software used a segmentation algorithm based on histograms derived from volumes of interest indicated by the operator. Using bone yield and fractal dimension as indices we are able to differentiate between the control and regenerative material (p<0.005). Regenerative material NCS showed an average 63.15% bone yield improvement over the control sample, NCS+alg showed 55.55% and NanoGen showed 37.5%. The bone regeneration process and quality of bone were dependent upon the position of defect and time period of healing. This study presents one of the first quantitative comparisons using non-destructive Micro-CT analysis for bone regenerative material in a large animal with a critical defect model. Our results indicate that Micro-CT measurement could be used to monitor invivo bone regeneration studies for greater regenerative process understanding.

  16. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    Huang, T H; Chen, C C; Liu, S L; Lu, Y C; Kao, C T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm −2 or 10 J cm −2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators. (letters)

  17. THE EFFECTS OF POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND OF NON-SURGICAL PERIODONTAL THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Cornelia OANȚĂ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the diabetic status and severity of the periodontal involvement, and also of the non-surgical periodontal therapy on the periodontal status of patients with diabetes mellitus. Materials and method: The study was conducted on 21 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (study group and 10 systemically healthy subjects (control group. We examined: the degree of glycemic control (by measuring the glycated hemoglobin, the periodontal and oral hygiene parameters at the baseline and 4 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after the periodontal treatment (scaling and root planning. Results and discussion: Subjects with a poor glycemic control presented a higher percentage of sites with attachment loss, significantly higher amounts of bacterial plaque, sub-gingival calculus and gingival bleeding - when compared with the control group or with subjects with good or moderated glycemic control. In the same group, a rapid recurrence of the deep periodontal pockets was observed after 12 months. Conclusions: A prolonged poor control of glycemia and the time elapsed from the debut of diabetes were closely related with its complications. The comparison between the diabetes and the control groups demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for the periodontal disease.

  18. Effects of periodontitis on the development of asthma: The role of photodynamic therapy.

    Larissa Carbonera Candeo

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether periodontitis modulates lung inflammation in an experimental model of asthma as well as the photodynamic therapy (PDT is associated with a reduction of lung inflammation. Seventy-two BALB/c male mice (~2 months were randomly divided into 8 groups (n = 9: Basal, Periodontitis (P, P+PT, P+PT+PDT, Asthma (A, A+P, A+P+PT, and A+P+PT+PDT. Periodontitis was induced by using the ligature technique and asthma was induced by ovalbumin (OVA. PT was performed with curettes and PDT with methylene blue (0.005%, λ = 660nm, with a radiant exposure of 318J/cm2. After 43 days, euthanasia was carried out prior to lung and mandible morphological analyzes. All of the manipulations of the animals were performed by only one operator. The total and differential cell counts and cytokines IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were evaluated in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and in the serum. Mucus and alkaline phosphatase were also quantified. Statistical analyzes were performed by a blinded statistician. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was employed, followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls test. Periodontitis group (P increased alkaline phosphatase and bone resorption (p<0.05, validating the experimental model of periodontitis. The A group and the P group increased the total amount of cells (p <0.05 in the BAL. However, in the A+P group, there was a decrease in these cells, except for in the A+P+PT+PDT group (p<0.05. The asthma group increased the Th2 cytokines and P group increased the Th1 cytokine profile, and A+P+PT+PDT group increased IL-10 cytokine. Mucus was increased for the A and P groups. In conclusion, periodontitis in the asthmatic mice reduced the inflammatory migrated cells in the BAL (eosinophils, lymphocytes, macrophages. In addition, it reduced the levels of the IL-4 and TNF-α cytokines, which was also accompanied by a decreased mucus production. After PDT treatment the total cell count increased however, this

  19. Polymeric Nanoparticle-Based Photodynamic Therapy for Chronic Periodontitis in Vivo.

    de Freitas, Laura Marise; Calixto, Giovana Maria Fioramonti; Chorilli, Marlus; Giusti, Juçaíra Stella M; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Soukos, Nikolaos S; Amiji, Mansoor M; Fontana, Carla Raquel

    2016-05-20

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is increasingly being explored for treatment of periodontitis. Here, we investigated the effect of aPDT on human dental plaque bacteria in suspensions and biofilms in vitro using methylene blue (MB)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles (MB-NP) and red light at 660 nm. The effect of MB-NP-based aPDT was also evaluated in a clinical pilot study with 10 adult human subjects with chronic periodontitis. Dental plaque samples from human subjects were exposed to aPDT-in planktonic and biofilm phases-with MB or MB-NP (25 µg/mL) at 20 J/cm² in vitro. Patients were treated either with ultrasonic scaling and scaling and root planing (US + SRP) or ultrasonic scaling + SRP + aPDT with MB-NP (25 µg/mL and 20 J/cm²) in a split-mouth design. In biofilms, MB-NP eliminated approximately 25% more bacteria than free MB. The clinical study demonstrated the safety of aPDT. Both groups showed similar improvements of clinical parameters one month following treatments. However, at three months ultrasonic SRP + aPDT showed a greater effect (28.82%) on gingival bleeding index (GBI) compared to ultrasonic SRP. The utilization of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulated with MB may be a promising adjunct in antimicrobial periodontal treatment.

  20. Polymeric Nanoparticle-Based Photodynamic Therapy for Chronic Periodontitis in Vivo

    Laura Marise de Freitas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT is increasingly being explored for treatment of periodontitis. Here, we investigated the effect of aPDT on human dental plaque bacteria in suspensions and biofilms in vitro using methylene blue (MB-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic (PLGA nanoparticles (MB-NP and red light at 660 nm. The effect of MB-NP-based aPDT was also evaluated in a clinical pilot study with 10 adult human subjects with chronic periodontitis. Dental plaque samples from human subjects were exposed to aPDT—in planktonic and biofilm phases—with MB or MB-NP (25 µg/mL at 20 J/cm2 in vitro. Patients were treated either with ultrasonic scaling and scaling and root planing (US + SRP or ultrasonic scaling + SRP + aPDT with MB-NP (25 µg/mL and 20 J/cm2 in a split-mouth design. In biofilms, MB-NP eliminated approximately 25% more bacteria than free MB. The clinical study demonstrated the safety of aPDT. Both groups showed similar improvements of clinical parameters one month following treatments. However, at three months ultrasonic SRP + aPDT showed a greater effect (28.82% on gingival bleeding index (GBI compared to ultrasonic SRP. The utilization of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulated with MB may be a promising adjunct in antimicrobial periodontal treatment.

  1. Chronic stress enhances progression of periodontitis via α1-adrenergic signaling: a potential target for periodontal disease therapy.

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan

    2014-10-17

    This study assessed the roles of chronic stress (CS) in the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system and explored the underlying mechanisms of periodontitis. Using an animal model of periodontitis and CS, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the protein levels of the α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) were assessed. Furthermore, human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDLFs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic the process of inflammation. The proliferation of the HPDLFs and the expression of α1-AR and β2-AR were assessed. The inflammatory-related cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were detected after pretreatment with the α1/β2-AR blockers phentolamine/propranolol, both in vitro and in vivo. Results show that periodontitis under CS conditions enhanced the expression of TH, α1-AR and β2-AR. Phentolamine significantly reduced the inflammatory cytokine levels. Furthermore, we observed a marked decrease in HPDLF proliferation and the increased expression of α1-ARfollowing LPS pretreatment. Pretreatment with phentolamine dramatically ameliorated LPS-inhibited cell proliferation. In addition, the blocking of α1-ARsignaling also hindered the upregulation of the inflammatory-related cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. These results suggest that CS can significantly enhance the pathological progression of periodontitis by an α1-adrenergic signaling-mediated inflammatory response. We have identified a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in those patients suffering from concurrent CS.

  2. Impact of Consumption of Chicory Leaf Extract in Adjunct with Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum Antioxidant and Lipid Status in Patients with Periodontal Disease: Preliminary Study

    Ahmad Zare-Javid

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Periodontal disease is a chronic disorder with a high prevalence. There are few studies about the role of diet in prevention and treatment of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of consumption of Chicory leaf extract in adjunct with non-surgical periodontal therapies on serum antioxidant and lipid status. Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial conducted on 40 patients in Sina Hospital of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (Iran in 2014. The intervention (n=20 and control groups (n=20 were allocated using blocked randomization. The intervention group received 2 capsules (2 g of Chicory leaf extract daily for 8 weeks. All subjects underwent non-surgical periodontal therapy during the intervention period. Anthropometric indices, 24-hour diet records, total antioxidant capacity, malate di-aldehyde (MDA, uric acid, total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG and HDL-c was measured before and after intervention. Results: The mean level of total antioxidant capacity (1.89 ± 0.49; 1.20 ± 0.25, respectively; P<0.001 and uric acid (7.15±1.98; 4.48±1.34, respectively; P<0.001 increased in the intervention group compared with the control group post intervention. The mean level of MDA decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group post-intervention (3.01±1.15; 3.97±1.19, respectively; P.d<0.001. Cholesterol difference was not significant pre- and post-intervention between the two groups (P=0.35. The mean level of serum triglyceride (TG was significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group post intervention (149.50±97.88; 109.35±58.00, respectively; P.d<0.001. The mean level of HDL-c was also significantly lower in the intervention group compared with the control group post treatment (42.25±8.47; 39.80±8.94, respectively; P.d<0.001. Conclusions: It seems that consumption of Chicory

  3. Efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy as an adjuvant in periodontal treatment in Down syndrome patients.

    Martins, Fabiana; Simões, Alyne; Oliveira, Marcio; Luiz, Ana Claudia; Gallottini, Marina; Pannuti, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) has characteristics that include mental retardation, a characteristic phenotype, congenital heart defects, immune disorders, and increased risk of periodontal disease (PD). Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is the combined use of photosensitizers associated with low-level laser (LLL) and oxygen, leading to singlet oxygen formation, which contributes to the antibacterial activity of the phagocytes, killing bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of aPDT as an adjuvant to conventional periodontal treatment of PD in DS patients. A double-blinded, controlled, randomized, split-mouth study was conducted. A total of 13 DS subjects who were 18 years or older and who presented at least one tooth in each quadrant of the mouth with probing pocket depth (PPD) equal to or greater than 5 mm were included. The patients were evaluated at three different times: at the baseline, PPD were obtained. After 1 week, conventional scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed, and two randomly selected quadrants also received aPDT. One month after SRP, all the patients were reevaluated. Periodontal conditions were improved among all the participants. The PDT-with-SRP group presented a nonsignificant reduction in PPD (mean = 1.27 mm, median = 1.17 mm) relative to that of the SRP group (mean = 1.00 mm, median = 0.95 mm). Changes over time were compared using the Wilcoxon test. A significant reduction in median PPD was observed in both groups (p = 0.001). Both types of periodontal treatment, with and without PDT, were similarly effective and were associated with good clinical response.

  4. The effect of supragingival glycine air polishing on periodontitis during maintenance therapy: a randomized controlled trial

    Hongye Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Glycine air polishing has been proved to be safe, comfortable and time-saving. Whether it could substitute ultrasonic scaling to remove dental plaque biofilm during periodontal maintenance remains unclear. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effect of supragingival glycine air polishing (SGAP on the subgingival periodontal pathogens during maintenance therapy and to check the association of periodontal pathogens and clinical parameters. Methods Twenty-three chronic periodontitis patients during their maintenance therapy were enrolled in the 12-week study. According to randomized split-mouth design, the test side was treated with SGAP (65 μm, while the control side was treated with supragingival ultrasonic scaling and polishing (SUSP with rubber cup. Clinical examination including plaque index (PLI, probing depth (PD, bleeding index (BI were performed at baseline and 12 weeks post-treatment. Sampling of the subgingival plaque at each investigational site (mesiobuccal site of the mandibular first molar was performed at baseline and 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks after maintenance treatment. Four periodontal pathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Fusobacterium nucleatum were detected by 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction. Results Clinical status generally improved after treatment in both groups. PLI in both groups, PD in SGAP group and bleeding on probing (% in SUSP group significantly decreased after treatment (p < 0.05. There was no significant difference of clinical parameters between two groups before and after treatment. The detection rates of P. gingivalis, T. denticola in both groups, T. forsythia in SUSP group and F. nucleatum in SGAP group decreased after maintenance treatment in both groups, although no significant difference was found, and it rebound to baseline level at 12 weeks after maintenance treatment. There was no significant difference between SGAP group and SUSP

  5. Do we treat our patients or rather periodontal microbes with adjunctive antibiotics in periodontal therapy? A 16S rDNA microbial community analysis.

    Hagenfeld, Daniel; Koch, Raphael; Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Harks, Inga; Eickholz, Peter; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kim, Ti-Sun; Kocher, Thomas; Meyle, Jörg; Kaner, Doğan; Schlagenhauf, Ulrich; Ehmke, Benjamin; Harmsen, Dag

    2018-01-01

    Empiric antibiotics are often used in combination with mechanical debridement to treat patients suffering from periodontitis and to eliminate disease-associated pathogens. Until now, only a few next generation sequencing 16S rDNA amplicon based publications with rather small sample sizes studied the effect of those interventions on the subgingival microbiome. Therefore, we studied subgingival samples of 89 patients with chronic periodontitis (solely non-smokers) before and two months after therapy. Forty-seven patients received mechanical periodontal therapy only, whereas 42 patients additionally received oral administered amoxicillin plus metronidazole (500 and 400 mg, respectively; 3x/day for 7 days). Samples were sequenced with Illumina MiSeq 300 base pairs paired end technology (V3 and V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rDNA). Inter-group differences before and after therapy of clinical variables (percentage of sites with pocket depth ≥ 5mm, percentage of sites with bleeding on probing) and microbiome variables (diversity, richness, evenness, and dissimilarity) were calculated, a principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) was conducted, and differential abundance of agglomerated ribosomal sequence variants (aRSVs) classified on genus level was calculated using a negative binomial regression model. We found statistically noticeable decreased richness, and increased dissimilarity in the antibiotic, but not in the placebo group after therapy. The PCoA revealed a clear compositional separation of microbiomes after therapy in the antibiotic group, which could not be seen in the group receiving mechanical therapy only. This difference was even more pronounced on aRSV level. Here, adjunctive antibiotics were able to induce a microbiome shift by statistically noticeably reducing aRSVs belonging to genera containing disease-associated species, e.g., Porphyromonas, Tannerella, Treponema, and Aggregatibacter, and by noticeably increasing genera containing health

  6. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds...... mesenchymal stromal cells, unless there is proof that they exhibit the fundamental in vivo characteristics of pluripotency and the ability to self-renew. That said, these cells from various tissues hold great promise for therapeutic use in horses. The 3 components of tissue engineering - cells, biological...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...

  7. Adjunctive Intracoronal Splint in Periodontal Treatment: Report of Two Cases

    Mora Octavia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of the amount of tooth roots which are embedded in their periodontium could cause tooth mobility. Splinting a weaker tooth with a more stable one, and using the principle of the multiple-root stabilization is one way to overcome tooth mobility. Temporary splinting aims to prevent pathological migration, restore masticatory function, stabilize teeth before/after surgery, and evaluate the prognosis of periodontal treatment. The use of intracoronal splint is still controversial because there are only a few studies that have evaluated the effect of splinting on periodontal health. We report two cases to evaluate the effect of intracoronal splint on periodontal treatment. Two periodontal cases that use intracoronal splint before, during, and after periodontal regenerative therapy using bone graft. Causes of tooth mobility were removed and the splinting principles, terms and guidelines were mastered to get the maximum results of periodontal treatment. Both cases were evaluated radiographically 10 months after treatment. In these cases, intracoronal splint has supported the therapy before, during, or after surgery. Splinting is only for adjunctive therapy, and does not serve as the sole method in getting occlusal stability.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v21i3.193

  8. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SINGLE FLAP APPROACH WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE WALL FOR PERIODONTAL REGENERATION

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The destructive periodontal diseases are among the most prevalent in the human population. In some cases, bony defects are formed during the disease progression, thus sustaining deep periodontal pockets. The reconstruction of these defects is usually done with the classical techniques of bone substitutes placement and guided tissue regeneration. The clinical and histological data from the recent years, however, demonstrate the relatively low regenerative potential of these techniques. The contemporary approaches for periodontal regeneration rely on minimally invasive surgical protocols, aimed at complete tissue preservation in order to achieve and maintain primary closure and at stimulating the natural regenerative potential of the periodontal tissues. AIM: This presentation demonstrates the application of a new, minimally invasive, single flap surgical technique for periodontal regeneration in a clinical case with periodontitis and a residual deep intrabony defect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 37 years old patient presented with chronic generalised periodontitis. The initial therapy led to good control of the periodontal infection with a single residual deep periodontal pocket medially at 11 due to a deep intrabony defect. A single flap approach with an enamel matrix derivate application and a connective tissue wall technique were performed. The proper primary closure was obtained. RESULT: One month after surgery an initial mineralisation process in the defect was detected. At the third month, a complete clinical healing was observed. The radiographic control showed finished bone mineralisation and periodontal space recreation. CONCLUSION: In the limitation of the presented case, the minimally invasive surgical approach led to complete clinical healing and new bone formation, which could be proof for periodontal regeneration.

  9. Advanced biomaterials and their potential applications in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Bei; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease is considered as a widespread infectious disease and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts for developing periodontal disease treatment strategies, including drug delivery and regeneration approaches, provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future periodontal therapies. Recently, emerging advanced biomaterials including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and particles, hold great potential to be utilized as cell/drug carriers for local drug delivery and biomimetic scaffolds for future regeneration therapies. In this review, first, we describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, including plaque formation, immune response and inflammatory reactions caused by bacteria. Second, periodontal therapy and an overview of current biomaterials in periodontal regenerative medicine have been discussed. Third, the roles of state-of-the-art biomaterials, including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and micro/nanoparticles, developed for periodontal disease treatment and periodontal tissue regeneration, and their fabrication methods, have been presented. Finally, biological properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and immunogenicity of the biomaterials, together with their current applications strategies are given. Conclusive remarks and future perspectives for such advanced biomaterials are discussed.

  10. [Combination of periodontal, orthodontic and endodontic therapy in upper anterior teeth with hopeless prognosis and long-time follow-up: a case report].

    Li, Y; Xu, L; Zhou, Y H; Ouyang, X Y; Cao, T

    2017-08-18

    It is complicated to decide the treatment plan of hopeless anterior teeth in esthetic zone due to severe periodontitis, periodontal-endodontic combined lesion or teeth trauma. The optional treatment plan for this kind of teeth includes retention after periodontal treatment, extraction and implant treatment, extraction and prosthodontic treatment and so on. To make an appropriate treatment plan, patients' periodontal conditions, periodontal biotype, local anatomy, esthetic demand, economic condition and social psychological status should be comprehensively considered. A combine of periodontal, endodontic and orthodontic therapy may achieve a good treatment effect in hopeless anterior teeth with severe periodontal destruction, tooth extrusion and occlusal trauma. In this case, a 20-year-old female who presented with symptoms of bleeding on brushing and upper incisors loosening for 1 month came to the Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. The clinical examinations revealed that the patient's right upper incisor had signs of mobility (III°), intrusion of 1-2 mm, and probing depth (PD) of 9-10 mm. The periapical radiograph showed that the alveolar bone of right upper incisor absorbed horizontally to the apex. And the patients showed Angle II° malocclusion with II° overbite in anterior teeth and maxillary protrusion. A diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis and Angle II° malocclusion was made. The treatment of this patient lasts for 5 years which include periodontal initial therapy, orthodontic therapy, guided tissue regeneration (GTR) of right upper incisor and supportive periodontal therapy and the clinical result is fine. A hopeless upper incisor was successfully retained and the longtime clinical condition was stable. The strategy of retention of hopeless upper anterior teeth, the relationship of periodontal treatment and orthodontic treatment, and the indications of periodontal and orthodontic combined therapy were

  11. Longitudinal Improvement in Periodontal Parameters between RPD Abutment Teeth with Direct and Indirect Retainers, after Periodontal Therapy.

    Almeida, Mariana Linhares; Tôrres, Ana Clara Soares de Paiva; de Oliveira, Kleiton Clécio; Calderon, Patrícia Dos Santos; Carreiro, Adriana da Fonte Porto; Gurgel, Bruno César de Vasconcelos

    2018-03-06

    To evaluate the effect of basic periodontal treatment on clinical periodontal parameters associated with abutment teeth of patients with mandibular Kennedy class I removable partial dentures (RPD) 18 months after treatment. Thirty patients with periodontal disease were treated and evaluated according to the following periodontal parameters: visible plaque index (VPI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), clinical attachment loss (CAL), and keratinized mucosa (KM). These parameters were compared between abutment teeth with direct and indirect retainers at baseline, and after 6 and 18 months. Data were analyzed by Friedman Test and Wilcoxon Test for all variables. Most patients (n = 26; 86.7%) included in the study were female and had a mean age of 61 years (±7.54). Results showed that VPI and BOP decreased over time, and that VPI values were higher in abutment teeth with direct retainers (p = 0.001). There was a reduction in PD after 6 months, which was maintained up to 18 months. In general, abutment teeth with direct retainers had significantly higher values for PD, GR, and CAL (p = 0.029). Data also indicated that the parameters for VPI, BOP, and PD improved; however, abutment teeth with direct retainers presented smaller improvements, compared with abutment teeth with indirect retainers, which presented significant improvements for almost all variables. Periodontal treatment and oral hygiene care of patients were adequate for maintenance of adequate periodontal conditions, regardless of the use of prostheses. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy verses oral hygiene instructions on type 2 diabetes subjects with chronic periodontitis: a randomised clinical trial.

    Raman, Renukanth Patabi Cheta; Taiyeb-Ali, Tara Bai; Chan, Siew Pheng; Chinna, Karuthan; Vaithilingam, Rathna Devi

    2014-06-25

    40 subjects with type 2 diabetes and moderate to severe CP were randomly distributed to groups receiving either NSPT or OHI. Periodontal parameters, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were evaluated at baseline, 2- and 3-months intervals. 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes and moderate to severe CP were randomly distributed to groups receiving either NSPT or OHI. Periodontal parameters, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were evaluated at baseline, 2- and 3-months intervals. 15 subjects from NSPT group and 17 from OHI group completed the study. The difference in plaque index (PI) between NSPT and OHI groups were significant at 2 months recall (p = 0.013). There was no significant difference between NSPT and OHI group for all other clinical periodontal parameters, HbA1c and CRP levels. At 3 months post-therapy, periodontal parameters improved significantly in both groups with sites with probing pocket depth (PPD) c levels decreased in both groups with NSPT group recording statistically significant reduction (p = 0.038). Participants who demonstrated ≥ 50% reduction in PPD showed significant reductions of HbA1c and hs-CRP levels (p = 0.004 and p = 0.012). NSPT significantly reduced PI at 2 months post-therapy as compared to OHI. Both NSPT and OHI demonstrated improvements in other clinical parameters as well as HbA1c and CRP levels. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01951547.

  13. Not Missing the Future: A Call to Action for Investigating the Role of Regenerative Medicine Therapies in Pediatric/Adolescent Sports Injuries.

    Best, Thomas M; Caplan, Arnold; Coleman, Michael; Goodrich, Laurie; Hurd, Jason; Kaplan, Lee D; Noonan, Ben; Schoettle, Philip; Scott, Christopher; Stiene, Henry; Huard, Johnny

    In August 2016, a group including sport medicine clinicians, researchers, and a bioethicist met in Vail, Colorado to discuss regenerative medicine and its potential role in youth sports injuries. There was consensus that a call to action is urgently needed to understand the current evidence base, the risks and rewards, and future directions of research and clinical practice for regenerative medicine therapies in youth sports. We present here a summary of our meeting, which was supported by the National Youth Sports Health and Safety Institute (NYSHSI), a partnership between the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and Sanford Health. The group's goal is to educate practitioners and the public, and to pioneer a means of accumulating meaningful clinical data on regenerative medicine therapies in pediatric and adolescent athletes.

  14. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with periodontal treatment for metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Evangelista, Erika Elisabeth; Fran?a, Cristiane Miranda; Veni, Priscila; de Oliveira Silva, Tamires; Gon?alves, Rafael Moredo; de Carvalho, Ver?nica Franco; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Camacho, Cleber P; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Alvarenga, Let?cia Heineck; Prates, Renato Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and periodontal disease is bidirectional. DM is a predisposing and modifying factor of periodontitis, which, in turn, worsens glycemic control and increases proteins found in the acute phase of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein. The gold standard for the treatment of periodontal disease is oral hygiene orientation, scaling and planing. Moreover, systemic antibiotic therapy may be employed in some cases. In an effort to minimize...

  15. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy

    Ting Gong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering—stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules—has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration.

  16. Stem cell- and growth factor-based regenerative therapies for avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    2012-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a debilitating disease of multifactorial genesis, predominately affects young patients, and often leads to the development of secondary osteoarthritis. The evolving field of regenerative medicine offers promising treatment strategies using cells, biomaterial scaffolds, and bioactive factors, which might improve clinical outcome. Early stages of AVN with preserved structural integrity of the subchondral plate are accessible to retrograde surgical procedures, such as core decompression to reduce the intraosseous pressure and to induce bone remodeling. The additive application of concentrated bone marrow aspirates, ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells, and osteogenic or angiogenic growth factors (or both) holds great potential to improve bone regeneration. In contrast, advanced stages of AVN with collapsed subchondral bone require an osteochondral reconstruction to preserve the physiological joint function. Analogously to strategies for osteochondral reconstruction in the knee, anterograde surgical techniques, such as osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), matrix-based autologous chondrocyte implantation, or the use of acellular scaffolds alone, might preserve joint function and reduce the need for hip replacement. This review summarizes recent experimental accomplishments and initial clinical findings in the field of regenerative medicine which apply cells, growth factors, and matrices to address the clinical problem of AVN. PMID:22356811

  17. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering—stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules—has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration. PMID:27069484

  18. Low antibiotic resistance among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria in periodontitis 5 years following metronidazole therapy.

    Dahlen, G; Preus, H R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antibiotic susceptibility among predominant Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontitis patients who 5 years prior had been subject to mechanical therapy with or without adjunctive metronidazole. One pooled sample was taken from the 5 deepest sites of each of 161 patients that completed the 5 year follow-up after therapy. The samples were analyzed by culture. A total number of 85 anaerobic strains were isolated from the predominant subgingival flora of 65/161 patient samples, identified, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility by MIC determination. E-tests against metronidazole, penicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were employed. The 73/85 strains were Gram-negative rods (21 Porphyromonas spp., 22 Prevotella/Bacteroides spp., 23 Fusobacterium/Filifactor spp., 3 Campylobacter spp. and 4 Tannerella forsythia). These were all isolated from the treated patients irrespective of therapy procedures (+/-metronidazole) 5 years prior. Three strains (Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium propionicum, Parvimonas micra) showed MIC values for metronidazole over the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing break point of >4 μg/mL. All Porphyromonas and Tannerella strains were highly susceptible. Metronidazole resistant Gram-negative strains were not found, while a few showed resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. In this population of 161 patients who had been subject to mechanical periodontal therapy with or without adjunct metronidazole 5 years prior, no cultivable antibiotic resistant anaerobes were found in the predominant subgingival microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  20. Regeneration and Repair in Endodontics—A Special Issue of the Regenerative Endodontics—A New Era in Clinical Endodontics

    Tarek Mohamed A. Saoud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Caries is the most common cause of pulp-periapical disease. When the pulp tissue involved in caries becomes irreversibly inflamed and progresses to necrosis, the treatment option is root canal therapy because the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue in the root canal system is not accessible to the host's innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms and antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue must be removed from the canal space by pulpectomy. As our knowledge in pulp biology advances, the concept of treatment of pulpal and periapical disease also changes. Endodontists have been looking for biologically based treatment procedures, which could promote regeneration or repair of the dentin-pulp complex destroyed by infection or trauma for several decades. After a long, extensive search in in vitro laboratory and in vivo preclinical animal experiments, the dental stem cells capable of regenerating the dentin-pulp complex were discovered. Consequently, the biological concept of ‘regenerative endodontics’ emerged and has highlighted the paradigm shift in the treatment of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps in clinical endodontics. Regenerative endodontics is defined as biologically based procedures designed to physiologically replace damaged tooth structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as the pulp-dentin complex. According to the American Association of Endodontists’ Clinical Considerations for a Regenerative Procedure, the primary goal of the regenerative procedure is the elimination of clinical symptoms and the resolution of apical periodontitis. Thickening of canal walls and continued root maturation is the secondary goal. Therefore, the primary goal of regenerative endodontics and traditional non-surgical root canal therapy is the same. The difference between non-surgical root canal therapy and regenerative endodontic therapy is that the disinfected root canals

  1. Regeneration and Repair in Endodontics—A Special Issue of the Regenerative Endodontics—A New Era in Clinical Endodontics

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A.; Ricucci, Domenico; Lin, Louis M.; Gaengler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Caries is the most common cause of pulp-periapical disease. When the pulp tissue involved in caries becomes irreversibly inflamed and progresses to necrosis, the treatment option is root canal therapy because the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue in the root canal system is not accessible to the host's innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms and antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue must be removed from the canal space by pulpectomy. As our knowledge in pulp biology advances, the concept of treatment of pulpal and periapical disease also changes. Endodontists have been looking for biologically based treatment procedures, which could promote regeneration or repair of the dentin-pulp complex destroyed by infection or trauma for several decades. After a long, extensive search in in vitro laboratory and in vivo preclinical animal experiments, the dental stem cells capable of regenerating the dentin-pulp complex were discovered. Consequently, the biological concept of ‘regenerative endodontics’ emerged and has highlighted the paradigm shift in the treatment of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps in clinical endodontics. Regenerative endodontics is defined as biologically based procedures designed to physiologically replace damaged tooth structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as the pulp-dentin complex. According to the American Association of Endodontists’ Clinical Considerations for a Regenerative Procedure, the primary goal of the regenerative procedure is the elimination of clinical symptoms and the resolution of apical periodontitis. Thickening of canal walls and continued root maturation is the secondary goal. Therefore, the primary goal of regenerative endodontics and traditional non-surgical root canal therapy is the same. The difference between non-surgical root canal therapy and regenerative endodontic therapy is that the disinfected root canals in the former

  2. Regeneration and Repair in Endodontics-A Special Issue of the Regenerative Endodontics-A New Era in Clinical Endodontics.

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A; Ricucci, Domenico; Lin, Louis M; Gaengler, Peter

    2016-02-27

    Caries is the most common cause of pulp-periapical disease. When the pulp tissue involved in caries becomes irreversibly inflamed and progresses to necrosis, the treatment option is root canal therapy because the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue in the root canal system is not accessible to the host's innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms and antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue must be removed from the canal space by pulpectomy. As our knowledge in pulp biology advances, the concept of treatment of pulpal and periapical disease also changes. Endodontists have been looking for biologically based treatment procedures, which could promote regeneration or repair of the dentin-pulp complex destroyed by infection or trauma for several decades. After a long, extensive search in in vitro laboratory and in vivo preclinical animal experiments, the dental stem cells capable of regenerating the dentin-pulp complex were discovered. Consequently, the biological concept of 'regenerative endodontics' emerged and has highlighted the paradigm shift in the treatment of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps in clinical endodontics. Regenerative endodontics is defined as biologically based procedures designed to physiologically replace damaged tooth structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as the pulp-dentin complex. According to the American Association of Endodontists' Clinical Considerations for a Regenerative Procedure, the primary goal of the regenerative procedure is the elimination of clinical symptoms and the resolution of apical periodontitis. Thickening of canal walls and continued root maturation is the secondary goal. Therefore, the primary goal of regenerative endodontics and traditional non-surgical root canal therapy is the same. The difference between non-surgical root canal therapy and regenerative endodontic therapy is that the disinfected root canals in the former therapy are

  3. Spontaneous correction of pathologic tooth migration and reduced infrabony pockets following nonsurgical periodontal therapy: a case report.

    Sato, Shuichi; Ujiie, Hisashi; Ito, Koichi

    2004-10-01

    This case report describes the spontaneous correction of pathologic tooth migration and reduced infrabony pockets after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. A 3-mm diastema between the maxillary incisors was closed completely, and the mandibular teeth, which had migrated pathologically, returned to the optimal position. Clinical evaluation showed a significant reduction in probing depth, with increased clinical attachment and bone deposition demonstrated radiologically.

  4. Targeting the vascular and perivascular niches as a regenerative therapy for lung and liver fibrosis.

    Cao, Zhongwei; Ye, Tinghong; Sun, Yue; Ji, Gaili; Shido, Koji; Chen, Yutian; Luo, Lin; Na, Feifei; Li, Xiaoyan; Huang, Zhen; Ko, Jane L; Mittal, Vivek; Qiao, Lina; Chen, Chong; Martinez, Fernando J; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2017-08-30

    The regenerative capacity of lung and liver is sometimes impaired by chronic or overwhelming injury. Orthotopic transplantation of parenchymal stem cells to damaged organs might reinstate their self-repair ability. However, parenchymal cell engraftment is frequently hampered by the microenvironment in diseased recipient organs. We show that targeting both the vascular niche and perivascular fibroblasts establishes "hospitable soil" to foster the incorporation of "seed," in this case, the engraftment of parenchymal cells in injured organs. Specifically, ectopic induction of endothelial cell (EC)-expressed paracrine/angiocrine hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and inhibition of perivascular NOX4 [NADPH (reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 4] synergistically enabled reconstitution of mouse and human parenchymal cells in damaged organs. Reciprocally, genetic knockout of Hgf in mouse ECs ( Hgf iΔEC/iΔEC ) aberrantly up-regulated perivascular NOX4 during liver and lung regeneration. Dysregulated HGF and NOX4 pathways subverted the function of vascular and perivascular cells from an epithelially inductive niche to a microenvironment that inhibited parenchymal reconstitution. Perivascular NOX4 induction in Hgf iΔEC/iΔEC mice recapitulated the phenotype of human and mouse liver and lung fibrosis. Consequently, EC-directed HGF and NOX4 inhibitor GKT137831 stimulated regenerative integration of mouse and human parenchymal cells in chronically injured lung and liver. Our data suggest that targeting dysfunctional perivascular and vascular cells in diseased organs can bypass fibrosis and enable reparative cell engraftment to reinstate lung and liver regeneration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. Use of minocycline as systemic antimicrobial therapy in refractory periodontitis with chronic gingival enlargement

    Khatri, Parag M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a multifactorial disease having various risk factors, but a dynamic interaction between bacterial products and host response in association with genetic and environmental factors is considered as the primary cause for periodontal tissue destruction in periodontitis. This bacterial-host interaction which is ever-so-present in periodontitis directs us toward utilizing antimicrobial agents along with the routine mechanical debridement. This case report present a case of a ...

  6. Application of Stem Cell Technology in Dental Regenerative Medicine.

    Feng, Ruoxue; Lengner, Chistopher

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the isolation and characterization of dental tissue-derived stem cells and address the potential of these cell types for use in regenerative cell transplantation therapy. Looking forward, platforms for the delivery of stem cells via scaffolds and the use of growth factors and cytokines for enhancing dental stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are discussed. We aim to understand the developmental origins of dental tissues in an effort to elucidate the molecular pathways governing the genesis of somatic dental stem cells. The advantages and disadvantages of several dental stem cells are discussed, including the developmental stage and specific locations from which these cells can be purified. In particular, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth may act as a very practical and easily accessibly reservoir for autologous stem cells and hold the most value in stem cell therapy. Dental pulp stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells should also be considered for their triple lineage differentiation ability and relative ease of isolation. Further, we address the potentials and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cells as a cell source in dental regenerative. From an economical and a practical standpoint, dental stem cell therapy would be most easily applied in the prevention of periodontal ligament detachment and bone atrophy, as well as in the regeneration of dentin-pulp complex. In contrast, cell-based tooth replacement due to decay or other oral pathology seems, at the current time, an untenable approach.

  7. Effect of periodontal therapy on metabolic control and an inflammatory mediator in type 2 diabetic subjects: a report on 17 consecutive cases.

    Serrano, Carlos; Pérez, Clara; Sabogal, Diego

    2012-04-01

    A reciprocal relationship between diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis has been described, whereby chronic periodontal infection could affect diabetic metabolic control. Therefore, periodontal therapy could influence metabolic control or systemic inflammation leading to diabetic complications. This case report series presents the effect of therapy on periodontal indices, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. Seventeen diabetic patients diagnosed with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis received periodontal therapy. All patients received a hygienic phase of treatment and were re-examined 3 months later. At re-examination, subjects judged to need periodontal surgery were treated and re-examined after a further 3 months. A complete clinical examination and measurements of HbA1c and hs-CRP were evaluated. Periodontal treatment led to a significant improvement in periodontal indices; only five patients required periodontal surgery. The percentage of bleeding on probing was reduced by nearly 40%; percentage of pockets > or = 5 mm was less than half baseline values; mean pocket depth reduction was 1.21 mm (0.58) and attachment level gain was 0.74 mm (0.69). Nevertheless, no changes were present for HbA1c; a reduction in hs-CRP of 1.37 mg/L (2.67) was present. Periodontal therapy in this case series group produced a significant improvement in the clinical condition, butdid not affect metabolic control. It led to a decrease in hs-CRP.

  8. Application of stem cell/growth factor system, as a multimodal therapy approach in regenerative medicine to improve cell therapy yields.

    Pourrajab, Fatemeh; Babaei Zarch, Mojtaba; Baghi Yazdi, Mohammad; Rahimi Zarchi, Abolfazl; Vakili Zarch, Abbas

    2014-04-15

    Stem cells hold a great promise for regenerative medicine, especially for replacing cells in infarcted organ that hardly have any intrinsic renewal capacity, including heart and brain. Signaling pathways that regulate pluripotency or lineage-specific gene and protein expression have been the major focus of stem cell research. Between them, there are some well known signaling pathways such as GF/GFR systems, SDF-1α/CXC4 ligand receptor interaction and PI3K/Akt signaling, and cytokines may regulate cell fate decisions, and can be utilized to positively influence cell therapy outcomes or accentuate synergistic compliance. For example, contributing factors in the progression of heart failure are both the loss of cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction, and the absence of an adequate endogenous repair signaling. Combining cell engraftment with therapeutic signaling factor delivery is more exciting in terms of host progenitor/donor stem cell survival and proliferation. Thus stem cell-based therapy, besides triggering signaling pathways through GF/GFR systems can become a realistic option in regenerative processes for replacing lost cells and reconstituting the damaged organ, as before. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of lasers for periodontal debridement: marketing tool or proven therapy?

    Chanthaboury, Rachel; Irinakis, Tassos

    2005-10-01

    The use of lasers in dentistry has recently received much attention, in both clinical practice and research; their unique properties produce favourable clinical results in some cases and encourage patient acceptance. Various types of lasers have been investigated as an adjunct to periodontal therapy; these include carbon dioxide (CO2), diode, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) and erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) lasers.However, adverse results have been associated with each type, including thermal damage to root surfaces, increases in pulpal temperature and the production of toxic by-products. The Er:YAG laser has produced the most promising results, as it can ablate effectively with minimal adverse effects. More research is needed to determine the ideal settings and methods for using the laser safely and effectively in clinical practice.

  10. Adjunctive Subantimicrobial Dose Doxycycline in the Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Unique Combination Therapy

    Gomaa Marwa Abdelhakim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of combination therapy including subantimicrobial dose doxycycline (SDD and locally delivered doxycycline (LD as adjuncts to scaling and root planing (SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Material and Methods: Forty patients with controlled T2DM (HbA1c ≤7% and chronic periodontitis were selected. They were randomly divided into two groups, twenty patients each: Test group (TG, n=20 patients was treated with combination therapy of full mouth SRP, LD gel 10% and SDD 20 mg twice daily for 6 months. Control group (CG, n=20 patients was treated with full mouth SRP only. The periodontal parameters were recorded at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months and included periodontal probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level (CAL, and bleeding on probing (BOP. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF samples were collected and a quantitative measurement of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8 was carried out by using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELIZA at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months. Results: Statistically significant reduction in all clinical parameters (PPD, CAL, and BOP was observed at TG over CG at 3, 6, and 9 months (p<0.05. Moreover, combination therapy provided significant reductions in the amount of GCF MMP-8 for the TG compared to CG at 3, 6, and 9 months evaluation period (p<0.05. Conclusions: Combination therapy including SRP, SDD, and LD, provided significantly greater clinical benefits than SRP alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis in patients with controlled T2DM.

  11. Use of minocycline as systemic antimicrobial therapy in refractory periodontitis with chronic gingival enlargement

    Parag M Khatri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a multifactorial disease having various risk factors, but a dynamic interaction between bacterial products and host response in association with genetic and environmental factors is considered as the primary cause for periodontal tissue destruction in periodontitis. This bacterial-host interaction which is ever-so-present in periodontitis directs us toward utilizing antimicrobial agents along with the routine mechanical debridement. This case report present a case of a female patient with recurrent periodontal infections with gingival enlargement treated with systemic Minocycline in conjunction with the conventional non-surgical approach.

  12. Use of minocycline as systemic antimicrobial therapy in refractory periodontitis with chronic gingival enlargement.

    Khatri, Parag M; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a multifactorial disease having various risk factors, but a dynamic interaction between bacterial products and host response in association with genetic and environmental factors is considered as the primary cause for periodontal tissue destruction in periodontitis. This bacterial-host interaction which is ever-so-present in periodontitis directs us toward utilizing antimicrobial agents along with the routine mechanical debridement. This case report present a case of a female patient with recurrent periodontal infections with gingival enlargement treated with systemic Minocycline in conjunction with the conventional non-surgical approach.

  13. Artificial intelligence: A joint narrative on potential use in pediatric stem and immune cell therapies and regenerative medicine.

    Sniecinski, Irena; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2018-05-09

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) reflects the intelligence exhibited by machines and software. It is a highly desirable academic field of many current fields of studies. Leading AI researchers describe the field as "the study and design of intelligent agents". McCarthy invented this term in 1955 and defined it as "the science and engineering of making intelligent machines". The central goals of AI research are reasoning, knowledge, planning, learning, natural language processing (communication), perception and the ability to move and manipulate objects. In fact the multidisplinary AI field is considered to be rather interdisciplinary covering numerous number of sciences and professions, including computer science, psychology, linguistics, philosophy and neurosciences. The field was founded on the claim that a central intellectual property of humans, intelligence-the sapience of Homo Sapiens "can be so precisely described that a machine can be made to simulate it". This raises philosophical issues about the nature of the mind and the ethics of creating artificial beings endowed with human-like intelligence. Artificial Intelligence has been the subject of tremendous optimism but has also suffered stunning setbacks. The goal of this narrative is to review the potential use of AI approaches and their integration into pediatric cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. Emphasis is placed on recognition and application of AI techniques in the development of predictive models for personalized treatments with engineered stem cells, immune cells and regenerated tissues in adults and children. These intelligent machines could dissect the whole genome and isolate the immune particularities of individual patient's disease in a matter of minutes and create the treatment that is customized to patient's genetic specificity and immune system capability. AI techniques could be used for optimization of clinical trials of innovative stem cell and gene therapies in pediatric patients

  14. Effect of NonSurgical Periodontal Therapy on Plasma Levels of IL-17 in Chronic Periodontitis Patients with Well Controlled Type-II Diabetes Mellitus—A Clinical Study

    Vishnu Jayakumar Sunandhakumari

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available For years the pathogenesis of periodontitis was under an immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm. Th1 cells are considered to afford protection against the intracellular pathogens. These cells produce the interferons (IFN that are involved in macrophage activation, which, in turn, plays an important role in phagocytosis, complement fixation, and opsonization. Th2 cells are thought to have evolved as a form of protection against parasitic helminthes. Th17 subset of CD4Not Necessary+ T cells was identified in the year 2005, which added greater complexity to Th function and are pro inflammatory in nature. Interleukins (ILs have the ability to alter immunological changes and they also possess the ability to regulate lymphocyte differentiation and haemopoietic stem cells, cell proliferation, and motility, which are classified as pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory. There are numerous studies that reported IL-17 levels associated with chronic periodontitis (CP development. Type II diabetes mellitus (DM is considered a risk factor for the development of periodontal diseases because the incidence, progression, and severity of periodontal diseases are more common with Type II DM than without DM. This study was aimed at evaluating whether non-surgical periodontal therapy had any effect on plasma concentrations of Interleukin-17 in systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients and in chronic periodontitis patients with well controlled Type II Diabetes mellitus. Patients were divided into the two groups including the chronic periodontitis group (20 subjects and the chronic periodontitis with well-controlled Type II Diabetes mellitus group (20 subjects. The Gingival Index and Plaque Index as well as the clinical Attachment Level (CAL were taken from all the patients of two groups after evaluating fasting blood sugar, post prandial blood sugar, and the Glycated Hemoglobin Level (HbA1c. Then 5 mL blood samples were collected from each patient and plasma was

  15. Extracorporeal shockwaves as regenerative therapy in orthopedic traumatology: a narrative review from basic research to clinical practice.

    D Agostino, M C; Frairia, R; Romeo, P; Amelio, E; Berta, L; Bosco, V; Gigliotti, S; Guerra, C; Messina, S; Messuri, L; Moretti, B; Notarnicola, A; Maccagnano, G; Russo, S; Saggini, R; Vulpiani, M C; Buselli, P

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT), after its first medical application in the urological field for lithotripsy, nowadays represents a valid therapeutical tool also for many musculoskeletal diseases, as well as for regenerative medicine applications. This is possible thanks to its mechanisms of action, which in the non-urological field are not related to mechanical disruption (as for renal stones), but rather to the capacity, by mechanotransduction, to induce neoangiogenesis, osteogenesis and to improve local tissue trophism, regeneration and remodeling, through stem cell stimulation. On the basis of these biological assumptions, it becomes clear that ESWT can represent a valid therapeutic tool also for all those pathological conditions that derive from musculoskeletal trauma, and are characterized by tissue loss and/or delayed healing and regeneration (mainly bone and skin, but not only). As a safe, repeatable and non–invasive therapy, in many cases it can represent a first–line therapeutic option, as an alternative to surgery (for example, in bone and skin healing disorders), or in combination with some other treatment options. It is hoped that with its use in daily practice also the muscle–skeletal field will grow, not only for standard indications, but also in post–traumatic sequelae, in order to improve recovery and shorten healing time, with undoubted advantages for the patients and lower health service expenses.

  16. State of the Art on the Evidence Base in Cardiac Regenerative Therapy: Overview of 41 Systematic Reviews

    Mariangela Peruzzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To provide a comprehensive appraisal of the evidence from secondary research on cardiac regenerative therapy. Study Design and Setting. Overview of systematic reviews of controlled clinical trials concerning stem cell administration or mobilization in patients with cardiovascular disease. Results. After a systematic database search, we short-listed 41 reviews (660 patients. Twenty-two (54% reviews focused on acute myocardial infarction (AMI, 19 (46% on chronic ischemic heart disease (IHD or heart failure (HF, 29 (71% on bone marrow-derived stem-cells (BMSC, and 36 (88% to randomized trials only. Substantial variability among reviews was found for validity (AMSTAR score: median 9 [minimum 3]; 1st quartile 9; 3rd quartile 10; maximum 11, effect estimates (change in ejection fraction from baseline to follow-up: 3.47% [0.02%; 2.90%; 4.22%; 6.11%], and citations (Web of Science yearly citations: 4.1 [0; 2.2; 6.5; 68.9]. No significant association was found between these three features. However, reviews focusing on BMSC therapy had higher validity scores (P=0.008 and showed more pronounced effect estimates (P=0.002. Higher citations were associated with journal impact factor (P=0.007, corresponding author from North America/Europe (P=0.022, and inclusion of nonrandomized trials (P=0.046. Conclusions. Substantial heterogeneity is apparent among these reviews in terms of quality and effect estimates.

  17. Treatment of an Erratic Extraction Socket for Implant Therapy in a Patient with Chronic Periodontitis

    Prabhu, Srividya

    2016-01-01

    As implant therapy becomes more commonplace in daily practice, preservation and preparation of edentulous sites are key. Many times, however, implant therapy may not be considered at the time of tooth extraction and additional measures are not taken to conserve the edentulous site. While the healing process in extraction sockets has been well investigated and bone fill can be expected, there are cases where even when clinicians perform thorough debridement of the sockets, connective tissue infiltration into the socket can occur. This phenomenon, known as “erratic healing,” may be associated with factors that lead to peri-implant disease and should be appropriately managed and treated prior to surgical implant placement. This case report describes the successful management of an erratic healing extraction socket in a 62-year-old Caucasian male patient with chronic periodontitis and the outcomes of an evidence-based treatment protocol performed prior to implant therapy. Careful preoperative analysis and cone beam computed tomography imaging can help detect signs of impaired healing in future implant sites and prevent surgical complications. PMID:27807485

  18. Treatment of an Erratic Extraction Socket for Implant Therapy in a Patient with Chronic Periodontitis

    Yusuke Hamada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As implant therapy becomes more commonplace in daily practice, preservation and preparation of edentulous sites are key. Many times, however, implant therapy may not be considered at the time of tooth extraction and additional measures are not taken to conserve the edentulous site. While the healing process in extraction sockets has been well investigated and bone fill can be expected, there are cases where even when clinicians perform thorough debridement of the sockets, connective tissue infiltration into the socket can occur. This phenomenon, known as “erratic healing,” may be associated with factors that lead to peri-implant disease and should be appropriately managed and treated prior to surgical implant placement. This case report describes the successful management of an erratic healing extraction socket in a 62-year-old Caucasian male patient with chronic periodontitis and the outcomes of an evidence-based treatment protocol performed prior to implant therapy. Careful preoperative analysis and cone beam computed tomography imaging can help detect signs of impaired healing in future implant sites and prevent surgical complications.

  19. Treatment of an Erratic Extraction Socket for Implant Therapy in a Patient with Chronic Periodontitis.

    Hamada, Yusuke; Prabhu, Srividya; John, Vanchit

    2016-01-01

    As implant therapy becomes more commonplace in daily practice, preservation and preparation of edentulous sites are key. Many times, however, implant therapy may not be considered at the time of tooth extraction and additional measures are not taken to conserve the edentulous site. While the healing process in extraction sockets has been well investigated and bone fill can be expected, there are cases where even when clinicians perform thorough debridement of the sockets, connective tissue infiltration into the socket can occur. This phenomenon, known as "erratic healing," may be associated with factors that lead to peri-implant disease and should be appropriately managed and treated prior to surgical implant placement. This case report describes the successful management of an erratic healing extraction socket in a 62-year-old Caucasian male patient with chronic periodontitis and the outcomes of an evidence-based treatment protocol performed prior to implant therapy. Careful preoperative analysis and cone beam computed tomography imaging can help detect signs of impaired healing in future implant sites and prevent surgical complications.

  20. Potential Strategies to Address the Major Clinical Barriers Facing Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease: A Review.

    Nguyen, Patricia K; Neofytou, Evgenios; Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-11-01

    Although progress continues to be made in the field of stem cell regenerative medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, significant barriers to clinical implementation still exist. To summarize the current barriers to the clinical implementation of stem cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease and to discuss potential strategies to overcome them. Information for this review was obtained through a search of PubMed and the Cochrane database for English-language studies published between January 1, 2000, and July 25, 2016. Ten randomized clinical trials and 8 systematic reviews were included. One of the major clinical barriers facing the routine implementation of stem cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease is the limited and inconsistent benefit observed thus far. Reasons for this finding are unclear but may be owing to poor cell retention and survival, as suggested by numerous preclinical studies and a small number of human studies incorporating imaging to determine cell fate. Additional studies in humans using imaging to determine cell fate are needed to understand how these factors contribute to the limited efficacy of stem cell therapy. Treatment strategies to address poor cell retention and survival are under investigation and include the following: coadministration of immunosuppressive and prosurvival agents, delivery of cardioprotective factors packaged in exosomes rather than the cells themselves, and use of tissue-engineering strategies to provide structural support for cells. If larger grafts are achieved using these strategies, it will be imperative to carefully monitor for the potential risks of tumorigenicity, immunogenicity, and arrhythmogenicity. Despite important achievements to date, stem cell therapy is not yet ready for routine clinical implementation. Significant research is still needed to address the clinical barriers outlined herein before the next wave of large clinical trials is under way.

  1. [Evidence-based therapy for cartilage lesions in the knee - regenerative treatment options].

    Proffen, B; von Keudell, A; Vavken, P

    2012-06-01

    The treatment of cartilage defects has seen a shift from replacement to regeneration in the last few years. The rationale behind this development is the improvement in the quality-of-care for the growing segment of young patients who are prone to arthroplasty complications because of their specific characteristics - young age, high level of activity, high demand for functionality. These days, two of the most popular regenerative treatments are microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Although these new options show promising results, no final algorithm for the treatment of cartilage lesions has been established as yet. The objective of this review is to describe and compare these two treatment options and to present an evidence-based treatment algorithm for focal cartilage defects. Microfracture is a cost-effective, arthroscopic one-stage procedure, in which by drilling of the subchondral plate, mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow migrate into the defect and rebuild the cartilage. ACI is a two-stage procedure in which first chondrocytes are harvested, expanded in cell culture and in a second open procedure reimplanted into the cartilage defect. Microfracture is usually used for focal cartilage defects osteophyte, and for the ACI patient, periosteal hypertrophy and the need for two procedures in ACI. Only a few studies provide detailed and evidence-based information on a comparative assessment. These studies, however, are showing widely similar clinical outcomes but better histological results for ACI, which are likely to translate into better long-term outcomes. Although evidence-based studies comparing microfracture and ACI have not found significant differences in the clinical outcome, the literature does show that choosing the treatment based on the size and characteristics of the osteochondral lesion might be beneficial. The American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons suggest that contained lesions < 4 cm2 should be treated by

  2. The effect of periodontal therapy on cardiovascular risk markers: a 6-month randomized clinical trial.

    Caúla, André Luis; Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães

    2014-09-01

    To determine the influence of non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment on inflammatory markers related to risk for cardiovascular disease. A total of 64 patients with severe chronic periodontitis was randomly subjected to immediately periodontal treatment (test group, n = 32) or delayed periodontal treatment, without treatment during the study period (control group, n = 32). Clinical periodontal and laboratory examinations were performed at baseline (T0), 2 months (T2), and 6 months (T6) after the initial examinations (Control group) or completion of periodontal treatment (Test group). After 2 months of periodontal treatment there was a significant reduction of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and triglycerides (p = 0.002, p = 0.004, respectively) in the test group. Median values of C-reactive protein, ESR, total cholesterol, and triglycerides were reduced after 6 month of periodontal treatment in the test group (p periodontal treatment was effective in reducing the levels of systemic inflammation markers and improved the lipid profile in subjects with severe chronic periodontitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Minocycline HCl microspheres reduce red-complex bacteria in periodontal disease therapy.

    Goodson, J Max; Gunsolley, John C; Grossi, Sara G; Bland, Paul S; Otomo-Corgel, Joan; Doherty, Frances; Comiskey, Judy

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this trial was to measure the antimicrobial effects of a minocycline HCl microsphere (MM) local drug-delivery system when used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP). DNA probe analysis for 40 bacteria was used to evaluate the oral bacteria of 127 subjects with moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. Subjects were randomly assigned to either SRP alone (N = 65) or MM + SRP (N = 62). The primary endpoints of this study were changes in numbers and proportions of the red-complex bacteria (RCB) and the sum of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia (formally T. forsythensis), and Treponema denticola relative to 40 oral bacteria at each test site from baseline to day 30. Numbers of RCB from the five test sites were averaged to provide a value for each subject. MM + SRP reduced the proportion of RCB by 6.49% and the numbers by 9.4 x 10(5). The reduction in RCB proportions and numbers by SRP alone (5.03% and 5.1 x 10(5), respectively) was significantly less. In addition, MM + SRP reduced probing depth by 1.38 mm (compared to 1.01 mm by SRP alone), bleeding on probing was reduced by 25.2% (compared to 13.8% by SRP alone), and a clinical attachment level gain of 1.16 mm (compared to 0.80 mm by SRP alone) was achieved. These observations support the hypothesis that RCBs are responsible for periodontal disease and that local antimicrobial therapy using MM + SRP effectively reduces numbers of RCBs and their proportions to a greater extent than SRP alone.

  4. Photodynamic therapy in non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis: short term randomized clinical trial study

    Russo, C.; Palaia, G.; Loskutova, E.; Libotte, F.; Kornblit, R.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to exposition to plaque and tartar. Conventional treatments consist of scaling and root planing (SRP) and antibiotics administration. Among them encouraging results have been obtained using alternative protocols, like the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT). Aim of the Study: Evaluation of PDT effects added to conventional methods. Materials and Methods: 11 patients (4M/7F, 37-67 years aged, non-smoking) affected by untreated chronic periodontal disease, with >3mm pockets in at least 4 teeth were divided in two groups, test and control group. Each patient had to made full-intraoral before and after the treatment. The test group received SRP+PDT, while the control group was subjected to SRP. The PDT was performed through the HELBO®TheraLite (Bredent Medical), diode laser battery powered 670nm with an output of 75mW/cm2. The Helbo Blue photosensitizer, containing methylene blue, was used. The exposure time to the laser effect was of 10'' for each site, for a total of 60'' at 3J/cm2. Results: Both groups had a significant improvement in the reduction of pocket depth (PD), above all in the test group. Statistical analysis was performed through the T-test, evaluating PD between the two groups p=0.96 (p> 0.05), resulting not statistically significant. Conclusion: PDT is a promising support to SRP, achieving a significant reduction in the pocket depth, but more cases are needed to confirm the validity of the used protocol.

  5. Clinical and microbiological effects of mechanical instrumentation and local antimicrobials during periodontal supportive therapy in aggressive periodontitis patients: smoker versus non-smoker patients.

    Guarnelli, Maria Elena; Farina, Roberto; Cucchi, Alessandro; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2010-11-01

    To compare the clinical and microbiological effects of ultrasonic mechanical instrumentation (UMI) associated to home-care use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (AmF/SnF(2) )-containing mouthrinse and toothpaste in smoker and non-smoker patients affected by generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP) during a recall session of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Thirteen smokers and 25 non-smokers G-AgP patients enrolled in an SPT programme received a single session of UMI associated with home-care use of AmF/SnF(2) -containing mouthrinse and toothpaste. Clinical and microbiological parameters were assessed pre-treatment, at 6 and 12 weeks post-treatment. In both groups, UMI plus AmF/SnF(2) -implemented oral hygiene use determined a significant decrease of total bacterial counts, with non-smokers exhibiting a lower count compared with smokers at 12 weeks. No significant differences were observed between smokers and non-smokers in the counts of total pathogens and red complex species at each observation interval. Clinically, a significant reduction of supragingival plaque, gingival inflammation and probing pocket depth was similarly observed in both groups. A combined mechanical/chemical plaque control approach based on UMI and the use of AmF/SnF(2) agents resulted in the reduction of supragingival plaque deposits, gingival inflammation and subgingival periodontal pathogens in G-AgP patients during SPT, with no substantial difference between smokers and non-smokers. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Differential benefits of amoxicillin-metronidazole in different phases of periodontal therapy in a randomized controlled crossover clinical trial.

    Mombelli, Andrea; Almaghlouth, Adnan; Cionca, Norbert; Courvoisier, Delphine S; Giannopoulou, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    The specific advantage of administering systemic antibiotics during initial, non-surgical therapy or in the context of periodontal surgery is unclear. This study assesses the differential outcomes of periodontal therapy supplemented with amoxicillin-metronidazole during either the non-surgical or the surgical treatment phase. This is a single-center, randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial with a 1-year follow-up. Eighty participants with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-associated moderate to advanced periodontitis were randomized into two treatment groups: group A, antibiotics (500 mg metronidazole plus 375 mg amoxicillin three times per day for 7 days) during the first, non-surgical phase of periodontal therapy (T1) and placebo during the second, surgical phase (T2); and group B, placebo during T1 and antibiotics during T2. The number of sites with probing depth (PD) >4 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) per patient was the primary outcome. A total of 11,212 sites were clinically monitored on 1,870 teeth. T1 with antibiotics decreased the number of sites with PD >4 mm and BOP per patient significantly more than without (group A: from 34.5 to 5.7, 84%; group B: from 28.7 to 8.7, 70%; P antibiotics, but only eight treated with placebo, achieved a 10-fold reduction of diseased sites (P = 0.007). Consequently, fewer patients of group A needed additional therapy, the mean number of surgical interventions was lower, and treatment time in T2 was shorter. Six months after T2, the mean number of residual pockets (group A: 2.8 ± 5.2; group B: 2.2 ± 5.0) was not significantly different and was sustained over 12 months in both groups. Giving the antibiotics during T1 or T2 yielded similar long-term outcomes, but antibiotics in T1 resolved the disease quicker and thus reduced the need for additional surgical intervention.

  7. Neural stem/progenitor cells as a promising candidate for regenerative therapy of the central nervous system

    Virginie eBonnamain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Neural transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases and other affections of the central nervous system (CNS like Parkinson and Huntington diseases, multiple sclerosis or stroke. If cell replacement therapy already went through clinical trials for some of these diseases using fetal human neuroblasts, several important limitations led to the search for alternative cell sources that would be more suitable for intracerebral transplantation. Taking into account logistical and ethical issues linked to the use of tissue derived from human fetuses, and the immunologically special status of the CNS allowing the occurrence of deleterious immune reactions, Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NSPCs appear as an interesting cell source candidate. In addition to their ability for replacing cell populations lost during the pathological events, NSPCs also display surprising therapeutic effects of neuroprotection and immunomodulation. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in these specific characteristics will hopefully lead in the future to a successful use of NSPCs in regenerative medicine for CNS affections.

  8. 激光在牙周治疗中的应用%Application of laser in periodontal therapy

    潘亚萍

    2015-01-01

    该文就目前牙周治疗中常见的几种激光作一介绍。文献回顾显示激光可以清除97%以上的牙周致病菌,能够有效去除病变牙骨质,并且对牙周组织和根面损伤较小,同时,激光可以减少治疗中的疼痛。在今后的牙周治疗具有广泛的应用前景。%To summarize the application of laser in the treatment of periodontal disease.Researches have proved that laser can clean more than 97%periodontal pathogens,and laser also can remove infected cementum effectively with little damage on periodontal tissue and tooth root.Laser also can alleviate pain in treatment.So laser may have potential application in periodontal therapy in future.

  9. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine. PMID:26131314

  10. Periodontal Therapy in Dogs Using Bone Augmentation Products Marketed for Veterinary Use.

    Angel, Molly

    Periodontal disease is extremely common in companion animal practice. Patients presenting for a routine oral examination and prophylaxis may be found to have extensive periodontal disease and attachment loss. Vertical bone loss is a known sequela to periodontal disease and commonly involves the distal root of the mandibular first molar. This case report outlines two dogs presenting for oral examination and prophylaxis with general anesthesia. Both patients did not have any clinical symptoms of periodontal disease other than halitosis. Both patients were diagnosed with three-walled vertical bone loss defects of one or both mandibular first molars utilizing dental radiography as well as periodontal probing, measuring, and direct visual inspection. These defects were consistent with periodontal disease index stage 4 (>50% attachment loss). The lesions were treated with appropriate root planing and debridement. Bone augmentation products readily available and marketed for veterinary use were then utilized to fill the defects to promote both the re-establishment of normal alveolar bone height and periodontal ligament reattachment to the treated surface. Follow-up assessment and owner dedication is critical to treatment outcome. Both patients' 6 mo follow-up examinations radiographically indicated bone repair and replacement with visible periodontal ligament space.

  11. Amniotic fluid stem cells: a promising therapeutic resource for cell-based regenerative therapy.

    Antonucci, Ivana; Pantalone, Andrea; Tete, Stefano; Salini, Vincenzo; Borlongan, Cesar V; Hess, David; Stuppia, Liborio

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a powerful tool in the treatment of several human diseases, both for their ability to represent a source of new cells to replace those lost due to tissue injuries or degenerative diseases, and for the ability of produce trophic molecules able to minimize damage and promote recovery in the injured tissue. Different cell types, such as embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells, human fetal tissues and genetically engineered cell lines, have been tested for their ability to replace damaged cells and to restore the tissue function after transplantation. Amniotic fluid -derived Stem cells (AFS) are considered a novel resource for cell transplantation therapy, due to their high renewal capacity, the "in vitro" expression of embryonic cell lineage markers, and the ability to differentiate in tissues derived from all the three embryonic layers. Moreover, AFS do not produce teratomas when transplanted into animals and are characterized by a low antigenicity, which could represent an advantage for cell transplantation or cell replacement therapy. The present review focuses on the biological features of AFS, and on their potential use in the treatment of pathological conditions such as ischemic brain injury and bone damages.

  12. Non-surgical periodontal therapy improves serum levels of C-reactive protein and edematous states in female patients with idiopathic edema.

    Joseph, Rosamma; Narayan, Vivek; Krishnan, Rajaratnam; Melemadathil, Sreelatha

    2011-02-01

    The relationship between periodontal disease and systemic disease is revealing new and exciting associations. Idiopathic edema presents a clinical syndrome with obscure pathophysiology. The present study investigates whether non-surgical periodontal therapy is beneficial in patients who are not responding to conventional treatment of idiopathic edema. Thirty patients with idiopathic edema were allocated to intervention and control groups. All the subjects were assessed for systemic (body weight, body mass index, visual scale of edema, serum C-reactive protein, and serum albumin) and periodontal (plaque index, calculus index, and gingival index) parameters. Non-surgical periodontal therapy, including oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing, and systemic antibiotic therapy, was provided in the intervention group. Both groups were reevaluated after 4 weeks. Both groups were comparable at baseline. All parameters, except serum albumin, showed significant improvement after periodontal therapy. The control group showed further worsening of these parameters. This study shows that sources for systemic inflammation, such as periodontal disease, could affect the pathogenesis of idiopathic edema. Successful elimination of such covert sources of inflammation leads to a clinical benefit in patients who are distressed by this condition.

  13. Impact of supragingival therapy on subgingival microbial profile in smokers versus non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis

    Tatiana Meulman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess subgingival microbiological changes in smokers versus non-smokers presenting severe chronic periodontitis after supragingival periodontal therapy (ST.Non-smokers (n=10 and smokers (n=10 presenting at least nine teeth with probing pocket depth (PPD (≥5 mm, bleeding on probing (BoP, and no history of periodontal treatment in the last 6 months were selected. Clinical parameters assessed were plaque index (PI, BoP, PPD, relative gingival margin position (rGMP and relative clinical attachment level (rCAL. Subgingival biofilm was collected before and 21 days after ST. DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified with the universal primer pair, 27F and 1492R. Amplified genes were cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison with known 16S rRNA sequences. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t and Chi-Square tests (α=5%.Clinically, ST promoted a significant reduction in PI and PPD, and gain of rCAL for both groups, with no significant intergroup difference. Microbiologically, at baseline, data analysis demonstrated that smokers harbored a higher proportion of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Bacteroidetes sp., Fusobacterium sp. and Tannerella forsythia and a lower number of cultivated phylotypes (p<0.05. Furthermore, non-smokers featured significant reductions in key phylotypes associated with periodontitis, whereas smokers presented more modest changes.Within the limits of the present study, ST promoted comparable clinical improvements in smokers and non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis. However, in smokers, ST only slightly affected the subgingival biofilm biodiversity, as compared with non-smokers.

  14. Regenerative endodontics.

    Simon, S; Smith, A J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  15. [Clinical effect of different sequences of debridement-antibiotic therapy in treatment of severe chronic periodontitis].

    Li, Yi; Xu, Li; Lu, Rui-fang; An, Yue-bang; Wang, Xian-e; Song, Wen-li; Meng, Huan-xi

    2015-02-18

    To evaluate the feasibility of full-mouth debridement (subgingival scaling and root planning, SRP) by 2 times within 1 week and compare the clinical effects of different sequences of debridement-antibiotic usage in patients with severe chronic periodontitis (CP). A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was conducted in 30 severe CP patients (14 males and 16 females, 40.5 ± 8.4 years old on average from 35 to 60) receiving 3 different sequences of debridement-antibiotictherapy: Group A, antibiotic usage (metronidazole, MTZ, 0.2 g, tid, 7 d; amoxicillin, AMX 0.5 g, tid, 7 d) was started together with SRP (completed by 2 times in 7 d); Group B, antibiotic usage (MTZ 0.2 g, tid, 7 d; AMX 0.5 g, tid, 7 d) was started 1 d after SRP(completed by 2 times in 7 d); Group C, SRP alone[probing depth (PD), bleeding index (BI) and tooth mobility] was examined. The average full-mouth probing depth, the average full-mouth proximal probing depth (pPD), the percentage of sites with PD>5 mm (PD>5 mm%), the percentage of sites with proximal PD>5 mm (pPD>5 mm%), the average bleeding index (BI) and the percentage of sites with bleeding on probing (BOP%) were calculated. Clinical examinations were performed at baseline and 2 months post therapy. (1) Compared with baseline conditions, all the subjects showed clinical improvements in all the parameters evaluated 2 months post therapy, Pantibiotic usage at the same time comparing with patients using antibiotics after SRP or SRP alone.

  16. Regenerative Medicine Build-Out

    Pfenning, Michael A.; Gores, Gregory J.; Harper, C. Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regenerative technologies strive to boost innate repair processes and restitute normative impact. Deployment of regenerative principles into practice is poised to usher in a new era in health care, driving radical innovation in patient management to address the needs of an aging population challenged by escalating chronic diseases. There is urgency to design, execute, and validate viable paradigms for translating and implementing the science of regenerative medicine into tangible health benefits that provide value to stakeholders. A regenerative medicine model of care would entail scalable production and standardized application of clinical grade biotherapies supported by comprehensive supply chain capabilities that integrate sourcing and manufacturing with care delivery. Mayo Clinic has rolled out a blueprint for discovery, translation, and application of regenerative medicine therapies for accelerated adoption into the standard of care. To establish regenerative medical and surgical service lines, the Mayo Clinic model incorporates patient access, enabling platforms and delivery. Access is coordinated through a designated portal, the Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, serving to facilitate patient/provider education, procurement of biomaterials, referral to specialty services, and/or regenerative interventions, often in clinical trials. Platforms include the Regenerative Medicine Biotrust and Good Manufacturing Practice facilities for manufacture of clinical grade products for cell-based, acellular, and/or biomaterial applications. Care delivery leverages dedicated interventional suites for provision of regenerative services. Performance is tracked using a scorecard system to inform decision making. The Mayo Clinic roadmap exemplifies an integrated organization in the discovery, development, and delivery of regenerative medicine within a growing community of practice at the core of modern health care. Significance Regenerative medicine is at the

  17. Regenerative Medicine Build-Out.

    Terzic, Andre; Pfenning, Michael A; Gores, Gregory J; Harper, C Michel

    2015-12-01

    Regenerative technologies strive to boost innate repair processes and restitute normative impact. Deployment of regenerative principles into practice is poised to usher in a new era in health care, driving radical innovation in patient management to address the needs of an aging population challenged by escalating chronic diseases. There is urgency to design, execute, and validate viable paradigms for translating and implementing the science of regenerative medicine into tangible health benefits that provide value to stakeholders. A regenerative medicine model of care would entail scalable production and standardized application of clinical grade biotherapies supported by comprehensive supply chain capabilities that integrate sourcing and manufacturing with care delivery. Mayo Clinic has rolled out a blueprint for discovery, translation, and application of regenerative medicine therapies for accelerated adoption into the standard of care. To establish regenerative medical and surgical service lines, the Mayo Clinic model incorporates patient access, enabling platforms and delivery. Access is coordinated through a designated portal, the Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, serving to facilitate patient/provider education, procurement of biomaterials, referral to specialty services, and/or regenerative interventions, often in clinical trials. Platforms include the Regenerative Medicine Biotrust and Good Manufacturing Practice facilities for manufacture of clinical grade products for cell-based, acellular, and/or biomaterial applications. Care delivery leverages dedicated interventional suites for provision of regenerative services. Performance is tracked using a scorecard system to inform decision making. The Mayo Clinic roadmap exemplifies an integrated organization in the discovery, development, and delivery of regenerative medicine within a growing community of practice at the core of modern health care. Regenerative medicine is at the vanguard of health care

  18. A brief motivational interviewing as an adjunct to periodontal therapy-A potential tool to reduce relapse in oral hygiene behaviours. A three-year study.

    Stenman, J; Wennström, J L; Abrahamsson, K H

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate (ii) whether inclusion of a single motivational interviewing (MI) session, as an adjunct to periodontal therapy, might be beneficial for preventing relapse in oral hygiene behaviours among patients treated for chronic periodontitis and (ii) whether individual and clinical characteristics can be of predictive value for retention of sufficient oral hygiene behaviours. This 3-year follow-up of a previously reported randomized controlled trial (RCT) study of 6-month duration included 26 patients. Patients in the test group had received one MI session by a clinical psychologist before initiation of the periodontal treatment. Otherwise, all patients followed the same treatment protocol for conventional educational intervention and non-surgical periodontal therapy. Efficacy variables assessed for evaluation of the standard of self-performed periodontal infection control were marginal bleeding index (MBI; primary efficacy variable) and plaque score (PI). The patterns of change in MBI and PI scores were similar for test and control groups over the observation period. At 3 years, both groups showed a desirable mean full-mouth MBI of 15%, a figure that was comparable to that at the short-term evaluation after active periodontal treatment. The post-treatment MBI was the only variable identified as a predictor of retained adequate oral hygiene behaviours. A single MI session as an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy could not be proven to be of long-term beneficial additive effect with regard to prevention of relapse in oral hygiene behaviour. Desirable standard of self-performed infection control after active periodontal treatment predicted the retention of sufficient oral hygiene behaviour over time. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in the Diagnosis and Therapy of Periodontitis

    L'ubomíra Tóthová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. However, large interventional studies with antioxidants failed to show benefits in the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, or diabetes mellitus. Numerous clinical studies have confirmed the association of oxidative stress markers and periodontitis. Technical and biological variability is high for most of the analyzed markers and none of them seems to be optimal for routine clinical use. In a research setting, analysis of a palette of oxidative stress markers is needed to cover lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and the antioxidant status. The source of reactive oxygen species and their role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis remains unclear. Interventional experiments indicate that oxidative stress might be more than just a simple consequence of the inflammation. Small studies have confirmed that some antioxidants could have therapeutic value at least as an addition to the standard non-surgical treatment of periodontitis. A clear evidence for the efficiency of antioxidant treatment in large patient cohorts is lacking. Potentially, because lowering of oxidative stress markers might be a secondary effect of anti-inflammatory or antibacterial agents. As the field of research of oxidative stress in periodontitis gains attraction and the number of relevant published papers is increasing a systematic overview of the conducted observational and interventional studies is needed. This review summarizes the currently available literature linking oxidative stress and periodontitis and points toward the potential of adjuvant antioxidant treatment, especially in cases where standard treatment fails to improve the periodontal status.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in the Diagnosis and Therapy of Periodontitis

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Celec, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. However, large interventional studies with antioxidants failed to show benefits in the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, or diabetes mellitus. Numerous clinical studies have confirmed the association of oxidative stress markers and periodontitis. Technical and biological variability is high for most of the analyzed markers and none of them seems to be optimal for routine clinical use. In a research setting, analysis of a palette of oxidative stress markers is needed to cover lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and the antioxidant status. The source of reactive oxygen species and their role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis remains unclear. Interventional experiments indicate that oxidative stress might be more than just a simple consequence of the inflammation. Small studies have confirmed that some antioxidants could have therapeutic value at least as an addition to the standard non-surgical treatment of periodontitis. A clear evidence for the efficiency of antioxidant treatment in large patient cohorts is lacking. Potentially, because lowering of oxidative stress markers might be a secondary effect of anti-inflammatory or antibacterial agents. As the field of research of oxidative stress in periodontitis gains attraction and the number of relevant published papers is increasing a systematic overview of the conducted observational and interventional studies is needed. This review summarizes the currently available literature linking oxidative stress and periodontitis and points toward the potential of adjuvant antioxidant treatment, especially in cases where standard treatment fails to improve the periodontal status. PMID:29311982

  1. The efficacy of proanthocyanidins and secnidazole in the treatment of chronic periodontitis after scaling and root planing therapy.

    Li, M; Li, R; Jin, Q; Pang, J; Xu, Z

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effect of the systemic antibiotic therapy of proanthocyanidins and secnidazole on periodontitis. Seventy-five subjects with chronic periodontitis were randomly divided into two treatment groups (secnidazole or proanthocyanidins) and one placebo control group (25 cases each). Plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (BI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were carried out at baseline, post-treatment and 3 months after treatment. Microbial analysis was performed at baseline and post-treatment. The results show that the two treatment groups had greater mean reduction in BI, GI, and PPD evaluated at both post-treatment and 3 months after treatment compared to the control group (p less than 0.05), but there were no significant differences in those of PI and CAL (except CAL evaluated at post-treatment, p 0.05). After treatment, culturable bacteria counts significantly decreased. In conclusion, the adjunctive use of proanthocyanidins or secnidazole in combination with scaling and root planing in adults with periodontitis is effective in reducing the pathogenic flora and achieves significantly better clinical results to a certain degree.

  2. Clinical effectiveness of diode laser therapy as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment: a randomized clinical study.

    Dukić, Walter; Bago, Ivona; Aurer, Andrej; Roguljić, Marija

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical study is to evaluate the effect of a 980-nm diode laser as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) treatment. Thirty-five patients with chronic periodontitis were selected for the split-mouth clinical study. SRP was performed using a sonic device and hand instruments. Quadrants were equally divided between the right and left sides. Teeth were treated with SRP in two control quadrants (control groups [CG]), and the diode laser was used adjunctively with SRP in contralateral quadrants (laser groups [LG]). Diode laser therapy was applied to periodontal pockets on days 1, 3, and 7 after SRP. Baseline data, including approximal plaque index (API), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL), were recorded before the treatment and 6 and 18 weeks after treatment. Changes in PD and CAL were analyzed separately for initially moderate (4 to 6 mm) and deep (7 to 10 mm) pockets. The results were similar for both groups in terms of API, BOP, PD in deep pockets, and CAL. The laser group showed only significant PD gain in moderate pockets during the baseline to 18-week (P 0.05). The present study indicates that, compared to SRP alone, multiple adjunctive applications of a 980-nm diode laser with SRP showed PD improvements only in moderate periodontal pockets (4 to 6 mm).

  3. Proceedings of the signature series event of the international society for cellular therapy: "Advancements in cellular therapies and regenerative medicine in digestive diseases," London, United Kingdom, May 3, 2017.

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Dos Santos, Claudia C; Baumgart, Daniel C; Cangemi, Giuseppina C; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Ciacci, Carolina; De Coppi, Paolo; Haldar, Debashis; Klersy, Catherine; Nostro, M Cristina; Ott, Michael; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Tomei, Alice A; Uygun, Basak; Vetrano, Stefania; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    A summary of the First Signature Series Event, "Advancements in Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine for Digestive Diseases," held on May 3, 2017, in London, United Kingdom, is presented. Twelve speakers from three continents covered major topics in the areas of cellular therapy and regenerative medicine applied to liver and gastrointestinal medicine as well as to diabetes mellitus. Highlights from their presentations, together with an overview of the global impact of digestive diseases and a proposal for a shared online collection and data-monitoring platform tool, are included in this proceedings. Although growing evidence demonstrate the feasibility and safety of exploiting cell-based technologies for the treatment of digestive diseases, regulatory and methodological obstacles will need to be overcome before the successful implementation in the clinic of these novel attractive therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of periodontitis in smokers with multiple sessions of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy or systemic antibiotics: A randomized clinical trial.

    Theodoro, Letícia Helena; Assem, Naida Zanini; Longo, Mariéllen; Alves, Márcio Luiz Ferro; Duque, Cristiane; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Vizoto, Natália Leal; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapies on smokers with chronic periodontitis, involving multiple adjunctive applications of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), and systemic metronidazole (MTZ) with amoxicillin (AMX). All participants were treated with scaling and root planing (SRP). Seventeen patients received 400 mg of MTZ and 500 mg of AMX three times per day for 7 days (MTZ + AMX). Additionally, 17 patients received a placebo, and 17 patients were treated with three applications of aPDT (immediately, 48 h and 96 h after SRP). Clinical and microbiological examinations were performed at baseline and at 90 and 180 days post-therapy. Subgingival samples were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. After 180 days, the patients in groups MTZ + AMX and aPDT had significantly lower mean probing depths, more clinical attachment level gains and less bleeding on probing. At 180 days, in the moderate pocket there was a reduction in the levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella nigrescens in the MTZ + AMX group, while group aPDT showed a reduction in Prevotella nigrescens. Furthermore, at 180 days, in the deep pocket a reduction in Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens was observed in group MTZ + AMX, as well as a reduction in the levels of Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens in group aPDT. In smokers with periodontitis, the MTZ + AMX and aPDT treatments significantly improved the effects of SRP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral health knowledge deficit: A barrier for seeking periodontal therapy? A pilot study

    Rajesh Hosadurga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In developing countries many chronic conditions including periodontitis are on the rise. Oral health attitudes and beliefs are important factors affecting oral health behavior. Aims: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the existing knowledge about periodontal disease and its impact on treatment seeking behavior in a group of population visiting the out-patient Department of Periodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, India. This study also attempted to identify deficit in the knowledge if present. Settings and Design: This is a written questionnaire based pilot study. 143 subjects (89 male and 54 female agreed to participate in the study. Simple random sampling was used for recruitment. Subjects and Methods: A written questionnaire consisting of 18 questions was given to the patients. Only one correct answer was present and the score given was + 1. The knowledge of the subjects was reflected by their ability to select a correct answer from the number of distractors (multiple choices, prespecified answers. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS software version 15.0 is used for all statistical analysis. The Chi-square test was employed to assess the passive knowledge of the participants in relation to their age. Results: We found a deficit in the knowledge in all the topics investigated. No consistent relationship between age and gender was found. Female respondents had better knowledge about oral hygiene compared to males. Conclusion: We made an attempt to assess the knowledge of periodontitis among the participants of this study. Knowledge deficit was found in the population surveyed. This knowledge deficit could be one of the reasons why patients do not seek periodontal treatment routinely unless there are acute symptoms. There is urgent need to educate the patients about the periodontal disease, the need for the treatment of periodontitis and advanced treatment modalities available.

  6. Oral health knowledge deficit: A barrier for seeking periodontal therapy? A pilot study

    Hosadurga, Rajesh; Boloor, Vinita; Kashyap, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Context: In developing countries many chronic conditions including periodontitis are on the rise. Oral health attitudes and beliefs are important factors affecting oral health behavior. Aims: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the existing knowledge about periodontal disease and its impact on treatment seeking behavior in a group of population visiting the out-patient Department of Periodontics, Yenepoya Dental College, India. This study also attempted to identify deficit in the knowledge if present. Settings and Design: This is a written questionnaire based pilot study. 143 subjects (89 male and 54 female) agreed to participate in the study. Simple random sampling was used for recruitment. Subjects and Methods: A written questionnaire consisting of 18 questions was given to the patients. Only one correct answer was present and the score given was + 1. The knowledge of the subjects was reflected by their ability to select a correct answer from the number of distractors (multiple choices, prespecified answers). Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS software version 15.0 is used for all statistical analysis. The Chi-square test was employed to assess the passive knowledge of the participants in relation to their age. Results: We found a deficit in the knowledge in all the topics investigated. No consistent relationship between age and gender was found. Female respondents had better knowledge about oral hygiene compared to males. Conclusion: We made an attempt to assess the knowledge of periodontitis among the participants of this study. Knowledge deficit was found in the population surveyed. This knowledge deficit could be one of the reasons why patients do not seek periodontal treatment routinely unless there are acute symptoms. There is urgent need to educate the patients about the periodontal disease, the need for the treatment of periodontitis and advanced treatment modalities available. PMID:26644723

  7. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Along With Myo-Inositol on High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Insulin Resistance in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Deepti; Tewari, Shikha; Narula, Satish Chander; Singhal, Savita Rani; Sharma, Rajinder Kumar

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy and medical treatment on the level of a serologic marker of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]) and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment [HOMA]) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and chronic periodontitis (CP). Women with PCOS and CP (n = 60) were randomly divided into two groups. The test group was treated with scaling and root planing (SRP) and myo-inositol (MI). The control group was treated with MI and given oral hygiene instructions. Anthropometric, metabolic, and periodontal parameters were assessed at baseline and re-evaluated at 3 and 6 months. All parameters of both groups at 6 months were compared with 25 systemically and periodontally healthy females (group A). Periodontal parameters were significantly improved in the test group compared with the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P 0.05) was observed in the test group compared with the control group at 3 and 6 months. Both the test and control group showed significant consistent improvement in metabolic parameters at 3- and 6-month follow-up, which was further comparable to group A. SRP together with medical treatment results in a greater reduction of systemic inflammatory burden compared with medical treatment alone in management of women with PCOS and CP.

  8. Transplantation of umbilical cord blood-derived cells for novel indications in regenerative therapy or immune modulation: a scoping review of clinical studies.

    Iafolla, Marco A J; Tay, Jason; Allan, David S

    2014-01-01

    Although used mainly for transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells in the treatment of blood disorders, umbilical cord blood (UCB)-based therapies are now being used increasingly for novel applications in nonhematopoietic diseases and as a form of cellular regenerative therapy or immune modulation. We performed a systematic scoping review by searching Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for published articles, and we searched www.clinicaltrials.com and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to describe the breadth of published studies and ongoing clinical activity in umbilical cord-based cellular therapy for regenerative therapy and immune modulation. The most commonly published area of expertise in the use of UCB-derived cellular transplantation for novel indications is for neurological disorders and this remains the most active area of study in ongoing registered trials. An increasingly broad range of disorders, however, are reflected in ongoing registered trials, which suggests greater activity, interest, and investment in UCB-derived cellular therapy. Interestingly, adult patients compose the majority of patients reported in published reports and registered ongoing clinical studies continue to enroll predominantly adult subjects. Geographically, Asian countries appear most active in UCB-derived cellular therapy and our analysis of ongoing studies suggests this trend will likely continue. Regular assessment of published and ongoing activity in UCB transplantation for emerging novel indications will be critical for informing UCB banking establishments and funding agencies to guide changes in banking practices related to emerging trends in cell therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Etiological periodontal treatment with and without low-level laser therapy on IL-1β level in gingival crevicular fluid: an in vivo multicentric pilot study.

    Mastrangelo, F; Dedola, A; Cattoni, F; Ferrini, F; Bova, F; Tatullo, M; Gherlone, E; Lo Muzio, L

    2018-01-01

    Cytokine proteins may have important roles during different human physiological and pathological processes. In the oral cavity, the bone loss and periodontal tissue pathology was related to inflammatory process activation. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of etiological periodontal therapy with and without the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) on clinical periodontal parameters and interleukin (IL)-1β level in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) from chronic periodontitis (CP) patients. Thirty non-smoker CP patients were selected from the Foggia University Dental Clinic and other 2 private dental clinics. All patients were divided into two homogeneous randomized groups: 15 patients were treated with only scaling and root planing (group 1) and 15 patients with scaling and root planing etiological treatment and LLLT (group 2). In all sites, at baseline before treatment, the periodontal pocket depth (PPD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were measured. In the PPD sites, the GCF samples were collected from 30 deep (≥5 mm) and shallow (≤3 mm) sites and IL-1β were evaluated at baseline, after 10 days and 1 month. In all the samples at baseline, the IL-1β concentration in GCF and BOP rate were significantly higher at deep PPD sites than at the shallow ones. After 10 days in all samples no PPD improvement was observed in the BOP rate but the IL-1 β level was statistically significantly improved (pdeep PPD sites, PPD and BOP improvements were observed. At same time, IL-1β levels were lower and statistically significantly (pdeep PPD sites with or with-out associated LLLT promotes periodontal health. Etiological treatment associated with LLLT, improves BOP and inflammation in periodontal disease. Moreover, the IL-1β concentration changes in GCF suggest these cytokines as a predictable marker of gingival inflammation in chronic periodontitis patients.

  10. Periodontal tissue engineering strategies based on nonoral stem cells.

    Requicha, João Filipe; Viegas, Carlos Alberto; Muñoz, Fernando; Reis, Rui Luís; Gomes, Manuela Estima

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease which constitutes an important health problem in humans due to its enormous prevalence and life threatening implications on systemic health. Routine standard periodontal treatments include gingival flaps, root planning, application of growth/differentiation factors or filler materials and guided tissue regeneration. However, these treatments have come short on achieving regeneration ad integrum of the periodontium, mainly due to the presence of tissues from different embryonic origins and their complex interactions along the regenerative process. Tissue engineering (TE) aims to regenerate damaged tissue by providing the repair site with a suitable scaffold seeded with sufficient undifferentiated cells and, thus, constitutes a valuable alternative to current therapies for the treatment of periodontal defects. Stem cells from oral and dental origin are known to have potential to regenerate these tissues. Nevertheless, harvesting cells from these sites implies a significant local tissue morbidity and low cell yield, as compared to other anatomical sources of adult multipotent stem cells. This manuscript reviews studies describing the use of non-oral stem cells in tissue engineering strategies, highlighting the importance and potential of these alternative stem cells sources in the development of advanced therapies for periodontal regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Meeting the need for regenerative therapies I: target-based incidence and its relationship to U.S. spending, productivity, and innovation.

    Parenteau, Nancy; Hardin-Young, Janet; Shannon, William; Cantini, Patrick; Russell, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Regenerative therapies possess high theoretical potential for medical advance yet their success as commercial therapeutics is still open to debate. Appropriate data on target opportunities that provide perspective and enable strategic decision making is necessary for both efficient and effective translation. Up until now, this data have been out of reach to research scientists and many start-up companies-the very groups currently looked to for the critical advance of these therapies. The target-based estimate of opportunity presented in this report demonstrates its importance in evaluating medical need and technology feasibility. In addition, analysis of U.S. research spending, productivity, and innovation reveals that U.S. basic research in this field would benefit from greater interdisciplinarity. Overcoming the barriers that currently prevent translation into high value therapies that are quickly clinically adopted requires simultaneous integration of engineering, science, business, and clinical practice. Achieving this integration is nontrivial.

  12. Enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration by periodontal cell implantation

    Yu, N.; Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Yang, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Due to a lack of regenerative potential, current treatments for periodontal defects do not always provide satisfactory clinical results. Previously, the implantation of a biomaterial scaffold-cell construct has been suggested as a clinically achievable approach. In this study, it was aimed to

  13. Maintenance after a complex orthoperio treatment in a case of generalized aggressive periodontitis: 7-year result.

    Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George; di Prisco, Manuela Occipite; Deli, Giorgio; Hoffmann, Oliver; Kasaj, Adrian

    2010-10-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) encompasses a distinct type of periodontal disease exhibiting much more rapid periodontal tissue destruction than chronic periodontitis. The best method for management of GAgP may include the use of both regenerative periodontal techniques and the administration of systemic antibiotics. The treatment of a case of GAgP over a period of 6.7 years is presented in this case report. Initial periodontal therapy (week 1- 32) consisted of supragingival plaque control and three appointments of scaling and root planing. Based on the periodontal pathogens isolated (5 species), the patient also received metronidazole plus amoxicillin for one week, followed 10 weeks later by metronidazole plus amoxicillin/clavulanate for one week. The patient was put on regular supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) thereafter. Orthodontic treatment was performed after completion of the initial therapy for 96 weeks. Measurements of clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing and plaque index were obtained at every examination. Antimicrobial and mechanical treatment resulted in eradication of all periopathogens and significantly improved all clinical parameters. During orthodontic treatment and active maintenance, there was no relapse of GAgP. The patient participated in SPT for 194 weeks and thereafter decided to discontinue SPT. Twenty-four months later a relapse of GAgP was diagnosed and all teeth had to be extracted. These results indicate that a combined mechanical and antimicrobial treatment approach can lead to consistent resolution of GAgP. Further studies including a larger number of cases are warranted to validate these findings.

  14. Effect of Topical Tetracycline Gel with Non Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hba1c and Lipid Profile in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Clinico- Biochemical Study

    A Haerian-Ardakani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to evaluate the Effect of topical tetracycline gel application with non surgical periodontal therapy on HbA1c and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: A total of 30 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received scaling and root planning, whereas the second group received scaling and root planning with topically applied tetracycline gel. Clinical factors such as GI, PI, PPD and biochemical factors such as HbA1c and lipid profile were assessed in beginning of study and 3 months later. Results: Comparing the clinical factors between the two groups revealed that periodontal pocket depth significantly reduced in tetracycline-received group. Regarding the biochemical factors, triglyceride levels decreased significantly in tetracycline-received group. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in regard with other clinical and biochemical factors. Conclusion: The study findings demonstrated that clinical and biochemical parameters have been improved after non surgical periodontal treatment in both groups. Although it seems that application of topical tetracycline gel combined with non-surgical periodontal therapy is effective in improvement of some clinical and biochemical factors like PPD and TG, it doesn’t offer any superiority in regard with other factors compared to mere non surgical periodontal therapy.

  15. Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry

    Mihnea Ioan Nicolescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting the progress achieved during the last years by scientific research and, in some cases, which has already been translated into clinical results. The distinct characteristics of stem cells and their microenvironment, together with their diversity in the oral cavity, are put into the context of research and clinical use. Examples of regenerative studies regarding endodontic and periodontal compartments, as well as hard (alveolar bone and soft (salivary glands related tissues, are presented to make the reader further acquainted with the topic. Instead of providing a conclusion, we will emphasize the importance for all dental community members, from young students to experienced dentists, of an early awareness rising regarding biomedical research progress in general and regenerative dentistry in particular.

  16. Little evidence for the use of diode lasers as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy.

    Dederich, Douglas N

    2015-03-01

    Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Embase databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) using thermal diode lasers as an adjunct to non-surgical conventional periodontal initial therapy conducted in patients ≥18 years old written in English or Dutch were considered. Study assessment data extraction and quality assessment was carried out independently by two reviewers. The main outcome variables were probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL), but plaque scores (PS), bleeding scores (BS) and the Gingival Index (GI) were also considered. Meta-analysis was carried out using a random effects model. Nine studies involving 247 patients were included. Seven studies were of split mouth design and two were parallel group studies. The study designs showed considerable heterogeneity and follow up ranged from six weeks to six months. Meta-analysis found no significant effect on PPD, CAL and PS. There was however a significant effect for GI and BS favouring adjunctive use of the diode laser. The collective evidence regarding adjunctive use of the diode laser with SRP indicates that the combined treatment provides an effect comparable to that of SRP alone. With respect to BS the results showed a small but significant effect favouring the diode laser, however, the clinical relevance of this difference remains uncertainStandard . This systematic review questions the adjunctive use of diode laser with traditional mechanical modalities of periodontal therapy in patients with periodontitis. The strength of the recommendation for the adjunctive use of the diode laser is considered to be 'moderate' for changes in PPD and CAL.

  17. An invention of thermo-responsive polymer surface, yielding cell sheet based regenerative therapies in cardiology and ophthalmology

    Sawa Y

    2015-12-01

    /2009/091/000590 after standardizing the procedures for collection of autologous bone marrow cells in January 2010. Out of the 104 patients, 68 patients met the inclusion criteria for the trial follow up. Of the total, 45 patients could not be followed up in spite of the team’s best efforts to trace them. Only 23 patients (34% were available for follow up. Amongst those, 19 patients (82.6% were alive at the end of the first year and 10 out of the 19 patients (52.6% had at least a 5% increase in the Ejection Fraction post therapy and had significant improvement in the functional status. The procedure was safe in all the other patients which were similar to the results of other studies reported so far. Though the results of this clinical trial infer that stem cells are not an alternative to heart transplantation they offer a 'dynamic cellular support' for regenerating functional and viable myocardium. As a step further in identifying definitive cell based therapy approaches to treat heart failure, cell sheet therapy was advocated by Prof. Sawa’s team. In Prof. Sawa’s Institute, longitudinal research team was launched in the late 1990s to develop new treatments for advanced cardiac disease by an array of basic experimental studies of surgical and regenerative approaches. As a result, placement of autologous or allogeneic stem/progenitor cell-sheets over the cardiac surface via surgical approach was proven to be the most safe and efficacious treatment for advanced cardiac failure. To grow the skeletal myoblasts as a sheet for clinical transplantation, Prof. Sawa’s team employed the thermo-responsive polymer dish developed by Prof. Okano’s team which enabled the in vitro growth of the skeletal myoblasts as patches and their easy separation for application over the ischemic/infarcted area of the heart after thorough validation in animal experiments [4]. A clinical study was, therefore, launched in 2006, wherein autologous skeletal myoblast cell-sheets were directly

  18. The assessment and appraisal of regenerative medicines and cell therapy products: an exploration of methods for review, economic evaluation and appraisal.

    Hettle, Robert; Corbett, Mark; Hinde, Sebastian; Hodgson, Robert; Jones-Diette, Julie; Woolacott, Nerys; Palmer, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) commissioned a 'mock technology appraisal' to assess whether changes to its methods and processes are needed. This report presents the findings of independent research commissioned to inform this appraisal and the deliberations of a panel convened by NICE to evaluate the mock appraisal. Our research included reviews to identify issues, analysis methods and conceptual differences and the relevance of alternative decision frameworks, alongside the development of an exemplar case study of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for treating acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. An assessment of previous evaluations of regenerative medicines found that, although there were a number of evidential challenges, none was unique to regenerative medicines or was beyond the scope of existing methods used to conceptualise decision uncertainty. Regarding the clinical evidence for regenerative medicines, the issues were those associated with a limited evidence base but were not unique to regenerative medicines: small non-randomised studies, high variation in response and the intervention subject to continuing development. The relative treatment effects generated from single-arm trials are likely to be optimistic unless it is certain that the historical data have accurately estimated the efficacy of the control agent. Pivotal trials may use surrogate end points, which, on average, overestimate treatment effects. To reduce overall uncertainty, multivariate meta-analysis of all available data should be considered. Incorporating indirectly relevant but more reliable (more mature) data into the analysis can also be considered; such data may become available as a result of the evolving regulatory pathways being developed by the European Medicines Agency. For the exemplar case of CAR T-cell therapy, target product profiles (TPPs) were developed, which considered the 'curative' and 'bridging to stem-cell transplantation

  19. Retreatment of failed regenerative endodontic of orthodontically treated immature permanent maxillary central incisor: a case report

    Musaed Fahad Al-Tammami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A revascularization procedure was shown to be the best alternative therapy for immature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical infection. A 12 year old female with a history of trauma to her upper central incisor and a sinus tract was referred for endodontic treatment. She was an active orthodontic patient and had undergone regenerative endodontic treatment for the past 2 years. Clinical examination revealed no response to sensibility, percussion, and palpation tests. The preoperative radiograph showed an open apex and apical rarefaction. The case was diagnosed as previously treated tooth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Regenerative endodontic retreatment was performed, and the case was followed for 3 years. Clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomography follow-up examination revealed an asymptomatic tooth, with evidence of periapical healing and root maturation.

  20. Role of Low-Level Laser Therapy as an Adjunct to Initial Periodontal Treatment in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Split-Mouth, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Demirturk-Gocgun, Oya; Baser, Ulku; Aykol-Sahin, Gokce; Dinccag, Nevin; Issever, Halim; Yalcin, Funda

    2017-02-01

    In this split-mouth clinical trial, we evaluated the clinical benefits of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The impaired wound healing seen in diabetic patients may affect the results of periodontal treatment and may require an additional approach. In total, 22 chronic periodontitis patients with type 2 DM were included. Applying a split-mouth design, two quadrants were treated with only scaling and root planing (SRP) as the control and those in the other two were treated with SRP + LLLT as the test sites in each patient. An 808 nm GaAlAs diode laser was performed in the test sites at the energy density of 4.46 J/cm 2 on days 1, 2, and 7 after SRP. Plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and clinical attachment level were measured at baseline and again at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Deep periodontal pockets (PD ≥4 mm) were evaluated separately. Test sites showed significant improvement in PI and BOP in deep pockets at the 1-month follow-up period (p < 0.001 and <0.001, respectively), whereas no difference was found between the control and the test sites in other periodontal parameters. LLLT during periodontal treatment offered minimal short-term additional benefit in deep pocket healing in patients with type 2 DM.

  1. Effects of periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein, sE-selectin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by peripheral blood-derived macrophages in diabetes. A pilot study.

    Lalla, E; Kaplan, S; Yang, J; Roth, G A; Papapanou, P N; Greenberg, S

    2007-06-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for vascular disease and periodontitis. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of periodontal treatment in diabetes with respect to alterations in the pro-inflammatory potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ten patients with diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis received full-mouth subgingival debridement. Blood samples for serum/plasma and mononuclear cell isolation were collected prior to and 4 wk after therapy. Mononuclear cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or ionomycin/phorbol ester to determine the pro-inflammatory capacity of macrophages and lymphocytes, respectively. Following periodontal treatment, all patients demonstrated a significant improvement in clinical periodontal status (p C-reactive protein significantly decreased by 37% (p periodontal therapy and a potential impact on atherosclerosis-related complications in diabetic individuals.

  2. Regenerative medicine in otorhinolaryngology.

    Wormald, J C R; Fishman, J M; Juniat, S; Tolley, N; Birchall, M A

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering using biocompatible scaffolds, with or without cells, can permit surgeons to restore structure and function following tissue resection or in cases of congenital abnormality. Tracheal regeneration has emerged as a spearhead application of these technologies, whilst regenerative therapies are now being developed to treat most other diseases within otolaryngology. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Ovid Medline and Ovid Embase, from database inception to 15 November 2014. A total of 561 papers matched the search criteria, with 76 fulfilling inclusion criteria. Articles were predominantly pre-clinical animal studies, reflecting the current status of research in this field. Several key human research articles were identified and discussed. The main issues facing research in regenerative surgery are translation of animal model work into human models, increasing stem cell availability so it can be used to further research, and development of better facilities to enable implementation of these advances.

  3. Phase I/II Trial of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation with a Three-Dimensional Woven-Fabric Scaffold for Periodontitis

    Shunsuke Baba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is emerging as a promising option, but the potential of autologous stem cells has not been investigated well in clinical settings of periodontal treatment. In this clinical study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of a new regenerative therapy based on the surgical implantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with a biodegradable three-dimensional (3D woven-fabric composite scaffold and platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Ten patients with periodontitis, who required a surgical procedure for intrabony defects, were enrolled in phase I/II trial. Once MSCs were implanted in each periodontal intrabony defect, the patients were monitored during 36 months for a medical exam including laboratory tests of blood and urine samples, changes in clinical attachment level, pocket depth, and linear bone growth (LBG. All three parameters improved significantly during the entire follow-up period (p<0.0001, leading to an average LBG of 4.7 mm after 36 months. Clinical mobility measured by Periotest showed a decreasing trend after the surgery. No clinical safety problems attributable to the investigational MSCs were identified. This clinical trial suggests that the stem cell therapy using MSCs-PRP/3D woven-fabric composite scaffold may constitute a novel safe and effective regenerative treatment option for periodontitis.

  4. Local adjunct effect of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetics: split-mouth double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Castro Dos Santos, Nídia Cristina; Andere, Naira Maria Rebelatto Bechara; Araujo, Cássia Fernandes; de Marco, Andrea Carvalho; Dos Santos, Lúcio Murilo; Jardini, Maria Aparecida Neves; Santamaria, Mauro Pedrine

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes has become a global epidemic. Its complications can have a significant impact on quality of life, longevity, and public health costs. The presence of diabetes might impair the prognosis of periodontal treatments due to its negative influence on wound healing. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a local approach that can promote bacterial decontamination in periodontal pockets. The aim of this study was to investigate the local effect of adjunct aPDT to ultrasonic periodontal debridement (UPD) and compare it to UD only for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. Twenty type 2 diabetic patients with moderate to severe generalized chronic periodontitis were selected. Two periodontal pockets with probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥5 mm received UPD only (UPD group) or UPD plus adjunct aPDT (UPD + aPDT group). Periodontal clinical measures were collected and compared at baseline and 30, 90, and 180 days. After 180 days of follow-up, there were statistically significant reductions in PD from 5.75 ± 0.91 to 3.47 ± 0.97 mm in the UPD group and from 6.15 ± 1.27 to 3.71 ± 1.63 mm in the UPD + aPDT group. However, intergroup analysis did not reveal statistically significant differences in any of the evaluated clinical parameters (p > 0.05). The adjunct application of aPDT to UPD did not present additional benefits for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients. The ClinicalTrials.gov identifier of the present study is NCT02627534.

  5. [Effect of the frequency of maintenance therapy on patients treated for gingivitis and incipient marginal periodontitis].

    Rojas, I F; Zepeda, M S; Zúñiga, H P

    1990-11-01

    The effectiveness of maintenance care program applied at different period of time was evaluate in patients treated for gingivitis and incipiente marginal periodontitis. Fifty six patients were divided in three groups, each one controlled three times (each 2, 4 and 6 months respectively), to evaluate periodontal health. At each control, gingival index and plaque index was registered and patients had profilaxis and reinforcement of dental care instructions. All patients knew and practiced a control plaque control during active treatment. Results demonstrated that maintenance care program applied each 2 months, could get better clinical healthy periodontal conditions, without influence of patient's control plaque. Those patients with good hygiene could provide for an acceptable level of periodontal health even in patients controlled each 4 and 6 months. Positive correlations between controls in each index are indicative for that. Age seemingly do not have influence like etiological factor of recurrence inflammation. High correlation between plaque index and gingival index was found in every control mainly in the groups controlled each 4 and 6 months.

  6. Microbiological changes after periodontal therapy in diabetic patients with inadequate metabolic control

    Carina Maciel Silva-Boghossian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment (SRP on the composition of the subgingival microbiota of chronic periodontitis (CP in individuals with type 2 diabetes (DM2 with inadequate metabolic control and in systemically healthy (SH individuals. Forty individuals (20 DM2 and 20 SH with CP underwent full-mouth periodontal examination. Subgingival plaque was sampled from 4 deep sites of each individual and tested for mean prevalence and counts of 45 bacterial taxa by the checkerboard method. Clinical and microbiological assessments were performed before and 3 months after SRP. At baseline, those in the DM2 group presented a significantly higher percentage of sites with visible plaque and bleeding on probing compared with those in the SH group (p < 0.01. Those in the DM2 group presented significantly higher levels of C. rectus and P. gingivalis, and lower prevalence of P. micra and S. anginosus, compared with those in the SH group (p ≤ 0.001. At the 3-month visit, both groups showed a significant improvement in all clinical parameters (p < 0.01. Those in the DM2 group showed significantly higher prevalence and/or levels of A. gerencseriae, A. naeslundii I, A. oris, A. odontolyticus, C. sputigena, F. periodonticum, and G. morbillorum compared with those in the SH group (p ≤ 0.001. However, those in the DM2 group showed a significant reduction in the levels of P. intermedia, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola (p ≤ 0.001 over time. Those in the SRP group showed improved periodontal status and reduced levels of putative periodontal pathogens at 3 months’ evaluation compared with those in the DM2 group with inadequate metabolic control.

  7. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  8. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T.; Jhaveri, Hiral M.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Wani, Mohan R.

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  9. Impact of Oral Health Education and a Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy on the Quality of Life of Patients with Diabetes Mellitus*

    Oanta Cornelia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of oral health education and non-surgical periodontal therapy on the quality of life for a group of patients with type I diabetes mellitus, in Iasi, Romania.

  10. Regenerative engineering

    Laurencin, Cato T

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative Engineering: The Future of Medicine Saadiq F. El-Amin III , MD , PhD; Joylene W.L. Thomas, MD ; Ugonna N. Ihekweazu, MD ; Mia D. Woods, MS; and Ashim Gupta, MSCell Biology Gloria Gronowicz, PhD and Karen Sagomonyants, DMDStem Cells and Tissue Regeneration Kristen Martins-Taylor, PhD; Xiaofang Wang, MD , PhD; Xue-Jun Li, PhD; and Ren-He Xu, MD , PhDIntroduction to Materials Science Sangamesh G. Kumbar, PhD and Cato T. Laurencin, MD , PhDBiomaterials A. Jon Goldberg, PhD and Liisa T. Kuhn, PhDIn Vitro Assessment of Cell-Biomaterial Interactions Yong Wang, PhDHost Response to Biomate

  11. Combination of platelet-rich plasma within periodontal ligament stem cell sheets enhances cell differentiation and matrix production.

    Xu, Qiu; Li, Bei; Yuan, Lin; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Han; Sun, Jin; Ge, Song; Jin, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The longstanding goal of periodontal therapy is to regenerate periodontal tissues. Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been gaining increasing popularity for use in the orofacial region, whether PRP is useful for periodontal regeneration is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mixture of periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets and PRP promoted bone regeneration, one of the most important measurement indices of periodontal tissue regenerative capability in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different doses of PRP on the differentiation of human PDLSCs. Then cell sheet formation, extracellular matrix deposition and osteogenic gene expression in response to different doses of PRP treatment during sheet grafting was investigated. Furthermore, we implanted PDLSC sheets treated with 1% PRP subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice to evaluate their bone-regenerative capability. The results revealed that 1% PRP significantly enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Based on the production of extracellular matrix proteins, the results of scanning electron microscopy and the expression of the osteogenic genes ALP, Runx2, Col-1 and OCN, the provision of 1% PRP for PDLSC sheets was the most effective PRP administration mode for cell sheet formation. The results of in vivo transplantation showed that 1% PRP-mediated PDLSC sheets exhibited better periodontal tissue regenerative capability than those obtained without PRP intervention. These data suggest that a suitable concentration of PRP stimulation may enhance extracellular matrix production and positively affect cell behaviour in PDLSC sheets. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in the Diagnosis and Therapy of Periodontitis

    L'ubomíra Tóthová; L'ubomíra Tóthová; Peter Celec; Peter Celec; Peter Celec

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. However, large interventional studies with antioxidants failed to show benefits in the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, or diabetes mellitus. Numerous clinical studies have confirmed the association of oxidative stress markers and periodontitis. Technical and biological variability is high for most of the analyzed markers and none of them seems to be optimal for routine clinical use. In a...

  13. Reconstructive periodontal therapy with simultaneous ridge augmentation. A clinical and histological case series report.

    Windisch, Péter; Szendroi-Kiss, Dóra; Horváth, Attila; Suba, Zsuzsanna; Gera, István; Sculean, Anton

    2008-09-01

    Treatment of intrabony periodontal defects with a combination of a natural bone mineral (NBM) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) has been shown to promote periodontal regeneration in intrabony defects. In certain clinical situations, the teeth presenting intrabony defects are located at close vicinity of the resorbed alveolar ridge. In these particular cases, it is of clinical interest to simultaneously reconstruct both the intrabony periodontal defect and the resorbed alveolar ridge, thus allowing insertion of endosseous dental implants. The aim of the present study was to present the clinical and histological results obtained with a new surgical technique designed to simultaneously reconstruct the intrabony defect and the adjacently located resorbed alveolar ridge. Eight patients with chronic advanced periodontitis displaying intrabony defects located in the close vicinity of resorbed alveolar ridges were consecutively enrolled in the study. After local anesthesia, mucoperiosteal flaps were raised, the granulation tissue removed, and the roots meticulously scaled and planed. A subepithelial connective tissue graft was harvested from the palate and sutured to the oral flap. The intrabony defect and the adjacent alveolar ridge were filled with a NBM and subsequently covered with a bioresorbable collagen membrane (GTR). At 11-20 months (mean, 13.9+/-3.9 months) after surgery, implants were placed, core biopsies retrieved, and histologically evaluated. Mean pocket depth reduction measured 3.8+/-1.7 mm and mean clinical attachment level gain 4.3+/-2.2 mm, respectively. Reentry revealed in all cases a complete fill of the intrabony component and a mean additional vertical hard tissue gain of 1.8+/-1.8 mm. The histologic evaluation indicated that most NBM particles were surrounded by bone. Mean new bone and mean graft area measured 17.8+/-2.8% and 32.1+/-8.3%, respectively. Within their limits, the present findings indicate that the described surgical approach may be

  14. Periodontal pathogen levels in adolescents before, during, and after fixed orthodontic appliance therapy.

    Thornberg, Michelle J; Riolo, Christopher S; Bayirli, Burcu; Riolo, Michael L; Van Tubergen, Elizabeth A; Kulbersh, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to document and investigate changes in periodontal pathogen levels before, during, and after orthodontic treatment in adolescents. DNA gene probe analysis was used to quantify the levels of 8 periodontal pathogens before, during, and after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances in 190 concurrently treated adolescent orthodontic patients. The 8 pathogens examined were Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (AA), Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG), Prevotella intermedia (PI), Tannerella forsythia (TF), Eikenella corrodens (EC), Fusobacterium nucleatum (FN), Treponema denticola (TD), and Campylobacter rectus (CR). Chi-square tests were used to determine whether the percentages of subjects with high counts significantly changed over time. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to derive the relative risk of higher counts of pathogenic bacteria with fixed appliances at the various time intervals studied. For 6 (PI, TF, EC, FN, TD, CR) of the 8 pathogens, the percentages of subjects with high pathogen counts increased significantly after 6 months of fixed appliance treatment, but these returned to pretreatment levels by 12 months of orthodontic treatment. No pathogen level was significantly higher after 12 months of orthodontic treatment, and orthodontic treatment was found to be significantly protective for half of the pathogens (EC, FN, TD, CR) posttreatment. Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances does not increase the risk of high levels of these periodontal pathogens.

  15. Nonsurgical therapy of chronic periodontitis with adjunctive systemic azithromycin or amoxicillin/metronidazole.

    Jentsch, Holger F R; Buchmann, Andreas; Friedrich, Abel; Eick, Sigrun

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present study is to compare the effect of systemic adjunctive use of azithromycin with amoxicillin/metronidazole to scaling and root planing (SRP) in a clinical study. Data from 60 individuals with chronic periodontitis were evaluated after full-mouth SRP. Antibiotics were given from the first day of SRP, in the test group (n = 29), azithromycin for 3 days and, in the control group (n = 31), amoxicillin/metronidazole for7 days. Probing depth (PD), attachment level (AL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) were recorded at baseline and after 3 and 12 months. Gingival crevicular fluid was analyzed for matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-8 and interleukin (IL)-1beta levels. Subgingival plaque was taken for assessment of the major bacteria associated with periodontitis. In both groups, PD, AL, and BOP were significantly reduced (p chronic periodontitis; however, a randomized placebo-controlled multicenter study is needed. Application of azithromycin as a single antibiotic for 3 days might be considered as an additional adjunctive antibiotic to SRP in selected patients.

  16. The Kidney and Periodontal Disease (KAPD) study: A pilot randomized controlled trial testing the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on chronic kidney disease.

    Grubbs, Vanessa; Garcia, Faviola; Jue, Bonnie L; Vittinghoff, Eric; Ryder, Mark; Lovett, David; Carrillo, Jacqueline; Offenbacher, Steven; Ganz, Peter; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Powe, Neil R

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains a prevalent public health problem that disproportionately affects minorities and the poor, despite intense efforts targeting traditional risk factors. Periodontal diseases are common bacterial plaque-induced inflammatory conditions that can respond to treatment and have been implicated as a CKD risk factor. However there is limited evidence that treatment of periodontal disease slows the progression of CKD. We describe the protocol of the Kidney and Periodontal Disease (KAPD) study, a 12-month un-blinded, randomized, controlled pilot trial with two intent-to-treat treatment arms: 1. immediate intensive non-surgical periodontal treatment or 2. rescue treatment with delayed intensive treatment. The goals of this pilot study are to test the feasibility of conducting a larger trial in an ethnically and racially diverse, underserved population (mostly poor and/or low literacy) with both CKD and significant periodontal disease to determine the effect of intensive periodontal treatment on renal and inflammatory biomarkers over a 12-month period. To date, KAPD has identified 634 potentially eligible patients who were invited to in-person screening. Of the 83 (13.1%) of potentially eligible patients who attended in-person screening, 51 (61.4%) were eligible for participation and 46 enrolled in the study. The mean age of participants is 59.2years (range 34 to 73). Twenty of the participants (43.5%) are Black and 22 (47.8%) are Hispanic. Results from the KAPD study will provide needed preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of non-surgical periodontal treatment to slow CKD progression and inform the design future clinical research trials. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Mesenchymal dental stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Francisco-Javier; Insausti, Carmen-Luisa; Iniesta, Francisca; Blanquer, Miguel; Ramírez, María-del-Carmen; Meseguer, Luis; Meseguer-Henarejos, Ana-Belén; Marín, Noemí; Martínez, Salvador; Moraleda, José-María

    2012-11-01

    In the last decade, tissue engineering is a field that has been suffering an enormous expansion in the regenerative medicine and dentistry. The use of cells as mesenchymal dental stem cells of easy access for dentist and oral surgeon, immunosuppressive properties, high proliferation and capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts, cementoblasts, osteoblasts and other cells implicated in the teeth, suppose a good perspective of future in the clinical dentistry. However, is necessary advance in the known of growth factors and signalling molecules implicated in tooth development and regeneration of different structures of teeth. Furthermore, these cells need a fabulous scaffold that facility their integration, differentiation, matrix synthesis and promote multiple specific interactions between cells. In this review, we give a brief description of tooth development and anatomy, definition and classification of stem cells, with special attention of mesenchymal stem cells, commonly used in the cellular therapy for their trasdifferentiation ability, non ethical problems and acceptable results in preliminary clinical trials. In terms of tissue engineering, we provide an overview of different types of mesenchymal stem cells that have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs), and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs), growth factors implicated in regeneration teeth and types of scaffolds for dental tissue regeneration.

  18. Radionecrosis skin model induced an athymic mouse nude (Nu/Nu) for development of dermal-epidermal human substitute based regenerative therapy

    Mosca, Rodrigo Crespo

    2014-01-01

    The neoplasms incidence has increased significantly in recent years and continued population growth and aging will increase the statistics of this illness in the world's diseases. The cancer treatment usually consists in individual or combined use of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy depending on the etiology of the tumor. In cases where radiotherapy is used in addition to the therapeutic effects of radiation, specific complications can occur, and in the skin, these complications can be present with a clinical expression ranging from erythema to radionecrosis, and this latter being the adverse effect with greater severity. The radionecrosis treatment consists in debridement necrotic areas and covering the surgical wounds. Autologous grafts are most commonly used for this covering, however when large areas are affected, allografts can be used for occlusive treatment and the keratinocytes and adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) addition becomes an alternative, due to the knowing for immunomodulatory and regenerative response. For that reason, aiming to simulate the radionecrosis adverse effects, an animal model of induced cutaneous radionecrosis was created, in athymic mouse Nude (Nu/Nu), for developing regenerative therapies based on human dermal-epidermal substitutes containing keratinocytes and ADSC, which proved occlusive as an efficient treatment, furthermore, having this radionecrosis animal model established, new possibilities for treatment of diseases involving dermal regeneration, can be tested. (author)

  19. Vital Pulp Therapy of a Mature Molar with Concurrent Hyperplastic Pulpitis, Internal Root Resorption and Periradicular Periodontitis: A Case Report.

    Asgary, Saeed; Kemal Çalışkan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) of permanent mature teeth is continuously ascertaining to be a more reliable endodontic treatment. The purpose of this case report was to describe successful VPT of a mature mandibular left first molar with concurrent hyperplastic pulpitis, internal root resorption and periradicular periodontitis in a 35-year-old male patient. After complete caries removal and access cavity preparation, the dental pulp was removed from the coronal third of the roots. To protect the remaining pulp, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed and adapted into the cavities; the tooth was then restored with amalgam. Six months after VPT, radiographic examination showed evidence of periradicular healing. Clinically, the tooth was functional without signs and symptoms of infection/inflammation. The successful outcome of this case suggests that diseased dental pulp (i.e. irreversible pulpitis) has the potential to heal after pulp protection with CEM biocement.

  20. [Quantitive study of interleukin 1beta in periapical exudates of chronic periapical periodontitis in the course of root canal therapy].

    Yan, Pei-fang; Liang, Jing-ping; Chen, Wei-min; Gu, Shen-sheng

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the relationship between IL-1beta and clinical findings of chronic apical periodontitis and to explore the function of IL-1beta during the endodontic interappointment flare-ups. Periapical exudates samples were obtained from 19 teeth suffering from endodontic flare-ups after root canal preparation and 20 teeth without any symptoms and signs at the second visit after root canal preparation. The levels of IL-1beta were determined by ELISA and the data was analyzed by SAS6.12 software package. Significantly higher levels of IL-1beta were found in periapical exudates from teeth suffering from endodontic flare-ups than that before canal preparation(Pendodontic therapy if there were no symptom at the second visit (Pendodontic interappointment flare-up.

  1. Vital Pulp Therapy of a Mature Molar with Concurrent Hyperplastic Pulpitis, Internal Root Resorption and Periradicular Periodontitis: A Case Report

    Asgary, Saeed; Kemal Çalışkan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) of permanent mature teeth is continuously ascertaining to be a more reliable endodontic treatment. The purpose of this case report was to describe successful VPT of a mature mandibular left first molar with concurrent hyperplastic pulpitis, internal root resorption and periradicular periodontitis in a 35-year-old male patient. After complete caries removal and access cavity preparation, the dental pulp was removed from the coronal third of the roots. To protect the remaining pulp, calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed and adapted into the cavities; the tooth was then restored with amalgam. Six months after VPT, radiographic examination showed evidence of periradicular healing. Clinically, the tooth was functional without signs and symptoms of infection/inflammation. The successful outcome of this case suggests that diseased dental pulp (i.e. irreversible pulpitis) has the potential to heal after pulp protection with CEM biocement. PMID:26523145

  2. Intraosseous anesthesia using a computer-controlled system during non-surgical periodontal therapy (root planing): Two case reports.

    Han, Keumah; Kim, Jongbin

    2018-02-01

    Local anesthesia is administered to control pain, but it may induce fear and anxiety. Root planing is a non-surgical periodontal therapy; however, when it is performed in an extensive manner, some tissue removal is inevitable. Notably, this removal may be so painful that local anesthesia is required to be administered to the area scheduled for the treatment. Although patients tend to accept root planing easily, they frequently express a fear of local anesthesia. Intraosseous anesthesia (IA) is an intraosseous injection technique, whereby local anesthetic is injected into the cancellous bone supporting the teeth. A computer-controlled IA system (CIAS) exhibits multiple benefits, such as less painful anesthesia, reduced soft tissue numbness, and the provision of palatal or lingual, as well as buccal, anesthesia via single needle penetration. In this report, we present two cases of root planing that were performed under local anesthesia, using a CIAS.

  3. Loss of proliferation and differentiation capacity of aged human periodontal ligament stem cells and rejuvenation by exposure to the young extrinsic environment.

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Shi; Ma, Dandan; Tang, Liang; Duan, Yinzhong; Jin, Yan

    2009-09-01

    The application of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) may be effective for periodontal regenerative therapy. As tissue regenerative potential may be negatively regulated by aging, whether aging and its microenvironment modify human PDLSCs remains a question. In this study, we compared the proliferation and differentiation capacity of PDLSCs obtained from young and aged donors. Then, we exposed aged PDLSCs to young periodontal ligament cell-conditioned medium (PLC-CM), and young PDLSCs were exposed to aged PLC-CM. Morphological appearance, colony-forming assay, cell cycle analysis, osteogenic and adipogenic induction media, gene expression of cementoblast phenotype, and in vivo differentiation capacities of PDLSCs were evaluated. PDLSCs obtained from aged donors exhibited decreased proliferation and differentiation capacity when compared with those from young donors. Young PLC-CM enhanced the proliferation and differentiation capacity of PDLSCs from aged donors. Aged PDLSCs induced by young PLC-CM showed enhanced tissue-regenerative capacity to produce cementum/periodontal ligament-like structures, whereas young PDLSCs induced by aged PLC-CM transplants mainly formed connective tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first study to mimic the developmental microenvironment of PDLSCs in vitro, and our data suggest that age influences the proliferation and differentiation potential of human PDLSCs, and that the activity of human PDLSCs can be modulated by the extrinsic microenvironment.

  4. Effect of Periodontal Therapy With Amoxicillin-Metronidazole on Pharyngeal Carriage of Penicillin- and Erythromycin-Resistant Viridans Streptococci.

    Mombelli, Andrea; Cionca, Norbert; Almaghlouth, Adnan; Cherkaoui, Abdessalam; Schrenzel, Jacques; Giannopoulou, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have focused on antibiotic resistance of Gram-negative bacteria before and after periodontal therapy. The purpose of this analysis is to assess changes in resistance patterns of the commensal Gram-positive microbiota. The viridans group streptococci (VGS) have been suggested to serve as reservoirs of resistance genes for more pathogenic streptococci and may be implicated in some non-oral infections. In this randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with periodontitis are distributed randomly into two groups. In group A, patients received 375 mg amoxicillin and 500 mg metronidazole three times per day for 7 days during the non-surgical treatment phase (T1). In group B, the antibiotics were administered during the surgical phase (T2). Resistance of VGS to penicillin and erythromycin was determined by the epsilometer test. At baseline, VGS from 12.5% (group A) and 11.8% (group B) of patients had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >2 μg/mL to penicillin. Three months after T1, VGS from 15.6% and 16.7% of patients had an MIC >2 μg/mL, respectively. Six months after T2 VGS from 5.9% and 5.9% and 12 months after T2 VGS from 6.1% and 6.3% patients had an MIC >2 μg/mL. There was no effect of therapy with antibiotics, administered either in T1 or T2, on the carriage of penicillin-resistant VGS. Erythromycin resistance was high at baseline and remained unchanged throughout the study. MICs for penicillin and erythromycin were correlated (P penicillin or erythromycin.

  5. Treatment of periodontal abcess with Class II furcation involvement

    Nur Rahmah; Arni Irawaty Djais

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of periodontal abscess with furcation involvement has its own challenges in achieving the success of periodontal treatment. Teeth with periodontal abscesses often indicate the presence of furcation involvement. Most periodontal abscess occurs in approximately 92.5% molar. Furcation involvement on tooth abscesses had a greater challenge to the success of periodontal therapy. A male patient aged 36 years came to the clinic with active periodontal disease. On examination, the teeth are...

  6. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis

    Izabela Korona-Głowniak; Radosław Siwiec; Marcin Berger; Anna Malm; Jolanta Szymańska

    2017-01-01

    The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host’s health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridi...

  7. Personalized Regenerative Medicine

    Babak Arjmand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine as a novel field of medicine refers to the prescription of specific therapeutics procedure for an individual. This approach has established based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information and data. The terms precision and personalized medicines are sometimes applied interchangeably. However, there has been a shift from “personalized medicine” towards “precision medicine”. Although personalized medicine emerged from pharmacogenetics, nowadays it covers many fields of healthcare. Accordingly, regenerative medicine and cellular therapy as the new fields of medicine use cell-based products in order to develop personalized treatments. Different sources of stem cells including mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been considered in targeted therapies which could give many advantages. iPSCs as the novel and individual pluripotent stem cells have been introduced as the appropriate candidates for personalized cell therapies. Cellular therapies can provide a personalized approach. Because of person-to-person and population differences in the result of stem cell therapy, individualized cellular therapy must be adjusted according to the patient specific profile, in order to achieve best therapeutic results and outcomes. Several factors should be considered to achieve personalized stem cells therapy such as, recipient factors, donor factors, and the overall body environment in which the stem cells could be active and functional. In addition to these factors, the source of stem cells must be carefully chosen based on functional and physical criteria that lead to optimal outcomes.

  8. Recommendations for using regenerative endodontic procedures in permanent immature traumatized teeth.

    Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Murray, Peter E

    2012-02-01

    The regeneration of immature permanent teeth following trauma could be beneficial to reduce the risk of fracture and loss of millions of teeth each year. Regenerative endodontic procedures include revascularization, partial pulpotomy, and apexogenesis. Several case reports give these procedures a good prognosis as an alternative to apexification. Care is needed to deliver regenerative endodontic procedures that maintain or restore the vitality of teeth, but which also disinfect and remove necrotic tissues. Regeneration can be accomplished through the activity of the cells from the pulp, periodontium, vascular, and immune system. Most therapies use the host's own pulp or vascular cells for regeneration, but other types of dental stem cell therapies are under development. There are no standardized treatment protocols for endodontic regeneration. The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature and suggest guidelines for using regenerative endodontic procedures for the treatment of permanent immature traumatized teeth. Recommendations for the selection of regenerative and conventional procedures based on the type of tooth injury, fracture type, presence of necrosis or infection, periodontal status, presence of periapical lesions, stage of tooth development, vitality status, patient age, and patient health status will be reviewed. Because of the lack of long-term evidence to support the use of regenerative endodontic procedures in traumatized teeth with open apices, revascularization regeneration procedures should only be attempted if the tooth is not suitable for root canal obturation, and after apexogenesis, apexification, or partial pulpotomy treatments have already been attempted and have a poor prognosis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Endodontic, surgical and periodontal treatment of dens invaginatus. Case report.

    Castellarin, M; Demitri, V; Politi, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a single stage global treatment of endodontic, periapical and periodontal lesions in a lateral maxillary incisor with dens invaginatus. A 24 year-old woman presenting a lateral maxillary incisor with dens invaginatus in association with periapica1 and periodontal lesions underwent simultaneous surgical, endodontic and periodontal regenerative procedures. At 2, 6, 12, 18 months follow-up the radiographic healing appeared to be improved and the periapical lesion healed completely 1 year after surgical intervention. Surgery in association with endodontic and periodontal procedures represents the treatment of choice to maximize long term prognosis in cases of dens invaginatus with chronic periapical and periodontal lesions.

  10. Variation of perimplant biofilm induced by non surgical periodontal therapy and the use of probiotics

    Marcello Gatti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to improved surgical tecniques the use of dental implants has increased greatly. However, high rates of osseointegrated correctly implants, over the years are undermined by disease of bacterial etiology in the perimplant zone, especially by Gram negative anaerobes such as in gingivitis and periodontitis, in particular: Fusobacterium spp.(F., Treponema denticola (T.d., Tannerella forsythensis (T.f., Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a., Prevotella intermedia (P.i. e Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.. The mechanic treatment (MS results in a reduction of the total bacterial count (TBC and a slight change in the subgingival bacterial microflora towards the less pathogenic species and more like those of a healthy periodontium.Also the use of a probiotic in the form of buccal tablets of Lactobacillus reuteri (L.r., as demonstrated in this study, is thought to improve and modulate the composition of plaque, as it is able to exert an inhibitory effect on oral bacteria that support caries, gingivitis, periodontal and perimplant disease with a combination of different mechanisms.

  11. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy with/without diode laser modulates metabolic control of type 2 diabetics with periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial

    Koçak, E.; Sağlam, M.; Kayış, S.A.; Dündar, N.; Kebapçılar, L.; Loos, B.G.; Hakki, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment with/without diode laser (DL) decontamination improves clinical parameters, the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in gingival crevicular fluid and metabolic

  12. Is adjunctive photodynamic therapy more effective than scaling and root planing alone in the treatment of periodontal disease in hyperglycemic patients? A systematic review.

    Javed, Fawad; Salehpoor, Danial; Al-Dhafeeri, Talal; Yousuf, Muhammad; Malmstrom, Hans; Khan, Junad; Akram, Zohaib

    2018-02-19

    To assess the impact of scaling and root planing (SRP) with and without adjunct photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontal disease (PD) in hyperglycemic patients. Databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE; and CENTRAL) were searched up to December 2017. The addressed PICO question was: "What is the effectiveness of adjunctive PDT to non-surgical periodontal treatment by means of clinical periodontal and glycemic parameters in hyperglycemic patients?" Four clinical trials and 1 experimental study were included. Energy fluence, power output, power density and duration of irradiation were 2.79 joules per square centimeters (J cm -2 ), 150 milliwatts (mW), 428 milliwatts per square centimeters (mW cm -2 ) and 133 seconds (s) respectively. All studies reporting clinical periodontal and metabolic parameters, showed that aPDT was effective in the treatment of periodontal inflammation in hyperglycemic patients at follow-up. When compared with SRP alone, none of the studies showed additional benefits of PDT as compared to SRP alone at follow up. Three studies showed no influence of SRP with or without aPDT on HbA1c levels. One study showed a significant reduction of HbA1c levels in adjunctive aPDT as compared to SRP alone at follow-up. It remains debatable whether adjunctive PDT as compared to SRP is effective in the treatment of periodontal inflammation and reduction of HbA1c levels in hyperglycemic patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Compliance and its role in successful treatment of an advanced periodontal case: review of the literature and a case report.

    Soolari, Ahmad

    2002-05-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic disease that is perceived by many patients to be nonthreatening. Periodontal therapy has been shown to be less effective if a regular periodontal maintenance schedule is not followed after completion of active therapy. Periodontal maintenance is an integral part of successful periodontal therapy.

  14. Histopathological, Microbiological, and Radiographic Analysis of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for the Treatment of Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: A Study in Rats' Molars.

    Trindade, Alessandra Cesar; de Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias; Barth Junior, Valdir Cristóvão; Gallo, Stephanie Wagner; Follmann, Carina; Wolle, Carlos Frederico Brilhante; Steier, Liviu; Morgental, Renata Dornelles; Weber, João Batista Blessmann

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo, by histological and radiographic analysis, the response of apical tissues of rats' teeth with experimentally induced apical periodontitis, after one- and two-session endodontic treatment with and without photodynamic therapy (PDT). A microbiological analysis was also performed to verify bacterial reduction after each treatment. Studies carried out in recent years highlighted the antibacterial potential of PDT when associated with conventional endodontic therapy in vitro. Although the antimicrobial effect of PDT is well-established, tissue response to PDT in teeth with apical periodontitis lacks studies. Thirty-two rats' root canals were assigned to four groups: one session/PDT-[chemomechanical preparation (CMP)+root canal filling (RCF)]; two sessions/PDT- [CMP+calcium hydroxide (CH) for 14 days+RCF]; one session/PDT+ [CMP+PDT+RCF], and two sessions/PDT+ [CMP+PDT+CH for 14 days+RCF]. For microbiological evaluation, samples were collected before and after proposed treatments. For radiographic and histological analysis, the animals were euthanized after 28 days and the mandibles surgically removed. PDT associated with conventional endodontic therapy was able to promote significant bacterial reduction in root canals with induced apical periodontitis, but this reduction was not significantly different to conventional endodontic therapy alone. Although radiographic evaluation showed no significant differences, histological analysis showed lower scores for neutrophils/eosinophils in PDT-treated groups and macrophages/giant cells in CH groups. The use of low-level laser as light source did not promote major improvement on radiographic and histological repair, but since the number of inflammatory cells slightly decreased, it may optimize repair by modulating inflammatory process. PDT may be indicated as an adjunct to conventional endodontic therapy for teeth with apical periodontitis, in association with an interappointment

  15. The periodontal abscess: a review.

    Herrera, D; Roldán, S; Sanz, M

    2000-06-01

    The periodontal abscess is a frequent periodontal condition in which periodontal tissues may be rapidly destroyed. Its importance is based on the possible need of urgent care, the affectation of tooth prognosis, and the possibility of infection spreading. There is scant information in the scientific literature regarding this condition and most of it has been published as case reports and text books, where conclusions are not evidence-based, but rather empirical observations made by recognised clinicians. The aim of this review was to critically analyse all available information on this subject in the dental and medical literature, including information on its prevalence, proposed etiologies and pathogenesis, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment alternatives. The periodontal abscess is the 3rd most frequent dental emergency, and it is specially prevalent among untreated periodontal patients and periodontal patients during maintenance. Different etiologies have been proposed, and 2 main groups can be distinguished, depending on its relation with periodontal pockets. In the case of a periodontitis-related abscess, the condition may appear as an exacerbation of a non-treated periodontitis or during the course of periodontal therapy. In non-periodontitis related abscesses, impaction of foreign objects, and radicular abnormalities are the 2 main causes. The abscess microflora seems to be similar to that of adult periodontitis, and it is dominated by gram-negative anaerobic rods, including well-known periodontal pathogens. Complications and consequences include tooth loss and the spread of the infection to other body sites. Diagnosis and treatment is mainly based on empiricism, since evidence-based data are not available. The role of systemic antibiotics, in the treatment of periodontal abscesses, is especially controversial.

  16. Periodontal Diseases

    ... diseases. The primary research focus was on oral bacteria. Periodontal diseases were thought to begin when chalky white ... tools to target their treatment specifically to the bacteria that trigger periodontal disease. At the same time, because biofilms form ...

  17. Periodontics--tissue engineering and the future.

    Douglass, Gordon L

    2005-03-01

    Periodontics has a long history of utilizing advances in science to expand and improve periodontal therapies. Recently the American Academy of Periodontology published the findings of the Contemporary Science Workshop, which conducted state-of-the-art evidence-based reviews of current and emerging areas in periodontics. The findings of this workshop provide the basis for an evidence-based approach to periodontal therapy. While the workshop evaluated all areas of periodontics, it is in the area of tissue engineering that the most exciting advances are becoming a reality.

  18. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of phase I periodontal therapy on levels of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1

    Pallavi S. Ghodpage

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: We observed that as the extent of periodontal destruction increases, MMP-1 concentration increases and TIMP-1 concentration decreases in GCF. When chronic periodontitis patients were treated by scaling and root planing (SRP, the average MMP-1 concentrations decreased and TIMP-1 concentrations increased in GCF.

  20. Smoking-a true periodontal hazard

    Mani Ameet M, Mani Shubhangi A, Tejnani Avneesh H, Gupta Ankit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that tobacco use in general and cigarette smoking in particular, is a major risk factor in the incidence and severity of several forms of periodontal diseases.A large number of studies have been published in the dental literature regarding this possible role. Much of the literature has also indicated that smokers affected with periodontitis respond less favourably to periodontal treatment be it non-surgical, surgical or regenerative. Numerous studies of the potential mechanisms whereby smoking tobacco may predispose to periodontal disease have been conducted, and it appears that smoking may affect the vasculature, the humoral immune system, and the cellular immune and inflammatory systems, and have effects throughout the cytokine and adhesion molecule network. The aim of this review is to consider the evidence for the association between smoking and periodontal diseases and to highlight the biological mechanisms whereby smoking may affect the periodontium.

  1. Pain Perception and Anxiety Levels during Menstrual Cycle Associated with Periodontal Therapy

    Nikhat Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the pain perception and anxiety levels of female patients undergoing scaling and root planing during menstrual (perimenstrual period with those observed during postmenstrual period. Materials and Methods. This was a single blind study, with a split-mouth design. Forty-four women with chronic periodontitis with regular menstrual cycles were subjected to complete Corah’s Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS during their first debridement visit. Patients were randomly selected to undergo their first debridement visit during either their menstrual or postmenstrual period. Scaling was performed under local anesthesia in bilateral quadrants of patients during the periods. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to score pain levels for each quadrant after performing scaling and root planing. Results. Increase in pain perception among females during their menstrual or perimenstrual period was significantly greater than their postmenstrual period (P < 0.05. It is observed that women whose first appointment was given in perimenstrual period had more pain (VAS (P = 0.0000 when compared to those women whose first appointment was given in postmenstrual period. Conclusion. Females in their menstrual period demonstrated higher pain responses and high anxiety levels to supra- and subgingival debridement. This increase in the pain levels of women during their menstrual period was statistically significant. If the appointments are given in postmenstrual period, women feel less pain.

  2. Periodontal surgery improves oral health-related quality of life in chronic periodontitis patients in Asian population.

    Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Ho, Kun-Yen; Wang, Wen-Chen; Hu, Kai-Fang

    2017-10-01

    The effect of periodontal surgery on patients' quality of life was investigated. Sixty patients received regenerative surgery or resective osseous surgery. Oral health-related quality of life and health-related quality of life instruments were used to assess the participants' quality of life before surgery and 4 weeks after surgery. Periodontal surgery can improve patients' quality of life by alleviating the physical pain and psychological discomfort. The scores were lower (more favorable) in the regenerative surgery group, and the functional limitations of the regenerative surgery group improved substantially compared with those of the resective osseous surgery group (P = 0.0421). The patients' oral health-related quality of life scores improved significantly after periodontal surgery. Clinicians can take advantage of the positive functional oral health-related quality of life impacts of regenerative surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  3. Regenerative Endodontics: Barriers and Strategies for Clinical Translation

    Kim, Sahng G.; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Ling; Cho, Shoko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fu, Susan Y.; Yang, Rujing; Zhou, Xuedong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a great deal of enthusiasm and effort, regenerative endodontics has encountered substantial challenges towards clinical translation. Recent adoption by the American Dental Association (ADA) of evoked pulp bleeding in immature permanent teeth is an important step for regenerative endodontics. However, there is no regenerative therapy for the majority of endodontic diseases. Simple recapitulation of cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies that are under development for other orga...

  4. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment with Orthodontic Treatment in a Tooth with Dens Evaginatus: A Case Report with a 4-year Follow-up.

    Natera, Marianella; Mukherjee, Padma M

    2018-06-01

    Dens evaginatus is a developmental tooth anomaly in which an extra cusp or tubercle protrudes on the occlusal surface of the tooth along with some pulpal tissue. Because of the fragile nature of the protrusion, these teeth are often at risk of pulpal exposure. When this occurs in an immature tooth, regenerative endodontic treatment may be a good treatment approach to promote root formation. There is limited literature that documents the occurrence of orthodontic treatment in teeth that have undergone regenerative endodontic therapy using triple antibiotic paste. Here we present a case of an immature premolar tooth with dens evaginatus that was diagnosed with pulp necrosis and chronic apical abscess. The tooth was treated with regenerative endodontic treatment; after which, the patient received orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances for 2 years. The tooth responded favorably to the regenerative endodontic treatment and orthodontic tooth movement. Clinically and radiographically, all the follow-up examinations revealed an asymptomatic tooth with evidence of periapical healing with stunted root development. The tooth remained asymptomatic even after 4 years. The regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) was successful in treating an immature permanent premolar with pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis with dens evaginatus. In this case, the tooth treated with an REP responded to orthodontic treatment similar to the nonendodontically treated teeth. Further studies are recommended to clarify the precise effects of orthodontic treatment on teeth treated with an REP. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A combined approach of enamel matrix derivative gel and autogenous bone grafts in treatment of intrabony periodontal defects. A case report.

    Leung, George; Jin, Lijian

    2003-04-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has recently been introduced as a new modality in regenerative periodontal therapy. This case report demonstrates a combined approach in topical application of EMD gel (Emdogain) and autogenous bone grafts for treatment of intrabony defects and furcation involvement defects in a patient with chronic periodontitis. The seven-month post-surgery clinical and radiographic results were presented. The combined application of EMD gel with autogenous bone grafts in intrabony osseous defects resulted in clinically significant gain of attachment on diseased root surfaces and bone fill on radiographs. Further controlled clinical studies are required to confirm the long-term effectiveness of the combination of EMD gel and autogenous bone grafts in treatment of various osseous defects in subjects with chronic periodontitis.

  6. Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    Sykova, Eva; Forostyak, Serhiy

    2013-01-01

    Background: A number of cardiovascular, neurological, musculoskeletal and other diseases have a limited capacity for repair and only a modest progress has been made in treatment of brain diseases. The discovery of stem cells has opened new possibilities for the treatment of these maladies, and cell therapy now stands at the cutting-edge of modern regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Experimental data and the first clinical trials employing stem cells have shown their broad therapeuti...

  7. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with periodontal treatment for metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Evangelista, Erika Elisabeth; França, Cristiane Miranda; Veni, Priscila; de Oliveira Silva, Tamires; Gonçalves, Rafael Moredo; de Carvalho, Verônica Franco; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Camacho, Cleber P; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Alvarenga, Letícia Heineck; Prates, Renato Araujo

    2015-05-27

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and periodontal disease is bidirectional. DM is a predisposing and modifying factor of periodontitis, which, in turn, worsens glycemic control and increases proteins found in the acute phase of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein. The gold standard for the treatment of periodontal disease is oral hygiene orientation, scaling and planing. Moreover, systemic antibiotic therapy may be employed in some cases. In an effort to minimize the prescription of antibiotics, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been studied as an antimicrobial technique and has demonstrated promising results. The aim of the proposed study is to determine whether PDT as a complement to periodontal therapy (PT) is helpful in the metabolic control of individuals with type 2 diabetes and the reduction of acute-phase inflammatory markers. The patients will be randomized using a proper software program into two groups: 1) PT + placebo PDT or 2) PT + active PDT. All patients will first be examined by a specialist, followed by PT performed by two other healthcare professionals. At the end of each session, PDT (active or placebo) will be administered by a fourth healthcare professional. The following will be the PDT parameters: diode laser (660 nm); power output = 110 mW; exposure time = 90 s per point (9 J/point); and energy density = 22 J/cm(2). The photosensitizer will be methylene blue (50 μg/mL). The patients will be re-evaluated 15, 30, 90 and 180 days after treatment. Serological examinations with complete blood count, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin and salivary examinations to screen for tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1, interleukin 6, ostelocalcin, and osteoprotegerin/RANKL will be performed at each evaluation. The data will be statistically evaluated using the most appropriate tests. The results of this study will determine the efficacy of photodynamic therapy as an adjuvant to periodontal treatment in diabetic patients. The

  8. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone

    Adrian Tudor Balseanu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg or in combination with a single dose (106 cells of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration.” However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies

  9. Regenerative surgical therapy for peri-implantitis using deproteinized bovine bone mineral with 10% collagen, enamel matrix derivative and Doxycycline-A prospective 3-year cohort study.

    Mercado, Faustino; Hamlet, Stephen; Ivanovski, Saso

    2018-05-16

    There is limited evidence regarding the long-term efficacy of regenerative treatment for peri-implantitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate a combination therapy of deproteinized bovine bone mineral with 10% collagen (DBBMC), enamel matrix derivative (EMD) and Doxycycline in the regeneration of bone defects associated with peri-implantitis. Thirty patients diagnosed with peri-implantitis (BoP/suppuration, probing depth greater than 4 mm, minimum radiographic bone loss of 20%, at least 2 years in function) were enrolled in the study. Clinical measurements included probing depths, recession, radiographic bone fill, gingival inflammation and bleeding on probing/suppuration. Following surgical access and debridement, the implant surfaces were decontaminated with 24% EDTA for 2 min, and the bone defects were filled with a combined mixture of DBBMC, EMD and Doxycycline powder. The defects were covered with connective tissue grafts where necessary. Clinical measurements were recorded after 12, 24 and 36 months. The mean probing depth and bone loss at the initial visit was 8.9 mm (±1.9) and 6.92 mm (±1.26), respectively. Both mean probing depth and bone loss reduced significantly from baseline to 3.55 mm (±0.50) and 2.85 mm (±0.73) at 12 months, 3.50 (±0.50) and 2.62 mm (±0.80) at 24 months and 3.50 mm (±0.50) and 2.60 mm (±0.73) at 36 months. 56.6% of the implants were considered successfully treated (according to Successful Treatment Outcome Criterion: PD 10%, no BoP/suppuration, no recession >0.5 mm for anterior implants and >1.5 mm for posterior implants) after 36 months. Regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis using a combined mixture of DBBMC, EMD and Doxycycline achieved promising results. The benefits of this protocol incorporating EMD should be tested in randomized clinical trials. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Human Umbilical Cord MSCs as New Cell Sources for Promoting Periodontal Regeneration in Inflammatory Periodontal Defect.

    Shang, Fengqing; Liu, Shiyu; Ming, Leiguo; Tian, Rong; Jin, Fang; Ding, Yin; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Zhihong; Jin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) transplantation represents a promising approach for periodontal regeneration; however, the cell source is limited due to the invasive procedure required for cell isolation. As human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) can be harvested inexpensively and inexhaustibly, here we evaluated the regenerative potentials of hUCMSCs as compared with hPDLSCs to determine whether hUCMSCs could be used as new cell sources for periodontal regeneration. Methods The characteristics of hUCMSCs, including multi-differentiation ability and anti-inflammatory capability, were determined by comparison with hPDLSCs. We constructed cell aggregates (CA) using hUCMSCs and hPDLSCs respectively. Then hPDLSCs-CA and hUCMSCs-CA were combined with β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramic (β-TCP) respectively and their regenerative potentials were determined in a rat inflammatory periodontal defect model. Results hPDLSCs showed higher osteogenic differentiation potentials than hUCMSCs. Meanwhile, hUCMSCs showed higher extracellular matrix secretion and anti-inflammatory abilities than hPDLSCs. Similar to hPDLSCs, hUCMSCs were able to contribute to regeneration of both soft and hard periodontal tissues under inflammatory periodontitis condition. There were more newly formed bone and periodontal ligaments in hPDLSCs and hUCMSCs groups than in non-cell treated group. Moreover, no significant differences of regenerative promoting effects between hPDLSCs and hUCMSCs were found. Conclusion : hUCMSCs generated similar promoting effects on periodontal regeneration compared with hPDLSCs, and can be used as new cell sources for periodontal regeneration.

  11. Acute periodontal lesions.

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute

  12. A roentgenographic assessment of regenerative efficacy of bioactive Gengigel® in conjunction with amnion membrane in grade II furcation defect

    S Harveen Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, techniques are being developed to guide and instruct the specialized cellular components of the periodontium to participate in the regenerative process. This approach of reconstruction makes use of understanding of the development of the periodontium and the cellular processes that are involved. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring non-sulfated high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that forms a critical component of the extracellular matrix and contributes significantly to tissue hydrodynamics, cell migration, and proliferation. Hence, its administration to periodontal wound sites could achieve comparable beneficial effects in periodontal tissue regeneration. Hence, the purpose of the present case report was to assess roentgenographically, the regenerative capacity of Gengigel® in conjunction with bioactive amnion guided tissue regeneration (GTR membrane in a patient with Grade II furcation defect. Case Presentation: A patient complained of bleeding gums from the lower back tooth region, reportedly found Grade II furcation in the lower right mandibular first molar. After Phase, I therapy, Gengigel® along with bioactive amnion membrane was placed in the furcation area during the surgical phase. Roentgenographic assessment was done at 4 months and 6 months postoperatively. It resulted in complete defect-fill and loss of radiolucency at 6 months. Conclusion: Surgical placement of Gengigel® along with amnion membrane in the furcation defect can significantly improve the periodontal defect morphology.

  13. Lasers in periodontics.

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  14. Is Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Effective as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis? A Systematic Review

    Betsy Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to investigate whether antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT as either a primary mode of treatment or an adjunct to non-surgical treatment was more effective than scaling and root planing (SRP alone in treating chronic periodontitis in terms of clinical attachment level (CAL gain and probing depth (PD reduction. The focused question was developed using the Patient, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome (PICO format, and two authors independently searched the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases for relevant studies from January 2008 to December 2016. Twenty studies included in this systematic review were randomized clinical trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs of aPDT compared to placebo, no intervention, or non-surgical treatment in an adult population. Basic study characteristics, photosensitizing agents and wavelengths used in aPDT, frequency of aPDT application, effect of aPDT on clinical parameters, antimicrobial effect of aPDT in chronic periodontitis, effect of immunological parameters following aPDT and patient-based outcome measures were collected from the studies. Although there was a wide range of heterogeneity in the included studied, they all indicated that aPDT has the potential to be an effective adjunct in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Long-term, multicenter studies with larger sample sizes are needed before aPDT can be recommended as an effective treatment modality.

  15. Novel Regenerative Therapies Based on Regionally Induced Multipotent Stem Cells in Post-Stroke Brains: Their Origin, Characterization, and Perspective.

    Takagi, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Sakuma, Rika; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Nakagomi, Takayuki

    2017-12-01

    Brain injuries such as ischemic stroke cause severe neural loss. Until recently, it was believed that post-ischemic areas mainly contain necrotic tissue and inflammatory cells. However, using a mouse model of cerebral infarction, we demonstrated that stem cells develop within ischemic areas. Ischemia-induced stem cells can function as neural progenitors; thus, we initially named them injury/ischemia-induced neural stem/progenitor cells (iNSPCs). However, because they differentiate into more than neural lineages, we now refer to them as ischemia-induced multipotent stem cells (iSCs). Very recently, we showed that putative iNSPCs/iSCs are present within post-stroke areas in human brains. Because iNSPCs/iSCs isolated from mouse and human ischemic tissues can differentiate into neuronal lineages in vitro, it is possible that a clearer understanding of iNSPC/iSC profiles and the molecules that regulate iNSPC/iSC fate (e.g., proliferation, differentiation, and survival) would make it possible to perform neural regeneration/repair in patients following stroke. In this article, we introduce the origin and traits of iNSPCs/iSCs based on our reports and recent viewpoints. We also discuss their possible contribution to neurogenesis through endogenous and exogenous iNSPC/iSC therapies following ischemic stroke.

  16. Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis and Its Treatment Options: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    T. Roshna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized aggressive periodontitis results in rapid destruction of the periodontium and can lead to early tooth loss in the affected individuals if not diagnosed early and treated appropriately. The diagnostic features of the disease are characteristic, but the clinical presentation and patterns of destructions may vary between patients. Successful management of the disease is challenging especially if diagnosed at advanced stages of the disease, but not impossible with the current therapeutic choices for the disease. A vast array of treatment modalities is available which can be employed in the treatment of generalized aggressive periodontitis with varying success rates, but a definite guideline for the management is yet to be formulated. However, with the exponential rate of developments in periodontal research, regenerative therapy, tissue engineering, and genetic technologies, the future seems promising in regard to options at managing the disease. This paper attempts to describe the clinical and radiographic diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of generalized aggressive periodontitis patients with case reports and a brief review.

  17. Impact of the level of metabolic control on the non-surgical periodontal therapy outcomes in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients: Clinical effects

    Mirnić Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes mellitus as a complex metabolic disease influences functioning of numerous organs. Chronic periodontitis is one of frequent diabetic complications. Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effects of non­surgical periodontal therapy between diabetes mellitus type 2 patients (DM type 2 and non­diabetic individuals (control group. Methods. Our study included 41 DM type 2 subjects and 21 non­diabetic individuals, all of them with chronic periodontitis. The diabetic group was divided into two subgroups based on the level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c as follows: D1 - 18 subjects with good metabolic control (HbA1c<7%, and D2 - 23 subjects with poor metabolic (HbA1c≥7%. State of oral hygiene and periodontal clinical parameters of subjects, such as: plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, papilla bleeding index (PBI, probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment level (CAL, were evaluated at the baseline and 3 months after scaling and root­planning. Results. ANOVA test showed that there was no statistically significant difference of treatment success between studied groups in relation to GI (p=0.52, PBI (p=0.36 and CAL (p=0.11. Reduction of PI and PPD in the control group (ΔPI=0.84; ΔPPD=0.35 mm was significantly higher (p<0.05 than the reduction of PI and PPD in patients with the diabetes (group D1 ΔPI=0.60, ΔPPD=0.11 mm; group D2 ΔPI=0.53, ΔPPD=0.11 mm. Conclusion. Although there were differences in treatment success between DM subjects and non­diabetic individuals, they were not significant for the most measured parameters. The results of this study did not absolutely support the assumption that the level of glycemic control significantly affected the periodontal therapy outcome in diabetics. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  18. Clinical application of platelet-rich fibrin as the sole grafting material in periodontal intrabony defects

    Yu-Chao Chang

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: From a clinical and radiologic point of view at 6 months after surgery, the use of PRF as the sole grafting material seems to be an effective modality of regenerative treatment for periodontal intrabony defects.

  19. Regenerative medicine primer.

    Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2013-07-01

    The pandemic of chronic diseases, compounded by the scarcity of usable donor organs, mandates radical innovation to address the growing unmet needs of individuals and populations. Beyond life-extending measures that are often the last available option, regenerative strategies offer transformative solutions in treating degenerative conditions. By leveraging newfound knowledge of the intimate processes fundamental to organogenesis and healing, the emerging regenerative armamentarium aims to boost the aptitude of human tissues for self-renewal. Regenerative technologies strive to promote, augment, and reestablish native repair processes, restituting organ structure and function. Multimodal regenerative approaches incorporate transplant of healthy tissues into damaged environments, prompt the body to enact a regenerative response in damaged tissues, and use tissue engineering to manufacture new tissue. Stem cells and their products have a unique aptitude to form specialized tissues and promote repair signaling, providing active ingredients of regenerative regimens. Concomitantly, advances in materials science and biotechnology have unlocked additional prospects for growing tissue grafts and engineering organs. Translation of regenerative principles into practice is feasible and safe in the clinical setting. Regenerative medicine and surgery are, thus, poised to transit from proof-of-principle studies toward clinical validation and, ultimately, standardization, paving the way for next-generation individualized management algorithms. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regenerative medicine blueprint.

    Terzic, Andre; Harper, C Michel; Gores, Gregory J; Pfenning, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Regenerative medicine, a paragon of future healthcare, holds unprecedented potential in extending the reach of treatment modalities for individuals across diseases and lifespan. Emerging regenerative technologies, focused on structural repair and functional restoration, signal a radical transformation in medical and surgical practice. Regenerative medicine is poised to provide innovative solutions in addressing major unmet needs for patients, ranging from congenital disease and trauma to degenerative conditions. Realization of the regenerative model of care predicates a stringent interdisciplinary paradigm that will drive validated science into standardized clinical options. Designed as a catalyst in advancing rigorous new knowledge on disease causes and cures into informed delivery of quality care, the Mayo Clinic regenerative medicine blueprint offers a patient-centered, team-based strategy that optimizes the discovery-translation-application roadmap for the express purpose of science-supported practice advancement.

  1. Platelet-rich plasma and bi-phasic tri calcium phosphate in the management of periodontally compromised teeth with hopeless prognosis: A case report with six-year follow-up and surgical re-entry

    Subramoniam Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives of periodontal therapy is to prolong the lifespan of dentition as there is no ideal substitute for natural dentition even in the era of dental implants. Treatment of teeth with advanced periodontal disease with hopeless prognosis is always extraction. However in this case report, we discuss a novel regenerative strategy using a combination of platelet rich plasma and bi-phasic tri calcium phosphate for a lower central incisor that was considered for extraction. Clinical and radiographic examination during the six-year follow-up postoperatively revealed stable periodontal health in the lower right central incisor. The surgical re-entry done in the sixth year postoperatively revealed good periradicular healing and alloplastic bone graft incorporation within the host bone.

  2. Periodontal treatment in a generalized severe chronic periodontitis patient: A case report with 7-year follow-up.

    Agrali, Omer Birkan; Kuru, Bahar Eren

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the periodontal treatment is to provide healthy and functional dentition all through a lifetime. In this report, periodontal treatment of a 42-year-old male patient with generalized severe chronic periodontitis is presented. He received initial periodontal treatment together with adjunctive antimicrobials. The devital teeth were endodontically treated, and free gingival grafts were placed at the inadequate keratinized tissue zones before regenerative surgery. Following the surgical treatment using enamel matrix derivatives and xenogenic bone graft combination, the patient was put on a strict recall program. After 12 months, favorable clinical and radiographical improvements were obtained. The 7-year maintenance of the present case with several initially hopeless teeth has been shown and discussed in this report. It can be concluded that optimum oral hygiene level as well as the positive cooperation of the patient enhanced the success of periodontal treatment results even in extremely severe periodontal destruction.

  3. Respuesta al tratamiento periodontal de diabéticos tipo 2 con mal control metabólico y obesos intolerantes a la glucosa, con periodontitis severa Impact of the periodontal therapy in both clinical and metabolic parameters in type 2 diabetic and prediabetic obese patients with severe periodontitis

    V Pavez Correa; A V Araya Quintanilla; Baksai López N

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) es un factor de riesgo para periodontitis, a su vez, el control metabólico de los diabéticos se dificulta por la presencia de la infección periodontal, aumentando el riesgo de complicaciones crónicas y eventualmente, la mortalidad por diabetes. Ambas enfermedades se relacionan porque los mediadores de inflamación generados en la infección periodontal y la translocación de bacterias de la cavidad oral a la circulación sistémica, podrían actuar como agravantes de la insul...

  4. Digital subtraction radiographic analysis of the combination of bioabsorbable membrane and bovine morphogenetic protein pool in human periodontal infrabony defects

    Maria do Carmo Machado Guimarães

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the bone density gain and its relationship with the periodontal clinical parameters in a case series of a regenerative therapy procedure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using a split-mouth study design, 10 pairs of infrabony defects from 15 patients were treated with a pool of bovine bone morphogenetic proteins associated with collagen membrane (test sites or collagen membrane only (control sites. The periodontal healing was clinically and radiographically monitored for six months. Standardized pre-surgical and 6-month postoperative radiographs were digitized for digital subtraction analysis, which showed relative bone density gain in both groups of 0.034 ± 0.423 and 0.105 ± 0.423 in the test and control group, respectively (p>0.05. RESULTS: As regards the area size of bone density change, the influence of the therapy was detected in 2.5 mm² in the test group and 2 mm² in the control group (p>0.05. Additionally, no correlation was observed between the favorable clinical results and the bone density gain measured by digital subtraction radiography (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the clinical benefit of the regenerative therapy observed did not come with significant bone density gains. Long-term evaluation may lead to a different conclusions.

  5. Overcoming immunological barriers in regenerative medicine.

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative therapies that use allogeneic cells are likely to encounter immunological barriers similar to those that occur with transplantation of solid organs and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Decades of experience in clinical transplantation hold valuable lessons for regenerative medicine, offering approaches for developing tolerance-induction treatments relevant to cell therapies. Outside the field of solid-organ and allogeneic HSC transplantation, new strategies are emerging for controlling the immune response, such as methods based on biomaterials or mimicry of antigen-specific peripheral tolerance. Novel biomaterials can alter the behavior of cells in tissue-engineered constructs and can blunt host immune responses to cells and biomaterial scaffolds. Approaches to suppress autoreactive immune cells may also be useful in regenerative medicine. The most innovative solutions will be developed through closer collaboration among stem cell biologists, transplantation immunologists and materials scientists.

  6. Role of 1% alendronate gel as adjunct to mechanical therapy in the treatment of chronic periodontitis among smokers.

    Sharma, Anuj; Raman, Achala; Pradeep, Avani Raju

    2017-01-01

    Alendronate (ALN) inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption and triggers osteostimulative properties both in vivo and in vitro, as shown by increase in matrix formation. This study aimed to explore the efficacy of 1% ALN gel as local drug delivery (LDD) in adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for the treatment of chronic periodontitis among smokers. 75 intrabony defects were treated in 46 male smokers either with 1% ALN gel or placebo gel. ALN gel was prepared by adding ALN into carbopol-distilled water mixture. Clinical parameters [modified sulcus bleeding index, plaque index, probing depth (PD), and periodontal attachment level (PAL)] were recorded at baseline, at 2 months, and at 6 months, while radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline and at 6 months. Defect fill at baseline and at 6 months was calculated on standardized radiographs by using the image analysis software. Mean PD reduction and mean PAL gain were found to be greater in the ALN group than in the placebo group, both at 2 and 6 months. Furthermore, a significantly greater mean percentage of bone fill was found in the ALN group (41.05±11.40%) compared to the placebo group (2.5±0.93%). The results of this study showed 1% ALN stimulated a significant increase in PD reduction, PAL gain, and an improved bone fill compared to placebo gel in chronic periodontitis among smokers. Thus, 1% ALN, along with SRP, is effective in the treatment of chronic periodontitis in smokers.

  7. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    Xiao L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Xiao,1 Masanori Nasu2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Research Center, The Nippon Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs. They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined.Keywords: oral mesenchymal stem cells, oral

  8. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein, oxidative stress, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled study.

    Koromantzos, Panagiotis A; Makrilakis, Konstantinos; Dereka, Xanthippi; Offenbacher, Steven; Katsilambros, Nicholas; Vrotsos, Ioannis A; Madianos, Phoebus N

    2012-01-01

    It is well accepted that glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is affected by systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. The effect of periodontal therapy on these systemic factors may be related to improvement on glycemic status. The aim of the present study is to assess over a period of 6 months the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), d-8-iso prostaglandin F2a (d-8-iso) as a marker of oxidative stress, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 on patients with type 2 DM. Sixty participants with type 2 DM and moderate to severe periodontal disease were randomized into intervention (IG) and control (CG) groups. IG received scaling and root planing, whereas CG received supragingival cleaning at baseline and scaling and root planing at 6 months. Participants of both groups were evaluated at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months. Periodontal data recorded at each visit included probing depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, and gingival index. Blood was collected at each visit for the assay of serum glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1c), hsCRP, d-8-iso, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Although there was a trend to a reduction in hsCRP, d-8-iso and MMP-9 it did not reach statistical significance. MMP-2 levels remained unchanged after periodontal treatment. Effective non-surgical periodontal treatment of participants with type 2 DM and moderate to severe periodontal disease improved significantly A1c levels but did not result in a statistically significant improvement in hsCRP, d-8-iso, MMP-2, and MMP-9 levels.

  9. Differentiated embryonic chondrocytes 1 expression of periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Hu, Shenlin; Shang, Wei; Yue, Haitao; Chen, Ruini; Dong, Zheng; Hu, Jinhua; Mao, Zhao; Yang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the DEC1 expression of periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis. 20 non-smoking patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 healthy individuals were enrolled. Periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue samples from healthy subjects were collected during teeth extraction for orthodontic reason or the third molar extraction. The parallel samples from patients with chronic periodontitis were obtained during periodontal flap operations or teeth extraction as part of periodontal treatment. The DEC1 expression and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of both the periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue were determined by Western blot, Immunohistochemistry and ALP Detection Kit. The DEC1 expression of periodontal ligament tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis decreased significantly along with the decreased ALP activity. On the contrary, the DEC1 expression of gingival tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis increased significantly. Further study found that the DEC1 expression of gingival tissue increased mainly in the suprabasal layer of gingival epithelial cells but decreased in the gingival connective tissue of the patients with chronic periodontitis. The DEC1 expression decreases in the periodontal ligament tissue which is related to the osteogenic capacity, whereas the DEC1 expression increases in the suprabasal layer of gingival epithelial cells which are involved in immune inflammatory response in the patients with chronic periodontitis. The findings provide a new target to explore the pathology and the therapy of periodontitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  11. The effect of systemic antibiotics administered during the active phase of non-surgical periodontal therapy or after the healing phase: a systematic review.

    Fritoli, Aretuza; Gonçalves, Cristiane; Faveri, Marcelo; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Pérez-Chaparro, Paula Juliana; Fermiano, Daiane; Feres, Magda

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to compare the clinical effectiveness of systemic antibiotics administered in the active stage of periodontal treatment or after the healing phase. An electronic search was performed in the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement. A manual search of the reference list of selected studies and of review articles was also performed up to November 2013. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) that evaluated the systemic administration of antibiotics as adjuvants to scaling and root planning (SRP) at different phases of periodontal treatment were included. Systematic reviews and studies that evaluated subjects with systemic diseases and those that used subantimicrobial doses of antibiotics were excluded. The initial search identified 1,039 articles, of which seven were selected, and only one met the inclusion criteria. This study showed that subjects taking metronidazole and amoxicillin at the initial phase of treatment exhibited statistically significantly greater reduction in pocket depth and gain in clinical attachment level in initially deep sites (PD≥7 mm) than subjects taking antibiotics after healing (pantibiotic intake, at the healing phase. To date, only one short-term RCT has directly compared different moments of systemic antibiotics administration, as adjuncts to SRP, in the treatment of periodontitis. Although the results of this study suggested some benefits for antibiotics intake during the active phase of therapy, these findings need to be confirmed by larger placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials with longer follow-up periods.

  12. The effect of systemic antibiotics administered during the active phase of non-surgical periodontal therapy or after the healing phase: a systematic review

    FRITOLI, Aretuza; GONÇALVES, Cristiane; FAVERI, Marcelo; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; PÉREZ-CHAPARRO, Paula Juliana; FERMIANO, Daiane; FERES, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this systematic review was to compare the clinical effectiveness of systemic antibiotics administered in the active stage of periodontal treatment or after the healing phase. Material and Methods An electronic search was performed in the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement. A manual search of the reference list of selected studies and of review articles was also performed up to November 2013. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) that evaluated the systemic administration of antibiotics as adjuvants to scaling and root planning (SRP) at different phases of periodontal treatment were included. Systematic reviews and studies that evaluated subjects with systemic diseases and those that used subantimicrobial doses of antibiotics were excluded. Results The initial search identified 1,039 articles, of which seven were selected, and only one met the inclusion criteria. This study showed that subjects taking metronidazole and amoxicillin at the initial phase of treatment exhibited statistically significantly greater reduction in pocket depth and gain in clinical attachment level in initially deep sites (PD≥7 mm) than subjects taking antibiotics after healing (pantibiotic intake, at the healing phase. Conclusion To date, only one short-term RCT has directly compared different moments of systemic antibiotics administration, as adjuncts to SRP, in the treatment of periodontitis. Although the results of this study suggested some benefits for antibiotics intake during the active phase of therapy, these findings need to be confirmed by larger placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials with longer follow-up periods. PMID:26221918

  13. Cellular Profile and Expression of Immunologic Markers in Chronic Apical Periodontitis from HIV-infected Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Gama, Túlio Gustavo Veiga; Pires, Fabio Ramoa; Armada, Luciana; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza

    2016-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the inflammatory cell profile (CD3-, CD4-, CD8-, CD20-, and CD68-positive cells) and the expression of immunologic markers (tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, interleukin-6, and interleukin-18) in chronic apical periodontitis are the same between non-HIV-infected patients and HIV-infected patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Thirty-four surgically excised chronic apical periodontitis lesions were sampled from 34 patients (17 HIV-infected and 17 non-HIV-infected). The lesions were extracted from teeth with no previous endodontic treatment. All HIV-infected patients were undergoing HAART. The specimens were submitted to histopathologic and immunohistochemical analyses by using an optical microscope. Immunoexpression was graded into 2 levels, focal to weak and moderate to strong. The χ(2), Fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze all significant differences between groups. Periapical cysts represented 70.6% and 52.9% of the lesions in the HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected groups, respectively; however, no statistically significant difference was observed (P = .481). There were no statistically significant differences between groups for the inflammatory cell profile and for any of the immunologic markers (P > .05). There are no statistically significant differences of the cellular profile and expression of immunologic markers in chronic apical periodontitis between non-HIV-infected patients and HIV-infected patients undergoing HAART. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of systemic antibiotics administered during the active phase of non-surgical periodontal therapy or after the healing phase: a systematic review

    Aretuza FRITOLI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this systematic review was to compare the clinical effectiveness of systemic antibiotics administered in the active stage of periodontal treatment or after the healing phase. Material and Methods An electronic search was performed in the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA statement. A manual search of the reference list of selected studies and of review articles was also performed up to November 2013. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT that evaluated the systemic administration of antibiotics as adjuvants to scaling and root planning (SRP at different phases of periodontal treatment were included. Systematic reviews and studies that evaluated subjects with systemic diseases and those that used subantimicrobial doses of antibiotics were excluded. Results The initial search identified 1,039 articles, of which seven were selected, and only one met the inclusion criteria. This study showed that subjects taking metronidazole and amoxicillin at the initial phase of treatment exhibited statistically significantly greater reduction in pocket depth and gain in clinical attachment level in initially deep sites (PD≥7 mm than subjects taking antibiotics after healing (p<0.05. This comparison was conducted 2 months after antibiotic intake, at the healing phase. Conclusion To date, only one short-term RCT has directly compared different moments of systemic antibiotics administration, as adjuncts to SRP, in the treatment of periodontitis. Although the results of this study suggested some benefits for antibiotics intake during the active phase of therapy, these findings need to be confirmed by larger placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials with longer follow-up periods.

  15. Combined photoablative and photodynamic diode laser therapy as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment: a randomized split-mouth clinical trial.

    Giannelli, Marco; Formigli, Lucia; Lorenzini, Luca; Bani, Daniele

    2012-10-01

    Comparing the efficacy of photoablative and photodynamic diode laser in adjunct to scaling -root planing (SRP) and SRP alone for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Twenty-six patients were studied. Maxillary left or right quadrants were randomly assigned to sham-laser treatment + SRP or laser + SRP. This consisted of photoablative intra/extra-pocket de-epithelization with diode laser (λ = 810 nm), followed by single SRP and multiple photodynamic treatments (once weekly, 4-10 applications, mean ± SD: 3.7 ± 2.4) using diode laser (λ = 635 nm) and 0.3% methylene blue as photosensitizer. The patients were monitored at days 0 and 365 by clinical assessment (probing depth, PD; clinical attachment level, CAL; bleeding on probing, BOP) and at days 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 365 by cytofluorescence analysis of gingival exfoliative samples taken in proximity of the teeth to be treated (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN; red blood cells, RBC; damaged epithelial cells, DEC; bacteria). At day 365, compared with the control quadrants, the laser + SRP therapy yielded a significant (p Diode laser treatment (photoablation followed by multiple photodynamic cycles) adjunctive to conventional SRP improves healing in chronic periodontitis patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. A simple point of care test can indicate the need for periodontal therapy to reduce the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes in mothers attending antenatal clinics.

    Turton, Mervyn Sydney; Henkel, Ralf Reinhold; Africa, Charlene Wilma Joyce

    2017-12-01

    Although the association between periodontal disease (PD) and adverse pregnancy outcomes has gained recognition amongst antenatal healthcare workers, not much has changed in practice to address it. This prospective study tested the hypothesis that BANA (N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-2-naphthylamide), a diagnostic test for PD, may inform obstetricians and other antenatal healthcare practitioners, of the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in mothers attending antenatal clinics. At first visit, the presence of suspected periodontopathogens was assessed by BANA testing of dental plaque from 443 mothers attending antenatal clinics in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and an association later sought with pregnancy outcomes. The accuracy of BANA to predict adverse pregnancy outcomes was evaluated by the calculation of likelihood ratios. The study complied with the Declaration of Helsinki. Significant differences were found between pregnancy outcomes of BANA-negative and BANA-positive mothers (p periodontal therapy to reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and could form part of the routine antenatal examination.

  17. A novel, potent dual inhibitor of Arg-gingipains and Lys-gingipain as a promising agent for periodontal disease therapy.

    Kataoka, Shinsuke; Baba, Atsuyo; Suda, Yoshimitsu; Takii, Ryosuke; Hashimoto, Munetaka; Kawakubo, Tomoyo; Asao, Tetsuji; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis produces a unique class of cysteine proteinases termed gingipains that comprises Arg-gingipain (Rgp) and Lys-gingipain (Kgp). Growing evidence indicates that these 2 types of gingipains synergistically contribute to the entire virulence of the organism and increase the risk of periodontal disease (PD) by disrupting the host immune system and degrading the host tissue and plasma proteins. Therefore, a dual inhibitor of both gingipains would have attractive clinical potential for PD therapy. In this study, a novel, potent, dual inhibitor of Rgp and Kgp was developed through structure-based drug design, and its biological potency was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This inhibitor had low nanomolar inhibitory potency (Ki=40 nM for Rgp, Ki=0.27 nM for Kgp) and good selectivity for host proteases and exhibited potent antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis by abrogating its manifold pathophysiological functions. The therapeutic potential of this inhibitor in vivo was also verified by suppressing the vascular permeability that was enhanced in guinea pigs by the organism and the gingival inflammation in beagle dog PD models. These findings suggest that a dual inhibitor of Rgp and Kgp would exhibit noteworthy anti-inflammatory activity in the treatment of PD. © FASEB.

  18. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant System in Periodontitis

    Wang, Yue; Andrukhov, Oleh; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common inflammatory disease, which is initiated by bacterial infection and subsequently progressed by aberrant host response. It can result in the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and have an influence on systemic health. When periodontitis occurs, reactive oxygen species, which are overproduced mostly by hyperactive neutrophils, could not be balanced by antioxidant defense system and cause tissues damage. This is characterized by increased metabolites of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and protein damage. Local and systemic activities of antioxidants can also be influenced by periodontitis. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidant status and oxidative stress index have been used to evaluate the oxidative stress associated with periodontitis. Studies have confirmed that inflammatory response in periodontitis is associated with an increased local and systemic oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant capacity. Our review focuses on increased oxidative stress in periodontal disease, specifically, on the relationship between the local and systemic biomarkers of oxidative stress and periodontitis and their association with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Also, the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammation, and the effects of periodontal therapy on oxidative stress parameters will be discussed. PMID:29180965

  19. The effect of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein, endothelial function, lipids and proinflammatory biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Saffi, Marco Aurélio Lumertz; Furtado, Mariana Vargas; Montenegro, Márlon Munhoz; Ribeiro, Ingrid Webb Josephson; Kampits, Cassio; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Haas, Alex Nogueira

    2013-09-06

    , fibrinogen, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin. These outcomes will be assessed at all time points over 12 months. Flow-mediated dilation will be assessed at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months after periodontal therapy. This trial will provide new evidence regarding the effect of periodontal treatment on risk markers for recurrence of cardiovascular events in stable coronary artery disease patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier, NCT01609725.

  20. Regenerative endodontics: barriers and strategies for clinical translation.

    Mao, Jeremy J; Kim, Sahng G; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Ling; Cho, Shoko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fu, Susan Y; Yang, Rujing; Zhou, Xuedong

    2012-07-01

    Regenerative endodontics has encountered substantial challenges toward clinical translation. The adoption by the American Dental Association of evoked pulp bleeding in immature permanent teeth is an important step for regenerative endodontics. However, there is no regenerative therapy for most endodontic diseases. Simple recapitulation of cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies that are under development for other organ systems has not led to clinical translation in regeneration endodontics. Recent work using novel biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors that orchestrate the homing of host endogenous cells represents a departure from traditional cell transplantation approaches and may accelerate clinical translation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Periodontal abscess: etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Vályi, Péter; Gorzó, István

    2004-08-01

    The periodontal abscess is an acute destructive process in the periodontium resulting in localized collections of pus communicating with the oral cavity through the gingival sulcus or other periodontal sites and not arising from the tooth pulp. The prevalence of periodontal abscess is relatively high and it affects the prognosis of the tooth. Periodontal abscesses can develop on the base of persisting periodontitis but can also occur in the absence of periodontitis. The cause of the development of periodontal abscess originating from chronic periodontitis is the marginal closure of a periodontal pocket, or the pocket lumen might be too tight to drain the increased suppuration due to changes in the composition of subgingival microflora, alteration of bacterial virulence or host defenses. Diagnosis of a periodontal abscess is based on medical and dental history as well as oral examination (pocket depth, swelling, suppuration, mobility, sensibility of the tooth). The most prevalent group of bacteria: P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, B. forsythus, F. nucleatum and P. micros. Previous studies have suggested that the complete therapy of the periodontitis patients with acute periodontal abscess has to do in two stages: the first stage is the management of acute lesions, then the second stage is the appropriate comprehensive treatment of the original and/or residual lesions. The management of acute lesions includes establishing drainage via pocket lumen, subgingival scaling and root planing, curettage of the lining pocket epithelia and seriously inflamed connective tissue, compressing pocket wall to underlying tooth and periodontal support, and maintaining tissue contact. Some authors recommend the incision or to establish drainage and irrigation, or a flap surgery, or even extraction of hopeless teeth. We recommend the use of systemic antibiotics as a preventive measure of systemic disease or in case of systemic symptoms.

  2. Controlled-release of tetracycline and lovastatin by poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid)-chitosan nanoparticles enhances periodontal regeneration in dogs.

    Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lee, Chien-Chen; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Jan; Lai, Chern-Hsiung; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is characterized by inflammation of periodontal tissues, leading to bone resorption and tooth loss. The goal of treatment is to regenerate periodontal tissues including bone and cementum lost as a consequence of disease. The local delivery of tetracycline was proven to be effective in controlling localized periodontal infection without apparent side effects. Previous studies suggested that lovastatin has a significant role in new bone formation; however, the local delivery of lovastatin might enhance its therapeutic effects. A number of local delivery devices have been developed recently, including poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to develop a local delivery device, PLGA-lovastatin-chitosan-tetracycline nanoparticles, which allows the sequential release of tetracycline and lovastatin to effectively control local infection and promote bone regeneration in periodontitis. The size and microstructure of nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy, Nanoparticle Size Analyzer, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The release of tetracycline and lovastatin was quantified using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect and alkaline phosphatase activity of the nanoparticles in osteoblast cell cultures as well as antibacterial activity against periodontal pathogens were investigated. Finally, the bone regeneration potential of PLGA nanoparticles in three-walled defects in beagle dogs was investigated. The results indicated that PLGA-lovastatin-chitosan-tetracycline nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility, antibacterial activity, and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. The volumetric analysis from micro-CT revealed significantly increased new bone formation in defects filled with nanoparticles in dogs. This novel local delivery device might be useful as an adjunctive treatment in periodontal regenerative therapy.

  3. State of the art: stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

    Lopez, M J; Jarazo, J

    2015-03-01

    According to Greek mythology, Prometheus' liver grew back nightly after it was removed each day by an eagle as punishment for giving mankind fire. Hence, contrary to popular belief, the concept of tissue and organ regeneration is not new. In the early 20th century, cell culture and ex vivo organ preservation studies by Alexis Carrel, some with famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, established a foundation for much of modern regenerative medicine. While early beliefs and discoveries foreshadowed significant accomplishments in regenerative medicine, advances in knowledge within numerous scientific disciplines, as well as nano- and micromolecular level imaging and detection technologies, have contributed to explosive advances over the last 20 years. Virtually limitless preparations, combinations and applications of the 3 major components of regenerative medicine, namely cells, biomaterials and bioactive molecules, have created a new paradigm of future therapeutic options for most species. It is increasingly clear, however, that despite significant parallels among and within species, there is no 'one-size-fits-all' regenerative therapy. Likewise, a panacea has yet to be discovered that completely reverses the consequences of time, trauma and disease. Nonetheless, there is no question that the promise and potential of regenerative medicine have forever altered medical practices. The horse is a relative newcomer to regenerative medicine applications, yet there is already a large body of work to incorporate novel regenerative therapies into standard care. This review focuses on the current state and potential future of stem cells in equine regenerative medicine. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  4. Combined periodontic-orthodonticendodontic interdisciplinary approach in the treatment of periodontally compromised tooth

    Deepa, D; Mehta, D. S.; Puri, Viren K.; Shetty, Sadashiva

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment in adult patients is one of the most frequently encountered components involving multidisciplinary approaches. In the present report, a 28-year-old male patient was treated for localized chronic periodontitis with pocket formation, mobility, pathologic migration and malalignment of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth #22. The periodontal therapy included motivation, education and oral-hygiene instructions (O.H.I.), scaling and root planing and periodontal flap surgery. ...

  5. Periodontal disease, periodontal treatment and systemic nitric oxide in dogs.

    Nemec, A; Verstraete, F J M; Jerin, A; Šentjurc, M; Kass, P H; Petelin, M; Pavlica, Z

    2013-06-01

    Thirty-two client-owned dogs treated for periodontal disease were divided in group 1 if no periodontitis, group 2 if ≤25%, and group 3 if >25% of the teeth present were affected with periodontitis. Blood was tested before and 2 weeks after periodontal therapy for nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) levels. No HbNO was detected in any of the animals tested. There was no significant difference in the NOx plasma levels within each group or across the groups before and after the treatment, but a noticeable increase in NOx plasma levels was observed in group 3 after the treatment. Plasma NT was detected in only one third of the animals. NO levels varied greatly across individual dogs. The data are suggestive of an overall increase in systemic NO response 2 weeks after periodontal treatment in dogs with advanced periodontal disease, but the response is greatly individually-dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Summary of: Regenerative endodontics.

    Clark, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  7. Regenerative similariton laser

    Thibault North

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-pulsating lasers based on cascaded reshaping and reamplification (2R are capable of initiating ultrashort pulses despite the accumulation of large amounts of nonlinearities in all-fiber resonators. The spectral properties of pulses in self-similar propagation are compatible with cascaded 2R regeneration by offset filtering, making parabolic pulses suitable for the design of a laser of this recently introduced class. A new type of regenerative laser giving birth to similaritons is numerically investigated and shows that this laser is the analog of regenerative sources based solely on self-phase modulation and offset filtering. The regenerative similariton laser does not suffer from instabilities due to excessive nonlinearities and enables ultrashort pulse generation in a simple cavity configuration.

  8. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  9. Treatment of endo-periodontal lesion using leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin. A case report.

    Betancourt, Pablo; Elgueta, Ricardo; Fuentes, Ramon

    2017-12-30

    The main objective of this paper was to report the clinical effectiveness of leukocyte- platelet- rich fibrin (L-PRF) in the treatment of a combined endo-periodontal lesion of an upper first premolar. The tooth had a profound abfraction on the vestibular aspect and presented no mobility but revealed a deep pocket measuring of 11 mm on the mesial vestibular aspect and 14 mm on the mesial palatine aspect. The three dimensional image analysis showed total bone loss in the mesial aspect and an extensively bone loss of the vestibular aspect of the vestibular root. Endodontic treatment was performed and periodontal access surgery (surgical periodontal therapy) was done with the application of autologous L-PRF. Three month and 6 months after surgery, the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) exams showed no bone regeneration in any aspect of the tooth. However, periodontal examination showed a significative improvement in the deepness of surcus. The mesial vestibular aspect had a deep pocket of 3 mm and 5 mm on the mesial palatine aspect showing a reduction in deepness of 8 mm and 9 mm, respectively. The actual treatment for teeth with bad prognosis is the extraction and replacement with implants. Even though implants are capable of restore function and aesthetic, the abuse of this approach have led to the loss of teeth that could be successfully treated with a less invasive technique. The prognosis of teeth with endoperiodontal lesion is poor but could be enhanced with regenerative therapies. Until now there are no clinical trials and just four case report about the treatment of these teeth with platelet rich fibrin.

  10. Periodontal treatment outcomes during pregnancy and postpartum.

    Moreira, Carlos Heitor Cunha; Weidlich, Patrícia; Fiorini, Tiago; da Rocha, José Mariano; Musskopf, Marta Liliana; Susin, Cristiano; Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to compare periodontal therapy outcomes during pregnancy and after delivery. One hundred nine pregnant women up to the 20th gestational week (GW) were randomized into two groups: the test group (comprehensive periodontal therapy during pregnancy) and the control group (comprehensive periodontal therapy after delivery). Periodontal examinations comprised plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), periodontal probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) volume. After baseline examination, women in the test group received periodontal treatment up to the 24th GW. The final examination was performed at the 26th to the 28th GW. Women in the control group were treated 30 days after delivery and reexamined 30 days after treatment. Periodontal therapy significantly reduced periodontal inflammation in both groups. The mean percentage of sites with BOP was reduced from 49.14 % (±22.49) to 11.10 % (±7.84) and from 45.71 % (±17.86) to 8.07 % (±5.21) in the test and control groups, respectively (p = 0.95). No statistically significant differences were observed between groups concerning PI, GI, PPD, CAL, and GCF. The reduction in mean percentage of sites with BOP stratified for initial PPD ≥4 mm was higher in the control group (p pregnancy do not interfere in treatment outcomes in women with widespread gingival inflammation and limited periodontal destruction. The role of these hormonal changes in pregnant women with different disease patterns remains uncertain. Periodontal health can be reestablished irrespective of the hormonal challenge that takes place during pregnancy.

  11. Interaction Between Immune Cells and Bacteria Associated With Periodontitis

    2017-07-22

    Periodontal Diseases; Periodontitis; Aggressive Periodontitis; Immunologic Disease; Microbial Disease; Periodontal Pocket; Inflammation; Inflammation Gum; Dysbiosis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis; Generalized Chronic Periodontitis; Chronic Periodontitis

  12. Common oral complications of head and neck cancer radiation therapy: mucositis, infections, saliva change, fibrosis, sensory dysfunctions, dental caries, periodontal disease, and osteoradionecrosis.

    Sroussi, Herve Y; Epstein, Joel B; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Saunders, Deborah P; Lalla, Rajesh V; Migliorati, Cesar A; Heaivilin, Natalie; Zumsteg, Zachary S

    2017-12-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy for the head and neck are susceptible to a significant and often abrupt deterioration in their oral health. The oral morbidities of radiation therapy include but are not limited to an increased susceptibility to dental caries and periodontal disease. They also include profound and often permanent functional and sensory changes involving the oral soft tissue. These changes range from oral mucositis experienced during and soon after treatment, mucosal opportunistic infections, neurosensory disorders, and tissue fibrosis. Many of the oral soft tissue changes following radiation therapy are difficult challenges to the patients and their caregivers and require life-long strategies to alleviate their deleterious effect on basic life functions and on the quality of life. We discuss the presentation, prognosis, and management strategies of the dental structure and oral soft tissue morbidities resulting from the administration of therapeutic radiation in head and neck patient. A case for a collaborative and integrated multidisciplinary approach to the management of these patients is made, with specific recommendation to include knowledgeable and experienced oral health care professionals in the treatment team. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Viswa Chandra, Rampalli

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases. PMID:23749826

  14. Link between rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis

    Tomasz Kaczyński

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is an infectious disease associated with the progressive destruction of periodontal tissues. In recent years, more and more data indicate an existing relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The link between both diseases has been confirmed in multiple studies. Despite the fact that this association might be based on shared environmental and genetic risk factors, a possible causal relation was advocated by experimental, epidemiological and interventional studies, with the leading role of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Individuals with chronic periodontitis are at an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, as well as rheumatoid arthritis patients are at an increased risk of chronic periodontitis and more severe forms of periodontitis. Furthermore, there is a correlation between the activity in both diseases – patients with more severe periodontitis suffer from more active rheumatoid arthritis. Intervention attempts were also performed, which demonstrated that eliminating periodontal infection and inflammation can affect the severity of rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the link between both diseases, focusing on its clinical implications. Will periodontal treatment become a part of standard therapy for rheumatoid arthritis?

  15. Bioprinting in Regenerative Medicine

    Manuela Monti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Turksen is a very well known scientist in the stem cell biology field and he is also internationally known for his fundamental studies on claudin-6. In addition to his research activity he is editor for the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series (Humana Press and editor-in-chief of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports.....

  16. A clinical case report of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and its impact on the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

    Patil, B S; Giri, G R

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease with microbial dental plaque as the initiator of periodontal disease. However, the manifestation and progression of the disease is influenced by a wide variety of determinants and factors. The strongest type of causal relationship is the association of systemic and periodontal disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis has also been considered as one of the causes of periodontal disease. This clinical case report highlights the impact of Hashimoto's thyroiditis on the outcome of periodontal therapy.

  17. The effect of periodontal therapy on neopterin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels in chronic periodontitis patients with and without acute myocardial infarction: a case-control study.

    Turgut Çankaya, Zeynep; Bodur, Ayşen; Taçoy, Gülten; Ergüder, Imge; Aktuna, Derya; Çengel, Atiye

    2018-04-05

    The presence of neopterin in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is a marker for local and acute immune activation, and the presence of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) in GCF is accepted as a marker for chronic vascular inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate effects of periodontal treatment on GCF levels of neopterin and VCAM-1 in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared with systemically healthy CP patients. Sixty subjects (20 CP patients with AMI, 20 healthy CP patients, and 20 healthy controls) were included. GCF samples were analyzed at baseline and after 3 and 6 months, and the probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing, gingival (GI) and plaque (PI) indices were recorded. We determined neopterin and VCAM-1 levels (concentration and total amount) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No significant differences were seen between the AMI+CP and CP groups for PI, GI, GCF levels of neopterin and VCAM-1 at baseline. The number of teeth with 5 mm≤CALperiodontal inflammation and the presence of neopterin and VCAM-1 in GCF prior to and following periodontal treatment, and between the GCF volume and clinical parameters. Data suggest that the total amount and concentration of neopterin and VCAM-1 in GCF seemed to be closely associated with periodontal disease severity in CP patients with AMI. Moreover, the results of our study demonstrate that the past periodontal status is potentially correlated between groups, with similar periodontal disease severity.

  18. Is antimicrobial photodynamic therapy an effective treatment for chronic periodontitis in diabetes mellitus and cigarette smokers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Al-Hamoudi, Nawwaf

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether treatment with antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) improves clinical, microbiological and immunological outcomes in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cigarette smokers with chronic periodontitis (CP). Databases (MEDLINE, PubMed; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register) were searched up to and including May 2017. The addressed PICO question was: "Does aPDT as an adjunct to SRP improves clinical, microbiological and immunological outcomes in T2DM and smokers with CP?" Six randomized clinical trials were included. All studies reporting clinical periodontal, microbiological, and immunological parameters showed that aPDT was effective in the treatment of CP in T2DM and smokers at follow up. When compared with SRP alone, none of the studies showed additional benefits of aPDT at follow up. Considering the effects of adjunctive aPDT as compared to SRP on clinical signs of CP in T2DM and smokers, no difference could be observed for all evaluated parameters (PD: Z=-0.81, P=0.41; CAL: Z=-0.19, P=0.84) except IL-1β (Z=4.57, P<0.001). Due to limited evidence, it remains debatable whether aPDT as an adjunct to SRP is effective in improving clinical, microbiological and immunological outcomes compared to SRP alone in T2DM and smokers with CP. Further well-designed, large-scale clinical trials with microbiological parameters and long follow up periods are needed in order to assess the efficacy of adjunctive aPDT in T2DM and cigarette smokers with CP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between Acute Phase of Chronic Periodontitis and Meteorological Factors in the Maintenance Phase of Periodontal Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    Takeuchi, Noriko; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-08-05

    The acute phase of chronic periodontitis may occur even in patients during supportive periodontal therapy. However, the details are not fully understood. Since the natural environment, including meteorology affects human health, we hypothesized that weather conditions may affect occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between weather conditions and acute phase of chronic periodontitis in patients under supportive periodontal therapy. Patients who were diagnosed with acute phase of chronic periodontitis under supportive periodontal therapy during 2011-2013 were selected for this study. We performed oral examinations and collected questionnaires and meteorological data. Of 369 patients who experienced acute phase of chronic periodontitis, 153 had acute phase of chronic periodontitis without direct-triggered episodes. When using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of time-series analysis, the independent covariant of maximum hourly range of barometric pressure, maximum hourly range of temperature, and maximum daily wind speed were significantly associated with occurrence of acute phase of chronic periodontitis (p chronic periodontitis.

  20. Chemically modified tetracyclines an emerging host modulator in chronic periodontitis patients: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial.

    Alyousef, Abdullah A; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Muzaheed

    2017-09-01

    Although periodontal diseases are caused by some of the specific pathogens, most of the tissue damage is caused by the host reaction to disease and not actually by the infections. Therefore, host modulatory therapy (HMT) has advanced benefit for the treatment of periodontitis, which works basically by reducing tissue destruction and regeneration in periodontium by altering the critical aspects of host response regulation and up regulating defensive regenerative responses. The present study was conducted with the goal to test an innovative therapeutic option using chemically modified tetracycline in patients affected with generalized, moderate and severe chronic periodontitis. We assumed that CMT might have the potential to provoke an assessable clinical result and pharmacologically impede the level inflammatory flow. CMT (incyclinide) treated group had significantly higher CAL (clinical attachment) values than Placebo Control suggesting an improved CAL in CMT treatment. Host modulation therapy width incyclinide can be as an adjunct to conventional nonsurgical therapies without antimicrobial resistance. Progress was noticed in the clinical parameters but not the serum CRP level in our study establishing the role of CMTs in controlling chronic periodontitis. Also CMT treatment indicates its role in anti-inflammatory process as it inhibited IL-12 and TNF alpha but IL-10 level was not affected. However, more randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials with large sample size are required in order to authenticate the usage of CMTs in chronic periodontitis treatment. Based on this understanding, exploration of the novel, low-cost synthetic inhibitors that can be used as potential therapeutic agents, has been tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Periodontal Disease Part IV: Periodontal Infections

    Turnbull, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In Part IV of this article, the author describes two periodontal infections, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (trench mouth) and periodontal abscess, both acute painful conditions for which patients may seek advice from their family physician rather than their dentist.

  2. Endodontic-periodontal microsurgery for combined endodontic-periodontal lesions: An overview.

    Sharma, Ritu; Hegde, Vivek; Siddharth, M; Hegde, Rashmi; Manchanda, Gunsha; Agarwal, Pratul

    2014-11-01

    Endodontic and periodontal microsurgery has surpassed the success rates for traditional endodontic and periodontal surgical procedures. Excellent healing results are being attributed to both the techniques, when employed, for isolated endodontic or periodontal defects. Combined endodontic-periodontal lesions have been referred to as a true challenge, requiring not only endodontic microsurgical management but also concurrent bone grafting and membrane barriers techniques. The prevention of epithelial downgrowth and regeneration of periodontal cementum, fiber, and bone seals the fate of these cases. Achieving primary closure with submergence of grafts has a positive effect on GTR outcome. New techniques of periodontal microsurgery, such as minimally invasive papilla preserving flaps with passive internal mattress suturing, have managed to obtain 90% primary flap closure over grafted sites. Root surface treatment and conditioning has also shown to be beneficial for GTR. Endodontic microsurgery for the combined lesion has not integrated these advances yet. These advances, along with a recently suggested treatment strategy, are ushering in the level next in management of the combined lesions. This article offers an overview of the combined lesion, the disease, its classification, treatment strategy, regenerative tools, microsurgical recommendations, and outcome studies.

  3. Introduction to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

    Stoltz, J-F; Decot, V; Huseltein, C; He, X; Zhang, L; Magdalou, J; Li, Y P; Menu, P; Li, N; Wang, Y Y; de Isla, N; Bensoussan, D

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues don't regenerate spontaneously, explaining why regenerative medicine and cell therapy represent a promising alternative treatment (autologous cells or stem cells of different origins). The principle is simple: cells are collected, expanded and introduced with or without modification into injured tissues or organs. Among middle-term therapeutic applications, cartilage defects, bone repair, cardiac insufficiency, burns, liver or bladder, neurodegenerative disorders could be considered.

  4. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  5. Chronic periodontitis with multiple risk factor syndrome: a case report.

    Shimoe, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Shiomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Fusanori; Takashiba, Shogo

    2011-07-01

    Multiple risk factor syndrome is a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity associated epidemiologically with insulin resistance. This report describes the clinical course of a patient suffering from severe periodontitis with multiple risk factor syndrome, and discusses the association between periodontal infection and systemic health. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension for over 10 years. At baseline, her hemoglobin A1 c was 8.1%. However, she had no diabetic complications except periodontitis. The IgG antibody titers against Porphyromonas gingivalis FDC 381 and SU63 were elevated above the mean of healthy subjects +2 standard deviations. Intensive periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, was performed to reduce periodontal infection and bacteremia. Her systemic and periodontal conditions were evaluated longitudinally for 10 years. Following periodontal treatment, antibody titers against Porphyromonas gingivalis and hemoglobin A1c values were significantly improved. The other clinical data and medication for her systemic condition also remained stable during supportive periodontal therapy. However, she developed myocardial infarction, and showed continuous deterioration of hemoglobin A1 c level and periodontitis. The long-term clustering of risk factors, such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and periodontitis, are associated with the development of myocardial infarction. Treatment of systemic conditions in combination with comprehensive periodontal treatment is important in management of patients with multiple risk factor syndrome.

  6. Periodontal regeneration around natural teeth.

    Garrett, S

    1996-11-01

    1. Evidence is conclusive (Table 2) that periodontal regeneration in humans is possible following the use of bone grafts, guided tissue regeneration procedures, both without and in combination with bone grafts, and root demineralization procedures. 2. Clinically guided tissue regeneration procedures have demonstrated significant positive clinical change beyond that achieved with debridement alone in treating mandibular and maxillary (buccal only) Class II furcations. Similar data exist for intraosseous defects. Evidence suggests that the use of bone grafts or GTR procedures produce equal clinical benefit in treating intraosseous defects. Further research is necessary to evaluate GTR procedures compared to, or combined with, bone grafts in treating intraosseous defects. 3. Although there are some data suggesting hopeful results in Class II furcations, the clinical advantage of procedures combining present regenerative techniques remains to be demonstrated. Additional randomized controlled trials with sufficient power are needed to demonstrate the potential usefulness of these techniques. 4. Outcomes following regenerative attempts remain somewhat variable with differences in results between studies and individual subjects. Some of this variability is likely patient related in terms of compliance with plaque control and maintenance procedures, as well as personal habits; e.g., smoking. Variations in the defects selected for study may also affect predictability of outcomes along with other factors. 5. There is evidence to suggest that present regenerative techniques lead to significant amounts of regeneration at localized sites on specific teeth. However, if complete regeneration is to become a reality, additional stimuli to enhance the regenerative process are likely needed. Perhaps this will be accomplished in the future, with combined procedures that include appropriate polypeptide growth factors or tissue factors to provide additional stimulus.

  7. Regenerative Medicine for Neurological Disorders

    Dong-Hyuk Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual meeting of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR has always introduced us to top-notch and up-to-date approaches for regenerative medicine related to neuroscience, ranging from stem cell–based therapy to novel drugs. The 16th ASNTR meeting focused on a variety of different topics, including the unknown pathogenesis or mechanisms of specific neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell biology, and development of novel alternative medicines or devices. Newly developed stem cells, such as amniotic epithelial stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as well-known traditional stem cells, such as neural, embryonic, bone marrow mesenchymal, and human umbilical cord blood–derived stem cells, were reported. A number of commercialized stem cells were also covered at this meeting. Fetal neural tissues, such as ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and Schwann cells, were investigated for neurodegenerative diseases or spinal cord injury. A number of studies focused on novel methods for drug monitoring or graft tracking, and combination therapy with stem cells and medicine, such as cytokines or trophic factors. Finally, the National Institutes of Health guidelines for human stem cell research, clinical trials of commercialized stem cells without larger animal testing, and prohibition of medical tourism were big controversial issues that led to heated discussion.

  8. Ethical guidelines, animal profile, various animal models used in periodontal research with alternatives and future perspectives.

    Pasupuleti, Mohan Kumar; Molahally, Subramanya Shetty; Salwaji, Supraja

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory animal models serve as a facilitator to investigate the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease, are used to know the efficacy of reconstructive and regenerative procedures, and are also helpful in evaluation of newer therapeutic techniques including laser and implant therapies prior to application in the human beings. The aim of this review is to know the different animal models used in various specialties of dental research and to know the ethical guidelines prior to the usage of experimental models with main emphasis on how to refine, replace, and reduce the number of animal models usage in the laboratory. An online search for experimental animal models used in dental research was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed database. Publications from 2009 to May 2013 in the specialty of periodontics were included in writing this review. A total of 652 references were published in PubMed/MEDLINE databases based on the search terms used. Out of 245 studies, 241 were related to the periodontal research published in English from 2009 to 2013. Relevant papers were chosen according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. After extensive electronic and hand search on animal models, it has been observed that various animal models were used in dental research. Search on animal models used for dental research purpose revealed that various animals such as rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbit, beagle dogs, goats, and nonhuman primates were extensively used. However, with the new advancement of ex vivo animal models, it has become easy to investigate disease pathogenesis and to test the efficacy of newer therapeutic modalities with the reduced usage of animal models. This review summarized the large amount of literature on animal models used in periodontal research with main emphasis on ethical guidelines and on reducing the animal model usage in future perspective.

  9. Ethical guidelines, animal profile, various animal models used in periodontal research with alternatives and future perspectives

    Mohan Kumar Pasupuleti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory animal models serve as a facilitator to investigate the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease, are used to know the efficacy of reconstructive and regenerative procedures, and are also helpful in evaluation of newer therapeutic techniques including laser and implant therapies prior to application in the human beings. The aim of this review is to know the different animal models used in various specialties of dental research and to know the ethical guidelines prior to the usage of experimental models with main emphasis on how to refine, replace, and reduce the number of animal models usage in the laboratory. An online search for experimental animal models used in dental research was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed database. Publications from 2009 to May 2013 in the specialty of periodontics were included in writing this review. A total of 652 references were published in PubMed/MEDLINE databases based on the search terms used. Out of 245 studies, 241 were related to the periodontal research published in English from 2009 to 2013. Relevant papers were chosen according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. After extensive electronic and hand search on animal models, it has been observed that various animal models were used in dental research. Search on animal models used for dental research purpose revealed that various animals such as rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbit, beagle dogs, goats, and nonhuman primates were extensively used. However, with the new advancement of ex vivo animal models, it has become easy to investigate disease pathogenesis and to test the efficacy of newer therapeutic modalities with the reduced usage of animal models. This review summarized the large amount of literature on animal models used in periodontal research with main emphasis on ethical guidelines and on reducing the animal model usage in future perspective.

  10. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships.

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients' periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  11. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    Dannan Aous

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients′ periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  12. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    Eisenacher Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A, Versican (CSPG-2, Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1, Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1, Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3, Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1, Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38, Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1, and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS; the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2, Complement component 3 (C3, Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2, Interleukin-8 (IL-8, Endothelin-1 (EDN-1, Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2, Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14, and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7. Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following

  13. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    Sağlam, Ebru; Saruhan, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  14. Group C. Initiator paper. Periodontal regeneration--fact or fiction?

    Bartold, P M

    2015-01-01

    Numerous techniques have been tried and tested to regenerate tissues lost to periodontal disease. While there has been some success to date, more work is required to move this to a reliable and clinically predictable procedure. Much of the future success for such treatments will rely largely on our understanding of the biology of both developmental and regenerative processes. Nonetheless, despite the noble goal of periodontal regeneration, the relevance of re-creation of a connective tissue attachment has been questioned. Since formation of a long junctional epithelial attachment to the tooth following a variety of periodontal treatment procedures has been shown to be no more susceptible to further breakdown than a non-diseased site, the question arises as to what purpose do we seek the ultimate outcome of periodontal regeneration? The answer lies in the "fact and fiction" of periodontal regeneration. There is no doubt that the regenerative procedures that have been developed can be shown to be biologically successful at the histological level. Furthermore, the results of periodontal regeneration (particularly guided tissue regeneration) have been stable over the long term (at least up to 10 years). However, the techniques currently under use which show the greatest promise (guided tissue regeneration and growth factors) are still clinically unpredictable because of their highly technique-sensitive nature. In addition, whether the slight clinical improvements offered by these procedures over routine open flap debridement procedures are of cost or patient benefit with regards to improved periodontal health and retention of teeth remains to be established. The next phase in regenerative technologies will undoubtedly involve a deeper understanding of the molecular signaling (both intra- and extra-cellular) and cellular differentiation processes involved in the regenerative processes. So in answer to the question of whether periodontal regeneration is fact or fiction

  15. Is anti-platelet therapy interruption a real clinical issue? Its implications in dentistry and particularly in periodontics

    Kumar A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of anti-platelet therapy has reduced the mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular disease remarkably. A considerable number of patients presenting before a dentist or periodontist give a history of anti-platelet therapy. A clinical dilemma whether to discontinue the anti-platelet therapy or continue the same always confronts the practitioner. Diverse opinions exist regarding the management of such patients. While one group of researchers advise continuation of anti-platelet therapy rather than invite remote, but possible, thromboembolic events, another group encourages discontinuation for variable periods. This study aims at reviewing the current rationale of anti-platelet therapy and the various options available to a clinician, with regard to the management of a patient under anti-platelet therapy. Current recommendations and consensus favour no discontinuation of anti-platelet therapy. This recommendation, however, comes with a rider to use caution and consider other mitigating factors as well. With a large number of patients giving a history of anti-platelet therapy, the topic is of interest and helps a clinician to arrive at a decision.

  16. Influence of nanotopography on periodontal ligament stem cell functions and cell sheet based periodontal regeneration.

    Gao, Hui; Li, Bei; Zhao, Lingzhou; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is an important part of regenerative medicine, with great clinical significance; however, the effects of nanotopography on the functions of periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells (PDLSCs) and on PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration have never been explored. Titania nanotubes (NTs) layered on titanium (Ti) provide a good platform to study this. In the current study, the influence of NTs of different tube size on the functions of PDLSCs was observed. Afterward, an ectopic implantation model using a Ti/cell sheets/hydroxyapatite (HA) complex was applied to study the effect of the NTs on cell sheet based periodontal regeneration. The NTs were able to enhance the initial PDLSC adhesion and spread, as well as collagen secretion. With the Ti/cell sheets/HA complex model, it was demonstrated that the PDLSC sheets were capable of regenerating the PDL tissue, when combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets and HA, without the need for extra soluble chemical cues. Simultaneously, the NTs improved the periodontal regeneration result of the ectopically implanted Ti/cell sheets/HA complex, giving rise to functionally aligned collagen fiber bundles. Specifically, much denser collagen fibers, with abundant blood vessels as well as cementum-like tissue on the Ti surface, which well-resembled the structure of natural PDL, were observed in the NT5 and NT10 sample groups. Our study provides the first evidence that the nanotopographical cues obviously influence the functions of PDLSCs and improve the PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration size dependently, which provides new insight to the periodontal regeneration. The Ti/cell sheets/HA complex may constitute a good model to predict the effect of biomaterials on periodontal regeneration.

  17. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    Vivek Kumar Bains

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO, is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials.

  18. Total anti-oxidant capacity of saliva in chronic periodontitis patients before and after periodontal treatment.

    Shirzaiy, M; Ansari, S M; Dehghan, J H; Ghaeni, S H

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease is among the most common inflammatory conditions which is associated with many different factors. One of the contributing factors to the pathogenesis of this condition may compromise the defensive mechanism of antioxidants. The present study evaluates the antioxidant capacity of saliva in periodontal patients before and after periodontal treatment. In this cross sectional study, 31 patients systemically healthy non smokers with chronic periodontitis were recruited. The antioxidant capacity of saliva was measured before the initial phase of periodontal therapy and after completion of the treatment. Data were analyzed using SPSS 19 software. Paired T-Test, Independent sample T-test and ANOVA tests were used as appropriated. The mean and standard deviation antioxidant capacity of the saliva after the treatment.(0.962± 0.287µM)was significantly higher than before the treatment (0.655 ± 0.281 µM ,pperiodontal treatment was higher among men than among women; however, the difference was not significant (P=0.07). The mean difference of salivary antioxidant capacity was not significantly differed among different ages (P=0.772). The antioxidant capacity of saliva was higher after periodontal therapy among patients with periodontal disease, however the change was not varied across the ages and gender. Therefore, the alterations in the defensive mechanism of antioxidants could be the key factors contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

  19. Regenerative rehabilitation: a new future?

    Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Childers, Martin K

    2014-11-01

    Modern rehabilitation medicine is propelled by newfound knowledge aimed at offering solutions for an increasingly aging population afflicted by chronic debilitating conditions. Considered a core component of future health care, the rollout of regenerative medicine underscores a paradigm shift in patient management targeted at restoring physiologic function and restituting normative impact. Nascent regenerative technologies offer unprecedented prospects in achieving repair of degenerated, diseased, or damaged tissues. In this context, principles of regenerative science are increasingly integrated in rehabilitation practices as illustrated in the present Supplement. Encompassing a growing multidisciplinary domain, the emergent era of "regenerative rehabilitation" brings radical innovations at the forefront of healthcare blueprints.

  20. Center for Neuroscience & Regenerative Medicine

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the U.S. Department of Defense...

  1. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  2. Nanotechnologies in regenerative medicine

    Kubinová, Šárka; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, 3-4 (2010), s. 144-156 ISSN 1364-5706 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR KAN201110651 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) 1M0538; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1242; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520804; EC FP6 project ENIMET(XE) LSHM-CT-2005-019063 Program:1M; GA; KA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Nanotechnology * regenerative medicine * nanofibers Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.051, year: 2010

  3. Regenerative laser system

    Biancardi, F.R.; Landerman, A.; Melikian, G.

    1975-01-01

    Regenerative apparatus for exhausting the working medium from the optical cavity of a laser and for supplying preheated diluent to the reaction chamber of a laser is disclosed. In an aftercooler thermal energy is exchanged between the working medium exhausted from the optical cavity and a cryogenic coolant which is subsequently utilized as the motive fluid for an ejector and as a diluent in the production of laser gas. Highly toxic and corrosive gases are condensed out of the working medium as the cryogenic coolant is evaporated and superheated. A preheater transfers additional heat to the diluent before the diluent enters the reaction chamber. (U.S.)

  4. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  5. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw; Amy, Gary; Chunggaze, Mohammed; Al-Ghasham, Tawfiq

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  6. Molecular Characteristics of the Equine Periodontal Ligament

    Antje Pöschke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The equine periodontal ligament (PDL is a fibrous connective tissue that covers the intra-alveolar parts of the tooth and anchors it to the alveolar bone—it, therefore, provides a similar function to a tendinous structure. While several studies have considered the formation and structure of tendons, there is insufficient information particularly on the molecular composition of the PDL. Especially for the equine PDL, there is limited knowledge concerning the expression of genes commonly regarded as typical for tendon tissue. In this study, the gene expression of, e.g., collagen type 1 alpha 1 (COL1, collagen type 3 alpha 1 (COL3, scleraxis (SCX, and fibrocartilage markers was examined in the functional mature equine PDL compared with immature and mature equine tendon tissue. PDL samples were obtained from incisor, premolar, and molar teeth from seven adult horses. Additionally, tendon samples were collected from four adult horses and five foals at different sampling locations. Analyses of gene expression were performed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Significantly higher expression levels of COL1 and 3 were found in the mature equine PDL in comparison with mature tendon, indicating higher rates of collagen production and turnover in the mature equine PDL. The expression levels of SCX, a specific marker for tenogenic-differentiated cells, were on a similar level in functional mature PDL and in mature tendon tissue. Evidence of chondrogenic metaplasia, often found in tendon entheses or in pressurized regions of tendons, was not found in the mature equine PDL. The obtained results justify further experiments focused on the possible use of equine PDL cells for cell-based regenerative therapies.

  7. [Comparison of the differences in pain and the effect of ibuprofen in reducing endodontic flare-up after single-visit root canal therapy between Uyghur and Han patients with chronic apical periodontitis].

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Xin-Ying; Wan, Na; Wu, Pei-Ling

    2017-04-01

    To compare the incidence of postoperative pain of chronic periapical periodontitis patients with root canal therapy between Han and Uygur, and the effect of ibuprofen in reducing endodontic flare-up after single-visit root canal therapy between Uyghur and Han patients with chronic apical periodontitis, in order to provide a basis for clinical administration. Two hundred and fifty Uyghur and 250 Han patients with chronic apical periodontitis in their incisor, canine and premolar were collected, and randomly divided into 2 groups: experimental group and control group. After single-visit root canal therapy, Uyghur patients in the experimental group (UEG) and Han patients in the experimental group (HEG) took ibuprofen capsules according to the drug instructions; while Uyghur patients in the control group (UCG) and Han patients in the control group(HCG) took placebo capsules. Both doctors and patient kept blind from the drug capsules and group of the patients. The incidence, degree of endodontic Flare-up at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 hours and 1 week after root canal therapy were recorded and analyzed by χ 2 test using SPSS11.0 software package. During the experiment, the incidence of E flare-up in Uygur patients was higher than in Han patients; the incidence of E flare-up in different groups in orders from high to low was: UCG>HCG>UEG>HEG. Chi-square test showed that there were significant differences between the two groups. In view of time distribution, most of flare-up happened between 24~48 hours after root canal therapy with the highest degree in all 4 groups. Regardless of the incidence or degree of flare-up, HEG and HCG were significantly greater than UEG and UCG. Ibuprofen can reduce and prevent flare-up for both Uyghur and Han patients, but it has better effect on Han patients.

  8. The silencing of cathepsin K used in gene therapy for periodontal disease reveals the role of cathepsin K in chronic infection and inflammation.

    Chen, W; Gao, B; Hao, L; Zhu, G; Jules, J; MacDougall, M J; Wang, J; Han, X; Zhou, X; Li, Y-P

    2016-10-01

    Periodontitis is a severe chronic inflammatory disease and one of the most prevalent non-communicable chronic diseases that affects the majority of the world's adult population. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this dreadful disease. In this study, we utilized adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing cathepsin K (Ctsk) small hairpin (sh)RNA (AAV-sh-Ctsk) to silence Ctsk in vivo and subsequently evaluated its impact in periodontitis as a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease. We used a known mouse model of periodontitis, in which wild-type BALB/cJ mice were infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 in the maxillary and mandibular periodontium to induce the disease. AAV-sh-Ctsk was then administrated locally into the periodontal tissues in vivo, followed by analyses to assess progression of the disease. AAV-mediated Ctsk silencing drastically protected mice (> 80%) from P. gingivalis-induced bone resorption by osteoclasts. In addition, AAV-sh-Ctsk administration drastically reduced inflammation by impacting the expression of many inflammatory cytokines as well as T-cell and dendritic cell numbers in periodontal lesions. AAV-mediated Ctsk silencing can simultaneously target both the inflammation and bone resorption associated with periodontitis through its inhibitory effect on immune cells and osteoclast function. Thereby, AAV-sh-Ctsk administration can efficiently protect against periodontal tissue damage and alveolar bone loss, establishing this AAV-mediated local silencing of Ctsk as an important therapeutic strategy for effectively treating periodontal disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Regenerative endodontics: A state of the art

    Rashmi Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue grafting, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. Non-vital infected teeth have long been treated with root canal therapy (for mature root apex and apexification (for immature root apex, or doomed to extraction. Although successful, current treatments fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in these teeth. But, what if the non-vital tooth could be made vital once again? That is the hope offered by regenerative endodontics, an emerging field focused on replacing traumatized and diseased pulp with functional pulp tissue. Restoration of vitality of non-vital tooth is based on tissue engineering and revascularization procedures. The purpose of this article is to review these biological procedures and the hurdles that must be overcome to develop regenerative endodontic procedures.

  10. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients’ quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering. PMID:25478476

  11. Clinical efficacy of photodynamic therapy adjunctive to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Xue, Dong; Tang, Lu; Bai, Yuhao; Ding, Qian; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhao, Ying

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) adjunctive to scaling and root planing (SRP) in patients with untreated chronic periodontitis based on up-to-date evidence. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs), supplemented by a manual literature search. Mean differences (MD) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) of probing depth (PD) reduction and clinical attachment level (CAL) gain were synthesized. The I 2 test and Q statistics were used to determine the inter-study heterogeneity. Subgroup analysis based on smoking status was performed. Eleven RCTs with a total of 243 subjects were included. Significant improvement in PD reduction (MD=0.13, CI:0.02-0.24, p=0.02) and marginal significant improvement in CAL gain (MD=0.18, CI:-0.005-0.363, p=0.056) were observed in favor of SRP+PDT at 3months. When evaluated at 6months after baseline, the association of PDT with SRP resulted in a significant benefit in PD reduction (MD=0.40, CI:0.05-0.74, p=0.03), but not in CAL gain (MD=0.37, CI:-0.18-0.93, p=0.18). Subgroup analysis revealed that the combined therapy produced no significant improvements in PD and CAL at neither 3months nor 6months for studies with smokers. No treatment-related adverse events or side effects had been reported by the included studies. Pooled analysis suggests a short-term benefit of PDT as an adjunct to SRP in clinical outcome variables. However, evidence regarding its long-term efficacy is still insufficient and no significant effect has been confirmed in terms of CAL gain at 6months. Future clinical trials of high methodological quality are needed to establish the optimal combination of photosensitizer and laser configuration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The regenerative medicine coalition. Interview with Frank-Roman Lauter.

    Lauter, Frank-Roman

    2012-11-01

    Frank-Roman Lauter, Secretary General of the recently launched Regenerative Medicine Coalition, explains how the coalition was formed and what they hope to achieve. Frank-Roman Lauter has served as Secretary General of the Regenerative Medicine Coalition since 2012, and as Head of Business Development at Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies since 2007. Frank-Roman Lauter's interest is the organization of academic infrastructures to promote efficient translation of research findings into new therapies. He co-organizes joined strategy development for regenerative medicine clusters from seven European countries (FP7-EU Project) and has initiated cooperation between the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the German Federal Ministry for Education & Research, resulting in a joined funding program. Recently, he cofounded the international consortium of Regenerative Medicine translational centers (RMC; www.the-rmc.org ). Trained as a molecular biologist at the Max-Planck Institute in Berlin-Dahlem and at Stanford, he has 16 years of experience as an entrepreneur and life science manager in Germany and the USA.

  13. Periodontitis: facts, fallacies and the future.

    Slots, Jørgen

    2017-10-01

    This volume of Periodontology 2000 represents the 25th anniversary of the Journal, and uses the occasion to assess important advancements in periodontology over the past quarter-century as well as the hurdles that remain. Periodontitis is defined by pathologic loss of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The disease involves complex dynamic interactions among active herpesviruses, specific bacterial pathogens and destructive immune responses. Periodontal diagnostics is currently based on clinical rather than etiologic criteria, and provides limited therapeutic guidance. Periodontal causative treatment consists of scaling, antiseptic rinses and occasionally systemic antibiotics, and surgical intervention has been de-emphasized, except perhaps for the most advanced types of periodontitis. Plastic surgical therapy includes soft-tissue grafting to cover exposed root surfaces and bone grafting to provide support for implants. Dental implants are used to replace severely diseased or missing teeth, but implant overuse is of concern. The utility of laser treatment for periodontitis remains unresolved. Host modulation and risk-factor modification therapies may benefit select patient groups. Patient self-care is a critical part of periodontal health care, and twice-weekly oral rinsing with 0.10-0.25% sodium hypochlorite constitutes a valuable adjunct to conventional anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis treatments. A link between periodontal herpesviruses and systemic diseases is a strong biological plausibility. In summary, research during the past 25 years has significantly changed our concepts of periodontitis pathobiology and has produced more-effective and less-costly therapeutic options. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Conference Report: 6th Annual International Symposium on Regenerative Rehabilitation.

    Loghmani, M Terry; Roche, Joseph A

    2018-04-03

    The 6th International Symposium on Regenerative Rehabilitation, hosted by the Alliance for Regenerative Rehabilitation Research and Training (AR 3 T), included a preconference meeting of institutional representatives of the International Consortium of Regenerative Rehabilitation, keynote talks from distinguished scientists, platform and poster presentations from experts and trainees, panel discussions and postconference workshops. The following priorities were identified: increasing rigor in basic, preclinical and clinical studies, especially the use of better controls; developing better outcome measures for preclinical and clinical trials; focusing on developing more tissue-based interventions versus cell-based interventions; including regenerative rehabilitation in curricula of professional programs like occupational and physical therapy; and developing better instruments to quantify rehabilitative interventions.

  15. Development of formulation device for periodontal disease.

    Sato, Yasuhiko; Oba, Takuma; Watanabe, Norio; Danjo, Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    In addition to providing standard surgical treatment that removes the plaque and infected tissues, medications that can regenerate periodontal tissue are also required in the treatment of periodontal disease. As a form of regenerative medication, various growth factors are expected to be used while treating periodontal disease. A protein-like growth factor is often developed as a lyophilized product with dissolution liquid, considering its instability in the solution state. We have clarified that the formulation for periodontal disease needs to be viscous. When the lyophilized product was dissolved using a sticky solution, various problems were encountered, difficulty in dissolving and air bubbles, for example, and some efforts were needed to prepare the formulation. In this research, to identify the problem of preparing a viscous formulation, a lyophilized product (placebo) and sticky liquid were prepared by using vial and ampoule as the conventional containers. Based on these problems, a prototype administration device was developed, and its functionality was confirmed. As a result, it was suggested that the device with a useful mixing system that could shorten the preparation time was developed.

  16. Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier

    Barclay, John A. [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Oseen-Send, Kathryn [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Ferguson, Luke [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Pouresfandiary, Jamshid [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Cousins, Anand [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Ralph, Heather [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Hampto, Tom [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-12

    This final report for the DOE Project entitled Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier (AMRL) funded under Grant DE-FG36-08GO18064 to Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy (Heracles/Prometheus) describes an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) prototype designed and built during the period from July 2008 through May 2011. The primary goal of this project was to make significant technical advances toward highly efficient liquefaction of hydrogen. Conventional hydrogen liquefiers at any scale have a maximum FOM of ~0.35 due primarily to the intrinsic difficulty of rapid, efficient compression of either hydrogen or helium working gases. Numerical simulation modeling of high performance AMRL designs indicates certain designs have promise to increase thermodynamic efficiency from a FOM of ~0.35 toward ~0.5 to ~0.6. The technical approach was the use of solid magnetic working refrigerants cycled in and out of high magnetic fields to build an efficient active regenerative magnetic refrigeration module providing cooling power for AMRL. A single-stage reciprocating AMRR with a design temperature span from ~290 K to ~120 K was built and tested with dual magnetic regenerators moving in and out of the conductively-cooled superconducting magnet subsystem. The heat transfer fluid (helium) was coupled to the process stream (refrigeration/liquefaction load) via high performance heat exchangers. In order to maximize AMRR efficiency a helium bypass loop with adjustable flow was incorporated in the design because the thermal mass of magnetic refrigerants is higher in low magnetic field than in high magnetic field. Heracles/Prometheus designed experiments to measure AMRR performance under a variety of different operational parameters such as cycle frequency, magnetic field strength, heat transfer fluid flow rate, amount of bypass flow of the heat transfer fluid while measuring work input, temperature span, cooling capability as a function of cold temperature

  17. Tooth loss due to periodontal abscess: a retrospective study.

    McLeod, D E; Lainson, P A; Spivey, J D

    1997-10-01

    This retrospective study focused on the frequency of tooth loss due to periodontal abscess among 42 patients who were treated by a single clinician over a 5- to 29-year period. A total of 114 patients were selected from the active periodontal recall schedule of a single periodontist at The University of Iowa College of Dentistry. The criteria for inclusion in the study included having a history of moderate to advanced periodontitis, being on 3 to 6 month recall periodontal maintenance care, and completion of active periodontal therapy prior to October 1987. Other parameters evaluated were age; gender; number of teeth present and missing at the initial, reevaluation, and last periodontal recall visit; initial periodontal prognosis; furcation involvement; non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy; and reasons for tooth loss. Patients were grouped according to the number of teeth lost following active periodontal treatment into well-maintained (0 to 3), downhill (4 to 9), and extreme downhill (10 to 23) groups. Forty-two of the 114 patients were identified as having one or more periodontal abscesses. A total of 109 teeth were affected by periodontal abscess of which 49 (45%) teeth were lost and 60 (55%) were successfully maintained over an average of 12.5 years (5 to 29 years). More furcated teeth were lost than nonfurcated teeth and teeth given a hopeless prognosis were lost more consistently than those given a questionable prognosis in all groups. The frequency of periodontal abscess and tooth loss per patient was greater in the downhill and extreme downhill response groups than the well-maintained group. This suggests that teeth with a history of periodontal abscess can be treated and maintained for several years.

  18. Effect of smoking and periodontal treatment on the subgingival microflora : A retrospective study

    Van der Velden, U; Varoufaki, A; Hutter, JW; Xu, L; Timmerman, MF; Van Winkelhoff, AJ; Loos, BG

    Background: The effect of smoking on the prevalence of periodontal pathogens after periodontal treatment is still not clear. Some studies found no effect of the smoking status on the prevalence of periodontal pathogens after therapy, whereas others did. The aim of this retrospective study was to

  19. Improvement in Oral Health-related Quality of Life by Periodontal Treatment: A Case Report on Elderly Patient with Chronic Periodontitis.

    Suzuki, Eiichi; Aoki, Hideo; Tomita, Sachiyo; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an elderly patient with chronic periodontitis requiring periodontal surgery. An 86-year-old man presented to Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital with the chief complaint of tooth fracture in the anterior region and occlusal pain in the posterior region. Clinical examination revealed 47% of sites with a probing depth (PD) of ≥4 mm and 47% of sites with bleeding on probing. Radiographic examination revealed generalized moderate horizontal bone loss with localized vertical defects. A clinical diagnosis of moderate chronic periodontitis was made. The patient's oral health-related quality of life (QoL) was also assessed at the time of each periodontal assessment. Initial periodontal therapy was provided followed by periodontal surgery. Open flap debridement was performed at sites with a PD of ≥5 mm (teeth #15-17). Surgical crown lengthening with an apically positioned flap was performed on #11 and 13 to gain an adequate biological width for the subsequent crown restoration. After confirming the stability of the periodontal tissue, provisional restorations were replaced with final restorations. No further deterioration was observed in the periodontal condition during the subsequent 1-year period of supportive periodontal therapy. Oral health-related QoL was markedly improved by the periodontal therapy. This suggests that periodontal therapy plays an important role in improving and maintaining oral health-related QoL in elderly people.

  20. Modeling susceptibility to periodontitis

    Laine, M.L.; Moustakis, V.; Koumakis, L.; Potamias, G.; Loos, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases like periodontitis have a complex pathogenesis and a multifactorial etiology, involving complex interactions between multiple genetic loci and infectious agents. We aimed to investigate the influence of genetic polymorphisms and bacteria on chronic periodontitis risk.

  1. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis.

    Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Siwiec, Radosław; Berger, Marcin; Malm, Anna; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2017-01-28

    The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host's health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridization) come increasingly into use. On the basis of a literature review, the following methods are presented: polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR), 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing, checkerboard and reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization, microarrays, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE), as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and next generation sequencing (NGS). The advantages and drawbacks of each method in the examination of periopathogens are indicated. The techniques listed above allow fast detection of even small quantities of pathogen present in diagnostic material and prove particularly useful to detect microorganisms that are difficult or impossible to grow in a laboratory.

  2. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis

    Izabela Korona-Głowniak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host’s health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridization come increasingly into use. On the basis of a literature review, the following methods are presented: polymerase chain reaction (PCR, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR, 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing, checkerboard and reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization, microarrays, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE, as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP and next generation sequencing (NGS. The advantages and drawbacks of each method in the examination of periopathogens are indicated. The techniques listed above allow fast detection of even small quantities of pathogen present in diagnostic material and prove particularly useful to detect microorganisms that are difficult or impossible to grow in a laboratory.

  3. Periodontist-Dental Hygienist Collaboration in Periodontal Care for Chronic Periodontitis: An 11-year Case Report.

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Uekusa, Tomomi; Hosono, Meiko; Kigure, Takashi; Sugito, Hiroki; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of severe chronic periodontitis treated and longitudinally maintained by a periodontist and dental hygienists. The patient was a 45-year-old woman who presented with the chief complaint of gingival bleeding and tooth mobility. An initial examination revealed generalized gingival inflammation and subgingival calculus in the premolar and molar regions. Premature contact was observed in #14 and 45. Clinical examination revealed 42% of sites with a probing depth (PD) of ≥4 mm and 44% of sites with bleeding on probing. Radiographic examination revealed vertical bone resorption in #35, 36, and 45, and horizontal bone resorption in other regions. Based on a clinical diagnosis of severe chronic periodontitis, initial periodontal therapy consisting of plaque control, scaling and root planing, and removal of an ill-fitting prosthesis was performed. Following suppression of inflammation, occlusal adjustment of premature contact sites was performed. Open flap debridement was performed for teeth with a PD of ≥5 mm. After confirming the stability of the periodontal tissue, final prostheses were placed on #16, 35-37, and 46. Following re-evaluation, the patient was placed on supportive periodontal therapy. It has been 11 years since the patient's first visit, and the periodontal conditions have remained stable. Meticulous periodontal care maintained over a number of years by a periodontist and dental hygienist have yielded a clinically favorable outcome.

  4. Simultaneous Occurrence of Periodontal and Skin Abscesses in a ...

    Pre-operative quantitative analysis of plasma CRP was 1500mg/l, moderate growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Porphyromonas gingivalis were isolated from the skin and periodontal pus respectively and basic heamatological values were within normal range. Intensive non-surgical periodontal therapy was done at ...

  5. The pharmacology of regenerative medicine.

    Christ, George J; Saul, Justin M; Furth, Mark E; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-07-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase "regenerative pharmacology" to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is "the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues." As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all.

  6. Combined periodontic-orthodonticendodontic interdisciplinary approach in the treatment of periodontally compromised tooth.

    Deepa, D; Mehta, D S; Puri, Viren K; Shetty, Sadashiva

    2010-04-01

    Orthodontic treatment in adult patients is one of the most frequently encountered components involving multidisciplinary approaches. In the present report, a 28-year-old male patient was treated for localized chronic periodontitis with pocket formation, mobility, pathologic migration and malalignment of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth #22. The periodontal therapy included motivation, education and oral-hygiene instructions (O.H.I.), scaling and root planing and periodontal flap surgery. Subsequently on resolution of periodontal inflammation, orthodontic therapy was carried out using the orthodontic aligner for a period of 6 months. Post-treatment (3 years) results showed complete resolution of infrabony pocket with significant bone fill, reduced tooth mobility and complete alignment of the affected maxillary left lateral incisor, thus restoring the esthetics and function.

  7. Combined periodontic-orthodontic-endodontic interdisciplinary approach in the treatment of periodontally compromised tooth

    Deepa D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment in adult patients is one of the most frequently encountered components involving multidisciplinary approaches. In the present report, a 28-year-old male patient was treated for localized chronic periodontitis with pocket formation, mobility, pathologic migration and malalignment of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth #22. The periodontal therapy included motivation, education and oral-hygiene instructions (O.H.I., scaling and root planing and periodontal flap surgery. Subsequently on resolution of periodontal inflammation, orthodontic therapy was carried out using the orthodontic aligner for a period of 6 months. Post-treatment (3 years results showed complete resolution of infrabony pocket with significant bone fill, reduced tooth mobility and complete alignment of the affected maxillary left lateral incisor, thus restoring the esthetics and function.

  8. Periodontal treatment reduces chronic systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Siribamrungwong, Monchai; Yothasamutr, Kasemsuk; Puangpanngam, Kutchaporn

    2014-06-01

    Chronic systemic inflammation, a non traditional risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, is associated with increasing mortality in chronic kidney disease, especially peritoneal dialysis patients. Periodontitis is a potential treatable source of systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients. Clinical periodontal status was evaluated in 32 stable chronic peritoneal dialysis patients by plaque index and periodontal disease index. Hematologic, blood chemical, nutritional, and dialysis-related data as well as highly sensitive C-reactive protein were analyzed before and after periodontal treatment. At baseline, high sensitive C-reactive protein positively correlated with the clinical periodontal status (plaque index; r = 0.57, P periodontal disease index; r = 0.56, P periodontal therapy, clinical periodontal indexes were significantly lower and high sensitivity C-reactive protein significantly decreased from 2.93 to 2.21 mg/L. Moreover, blood urea nitrogen increased from 47.33 to 51.8 mg/dL, reflecting nutritional status improvement. Erythropoietin dosage requirement decreased from 8000 to 6000 units/week while hemoglobin level was stable. Periodontitis is an important source of chronic systemic inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients. Treatment of periodontal diseases can improve systemic inflammation, nutritional status and erythropoietin responsiveness in peritoneal dialysis patients. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  9. Bromelain: A potential strategy for the adjuvant treatment of periodontitis

    Felipe Rodolfo Pereira da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bromelain, a mixture of proteases derived from different parts of pineapple, has been described to have therapeutic benefits in a diversity of inflammatory diseases. Such effects are associated to its proteolytic activity. As one of the most common and multifactorial diseases, periodontitis is a bacterial infection that results from the damage to the integrity of the tissues around the tooth, which includes gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. In periodontitis, the recruitment of defense cells occurs, which releases several pro-inflammatory cytokines. At elevated levels, they can potentiate the alveolar bone loss. Studies have been conducted trying to alleviate the damage to the periodontium, however, the regeneration of the periodontal tissues is still limited. The Hypotheses: Based on previous studies showing that bromelain can act by decreasing the periodontal microorganism growth by proteolytically cleaving important cell surface molecules in leucocytes, by reducing neutrophils migration to periodontal sites, by downregulating the inflammation mediator levels, and by decreasing alveolar bone loss in the periodontitis. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: In a first moment, to evaluate this hypothesis, could be used two animal models: the ligature or bacteria inoculation induced periodontitis. If studies using animal models show encouraging results, appropriate clinical trials should be designed to evaluate the effect of bromelain as a complementary treatment for periodontal disease in humans, during the active phase or after the healing phase of mechanical therapy could be tested; to conduct a placebo-controlled study where health and periodontitis patients could be used.

  10. Controlled-release of tetracycline and lovastatin by poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid-chitosan nanoparticles enhances periodontal regeneration in dogs

    Lee BS

    2016-01-01

    three-walled defects in beagle dogs was investigated. The results indicated that PLGA-lovastatin-chitosan-tetracycline nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility, antibacterial activity, and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. The volumetric analysis from micro-CT revealed significantly increased new bone formation in defects filled with nanoparticles in dogs. This novel local delivery device might be useful as an adjunctive treatment in periodontal regenerative therapy. Keywords: lovastatin, tetracycline, chitosan, poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid, periodontal regeneration

  11. Evaluation of a platelet lysate bilayered system for periodontal regeneration in a rat intrabony three-wall periodontal defect

    Babo, P.S.; Cai, X; Plachokova, A.S.; Reis, R.L.; Jansen, J.A.; Gomes, M.E.; Walboomers, X.F.

    2018-01-01

    With currently available therapies, full regeneration of lost periodontal tissues after periodontitis cannot be achieved. In this study, a combined compartmentalized system was tested, composed of (a) a platelet lysate (PL)-based construct, which was placed along the root aiming to regenerate the

  12. Aggressive and acute periodontal diseases.

    Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    genetic profile, currently do not exist. Genetic markers have the potential to be implemented as screening tools to identify subjects at risk. This approach may significantly enhance treatment outcome through the early detection and treatment of affected subjects, as well as using future approaches based on gene therapy. At present, the treatment of this disease is directed toward elimination of the subgingival bacterial load and other local risk factors. Adjunctive use of appropriate systemic antibiotics is recommended and may contribute to a longer suppression of the microbial infection. Other aggressive forms of periodontal diseases occur in patients who are affected with certain systemic diseases, including the leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome, Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, Chediak-Higashi syndrome and Down syndrome. Management of the periodontal component of these diseases is very challenging. Acute gingival and periodontal lesions include a group of disorders that range from nondestructive to destructive forms, and these lesions are usually associated with pain and are a common reason for emergency dental consultations. Some of these lesions may cause a rapid and severe destruction of the periodontal tissues and loss of teeth. Oral infections, particularly acute infections, can spread to extra-oral sites and cause serious medical complications, and even death. Hence, prompt diagnosis and treatment are paramount. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Liver regenerative medicine: advances and challenges.

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the standard care for many end-stage liver diseases. However, donor organs are scarce and some people succumb to liver failure before a donor is found. Liver regenerative medicine is a special interdisciplinary field of medicine focused on the development of new therapies incorporating stem cells, gene therapy and engineered tissues in order to repair or replace the damaged organ. In this review we consider the emerging progress achieved in the hepatic regenerative medicine within the last decade. The review starts with the characterization of liver organogenesis, fetal and adult stem/progenitor cells. Then, applications of primary hepatocytes, embryonic and adult (mesenchymal, hematopoietic and induced pluripotent) stem cells in cell therapy of liver diseases are considered. Current advances and challenges in producing mature hepatocytes from stem/progenitor cells are discussed. A section about hepatic tissue engineering includes consideration of synthetic and natural biomaterials in engineering scaffolds, strategies and achievements in the development of 3D bioactive matrices and 3D hepatocyte cultures, liver microengineering, generating bioartificial liver and prospects for fabrication of the bioengineered liver. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Digital radiographic evaluation of alveolar bone loss, density and lamina dura integrity on post splinting mandibular anterior with chronic periodontitis

    Rafini, F.; Priaminiarti, M.; Sukardi, I.; Lessang, R.

    2017-08-01

    The healing of periodontal splinting can be detected both with clinical and radiographic examination. In this study, the alveolar bone was evaluated by radiographic digital periapical analysis. Periodontal tooth splinting is periodontal support therapy used to prevent periodontal injury during repair and regeneration of periodontal therapy. Radiographic digital periapical analysis of alveolar bone in the mandibular anterior region with chronic periodontitis and 2/3 cervical bone loss after three months of periodontal splinting. Eighty four proximal site (43 mesial and 41 distal) from 16 patients with chronic periodontitis and treated with spinting were examined by taking periapical digital radiographic at day 1 and 91. The bone loss, bone density and utility of lamina dura were evaluated. The statistical analysis after three months evaluation using T-test for bone loss, Wilcoxon sign rank test for bone density and utility lamina dura showed no significantly differences (pchronic periodontitis with 2/3 alveolar bone loss after three months splinting.

  15. Why regenerative medicine needs an extracellular matrix.

    Prestwich, Glenn D; Healy, Kevin E

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is now coming of age. Many attempts at cell therapy have failed to show significant efficacy, and the umbrella term 'stem cell therapy' is perceived in some quarters as hype or just expensive and unnecessary medical tourism. Here we present a short editorial in three parts. First, we examine the importance of using a semisynthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) mimetic, or sECM, to deliver and retain therapeutic cells at the site of administration. Second, we describe one approach in which biophysical and biochemical properties are tailored to each tissue type, which we call "design for optimal functionality." Third, we describe an alternative approach to sECM design and implementation, called "design for simplicity," in which a deconstructed, minimalist sECM is employed and biology is allowed to perform the customization in situ. We opine that an sECM, whether minimal or instructive, is an essential contributor to improve the outcomes of cell-based therapies.

  16. Resistin: A Potential Biomarker for Periodontitis Influenced Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Induced Periodontitis

    Archana Devanoorkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are highly specific and sensitive indicators of disease activity. Resistin is a recently discovered adipocytokine, having a potent biomarker quality. Initially resistin was thought to be produced by adipocytes alone; however, emerging evidence suggests that it is also produced in abundance by various cells of the immunoinflammatory system, indicating its role in various chronic inflammatory diseases. Data suggests that resistin plays a role in obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, and periodontitis. Resistin derived its name from the original observation that it induced insulin resistance (resist-in: resist insulin in mice and is downregulated in mature murine adipocytes cultured in the presence of insulin sensitizing drugs like thiazolidinediones. It is well recognized that obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes. A three-way relationship has been established between diabetes, obesity and periodontitis. Recent evidence also suggests an association between obesity and increased risk for periodontitis. Our previous research showed incremental elevation of resistin with periodontal disease activity and a reduced level of resistin, after periodontal therapy. Thus resistin would be one of the molecular links connecting obesity, periodontitis, and diabetes and may serve as a marker that links periodontal disease with other systemic diseases. A Medline/PubMed search was carried out for keywords “Diabetes Mellitus,” “Periodontitis,” and “Resistin,” and all relevant research papers from 1990 in English were shortlisted and finalized based on their importance. This review provides an insight into the biological action of resistin and its possible role in periodontitis influenced diabetes mellitus and diabetes induced periodontitis.

  17. Topical tacrolimus and periodontal therapy in the management of a case of oral chronic GVHD characterized by specific gingival localization.

    Conrotto, Davide; Broccoletti, Roberto; Carcieri, Paola; Giaccone, Luisa; Arduino, Paolo G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement.

  18. Topical Tacrolimus and Periodontal Therapy in the Management of a Case of Oral Chronic GVHD Characterized by Specific Gingival Localization

    Davide Conrotto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD is a complication following bone marrow transplantation. The oral lesions are difficult to control with a systemic pharmacological therapy. Case Description. A 63-year-old female patient, who underwent an allogeniec transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia, developed a chronic oral and cutaneous GVHD. The patient was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1%, twice daily for two months, and underwent a protocol of oral hygiene characterized by 3 appointments of scaling, root planning, and daily oral hygiene instructions. The patient showed marked resolution of gingival lesions and a significant improvement of related pain and gingival inflammatory indexes. Clinical Implications. This case report suggests that treatment with topical tacrolimus and professional oral hygiene may be helpful in the management of chronic oral GVHD with severe gingival involvement.

  19. Recent advancements in regenerative dentistry: A review.

    Amrollahi, Pouya; Shah, Brinda; Seifi, Amir; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-12-01

    Although human mouth benefits from remarkable mechanical properties, it is very susceptible to traumatic damages, exposure to microbial attacks, and congenital maladies. Since the human dentition plays a crucial role in mastication, phonation and esthetics, finding promising and more efficient strategies to reestablish its functionality in the event of disruption has been important. Dating back to antiquity, conventional dentistry has been offering evacuation, restoration, and replacement of the diseased dental tissue. However, due to the limited ability and short lifespan of traditional restorative solutions, scientists have taken advantage of current advancements in medicine to create better solutions for the oral health field and have coined it "regenerative dentistry." This new field takes advantage of the recent innovations in stem cell research, cellular and molecular biology, tissue engineering, and materials science etc. In this review, the recently known resources and approaches used for regeneration of dental and oral tissues were evaluated using the databases of Scopus and Web of Science. Scientists have used a wide range of biomaterials and scaffolds (artificial and natural), genes (with viral and non-viral vectors), stem cells (isolated from deciduous teeth, dental pulp, periodontal ligament, adipose tissue, salivary glands, and dental follicle) and growth factors (used for stimulating cell differentiation) in order to apply tissue engineering approaches to dentistry. Although they have been successful in preclinical and clinical partial regeneration of dental tissues, whole-tooth engineering still seems to be far-fetched, unless certain shortcomings are addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Perivascular cells for regenerative medicine

    M. Crisan (Mihaela); M. Corselli (Mirko); W.C. Chen (William); B. Péault (Bruno)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are currently the best candidate therapeutic cells for regenerative medicine related to osteoarticular, muscular, vascular and inflammatory diseases, although these cells remain heterogeneous and necessitate a better biological characterization. We

  1. Tissue-specific composite cell aggregates drive periodontium tissue regeneration by reconstructing a regenerative microenvironment.

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Wenjia; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Xicong; Duan, Yan; Li, Dehua; Jin, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Periodontitis is the most common cause of periodontium destruction. Regeneration of damaged tissue is the expected treatment goal. However, the regeneration of a functional periodontal ligament (PDL) insertion remains a difficulty, due to complicated factors. Recently, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been shown to participate in PDL regeneration, both pathologically and physiologically. Besides, interactions affect the biofunctions of different derived cells during the regenerative process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to discuss the different derived composite cell aggregate (CA) systems of PDLSCs and BMMSCs (iliac-derived or jaw-derived) for periodontium regeneration under regenerative microenvironment reconstruction. Our results showed although all three mono-MSC CAs were compacted and the cells arranged regularly in them, jaw-derived BMMSC (JBMMSC) CAs secreted more extracellular matrix than the others. Furthermore, PDLSC/JBMMSC compound CAs highly expressed ALP, Col-I, fibronectin, integrin-β1 and periostin, suggesting that their biofunction is more appropriate for periodontal structure regeneration. Inspiringly, PDLSC/JBMMSC compound CAs regenerated more functional PDL-like tissue insertions in both nude mice ectopic and minipig orthotopic transplantation. The results indicated that the different derived CAs of PDLSCs/JBMMSCs provided an appropriate regenerative microenvironment facilitating a more stable and regular regeneration of functional periodontium tissue. This method may provide a possible strategy to solve periodontium defects in periodontitis and powerful experimental evidence for clinical applications in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Dental pulp stem cells. Biology and use for periodontal tissue engineering.

    Ashri, Nahid Y; Ajlan, Sumaiah A; Aldahmash, Abdullah M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors.

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Regenerative Medicine

    Xavier Van Bellinghen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an articulation formed between the temporal bone and the mandibular condyle which is commonly affected. These affections are often so painful during fundamental oral activities that patients have lower quality of life. Limitations of therapeutics for severe TMJ diseases have led to increased interest in regenerative strategies combining stem cells, implantable scaffolds and well-targeting bioactive molecules. To succeed in functional and structural regeneration of TMJ is very challenging. Innovative strategies and biomaterials are absolutely crucial because TMJ can be considered as one of the most difficult tissues to regenerate due to its limited healing capacity, its unique histological and structural properties and the necessity for long-term prevention of its ossified or fibrous adhesions. The ideal approach for TMJ regeneration is a unique scaffold functionalized with an osteochondral molecular gradient containing a single stem cell population able to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation such as BMSCs, ADSCs or DPSCs. The key for this complex regeneration is the functionalization with active molecules such as IGF-1, TGF-β1 or bFGF. This regeneration can be optimized by nano/micro-assisted functionalization and by spatiotemporal drug delivery systems orchestrating the 3D formation of TMJ tissues.

  4. A helium regenerative compressor

    Swift, W.L.; Nutt, W.E.; Sixsmith, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a regenerative compressor that was developed primarily for use in cryogenic helium systems. The objectives for the development were to achieve acceptable efficiency in the machine using conventional motor and bearing technology while reducing the complexity of the system required to control contamination from the lubricants. A single stage compressor was built and tested. The compressor incorporates aerodynamically shaped blades on a 218 mm (8.6 inches) diameter impeller to achieve high efficiency. A gas-buffered non-contact shaft seal is used to oppose the diffusion of lubricant from the motor bearings into the cryogenic circuit. Since it is a rotating machine, the flow is continuous and steady, and the machine is very quiet. During performance testing with helium, the single stage machine has demonstrated a pressure ratio of 1.5 at a flow rate of 12 g/s with measured isothermal efficiencies in excess of 30%. This performance compares favorably with efficiencies generally achieved in oil flooded screw compressors

  5. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  6. Association of human interleukin-35 level in gingival crevicular fluid and serum in periodontal health, disease, and after nonsurgical therapy: A comparative study

    Subash Chandra Raj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Innovating newer methods to diagnose a multifactorial disease such as periodontitis is always challenging for a clinician. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF which is closely associated with the periodontal tissue environment has been used a viable alternative to saliva for the diagnosis of periodontitis. Aim: The aim of the present study was to estimate and compare the interleukin-35 (IL-35 levels in GCF and serum among healthy, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis (CP individuals as well as to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment (NSPT on IL-35 level among patients with CP. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at the Department of Periodontics, Srirama Chandra Bhanja Dental College and Hospital, Cuttack, Odisha, India. It is a comparative study. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 participants were divided into healthy (Group I; n = 20, gingivitis (Group II; n = 20, and CP (Group IIIA; n = 20. GCF samples collected from each individual at baseline and 6 weeks after NSPT for Group III individuals (Group IIIB; n = 20 were quantified for IL-35 levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical Analysis: All analyses were performed using Shapiro–Wilk test, analysis of variance, Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc test, and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean IL-35 concentration in GCF was significantly high (P < 0.05 for Group IIIA (70.26 ± 4.0 pg/ml, as compared to Group I (54.81 ± 22.3 pg/ml and Group IIIB (55.72 ± 10.2 pg/ml. Conclusion: In the present study, GCF and serum IL-35 concentration among CP individuals was highest among all the groups. Individuals receiving NSPT showed a significant reduction in IL-35 levels as compared to CP individuals.

  7. Position paper: periodontal diseases of children and adolescents.

    Califano, Joseph V

    2003-11-01

    Children and adolescents are subject to several periodontal diseases. Although there is a much lower prevalence of destructive periodontal diseases in children than in adults, children can develop severe forms of periodontitis. In some cases, this destructive disease is a manifestation of a known underlying systemic disease. In other young patients, the underlying cause for increased susceptibility and early onset of disease is unknown. These diseases are often familial, suggesting a genetic predisposition for aggressive disease. Current modalities for managing periodontal diseases of children and adolescents may include antibiotic therapy in combination with non-surgical and/or surgical therapy. Since early diagnosis ensures the greatest chance for successful treatment, it is important that children receive a periodontal examination as part of their routine dental visits.

  8. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with "teeth as a tool".

    Bhat, G Subraya; Singh, Vishal; Bhat, K Mahalinga

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertaken. A papilla preservation flap with regenerative periodontal surgical procedure was done, orthodontic and restorative treatment was planned at the follow-up. This case highlights the importance of eliciting a proper and complete personal history, including occupational details. In our patient these details helped us correlate the destruction of the periodontium to the unusual etiology.

  9. Recurrent periodontal abscess associated with "teeth as a tool"

    G Subraya Bhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of recurrent periodontal abscess in a 31-year-old male electrician due to his habit of using his teeth as a tool for stripping electrical wires. The patient was not aware of the consequences of this habit. Clinically, there was presence of moderate depth of periodontal pocket around the tooth and, radiographically, there was a vertical defect mesial to the involved teeth. The patient was educated about the consequences of his habit and surgical treatment was undertaken. A papilla preservation flap with regenerative periodontal surgical procedure was done, orthodontic and restorative treatment was planned at the follow-up. This case highlights the importance of eliciting a proper and complete personal history, including occupational details. In our patient these details helped us correlate the destruction of the periodontium to the unusual etiology.

  10. Role of integrins in the periodontal ligament: organizers and facilitators.

    Barczyk, Malgorzata; Bolstad, Anne Isine; Gullberg, Donald

    2013-10-01

    The periodontal ligament is the tissue that connects teeth to bone. The periodontal ligament is a fascinating tissue from a cell biologist's point of view, and because of its special properties and stem-cell content it has also come into the limelight in emerging fields of regenerative medicine. An increased range of genetically modified mouse models offer new tools for studying molecular mechanisms of tooth development. However, owing to species-specific organization of the tooth apparatus, the use of genetic animal models to study the role of the periodontal ligament in normal human tooth physiology and tooth pathology is challenging. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. An Innovative Regenerative Endodontic Procedure Using Leukocyte and Platelet-rich Fibrin Associated with Apical Surgery: A Case Report.

    Pinto, Nelson; Harnish, Alexandra; Cabrera, Carolina; Andrade, Catherine; Druttman, Tony; Brizuela, Claudia

    2017-11-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) associated with apical surgery could represent an alternative treatment strategy for patients whose teeth present incomplete root formation and extensive apical lesions. Leukocyte platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) has potential benefits in REPs; it could promote apical root formation and optimal bone healing. The aim of this case report was to describe innovative regenerative endodontic therapy using L-PRF in the root canal and an extensive apical lesion in an immature tooth with dens invaginatus and asymptomatic apical periodontitis. A healthy 20-year-old woman was referred to the dental clinic of the Universidad de Los Andes, Santiago, Chile, for endodontic treatment in tooth # 22 with incomplete root development and an extensive apical lesion. The diagnosis was asymptomatic apical periodontitis associated with dens invaginatus type II. The patient was treated with an innovative approach using L-PRF in REPs associated with apical surgery. Follow-ups were performed at 6 months and 1 year later. They included periapical radiographs, cone-beam computed tomographic imaging, sensitivity, and vitality tests. The clinical evaluations performed at 6 months and 1 year revealed an absence of symptoms. The radiographic evaluations showed that the apical lesion was resolved. The cone-beam images indicated that the root length increased and the walls had thickened. The sensitivity tests were positive, and the laser Doppler flowmetry showed positive blood flow after 1 year. The success of the results in this case report indicate that L-PRF can be used as a complement in apical surgery and REPs and could provide an innovative alternative treatment strategy for complex clinical cases like these. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypoxia-based strategies for regenerative dentistry-Views from the different dental fields.

    Müller, Anna Sonja; Janjić, Klara; Lilaj, Bledar; Edelmayer, Michael; Agis, Hermann

    2017-09-01

    The understanding of the cell biological processes underlying development and regeneration of oral tissues leads to novel regenerative approaches. Over the past years, knowledge on key roles of the hypoxia-based response has become more profound. Based on these findings, novel regenerative approaches for dentistry are emerging, which target cellular oxygen sensors. These approaches include hypoxia pre-conditioning and pharmacologically simulated hypoxia. The increase in studies on hypoxia and hypoxia-based strategies in regenerative dentistry highlights the growing attention to hypoxia's role in regeneration and its underlying biology, as well as its application in a therapeutic setting. In this narrative review, we present the current knowledge on the role of hypoxia in oral tissues and review the proposed hypoxia-based approaches in different fields of dentistry, including endodontics, orthodontics, periodontics, and oral surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Orthodontic-periodontic intervention of pathological migration of maxillary anterior teeth in advanced periodontal disease.

    Panchal, Anita H; Patel, Vasumati G; Bhavsar, Neeta V; Mehta, Hardik V

    2013-05-01

    This case report presents a female patient whose chief complaint was of mobile and palatally drifted upper left central incisor which led to malalignment of upper anterior teeth. Orthodontic treatment of upper left central incisor was done with the help of 'Z' spring for the alignment of the upper anterior teeth. It was followed by splinting of upper anterior teeth to improve the stability and masticatory comfort. Regenerative periodontal surgery with Decalcified freeze dried bone allograft was done in relation to upper left central incisor.

  14. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans associated periodontitis

    Kleinfelder, JW; Mueller, RF; Lange, DE

    Background: Periodontitis patients harboring Actinobacillus actinmycetemcomitans (Aa) are prime candidates for systemic antibiotic therapy. Besides tetracycline and the combination of metronidazole and amoxicillin the fluoroquinolones are also believed to have antibacterial activity against Aa. The

  15. Optimal timing of periodontal disease treatment for prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes: before or during pregnancy?

    Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre; Goldenberg, Robert L; Offenbacher, Steven; Qian, Xu

    2011-08-01

    Several large randomized controlled clinical trials failed to find that standard periodontal therapy during pregnancy reduces the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes (eg, preterm birth and low birthweight). However, treating periodontal disease during pregnancy may be too late to reduce the inflammation that is related to the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Moreover, periodontal treatment during pregnancy can cause bacteremia, which itself may initiate the pathway leading to the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Finally, the periodontal treatments provided during pregnancy are not always effective in preventing the progression of periodontal disease during pregnancy. Pregnancy may not be an appropriate period for periodontal intervention(s). We hypothesize that periodontal treatment before pregnancy may reduce the rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to test if treating periodontal disease in the prepregnancy period reduces the rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering: what the future holds?

    Goodis, Harold E; Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Kinaia, Atheel M; Chogle, Sami M A

    2012-07-01

    The work performed by researchers in regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering over the last decades has been superb; however, many questions remain to be answered. The basic biologic mechanisms must be elucidated that will allow the development of dental pulp and dentin in situ. Stress must be placed on the many questions that will lead to the design of effective, safe treatment options and therapies. This article discusses those questions, the answers to which may become the future of regenerative endodontics. The future remains bright, but proper support and patience are required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.