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Sample records for regeneration bose-otto engine

  1. Performance analysis and parametric optimum criteria of a regeneration Bose-Otto engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hao; Du Jianqiang [School of Computer, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004 (China); Liu Sanqiu [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)], E-mail: ncu.wh@163.com

    2009-05-15

    A general regenerative model of the Otto engine cycle working with an ideal Bose gas is used to discuss the influence of quantum degeneracy, regeneration and finite rate heat transfer on the performance of the cycle. Based on the model, expressions for some important parameters, such as the power output and efficiency of the Bose-Otto engine cycle, are derived analytically. By means of numerical calculation and illustration, the influence of the compression ratio of the two isochoric processes and the regenerator effectiveness on the performance of the cycle are discussed and evaluated in detail. Moreover, the general optimal performance characteristics of the cycle are revealed. This analysis could provide a general theoretical tool for the optimal design and operation of real power plants.

  2. Performance analysis and parametric optimum criteria of a regeneration Bose-Otto engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; Du, Jianqiang

    2009-05-01

    A general regenerative model of the Otto engine cycle working with an ideal Bose gas is used to discuss the influence of quantum degeneracy, regeneration and finite rate heat transfer on the performance of the cycle. Based on the model, expressions for some important parameters, such as the power output and efficiency of the Bose-Otto engine cycle, are derived analytically. By means of numerical calculation and illustration, the influence of the compression ratio of the two isochoric processes and the regenerator effectiveness on the performance of the cycle are discussed and evaluated in detail. Moreover, the general optimal performance characteristics of the cycle are revealed. This analysis could provide a general theoretical tool for the optimal design and operation of real power plants.

  3. Performance analysis and parametric optimum criteria of an irreversible Bose-Otto engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; He, Jizhou

    2009-04-01

    An irreversible cycle model of a Bose-Otto engine is established, in which finite time thermodynamic processes and the irreversibility result from the nonisentropic compression and expansion processes are taken into account. Based on the model, expressions for the power output and efficiency of the Bose-Otto engine are derived. On the basis of the thermodynamic properties of ideal Bose gas, the effects of the irreversibility and the compression ratio of the two isochoric processes on the performance of the Bose-Otto engine are revealed and some important performance parameters are optimized. Furthermore, some optimal operating regions including those for the power output, efficiency, and the temperatures of the cyclic working substance at two important state points are determined and evaluated. Finally, several special cases are discussed in detail.

  4. Tissue engineering for periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Richard T; Conte, Greg; Nishimine, Dee; Dault, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As a result of periodontal regeneration research, a series of clinical techniques have emerged that permit tissue engineering to be performed for more efficient regeneration and repair of periodontal defects and improved implant site development. Historically, periodontal regeneration research has focused on a quest for "magic filler" material. This search has led to the development of techniques utilizing autologous bone and bone marrow, allografts, xenografts, and various man-made bone substitutes. Though these techniques have had limited success, the desire for a more effective regenerative approach has resulted in the development of tissue engineering techniques. Tissue engineering is a relatively new field of reconstructive biology which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biologic mediators to facilitate reconstruction/regeneration of a particular tissue. In periodontology, the concept of tissue engineering had its beginnings with guided tissue regeneration, a mechanical approach utilizing nonresorbable membranes to obtain regeneration in defects. In dental implantology, guided bone regeneration membranes +/- mechanical support are used for bone augmentation of proposed implant placement sites. With the availability of partially purified protein mixture from developing teeth and growth factors from recombinant technology, a new era of tissue engineering whereby biologic mediators can be used for periodontal regeneration. The advantage of recombinant growth factors is this tissue engineering device is consistent in its regenerative capacity, and variations in regenerative response are due to individual healing response and/or poor surgical techniques. In this article, the authors review how tissue engineering has advanced and discuss its impact on the clinical management of both periodontal and osseous defects in preparation for implant placement. An understanding of these new tissue engineering techniques is essential for comprehending today's ever

  5. Advanced Engineering Strategies for Periodontal Complex Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Ho Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration and integration of multiple tissue types is critical for efforts to restore the function of musculoskeletal complex. In particular, the neogenesis of periodontal constructs for systematic tooth-supporting functions is a current challenge due to micron-scaled tissue compartmentalization, oblique/perpendicular orientations of fibrous connective tissues to the tooth root surface and the orchestration of multiple regenerated tissues. Although there have been various biological and biochemical achievements, periodontal tissue regeneration remains limited and unpredictable. The purpose of this paper is to discuss current advanced engineering approaches for periodontal complex formations; computer-designed, customized scaffolding architectures; cell sheet technology-based multi-phasic approaches; and patient-specific constructs using bioresorbable polymeric material and 3-D printing technology for clinical application. The review covers various advanced technologies for periodontal complex regeneration and state-of-the-art therapeutic avenues in periodontal tissue engineering.

  6. Heat engine regenerators: Research status and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    The rapidly oscillating, variable density flows of regenerative heat engines provide a class of poorly understood unsteady flow and heat transfer problems. These problems are not currently amenable to direct experimental resolution. Experiences in engine development and test programs and efforts to develop analysis tools point to the regenerator as a key area of insufficient understanding. Focusing on flow and heat transfer in regenerators, this report discusses similarity parameters for the flows and reviews the experimental data currently available for Stirling analysis. Then a number of experimental results are presented from recent fundamental fluid mechanical and thermal investigations that shed additional light on the functioning of heat engine regenerators. Suggestions are made for approaches for further measurement and analysis efforts.

  7. Composite Matrix Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    This project concerns the design, fabrication and testing of carbon regenerators for use in Stirling power convertors. Radial fiber design with nonmetallic components offers a number of potential advantages over conventional steel regenerators: reduced conduction and pressure drop losses, and the capability for higher temperature, higher frequency operation. Diverse composite fabrication methods are explored and lessons learned are summarized. A pulsed single-blow test rig has been developed that has been used for generating thermal effectiveness data for different flow velocities. Carbon regenerators have been fabricated by carbon vapor infiltration of electroflocked preforms. Performance data in a small Stirling engine are obtained. Prototype regenerators designed for the BP-1000 power convertor were fabricated and delivered to NASA-Lewis.

  8. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  9. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Yilgor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine including regenerator dead volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puech, Pascal; Tishkova, Victoria [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, CNRS, CEMES, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, F-31055 Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-15

    This paper provides a theoretical investigation on the thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine with linear and sinusoidal variations of the volume. The regenerator in a Stirling engine is an internal heat exchanger allowing to reach high efficiency. We used an isothermal model to analyse the net work and the heat stored in the regenerator during a complete cycle. We show that the engine efficiency with perfect regeneration doesn't depend on the regenerator dead volume but this dead volume strongly amplifies the imperfect regeneration effect. An analytical expression to estimate the improvement due to the regenerator has been proposed including the combined effects of dead volume and imperfect regeneration. This could be used at the very preliminary stage of the engine design process. (author)

  11. The Amount of Regenerated Heat Inside the Regenerator of a Stirling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Škorpík

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analytical computing of the regenerated heat inside the regenerator of a Stirling engine. The total sum of the regenerated heat is constructed as a function of the crank angle in the case of Schmidt’s idealization. 

  12. Tissue Engineering Considerations in Dental Pulp Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Ali; Kim, Jong Ryul; Verma, Prashant; S. Chand, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedure is introduced as a biologically based treatment for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. Successful clinical and radiographic outcomes following regenerative procedures have been reported in landmark case reports. Retrospective studies have shown that this conservative treatment allows for continued root development and increases success and survival rate of the treated teeth compared to other treatment options. Although the goal of treatment is regeneration of a functional pulp tissue, histological analyses show a different outcome. Developing predictable protocols would require the use of key elements for tissue engineering: stem cells, bioactive scaffolds, and growth factors. In this study we will review the evidence based steps and outcomes of regenerative endodontics. PMID:24396373

  13. Tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Dabra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a major public health issue and the development of effective therapies to treat the disease and regenerate periodontal tissue is an important goal of today′s medicine. Regeneration of periodontal tissue is perhaps one of the most complex process to occur in the body. Langer and colleagues proposed tissue engineering as a possible technique for regenerating the lost periodontal tissues. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field, which involves the application of the principles and methods of engineering and life sciences to help in the development of biological substitutes to restore, maintain or improve the function of damaged tissues and organs. A Google/Medline search was conducted and relevant literature evaluating the potential role of the tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration, which included histological studies and controlled clinical trials, was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal regeneration were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicate tissue engineering to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. The purpose behind writing this brief review has been to integrate the evidence of research related to tissue engineering so as to implement them in our daily practice.

  14. Tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabra, Sarita; Chhina, Kamalpreet; Soni, Nitin; Bhatnagar, Rakhi

    2012-11-01

    Periodontal disease is a major public health issue and the development of effective therapies to treat the disease and regenerate periodontal tissue is an important goal of today's medicine. Regeneration of periodontal tissue is perhaps one of the most complex process to occur in the body. Langer and colleagues proposed tissue engineering as a possible technique for regenerating the lost periodontal tissues. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field, which involves the application of the principles and methods of engineering and life sciences to help in the development of biological substitutes to restore, maintain or improve the function of damaged tissues and organs. A Google/Medline search was conducted and relevant literature evaluating the potential role of the tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration, which included histological studies and controlled clinical trials, was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal regeneration were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicate tissue engineering to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. The purpose behind writing this brief review has been to integrate the evidence of research related to tissue engineering so as to implement them in our daily practice.

  15. Advanced tissue engineering in periodontal Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Ali Banihashemrad

    2014-01-01

    The old wishes of people were to regenerate lost tissues of periodontium that this fact is achieved by gen and cell therapy .Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammation around the tooth by microbes that causes destruction of supporting structure of tissue of tooth such as alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament. For treatment of periodontal diseases we can use the biomaterials which help to regenerate the periodontal tissues like; autogenous bone grafts, allograft, guided tissue re...

  16. Ceramic regenerator systems development program. [for automobile gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines. The results of 19,600 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate showed minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 6935 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 3510 hours at 982 C. Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  17. Engineering Bi-Layer Nanofibrous Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiqian; Wang, Aijun; Patel, Shyam; Kurpinski, Kyle; Diao, Edward; Bao, Xuan; Kwong, George; Young, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma injuries often cause peripheral nerve damage and disability. A goal in neural tissue engineering is to develop synthetic nerve conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration having therapeutic efficacy comparable to that of autografts. Nanofibrous conduits with aligned nanofibers have been shown to promote nerve regeneration, but current fabrication methods rely on rolling a fibrous sheet into the shape of a conduit, which results in a graft with inconsistent size and a discontinuous joint or seam. In addition, the long-term effects of nanofibrous nerve conduits, in comparison with autografts, are still unknown. Here we developed a novel one-step electrospinning process and, for the first time, fabricated a seamless bi-layer nanofibrous nerve conduit: the luminal layer having longitudinally aligned nanofibers to promote nerve regeneration, and the outer layer having randomly organized nanofibers for mechanical support. Long-term in vivo studies demonstrated that bi-layer aligned nanofibrous nerve conduits were superior to random nanofibrous conduits and had comparable therapeutic effects to autografts for nerve regeneration. In summary, we showed that the engineered nanostructure had a significant impact on neural tissue regeneration in situ. The results from this study will also lead to the scalable fabrication of engineered nanofibrous nerve conduits with designed nanostructure. This technology platform can be combined with drug delivery and cell therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:21501089

  18. Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    An involute-foil regenerator was designed, microfabricated, and tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. The concept consists of stacked involute-foil nickel disks (see figure) microfabricated via a lithographic process. Test results yielded a performance of about twice that of the 90-percent random-fiber currently used in small Stirling converters. The segmented nature of the involute- foil in both the axial and radial directions increases the strength of the structure relative to wrapped foils. In addition, relative to random-fiber regenerators, the involute-foil has a reduced pressure drop, and is expected to be less susceptible to the release of metal fragments into the working space, thus increasing reliability. The prototype nickel involute-foil regenerator was adequate for testing in an engine with a 650 C hot-end temperature. This is lower than that required by larger engines, and high-temperature alloys are not suited for the lithographic microfabrication approach.

  19. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  20. Advances in Skin Regeneration Using Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Komal; Chaudhari, Atul; Tripathi, Shweta; Dixit, Saurabh; Sahu, Rajnish; Pillai, Shreekumar; Dennis, Vida A.; Singh, Shree R.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineered skin substitutes for wound healing have evolved tremendously over the last couple of years. New advances have been made toward developing skin substitutes made up of artificial and natural materials. Engineered skin substitutes are developed from acellular materials or can be synthesized from autologous, allograft, xenogenic, or synthetic sources. Each of these engineered skin substitutes has their advantages and disadvantages. However, to this date, a complete functional skin substitute is not available, and research is continuing to develop a competent full thickness skin substitute product that can vascularize rapidly. There is also a need to redesign the currently available substitutes to make them user friendly, commercially affordable, and viable with longer shelf life. The present review focuses on providing an overview of advances in the field of tissue engineered skin substitute development, the availability of various types, and their application. PMID:28387714

  1. Periodontal regeneration: a challenge for the tissue engineer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, F J; Ghuman, M; Talal, A

    2010-12-01

    Periodontitis affects around 15 per cent of human adult populations. While periodontal treatment aimed at removing the bacterial cause of the disease is generally very successful, the ability predictably to regenerate the damaged tissues remains a major unmet objective for new treatment strategies. Existing treatments include the use of space-maintaining barrier membranes (guided tissue regeneration), use of graft materials, and application of bioactive molecules to induce regeneration, but their overall effects are relatively modest and restricted in application. The periodontal ligament is rich in mesenchymal stem cells, and the understanding of the signalling molecules that may regulate their differentation has increased enormously in recent years. Applying these principles for the development of new tissue engineering strategies for periodontal regeneration will require further work to determine the efficacy of current experimental preclinical treatments, including pharmacological application of growth factors such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or Wnts, use of autologous stem cell reimplantation strategies, and development of improved biomaterial scaffolds. This article describes the background to this problem, addresses the current status of periodontal regeneration, including the background biology, and discusses the potential for some of these experimental therapies to achieve the goal of clinically predictable periodontal regeneration.

  2. Simulation of Temperature Fluctuations in Stirling Engine Regenerator Matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegaard; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2003-01-01

    , and momentum and the ideal gas equation of state. ODEs that govern the dynamic behaviour of the regenerator matrix temperatures are included in the model. Known loss mechanisms are coupled directly into the governing equations instead of applying the losses as corrections to simulation results from...... and accurately calculated. Simulation results have been compared to experimental data for a 9 kW Stirling engine and reasonable agreement has been found over a wide range of operating conditions using Helium or Nitrogen as working gas. Simulation results indicate that fluctuations in the regenerator matrix...

  3. Harnessing developmental processes for vascular engineering and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-07-01

    The formation of vasculature is essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration. During development, the vasculature forms via the dual processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, and is regulated at multiple levels: from transcriptional hierarchies and protein interactions to inputs from the extracellular environment. Understanding how vascular formation is coordinated in vivo can offer valuable insights into engineering approaches for therapeutic vascularization and angiogenesis, whether by creating new vasculature in vitro or by stimulating neovascularization in vivo. In this Review, we will discuss how the process of vascular development can be used to guide approaches to engineering vasculature. Specifically, we will focus on some of the recently reported approaches to stimulate therapeutic angiogenesis by recreating the embryonic vascular microenvironment using biomaterials for vascular engineering and regeneration.

  4. Tissue engineering and peripheral nerve regeneration (III) -- Sciatic nerve regeneration with PDLLA nerve guide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The biodegradation rate and biocompatibility of poly(d, l -lactide) (PDLLA) in vivo were evaluated. The aim of this study was to establish a nerve guide constructed by the PDLLA with 3-D microenvironment and to repair a 10 mm of sciatic nerve gap in rats. The process of the nerve regeneration was investigated by histological assessment, electrophysiological examination, and determination of wet weight recovery rate of the gastrocnemius muscle. After 3 weeks, the nerve guide had changed from a transparent to an opaque status. The conduit was degraded and absorbed partly and had lost their strength with breakage at the 9th week of postoperation. At the conclusion of 12 weeks, proximal and distal end of nerves were anastomosed by nerve regeneration and the conduit vanished completely. The results suggest that PDLLA conduits may serve for peripheral nerve regeneration and PDLLA is a sort of hopeful candidate for tissue engineering.

  5. Engineering vascular development for tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivron, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim at restoring a damaged tissue by recreating in vitro or promoting its regeneratin in vovo. The vasculature is central to these therapies for the irrigation of the defective tissue (oxygen, nutrients or circulating regenerative cells) and as an

  6. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM. During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90 percent random fiber currently used in small approx.100 W Stirling space-power convertors-in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50 to 100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6 to 9 percent; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to 1200 C

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine including dead volumes of hot space, cold space and regenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongtragool, Bancha; Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Laboratory (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Suksawas 48, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2006-03-01

    This paper provides a theoretical investigation on the thermodynamic analysis of a Stirling engine. An isothermal model is developed for an imperfect regeneration Stirling engine with dead volumes of hot space, cold space and regenerator that the regenerator effective temperature is an arithmetic mean of the heater and cooler temperature. Numerical simulation is performed and the effects of the regenerator effectiveness and dead volumes are studied. Results from this study indicate that the engine net work is affected by only the dead volumes while the heat input and engine efficiency are affected by both the regenerator effectiveness and dead volumes. The engine net work decreases with increasing dead volume. The heat input increases with increasing dead volume and decreasing regenerator effectiveness. The engine efficiency decreases with increasing dead volume and decreasing regenerator effectiveness. (author)

  8. Tissue Engineering Strategies for the Regeneration of Orthopaedic Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Helen H.; Subramony, Siddarth D.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2013-01-01

    A major focus in the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is the development of tissue engineered bone and soft tissue grafts with biomimetic functionality to allow for their translation to the clinical setting. One of the most significant challenges of this endeavor is promoting the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as the implant site. Such fixation requires strategic biomimicry to be incorporated into the scaffold design in order to re-establish the critical structure-function relationship of the native soft tissue-to-bone interface. The integration of distinct tissue types (e.g. bone and soft tissues such as cartilage, ligaments, or tendons), requires a multi-phased or stratified scaffold with distinct yet continuous tissue regions accompanied by a gradient of mechanical properties that mimics that of the multi-tissue transition between bone and soft tissues. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies for regenerating common tissue-to-tissue interfaces (ligament-to-bone, tendon-to-bone or cartilage-to-bone), and the strategic biomimicry implemented in stratified scaffold design for multi-tissue regeneration. Potential challenges and future directions in this emerging field will also be presented. It is anticipated that interface tissue engineering will enable integrative soft tissue repair, and will be instrumental for the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems with biomimetic complexity and functionality. PMID:20422291

  9. Harnessing wound healing and regeneration for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, A D; Ferguson, M W J

    2005-04-01

    Biomedical science has made major advances in understanding how cells grow into functioning tissue and the signalling mechanisms used to achieve this are slowly being dissected. Tissue engineering is the application of that knowledge to the building or repairing of organs, including skin, the largest organ in the body. Generally, engineered tissue is a combination of living cells and a supporting matrix. Besides serving as burn coverings, engineered skin substitutes can help patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Today, most of these ulcers are treated with an approach that includes antibiotics, glucose control, special shoes and frequent cleaning and bandaging. The results of such treatments are often disappointing and ineffectual, and scarring remains a major problem, mechanically, cosmetically and psychologically. Within our group we are attempting to address this by investigating novel approaches to skin tissue engineering. We are identifying novel therapeutic manipulations to improve the degree of integration between a tissue engineered dermal construct and the host by both molecular manipulation of growth factors but also by understanding and harnessing mechanisms of regenerative biology. For the purpose of this summary, we will concentrate primarily on the latter of these two approaches in that we have identified a novel mouse mutant that completely and perfectly regenerates skin and cartilaginous components following ear injury. This experimental animal will allow us to characterize not only novel genes involved in the regeneration process but also to utilize cells from such animals in artificial skin equivalents to assess their behaviour compared with normal cells. This approach should allow us to create a tissue-engineered substitute, which more closely resembles the normal regional microanatomy and physiology of the skin, allowing better integration to the host with minimal or no scarring.

  10. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy.

  11. Endochondral Priming: A Developmental Engineering Strategy for Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Fiona E; McNamara, Laoise M

    2017-04-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have significant potential to treat bone pathologies by exploiting the capacity for bone progenitors to grow and produce tissue constituents under specific biochemical and physical conditions. However, conventional tissue engineering approaches, which combine stem cells with biomaterial scaffolds, are limited as the constructs often degrade, due to a lack of vascularization, and lack the mechanical integrity to fulfill load bearing functions, and as such are not yet widely used for clinical treatment of large bone defects. Recent studies have proposed that in vitro tissue engineering approaches should strive to simulate in vivo bone developmental processes and, thereby, imitate natural factors governing cell differentiation and matrix production, following the paradigm recently defined as "developmental engineering." Although developmental engineering strategies have been recently developed that mimic specific aspects of the endochondral ossification bone formation process, these findings are not widely understood. Moreover, a critical comparison of these approaches to standard biomaterial-based bone tissue engineering has not yet been undertaken. For that reason, this article presents noteworthy experimental findings from researchers focusing on developing an endochondral-based developmental engineering strategy for bone tissue regeneration. These studies have established that in vitro approaches, which mimic certain aspects of the endochondral ossification process, namely the formation of the cartilage template and the vascularization of the cartilage template, can promote mineralization and vascularization to a certain extent both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, this article outlines specific experimental challenges that must be overcome to further exploit the biology of endochondral ossification and provide a tissue engineering construct for clinical treatment of large bone/nonunion defects and obviate the need for

  12. Engineering Pre-vascularized Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabaschi, Giada D G; Manoharan, Vijayan; Li, Qing; Bertassoni, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Survival of functional tissue constructs of clinically relevant size depends on the formation of an organized and uniformly distributed network of blood vessels and capillaries. The lack of such vasculature leads to spatio-temporal gradients in oxygen, nutrients and accumulation of waste products inside engineered tissue constructs resulting in negative biological events at the core of the scaffold. Unavailability of a well-defined vasculature also results in ineffective integration of scaffolds to the host vasculature upon implantation. Arguably, one of the greatest challenges in engineering clinically relevant bone substitutes, therefore, has been the development of vascularized bone scaffolds. Various approaches ranging from peptide and growth factor functionalized biomaterials to hyper-porous scaffolds have been proposed to address this problem with reasonable success. An emerging alternative to address this challenge has been the fabrication of pre-vascularized scaffolds by taking advantage of biomanufacturing techniques, such as soft- and photo-lithography or 3D bioprinting, and cell-based approaches, where functional capillaries are engineered in cell-laden scaffolds prior to implantation. These strategies seek to engineer pre-vascularized tissues in vitro, allowing for improved anastomosis with the host vasculature upon implantation, while also improving cell viability and tissue development in vitro. This book chapter provides an overview of recent methods to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone regeneration. We first review the development of functional blood capillaries in bony structures and discuss controlled delivery of growth factors, co-culture systems, and on-chip studies to engineer vascularized cell-laden biomaterials. Lastly, we review recent studies using microfabrication techniques and 3D printing to engineer pre-vascularized scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  13. Stem Cell Sources for Vascular Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Vivek K.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the stem cell sources with the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering and to promote vascular regeneration. The first clinical studies using tissue-engineered vascular grafts are already under way, supporting the potential of this technology in the treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases. Despite progress in engineering biomaterials with the appropriate mechanical properties and biological cues as well as bioreactors for generating the correct tissue microenvironment, the source of cells that make up the vascular tissues remains a major challenge for tissue engineers and physicians. Mature cells from the tissue of origin may be difficult to obtain and suffer from limited proliferative capacity, which may further decline as a function of donor age. On the other hand, multipotent and pluripotent stem cells have great potential to provide large numbers of autologous cells with a great differentiation capacity. Here, we discuss the adult multipotent as well as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation potential toward vascular lineages, and their use in engineering functional and implantable vascular tissues. We also discuss the associated challenges that need to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition of this technology from the bench to the bedside. PMID:22571595

  14. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hairfollicle regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functionalhair follicle from dissociated cells propagated underdefined tissue culture conditions is a challenge stillpending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair folliclescaused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia notonly affects the patients' psychological well-being, butalso endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. Itis then of great interest to find different strategies aimingto regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle underconditions proper of an adult individual. Based uponcurrent knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells andtheir interactions during the embryonic hair generationand adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried toobtain mature hair follicles using different strategies andapproaches depending on the causes of hair loss. Thisreview summarizes current advances in the differentexperimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hairfollicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesisof hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cellsand tissue engineering. Most of these experiments wereperformed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonicor newborn origin. However, no successful strategy togenerate human hair follicles from adult cells has yetbeen reported. This review identifies several issues thatshould be considered to achieve this objective. Perhapsthe most important challenge is to provide threedimensionalculture conditionsmimicking the structure ofliving tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow theexpansion of specific cells while protecting their inductiveproperties, as well as methods for selecting populationsof epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary toolsto overcome the difficulties that constrain human hairfollicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends showsthat the number of patent applications aimed at hairfollicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasingduring the last decade. This field is attractive not only

  15. Neural tissue engineering options for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Williams, David F

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs) have emerged as a potential alternative to autologous nerve grafts, the gold standard for peripheral nerve repair. Typically, TENGs are composed of a biomaterial-based template that incorporates biochemical cues. A number of TENGs have been used experimentally to bridge long peripheral nerve gaps in various animal models, where the desired outcome is nerve tissue regeneration and functional recovery. So far, the translation of TENGs to the clinic for use in humans has met with a certain degree of success. In order to optimize the TENG design and further approach the matching of TENGs with autologous nerve grafts, many new cues, beyond the traditional ones, will have to be integrated into TENGs. Furthermore, there is a strong requirement for monitoring the real-time dynamic information related to the construction of TENGs. The aim of this opinion paper is to specifically and critically describe the latest advances in the field of neural tissue engineering for peripheral nerve regeneration. Here we delineate new attempts in the design of template (or scaffold) materials, especially in the context of biocompatibility, the choice and handling of support cells, and growth factor release systems. We further discuss the significance of RNAi for peripheral nerve regeneration, anticipate the potential application of RNAi reagents for TENGs, and speculate on the possible contributions of additional elements, including angiogenesis, electrical stimulation, molecular inflammatory mediators, bioactive peptides, antioxidant reagents, and cultured biological constructs, to TENGs. Finally, we consider that a diverse array of physicochemical and biological cues must be orchestrated within a TENG to create a self-consistent coordinated system with a close proximity to the regenerative microenvironment of the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Material-based engineering strategies for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Mieke H van; Bax, Noortje A M; Spreeuwel, Ariane C C van; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is composed of muscle and non-muscle cells, surrounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) and spatially organized into a complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture to allow for coordinated contraction and electrical pulse propagation. Despite emerging evidence for cardiomyocyte turnover in mammalian hearts, the regenerative capacity of human cardiac tissue is insufficient to recover from damage, e.g. resulting from myocardial infarction (MI). Instead, the heart 'repairs' lost or injured tissue by ongoing synthesis and remodeling of scar tissue. Conventional therapies and timely (stem) cell delivery to the injured tissue markedly improve short-term function and remodeling, but do not attenuate later stage adverse remodeling, leading to functional deterioration and eventually failure of the heart. Material-based therapies have been successfully used to mechanically support and constrain the post-MI failing heart, preventing it from further remodeling and dilation. When designed to deliver the right microenvironment for endogenous or exogenous cells, as well as the mechanical and topological cues to guide neo-tissue formation, material-based therapies may even reverse remodeling and boost cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the up-to-date status of material-based cardiac regeneration with special emphasis on 1) the use of bare biomaterials to deliver passive constraints that unload the heart, 2) the use of materials and cells to create engineered cardiac constructs for replacement, support, or regeneration of damaged myocardium, and 3) the development of bio-inspired and bioactive materials that aim to enhance the endogenous regenerative capacity of the heart. As the therapies should function in the infarcted heart, the damaged host environment and engineered in vitro test systems that mimic this environment, are reviewed as well.

  17. Role of tissue engineering in dental pulp regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Sial

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer′s disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  18. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Youngstrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems.

  19. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gadeon, David; Qiu, Songgang; Wood, Gary; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    An actual-size microfabricated regenerator comprised of a stack of 42 disks, 19 mm diameter and 0.25 mm thick, with layers of microscopic, segmented, involute-shaped flow channels was fabricated and tested. The geometry resembles layers of uniformly-spaced segmented-parallel-plates, except the plates are curved. Each disk was made from electro-plated nickel using the LiGA process. This regenerator had feature sizes close to those required for an actual Stirling engine but the overall regenerator dimensions were sized for the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow regenerator test rig. Testing in the oscillating-flow test rig showed the regenerator performed extremely well, significantly better than currently used random-fiber material, producing the highest figures of merit ever recorded for any regenerator tested in that rig over its approximately 20 years of use.

  20. Preliminary Results from Simulations of Temperature Oscillations in Stirling Engine Regenerator Matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to create a Stirling engine model for studying the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations on Stirling engine performance. A one-dimensional model with axial discretisation of engine components has been formulated using the control volume method....... The model contains a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) derived from mass and energy balances for gas filled control volumes and energy balances for regenerator matrix control masses. Interpolation methods with filtering properties are used for state variables at control volume interfaces...... shooting method. It has been found possible to accurately solve the stiff ODE system that describes the coupled thermodynamics of the gas and the regenerator matrix and to reliably find periodic steady state solutions to the model. Preliminary results indicate that the regenerator matrix temperature...

  1. Failure Analysis and Regeneration Performances Evaluation on Engine Lubricating Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. L.; Zhang, G. N.; Zhang, J. Y.; Yin, Y. L.; Xu, Y.

    To investigate the behavior of failure and recycling of lubricating oils, three sorts of typical 10w-40 lubricating oils used in heavy-load vehicle including the new oil, waste oil and regeneration oil regenerated by self-researched green regeneration technology were selected. The tribology properties were tested by four-ball friction wear tester as well. The results indicated that the performance of anti-extreme pressure of regeneration oil increase by 34.1% compared with the waste one and its load- carrying ability is close to the new oil; the feature of wear spot are better than those of the waste oil and frictional coefficient almost reach the level of the new oil's. As a result, the performance of anti-wear and friction reducing are getting better obviously.

  2. Measurement of Heat Flow Transmitted through a Stacked-Screen Regenerator of Thermoacoustic Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Han Hsu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A stacked-screen regenerator is a key component in a thermoacoustic Stirling engine. Therefore, the choice of suitable mesh screens is important in the engine design. To verify the applicability of four empirical equations used in the field of thermoacoustic engines and Stirling engines, this report describes the measurements of heat flow rates transmitted through the stacked screen regenerator inserted in an experimental setup filled with pressurized Argon gas having mean pressure of 0.45 MPa. Results show that the empirical equations reproduce the measured heat flow rates to a mutually similar degree, although their derivation processes differ. Additionally, results suggest that two effective pore radii would be necessary to account for the viscous and thermal behaviors of the gas oscillating in the stacked-screen regenerators.

  3. Gene-enhanced tissue engineering for dental hard tissue regeneration: (1 overview and practical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason James M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene-based therapies for tissue regeneration involve delivering a specific gene to a target tissue with the goal of changing the phenotype or protein expression profile of the recipient cell; the ultimate goal being to form specific tissues required for regeneration. One of the principal advantages of this approach is that it provides for a sustained delivery of physiologic levels of the growth factor of interest. This manuscript will review the principals of gene-enhanced tissue engineering and the techniques of introducing DNA into cells. Part 2 will review recent advances in gene-based therapies for dental hard tissue regeneration, specifically as it pertains to dentin regeneration/pulp capping and periodontal regeneration.

  4. Heat transfer measurements in the regenerator of a Stirling engine; Die Bestimmung des Waermeuebergangs im Regenerator einer Stirling-Maschine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schikora, H.

    2002-07-01

    The F-CFC ban has stimulated research on new refrigerants and alternative technologies. The Stirling engine is one such option. Simulation programs commonly use empirical heat transfer relations. However, these are difficult to establish as Stirling engines have highly complex flow patterns. The author describes an experimental measurement of heat transfer in the regenerator of a Stirling engine. The results serve as a basis for calculating a new correlation for heat transfer in this important component, which will enable more realistic calculations of the Stirling engine process. [German] Wegen des weitgehenden Verbots der ozonzerstoerenden Fluor-Chlor-Kohlenwasserstoffe (FCKW) wird in der Kaeltetechnik seit Jahren nach Alternativen gesucht. Neben der Verwendung oekologisch vertraeglicher Kaeltemittel in Kaltdampf-Kaeltemaschinen kann auch der Einsatz alternativer Kaelteerzeugungsverfahren sinnvoll sein. In diesem Zusammenhang bieten sich vor allem Stirling-Kaeltemaschinen an, die mit dem umweltunschaedlichen Arbeitsgas Helium betrieben werden. Simulationsprogramme zur Berechnung dieser Maschinen verwenden u.a. empirische Beziehungen fuer den Waermeuebergang. Wegen der aeusserst komplexen Stroemungsformen in Stirling-Maschinen sind diese Beziehungen jedoch bisher relativ ungenau. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die experimentelle Bestimmung des Waermeuebergangs im Regenerator einer Stirling-Maschine beschrieben. Auf Basis dieser Ergebnisse wurde eine neue Korrelation fuer den Waermeuebergang in diesem wichtigen Bauteil ermittelt. Diese neue Beziehung ermoeglicht zukuenftig eine realitaetsnaehere Berechnung von Stirling-Maschinen. (orig.)

  5. HISTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF IN VITRO REGENERATION OF HUMAN DENTAL PULP COMPLEX WITH AUTOLOGOUS TISSULAR ENGINEERING

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Márquez, Ricardo Manuel; Docente Colaborador del Departamento de Ciencias Básicas Estomatológicas, Curso de Patología General y del Sistema Estomatognático. Facultad de Odontología. UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    A long time ago, dental pulp-complex regeneration was our main objective in radicular reparation which could guarantee all appropiate growth of healthy and functional tissue. The present study is about a histological assay of a new dentinal-pulp complex formation using platelet rich plasm, pulpar tissue and fibrina, all autolougus, as components of dental pulp tissular engineering treatment. Qualitative and quantitative assays about the dentin pulp-complex regeneration grade on experimental a...

  6. Biomaterial-engineering and neurobiological approaches for regenerating the injured cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuki Ajioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex is responsible for higher functions of the central nervous system (CNS, such as movement, sensation, and cognition. When the cerebral cortex is severely injured, these functions are irreversibly impaired. Although recent neurobiological studies reveal that the cortex has the potential for regeneration, therapies for functional recovery face some technological obstacles. Biomaterials have been used to evoke regenerative potential and promote regeneration in several tissues, including the CNS. This review presents a brief overview of new therapeutic strategies for cortical regeneration from the perspectives of neurobiology and biomaterial engineering, and discusses a promising technology for evoking the regenerative potential of the cerebral cortex.

  7. Looking Ahead to Engineering Epimorphic Regeneration of a Human Digit or Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Lina M; Lynch, Kristen M; Allan, Christopher H; Badylak, Stephen F; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 2 million people have had limb amputations in the United States due to disease or injury, with more than 185,000 new amputations every year. The ability to promote epimorphic regeneration, or the regrowth of a biologically based digit or limb, would radically change the prognosis for amputees. This ambitious goal includes the regrowth of a large number of tissues that need to be properly assembled and patterned to create a fully functional structure. We have yet to even identify, let alone address, all the obstacles along the extended progression that limit epimorphic regeneration in humans. This review aims to present introductory fundamentals in epimorphic regeneration to facilitate design and conduct of research from a tissue engineering and regenerative medicine perspective. We describe the clinical scenario of human digit healing, featuring published reports of regenerative potential. We then broadly delineate the processes of epimorphic regeneration in nonmammalian systems and describe a few mammalian regeneration models. We give particular focus to the murine digit tip, which allows for comparative studies of regeneration-competent and regeneration-incompetent outcomes in the same animal. Finally, we describe a few forward-thinking opportunities for promoting epimorphic regeneration in humans.

  8. Tissue-Engineered Tendon for Enthesis Regeneration in a Rat Rotator Cuff Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Smietana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healing of rotator cuff (RC injuries with current suture or augmented scaffold techniques fails to regenerate the enthesis and instead forms a weaker fibrovascular scar that is prone to subsequent failure. Regeneration of the enthesis is the key to improving clinical outcomes for RC injuries. We hypothesized that the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon to repair either an acute or a chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tear would regenerate a functional enthesis and return the biomechanics of the tendon back to that found in native tissue. Engineered tendons were fabricated from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells utilizing our well-described fabrication technology. Forty-three rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute (immediate or chronic (4 weeks retracted repair by using either our engineered tendon or a trans-osseous suture technique. Animals were sacrificed at 8 weeks. Biomechanical and histological analyses of the regenerated enthesis and tendon were performed. Statistical analysis was performed by using a one-way analysis of variance with significance set at p < 0.05. Acute repairs using engineered tendon had improved enthesis structure and lower biomechanical failures compared with suture repairs. Chronic repairs with engineered tendon had a more native-like enthesis with increased fibrocartilage formation, reduced scar formation, and lower biomechanical failure compared with suture repair. Thus, the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon showed improve enthesis regeneration and improved function in chronic RC repairs compared with suture repair. Clinical Significance: Our engineered tendon construct shows promise as a clinically relevant method for repair of RC injuries.

  9. Preliminary results from simulations of temperature oscillations in Stirling engine regenerator matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegaard [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)]. E-mail: ska@mek.dtu.dk; Carlsen, Henrik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Thomsen, Per Grove [Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2006-08-15

    The objective of this study has been to create a Stirling engine model for studying the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations on Stirling engine performance. A one-dimensional model with axial discretisation of engine components has been formulated using the control volume method. The model contains a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) derived from mass and energy balances for gas filled control volumes and energy balances for regenerator matrix control masses. Interpolation methods with filtering properties are used for state variables at control volume interfaces to reduce numerical diffusion and/or non-physical oscillations. Loss mechanisms are included directly in the governing equations as terms in the mass and energy balances. Steady state periodic solutions that satisfy cyclic boundary conditions and integral conditions are calculated using a custom built shooting method. It has been found possible to accurately solve the stiff ODE system that describes the coupled thermodynamics of the gas and the regenerator matrix and to reliably find periodic steady state solutions to the model. Preliminary results indicate that the regenerator matrix temperature oscillations do have significant impact on the regenerator loss, the cycle power output, and the cycle efficiency and thus deserve further study.

  10. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix temperature oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    A new regenerator matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results in good agreement with experimental data was used for mapping...... the per- formance of the engine, for mapping the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations, and for optimising the regenerator design. The regenerator matrix temperatures were found to oscillate in two modes. The first mode was oscillation of a nearly linear axial matrix temperature profile...... while the second mode bended the ends of the axial matrix temperature profile when gas flowed into the regenerator with a temperature significantly different from the matrix temperature. The first mode of oscillation improved the efficiency of the engine but the second mode reduced both the work output...

  11. Recent Strategies in Tissue Engineering for Guided Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kayla; Dinis, Tony M; Taourirt, Sami; Vidal, Guillaume; Kaplan, David L; Egles, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The repair of large crushed or sectioned segments of peripheral nerves remains a challenge in regenerative medicine due to the complexity of the biological environment and the lack of proper biomaterials and architecture to foster reconstruction. Traditionally such reconstruction is only achieved by using fresh human tissue as a surrogate for the absence of the nerve. However, recent focus in the field has been on new polymer structures and specific biofunctionalization to achieve the goal of peripheral nerve regeneration by developing artificial nerve prostheses. This review presents various tested approaches as well their effectiveness for nerve regrowth and functional recovery.

  12. Bone Regeneration Based on Tissue Engineering Conceptions-A 21st Century Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Henkel; Maria A. Woodruff; Devakara R. Epari; Roland Steck; Vaida Glatt; Ian C. Dickinson; Peter FM Choong; Michael A. Schuetz; Dietmar W. Hutmacher

    2013-01-01

    The role of Bone Tissue Engineering in the field of Regenerative Medicine has been the topic of substantial research over the past two decades. Technological advances have improved orthopaedic implants and surgical techniques for bone reconstruction. However, improvements in surgical techniques to reconstruct bone have been limited by the paucity of autologous materials available and donor site morbidity. Recent advances in the development of biomaterials have provided attractive alternatives to bone grafting expanding the surgical options for restoring the form and function of injured bone. Specifically, novel bioactive (second generation) biomaterials have been developed that are characterised by controlled action and reaction to the host tissue environment, whilst exhibiting controlled chemical breakdown and resorption with an ultimate replacement by regenerating tissue. Future generations of biomaterials (third generation) are designed to be not only osteo-conductive but also osteoinductive, i.e. to stimulate regeneration of host tissues by combining tissue engineer-ing and in situ tissue regeneration methods with a focus on novel applications. These techniques will lead to novel possibilities for tissue regeneration and repair. At present, tissue engineered constructs that may find future use as bone grafts for complex skeletal defects, whether from post-traumatic, degenerative, neoplastic or congenital/developmental“origin”require osseous reconstruction to ensure structural and functional integrity. Engineering functional bone using combinations of cells, scaffolds and bioactive factors is a promising strategy and a particular feature for future development in the area of hybrid materials which are able to exhibit suitable biomimetic and mechanical properties. This review will discuss the state of the art in this field and what we can expect from future generations of bone regeneration concepts.

  13. Dental Pulp and Dentin Tissue Engineering and Regeneration – Advancement and Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Hard tissue is difficult to repair especially dental structures. Tooth enamel is incapable of self-repairing whereas dentin and cememtum can regenerate with limited capacity. Enamel and dentin are commonly under the attack by caries. Extensive forms of caries destroy enamel and dentin and can lead to dental pulp infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by the pulp space disinfection and filled with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection --commonly known as root canal or endodontic therapy. Regeneration of dentin relies on having vital pulps; however, regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. With the advent of modern tissue engineering concept and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the recent endeavor on pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement and challenge in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:21196351

  14. Long-term survival and integration of transplanted engineered nervous tissue constructs promotes peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jason H; Cullen, D Kacy; Browne, Kevin D; Groff, Robert; Zhang, Jun; Pfister, Bryan J; Zager, Eric L; Smith, Douglas H

    2009-07-01

    Although peripheral nerve injury is a common consequence of trauma or surgery, there are insufficient means for repair. In particular, there is a critical need for improved methods to facilitate regeneration of axons across major nerve lesions. Here, we engineered transplantable living nervous tissue constructs to provide a labeled pathway to guide host axonal regeneration. These constructs consisted of stretch-grown, longitudinally aligned living axonal tracts inserted into poly(glycolic acid) tubes. The constructs (allogenic) were transplanted to bridge an excised segment of sciatic nerve in the rat, and histological analyses were performed at 6 and 16 weeks posttransplantation to determine graft survival, integration, and host regeneration. At both time points, the transplanted constructs were found to have maintained their pretransplant geometry, with surviving clusters of graft neuronal somata at the extremities of the constructs spanned by tracts of axons. Throughout the transplanted region, there was an intertwining plexus of host and graft axons, suggesting that the transplanted axons mediated host axonal regeneration across the lesion. By 16 weeks posttransplant, extensive myelination of axons was observed throughout the transplant region. Further, graft neurons had extended axons beyond the margins of the transplanted region, penetrating into the host nerve. Notably, this survival and integration of the allogenic constructs occurred in the absence of immunosuppression therapy. These findings demonstrate the promise of living tissue-engineered axonal constructs to bridge major nerve lesions and promote host regeneration, potentially by providing axon-mediated axonal outgrowth and guidance.

  15. Engineering Cell Fate for Tissue Regeneration by In Vivo Transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lázaro, I; Kostarelos, K

    2016-02-01

    Changes in cell identity occur in adult mammalian organisms but are rare and often linked to disease. Research in the last few decades has thrown light on how to manipulate cell fate, but the conversion of a particular cell type into another within a living organism (also termed in vivo transdifferentiation) has only been recently achieved in a limited number of tissues. Although the therapeutic promise of this strategy for tissue regeneration and repair is exciting, important efficacy and safety concerns will need to be addressed before it becomes a reality in the clinical practice. Here, we review the most relevant in vivo transdifferentiation studies in adult mammalian animal models, offering a critical assessment of this potentially powerful strategy for regenerative medicine.

  16. Stem cell and biomaterials research in dental tissue engineering and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Orapin V; Chavez, Miquella G; Jheon, Andrew H; Desai, Tejal; Klein, Ophir D

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes approaches used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, with a focus on dental applications. Dental caries and periodontal disease are the most common diseases resulting in tissue loss. To replace or regenerate new tissues, various sources of stem cells have been identified such as somatic stem cells from teeth and peridontium. Advances in biomaterial sciences including microfabrication, self-assembled biomimetic peptides, and 3-dimensional printing hold great promise for whole-organ or partial tissue regeneration to replace teeth and periodontium.

  17. Preliminary Results from Simulations of Temperature Fluctuations in Stirling Engine Regenerator Matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study has been to create a model for studying effects of temperature fluctuations in regenerator matrices on Stirling engine performance. A one-dimensional model with axial discretisation of engine components has been formulated using a fixed Eulerian grid. The model contains...... a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing the mass and energy balances for the working gas in all control volumes and energy balances for the matrix material in the control volumes of the regenerator. Interpolation methods with filtering properties are used for state variables...... that adjusts solutions so that they satisfy the necessary cyclic boundary conditions as well as integral conditions for cyclic heat transfer for walls in the engine and for the mean cycle pressure. It has been found that it is possible to accurately solve the stiff ODE system that describes the coupled...

  18. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix temperature oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegard [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energy Engineering Section, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Alle bygning 402, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)]. E-mail: ska@mek.dtu.dk; Carlsen, Henrik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Energy Engineering Section, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Alle bygning 402, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Thomsen, Per Grove [Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Technical University of Denmark, Richard Petersens Plads bygning, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2006-05-15

    A new regenerator matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results in good agreement with experimental data was used for mapping the performance of the engine, for mapping the effects of regenerator matrix temperature oscillations, and for optimising the regenerator design. The regenerator matrix temperatures were found to oscillate in two modes. The first mode was oscillation of a nearly linear axial matrix temperature profile while the second mode bended the ends of the axial matrix temperature profile when gas flowed into the regenerator with a temperature significantly different from the matrix temperature. The first mode of oscillation improved the efficiency of the engine but the second mode reduced both the work output and efficiency of the engine. A new regenerator with three differently designed matrix sections that amplified the first mode of oscillation and reduced the second improved the efficiency of the engine from the current 32.9 to 33.2% with a 3% decrease in power output. An efficiency of 33.0% was achievable with uniform regenerator matrix properties.

  19. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  20. Healing Osteoarthritis: Engineered Proteins Created for Therapeutic Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Cherry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people worldwide are afflicted with painfulosteoarthritis, which is characterized by degradationof articular cartilage found in major joints such as thehip or knee. Symptoms include inflammation, pain,and decreased mobility. Because cartilage has a limitedability to self-heal, researchers have focused efforts onmethods that trigger cartilage regeneration. Our approachis to develop an injectable, protein-based hydrogel withmechanical properties analogous to healthy articularcartilage. The hydrogel provides an environment for cellgrowth and stimulates new tissue formation. We utilizedrecombinant DNA technology to create multifunctional,elastomeric proteins. The recombinant proteins weredesigned with biologically active domains to influence cellbehavior and resilin structural domains that mimic thestiffness of native cartilage. Resilin, a protein found in thewing and leg joints of mosquitoes, provided inspiration forthe mechanical domain in the recombinant protein. Thenew resilin-based protein was expressed in E. coli bacteria.Forming hydrogels requires a large quantity of engineeredprotein, so parameters such as bacterial host, incubationtemperature, expression time, and induction method wereoptimized to increase the protein yield. Using salt toprecipitate the protein and exploiting resilin’s heat stability,27 mg/L of recombinant protein was recovered at 95%purity. The protein expression and purification protocolswere established by analyzing experimental samples onSDS-PAGE gels and by Western blotting. The mechanicalproperties and interactions with stem cells are currentlybeing evaluated to assess the potential of the resilin-basedhydrogel as a treatment for osteoarthritis.

  1. Self-synthesized extracellular matrix contributes to mature adipose tissue regeneration in a tissue engineering chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Weiqing; Chang, Qiang; Xiao, Xiaolian; Dong, Ziqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The development of an engineered adipose tissue substitute capable of supporting reliable, predictable, and complete fat tissue regeneration would be of value in plastic and reconstructive surgery. For adipogenesis, a tissue engineering chamber provides an optimized microenvironment that is both efficacious and reproducible; however, for reasons that remain unclear, tissues regenerated in a tissue engineering chamber consist mostly of connective rather than adipose tissue. Here, we describe a chamber-based system for improving the yield of mature adipose tissue and discuss the potential mechanism of adipogenesis in tissue-chamber models. Adipose tissue flaps with independent vascular pedicles placed in chambers were implanted into rabbits. Adipose volume increased significantly during the observation period (week 1, 2, 3, 4, 16). Histomorphometry revealed mature adipose tissue with signs of adipose tissue remolding. The induced engineered constructs showed high-level expression of adipogenic (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ), chemotactic (stromal cell-derived factor 1a), and inflammatory (interleukin 1 and 6) genes. In our system, the extracellular matrix may have served as a scaffold for cell migration and proliferation, allowing mature adipose tissue to be obtained in a chamber microenvironment without the need for an exogenous scaffold. Our results provide new insights into key elements involved in the early development of adipose tissue regeneration.

  2. Stem Cell-based Tissue Engineering Approaches for Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick T.; Handorf, Andrew M.; Jeon, Won Bae; Li, Wan-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering is an ever evolving field that holds promise in treating numerous musculoskeletal diseases and injuries. An important impetus in the development of the field was the discovery and implementation of stem cells. The utilization of mesenchymal stem cells, and later embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, opens new arenas for tissue engineering and presents the potential of developing stem cell-based therapies for disease treatment. Multipotent and pluripotent stem cells can produce various lineage tissues, and allow for derivation of a tissue that may be comprised of multiple cell types. As the field grows, the combination of biomaterial scaffolds and bioreactors provides methods to create an environment for stem cells that better represent their microenvironment for new tissue formation. As technologies for the fabrication of biomaterial scaffolds advance, the ability of scaffolds to modulate stem cell behavior advances as well. The composition of scaffolds could be of natural or synthetic materials and could be tailored to enhance cell self-renewal and/or direct cell fates. In addition to biomaterial scaffolds, studies of tissue development and cellular microenvironments have determined other factors, such as growth factors and oxygen tension, that are crucial to the regulation of stem cell activity. The overarching goal of stem cell-based tissue engineering research is to precisely control differentiation of stem cells in culture. In this article, we review current developments in tissue engineering, focusing on several stem cell sources, induction factors including growth factors, oxygen tension, biomaterials, and mechanical stimulation, and the internal and external regulatory mechanisms that govern proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23432679

  3. Engineering Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration: A novel chassis strain for whole-cell catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Geier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many synthetically useful reactions are catalyzed by cofactor-dependent enzymes. As cofactors represent a major cost factor, methods for efficient cofactor regeneration are required especially for large-scale synthetic applications. In order to generate a novel and efficient host chassis for bioreductions, we engineered the methanol utilization pathway of Pichia pastoris for improved NADH regeneration. By deleting the genes coding for dihydroxyacetone synthase isoform 1 and 2 (DAS1 and DAS2, NADH regeneration via methanol oxidation (dissimilation was increased significantly. The resulting Δdas1 Δdas2 strain performed better in butanediol dehydrogenase (BDH1 based whole-cell conversions. While the BDH1 catalyzed acetoin reduction stopped after 2 h reaching ~50% substrate conversion when performed in the wild type strain, full conversion after 6 h was obtained by employing the knock-out strain. These results suggest that the P. pastoris Δdas1 Δdas2 strain is capable of supplying the actual biocatalyst with the cofactor over a longer reaction period without the over-expression of an additional cofactor regeneration system. Thus, focusing the intrinsic carbon flux of this methylotrophic yeast on methanol oxidation to CO2 represents an efficient and easy-to-use strategy for NADH-dependent whole-cell conversions. At the same time methanol serves as co-solvent, inductor for catalyst and cofactor regeneration pathway expression and source of energy.

  4. Modeling planarian regeneration: a primer for reverse-engineering the worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Daniel; Beane, Wendy S; Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of robust self-assembly and repair capabilities of complex systems would have enormous implications for basic evolutionary developmental biology as well as for transformative applications in regenerative biomedicine and the engineering of highly fault-tolerant cybernetic systems. Molecular biologists are working to identify the pathways underlying the remarkable regenerative abilities of model species that perfectly regenerate limbs, brains, and other complex body parts. However, a profound disconnect remains between the deluge of high-resolution genetic and protein data on pathways required for regeneration, and the desired spatial, algorithmic models that show how self-monitoring and growth control arise from the synthesis of cellular activities. This barrier to progress in the understanding of morphogenetic controls may be breached by powerful techniques from the computational sciences-using non-traditional modeling approaches to reverse-engineer systems such as planaria: flatworms with a complex bodyplan and nervous system that are able to regenerate any body part after traumatic injury. Currently, the involvement of experts from outside of molecular genetics is hampered by the specialist literature of molecular developmental biology: impactful collaborations across such different fields require that review literature be available that presents the key functional capabilities of important biological model systems while abstracting away from the often irrelevant and confusing details of specific genes and proteins. To facilitate modeling efforts by computer scientists, physicists, engineers, and mathematicians, we present a different kind of review of planarian regeneration. Focusing on the main patterning properties of this system, we review what is known about the signal exchanges that occur during regenerative repair in planaria and the cellular mechanisms that are thought to underlie them. By establishing an engineering-like style

  5. Modeling planarian regeneration: a primer for reverse-engineering the worm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lobo

    Full Text Available A mechanistic understanding of robust self-assembly and repair capabilities of complex systems would have enormous implications for basic evolutionary developmental biology as well as for transformative applications in regenerative biomedicine and the engineering of highly fault-tolerant cybernetic systems. Molecular biologists are working to identify the pathways underlying the remarkable regenerative abilities of model species that perfectly regenerate limbs, brains, and other complex body parts. However, a profound disconnect remains between the deluge of high-resolution genetic and protein data on pathways required for regeneration, and the desired spatial, algorithmic models that show how self-monitoring and growth control arise from the synthesis of cellular activities. This barrier to progress in the understanding of morphogenetic controls may be breached by powerful techniques from the computational sciences-using non-traditional modeling approaches to reverse-engineer systems such as planaria: flatworms with a complex bodyplan and nervous system that are able to regenerate any body part after traumatic injury. Currently, the involvement of experts from outside of molecular genetics is hampered by the specialist literature of molecular developmental biology: impactful collaborations across such different fields require that review literature be available that presents the key functional capabilities of important biological model systems while abstracting away from the often irrelevant and confusing details of specific genes and proteins. To facilitate modeling efforts by computer scientists, physicists, engineers, and mathematicians, we present a different kind of review of planarian regeneration. Focusing on the main patterning properties of this system, we review what is known about the signal exchanges that occur during regenerative repair in planaria and the cellular mechanisms that are thought to underlie them. By establishing an

  6. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefai, Mohammad T; Murali, Divya; Paul, Arghya; Ridwan, Khalid M; Connell, John M; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. PMID:25999743

  7. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Swaminathan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  8. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Anuradha; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2009-11-25

    Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  9. Concise review: tissue-engineered skin and nerve regeneration in burn treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Mathieu; Parenteau-Bareil, Rémi; Cadau, Sébastien; Berthod, François

    2013-07-01

    Burns not only destroy the barrier function of the skin but also alter the perceptions of pain, temperature, and touch. Different strategies have been developed over the years to cover deep and extensive burns with the ultimate goal of regenerating the barrier function of the epidermis while recovering an acceptable aesthetic aspect. However, patients often complain about a loss of skin sensation and even cutaneous chronic pain. Cutaneous nerve regeneration can occur from the nerve endings of the wound bed, but it is often compromised by scar formation or anarchic wound healing. Restoration of pain, temperature, and touch perceptions should now be a major challenge to solve in order to improve patients' quality of life. In addition, the cutaneous nerve network has been recently highlighted to play an important role in epidermal homeostasis and may be essential at least in the early phase of wound healing through the induction of neurogenic inflammation. Although the nerve regeneration process was studied largely in the context of nerve transections, very few studies have been aimed at developing strategies to improve it in the context of cutaneous wound healing. In this concise review, we provide a description of the characteristics of and current treatments for extensive burns, including tissue-engineered skin approaches to improve cutaneous nerve regeneration, and describe prospective uses for autologous skin-derived adult stem cells to enhance recovery of the skin's sense of touch.

  10. Tissue engineering strategies applied in the regeneration of the human intervertebral disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Correia, Joana; Correia, Sandra I; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui L

    2013-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common painful conditions that lead to work absenteeism, medical visits, and hospitalization. The majority of cases showing signs of LBP are due to age-related degenerative changes in the intervertebral disk (IVD), which are, in fact, associated with multiple spine pathologies. Traditional and more conservative procedures/clinical approaches only treat the symptoms of disease and not the underlying pathology, thus limiting their long-term efficiency. In the last few years, research and development of new approaches aiming to substitute the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus tissue and stimulate its regeneration has been conducted. Regeneration of the damaged IVD using tissue engineering strategies appears particularly promising in pre-clinical studies. Meanwhile, surgical techniques must be adapted to this new approach in order to be as minimally invasive as possible, reducing recovering time and side effects associated to traditional surgeries. In this review, the current knowledge on IVD, its associated pathologies and current surgical procedures are summarized. Furthermore, it also provides a succinct and up-to-date overview on regenerative medicine research, especially on the newest tissue engineering strategies for IVD regeneration.

  11. Should we use cells, biomaterials, or tissue engineering for cartilage regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Jonathan C; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-04-18

    For a long time, cartilage has been a major focus of the whole field of tissue engineering, both because of the constantly growing need for more effective options for joint repair and the expectation that this apparently simple tissue will be easy to engineer. After several decades, cartilage regeneration has proven to be anything but easy. With gratifying progress in our understanding of the factors governing cartilage development and function, and cell therapy being successfully used for several decades, there is still a lot to do. We lack reliable methods to generate durable articular cartilage that would resemble the original tissue lost to injury or disease. The question posed here is whether the answer would come from the methods using cells, biomaterials, or tissue engineering. We present a concise review of some of the most meritorious efforts in each area, and propose that the solution will most likely emerge from the ongoing attempts to recapitulate certain aspects of native cartilage development. While an ideal recipe for cartilage regeneration is yet to be formulated, we believe that it will contain cell, biomaterial, and tissue engineering approaches, blended into an effective method for seamless repair of articular cartilage.

  12. Vascularization strategies of engineered tissues and their application in cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuetao; Altalhi, Wafa; Nunes, Sara S

    2016-01-15

    The primary function of vascular networks is to transport blood and deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues, which occurs at the interface of the microvasculature. Therefore, the formation of the vessels at the microcirculatory level, or angiogenesis, is critical for tissue regeneration and repair. Current strategies for vascularization of engineered tissues have incorporated multi-disciplinary approaches including engineered biomaterials, cells and angiogenic factors. Pre-vascularization of scaffolds composed of native matrix, synthetic polymers, or other biological materials can be achieved through the use of single cells in mono or co-culture, in combination or not with angiogenic factors or by the use of isolated vessels. The advance of these methods, together with a growing understanding of the biology behind vascularization, has facilitated the development of vascularization strategies for engineered tissues with therapeutic potential for tissue regeneration and repair. Here, we review the different cell-based strategies utilized to pre-vascularize engineered tissues and in making more complex vascularized cardiac tissues for regenerative medicine applications.

  13. The application of tissue engineering to regeneration of pulp and dentin in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Misako; Akamine, Akifumi

    2005-10-01

    Caries, pulpitis, and apical periodontitis increase health care costs and attendant loss of economic productivity. They ultimately result in premature tooth loss and therefore diminishing the quality of life. Advances in vital pulp therapy with pulp stem/progenitor cells might give impetus to regenerate dentin-pulp complex without the removal of the whole pulp. Tissue engineering is the science of design and manufacture of new tissues to replace lost parts because of diseases including cancer and trauma. The three key ingredients for tissue engineering are signals for morphogenesis, stem cells for responding to morphogens and the scaffold of extracellular matrix. In preclinical studies cell therapy and gene therapy have been developed for many tissues and organs such as bone, heart, liver, and kidney as a means of delivering growth factors, cytokines, or morphogens with stem/progenitor cells in a scaffold to the sites of tissue injury to accelerate and/or induce a natural biological regeneration. The pulp tissue contains stem/progenitor cells that potentially differentiate into odontoblasts in response to bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). There are two strategies to regenerate dentin. First, is in vivo therapy, where BMP proteins or BMP genes are directly applied to the exposed or amputated pulp. Second is ex vivo therapy and consists of isolation of stem/progenitor cells from pulp tissue, differentiation into odontoblasts with recombinant BMPs or BMP genes and finally transplanted autogenously to regenerate dentin. This review is focused on the recent progress in this area and discusses the barriers and challenges for clinical utility in endodontics.

  14. Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration: From Cell-Based Therapies to Decellularised Engineered Extracellular Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, James N.; Peretti, Giuseppe M.; Scotti, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Currently, autologous bone grafting represents the clinical gold standard in orthopaedic surgery. In certain cases, however, alternative techniques are required. The clinical utility of stem and stromal cells has been demonstrated for the repair and regeneration of craniomaxillofacial and long bone defects although clinical adoption of bone tissue engineering protocols has been very limited. Initial tissue engineering studies focused on the bone marrow as a source of cells for bone regeneration, and while a number of promising results continue to emerge, limitations to this technique have prompted the exploration of alternative cell sources, including adipose and muscle tissue. In this review paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cell sources with a focus on adipose tissue and the bone marrow. Additionally, we highlight the relatively recent paradigm of developmental engineering, which promotes the recapitulation of naturally occurring developmental processes to allow the implant to optimally respond to endogenous cues. Finally we examine efforts to apply lessons from studies into different cell sources and developmental approaches to stimulate bone growth by use of decellularised hypertrophic cartilage templates. PMID:26997959

  15. Adipose tissue extract promotes adipose tissue regeneration in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zijing; Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    An adipose tissue engineering chamber model of spontaneous adipose tissue generation from an existing fat flap has been described. However, the chamber does not completely fill with adipose tissue in this model. Here, the effect of adipose tissue extract (ATE) on adipose tissue regeneration was investigated. In vitro, the adipogenic and angiogenic capacities of ATE were evaluated using Oil Red O and tube formation assays on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), respectively. In vivo, saline or ATE was injected into the adipose tissue engineering chamber 1 week after its implantation. At different time points post-injection, the contents were morphometrically, histologically, and immunohistochemically evaluated, and the expression of growth factors and adipogenic genes was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time PCR. With the exception of the baseline control group, in which fat flaps were not inserted into a chamber, the total volume of fat flap tissue increased significantly in all groups, especially in the ATE group. Better morphology and structure, a thinner capsule, and more vessels were observed in the ATE group than in the control group. Expression of angiogenic growth factors and adipogenic markers were significantly higher in the ATE group. ATE therefore significantly promoted adipose tissue regeneration and reduced capsule formation in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model. These data suggest that ATE provides a more angiogenic and adipogenic microenvironment for adipose tissue formation by releasing various cytokines and growth factors that also inhibit capsule formation.

  16. Endochondral ossification for enhancing bone regeneration: converging native extracellular matrix biomaterials and developmental engineering in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, S Connor; Berkland, Cory J; Bonewald, Lynda F; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Autologous bone grafting (ABG) remains entrenched as the gold standard of treatment in bone regenerative surgery. Consequently, many marginally successful bone tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking portions of ABG's "ideal" osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic composition resembling the late reparative stage extracellular matrix (ECM) in bone fracture repair, also known as the "hard" or "bony" callus. An alternative, less common approach that has emerged in the last decade harnesses endochondral (EC) ossification through developmental engineering principles, which acknowledges that the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in developmental skeletogenesis, specifically EC ossification, are closely paralleled during native bone healing. EC ossification naturally occurs during the majority of bone fractures and, thus, can potentially be utilized to enhance bone regeneration for nearly any orthopedic indication, especially in avascular critical-sized defects where hypoxic conditions favor initial chondrogenesis instead of direct intramembranous ossification. The body's native EC ossification response, however, is not capable of regenerating critical-sized defects without intervention. We propose that an underexplored potential exists to regenerate bone through the native EC ossification response by utilizing strategies which mimic the initial inflammatory or fibrocartilaginous ECM (i.e., "pro-" or "soft" callus) observed in the early reparative stage of bone fracture repair. To date, the majority of strategies utilizing this approach rely on clinically burdensome in vitro cell expansion protocols. This review will focus on the confluence of two evolving areas, (1) native ECM biomaterials and (2) developmental engineering, which will attempt to overcome the technical, business, and regulatory challenges that persist in the area of bone regeneration. Significant attention will be given to native "raw" materials and ECM-based designs that

  17. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

    2011-12-01

    Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during

  18. The role of biodegradable engineered scaffolds seeded with Schwann cells for spinal cord regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, H; Amoabediny, Gh; Nik, N Salehi; Heydari, M; Yosefifard, M; Siadat, S O Ranaei; Mottaghy, K

    2009-02-01

    Spinal cord injury is very complicated, as there are factors in the body that inhibit its repair. Although regeneration of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) was once thought to be impossible, studies over the past two decades have shown that axonal growth after spinal cord injury can occur when provided with the correct substratum. Traditionally, tissue transplantation or peripheral nerve grafting are used to repair damaged or diseased regions of the CNS, but donor shortage and immunological problems associated with infectious disease are often encountered. Fortunately, recent advances in neuroscience, cell culture, and biomaterials provide optimistic future using new treatments for nerve injuries. Biomaterial scaffold creates substrate within which cells are instructed to form a tissue or an organ in a highly controlled way. The principal function of a scaffold is to direct cell behavior such as migration, proliferation, differentiation, maintenance of phenotype, and apoptosis by facilitating sensing and responding to the environment via cell-matrix and cell-cell communications. Therefore, having such abilities provides scaffolds seeded with a special type of cell as an important part of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine which spinal cord regeneration is an example of. Nevertheless, the vast number of biodegradable synthetic and natural biopolymers makes choosing the right one very difficult. In this review article, it was tried to provide an inclusive survey of biopolymers seeded with Schwann cells (SCs) to be used for axonal regeneration in the nervous system.

  19. Skeletal muscle regeneration via engineered tissue culture over electrospun nanofibrous chitosan/PVA scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmandi, Mahsa; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Ghiaseddin, Ali; Ganji, Fariba

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue shows a remarkable potential in regeneration of injured tissue. However, in some of chronic and volumetric muscle damages, the native tissue is incapable to repair and remodeling the trauma. In the same condition, stem-cell therapy increased regeneration in situations of deficient muscle repair, but the major problem seems to be the lack of ability to attachment and survive of injected cells on the exact location. In this study, chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibrous scaffold was studied to promote cell attachment and provide mechanical support during regeneration. Scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and tensile test. Degradation and swelling behavior of scaffold were studied for 20 days. The cell-scaffold interaction was characterized by MTT assay for 10 days and in vivo biocompatibility of scaffold in a rabbit model was evaluated. Results showed that cells had a good viability, adhesion, growth, and spread on the scaffold, which make this mat a desirable engineered muscular graft. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1720-1727, 2016.

  20. Skeletal Muscle Regeneration on Protein-Grafted and Microchannel-Patterned Scaffold for Hypopharyngeal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisen Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF or gelatin (PU-Gel to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration.

  1. Skeletal muscle regeneration on protein-grafted and microchannel-patterned scaffold for hypopharyngeal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhisen; Guo, Shanshan; Ye, Dong; Chen, Jingjing; Kang, Cheng; Qiu, Shejie; Lu, Dakai; Li, Qun; Xu, Kunjie; Lv, Jingjing; Zhu, Yabin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, polymeric materials with high biocompatibility like polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid have been widely used for fabricating living constructs. For hypopharynx tissue engineering, skeletal muscle is one important functional part of the whole organ, which assembles the unidirectionally aligned myotubes. In this study, a polyurethane (PU) scaffold with microchannel patterns was used to provide aligning guidance for the seeded human myoblasts. Due to the low hydrophilicity of PU, the scaffold was grafted with silk fibroin (PU-SF) or gelatin (PU-Gel) to improve its cell adhesion properties. Scaffolds were observed to degrade slowly over time, and their mechanical properties and hydrophilicities were improved through the surface grafting. Also, the myoblasts seeded on PU-SF had the higher proliferative rate and better differentiation compared with those on the control or PU-Gel. Our results demonstrate that polyurethane scaffolds seeded with myoblasts hold promise to guide hypopharynx muscle regeneration.

  2. Engineering bone regeneration with novel cell-laden hydrogel microfiber-injectable calcium phosphate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Ping; Wang, Lin; Bao, Chunyun; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Ren, Ke; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-06-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering is promising to create living functional tissues for bone regeneration. The implanted cells should be evenly distributed in the scaffold, be fast-released to the defect and maintain high viability in order to actively participate in the regenerative process. Herein, we report an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold containing cell-encapsulating hydrogel microfibers with desirable degradability that could deliver cells in a timely manner and maintain cell viability. Microfibers were synthesized using partially-oxidized alginate with various concentrations (0-0.8%) of fibrinogen to optimize the degradation rate of the alginate-fibrin microfibers (Alg-Fb MF). A fibrin concentration of 0.4% in Alg-Fb MF resulted in the greatest enhancement of cell migration, release and proliferation. Interestingly, a significant amount of cell-cell contact along the long-axis of the microfibers was established in Alg-0.4%Fb MF as early as day 2. The injectable tissue engineered construct for bone reconstruct was fabricated by mixing the fast-degradable Alg-0.4%Fb MF with CPC paste at 1:1 volume ratio. In vitro study showed that cells re-collected from the construct maintained good viability and osteogenic potentials. In vivo study demonstrated that the hBMSC-encapsulated CPC-MF tissue engineered construct displayed a robust capacity for bone regeneration. At 12weeks after implantation, osseous bridge in the rat mandibular defect was observed in CPC-MF-hBMSCs group with a new bone area fraction of (42.1±7.8) % in the defects, which was >3-fold that of the control group. The novel tissue-engineered construct presents an excellent prospect for a wide range of dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing nerve regeneration in the peripheral nervous system using polymeric scaffolds, stem cell engineering and nanoparticle delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anup Dutt

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex biological process responsible for regrowth of neural tissue following a nerve injury. The main objective of this project was to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration using interdisciplinary approaches involving polymeric scaffolds, stem cell therapy, drug delivery and high content screening. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric materials such as poly (lactic acid) were used for engineering conduits with micropatterns capable of providing mechanical support and orientation to the regenerating axons and polyanhydrides for fabricating nano/microparticles for localized delivery of neurotrophic growth factors and cytokines at the site of injury. Transdifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were used as cellular replacements for lost native Schwann cells (SCs) at the injured nerve tissue. MSCs that have been transdifferentiated into an SC-like phenotype were tested as a substitute for the myelinating SCs. Also, genetically modified MSCs were engineered to hypersecrete brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to secrete therapeutic factors which Schwann cell secrete. To further enhance the regeneration, nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin-4 (IL4) releasing polyanhydrides nano/microparticles were fabricated and characterized in vitro for their efficacy. Synergistic use of these proposed techniques was used for fabricating a multifunctional nerve regeneration conduit which can be used as an efficient tool for enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration.

  4. Macrophages Undergo M1-to-M2 Transition in Adipose Tissue Regeneration in a Rat Tissue Engineering Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijin; Xu, Fangfang; Wang, Zhifa; Dai, Taiqiang; Ma, Chao; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yanpu

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are involved in the full processes of tissue healing or regeneration and play an important role in the regeneration of a variety of tissues. Although recent evidence suggests the role of different macrophage phenotypes in adipose tissue expansion, metabolism, and remodeling, the spectrum of macrophage phenotype in the adipose tissue engineering field remains unknown. The present study established a rat model of adipose tissue regeneration using a tissue engineering chamber. Macrophage phenotypes were assessed during the regenerative process in the model. Neo-adipose tissue was generated 6 weeks after implantation. Macrophages were obvious in the chamber constructs 3 days after implantation, peaked at day 7, and significantly decreased thereafter. At day 3, macrophages were predominantly M1 macrophages (CCR7+), and there were few M2 macrophages (CD206+). At day 7, the percentage of M2 macrophages significantly increased and remained stable at day 14. M2 macrophages became the predominant macrophage population at 42 days. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated transition of cytokines from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory, which was consistent with the transition of macrophage phenotype from M1 to M2. These results showed distinct transition of macrophage phenotypes from a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to an anti-inflammatory M2 in adipose tissue regeneration in our tissue engineering model. This study provides new insight into macrophage phenotype transition in the regeneration of adipose tissue.

  5. THE FUNCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF A CELL-ENGINEERED CONSTRUCT FOR THE REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Sevastianov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is an analysis of the functional effectiveness of a biomedical cell product consisting of a biopolymer microheterogeneous collagen-containing hydrogel (BMCH, human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hADMSCs, and chondrogenic induction medium in the regeneration of articular cartilage. Materials and methods. The test model of the adjuvant arthritis was used (female Soviet Chinchilla rabbits with the further development into osteoarthrosis (OA combined with the clinical, biochemical, radiological, and histochemical trials. Results. On Day 92 of the OA model it has been found that the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH with hADMSCs into the left knee joint (n = 3 30 days after the OA modeling, as opposed to the right joint (negative control, n = 3, stimulates the regenerative processes of the cartilaginous tissue structure characterized by the formation of chondrocyte «columns», the emergence of isogenic groups in the intracellular matrix and the regeneration of its structure. Upon the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH (n = 3 such effects are markedly less pronounced. Conclusions. A significant regenerative potential of a cell-engineered construct of human articular tissue (CEC ATh has been proven. It is possible to presume that biostimulating properties of CEC ATh are due to the activating effect of a biomedical cell product on the stem cell migration processes from the surrounding tissue into the injured area with their subsequent differentiation. 

  6. Fatigue failure of regenerator screens in a high frequency Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David R.; Alger, Donald L.; Moore, Thomas J.; Scheuermann, Coulson M.

    1988-01-01

    Failure of Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) regenerator screens was investigated. After several hours of operation the SPDE was shut down for inspection and on removing the regenator screens, debris of unknown origin was discovered along with considerable cracking of the screens in localized areas. Metallurgical analysis of the debris determined it to be cracked-off-deformed pieces of the 41 micron thickness Type 304 stainless steel wire screen. Scanning electron microscopy of the cracked screens revealed failures occurring at wire crossovers and fatigue striations on the fracture surface of the wires. Thus, the screen failure can be characterized as a fatigue failure of the wires. The crossovers were determined to contain 30 percent reduction in wire thickness and a highly worked microstructure occurring from the manufacturing process of the wire screens. Later it was found that reduction in wire thickness occurred because the screen fabricator had subjected it to a light cold-roll process after weaving. Installation of this screen left a clearance in the regenerator allowing the screens to move. The combined effects of the reduction in wire thickness, stress concentration (caused by screen movement), and highly worked microstructure at the wire crossovers led to the fatigue failure of the screens.

  7. 3D-engineering of Cellularized Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Wu, Yao; Gou, Zhiyuan; Tao, Jie; Zhang, Jiumeng; Liu, Qianqi; Kang, Tianyi; Jiang, Shu; Huang, Siqing; He, Jiankang; Chen, Shaochen; Du, Yanan; Gou, Maling

    2016-08-01

    Tissue engineered conduits have great promise for bridging peripheral nerve defects by providing physical guiding and biological cues. A flexible method for integrating support cells into a conduit with desired architectures is wanted. Here, a 3D-printing technology is adopted to prepare a bio-conduit with designer structures for peripheral nerve regeneration. This bio-conduit is consisted of a cryopolymerized gelatin methacryloyl (cryoGelMA) gel cellularized with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). By modeling using 3D-printed “lock and key” moulds, the cryoGelMA gel is structured into conduits with different geometries, such as the designed multichannel or bifurcating and the personalized structures. The cryoGelMA conduit is degradable and could be completely degraded in 2-4 months in vivo. The cryoGelMA scaffold supports the attachment, proliferation and survival of the seeded ASCs, and up-regulates the expression of their neurotrophic factors mRNA in vitro. After implanted in a rat model, the bio-conduit is capable of supporting the re-innervation across a 10 mm sciatic nerve gap, with results close to that of the autografts in terms of functional and histological assessments. The study describes an indirect 3D-printing technology for fabricating cellularized designer conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration, and could lead to the development of future nerve bio-conduits for clinical use.

  8. Advances and Prospects in Tissue-Engineered Meniscal Scaffolds for Meniscus Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The meniscus plays a crucial role in maintaining knee joint homoeostasis. Meniscal lesions are relatively common in the knee joint and are typically categorized into various types. However, it is difficult for inner avascular meniscal lesions to self-heal. Untreated meniscal lesions lead to meniscal extrusions in the long-term and gradually trigger the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA. The relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA is complex. Partial meniscectomy, which is the primary method to treat a meniscal injury, only relieves short-term pain; however, it does not prevent the development of knee OA. Similarly, other current therapeutic strategies have intrinsic limitations in clinical practice. Tissue engineering technology will probably address this challenge by reconstructing a meniscus possessing an integrated configuration with competent biomechanical capacity. This review describes normal structure and biomechanical characteristics of the meniscus, discusses the relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA, and summarizes the classifications and corresponding treatment strategies for meniscal lesions to understand meniscal regeneration from physiological and pathological perspectives. Last, we present current advances in meniscal scaffolds and provide a number of prospects that will potentially benefit the development of meniscal regeneration methods.

  9. 3D-engineering of Cellularized Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Wu, Yao; Gou, Zhiyuan; Tao, Jie; Zhang, Jiumeng; Liu, Qianqi; Kang, Tianyi; Jiang, Shu; Huang, Siqing; He, Jiankang; Chen, Shaochen; Du, Yanan; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineered conduits have great promise for bridging peripheral nerve defects by providing physical guiding and biological cues. A flexible method for integrating support cells into a conduit with desired architectures is wanted. Here, a 3D-printing technology is adopted to prepare a bio-conduit with designer structures for peripheral nerve regeneration. This bio-conduit is consisted of a cryopolymerized gelatin methacryloyl (cryoGelMA) gel cellularized with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). By modeling using 3D-printed “lock and key” moulds, the cryoGelMA gel is structured into conduits with different geometries, such as the designed multichannel or bifurcating and the personalized structures. The cryoGelMA conduit is degradable and could be completely degraded in 2-4 months in vivo. The cryoGelMA scaffold supports the attachment, proliferation and survival of the seeded ASCs, and up-regulates the expression of their neurotrophic factors mRNA in vitro. After implanted in a rat model, the bio-conduit is capable of supporting the re-innervation across a 10 mm sciatic nerve gap, with results close to that of the autografts in terms of functional and histological assessments. The study describes an indirect 3D-printing technology for fabricating cellularized designer conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration, and could lead to the development of future nerve bio-conduits for clinical use. PMID:27572698

  10. Development of an experimental apparatus for oscillating-flow pressure-drop measurements through a stirling engine regenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gekas, V.; Ahladianakis, K.; Nikolos, I. K.

    2004-07-01

    In this work the development of an experimental apparatus is described, designed for oscillating-flow pressure-drop measurements through a Stirling engine regenerator. A literature survey was initially performed, in order to investigate the different experimental approaches to the measurement of oscillating flow through a Stirling engine regenerator. The test rig was designed to be modular, versatile and scalable, in order to provide the ability of introducing variable measuring devices, variable regenerator designs and variable operating conditions, without the need of building a new test rig for each different case. Adopting a modular design for the experimental apparatus, it is possible to introduce new features in the future, with a minimal cost and risk. (Author) 7 refs.

  11. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  12. Synthetic bone substitute engineered with amniotic epithelial cells enhances bone regeneration after maxillary sinus augmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Barboni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence has been provided that a cell-based therapy combined with the use of bioactive materials may significantly improve bone regeneration prior to dental implant, although the identification of an ideal source of progenitor/stem cells remains to be determined. AIM: In the present research, the bone regenerative property of an emerging source of progenitor cells, the amniotic epithelial cells (AEC, loaded on a calcium-phosphate synthetic bone substitute, made by direct rapid prototyping (rPT technique, was evaluated in an animal study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two blocks of synthetic bone substitute (∼0.14 cm(3, alone or engineered with 1×10(6 ovine AEC (oAEC, were grafted bilaterally into maxillary sinuses of six adult sheep, an animal model chosen for its high translational value in dentistry. The sheep were then randomly divided into two groups and sacrificed at 45 and 90 days post implantation (p.i.. Tissue regeneration was evaluated in the sinus explants by micro-computer tomography (micro-CT, morphological, morphometric and biochemical analyses. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The obtained data suggest that scaffold integration and bone deposition are positively influenced by allotransplantated oAEC. Sinus explants derived from sheep grafted with oAEC engineered scaffolds displayed a reduced fibrotic reaction, a limited inflammatory response and an accelerated process of angiogenesis. In addition, the presence of oAEC significantly stimulated osteogenesis either by enhancing bone deposition or making more extent the foci of bone nucleation. Besides the modulatory role played by oAEC in the crucial events successfully guiding tissue regeneration (angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inflammation, data provided herein show that oAEC were also able to directly participate in the process of bone deposition, as suggested by the presence of oAEC entrapped within the newly deposited osteoid matrix and by their

  13. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  14. In situ guided tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal diseases and aging : Implementing pathology into tailored tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Rudert, Maximilian; Nöth, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias; Meinel, Lorenz; Groll, Jürgen

    2012-03-01

    In situ guided tissue regeneration, also addressed as in situ tissue engineering or endogenous regeneration, has a great potential for population-wide "minimal invasive" applications. During the last two decades, tissue engineering has been developed with remarkable in vitro and preclinical success but still the number of applications in clinical routine is extremely small. Moreover, the vision of population-wide applications of ex vivo tissue engineered constructs based on cells, growth and differentiation factors and scaffolds, must probably be deemed unrealistic for economic and regulation-related issues. Hence, the progress made in this respect will be mostly applicable to a fraction of post-traumatic or post-surgery situations such as big tissue defects due to tumor manifestation. Minimally invasive procedures would probably qualify for a broader application and ideally would only require off the shelf standardized products without cells. Such products should mimic the microenvironment of regenerating tissues and make use of the endogenous tissue regeneration capacities. Functionally, the chemotaxis of regenerative cells, their amplification as a transient amplifying pool and their concerted differentiation and remodeling should be addressed. This is especially important because the main target populations for such applications are the elderly and diseased. The quality of regenerative cells is impaired in such organisms and high levels of inhibitors also interfere with regeneration and healing. In metabolic bone diseases like osteoporosis, it is already known that antagonists for inhibitors such as activin and sclerostin enhance bone formation. Implementing such strategies into applications for in situ guided tissue regeneration should greatly enhance the efficacy of tailored procedures in the future.

  15. Tissue engineering chamber promotes adipose tissue regeneration in adipose tissue engineering models through induced aseptic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhangsong; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Zhan, Weiqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Shengchang; Lu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) makes it possible to generate significant amounts of mature, vascularized, stable, and transferable adipose tissue. However, little is known about the role of the chamber in tissue engineering. Therefore, to investigate the role of inflammatory response and the change in mechanotransduction started by TEC after implantation, we placed a unique TEC model on the surface of the groin fat pads in rats to study the expression of cytokines and tissue development in the TEC. The number of infiltrating cells was counted, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression levels in the chamber at multiple time points postimplantation were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tissue samples were collected at various time points and labeled for specific cell populations. The result showed that new adipose tissue formed in the chamber at day 60. Also, the expression of MCP-1 and VEGF in the chamber decreased slightly from an early stage as well as the number of the infiltrating cells. A large number of CD34+/perilipin- perivascular cells could be detected at day 30. Also, the CD34+/perilipin+ adipose precursor cell numbers increased sharply by day 45 and then decreased by day 60. CD34-/perilipin+ mature adipocytes were hard to detect in the chamber content at day 30, but their number increased and then peaked at day 60. Ki67-positive cells could be found near blood vessels and their number decreased sharply over time. Masson's trichrome showed that collagen was the dominant component of the chamber content at early stage and was replaced by newly formed small adipocytes over time. Our findings suggested that the TEC implantation could promote the proliferation of adipose precursor cells derived from local adipose tissue, increase angiogenesis, and finally lead to spontaneous adipogenesis by inducing aseptic inflammation and changing local mechanotransduction.

  16. Periodontal Ligament Cell Sheet Engineering: A new Possible Strategy to Promote Periodontal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-sheng Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osseointegration represents a direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone and the surface of a load-carrying implant without the periodontium. As a result, im-plant fracture or aggressive bone loss sometime occurs because the patient cannot feel the mechanical overloads exerted on the implant. Until now, no available method has been used to solve this problem.The hypothesis: Periodontal ligament (PDL cells are a desirable cell population capable of regenerating a functional periodontal at-tachment apparatus. Cell sheet engineering has emerged as a novel alternative approach for periodontal tissue engineering without the disruption of both critical cell surface proteins such as ion channels, growth factor receptors and cell-to-cell junction proteins. PDL cells can be isolated from an extracted tooth and can be cultured on temperature-responsive culture dishes at 37°C. Transplantable cell sheets can be harvested by reducing the temperature to 20°C, and would be transplanted into the implant beds before insertion of the implant.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Controlling the differentiation of PDL cell sheets to different functional peri-implant periodontal tissues is very difficult. Further studies are required to determine the fate of implanted cells. Fluorescence protein-labeled cell sheets would be a good approach to investigate the fate of the grafted cell sheet.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of regenerated silk scaffolds reinforced with natural silk fibers for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Sahba; Hoyer, Birgit; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Lode, Anja; Nosoudi, Nasim; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Gelinsky, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite material developed for bone tissue engineering. Three-dimensional scaffolds were fabricated by embedding of natural degummed silk fibers in a matrix of regenerated fibroin, followed by freeze-drying. Different ratios of fibers to fibroin were investigated with respect to their influence on mechanical and biological properties. For all scaffold types, an interconnected porous structure suitable for cell penetration was proven by scanning electron microscopy. Compressive tests, carried out in static and cyclic mode under dry as well as wet conditions, revealed a strong impact of fiber reinforcement on compressive modulus and compressive stress. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that the fiber/fibroin composite scaffolds support cell attachment, proliferation, as well as differentiation along the osteoblastic lineage. Considering the excellent mechanical and biological properties, novel fiber/fibroin scaffolds appear to be an interesting structure for prospect studies in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cell therapy, 3D culture systems and tissue engineering for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Maximilian Y; Hitchcock, Robert W; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2014-04-01

    Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) still represents the "Number One Killer" worldwide accounting for the death of numerous patients. However the capacity for self-regeneration of the adult heart is very limited and the loss of cardiomyocytes in the infarcted heart leads to continuous adverse cardiac-remodeling which often leads to heart-failure (HF). The concept of regenerative medicine comprising cell-based therapies, bio-engineering technologies and hybrid solutions has been proposed as a promising next-generation approach to address IHD and HF. Numerous strategies are under investigation evaluating the potential of regenerative medicine on the failing myocardium including classical cell-therapy concepts, three-dimensional culture techniques and tissue-engineering approaches. While most of these regenerative strategies have shown great potential in experimental studies, the translation into a clinical setting has either been limited or too rapid leaving many key questions unanswered. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art, important challenges and future research directions as to regenerative approaches addressing IHD and resulting HF.

  19. Regeneration of Vocal Fold Mucosa Using Tissue-Engineered Structures with Oral Mucosal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioko Fukahori

    Full Text Available Scarred vocal folds result in irregular vibrations during phonation due to stiffness of the vocal fold mucosa. To date, a completely satisfactory corrective procedure has yet to be achieved. We hypothesize that a potential treatment option for this disease is to replace scarred vocal folds with organotypic mucosa. The purpose of this study is to regenerate vocal fold mucosa using a tissue-engineered structure with autologous oral mucosal cells.Animal experiment using eight beagles (including three controls.A 3 mm by 3 mm specimen of canine oral mucosa was surgically excised and divided into epithelial and subepithelial tissues. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were isolated and cultured separately. The proliferated epithelial cells were co-cultured on oriented collagen gels containing the proliferated fibroblasts for an additional two weeks. The organotypic cultured tissues were transplanted to the mucosa-deficient vocal folds. Two months after transplantation, vocal fold vibrations and morphological characteristics were observed.A tissue-engineered vocal fold mucosa, consisting of stratified epithelium and lamina propria, was successfully fabricated to closely resemble the normal layered vocal fold mucosa. Laryngeal stroboscopy revealed regular but slightly small mucosal waves at the transplanted site. Immunohistochemically, stratified epithelium expressed cytokeratin, and the distributed cells in the lamina propria expressed vimentin. Elastic Van Gieson staining revealed a decreased number of elastic fibers in the lamina propria of the transplanted site.The fabricated mucosa with autologous oral mucosal cells successfully restored the vocal fold mucosa. This reconstruction technique could offer substantial clinical advantages for treating intractable diseases such as scarring of the vocal folds.

  20. Regeneration of sugarcane elite breeding lines and engineering of stem borer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Li-Xing; Deng, Haihua; Xu, Jin-Ling; Li, Qi; Wang, Lian-Hui; Jiang, Zide; Zhang, Hai Bao; Li, Qiwei; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2006-02-01

    Five elite sugarcane breeding lines were tested for efficiency in embryogenesis and plant regeneration. All of them produced regenerative embryogenic calli but with varied efficiencies. To engineer strongly insect-resistant sugarcanes, the GC content of a truncated cry1Ac gene, which encodes the active region of Cry1Ac insecticidal delta-endotoxin, was increased from the original 37.4 to 47.5% following the sugarcane codon usage pattern. The synthetic cry1Ac gene (s-cry1Ac) was placed under the control of maize ubiquitin promoter and introduced by microprojectile bombardment into the embryogenic calli of sugarcane lines YT79-177 and ROC16. Southern blotting analysis showed that multicopies of s-cry1Ac were integrated into the genomes of transgenic sugarcane lines. Immunoblotting analysis identified 18 transgenic lines expressing detectable levels of s-Cry1Ac, which were estimated in the range of 1.8-10.0 ng mg(-1) total soluble proteins. Four transgenic and two parental lines were assayed for sugarcane stem borer resistance in leaf tissue feeding trials and greenhouse plant assays. The results showed that, while the untransformed control lines were severely damaged in both leaves and stems, the transgenic sugarcane lines expressing high levels of s-Cry1Ac proteins were highly resistant to sugarcane stem borer attack, resulting in complete mortality of the inoculated insects within 1 week after inoculation.

  1. Promising Therapeutic Strategies for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Cardiovascular Regeneration: From Cell Priming to Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Taek Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause of death among chronic diseases worldwide is ischemic cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Recent evidence indicates that adult stem cell therapies involving cardiovascular regeneration represent promising strategies to treat cardiovascular diseases. Owing to their immunomodulatory properties and vascular repair capabilities, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are strong candidate therapeutic stem cells for use in cardiovascular regeneration. However, major limitations must be overcome, including their very low survival rate in ischemic lesion. Various attempts have been made to improve the poor survival and longevity of engrafted MSCs. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies, it is necessary to first identify stem cell modulators for intracellular signal triggering or niche activation. One promising therapeutic strategy is the priming of therapeutic MSCs with stem cell modulators before transplantation. Another is a tissue engineering-based therapeutic strategy involving a cell scaffold, a cell-protein-scaffold architecture made of biomaterials such as ECM or hydrogel, and cell patch- and 3D printing-based tissue engineering. This review focuses on the current clinical applications of MSCs for treating cardiovascular diseases and highlights several therapeutic strategies for promoting the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs in vitro or in vivo from cell priming to tissue engineering strategies, for use in cardiovascular regeneration.

  2. Salidroside promotes peripheral nerve regeneration based on tissue engineering strategy using Schwann cells and PLGA: in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lv, Peizhen; Zhu, Yongjia; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Fuben; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Salidriside (SDS), a phenylpropanoid glycoside derived from Rhodiola rosea L, has been shown to be neuroprotective in many studies, which may be promising in nerve recovery. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of SDS on engineered nerve constructed by Schwann cells (SCs) and Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were studied in vitro. We further investigated the effect of combinational therapy of SDS and PLGA/SCs based tissue engineering on peripheral nerve regeneration based on the rat model of nerve injury by sciatic transection. The results showed that SDS dramatically enhanced the proliferation and function of SCs. The underlying mechanism may be that SDS affects SCs growth through the modulation of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF and CNTF). 12 weeks after implantation with a 12 mm gap of sciatic nerve injury, SDS-PLGA/SCs achieved satisfying outcomes of nerve regeneration, as evidenced by morphological and functional improvements upon therapy by SDS, PLGA/SCs or direct suture group assessed by sciatic function index, nerve conduction assay, HE staining and immunohistochemical analysis. Our results demonstrated the significant role of introducing SDS into neural tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration.

  3. Comparison of Engineered Peptide-Glycosaminoglycan Microfibrous Hybrid Scaffolds for Potential Applications in Cartilage Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Romanelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in tissue engineering have enabled the ability to design and fabricate biomaterials at the nanoscale that can actively mimic the natural cellular environment of host tissue. Of all tissues, cartilage remains difficult to regenerate due to its avascular nature. Herein we have developed two new hybrid polypeptide-glycosaminoglycan microfibrous scaffold constructs and compared their abilities to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation, sulfated proteoglycan synthesis and soluble collagen synthesis when seeded with chondrocytes. Both constructs were designed utilizing self-assembled Fmoc-protected valyl cetylamide nanofibrous templates. The peptide components of the constructs were varied. For Construct I a short segment of dentin sialophosphoprotein followed by Type I collagen were attached to the templates using the layer-by-layer approach. For Construct II, a short peptide segment derived from the integrin subunit of Type II collagen binding protein expressed by chondrocytes was attached to the templates followed by Type II collagen. To both constructs, we then attached the natural polymer N-acetyl glucosamine, chitosan. Subsequently, the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate was then attached as the final layer. The scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In vitro culture studies were carried out in the presence of chondrocyte cells for both scaffolds and growth morphology was determined through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy taken at different magnifications at various days of culture. Cell proliferation studies indicated that while both constructs were biocompatible and supported the growth and adhesion of chondrocytes, Construct II stimulated cell adhesion at higher rates and resulted in the formation of three dimensional cell-scaffold matrices within 24 h. Proteoglycan

  4. Possible role of mechanical force in regulating regeneration of the vascularized fat flap inside a tissue engineering chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuan; Yuan, Yi; Lu, Feng; Gao, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    In plastic and reconstructive surgery, adipose tissue is widely used as effective filler for tissue defects. Strategies for treating soft tissue deficiency, which include free adipose tissue grafts, use of hyaluronic acid, collagen injections, and implantation of synthetic materials, have several clinical limitations. With the aim of overcoming these limitations, researchers have recently utilized tissue engineering chambers to produce large volumes of engineered vascularized fat tissue. However, the process of growing fat tissue in a chamber is still relatively limited, and can result in unpredictable or dissatisfactory final tissue volumes. Therefore, detailed understanding of the process is both necessary and urgent. Many studies have shown that mechanical force can change the function of cells via mechanotransduction. Here, we hypothesized that, besides the inflammatory response, one of the key factors to control the regeneration of vascularized fat flap inside a tissue engineering chamber might be the balance of mechanical forces. To test our hypothesis, we intend to change the balance of forces by means of measures in order to make the equilibrium point in favor of the direction of regeneration. If those measures proved to be feasible, they could be applied in clinical practice to engineer vascularized adipose tissue of predictable size and shape, which would in turn help in the advancement of tissue engineering.

  5. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  6. Genipin-Crosslinked Chitosan Gels and Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regeneration of Cartilage and Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A A; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Bottegoni, Carlo; Aquili, Alberto; Gigante, Antonio

    2015-12-11

    The present review article intends to direct attention to the technological advances made since 2009 in the area of genipin-crosslinked chitosan (GEN-chitosan) hydrogels. After a concise introduction on the well recognized characteristics of medical grade chitosan and food grade genipin, the properties of GEN-chitosan obtained with a safe, spontaneous and irreversible chemical reaction, and the quality assessment of the gels are reviewed. The antibacterial activity of GEN-chitosan has been well assessed in the treatment of gastric infections supported by Helicobacter pylori. Therapies based on chitosan alginate crosslinked with genipin include stem cell transplantation, and development of contraction free biomaterials suitable for cartilage engineering. Collagen, gelatin and other proteins have been associated to said hydrogels in view of the regeneration of the cartilage. Viability and proliferation of fibroblasts were impressively enhanced upon addition of poly-l-lysine. The modulation of the osteocytes has been achieved in various ways by applying advanced technologies such as 3D-plotting and electrospinning of biomimetic scaffolds, with optional addition of nano hydroxyapatite to the formulations. A wealth of biotechnological advances and know-how has permitted reaching outstanding results in crucial areas such as cranio-facial surgery, orthopedics and dentistry. It is mandatory to use scaffolds fully characterized in terms of porosity, pore size, swelling, wettability, compressive strength, and degree of acetylation, if the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is sought: in fact, the novel characteristics imparted by GEN-chitosan must be simultaneously of physico-chemical and cytological nature. Owing to their high standard, the scientific publications dated 2010-2015 have met the expectations of an interdisciplinary audience.

  7. Mathematical model for osteobstruction in bone regeneration mechanisms: a headway in skeletal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsalu, C; Arunaye, F I; Ezeokoli, C; Gardner, M; Rohrer, M; Prasad, H

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we formulate a mathematical model for the evaluation of parameters responsible for the retardation and eventual acceleration of bone regeneration on the contralateral side of the mandible of experimental animals, following the discovery of a new mechanism of bone regeneration called the osteobstruction mechanism (a negative mechanism of bone regeneration as opposed to the well established and extensively documented positive mechanisms such as osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction). This osteobstructive mechanism was demonstrated by episodes of overtaking and reovertaking on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) following evaluation of osteoblastic activities in a sequential animal experiment to validate both the Ogunsalu sandwich technique (a double guided tissue technique; D-GTR) and the interceed membrane technique (a single guided tissue regeneration technique; S-GTR) utilizing SPECT, histological and histomorphometric evaluation. This work is now given special attention in terms of mathematical analysis because of limited experimental observations since experiments cannot be observed infinitely. Mathematical modelling is as such essential to generalize the results of this osteobstructive mechanism in bone regeneration. We utilize the Fisher's equation to describe bone cell mobilization during bone regeneration by two different techniques: the Ogunsalu sandwich bone regeneration technique (D-GTR) and the S-GTR.

  8. Middle ear mucosal regeneration with three-dimensionally tissue-engineered autologous middle ear cell sheets in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Daisuke; Yamato, Masayuki; Hama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Kazuhisa; Kojima, Hiromi; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Okano, Teruo

    2016-03-01

    The likelihood of recurrent retraction and adhesion of newly formed tympanic membrane is high when middle ear mucosa is extensively lost during cholesteatoma and adhesive otitis media surgery. If rapid postoperative regeneration of the mucosa on the exposed bone surface can be achieved, prevention of recurrent eardrum adhesion and cholesteatoma formation, for which there has been no definitive treatment, can be expected. Suture-less transplantation of tissue-engineered mucosal cell sheets was examined immediately after the operation of otitis media surgery in order to quickly regenerate middle ear mucosa lost during surgery in a rabbit model. Transplantable middle ear mucosal cell sheets with a three-dimensional tissue architecture very similar to native middle ear mucosa were fabricated from middle ear mucosal tissue fragments obtained in an autologous manner from middle ear bulla on temperature-responsive culture surfaces. Immediately after the mucosa was resected from middle ear bone bulla inner cavity, mucosal cell sheets were grafted at the resected site. Both bone hyperplasia and granulation tissue formation were inhibited and early mucosal regeneration was observed in the cell sheet-grafted group, compared with the control group in which only mucosal removal was carried out and the bone surface exposed. This result indicates that tissue engineered mucosal cell sheets would be useful to minimize complications after the surgical operation on otitis media and future clinical application is expected.

  9. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering: an advanced strategy for blood vessels regeneration and vascular disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yin, Pei; Bian, Guang-Liang; Huang, Hao-Yue; Shen, Han; Yang, Jun-Jie; Yang, Zi-Ying; Shen, Zhen-Ya

    2017-09-15

    Over the past years, vascular diseases have continued to threaten human health and increase financial burdens worldwide. Transplantation of allogeneic and autologous blood vessels is the most convenient treatment. However, it could not be applied generally due to the scarcity of donors and the patient's condition. Developments in tissue engineering are contributing greatly with regard to this urgent need for blood vessels. Tissue engineering-derived blood vessels are promising alternatives for patients with aortic dissection/aneurysm. The aim of this review is to show the importance of advances in biomaterials development for the treatment of vascular disease. We also provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of tissue reconstruction from stem cells and transplantable cellular scaffold constructs, focusing on the combination of stem cells and tissue engineering for blood vessel regeneration and vascular disease treatment.

  10. A tissue engineering approach to anterior cruciate ligament regeneration using novel shaped capillary channel polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kristofer D.

    2009-12-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are the most frequent of injuries to the knee due to its role in preventing anterior translation of the tibia. It is estimated that as many as 200,000 Americans per year will suffer from a ruptured ACL, resulting in management costs on the order of 5 billion dollars. Without treatment these patients are unable to return to normal activity, as a consequence of the joint instability found within the ACL deficient knee. Over the last thirty years, a variety of non-degradable, synthetic fibers have been evaluated for their use in ACL reconstruction; however, a widely accepted prosthesis has been unattainable due to differences in mechanical properties of the synthetic graft relative to the native tissue. Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field charged with the task of developing therapeutic solutions for tissue and organ failure by enhancing the natural wound healing process through the use of cellular transplants, biomaterials, and the delivery of bioactive molecules. The capillary channel polymer (CC-P) fibers used in this research were fabricated by melt extrusion from polyethylene terephthalate and polybutylene terephthalate. These fibers possess aligned micrometer scale surface channels that may serve as physical templates for tissue growth and regeneration. This inherent surface topography offers a unique and industrially viable approach for cellular contact guidance on three dimensional constructs. In this fundamental research the ability of these fiber channels to support the adhesion, alignment, and organization of fibroblasts was demonstrated and found to be superior to round fiber controls. The results demonstrated greater uniformity of seeding and accelerated formation of multi-layered three-dimensional biomass for the CC-P fibers relative to those with a circular cross-section. Furthermore, the CC-P geometry induced nuclear elongation consistent with that observed in native ACL tissue. Through the

  11. Analysis of regenerated single-shaft ceramic gas-turbine engines and resulting fuel economy in a compact car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, J. L.; Tew, R. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Ranges in design and off-design operating conditions of an advanced gas turbine and their effects on fuel economy were analyzed. The assumed engine incorporated a single stage radial flow turbine and compressor with fixed geometry. Fuel economies were calculated over the composite driving cycle with gasoline as the fuel. At a constant turbine-inlet temperature, with a regenerator sized for a full power effectiveness the best fuel economies ranged from 11.1 to 10.2 km/liter (26.2 to 22.5 mpg) for full power turbine tip speeds of 770 to 488m/sec (2530 to 1600ft/sec), respectively.

  12. Experimental considerations concerning the use of stem cells and tissue engineering for facial nerve regeneration: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler de Souza Lucena, Eudes; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; Lopes de Paiva Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo; Galvão Barboza, Carlos Augusto; Silva do Nascimento Júnior, Expedito; Cavalcante, Jeferson de Sousa

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral nerve trauma results in functional loss in the innervated organ, and recovery without surgical intervention is rare. Many surgical techniques can be used for repair in experimental models. The authors investigated the source and delivery method of stem cells in experimental outcomes, seeking to clarify whether stem cells must be differentiated in the injured facial nerve and improve the regenerative process. The following key terms were used: nervous regeneration, nerve regeneration, facial nerve regeneration, stem cells, embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells, facial nerve, facial nerve trauma, and facial nerve traumatism. The search was restricted to experimental studies that applied stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for nerve repair. Eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Different sources of stem and precursor cells were explored (bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, dental pulp cells, and neural stem cells) for their potential application in the scenario of facial nerve injuries. Different material conduits (vases, collagen, and polyglycolic acid) were used as bridges. Immunochemistry and electrophysiology are the principal methods for analyzing regenerative effects. Although recent studies have shown that stem cells can act as a promising bridge for nerve repair, considerable optimization of these therapies will be required for their potential to be realized in a clinical setting. Based on these studies, the use of stem cells derived from different sources presents promising results related to facial nerve regeneration and produces effective functional results. The use of tubes also optimizes nerve repair, thus promoting greater myelination and axonal growth of peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. BMP2 genetically engineered MSCs and EPCs promote vascularized bone regeneration in rat critical-sized calvarial bone defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning He

    Full Text Available Current clinical therapies for critical-sized bone defects (CSBDs remain far from ideal. Previous studies have demonstrated that engineering bone tissue using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is feasible. However, this approach is not effective for CSBDs due to inadequate vascularization. In our previous study, we have developed an injectable and porous nano calcium sulfate/alginate (nCS/A scaffold and demonstrated that nCS/A composition is biocompatible and has proper biodegradability for bone regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that the combination of an injectable and porous nCS/A with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs could significantly enhance vascularized bone regeneration. Our results demonstrated that delivery of MSCs and EPCs with the injectable nCS/A scaffold did not affect cell viability. Moreover, co-culture of BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and EPCs dramatically increased osteoblast differentiation of MSCs and endothelial differentiation of EPCs in vitro. We further tested the multifunctional bone reconstruction system consisting of an injectable and porous nCS/A scaffold (mimicking the nano-calcium matrix of bone and BMP2 genetically-engineered MSCs and EPCs in a rat critical-sized (8 mm caviarial bone defect model. Our in vivo results showed that, compared to the groups of nCS/A, nCS/A+MSCs, nCS/A+MSCs+EPCs and nCS/A+BMP2 gene-modified MSCs, the combination of BMP2 gene -modified MSCs and EPCs in nCS/A dramatically increased the new bone and vascular formation. These results demonstrated that EPCs increase new vascular growth, and that BMP2 gene modification for MSCs and EPCs dramatically promotes bone regeneration. This system could ultimately enable clinicians to better reconstruct the craniofacial bone and avoid donor site morbidity for CSBDs.

  14. Tissue Engineering and Cellular Regeneration at NASA Report to Regenetech SAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A project overview describing three dimensional tissue models is shown. The topics include: 1) cellular regeneration; 2) haemopoietic replacement; 3) novel vaccine development; 4) pharmacology and toxicology interventions; 5) development of synthetic viruses; and 6) molecular genetics and proteomics of recapitulated models.

  15. Inferring regulatory networks from experimental morphological phenotypes: a computational method reverse-engineers planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Transformative applications in biomedicine require the discovery of complex regulatory networks that explain the development and regeneration of anatomical structures, and reveal what external signals will trigger desired changes of large-scale pattern. Despite recent advances in bioinformatics, extracting mechanistic pathway models from experimental morphological data is a key open challenge that has resisted automation. The fundamental difficulty of manually predicting emergent behavior of even simple networks has limited the models invented by human scientists to pathway diagrams that show necessary subunit interactions but do not reveal the dynamics that are sufficient for complex, self-regulating pattern to emerge. To finally bridge the gap between high-resolution genetic data and the ability to understand and control patterning, it is critical to develop computational tools to efficiently extract regulatory pathways from the resultant experimental shape phenotypes. For example, planarian regeneration has been studied for over a century, but despite increasing insight into the pathways that control its stem cells, no constructive, mechanistic model has yet been found by human scientists that explains more than one or two key features of its remarkable ability to regenerate its correct anatomical pattern after drastic perturbations. We present a method to infer the molecular products, topology, and spatial and temporal non-linear dynamics of regulatory networks recapitulating in silico the rich dataset of morphological phenotypes resulting from genetic, surgical, and pharmacological experiments. We demonstrated our approach by inferring complete regulatory networks explaining the outcomes of the main functional regeneration experiments in the planarian literature; By analyzing all the datasets together, our system inferred the first systems-biology comprehensive dynamical model explaining patterning in planarian regeneration. This method provides an automated

  16. The sequential seeding of epithelial and mesenchymal cells for tissue-engineered tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaki J; Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Sumita, Yoshinori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Ueda, Minoru

    2007-02-01

    Progress is being made toward regenerating teeth by seeding dissociated postnatal odontogenic cells onto scaffolds and implanting them in vivo, but tooth morphology remains difficult to control. In this study, we aimed to facilitate tooth regeneration using a novel technique to sequentially seed epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells so that they formed appropriate interactions in the scaffold. Dental epithelium and mesenchyme from porcine third molar teeth were enzymatically separated and dissociated into single cells. Mesenchymal cells were seeded onto the surface of the scaffold and epithelial cells were then plated on top so that the two cell types were in direct contact. The cell-scaffold constructs were evaluated in vitro and also implanted into immunocompromised rats for in vivo analysis. Control groups included constructs where direct contact between the two cell types was prevented. In scaffolds seed using the novel technique, alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly greater than controls, the tooth morphology in vivo was developed in similar to that of natural tooth, and only one tooth structure formed in each scaffold. These results suggest that the novel cell-seeding technique could be useful for regulating the morphology of regenerated teeth.

  17. Tissue engineering with peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promotes the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mengjie; Wang, Xianghai; Chen, Yijing; Cao, Shangtao; Wen, Jinkun; Wu, Guofeng; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Lixia; Qian, Changhui; Qin, Zhenqi; Li, Zhenlin; Tan, Dandan; Fan, Zhihao; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair can be enhanced by Schwann cell (SC) transplantation, but clinical applications are limited by the lack of a cell source. Thus, alternative systems for generating SCs are desired. Herein, we found the peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PBMSCs) could be induced into SC like cells with expressing SC-specific markers (S100, P75NTR and CNPase) and functional factors (NGF, NT-3, c-Fos, and Krox20). When the induced PBMSCs (iPBMSCs) were transplanted into crushed rat sciatic nerves, they functioned as SCs by wrapping the injured axons and expressing myelin specific marker of MBP. Furthermore, iPBMSCs seeded in an artificial nerve conduit to bridge a 10-mm defect in a sciatic nerve achieved significant nerve regeneration outcomes, including axonal regeneration and remyelination, nerve conduction recovery, and restoration of motor function, and attenuated myoatrophy and neuromuscular junction degeneration in the target muscle. Overall, the data from this study indicated that PBMSCs can transdifferentiate towards SC-like cells and have potential as grafting cells for nerve tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. A nanoparticulate injectable hydrogel as a tissue engineering scaffold for multiple growth factor delivery for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyondi D

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Deepti Dyondi,1 Thomas J Webster,2 Rinti Banerjee11Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India; 2Nanomedicine Laboratories, Division of Engineering and Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Gellan xanthan gels have been shown to be excellent carriers for growth factors and as matrices for several tissue engineering applications. Gellan xanthan gels along with chitosan nanoparticles of 297 ± 61 nm diameter, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7 were employed in a dual growth factor delivery system to promote the differentiation of human fetal osteoblasts. An injectable system with ionic and temperature gelation was optimized and characterized. The nanoparticle loaded gels showed significantly improved cell proliferation and differentiation due to the sustained release of growth factors. A differentiation marker study was conducted, analyzed, and compared to understand the effect of single vs dual growth factors and free vs encapsulated growth factors. Dual growth factor loaded gels showed a higher alkaline phosphatase and calcium deposition compared to single growth factor loaded gels. The results suggest that encapsulation and stabilization of growth factors within nanoparticles and gels are promising for bone regeneration. Gellan xanthan gels also showed antibacterial effects against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, the common pathogens in implant failure.Keywords: bone tissue engineering, bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, hydrogel, nanoparticles, osteoblasts

  19. A Quiescent, Regeneration-Responsive Tissue Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bone Marrow Niche Model via Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily Elizabeth Louise; Wheadon, Helen; Lewis, Natasha; Yang, Jingli; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Dalby, Matthew John; Berry, Catherine Cecilia

    2016-09-27

    The bone marrow niche represents a specialized environment that regulates mesenchymal stem cell quiescence and self-renewal, yet fosters stem cell migration and differentiation upon demand. An in vitro model that embodies these features would open up the ability to perform detailed study of stem cell behavior. In this paper we present a simple bone marrow-like niche model, which comprises of nanomagnetically levitated stem cells cultured as multicellular spheroids within a type I collagen gel. The stem cells maintained are nestin positive and remain quiescent until regenerative demand is placed upon them. In response to coculture wounding, they migrate and appropriately differentiate upon engraftment. This tissue engineered regeneration-responsive bone marrow-like niche model will allow for greater understanding of stem cell response to injury and also facilitate as a testing platform for drug candidates in a multiwell plate format.

  20. [Construction of guided bone regeneration membrane by tissue engineering in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanfeng; Qi, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Xu, Xinxiang

    2004-08-01

    In this study, porous polymer (PLA/PCL) membrane was first treated with ethanol to become hydrophilic, and then immersed into DMEM with 50% fetal bovine serum to enhance the affinity to cells. MSCs cultured in osteogenic medium were loaded into the membrane at density of 5 x 10(6)/cm2 for 7 days, and scanning electrical microscope was used to observe the growth of the MSCs. The growth of MSCs inside the constructs was functionally well, and the cells proliferated with the time of culture. We concluded from current study that the membrane had satisfactory biocompatibility and the constructs could be used to guided bone regeneration.

  1. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A; Janeczek, Agnieszka A; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-08-31

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

  2. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p < 0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

  3. Tendon tissue engineering: adipose-derived stem cell and GDF-5 mediated regeneration using electrospun matrix systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Kumbar, S G; Laurencin, C T [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030 (United States); Balian, G; Chhabra, A B, E-mail: ac2h@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Tendon tissue engineering with a biomaterial scaffold that mimics the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) and is biomechanically suitable, and when combined with readily available autologous cells, may provide successful regeneration of defects in tendon. Current repair strategies using suitable autografts and freeze-dried allografts lead to a slow repair process that is sub-optimal and fails to restore function, particularly in difficult clinical situations such as zone II flexor tendon injuries of the hand. We have investigated the effect of GDF-5 on cell proliferation and gene expression by primary rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) that were cultured on a poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) PLAGA fiber scaffold and compared to a PLAGA 2D film scaffold. The electrospun scaffold mimics the collagen fiber bundles present in native tendon tissue, and supports the adhesion and proliferation of multipotent ADSCs. Gene expression of scleraxis, the neotendon marker, was upregulated seven- to eightfold at 1 week with GDF-5 treatment when cultured on a 3D electrospun scaffold, and was significantly higher at 2 weeks compared to 2D films with or without GDF-5 treatment. Expression of the genes that encode the major tendon ECM protein, collagen type I, was increased by fourfold starting at 1 week on treatment with 100 ng mL{sup -1} GDF-5, and at all time points the expression was significantly higher compared to 2D films irrespective of GDF-5 treatment. Thus stimulation with GDF-5 can modulate primary ADSCs on a PLAGA fiber scaffold to produce a soft, collagenous musculoskeletal tissue that fulfills the need for tendon regeneration.

  4. Platelet-Rich Blood Derivatives for Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masoudi, E.A.; Ribas, J.; Kaushik, G.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich blood derivatives have been widely used in different fields of medicine and stem cell-based tissue engineering. They represent natural cocktails of autologous growth factors, which could provide an alternative for recombinant protein-based approaches. Platelet-rich blood derivatives,

  5. Platelet-Rich Blood Derivatives for Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masoudi, E.A.; Ribas, J.; Kaushik, G.; Leijten, J.C.H.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich blood derivatives have been widely used in different fields of medicine and stem cell-based tissue engineering. They represent natural cocktails of autologous growth factors, which could provide an alternative for recombinant protein-based approaches. Platelet-rich blood derivatives, s

  6. Stirling convertor regenerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Mounir B

    2011-01-01

    Stirling Convertor Regenerators addresses the latest developments and future possibilities in the science and practical application of Stirling engine regenerators and technology. Written by experts in the vanguard of alternative energy, this invaluable resource presents integral scientific details and design concepts associated with Stirling converter regenerators. Content is reinforced with novel insights and remarkable firsthand experience that the authors and their colleagues acquired while working at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and other leading organizations.

  7. Immobilization of collagen peptide on dialdehyde bacterial cellulose nanofibers via covalent bonds for tissue engineering and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Yudong; Wu, Jian; Wang, Lu-Ning; Yuan, Zhenya; Peng, Jiang; Meng, Haoye

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is an alternative nanostructured biomaterial to be utilized for a wide range of biomedical applications. Because of its low bioactivity, which restricted its practical application, collagen and collagen hydrolysate were usually composited into BC. It is necessary to develop a new method to generate covalent bonds between collagen and cellulose to improve the immobilization of collagen on BC. This study describes a facile dialdehyde BC/collagen peptide nanocomposite. BC was oxidized into dialdehyde bacterial cellulose (DBC) by regioselective oxidation, and then composited with collagen peptide (Col-p) via covalent bonds to form Schiff's base type compounds, which was demonstrated by the results of microstructures, contact angle, Col-p content, and peptide-binding ratio. The peptide-binding ratio was further affected by the degree of oxidation, pH value, and zeta potential. In vitro desorption measurement of Col-p suggested a controlled release mechanism of the nanocomposite. Cell tests indicated that the prepared DBC/Col-p composite was bioactive and suitable for cell adhesion and attachment. This work demonstrates that the DBC/Col-p composite is a promising material for tissue engineering and regeneration.

  8. The Hidden Treasure in Apical Papilla: The Potential Role in Pulp/Dentin Regeneration and BioRoot Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T.-J.; Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Liu, He; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2009-01-01

    Some clinical case reports have shown that immature permanent teeth with periradicular periodontitis or abscess can undergo apexogenesis after conservative endodontic treatment. A call for a paradigm shift and new protocol for the clinical management of these cases has been brought to attention. Concomitantly, a new population of mesenchymal stem cells residing in the apical papilla of permanent immature teeth recently has been discovered and was termed stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAP). These stem cells appear to be the source of odontoblasts that are responsible for the formation of root dentin. Conservation of these stem cells when treating immature teeth may allow continuous formation of the root to completion. This article reviews current findings on the isolation and characterization of these stem cells. The potential role of these stem cells in the following respects will be discussed: (1) their contribution in continued root maturation in endodontically treated immature teeth with periradicular periodontitis or abscess and (2) their potential utilization for pulp/dentin regeneration and bioroot engineering. PMID:18498881

  9. Design and Use of a Novel Bioreactor for Regeneration of Biaxially Stretched Tissue-Engineered Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Angela Hai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Calle, Elizabeth A; Boyle, Michael; Starcher, Barry C; Humphrey, Jay D; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-08-01

    Conventional bioreactors are used to enhance extracellular matrix (ECM) production and mechanical strength of tissue-engineered vessels (TEVs) by applying circumferential strain, which is uniaxial stretching. However, the resulting TEVs still suffer from inadequate mechanical properties, where rupture strengths and compliance values are still very different from native arteries. The biomechanical milieu of native arteries consists of both circumferential and axial loading. Therefore, to better simulate the physiological stresses acting on native arteries, we built a novel bioreactor system to enable biaxial stretching of engineered arteries during culture. This new bioreactor system allows for independent control of circumferential and axial stretching parameters, such as displacement and beat rate. The assembly and setup processes for this biaxial bioreactor system are reliable with a success rate greater than 75% for completion of long-term sterile culture. This bioreactor also supports side-by-side assessments of TEVs that are cultured under three types of mechanical conditions (static, uniaxial, and biaxial), all within the same biochemical environment. Using this bioreactor, we examined the impact of biaxial stretching on arterial wall remodeling of TEVs. Biaxial TEVs developed the greatest wall thickness compared with static and uniaxial TEVs. Unlike uniaxial loading, biaxial loading led to undulated collagen fibers that are commonly found in native arteries. More importantly, the biaxial TEVs developed the most mature elastin in the ECM, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The presence of mature extracellular elastin along with the undulated collagen fibers may contribute to the observed vascular compliance in the biaxial TEVs. The current work shows that biaxial stretching is a novel and promising means to improve TEV generation. Furthermore, this novel system allows us to optimize biomechanical conditioning by unraveling the interrelationships among the

  10. Human airway organoid engineering as a step toward lung regeneration and disease modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qi; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Sicard, Delphine; Tschumperlin, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Organoids represent both a potentially powerful tool for the study cell-cell interactions within tissue-like environments, and a platform for tissue regenerative approaches. The development of lung tissue-like organoids from human adult-derived cells has not previously been reported. Here we combined human adult primary bronchial epithelial cells, lung fibroblasts, and lung microvascular endothelial cells in supportive 3D culture conditions to generate airway organoids. We demonstrate that randomly-seeded mixed cell populations undergo rapid condensation and self-organization into discrete epithelial and endothelial structures that are mechanically robust and stable during long term culture. After condensation airway organoids generate invasive multicellular tubular structures that recapitulate limited aspects of branching morphogenesis, and require actomyosin-mediated force generation and YAP/TAZ activation. Despite the proximal source of primary epithelium used in the airway organoids, discrete areas of both proximal and distal epithelial markers were observed over time in culture, demonstrating remarkable epithelial plasticity within the context of organoid cultures. Airway organoids also exhibited complex multicellular responses to a prototypical fibrogenic stimulus (TGF-β1) in culture, and limited capacity to undergo continued maturation and engraftment after ectopic implantation under the murine kidney capsule. These results demonstrate that the airway organoid system developed here represents a novel tool for the study of disease-relevant cell-cell interactions, and establishes this platform as a first step toward cell-based therapy for chronic lung diseases based on de novo engineering of implantable airway tissues.

  11. Engineering a growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix niche to promote vascularization for functional cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Kumaraswamy, Priyadharshini; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2016-08-01

    The major loss of tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) after myocardial ischemia is a serious burden that gradually leads to heart failure. Due to lack of available treatment methods to restore the cardiac function, various research strategies have come up to treat the ischemic myocardium. However these have met with limited success due to the complexity of the cardiac tissue, which exhibits a nanofibrous collagenous matrix with spatio-temporal localization of a combination of growth factors. To mimic the topographical and chemical cues of the natural cardiac tissue, we have fabricated a growth factor embedded nanofibrous scaffold through electrospinning. In our previous work, we have reported a nanofibrous matrix made of PLCL and PEOz with an average diameter of 500 nm. The scaffold properties were specifically characterized in vitro for cardio-compatibility. In the present study, we have loaded dual growth factors VEGF and bFGF in the nanofiber matrix and investigated its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering. The encapsulation and release of dual growth factors from the matrix were studied using XPS and ELISA. Bioactivity of the loaded growth factors towards proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated through MTS and Boyden chamber assays respectively. The efficiency of growth factors on the nanofibrous matrix to activate signaling molecules was studied in HUVECs through gene expression analysis. Preclinical evaluation of the growth factor embedded nanofibrous patch in a rabbit acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model was studied and cardiac function assessment was made through ECG and echocardiography. The evidence for angiogenesis in the patch secured regions was analyzed through histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Our results confirm the effectiveness of growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix in restoration of cardiac function after ischemia when compared to conventional patch material thereby exhibiting promise as a

  12. Periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  13. Transplantable living scaffolds comprised of micro-tissue engineered aligned astrocyte networks to facilitate central nervous system regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carla C.; Katiyar, Kritika S.; Hernandez, Nicole S.; Song, Yeri J.; Struzyna, Laura A.; Harris, James P.; Cullen, D. Kacy

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease may result in widespread loss of neural cells as well as the complex interconnectivity necessary for proper central nervous system function, generally resulting in permanent functional deficits. Potential regenerative strategies involve the recruitment of endogenous neural stem cells and/or directed axonal regeneration through the use of tissue engineered “living scaffolds” built to mimic features of three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo migratory or guidance pathways. Accordingly, we devised a novel biomaterial encasement scheme using tubular hydrogel-collagen micro-columns that facilitated the self-assembly of seeded astrocytes into 3-D living scaffolds consisting of long, cable-like aligned astrocytic networks. Here, robust astrocyte alignment was achieved within a micro-column inner diameter (ID) of 180 μm or 300–350 μm but not 1.0 mm, suggesting that radius of curvature dictated the extent of alignment. Moreover, within small ID micro-columns, >70% of the astrocytes assumed a bi-polar morphology, versus ~10% in larger micro-columns or planar surfaces. Cell–cell interactions also influenced the aligned architecture, as extensive astrocyte-collagen contraction was achieved at high (9–12 × 105 cells/mL) but not lower (2–6 × 105 cells/mL) seeding densities. This high density micro-column seeding led to the formation of ultra-dense 3-D “bundles” of aligned bi-polar astrocytes within collagen measuring up to 150 μm in diameter yet extending to a remarkable length of over 2.5 cm. Importantly, co-seeded neurons extended neurites directly along the aligned astrocytic bundles, demonstrating permissive cues for neurite extension. These transplantable cable-like astrocytic networks structurally mimic the glial tube that guides neuronal progenitor migration in vivo along the rostral migratory stream, and therefore may be useful to guide progenitor cells to repopulate sites of widespread neurodegeneration

  14. Maximum power output of a class of irreversible non-regeneration heat engines with a non-uniform working fluid and linear phenomenological heat transfer law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Maximum power output of a class of irreversible non-regeneration heat engines with non-uniform working fluid,in which heat transfers between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs obey the linear phenomenological heat transfer law [q ∝Δ(T-1)],are studied in this paper. Optimal control theory is used to determine the upper bounds of power of the heat engine for the lumped-parameter model and the distributed-parameter model,respectively. The results show that the maximum power output of the heat engine in the distributed-parameter model is less than or equal to that in the lumped-parameter model,which could provide more realistic guidelines for real heat engines. Analytical solutions of the maximum power output are obtained for the irreversible heat engines working between constant temperature reservoirs. For the irreversible heat engine operating between variable temperature reservoirs,a numerical example for the lumped-parameter model is provided by numerical calculation. The effects of changes of reservoir’s temperature on the maximum power of the heat engine are analyzed. The obtained results are,in addition,compared with those obtained with Newtonian heat transfer law [q ∝Δ(T)].

  15. Engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Includes papers in the following fields: Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical...

  16. Tissue-engineered tooth regeneration:hotspots and clinical application%组织工程化牙齿再生:热点与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹏鹏; 沈慧娟; 王子轶; 吴银芳; 金光勇; 祁倩娴; 曾宪智

    2014-01-01

    背景:临床有一些方法治疗牙齿缺失比如假牙和牙齿种植,被认为有安全和使用寿命的问题。鉴于生物学和生物材料科学的发展,最近牙齿组织工程引起越来越多的关注。  目的:综述用组织工程方法促进牙齿再生的热点与问题。  方法:以“tissue engineering, tooth regeneration”为检索词,应用计算机检索 Pubmed数据库(2007至2013年);以“组织工程、牙齿再生”为检索词,检索中国期刊网全文数据库(2007至2013年);共收集65篇关于组织工程牙齿再生方面的文献,中文25篇,英文40篇,排除发表时间较早、重复及类似研究,纳入48篇符合标准的文献。  结果与结论:干细胞与合适的组织工程支架被广泛地应用在牙齿再生中,其中相当一部分研究还加入能够产生促进牙齿再生的生长因子或骨髓液,实现了部分或全部的牙齿再生。但对于牙齿再生的机制研究显然不足。%BACKGROUND:Although several prosthetic methods, such as artificial denture and dental implants, are clinical therapies to tooth loss, they are thought to have safety and usage time issues. With the development of biological and biomaterial sciences, recently, tooth tissue engineering has attracted more and more attention. OBJECTIVE:To reflect advances and problems of tissue engineering technologies for promotion of tooth regeneration. METHODS:Using the keywords of“tissue engineering, tooth regeneration”in English and Chinese, PubMed and CNKI databases from 2007 to 2013 were retrieved. A total of 65 literatures addressing tooth regeneration and tissue engineering were col ected, including 25 Chinese articles and 40 English articles. Published early, repetitive, and similar researches were excluded. Final y, 48 articles were included. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The combination of stem cells and suitable scaffolds is widely used in tooth regeneration today, and growth

  17. Sciatic nerve regeneration in rats by a nerve conduit engineering with a membrane derived from natural latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganga, Marcos Vinícius Muniz; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Marques Junior, Wilson; Catalão, Carlos Henrique Rocha; Santana, Ricardo Torres; Oltramari, Marcos Roberto Pedron; Carraro, Kleber Tadeu; Lachat, João-José; Lopes, Luiza da Silva

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the capacity of natural latex membrane to accelerate and improve the regeneration quality of the of rat sciatic nerves. Forty male adult Wistar rats were used, anesthetized and operated to cut the sciatic nerve and receive an autograft or a conduit made with a membrane derived from natural latex (Hevea brasiliensis). Four or eight weeks after surgery, to investigate motor nerve recovery, we analyzed the neurological function by walking pattern (footprints analysis and computerized treadmill), electrophysiological evaluation and histological analysis of regenerated nerve (autologous nerve graft or tissue cables between the nerve stumps), and anterior tibial and gastrocnemius muscles. All functional and morphological analysis showed that the rats transplanted with latex conduit had a better neurological recovery than those operated with autologous nerve: quality of footprints, performance on treadmill (pregeneration. The data reported showed behavioral and functional recovery in rats implanted with latex conduit for sciatic nerve repair, supporting a complete morphological and physiological regeneration of the nerve.

  18. Tooth regeneration: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadu Shifali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  19. Tooth regeneration: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadu, Shifali S

    2009-01-01

    Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  20. Simulation, construction and testing of a two-cylinder solar Stirling engine powered by a flat-plate solar collector without regenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakolpour, Ali Reza; Zomorodian, Ali [Department of Mechanics of Farm Machinery Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran); Akbar Golneshan, Ali [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran)

    2008-01-15

    In this research, a gamma-type, low-temperature differential (LTD) solar Stirling engine with two cylinders was modeled, constructed and primarily tested. A flat-plate solar collector was employed as an in-built heat source, thus the system design was based on a temperature difference of 80{sup o}C. The principles of thermodynamics as well as Schmidt theory were adapted to use for modeling the engine. To simulate the system some computer programs were written to analyze the models and the optimized parameters of the engine design were determined. The optimized compression ratio was computed to be 12.5 for solar application according to the mean collector temperature of 100{sup o}C and sink temperature of 20{sup o}C. The corresponding theoretical efficiency of the engine for the mentioned designed parameters was calculated to be 0.012 for zero regenerator efficiency. Proposed engine dimensions are as follows: power piston stroke 0.044 m, power piston diameter 0.13 m, displacer stroke 0.055 m and the displacer diameter 0.41 m. Finally, the engine was tested. The results indicated that at mean collector temperature of 110{sup o}C and sink temperature of 25{sup o}C, the engine produced a maximum brake power of 0.27 W at 14 rpm. The mean engine speed was about 30 rpm at solar radiation intensity of 900 W/m{sup 2} and without load. The indicated power was computed to be 1.2 W at 30 rpm. (author)

  1. Adipose stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration: Current status and concepts for the future: Tissue Engineering Review Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Lu, Z.F.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Wuisman, P.I.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative disc disease and emerging biological treatment approaches Stem cell sources Integration of ASC-based regenerative medicine and surgery In vitro studies Animal models Cells in disc regeneration in vivo In vivo studies Perspective Conclusions Abstract New regenerative treatme

  2. The composition of engineered cartilage at the time of implantation determines the likelihood of regenerating tissue with a normal collagen architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Thomas; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    The biomechanical functionality of articular cartilage is derived from both its biochemical composition and the architecture of the collagen network. Failure to replicate this normal Benninghoff architecture in regenerating articular cartilage may in turn predispose the tissue to failure. In this article, the influence of the maturity (or functionality) of a tissue-engineered construct at the time of implantation into a tibial chondral defect on the likelihood of recapitulating a normal Benninghoff architecture was investigated using a computational model featuring a collagen remodeling algorithm. Such a normal tissue architecture was predicted to form in the intact tibial plateau due to the interplay between the depth-dependent extracellular matrix properties, foremost swelling pressures, and external mechanical loading. In the presence of even small empty defects in the articular surface, the collagen architecture in the surrounding cartilage was predicted to deviate significantly from the native state, indicating a possible predisposition for osteoarthritic changes. These negative alterations were alleviated by the implantation of tissue-engineered cartilage, where a mature implant was predicted to result in the formation of a more native-like collagen architecture than immature implants. The results of this study highlight the importance of cartilage graft functionality to maintain and/or re-establish joint function and suggest that engineering a tissue with a native depth-dependent composition may facilitate the establishment of a normal Benninghoff collagen architecture after implantation into load-bearing defects.

  3. A proposal for enhancing four-wave mixing in slow light engineered photonic crystal waveguides and its application to optical regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebnali-Heidari, M; Monat, C; Grillet, C; Moravvej-Farshi, M K

    2009-09-28

    In this paper, we investigate both analytically and numerically four-wave mixing (FWM) in short (80 microm) dispersion engineered slow light photonic crystal waveguides. We demonstrate that both a larger FWM conversion efficiency and an increased FWM bandwidth (approximately 10 nm) can be achieved in these waveguides as compared to dispersive PhC waveguides. This improvement is achieved through the net slow light enhancement of the FWM efficiency (almost 30dB as compared to a fast nanowire of similar length), even in the presence of slow light increased linear and nonlinear losses, and the suitable dispersion profile of these waveguides. We show how such improved FWM operation can be advantageously exploited for designing a compact 2R and 3R regenerator with the appropriate nonlinear power transfer function.

  4. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  5. Retention of phosphorous ions on natural and engineered waste pumice: Characterization, equilibrium, competing ions, regeneration, kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimaian, Kamal Aldin [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sannandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrane, Abdeltif [Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, Université Rennes 1, CNRS, UMR 6226, Avenue du Général Leclerc, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Kazemian, Hossein [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Western University, London, ON, Canada N6A 5B9 (Canada); Panahi, Reza [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarrabi, Mansur, E-mail: mansor62@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    Natural and Mg{sup 2+} modified pumice were used for the removal of phosphorous. The adsorbents were characterized using XRF, XRD, SEM and FTIR instrumental techniques. In the optimal conditions, namely at equilibrium time (30 min), for a phosphorus concentration of 15 mg/L and pH 6, 69 and 97% phosphorus removals were achieved using 10 g/L of natural and modified pumice adsorbents, respectively. Maximum adsorption capacities were 11.88 and 17.71 mg/g by natural and modified pumice, respectively. Pseudo-second order kinetic model was the most relevant to describe the kinetic of phosphorus adsorption. External mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing phosphorous concentration and film diffusion was found to be the rate-controlling step. Only a very low dissolution of the adsorbent was observed, leading to a low increase in conductivity and turbidity. Removal efficiency decreased for increasing ionic strength. It also decreased in the presence of competing ions; however modified pumice remained effective, since 67% of phosphorus was removed, versus only 17% for the natural pumice. The efficiency of the modified pumice was confirmed during the regeneration tests, since 96% regeneration yield was obtained after 510 min experiment, while only 22% was observed for the raw pumice.

  6. Simultaneous implant placement and bone regeneration around dental implants using tissue-engineered bone with fibrin glue, mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Naiki, Takahito; Ueda, Minoru

    2006-10-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of tissue-engineered bone as grafting material for alveolar augmentation with simultaneous implant placement. Twelve adult hybrid dogs were used in this study. One month after the extraction of teeth in the mandible region, bone defects on both sides of the mandible were induced using a trephine bar with a diameter of 10 mm. Dog mesenchymal stem cells (dMSCs) were obtained via iliac bone biopsy and cultured for 4 weeks before implantation. After installing the dental implants, the defects were simultaneously implanted with the following graft materials: (i) fibrin, (ii) dMSCs and fibrin (dMSCs/fibrin), (iii) dMSCs, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and fibrin (dMSCs/PRP/fibrin) and (iv) control (defect only). The implants were assessed by histological and histomorphometric analysis, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. The implants exhibited varying degrees of bone-implant contact (BIC). The BIC was 17%, 19% and 29% (control), 20%, 22% and 25% (fibrin), 22%, 32% and 42% (dMSCs/fibrin) and 25%, 49% and 53% (dMSCs/PRP/fibrin) after 2, 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. This study suggests that tissue-engineered bone may be of sufficient quality for predictable enhancement of bone regeneration around dental implants when used simultaneous by with implant placement.

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of a Biomedical-Grade Bilayer Chitosan Porous Skin Regenerating Template as a Potential Dermal Scaffold in Skin Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Keong Lim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a copolymer of N-acetylglucosamine and glucosamine. A bilayer chitosan porous skin regenerating template (CPSRT has been developed for skin tissue engineering. The pore size of the CPSRT was assessed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The in vitro cytocompatibility of the CPSRT was tested on primary human epidermal keratinocyte (pHEK cultures by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels and skin irritation by western blot analysis of the interleukin-8 (IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α secretions. The ability of the CPSRT to support cell ingrowth was evaluated by seeding primary human dermal fibroblasts (pHDFs on the scaffold, staining the cells with live/dead stain, and imaging the construct by confocal microscopy (CLSM. The CPSRT with pore sizes ranging from 50 to 150 μm was cytocompatible because it did not provoke the additional production of IL-8 and TNF-α by pHEK cultures. Cultured pHDFs were able to penetrate the CPSRT and had increased in number on day 14. In conclusion, the CPSRT serves as an ideal template for skin tissue engineering.

  8. Host cell and expression engineering for development of an E. coli ketoreductase catalyst: Enhancement of formate dehydrogenase activity for regeneration of NADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mädje Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymatic NADH or NADPH-dependent reduction is a widely applied approach for the synthesis of optically active organic compounds. The overall biocatalytic conversion usually involves in situ regeneration of the expensive NAD(PH. Oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide, catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.2; FDH, presents an almost ideal process solution for coenzyme regeneration that has been well established for NADH. Because isolated FDH is relatively unstable under a range of process conditions, whole cells often constitute the preferred form of the biocatalyst, combining the advantage of enzyme protection in the cellular environment with ease of enzyme production. However, the most prominent FDH used in biotransformations, the enzyme from the yeast Candida boidinii, is usually expressed in limiting amounts of activity in the prime host for whole cell biocatalysis, Escherichia coli. We therefore performed expression engineering with the aim of enhancing FDH activity in an E. coli ketoreductase catalyst. The benefit resulting from improved NADH regeneration capacity is demonstrated in two transformations of technological relevance: xylose conversion into xylitol, and synthesis of (S-1-(2-chlorophenylethanol from o-chloroacetophenone. Results As compared to individual expression of C. boidinii FDH in E. coli BL21 (DE3 that gave an intracellular enzyme activity of 400 units/gCDW, co-expression of the FDH with the ketoreductase (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; XR resulted in a substantial decline in FDH activity. The remaining FDH activity of only 85 U/gCDW was strongly limiting the overall catalytic activity of the whole cell system. Combined effects from increase in FDH gene copy number, supply of rare tRNAs in a Rosetta strain of E. coli, dampened expression of the ketoreductase, and induction at low temperature (18°C brought up the FDH activity threefold to a level of 250 U/gCDW while reducing the XR activity by

  9. Cell-engineered human elastic chondrocytes regenerate natural scaffold in vitro and neocartilage with neoperichondrium in the human body post-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a unique method that allows us to culture large volumes of chondrocyte expansion from a small piece of human elastic cartilage. The characteristic features of our culturing method are that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which promotes proliferation of elastic chondrocytes, is added to a culture medium, and that cell-engineering techniques are adopted in the multilayered culture system that we have developed. We have subsequently discovered that once multilayered chondrocytes are transplanted into a human body, differentiation induction that makes use of surrounding tissue occurs in situ, and a large cartilage block is obtained through cartinogenesis and matrix formation. We have named this method two-stage transplantation. We have clinically applied this transplantation method to the congenital ear defect, microtia, and reported successful ear reconstruction. In our present study, we demonstrated that when FGF2 was added to elastic chondrocytes, the cell count increased and the level of hyaluronic acid, which is a major extracellular matrix (ECM) component, increased. We also demonstrated that these biochemical changes are reflected in the morphology, with the elastic chondrocytes themselves producing a matrix and fibers in vitro to form a natural scaffold. We then demonstrated that inside the natural scaffold thus formed, the cells overlap, connect intercellularly to each other, and reconstruct a cartilage-like three-dimensional structure in vitro. We further demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopic analysis that when the multilayered chondrocytes are subsequently transplanted into a living body (abdominal subcutaneous region) in the two-stage transplantation process, neocartilage and neoperichondrium of elastic cartilage origin are regenerated 6 months after transplantation. Further, evaluation by dynamic mechanical analysis showed the regenerated neocartilage to have the same viscoelasticity as normal auricular

  10. Effectiveness of tissue engineered chitosan-gelatin composite scaffold loaded with human platelet gel in regeneration of critical sized radial bone defect in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Ahmad; Alidadi, Soodeh; Bigham-Sadegh, Amin; Moshiri, Ali; Kamali, Amir

    2017-03-29

    Although many strategies have been utilized to accelerate bone regeneration, an appropriate treatment strategy to regenerate a new bone with optimum morphology and mechanical properties has not been invented as yet. This study investigated the healing potential of a composite scaffold consisting of chitosan (CS), gelatin (Gel) and platelet gel (PG), named CS-Gel-PG, on a bilateral critical sized radial bone defect in rat. Eighty radial bone defects were bilaterally created in 40 Sprague-Dawley rats and were randomly divided into eight groups including untreated, autograft, CS, Gel, CS-PG, Gel-PG, CS-Gel, and CS-Gel-PG treated defects. The bone defects were evaluated clinically and radiologically during the study and their bone samples were assessed by gross and histopathology, histomorphometry, CT-scan, scanning electron microscopy, and biomechanical testing after 8weeks of bone injury. The autograft and CS-Gel-PG groups showed significantly higher new bone formation, density of osseous and cartilaginous tissues, bone volume, and mechanical performance than the defect, CS and Gel-PG groups (P˂0.05). In addition, bone volume, density of osseous and cartilaginous tissues, and numbers of osteons in the CS-Gel-PG group were significantly superior to the CS-PG, CS-Gel and Gel groups (P˂0.05). Increased mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor as osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation markers were found with the CS-Gel-PG scaffold by quantitative real-time PCR in vitro after 30days of culturing on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In conclusion, the healing potential of CS-Gel scaffold embedded with PG was comparable to autografting and therefore, it can be offered as an appropriate scaffold in bone tissue engineering and regenerative applications.

  11. Engineering on the straight and narrow: the mechanics of nanofibrous assemblies for fiber-reinforced tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Robert L; Baker, Brendon M; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Burdick, Jason A; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S; Elliott, Dawn M

    2009-06-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation.

  12. Engineering on the Straight and Narrow: The Mechanics of Nanofibrous Assemblies for Fiber-Reinforced Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation. PMID:19207040

  13. Liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-04-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review provides an overview of the models of study currently used in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus is placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration, including small-for-size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting-edge topics in liver regeneration, including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a 3-dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation, are proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration.

  14. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  15. Nano-Bio Engineered Carbon Dot-Peptide Functionalized Water Dispersible Hyperbranched Polyurethane for Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Maji, Somnath; Mishra, Debasish; Devi, K Sanjana P; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-03-01

    The present study delves into a combined bio-nano-macromolecular approach for bone tissue engineering. This approach relies on the properties of an ideal scaffold material imbued with all the chemical premises required for fostering cellular growth and differentiation. A tannic acid based water dispersible hyperbranched polyurethane is fabricated with bio-nanohybrids of carbon dot and four different peptides (viz. SVVYGLR, PRGDSGYRGDS, IPP, and CGGKVGKACCVPTKLSPISVLYK) to impart target specific in vivo bone healing ability. This polymeric bio-nanocomposite is blended with 10 wt% of gelatin and examined as a non-invasive delivery vehicle. In vitro assessment of the developed polymeric system reveals good osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Aided by this panel of peptides, the polymeric bio-nanocomposite exhibits in vivo ectopic bone formation ability. The study on in vivo mineralization and vascularization reveals the occurrence of calcification and blood vessel formation. Thus, the study demonstrates carbon dot/peptide functionalized hyperbranched polyurethane gel for bone tissue engineering application.

  16. Plasma regeneration of mineral adsorbents for the precipitation of formaldehyde from exhaust gases of biogas engines; Plasmaregeneration mineralischer Adsorbentien zur Formaldehydabscheidung aus Abgasen von Biogas-Motoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Siegfried; Saulich, Katja [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Greifswald (Germany); Schomburg, Joachim [DURTEC, Neubrandenburg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Formaldehyde.is a harmful ambient air pollutant which can be produced by incomplete combustion processes, e.g. in power plants or combustion engines. Adsorbents are widely applied in the area of cleaning as well as enrichment of gas components. In this study, we designed a bench-scale experiment to investigate a gas pollution treatment technique, which integrated the adsorption process and the plasma treatment for formaldehyde removal from gas streams. The mineral granulate used consisted of 80% halloysite and showed a good adsorption capacity for formaldehyde. In the discharge step, the adsorbed formaldehyde molecules were decomposed to CO{sub 2}, CO and hydrocarbons. For the further optimization of the method the influence of the power and the pulse break ratio of sustaining voltage were tested. Further the decomposition performance on adsorbed formaldehyde molecules was studied depending on space-time, a 10% oxygen fraction of the carrier gas, and the influence of temperature. It was shown that with the chosen plasma method the absorber material could be loaded repeatedly and subsequently regenerated at a low input discharge power. (orig.)

  17. A three-dimensional multiporous fibrous scaffold fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein/poly(l-lactic acid) for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaozhen; Sun, Chengjun

    2015-02-01

    An axially aligned three-dimensional (3-D) fibrous scaffold was fabricated with regenerated spider silk protein (RSSP)/poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) through electrospinning and post treatment. The morphology, mechanical and degradation properties of the scaffold were controlled through the weight ratio of RSSP to PLLA, the thickness of the scaffold and the treatment time. The scaffold with a weight ratio of 2:3 (RSSP:PLLA) had a nanoleaves-on-nanofibers hierarchical nanostructure; the length and thickness of the nanoleaves were about 400 and 30 nm, respectively. The holes of the scaffolds ranged from hundreds of nanometers to several microns. The scaffold showed an ideal mechanical property that it was stiff when dry, but became soft once hydrated in the culture medium. Its degradation rate was very slow in the first 2 months, and then accelerated in the following 2 months. The pH values of the degradation mediums of all the samples remained in the range of 7.40-7.12 during degradation for 6 months. It had good biocompatibility with PC 12 cells. The aligned hierarchical nanostructure could guide the directions of the axon extension. This scaffold has a potential application in Tissue Engineering and controlled release. This study provides a method to produce synthetic or natural biodegradable polymer scaffold with tailored morphology, mechanical, and degradation properties.

  18. Engineered neural tissue with aligned, differentiated adipose-derived stem cells promotes peripheral nerve regeneration across a critical sized defect in rat sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Melanie; Golding, Jon P; Loughlin, Alison J; Kingham, Paul J; Phillips, James B

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells were isolated from rats and differentiated to a Schwann cell-like phenotype in vitro. The differentiated cells (dADSCs) underwent self-alignment in a tethered type-1 collagen gel, followed by stabilisation to generate engineered neural tissue (EngNT-dADSC). The pro-regenerative phenotype of dADSCs was enhanced by this process, and the columns of aligned dADSCs in the aligned collagen matrix supported and guided neurite extension in vitro. EngNT-dADSC sheets were rolled to form peripheral nerve repair constructs that were implanted within NeuraWrap conduits to bridge a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve. After 8 weeks regeneration was assessed using immunofluorescence imaging and transmission electron microscopy and compared to empty conduit and nerve graft controls. The proportion of axons detected in the distal stump was 3.5 fold greater in constructs containing EngNT-dADSC than empty tube controls. Our novel combination of technologies that can organise autologous therapeutic cells within an artificial tissue construct provides a promising new cellular biomaterial for peripheral nerve repair.

  19. A numerical method of regenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Shaowei [Aisin Seiki Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan); Matsubara, Yoichi [Nihon Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. of Quantum Science

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect. (author)

  20. A numerical method of regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect.

  1. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  2. Biphasic calcium phosphate–casein bone graft fortified with Cassia occidentalis for bone tissue engineering and regeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Santhosh Kumar; T Hemalatha; R Deepachitra; R Narasimha Raghavan; P Prabu; T P Sastry

    2015-02-01

    Research on traditional herbs is gaining momentum owing to their potent medical properties, among which Cassia occidentalis (CO) is a promising herb, with osteogenic potential. The study investigates the efficacy of CO extract incorporated biphasic calcium phosphate as an osteoinductive material. Prepared bone implants were characterized physico-chemically using FT-IR, TGA, XRD, SEM and EDX. The implants were analysed further for mechanical and biological properties. The results revealed that CO extract-incorporated bone implants possessed better compression strength and it was able to induce proliferation and enhance alkaline phosphatase activity in SaOS-2 cells. The implant proves to be promising for bone tissue engineering, and hence it demands further in vivo evaluation.

  3. Soluble CD54 induces human endothelial cells ex vivo expansion useful for cardiovascular regeneration and tissue engineering application

    KAUST Repository

    Malara, N.M.

    2015-03-01

    Aim: Consistent expansion of primary human endothelial cells in vitro is critical in the development of engineered tissue. A variety of complex culture media and techniques developed from different basal media have been reported with alternate success. Incongruous results are further confounded by donor-to-donor variability and cellular source of derivation. Our results demonstrate how to overcome these limitations using soluble CD54 (sCD54) as additive to conventional culture medium. Methods and results: Isolated primary fragment of different vessel types was expanded in Ham\\'s F12 DMEM, enriched with growth factors, Fetal Calf Serum and conditioned medium of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) collected at different passages. Cytokine content of culture media was analyzed in order to identify the soluble factors correlating with better proliferation profile. sCD54 was found to induce the in vitro expansion of human endothelial cells (HECs) independently from the vessels source and even in the absence of HUVEC-conditioned medium. The HECs cultivated in the presence of sCD54 (50 ng/ml), resulted positive for the expression of CD146 and negative for CD45, and lower fibroblast contamination. Cells were capable to proliferate with an S phase of 25%, to produce vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, (10 ng/ml) and to give origin to vessel-like tubule in vitro. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that sCD54 is an essential factor for the in-vitro expansion of HECs without donor and vessel-source variability. Resulting primary cultures can be useful, for tissue engineering in regenerative medicine (e.g. artificial micro tissue generation, coating artificial heart valve etc.) and bio-nanotechnology applications. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Engineering a multi-biofunctional composite using poly(ethylenimine) decorated graphene oxide for bone tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sachin; Raj, Shammy; Sarkar, Kishor; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    Toward preparing strong multi-biofunctional materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) conjugated graphene oxide (GO_PEI) was synthesized using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as a spacer and incorporated in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) at different fractions. GO_PEI significantly promoted the proliferation and formation of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on PCL. GO_PEI was highly potent in inducing stem cell osteogenesis leading to near doubling of alkaline phosphatase expression and mineralization over neat PCL with 5% filler content and was ~50% better than GO. Remarkably, 5% GO_PEI was as potent as soluble osteoinductive factors. Increased adsorption of osteogenic factors due to the amine and oxygen containing functional groups on GO_PEI augment stem cell differentiation. GO_PEI was also highly efficient in imparting bactericidal activity with 85% reduction in counts of E. coli colonies compared to neat PCL at 5% filler content and was more than twice as efficient as GO. This may be attributed to the synergistic effect of the sharp edges of the particles along with the presence of the different chemical moieties. Thus, GO_PEI based polymer composites can be utilized to prepare bioactive resorbable biomaterials as an alternative to using labile biomolecules for fabricating orthopedic devices for fracture fixation and tissue engineering.Toward preparing strong multi-biofunctional materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) conjugated graphene oxide (GO_PEI) was synthesized using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as a spacer and incorporated in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) at different fractions. GO_PEI significantly promoted the proliferation and formation of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on PCL. GO_PEI was highly potent in inducing stem cell osteogenesis leading to near doubling of alkaline phosphatase expression and mineralization over neat PCL with 5% filler content and was ~50% better than GO. Remarkably, 5% GO_PEI was as potent as soluble

  5. Tissue-engineered conduit promotes sciatic nerve regeneration following radiation-induced injury as monitored by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chengde; Zheng, Rui; Wei, Changzheng; Yan, Jun; Ding, Yingying; Wang, Guangshun; Li, Zhuolin; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-05-01

    To observe the longitudinal changes in peripheral nerve repaired with chitosan conduits in a rat model of radiation-induced neuropathy. Four months after 40 Gy radiation to the right lower limbs, forty-two rats were divided randomly into three groups. Chitosan conduits were implanted with (group A, n=12) or without (group B, n=12) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and untreated controls (group C, n=12). Following sciatic nerve MR imaging (including T2WI and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1WI), functional evaluation and electrophysiological exam were performed two-monthly, final histological assessments were done at the end of one year. The differences among the experimental and control groups were statistically analysed with Fisher's PLSD or t-test. The compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and sciatic function index (SFI) had declined since 4 months after radiation injury. The focal nerve enlargement and hyperintensity, the perineurium and connecting muscle enhancement were demonstrated by MR neurography images. After chitosan tube implantation, the normalized signal intensities (SIs) in group A were declined more rapidly than SIs in other groups. The histological assessments indicated that group A had better remyelination, combined with higher CMAPs amplitude and SFI score than other groups. A single fraction dose of 40 Gy can be used to establish a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. Longitudinal electrophysiological examination and MR neurography are useful to evaluate the post-irradiation sciatic neuropathy. The rats with tissue-engineered conduits implantation showed some improvement of lower limb function, accompanied by a normalization of (T1W/T2W) MR signal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Periodontitis and tissue regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2005-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a destructive disease that affects the supporting structures of the teeth including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. If left untreated, patients may lose multiple teeth and extensive prosthetic treatment will be required. In order to re-engineer lost tooth-supporting tissues, various therapeutic modalities have been used clinically. Periodontal regeneration procedures including guided tissue regeneration have achieved substantial effects. However, there are several issues to be solved. They are highly technique-sensitive, applicable to limited cases which are susceptible to treatment, and supposed to have relatively low predictability. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new approaches to improve the predictability and effectiveness of regenerative therapies for periodontal tissues. Recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been introduced to restore lost tissues more effectively where the biological process of healing is mimicked. To achieve this, integration of three key elements is required: progenitor/stem cells, growth factors and the extracellular matrix scaffold. Although it has been shown that implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into periodontal osseous defects induced regeneration of cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone in dogs, further extensive preclinical studies are required. On the other hand, application of growth factors, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor in the treatment of human periodontitis, is promising and is now in clinical trial. Furthermore, the rate of release of growth factor from the scaffold also can profoundly affect the results of tissue engineering strategies and the development of new materials is expected. In addition, as tissue regenerative potential is negatively regulated by aging, the effects of aging have to be clarified to gain complete regeneration.

  7. Molecular engineering of simple phenothiazine-based dyes to modulate dye aggregation, charge recombination, and dye regeneration in highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yong; Chang, Shuai; He, Jian; Zhang, Caishun; Zhao, Jianzhang; Chen, Tao; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Zhu, Xunjin

    2014-05-19

    A series of simple phenothiazine-based dyes, namely, TP, EP, TTP, ETP, and EEP have been developed, in which the thiophene (T), ethylenedioxythiophene (E), their dimers, and mixtures are present to modulate dye aggregation, charge recombination, and dye regeneration for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Devices sensitized by the dyes TP and TTP display high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 8.07 (Jsc = 15.2 mA cm(-2), Voc =0.783 V, fill factor (FF) = 0.679) and 7.87 % (Jsc = 16.1 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.717 V, FF = 0.681), respectively; these were measured under simulated AM 1.5 sunlight in conjunction with the I(-)/I3(-) redox couple. By replacing the T group with the E unit, EP-based DSSCs had a slightly lower PCE of 7.98 % with a higher short-circuit photocurrent (Jsc) of 16.7 mA cm(-2). The dye ETP, with a mixture of E and T, had an even lower PCE of 5.62 %. Specifically, the cell based on the dye EEP, with a dimer of E, had inferior Jsc and Voc values and corresponded to the lowest PCE of 2.24 %. The results indicate that the photovoltaic performance can be finely modulated through structural engineering of the dyes. The selection of T analogues as donors can not only modulate light absorption and energy levels, but also have an impact on dye aggregation and interfacial charge recombination of electrons at the interface of titania, electrolytes, and/or oxidized dye molecules; this was demonstrated through DFT calculations, electrochemical impedance analysis, and transient photovoltage studies.

  8. A tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration based on a biodegradable double-layer scaffold and adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requicha, João F; Viegas, Carlos A; Muñoz, Fernando; Azevedo, Jorge M; Leonor, Isabel B; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2014-09-01

    Human and canine periodontium are often affected by an inflammatory pathology called periodontitis, which is associated with severe damages across tissues, namely, in the periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. However, the therapies used in the routine dental practice, often consisting in a combination of different techniques, do not allow to fully restore the functionality of the periodontium. Tissue Engineering (TE) appears as a valuable alternative approach to regenerate periodontal defects, but for this purpose, it is essential to develop supportive biomaterial and stem cell sourcing/culturing methodologies that address the complexity of the various tissues affected by this condition. The main aim of this work was to study the in vitro functionality of a newly developed double-layer scaffold for periodontal TE. The scaffold design was based on a combination of a three-dimensional (3D) fiber mesh functionalized with silanol groups and a membrane, both made of a blend of starch and poly-ɛ-(caprolactone). Adipose-derived stem cells (canine adipose stem cells [cASCs]) were seeded and cultured onto such scaffolds, and the obtained constructs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, metabolic activity, and proliferation. The osteogenic potential of the fiber mesh layer functionalized with silanol groups was further assessed concerning the osteogenic differentiation of the seeded and cultured ASCs. The obtained results showed that the proposed double-layer scaffold supports the proliferation and selectively promotes the osteogenic differentiation of cASCs seeded onto the functionalized mesh. These findings suggest that the 3D structure and asymmetric composition of the scaffold in combination with stem cells may provide the basis for developing alternative therapies to treat periodontal defects more efficiently.

  9. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nuan Chen; Lingling Tian; Liumin He; Seeram Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great lfexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great po-tential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by ifve main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design,in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed.

  10. My Regeneration:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Dale

    2016-01-01

    and cultural referents shows that it offers an index to the album. Using its frontier setting and a variety of sacred and secular myths, symbols and icons, ‘Heroes and Villains,’ like Smile as a whole, offers historically-informed visions of national decline, crisis and regeneration that are at once critical...

  11. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  12. Regenerating articular tissue by converging technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moroni, Lorenzo; Hamann, D.; Paoluzzi, Luca; Pieper, Jeroen; de Wijn, J.R.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds for osteochondral tissue engineering should provide mechanical stability, while offering specific signals for chondral and bone regeneration with a completely interconnected porous network for cell migration, attachment, and proliferation. Composites of polymers and ceramics are often

  13. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  14. DECOLORIZATION AND CHEMICAL REGENERATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Citric acid is an important chemical product which wildly used in the food and ... activated carbon (PAC) decoloring process is batch operation and has to be filtered to .... adsorbates adsorbed from solution per unit weight of regenerated GAC at the ..... Achaerandio, I.; Guell, C.; Lopez, F. J. Food Engineering 2002, 51, 311. 9.

  15. The Molecular and Cellular Choreography of Appendage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Elly M

    2016-06-16

    Recent advances in limb regeneration are revealing the molecular events that integrate growth control, cell fate programming, and positional information to yield the exquisite replacement of the amputated limb. Parallel progress in several invertebrate and vertebrate models has provided a broader context for understanding the mechanisms and the evolution of regeneration. Together, these discoveries provide a foundation for describing the principles underlying regeneration of complex, multi-tissue structures. As such these findings should provide a wealth of ideas for engineers seeking to reconstitute regeneration from constituent parts or to elicit full regeneration from partial regeneration events.

  16. Biological apatite (BAp) crystallographic orientation and texture as a new index for assessing the microstructure and function of bone regenerated by tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takayoshi; Kaibara, Kazuhiro; Ishimoto, Takuya; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Umakoshi, Yukichi

    2012-10-01

    Recently, there have been remarkable advances in medical techniques for regenerating bone defects. To determine the degree of bone regeneration, it is essential to develop a new method that can analyze microstructure and related mechanical function. Here, quantitative analysis of the orientation distribution of biological apatite (BAp) crystallites by a microbeam X-ray diffractometer system is proposed as a new index of bone quality for the evaluation of regenerated bone microstructure. Preferential alignment of the BAp c-axis in the rabbit ulna and skull bone, regenerated by controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was investigated. The BAp c-axis orientation was evaluated by the relative intensity between the (002) and (310) diffraction peaks, or the three-dimensional texture for the (002) peak. It was found that new bone in the defects was initially produced without preferential alignment of the BAp c-axis, and subsequently reproduced to recover towards the original alignment. In other words, the BAp density recovered prior to the BAp orientation. Perfect recovery of BAp alignment was not achieved in the ulna and skull defects after 4 weeks and 12 weeks, respectively. Apparent recovery of the macroscopic shape and bio-mineralization of BAp was almost complete in the ulna defect after 4 weeks. However, an additional 2 weeks was required for complete repair of BAp orientation. It is finally concluded that orientation distribution of BAp crystallites offers an effective means of evaluating the degree of microstructural regeneration, and also the related mechanical function, in regenerated hard tissues.

  17. Important engineering issues in FCC regenerable wet flue gas scrubbing process%催化裂化可再生湿法烟气脱硫工艺应关注的工程问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡敏; 郭宏昶; 胡永龙; 汤红年; 王刻文; 谭忻; 朱雷鸣

    2012-01-01

    The two typical and industrialized FCC regenerable wet flue gas scrubbing processes I. E. LABSORB process of DuPont BELCO and CANSOLV process of Shell Global Solutions are introduced and the main technical indexes and technical features of the two processes are compared. The main characteristics of RASO process and associated engineering technologies developed by SINOPEC Luoyang Petrochemical Engineering Corporation are described, and the ion liquid recycle flue gas scrubbing process developed by Chengdu Huaxi Chemical Technology Co, Ltd. Are discussed. The impacts of application of regenerable wet flue gas scrubbing process in FCC units on the upstream flue gas expander, waste heat boiler or CO boiler and on operating parameters and capacity of the downstream sulfur recovery unit are studied in detail. It is pointed out that the absorbent ( scrubbing liquid) is the core technology of the regenerable wet flue gas scrubbing process, which determines the advance of the technology as well as capital investment and energy consumption of the flue gas scrubbing unit. The engineering technologies for application of regenerable wet flue gas scrubbing technology in FCC unit need to be further improved in respect of long-term operation, equipment layout & plot area requirement, capital vestment, energy consumption and operating costs, etc. When selecting the regenerable wet flue gas scrubbing for FCC unit, the impacts on upstream flue gas expander, waste heat boiler or CO boiler and the downstream sulfur recovery unit have to be considered to design FCC unit, flue gas scrubbing unit and sulfur recovery unit into an integrated complex.The two typical and industrialized FCC regenerable wet flue gas scrubbing processes I. E. LABSORB. Process of DuPont, BELCO, And CANSOLV, Process of Shell Global Solutions are introduced and the main technical indexes and technical features of the two processes are compared. The main characteristics of RASO process and associated engineering

  18. Cementum and Periodontal Ligament Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicanin, Danijela; Hynes, K; Han, J; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2015-01-01

    The unique anatomy and composition of the periodontium make periodontal tissue healing and regeneration a complex process. Periodontal regeneration aims to recapitulate the crucial stages of wound healing associated with periodontal development in order to restore lost tissues to their original form and function and for regeneration to occur, healing events must progress in an ordered and programmed sequence both temporally and spatially, replicating key developmental events. A number of procedures have been employed to promote true and predictable regeneration of the periodontium. Principally, the approaches are based on the use of graft materials to compensate for the bone loss incurred as a result of periodontal disease, use of barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration and use of bioactive molecules. More recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been integrated into research and applications of regenerative dentistry, including periodontics, to aim to manage damaged and lost oral tissues, through reconstruction and regeneration of the periodontium and alleviate the shortcomings of more conventional therapeutic options. The essential components for generating effective cellular based therapeutic strategies include a population of multi-potential progenitor cells, presence of signalling molecules/inductive morphogenic signals and a conductive extracellular matrix scaffold or appropriate delivery system. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered suitable candidates for cell-based tissue engineering strategies owing to their extensive expansion rate and potential to differentiate into cells of multiple organs and systems. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from multiple tissue sources have been investigated in pre-clinical animal studies and clinical settings for the treatment and regeneration of the periodontium.

  19. Use of Natural Neural Scaffolds Consisting of Engineered Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Immobilized on Ordered Collagen Fibers Filled in a Collagen Tube for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukai Ma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for effective strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration has attracted much attention in recent years. In this study, ordered collagen fibers were used as intraluminal fibers after nerve injury in rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its very fast initial burst of activity within a short time has largely limited its clinical use. For the stable binding of VEGF to ordered collagen fibers, we fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD to VEGF through recombinant DNA technology. Then, we filled the ordered collagen fibers-CBD-VEGF targeting delivery system in a collagen tube to construct natural neural scaffolds, which were then used to bridge transected nerve stumps in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. After transplantation, the natural neural scaffolds showed minimal foreign body reactions and good integration into the host tissue. Oriented collagen fibers in the collagen tube could guide regenerating axons in an oriented manner to the distal, degenerating nerve segment, maximizing the chance of target reinnervation. Functional and histological analyses indicated that the recovery of nerve function in the natural neural scaffolds-treated group was superior to the other grafted groups. The guiding of oriented axonal regeneration and effective delivery systems surmounting the otherwise rapid and short-lived diffusion of growth factors in body fluids are two important strategies in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. The natural neural scaffolds described take advantage of these two aspects and may produce synergistic effects. These properties qualified the artificial nerve conduits as a putative candidate system for the fabrication of peripheral nerve reconstruction devices.

  20. Use of natural neural scaffolds consisting of engineered vascular endothelial growth factor immobilized on ordered collagen fibers filled in a collagen tube for peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Meng, Danqing; Hou, Xianglin; Zhu, Jianhong; Dai, Jianwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2014-10-15

    The search for effective strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration has attracted much attention in recent years. In this study, ordered collagen fibers were used as intraluminal fibers after nerve injury in rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its very fast initial burst of activity within a short time has largely limited its clinical use. For the stable binding of VEGF to ordered collagen fibers, we fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to VEGF through recombinant DNA technology. Then, we filled the ordered collagen fibers-CBD-VEGF targeting delivery system in a collagen tube to construct natural neural scaffolds, which were then used to bridge transected nerve stumps in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. After transplantation, the natural neural scaffolds showed minimal foreign body reactions and good integration into the host tissue. Oriented collagen fibers in the collagen tube could guide regenerating axons in an oriented manner to the distal, degenerating nerve segment, maximizing the chance of target reinnervation. Functional and histological analyses indicated that the recovery of nerve function in the natural neural scaffolds-treated group was superior to the other grafted groups. The guiding of oriented axonal regeneration and effective delivery systems surmounting the otherwise rapid and short-lived diffusion of growth factors in body fluids are two important strategies in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. The natural neural scaffolds described take advantage of these two aspects and may produce synergistic effects. These properties qualified the artificial nerve conduits as a putative candidate system for the fabrication of peripheral nerve reconstruction devices.

  1. Regenerator seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  2. Process for regeneration of a soot particle filter situated in the exhaust pipe of an air-compressing internal combustion engine. Verfahren zur Regeneration eines in der Abgasleitung einer luftverdichtenden Brennkraftmaschine angeordneten Russpartikelfilters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abthoff, J.; Schuster, H.D.; Langer, H.J.; Strohmer, E.; Gabler, R.; Schulte, R.

    1991-05-08

    A process for the regenration of a soot particle filter situated in the exhaust pipe of an air-compressing injection internal combustion engine by burning off the soot particles is described. A device to control the suction pipe cross section depending on the load and speed is provided in the suction pipe. To prevent damage to the soot filter when changing to thrust operation of the internal combustion engine, it is proposed to move the device to control the suction air pipe cross section directly after a change to thrust operation of the internal combustion engine to a position reducing the pipe crosss ection to a minimum and then to move it continuously to its open position.

  3. Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration methods and systems for hybrid vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

    2010-10-12

    A control system for controlling regeneration of a particulate filter for a hybrid vehicle is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration. An engine control module controls operation of an engine of the hybrid vehicle based on the control of the current to the particulate filter.

  4. Calcium phosphate coatings for bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Liang

    2010-01-01

    As a novel approach to repair and regenerate damaged and degraded bone tissue, tissue engineering has recorded tremendous growth for the last thirty years. This is an emerging interdisciplinary field applying the principles of biology and engineering to the development of viable substitutes that res

  5. [Tooth regeneration--dream to reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song-Ling; Wang, Xue-Jiu

    2008-04-01

    Tooth or dentition missing compromises human health physically and psychiatrically. Although several prosthesis methods are used to restore tooth loss, these restorations are still non-biological methods. It is a dream for human being to regenerate a real tooth for hundreds years. There are two ways to regenerate the tooth. One is application of conventional tissue engineering techniques including seed cells and scaffold. The other is regeneration tooth using dental epithelium and dental mesenchymal cells based on the knowledge of tooth initiation and development. Marked progress has been achieved in these two ways, while there is still a long way to go. Recently a new concept has been proposed for regeneration of a biological tooth root based on tooth-related stem cells and tissue engineering technique. A biological tooth root has been regenerated in swine. It may be a valuable method for restoration of tooth loss before successful whole tooth regeneration. A latest research showed that a subpopulation in bone marrow cells can give rise to ameloblast-like cells when mixed with embryonic epithelium and reassociation with integrated mesenchyme, which may provide a new seed cell source for tooth regeneration.

  6. Efficient whole-cell biocatalyst for acetoin production with NAD+ regeneration system through homologous co-expression of 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase in engineered Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Bao

    Full Text Available Acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone, an extensively-used food spice and bio-based platform chemical, is usually produced by chemical synthesis methods. With increasingly requirement of food security and environmental protection, bio-fermentation of acetoin by microorganisms has a great promising market. However, through metabolic engineering strategies, the mixed acid-butanediol fermentation metabolizes a certain portion of substrate to the by-products of organic acids such as lactic acid and acetic acid, which causes energy cost and increases the difficulty of product purification in downstream processes. In this work, due to the high efficiency of enzymatic reaction and excellent selectivity, a strategy for efficiently converting 2,3-butandiol to acetoin using whole-cell biocatalyst by engineered Bacillus subtilis is proposed. In this process, NAD+ plays a significant role on 2,3-butanediol and acetoin distribution, so the NADH oxidase and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase both from B. subtilis are co-expressed in B. subtilis 168 to construct an NAD+ regeneration system, which forces dramatic decrease of the intracellular NADH concentration (1.6 fold and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.2 fold. By optimization of the enzymatic reaction and applying repeated batch conversion, the whole-cell biocatalyst efficiently produced 91.8 g/L acetoin with a productivity of 2.30 g/(L·h, which was the highest record ever reported by biocatalysis. This work indicated that manipulation of the intracellular cofactor levels was more effective than the strategy of enhancing enzyme activity, and the bioprocess for NAD+ regeneration may also be a useful way for improving the productivity of NAD+-dependent chemistry-based products.

  7. In situ guided tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal diseases and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Rudert, Maximilian; Nöth, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias; Meinel, Lorenz; Groll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In situ guided tissue regeneration, also addressed as in situ tissue engineering or endogenous regeneration, has a great potential for population-wide “minimal invasive” applications. During the last two decades, tissue engineering has been developed with remarkable in vitro and preclinical success but still the number of applications in clinical routine is extremely small. Moreover, the vision of population-wide applications of ex vivo tissue engineered constructs based on cells, growth and ...

  8. Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2001-03-05

    Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  9. Modulation of tissue repair by regeneration enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Junsu; Hu, Jianxin; Karra, Ravi; Dickson, Amy L; Tornini, Valerie A; Nachtrab, Gregory; Gemberling, Matthew; Goldman, Joseph A; Black, Brian L; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-04-14

    How tissue regeneration programs are triggered by injury has received limited research attention. Here we investigate the existence of enhancer regulatory elements that are activated in regenerating tissue. Transcriptomic analyses reveal that leptin b (lepb) is highly induced in regenerating hearts and fins of zebrafish. Epigenetic profiling identified a short DNA sequence element upstream and distal to lepb that acquires open chromatin marks during regeneration and enables injury-dependent expression from minimal promoters. This element could activate expression in injured neonatal mouse tissues and was divisible into tissue-specific modules sufficient for expression in regenerating zebrafish fins or hearts. Simple enhancer-effector transgenes employing lepb-linked sequences upstream of pro- or anti-regenerative factors controlled the efficacy of regeneration in zebrafish. Our findings provide evidence for 'tissue regeneration enhancer elements' (TREEs) that trigger gene expression in injury sites and can be engineered to modulate the regenerative potential of vertebrate organs.

  10. Active magnetic regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  11. Helping the Retina Regenerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Briefs > Helping the retina regenerate Helping the retina regenerate NEI Audacious Goals Initiative report outlines strategies to replace or reprogram neurons in the retina News Brief 03/30/17 ...

  12. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  13. Biocompatibility of physico-crosslinked regenerated silk fibroin film as tissue engineered cornea%物理交联再生丝素膜组织工程角膜的生物相容性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓峰; 刘铁连; 杨吉成; 夏蔚; 钟蕾; 孙正大; 王英明; 夏静

    2011-01-01

    差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。术后1个月与术后2个月比较,角膜中CD34阳性率的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。 结论物理交联再生丝素膜构建组织工程角膜可行,再生丝素膜与角膜组织生物相容性良好,再生丝素膜植入兔角膜基质后无明显的炎症反应和新生血管。%Background Biomaterials for corneal tissue engineering must demonstrate several critical features for potential utility in vivo, including transparency, mechanical integrity, biocompatibility and slow biodegradation. Silk film biomaterial had been characterized to meet these functional requirements. Objective This study was to investigate the feasibility of physico-crosslink regenerated silk fibroin film as tissue engineered corneal scaffold. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells(CECs) links were cultured by regular method and CECs in logarithmic phase were than incubated on physico-crosslink regenerated silk fibroin film membrane. The shape of cultured human CECs was observed after 24,48 and 72 hours under the inverted microscope and scanning electron microscope( SEM ) ,and the CECs were cultured on culture plates as controls. The growth state of CECs on regenerated silk fibroin film was observed daily for 7 days by MTT, and cell cycle analysis and the presence of apoptosis of human CECs were examined by flow cytometry after incubation on regenerated silk fibroin film. Regenerated silk fibroin filmCECs (4 mm×3 mm) were implanted into the corneal stroma of the right eyes of New Zealand white rabbits. At the end of 4 and 8 weeks after implantation, the appearance of the ocular surface was examined using slit lamp and corneal neovascular area was measured. Corneal histopathological examination was carried out to assess the degradation of graft materials and immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of CD34 in the corneal tissue after operation. Results The morphology and structure of CECs were identical using the two cultured Methods when

  14. Jet Penetration into a Scaled Microfabricated Stirling Cycle Regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liyong; Simon, Terrence W.; Mantell, Susan; Ibrahim, Mournir; Gedeon, David; Tew, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The cooler and heater adjacent to the regenerator of a Stirling cycle engine have tubes or channels which form jets that pass into the regenerator while diffusing within the matrix. An inactive part of the matrix, beyond the cores of these jets, does not participate fully in the heat transfer between the flow of working fluid and the regenerator matrix material, weakening the regenerator s ability to exchange heat with the working fluid. The objective of the present program is to document this effect on the performance of the regenerator and to develop a model for generalizing the results. However, the small scales of actual Stirling regenerator matrices (on the order of tens of microns) make direct measurements of this effect very difficult. As a result, jet spreading within a regenerator matrix has not been characterized well and is poorly understood. Also, modeling is lacking experimental verification. To address this, a large-scale mockup of thirty times actual scale was constructed and operated under conditions that are dynamically similar to the engine operation. Jet penetration with round jets and slot jets into the microfabricated regenerator geometry are then measured by conventional means. The results are compared with those from a study of spreading of round jets within woven screen regenerator for further documentation of the comparative performance of the microfabricated regenerator geometry.

  15. PROTEIN METABOLISM IN REGENERATING WOUND TISSUE: FUNCTION OF THE SULFUR AMINO ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROTEINS, *TISSUES(BIOLOGY), METABOLISM, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), REGENERATION(ENGINEERING), WOUNDS AND INJURIES, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), TRACER STUDIES, METHIONINE, COLLAGEN, TYROSINE, BIOSYNTHESIS, AMINO ACIDS .

  16. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  17. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  18. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  19. Missing Concepts in De Novo Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, G T-J; Garcia-Godoy, F

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative endodontics has gained much attention in the past decade because it offers an alternative approach in treating endodontically involved teeth. Instead of filling the canal space with artificial materials, it attempts to fill the canal with vital tissues. The objective of regeneration is to regain the tissue and restore its function to the original state. In terms of pulp regeneration, a clinical protocol that intends to reestablish pulp/dentin tissues in the canal space has been developed--termed revitalization or revascularization. Histologic studies from animal and human teeth receiving revitalization have shown that pulp regeneration is difficult to achieve. In tissue engineering, there are 2 approaches to regeneration tissues: cell based and cell free. The former involves transplanting exogenous cells into the host, and the latter does not. Revitalization belongs to the latter approach. A number of crucial concepts have not been well discussed, noted, or understood in the field of regenerative endodontics in terms of pulp/dentin regeneration: (1) critical size defect of dentin and pulp, (2) cell lineage commitment to odontoblasts, (3) regeneration vs. repair, and (4) hurdles of cell-based pulp regeneration for clinical applications. This review article elaborates on these missing concepts and analyzes them at their cellular and molecular levels, which will in part explain why the non-cell-based revitalization procedure is difficult to establish pulp/dentin regeneration. Although the cell-based approach has been proven to regenerate pulp/dentin, such an approach will face barriers--with the key hurdle being the shortage of the current good manufacturing practice facilities, discussed herein. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  20. Harnessing Biomechanics to Develop Cartilage Regeneration Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasiou, KA; Responte, DJ; Brown, WE; Hu, JC

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 by ASME. As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. Thi...

  1. Cellular and genetic approaches to myocardial regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyn, John van

    2008-01-01

    Injection of (stem) cells into the damaged heart has a positive effect on cardiac function. In this thesis two strategies for improving myocardial regeneration over classical cell therapy were investigated. The first is to induce cardiomyogenic differentiation by genetically engineering cells to ex

  2. Heterogeneous scaffold designs for selective neural regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 5 decades, there has been a drive to apply technology to enhance neural regeneration in order to improve patient recovery after disease or injury. This has evolved into the field of Neural Engineering, with the aim to understand, control and exploit the development and function of neur

  3. Notch Signaling Inhibits Axon Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Bejjani, Rachid El; Hammarlund, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Many neurons have limited capacity to regenerate their axons after injury. Neurons in the mammalian CNS do not regenerate, and even neurons in the PNS often fail to regenerate to their former targets. This failure is likely due in part to pathways that actively restrict regeneration; however, only a few factors that limit regeneration are known. Here, using single-neuron analysis of regeneration in vivo, we show that Notch/lin-12 signaling inhibits the regeneration of mature C. elegans neuron...

  4. Scaffolding Biomaterials for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Completely repairing of damaged cartilage is a difficult procedure. In recent years, the use of tissue engineering approach in which scaffolds play a vital role to regenerate cartilage has become a new research field. Investigating the advances in biological cartilage scaffolds has been regarded as the main research direction and has great significance for the construction of artificial cartilage. Native biological materials and synthetic polymeric materials have their advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantages can be overcome through either physical modification or biochemical modification. Additionally, developing composite materials, biomimetic materials, and nanomaterials can make scaffolds acquire better biocompatibility and mechanical adaptability.

  5. Chitosan-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microsphere-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: in vitro degradation and in vivo bone regeneration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Nukavarapu, Syam P; Deng, Meng; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Kofron, Michelle D; Doty, Stephen B; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Laurencin, Cato T

    2010-09-01

    Natural polymer chitosan and synthetic polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) have been investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. We have previously reported the fabrication and in vitro evaluation of a novel chitosan/PLAGA sintered microsphere scaffold for load-bearing bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, the in vitro degradation characteristics of the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold and the in vivo bone formation capacity of the chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model were investigated. The chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed slower degradation than the PLAGA scaffold in vitro. Although chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed a gradual decrease in compressive properties during the 12-week degradation period, the compressive strength and compressive modulus remained in the range of human trabecular bone. Chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds were able to guide bone formation in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model. Microcomputed tomography analysis demonstrated that successful bridging of the critical-sized defect on the sides both adjacent to and away from the radius occurred using chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds. Immobilization of heparin and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold surface promoted early bone formation as evidenced by complete bridging of the defect along the radius and significantly enhanced mechanical properties when compared to the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold. Furthermore, histological analysis suggested that chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds supported normal bone formation via intramembranous formation.

  6. Guided tissue regeneration in periapical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Louis; Chen, Melody Y-H; Ricucci, Domenico; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2010-04-01

    Tissue regeneration by using membrane barriers and bone grafting materials in periapical surgery is an example of tissue engineering technology. Membrane barriers and/or bone grafts are often used to enhance periapical new bone formation. However, the periapical tissues also consist of the periodontal ligament (PDL) and cementum. For regeneration of the periapical tissues after periapical surgery, one of the important requirements is recruitment and differentiation of progenitor/stem cells into committed pre-osteoblasts, pre-PDL cells, and pre-cementoblasts. Homing of progenitor/stem cells into the wounded periapical tissues is regulated by factors such as stromal cell-derived factor 1, growth factors/cytokines, and by microenvironmental cues such as adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix and associated noncollagenous molecules. Tissue regeneration after injury appears to recapitulate the pathway of normal embryonic tissue development. Multiple tissue regeneration involves a complex interaction between different cells, extracellular matrix, growth/differentiation factors, and microenvironmental cues. Little is known concerning the biologic mechanisms that regulate temporal and spatial relationship between alveolar bone, PDL, and cementum regeneration during periapical wound healing. Simply applying a membrane barrier and/or bone graft during periapical surgery might not result in complete regeneration of the periapical tissues. It has not been clearly demonstrated that these biomaterials are capable of recruiting progenitor/stem cells and inducing these undifferentiated mesenchymal cells to differentiate into PDL cells and cementoblasts after periapical surgery.

  7. Spinal Injury: Regeneration, Recovery, and a Possible New Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Avis [U of Maryland, Dept of Biology

    2009-02-04

    Spinal injury is most frequent in young healthy men, desperate to walk. Most treatments have focused on regeneration of the injured axons, but no one has as yet achieved success with this approach. However, in the lamprey, a primitive fish with a spinal cord having all the critical features of the human spinal cored, spinal injury is followed by complete regeneration of injured axons. Additionally, the animal recovers the ability to swim, and in many, the swimming is normal. Unfortunately, in most others, it is highly abnormal. This talk will review evidence from the abnormal regeneration, why it bespeaks difficulties heretofore not considered, and suggest an alternate approach for the near future. In so doing, the speaker will introduce the normal function of the spinal cord, what happens in normal and abnormal regeneration, and the new techniques that employ methods from neuromorphic engineering, a synthesis of neuroscience and engineering to engineer smart devices.

  8. The Analysis of Activated Carbon Regeneration Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚芳

    2014-01-01

    A series of methods for activated carbon regeneration were briefly introduced.Such as thermal regeneration,chemical regeneration,biochemical regeneration,and newly supercritical fluid regeneration, electrochemical regeneration,light-catalyzed regeneration,and microwave radiation method,and the developing trend of activated carbon regeneration was predicted.

  9. Research progress on dental pulp tissue regeneration based on revascularization and tooth tissue engineering%再血管化和牙组织工程化牙髓再生的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺露; 郭俊; 杨健

    2015-01-01

    Pulpitis and periapical periodontitis are mainly treated with root canal therapy, and immature permanent tooth is treated through apexification. These treatment modalities exhibit some limitations that can be theoretically surmounted through dental pulp regeneration, thus, dental pulp tissue regeneration could be a superior treatment of pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. This technique can be performed using two approaches. The first approach is based on host cells from the apical region; these cells are induced to migrate toward the interior of the root canal and differentiate into a vascularized pulp tissue. The other approach is based on the transplantation of stem cells into the root canal and the differentiation of such cells into a new dental pulp. This paper summarized the research progress and challenges on dental pulp regeneration based on revascularization and tooth tissue engineering.%牙髓再生一是通过刺激根尖部出血,诱导根尖部宿主细胞迁移和分化,共同实现牙髓的再血管化,使牙髓腔中再生长出活性组织实现牙根的继续发育,即再血管化治疗;再是利用工程学原理将干细胞辅以支架移植到根管,诱导分化新生牙髓,实现牙本质牙髓再生。本文就再血管化及其牙髓再生,牙组织工程及其牙髓再生研究进展以及存在的问题等作一综述。

  10. Regeneration and reprogramming compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robles Vanesa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dedifferentiation occurs naturally in mature cell types during epimorphic regeneration in fish and some amphibians. Dedifferentiation also occurs in the induction of pluripotent stem cells when a set of transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc is over expressed in mature cell types. Results We hypothesised that there are parallels between dedifferentiation or reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells and the natural process of dedifferentiation during epimorphic regeneration. We analysed expression levels of the most commonly used pluripotency associated factors in regenerating and non-regenerating tissue and compared them with levels in a pluripotent reference cell. We found that some of the pluripotency associated factors (oct4/pou5f1, sox2, c-myc, klf4, tert, sall4, zic3, dppa2/4 and fut1, a homologue of ssea1 were expressed before and during regeneration and that at least two of these factors (oct4, sox2 were also required for normal fin regeneration in the zebrafish. However these factors were not upregulated during regeneration as would be expected if blastema cells acquired pluripotency. Conclusions By comparing cells from the regeneration blastema with embryonic pluripotent reference cells we found that induced pluripotent stem and blastema cells do not share pluripotency. However, during blastema formation some of the key reprogramming factors are both expressed and are also required for regeneration to take place. We therefore propose a link between partially reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells and the half way state of blastema cells and suggest that a common mechanism might be regulating these two processes.

  11. Strategies for lung regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. Petersen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limited ability of the adult lung to regenerate and the frequency of lung disease, the lung is a tissue that can especially benefit from regenerative medicine. Prospects for lung regeneration have made great strides in the past year. In this review, we summarize recent progress and key challenges for approaches in lung regenerative medicine. With a focus on the matrix components critical for the development of regenerative lung tissues, we discuss possible cell sources for lung regeneration, key matrix effects on cell repopulation, and physical stimuli that will aid in the growth of lung tissues in vitro.

  12. Regeneration Heat Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Lin

    2003-07-30

    The original project goals were to establish the viability of the proposed gas turbine regenerator concept by performing the following tasks: (1) Perform detailed design of a working model of the regenerator concept. (2) Construct a ''bench-top'' model of the regenerator concept based upon the detail design. (3) Test the bench-top model and gather data to support the concept's viability. The project funding was used to acquire the tools and material to perform the aforementioned tasks.

  13. Tissue engineered periodontal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartold, P M; Gronthos, S; Ivanovski, S; Fisher, A; Hutmacher, D W

    2016-02-01

    Attainment of periodontal regeneration is a significant clinical goal in the management of advanced periodontal defects arising from periodontitis. Over the past 30 years numerous techniques and materials have been introduced and evaluated clinically and have included guided tissue regeneration, bone grafting materials, growth and other biological factors and gene therapy. With the exception of gene therapy, all have undergone evaluation in humans. All of the products have shown efficacy in promoting periodontal regeneration in animal models but the results in humans remain variable and equivocal concerning attaining complete biological regeneration of damaged periodontal structures. In the early 2000s, the concept of tissue engineering was proposed as a new paradigm for periodontal regeneration based on molecular and cell biology. At this time, tissue engineering was a new and emerging field. Now, 14 years later we revisit the concept of tissue engineering for the periodontium and assess how far we have come, where we are currently situated and what needs to be done in the future to make this concept a reality. In this review, we cover some of the precursor products, which led to our current position in periodontal tissue engineering. The basic concepts of tissue engineering with special emphasis on periodontal tissue engineering products is discussed including the use of mesenchymal stem cells in bioscaffolds and the emerging field of cell sheet technology. Finally, we look into the future to consider what CAD/CAM technology and nanotechnology will have to offer.

  14. Regenerating a kidney in a lymph node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Lagasse, Eric

    2016-10-01

    The ultimate treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is orthotopic transplantation. However, the demand for kidney transplantation far exceeds the number of available donor organs. While more than 100,000 Americans need a kidney, only 17,000 people receive a kidney transplant each year (National Kidney Foundation's estimations). In recent years, several regenerative medicine/tissue engineering approaches have been exploited to alleviate the kidney shortage crisis. Although these approaches have yielded promising results in experimental animal models, the kidney is a complex organ and translation into the clinical realm has been challenging to date. In this review, we will discuss cell therapy-based approaches for kidney regeneration and whole-kidney tissue engineering strategies, including our innovative approach to regenerate a functional kidney using the lymph node as an in vivo bioreactor.

  15. Chemical genetics and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sumitra; Zhang, Liyun; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration involves interactions between multiple signaling pathways acting in a spatially and temporally complex manner. As signaling pathways are highly conserved, understanding how regeneration is controlled in animal models exhibiting robust regenerative capacities should aid efforts to stimulate repair in humans. One way to discover molecular regulators of regeneration is to alter gene/protein function and quantify effect(s) on the regenerative process: dedifferentiation/reprograming, stem/progenitor proliferation, migration/remodeling, progenitor cell differentiation and resolution. A powerful approach for applying this strategy to regenerative biology is chemical genetics, the use of small-molecule modulators of specific targets or signaling pathways. Here, we review advances that have been made using chemical genetics for hypothesis-focused and discovery-driven studies aimed at furthering understanding of how regeneration is controlled.

  16. Perkembangan Terkini Membran Guided Tissue Regeneration/Guided Bone Regeneration sebagai Terapi Regenerasi Jaringan Periodontal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Cahaya

    2015-06-01

    kombinasi prosedur-prosedur di atas, termasuk prosedur bedah restoratif yang berhubungan dengan rehabilitasi oral dengan penempatan dental implan. Pada tingkat selular, regenerasi periodontal adalah proses kompleks yang membutuhkan proliferasi yang terorganisasi, differensiasi dan pengembangan berbagai tipe sel untuk membentuk perlekatan periodontal. Rasionalisasi penggunaan guided tissue regeneration sebagai membran pembatas adalah menahan epitel dan gingiva jaringan pendukung, sebagai barrier membrane mempertahankan ruang dan gigi serta menstabilkan bekuan darah. Pada makalah ini akan dibahas sekilas mengenai 1. Proses penyembuhan terapi periodontal meliputi regenerasi, repair ataupun pembentukan perlekatan baru. 2. Periodontal spesific tissue engineering. 3. Berbagai jenis membran/guided tissue regeneration yang beredar di pasaran dengan keuntungan dan kerugian sekaligus karakteristik masing-masing membran. 4. Perkembangan membran terbaru sebagai terapi regenerasi penyakit periodontal. Tujuan penulisan untuk memberi gambaran masa depan mengenai terapi regenerasi yang menjanjikan sebagai perkembangan terapi penyakit periodontal.   Latest Development of Guided Tissue Regeneration and Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane as Regenerative Therapy on Periodontal Tissue. Periodontitis is a patological state which influences the integrity of periodontal system that could lead to the destruction of the periodontal tissue and end up with tooth loss. Currently, there are so many researches and efforts to regenerate periodontal tissue, not only to stop the process of the disease but also to reconstruct the periodontal tissue. Periodontal regenerative therapy aims at directing the growth of new bone, cementum and periodontal ligament on the affected teeth. Regenerative procedures consist of soft tissue graft, bone graft, roots biomodification, guided tissue regeneration and combination of the procedures, including restorative surgical procedure that is

  17. Air regenerating and conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishayenkov, B. G.

    1975-01-01

    Various physicochemical methods of regenerating and conditioning air for spacecraft are described with emphasis on conditions which affect efficiency of the system. Life support systems used in closed, hermetically sealed environments are discussed with references to actual application in the Soviet Soyuz and Voskhod manned spacecraft. Temperature and humidity control, removal of carbon dioxide, oxygen regeneration, and removal of bacteria and viruses are among the factors considered.

  18. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2008-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article...

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Periodontal Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Mi; Duan, Xuejing; Yang, Pishan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of both the soft and hard tissues of the periodontium. Tissue engineering is a therapeutic approach in regenerative medicine that aims to induce new functional tissue regeneration via the synergistic combination of cells, biomaterials, and/or growth factors. Advances in our understanding of the biology of stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells, have provided opportunities for periodontal ...

  20. Effects of dental and non-dental stem cells in the study of tissue-engineered regenerated teeth%牙源和非牙源性干细胞在组织工程再生牙研究中的作用****★

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥航; 农晓琳

    2013-01-01

      背景:牙齿缺失是人类最为常见的器官缺失,近年组织工程学器官的研究日渐成熟,各类成体干细胞被用在再生牙的研究中。目的:对各类成体干细胞的特性进行阐述,探讨各类成体干细胞在再生牙研究过程中的作用及新进展。方法:由作者应用计算机检索1979至2012年PubMed数据库及CNKI数据库的文献,在英文标题和摘要中以“stem cel”和“tooth regeneration”检索,中文文献检索以“干细胞,牙再生,组织工程学牙,种子细胞”为关键词,选择内容与成体干细胞、再生牙与牙组织工程相关的文章,同一领域文献则选择近期发表或发表在权威杂志文章,共纳入53篇文献。结果与结论:牙齿生长发育条件特殊,易缺失且自体难以再生,再生组织工程牙的研究为牙缺失的治疗提供了一个新的治疗手段,在大量的实验研究中发现,不同的成体干细胞无论在体内诱导还是体外重建再生牙的过程中都可起到不同的作用,且各有优缺点,相比之下,脐血干细胞的优势就较为突出,在今后的再生牙研究中可能将发挥重要的作用。%  BACKGROUND: Absence of tooth is a common organ loss for human. Recent study of tissue-engineered organ is gradual y mature. Various adult stem cel s have been used in the study of regenerated tooth. OBJECTIVE: To summarize the properties of various adult stem cel s and to explore the effects and new progresses of various adult stem cel s in the study of regenerated teeth. METHODS: An online retrieval of PubMed database and China National Knowledge Infrastructure for articles published from 1979 to 2012 was conducted. In titles and abstracts, the keywords were “stem cel s, tooth regeneration” in English, and “stem cel s, regenerated tooth, tissue-engineered tooth, seed cel s” in Chinese. Articles addressed adult stem cel s, regenerated tooth and tooth tissue

  1. Perfluorodecalin and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Tamimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorodecalin (PFD is a chemically and biologically inert biomaterial and, as many perfluorocarbons, is also hydrophobic, radiopaque and has a high solute capacity for gases such as oxygen. In this article we have demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, that PFD may significantly enhance bone regeneration. Firstly, the potential benefit of PFD was demonstrated by prolonging the survival of bone marrow cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. These findings translated in vivo, where PFD incorporated into bone-marrow-loaded 3D-printed scaffolds substantially improved their capacity to regenerate bone. Secondly, in addition to biological applications, we have also shown that PFD improves the radiopacity of bone regeneration biomaterials, a key feature required for the visualisation of biomaterials during and after surgical implantation. Finally, we have shown how the extreme hydrophobicity of PFD enables the fabrication of highly cohesive self-setting injectable biomaterials for bone regeneration. In conclusion, perfluorocarbons would appear to be highly beneficial additives to a number of regenerative biomaterials, especially those for bone regeneration.

  2. Bone regeneration: current concepts and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGonagle Dennis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bone regeneration is a complex, well-orchestrated physiological process of bone formation, which can be seen during normal fracture healing, and is involved in continuous remodelling throughout adult life. However, there are complex clinical conditions in which bone regeneration is required in large quantity, such as for skeletal reconstruction of large bone defects created by trauma, infection, tumour resection and skeletal abnormalities, or cases in which the regenerative process is compromised, including avascular necrosis, atrophic non-unions and osteoporosis. Currently, there is a plethora of different strategies to augment the impaired or 'insufficient' bone-regeneration process, including the 'gold standard' autologous bone graft, free fibula vascularised graft, allograft implantation, and use of growth factors, osteoconductive scaffolds, osteoprogenitor cells and distraction osteogenesis. Improved 'local' strategies in terms of tissue engineering and gene therapy, or even 'systemic' enhancement of bone repair, are under intense investigation, in an effort to overcome the limitations of the current methods, to produce bone-graft substitutes with biomechanical properties that are as identical to normal bone as possible, to accelerate the overall regeneration process, or even to address systemic conditions, such as skeletal disorders and osteoporosis.

  3. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  4. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  5. Bioelectricity and epimorphic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Scott; Rojas-Muñoz, Agustin; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2007-11-01

    All cells have electric potentials across their membranes, but is there really compelling evidence to think that such potentials are used as instructional cues in developmental biology? Numerous reports indicate that, in fact, steady, weak bioelectric fields are observed throughout biology and function during diverse biological processes, including development. Bioelectric fields, generated upon amputation, are also likely to play a key role during vertebrate regeneration by providing the instructive cues needed to direct migrating cells to form a wound epithelium, a structure unique to regenerating animals. However, mechanistic insight is still sorely lacking in the field. What are the genes required for bioelectric-dependent cell migration during regeneration? The power of genetics combined with the use of zebrafish offers the best opportunity for unbiased identification of the molecular players in bioelectricity.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  8. Tooth regeneration: challenges and opportunities for biomedical material research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chang; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2006-03-01

    Tooth regeneration presents many challenges to researchers in the fields of biology, medicine and material science. This review considers the opportunities for biomedical material research to contribute to this multidisciplinary endeavor. We present short summaries and an overview on the collective knowledge of tooth developmental biology, advances in stem-cell research, and progress in the understanding of the tooth biomineralization principles as they provide the foundation for developing strategies for reparative and regenerative medicine. We emphasize that various biomaterials developed via biomimetic strategies have great potential for tooth tissue engineering and regeneration applications. The current practices in tooth tissue engineering approaches and applications of biomimetic carriers or scaffolds are also discussed.

  9. Bioreactor cultivation and mechanical stimulation for regeneration of tissue-engineered cartilage%生物反应器中的力学刺激促进组织工程软骨再生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余晓明; 孟昊业; 孙振; 尹合勇; 袁雪凌; 郭全义; 彭江; 汪爱媛; 卢世璧

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Cartilage tissue engineering has been widely used to achieve cartilage regeneration in vitro and repair cartilage defects. Tissue-engineered cartilage mainly consists of chondrocytes, cartilage scaffold and in vitro environment. OBJECTIVE:To mimic the environment of articular cartilage development in vivo, in order to increase the bionic features of tissue-engineered cartilage scaffold and effectiveness of cartilage repair. METHODS: Knee joint chondrocytes were isolated from New Zealand white rabbits, 2 months old, and expanded in vitro. The chondrocytes at passage 2 were seeded onto a scaffold of articular cartilage extracelular matrix in the concentration of 1×106/L to prepare cel-scaffold composites. Cel-scaffold composites were cultivated in an Instron bioreactor with mechanical compression (1 Hz, 3 hours per day, 10% compression) as experimental group for 7, 14, 24, 28 days or cultured staticaly for 1 day as control group. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Morphological observations demonstrated that the thickness, elastic modulus and maximum load of the composite in the experimental group were significantly higher than those in the control group, which were positively related to time (P < 0.05). Histological staining showed the proliferation of chondrocytes, formation of cartilage lacuna and synthesis of proteoglycan in the experimental group through hematoxylin-eosin staining and safranin-O staining, which were increased gradualy with mechanical stimulation time. These results were consistent with the findings of proteoglycan kit. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of colagen type I and colagen type II were significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group (P < 0.05). The experimental group showed the highest mRNA expression of colagen type I and colagen type II at 21 and 28 days of mechanical stimulation, respectively (P < 0.05). With the mechanical stimulation of bioreactor, the cel-scaffold composite can produce

  10. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. In situ tissue regeneration: chemoattractants for endogenous stem cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering uses cells, signaling molecules, and/or biomaterials to regenerate injured or diseased tissues. Ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have long been a cornerstone of regeneration therapies; however, drawbacks that include altered signaling responses and reduced homing capacity have prompted investigation of regeneration based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Recent successful proof-of-concept studies have further motivated endogenous MSC recruitment-based approaches. Stem cell migration is required for morphogenesis and organogenesis during development and for tissue maintenance and injury repair in adults. A biomimetic approach to in situ tissue regeneration by endogenous MSC requires the orchestration of three main stages: MSC recruitment, MSC differentiation, and neotissue maturation. The first stage must result in recruitment of a sufficient number of MSC, capable of effecting regeneration, to the injured or diseased tissue. One of the challenges for engineering endogenous MSC recruitment is the selection of effective chemoattractant(s). The objective of this review is to synthesize and evaluate evidence of recruitment efficacy by reported chemoattractants, including growth factors, chemokines, and other more recently appreciated MSC chemoattractants. The influence of MSC tissue sources, cell culture methods, and the in vitro and in vivo environments is discussed. This growing body of knowledge will serve as a basis for the rational design of regenerative therapies based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Successful endogenous MSC recruitment is the first step of successful tissue regeneration.

  12. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world’s best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration. PMID:27527229

  13. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world's best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration.

  14. Microwave-assisted in-situ regeneration of a perovskite coated diesel soot filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang-Steenwinkel, Y.; van der Zande, L.M.; Castricum, H.L.; Bliek, A.; van den Brink, R.W.; Elzinga, G.D.

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric heating may be used as an in situ technique for the periodic regeneration of soot filters, as those used in Diesel engines. As generally the Diesel exhaust temperatures are below the soot light-off temperature, passive regeneration is not possible. Presently, we have investigated the diel

  15. Infection and Pulp Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahng G. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex has been a great challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Previous work has shown that the presence of prior infection may influence the characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space after regenerative endodontic treatment. The formation of ectopic tissues such as periodontal ligament, bone, and cementum has been observed in the root canal space of immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis, while the regeneration of dentin and pulp has been identified in previously non-infected teeth. The current regenerative endodontic therapy utilizes disinfection protocols, which heavily rely on chemical irrigation using conventional disinfectants. From a microbiological point of view, the current protocols may not allow a sufficiently clean root canal microenvironment, which is critical for dentin and pulp regeneration. In this article, the significance of root canal disinfection in regenerating the pulp-dentin complex, the limitations of the current regenerative endodontic disinfection protocols, and advanced disinfection techniques designed to reduce the microorganisms and biofilms in chronic infection are discussed.

  16. Cell- and gene- based therapeutics for periodontal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshava Abbayya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a disease of the periodontium, characterized by loss of connective tissue attachment and supporting the alveolar bone. Therefore, to regenerate these lost tissues of the periodontium researchers have included a variety of surgical procedures including grafting materials growth factors and the use of barrier membranes, ultimately resulting into regeneration that is biologically possible but clinically unpredictable. Recently a newer approach of delivering DNA plasmids as therapeutic agents is gaining special attention and is called gene delivery method. Gene therapy being considered a novel approach have a potential to channel their signals in a very systematic and controlled manner thereby providing encoded proteins at all stages of tissue regeneration. The aim of this review was to enlighten a view on the application involving gene delivery and tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration.

  17. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  18. Limb regeneration: a new development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Eugen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2011-01-01

    Salamander limb regeneration is a classical model of tissue morphogenesis and patterning. Through recent advances in cell labeling and molecular analysis, a more precise, mechanistic understanding of this process has started to emerge. Long-standing questions include to what extent limb regeneration recapitulates the events observed in mammalian limb development and to what extent are adult- or salamander- specific aspects deployed. Historically, researchers studying limb development and limb regeneration have proposed different models of pattern formation. Here we discuss recent data on limb regeneration and limb development to argue that although patterning mechanisms are likely to be similar, cell plasticity and signaling from nerves play regeneration-specific roles.

  19. Tissue engineering for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sujata K

    2010-12-01

    Tissue engineering is increasingly being recognized as a beneficial means for lessening the global disease burden. One strategy of tissue engineering is to replace lost tissues or organs with polymeric scaffolds that contain specialized populations of living cells, with the goal of regenerating tissues to restore normal function. Typical constructs for tissue engineering employ biocompatible and degradable polymers, along with organ-specific and tissue-specific cells. Once implanted, the construct guides the growth and development of new tissues; the polymer scaffold degrades away to be replaced by healthy functioning tissue. The ideal biomaterial for tissue engineering not only defends against disease and supports weakened tissues or organs, it also provides the elements required for healing and repair, stimulates the body's intrinsic immunological and regenerative capacities, and seamlessly interacts with the living body. Tissue engineering has been investigated for virtually every organ system in the human body. This review describes the potential of tissue engineering to alleviate disease, as well as the latest advances in tissue regeneration. The discussion focuses on three specific clinical applications of tissue engineering: cardiac tissue regeneration for treatment of heart failure; nerve regeneration for treatment of stroke; and lung regeneration for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fenestration defects in the rabbit jaw: an inadequate model for studying periodontal regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Meijer, G.J.; Bronckers, A.L.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the support of the teeth, eventually leading to loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Effective procedures for periodontal tissue engineering or regeneration require preclinical models before market introduction. Research has been performed in eit

  1. Fenestration defects in the rabbit jaw: an inadequate model for studying periodontal regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Meijer, G.J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the support of the teeth, eventually leading to loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Effective procedures for periodontal tissue engineering or regeneration require preclinical models before market introduction. Research has been performed in eit

  2. Hydrogel based injectable scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Janani; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering promises to be an effective strategy that can overcome the lacuna existing in the current pharmacological and interventional therapies and heart transplantation. Heart failure continues to be a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality across the globe. This may be attributed to the limited regeneration capacity after the adult cardiomyocytes are terminally differentiated or injured. Various strategies involving acellular scaffolds, stem cells, and combinations of stem cells, scaffolds and growth factors have been investigated for effective cardiac tissue regeneration. Recently, injectable hydrogels have emerged as a potential candidate among various categories of biomaterials for cardiac tissue regeneration due to improved patient compliance and facile administration via minimal invasive mode that treats complex infarction. This review discusses in detail on the advances made in the field of injectable materials for cardiac tissue engineering highlighting their merits over their preformed counterparts.

  3. Analytical Solutions and Optimization of the Exo-Irreversible Schmidt Cycle with Imperfect Regeneration for the 3 Classical Types of Stirling Engine Solutions analytiques et optimisation du cycle de Schmidt irréversible à régénération imparfaite appliquées aux 3 types classiques de moteur Stirling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle P.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The “old” Stirling engine is one of the most promising multi-heat source engines for the future. Simple and realistic basic models are useful to aid in optimizing a preliminary engine configuration. In addition to new proper analytical solutions for regeneration that dramatically reduce computing time, this study of the Schmidt-Stirling engine cycle is carried out from an engineer-friendly viewpoint introducing exo-irreversible heat transfers. The reference parameters are the technological or physical constraints: the maximum pressure, the maximum volume, the extreme wall temperatures and the overall thermal conductance, while the adjustable optimization variables are the volumetric compression ratio, the dead volume ratios, the volume phase-lag, the gas characteristics, the hot-to-cold conductance ratio and the regenerator efficiency. The new normalized analytical expressions for the operating characteristics of the engine: power, work, efficiency, mean pressure, maximum speed of revolution are derived, and some dimensionless and dimensional reference numbers are presented as well as power optimization examples with respect to non-dimensional speed, volume ratio and volume phase-lag angle.analytical solutions. Le “vieux” moteur Stirling est l’un des moteurs a sources multiples d’energie les plus prometteurs pour le futur. Des modeles elementaires simples et realistes sont utiles pour faciliter l’optimisation de configurations preliminaires du moteur. En plus de nouvelles solutions analytiques qui reduisent fortement le temps de calcul, cette etude du cycle moteur de Schmidt-Stirling modifie est entreprise avec le point de vue de l’ingenieur en introduisant les exo-irreversibilites dues aux transferts thermiques. Les parametres de reference sont des contraintes technologiques ou physiques : la pression maximum, le volume maximum, les temperatures de paroi extremes et la conductance totale, alors que les parametres d

  4. Rapid Self-Integrating, Injectable Hydrogel for Tissue Complex Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Sen; Wang, Xuefei; Park, Sean; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-07-15

    A novel rapid self-integrating, injectable, and bioerodible hydrogel is developed for bone-cartilage tissue complex regeneration. The hydrogels are able to self-integrate to form various structures, as can be seen after dying some hydrogel disks pink with rodamine. This hydrogel is demonstrated to engineer cartilage-bone complex.

  5. Hybrid-assisted DPF regeneration in distribution trucks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, D.L.; Kessels, J.T.B.A.; Aneke, N.P.I.; Rojer, C.

    2009-01-01

    TNO Automotive is developing an Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) concept for powertrain controls that focuses on integration of the engine, aftertreatment and parallel hybrid electric system. One of the first steps is the focus on hybrid assisted Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration. For

  6. Articles collection published in Neural Regeneration Research 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Neural Regeneration Research (NRR, ISSN 1675-5374, CN11-5422/R), an English language journal published in China every ten days, is dedicated to presenting peer-reviewed, evidenced based scholarly research in neuroregeneration, including neural stem cells, nerve tissue engineering, gene therapy, and traditional Chinese medicine.

  7. Biomimetic materials design for cardiac tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, David A; Hodge, Alexander J; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. In the absence of sufficient numbers of organs for heart transplant, alternate approaches for healing or replacing diseased heart tissue are under investigation. Designing biomimetic materials to support these approaches will be essential to their overall success. Strategies for cardiac tissue engineering include injection of cells, implantation of three-dimensional tissue constructs or patches, injection of acellular materials, and replacement of valves. To replicate physiological function and facilitate engraftment into native tissue, materials used in these approaches should have properties that mimic those of the natural cardiac environment. Multiple aspects of the cardiac microenvironment have been emulated using biomimetic materials including delivery of bioactive factors, presentation of cell-specific adhesion sites, design of surface topography to guide tissue alignment and dictate cell shape, modulation of mechanical stiffness and electrical conductivity, and fabrication of three-dimensional structures to guide tissue formation and function. Biomaterials can be engineered to assist in stem cell expansion and differentiation, to protect cells during injection and facilitate their retention and survival in vivo, and to provide mechanical support and guidance for engineered tissue formation. Numerous studies have investigated the use of biomimetic materials for cardiac regeneration. Biomimetic material design will continue to exploit advances in nanotechnology to better recreate the cellular environment and advance cardiac regeneration. Overall, biomimetic materials are moving the field of cardiac regenerative medicine forward and promise to deliver new therapies in combating heart disease.

  8. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  9. Low Temperature Regenerator Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    effect. The idealized cycle achieves the same theoretical coefficient of performance (COP) as the theoretical Carnot cycle , whose limiting performance...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract *irt.,ed in Block 20, iI different it oe) I8. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES I9. KEY WORDS (Continute on reverse @do of noco*oy...PERFORMANCE ............ 64 3.1 Introduction ..... 0 ... . ......... ... . 64 3.2 Stirling Cycle Analysis ................. 71 3.2.1 Simple Regenerator Model

  10. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  11. ISLET FORMATION AND REGENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanisms of differentiation and development of pancreatic endocrine cells as well as pancreatic regeneration. Methods Human embryonic pancreatic tissue at 7-14 weeks of gestation was collected. Diabetes mellitus rat model was induced with 65 mg/kg of streptozotocin. Insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, nestin, and cytokeratin 19 (CK19)of pancreatic tissues were observed by immunohistochemistry. Results At 9 weeks of gestation, pancreatic epithelial cells began to co-express insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and CK19 before migration. Islet cells gradually congregated along with the increase of aging, and at 14 weeks of gestation histological examination showed islet formation. At 12 weeks of gestation, nestin-positive cells could be seen in the pancreatic mesenchyme. During early embryogenesis, islet cells of pancreatic ducts co-expressed insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. During pancreatic regeneration after damage, nestin expression of islet cells increased. Conclusion In the early stage of embryogenesis, islet cells of primary pancreatic ducts can be differentiated to multipotential endocrine cells before migration. During tissue regeneration, pancreatic stem cells may differentiate and proliferate to form pancreatic islet.

  12. Functional regeneration of tissue-engineered skin appendage is significant for metabolism and perspiration%功能性组织工程皮肤附属物再生对排汗和新陈代谢的意义***☆◆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔晓; 程飚; 刘坚

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perspiration can remove some metabolites dissolved in the sweat out of the body, playing a supporting role in the excretion. Modern medicine cannot restore the sweat glands of severe trauma or burn patients, and how to solve the regeneration of the skin and sweat glands and culture tissue-engineered skin functional appendage has become a hot spot in today’s medical research. OBJECTIVE: To explore the body’s metabolism and metabolic way of the sweat, thereby analyzing the functional sweat gland regeneration of tissue-engineered skin. METHODS: Studies addressing the tissue-engineered skin functional appendage regeneration effects on perspiration and metabolism were col ected to analyze the body’s metabolism and excretion ways, sweat metabolites and metabolism methods, as wel as the regeneration of tissue-engineered skin appendages. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Sweat as an important member in the excretory system cannot be ignored in maintaining the dynamic equilibrium of the body and preventing the body against metabolite damages. Ideal tissue-engineered skin functional appendages have abilities of sweat secretion, excretion of waste, regulating body temperature and maintaining the dynamic equilibrium of the skin, thereby playing a vital role in skin wound repair and reconstruction after extensive burns. Studies have shown that stem cells and sweat gland cells were co-cultured, and then transplanted into the scar wound for sweat gland reconstruction, which has achieved some success.%  背景:排汗可将一些溶解于汗液的代谢产物带出体外,在排泄中起辅助作用。现代医学目前还无法恢复严重创伤或烧伤患者的汗腺,如何解决皮肤汗腺的再生及如何培养具有皮肤附属物的“功能性组织工程皮肤”问题已成为当今医学研究中的热点。目的:探讨机体的新陈代谢、汗液的代谢方式,分析组织工程皮肤功能性附属物汗腺再生研究的现状。方

  13. Tooth regeneration: implications for the use of bioengineered organs in first-wave organ replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Taka; Ide, Yoshiaki

    2007-08-01

    Experiments with animal models have shown that the tooth crown structure can be regenerated using tissue engineering techniques that combine tooth bud cells and biodegradable materials, or by using embryonic tissue and adult stem cells. Moreover, tooth roots and periodontal tissues have been reconstructed by grafting dental stem cells, which leads to the recovery of tooth function, suggesting that tooth regeneration will become possible in humans in the near future. The present article reviews current research on tooth regeneration, discusses a model of tooth replacement that could be used clinically, and proposes a new tooth regeneration approach that overcomes the difficulties associated with the tooth replacement model. Tooth regeneration is an important stepping stone in the establishment of engineered organ transplantation, which is one of the ultimate goals of regenerative therapies.

  14. In vivo bone regeneration using a novel porous bioactive composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie En [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Hu Yunyu [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)], E-mail: orth1@fmmn.edu.cn; Chen Xiaofeng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Bai Xuedong; Li Dan [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ren Li [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang Ziru [Foreign Languages School, Northwest University Xi' an (China)

    2008-11-15

    Many commercial bone graft substitutes (BGS) and experimental bone tissue engineering scaffolds have been developed for bone repair and regeneration. This study reports the in vivo bone regeneration using a newly developed porous bioactive and resorbable composite that is composed of bioactive glass (BG), collagen (COL), hyaluronic acid (HYA) and phosphatidylserine (PS), BG-COL-HYA-PS. The composite was prepared by a combination of sol-gel and freeze-drying methods. A rabbit radius defect model was used to evaluate bone regeneration at time points of 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Techniques including radiography, histology, and micro-CT were applied to characterize the new bone formation. 8 weeks results showed that (1) nearly complete bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composite that was combined with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); (2) partial bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composites alone; and (3) control remained empty. This study demonstrated that the novel BG-COL-HYA-PS, with or without the grafting of BMP incorporation, is a promising BGS or a tissue engineering scaffold for non-load bearing orthopaedic applications.

  15. Electrospun scaffold development for periodontal ligament regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourattar, Parisa

    Periodontitis is a major chronic inflammatory disorder that can lead to the destruction of the periodontal tissues and, ultimately, tooth loss. It is a major cause of tooth loss in adults and a substantial public-health burden worldwide. There is thus a significant need for periodontal ligament (PDL) regeneration to enable functional mechanical support of tooth prostheses and prevent occlusal overloading. The goal of stem cell-based dental tissue engineering, is to create tooth-like structures using scaffold materials to guide the dental stem cells. Current resorbable membranes act as an epithelial tissue down-growth into the defect, favoring the regeneration of periodontal tissues. In order to develop synthetic grafts for these applications, different biocompatible materials have been used to fabricate fibers with different structures and morphologies. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using a composite material that combines the advantage of multiple materials to synthesize polyvinyl alcohol/ chitosan blend fiber scaffolds to promote PDL regeneration and to achieve a synthetic composite that match the native PDL modulus. Morphology, dispersibility, and mechanical properties of blend nanofibrous mats were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and tensile test.

  16. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gianluca; Vadalà; Fabrizio; Russo; Luca; Ambrosio; Mattia; Loppini; Vincenzo; Denaro

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments.Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers(e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration.

  17. Regenerating articular tissue by converging technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Moroni

    Full Text Available Scaffolds for osteochondral tissue engineering should provide mechanical stability, while offering specific signals for chondral and bone regeneration with a completely interconnected porous network for cell migration, attachment, and proliferation. Composites of polymers and ceramics are often considered to satisfy these requirements. As such methods largely rely on interfacial bonding between the ceramic and polymer phase, they may often compromise the use of the interface as an instrument to direct cell fate. Alternatively, here, we have designed hybrid 3D scaffolds using a novel concept based on biomaterial assembly, thereby omitting the drawbacks of interfacial bonding. Rapid prototyped ceramic particles were integrated into the pores of polymeric 3D fiber-deposited (3DF matrices and infused with demineralized bone matrix (DBM to obtain constructs that display the mechanical robustness of ceramics and the flexibility of polymers, mimicking bone tissue properties. Ostechondral scaffolds were then fabricated by directly depositing a 3DF structure optimized for cartilage regeneration adjacent to the bone scaffold. Stem cell seeded scaffolds regenerated both cartilage and bone in vivo.

  18. Enamel Regeneration in Making a Bioengineered Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruoshi; Zhou, Yachuan; Zhang, Binpeng; Shen, Jiefei; Gao, Bo; Xu, Xin; Ye, Ling; Zheng, Liwei; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-01-01

    Overall enamel is the hard tissue overlying teeth that is vulnerable to caries, congenital defects, and damage due to trauma. Not only is enamel incapable of self-repair in most species, but it is also subject to attrition. Besides the use of artificial materials to restore enamel, enamel regeneration is a promising approach to repair enamel damage. In order to comprehend the progression and challenges in tissue-engineered enamel, this article elaborates alternative stem cells potential for enamel secretion and expounds fined strategies for enamel regeneration in bioengineered teeth. Consequently, more and more cell types have been induced to differentiate into ameloblasts and to secrete enamel, and an increasing number of reports have emerged to provide various potential approaches to induce cells to secrete enamel based on recombination experiments, artificial bioactive nano-materials, or gene manipulation. Accordingly, it is expected to further project more optimal conditions for enamel formation in bioengineering based on a more thorough knowledge of reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, by which the procedures of enamel regeneration are able to be practically recapitulated and widely spread for the potential clinical value of enamel repair.

  19. Extracellular matrix components in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Injured axons of the peripheral nerve are able to regenerate and, eventually, reinnervate target organs. However, functional recovery is usually poor after severe nerve injuries. The switch of Schwann cells to a proliferative state, secretion of trophic factors, and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (such as collagen, laminin, or fibronectin) in the distal stump are key elements to create a permissive environment for axons to grow. In this review, we focus attention on the ECM components and their tropic role in axonal regeneration. These components can also be used as molecular cues to guide the axons through artificial nerve guides in attempts to better mimic the natural environment found in a degenerating nerve. Most used scaffolds tested are based on natural molecules that form the ECM, but use of synthetic polymers and functionalization of hydrogels are bringing new options. Progress in tissue engineering will eventually lead to the design of composite artificial nerve grafts that may replace the use of autologous nerve grafts to sustain regeneration over long gaps.

  20. Signaling Molecules and Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Widbiller, Matthias; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-09-01

    Signaling molecules play an essential role in tissue engineering because they regulate regenerative processes. Evidence exists from animal studies that single molecules such as members of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and factors that induce the growth of blood vessels (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerves (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), or fibroblasts (fibroblast growth factor) may induce reparative dentin formation. Mainly the formation of atubular dentin (osteodentin) has been described after the application of single molecules or combinations of recombinant growth factors on healthy exposed pulps or in pulp regeneration. Generally, such preparations have not received regulatory approval on the market so far. Only the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors together with cell transplantation is presently tested clinically. Besides approaches with only 1 or few combined molecules, the exploitation of tissue-derived growth factors depicts a third promising way in dental pulp tissue engineering. Preparations such as platelet-rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin provide a multitude of endogenous signaling molecules, and special regulatory approval for the market does not seem necessary. Furthermore, dentin is a perfect reservoir of signaling molecules that can be mobilized by treatment with demineralizing agents such as EDTA. This conditions the dentin surface and allows for contact differentiation of pulp stem cells into odontoblastlike cells, protects dentin from resorption, and enhances cell growth as well as attachment to dentin. By ultrasonic activation, signaling molecules can be further released from EDTA pretreated dentin into saline, thus avoiding cytotoxic EDTA in the final preparation. The use of dentin-derived growth factors offers a number of advantages because they are locally available and presumably are most fit to induce signaling processes in dental pulp. However, better characterization and standardization of the

  1. Stirling engine power control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, James P.

    1983-01-01

    A power control method and apparatus for a Stirling engine including a valved duct connected to the junction of the regenerator and the cooler and running to a bypass chamber connected between the heater and the cylinder. An oscillating zone of demarcation between the hot and cold portions of the working gas is established in the bypass chamber, and the engine pistons and cylinders can run cold.

  2. Regenerative medicine for diseases of the head and neck: principles of in vivo regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenheim, H

    2003-09-01

    The application of endogenous regeneration in regenerative medicine is based on the concept of inducing regeneration of damaged or lost tissues from residual tissues in situ. Therefore, endogenous regeneration is also termed in vivo regeneration as opposed to mechanisms of ex vivo regeneration which are applied, for example, in the field of tissue engineering. The basic science foundation for mechanisms of endogenous regeneration is provided by the field of regenerative biology. The ambitious vision for the application of endogenous regeneration in regenerative medicine is stimulated by investigations in the model organisms of regenerative biology, most notably hydra, planarians and urodeles. These model organisms demonstrate remarkable regenerative capabilities, which appear to be conserved over large phylogenetical stretches with convincing evidence for a homologue origin of an endogenous regenerative capability. Although the elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of these endogenous regenerative phenomena is still in its beginning, there are indications that these processes have potential to become useful for human benefit. Such indications also exist for particular applications in diseases of the head and neck region. As such epimorphic regeneration without blastema formation may be relevant to regeneration of sensorineural epithelia of the inner ear or the olphactory epithelium. Complex tissue lesions of the head and neck as they occur after trauma or tumor resections may be approached on the basis of relevant mechanisms in epimorphic regeneration with blastema formation.

  3. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or s...

  4. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  5. Integrating three-dimensional printing and nanotechnology for musculoskeletal regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Margaret; Castro, Nathan J.; Rao, Raj; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-09-01

    The field of tissue engineering is advancing steadily, partly due to advancements in rapid prototyping technology. Even with increasing focus, successful complex tissue regeneration of vascularized bone, cartilage and the osteochondral interface remains largely illusive. This review examines current three-dimensional printing techniques and their application towards bone, cartilage and osteochondral regeneration. The importance of, and benefit to, nanomaterial integration is also highlighted with recent published examples. Early-stage successes and challenges of recent studies are discussed, with an outlook to future research in the related areas.

  6. Peripheral nerve regeneration: experimental strategies and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroni, Alessandro; Mobasseri, S Atefeh; Kingham, Paul J; Reid, Adam J

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries represent a substantial clinical problem with insufficient or unsatisfactory treatment options. This review summarises all the events occurring after nerve damage at the level of the cell body, the site of injury and the target organ. Various experimental strategies to improve neuronal survival, axonal regeneration and target reinnervation are described including pharmacological approaches and cell-based therapies. Given the complexity of nerve regeneration, further studies are needed to address the biology of nerve injury, to improve the interaction with implantable scaffolds, and to implement cell-based therapies in nerve tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Regenerable solid imine sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

    2013-09-10

    Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

  8. Insights to regenerate materials: learning from nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Aznar, J. M.; Valero, C.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Javierre, E.

    2016-08-01

    Self-healing materials, both biological and engineered, integrate the ability to repair themselves and recover their functionality using the resources inherently available to them. Although significant advances have been made, in recent years, for the design of different concepts of self-healing materials, this work aims to provide some insights into how living materials are able to regenerate or heal when a fracture or injury occurs. The main sensors that regulate this adaptive and regenerative behavior are the cells. These are able to sense the mechanical alterations in their surroundings and regulate their activity in order to remove dead tissue and/or create new tissue. Therefore, understanding how cells are able to regenerate tissues under complex and multiphysics conditions can define the biomimetics guidelines to heal through inert or traditional engineering materials. In this work, we present a combination of experiments and different kinds of multiscale and multiphysics models in order to understand how mechanics regulate some mechanisms at cell and tissue level. This combination of results aims to gain insight into the development of novel strategies for self-healing materials, mimicking the behavior induced by cells and biological tissues.

  9. Diamex solvent regeneration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, C.; Cames, B.; Margot, L.; Ramain, L. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, DRRV, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    The CEA has undertaken the development of the DIAMEX process as the first step in the strategy aiming at recovering minor actinides which could then be transmuted or separately conditioned. The scientific feasibility of this process was demonstrated during counter current hot tests operated in 1993. Then experimental works were conducted, on one hand to optimise the extractant formula, on the other hand to improve the flowsheet. Reference extractant and flowsheet were then chosen, respectively in 1995 and 1996. The next step, still in progress, is the demonstration of the DIAMEX technical feasibility (in 2002); this means that the flowsheet should include solvent regeneration treatments. In this aim, degradation studies were performed to quantify main degradation products, and identify those which could be disturbing in the process. This paper deals with experimental studies performed with intend to propose a regeneration treatment, included in the flowsheet, so that the solvent could be recycled. It comprises: - Quantification of the main degradation products issued from radiolysis or hydrolysis, which are methyl octyl amine (MOA) and carboxylic acids; - Effects of these products on extracting and hydrodynamics performances of the process; - Study of methods able to remove mainly disturbing degradation products. Acidic scrubbing, which are performed in the scrubbing and stripping sections of the DIAMEX process, should allow the quantitative removal of methyl octyl amine. Then basic scrubbings, which were more especially studied, should eliminate at least 80% of carboxylic acids, and part of the cations remaining in the solvent. (authors)

  10. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  11. Progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Fan; Haichao Li; Yuwei Wang; Yanglin Zheng; Lianjun Jia; Zhihui Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of progesterone on peripheral nerve regeneration.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Medline and OVID databases was under taken to identify articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration published in English between January 1990 and June 2004 by using the keywords of "peripheral nerve, injury, progesterone, regeneration".STUDY SELECTION: The data were primarily screened, those correlated with progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were involved, and their original articles were further searched, the repetitive studies or reviews were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 59 articles about progesterone and peripheral nerve regeneration were collected, and 26 of them were involved, the other 33 excluded ones were the repetitive studies or reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: Recent researches found that certain amount of progesterone could be synthetized in peripheral nervous system, and the expression of progesterone receptor could be found in sensory neurons and Schwann cells. After combined with the receptor, endogenous and exogenous progesterone can accelerate the formation of peripheral nerve myelin sheath, also promote the axonal regeneration.CONCLUSION: Progesterone plays a role in protecting neurons, increasing the sensitivity of nerve tissue to nerve growth factor, and accelerating regeneration of nerve in peripheral nerve regeneration, which provides theoretical references for the treatment of demyelinated disease and nerve injury, as well as the prevention of neuroma, especially that the in vivo level of progesterone should be considered for the elderly people accompanied by neuropathy and patients with congenital luteal phase defect, which is of positive significance in guiding the treatment.

  12. Molecular approach to echinoderm regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndyke, M C; Chen, W C; Beesley, P W; Patruno, M

    2001-12-15

    Until very recently echinoderm regeneration research and indeed echinoderm research in general has suffered because of the lack of critical mass. In terms of molecular studies of regeneration, echinoderms in particular have lagged behind other groups in this respect. This is in sharp contrast to the major advances achieved with molecular and genetic techniques in the study of embryonic development in echinoderms. The aim of our studies has been to identify genes involved in the process of regeneration and in particular neural regeneration in different echinoderm species. Our survey included the asteroid Asterias rubens and provided evidence for the expression of Hox gene homologues in regenerating radial nerve cords. Present evidence suggests: 1) ArHox1 expression is maintained in intact radial nerve cord and may be upregulated during regeneration. 2) ArHox1 expression may contribute to the dedifferentiation and/or cell proliferation process during epimorphic regeneration. From the crinoid Antedon bifida, we have been successful in cloning a fragment of a BMP2/4 homologue (AnBMP2/4) and analysing its expression during arm regeneration. Here, we discuss the importance of this family of growth factors in several regulatory spheres, including maintaining the identity of pluripotent blastemal cells or as a classic skeletal morphogenic regulator. There is clearly substantial scope for future echinoderm research in the area of molecular biology and certain aspects are discussed in this review.

  13. The Basis of Muscle Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Musarò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle regeneration recapitulates many aspects of embryonic myogenesis and is an important homeostatic process of the adult skeletal muscle, which, after development, retains the capacity to regenerate in response to appropriate stimuli, activating the muscle compartment of stem cells, namely, satellite cells, as well as other precursor cells. Moreover, significant evidence suggests that while stem cells represent an important determinant for tissue regeneration, a “qualified” environment is necessary to guarantee and achieve functional results. It is therefore plausible that the loss of control over these cell fate decisions could lead to a pathological transdifferentiation, leading to pathologic defects in the regenerative process. This review provides an overview about the general aspects of muscle development and discusses the cellular and molecular aspects that characterize the five interrelated and time-dependent phases of muscle regeneration, namely, degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, remodeling, and maturation/functional repair.

  14. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  15. A tissue regeneration approach to bone and cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Dunstan, Colin; Rosen, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing exhaustively the current state of the art of tissue engineering strategies for regenerating bones and joints through the use of biomaterials, growth factors and stem cells, along with an investigation of the interactions between biomaterials, bone cells, growth factors and added stem cells and how together skeletal tissues can be optimised, this book serves to highlight the importance of biomaterials composition, surface topography, architectural and mechanical properties in providing support for tissue regeneration. Maximizing reader insights into the importance of the interplay of these attributes with bone cells (osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts) and cartilage cells (chondrocytes), this book also provides a detailed reference as to how key signalling pathways are activated. The contribution of growth factors to drive tissue regeneration and stem cell recruitment is discussed along with a review the potential and challenges of adult or embryonic mesenchymal stem cells to further enhance the...

  16. Advanced Scaffolds for Dental Pulp and Periodontal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottino, Marco C; Pankajakshan, Divya; Nör, Jacques E

    2017-10-01

    No current therapy promotes root canal disinfection and regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex in cases of pulp necrosis. Antibiotic pastes used to eradicate canal infection negatively affect stem cell survival. Three-dimensional easy-to-fit antibiotic-eluting nanofibers, combined with injectable scaffolds, enriched or not with stem cells and/or growth factors, may increase the likelihood of achieving predictable dental pulp regeneration. Periodontitis is an aggressive disease that impairs the integrity of tooth-supporting structures and may lead to tooth loss. The latest advances in membrane biomodification to endow needed functionalities and technologies to engineer patient-specific membranes/constructs to amplify periodontal regeneration are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Pessina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component.

  18. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-09

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component.

  19. Photon Regeneration Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Ringwald, A

    2006-01-01

    Precision experiments exploiting low-energy photons may yield information on particle physics complementary to experiments at high-energy colliders, in particular on new very light and very weakly interacting particles, predicted in many extensions of the standard model. Such particles may be produced by laser photons send along a transverse magnetic field. The laser polarization experiment PVLAS may have seen the first indirect signal of such particles by observing an anomalously large rotation of the polarization plane of photons after the passage through a magnetic field. This can be interpreted as evidence for photon disappearance due to particle production. There are a number of experimental proposals to test independently the particle interpretation of PVLAS. Many of them are based on the search for photon reappearance or regeneration, i.e. for ``light shining through a wall''. At DESY, the Axion-Like Particle Search (ALPS) collaboration is currently setting up such an experiment.

  20. Photon regeneration plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwald, A.

    2006-12-15

    Precision experiments exploiting low-energy photons may yield information on particle physics complementary to experiments at high-energy colliders, in particular on new very light and very weakly interacting particles, predicted in many extensions of the standard model. Such particles may be produced by laser photons send along a transverse magnetic field. The laser polarization experiment PVLAS may have seen the first indirect signal of such particles by observing an anomalously large rotation of the polarization plane of photons after the passage through a magnetic field. This can be interpreted as evidence for photon disappearance due to particle production. There are a number of experimental proposals to test independently the particle interpretation of PVLAS. Many of them are based on the search for photon reappearance or regeneration, i.e. for ''light shining through a wall''. At DESY, the Axion-Like Particle Search (ALPS) collaboration is currently setting up such an experiment. (orig.)

  1. A regenerable bitumen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudzuki, K.; Asakava, Y.; Matsui, A.; Ogava, A.

    1982-10-18

    The regenerable bitumin composition includes the bitumen material (asphalt, oxidized bitumen, petroleum or asphalt pitch) emulsified by an cation emulsifier (alkylamine or an imidazole derivative) and additionally by a noniononic emulsifier (polyoxyethylenamine), an amide, which contains greater than 1 amide groups per molecule (amide derivative, imidazoline), an epoxide compound with greater than 1 epoxide group per molecule (preferably with an epoxy equivalent of 180 to 500), an inorganic compound which hardens in water (Portland cement or silicate cement) and additionally, water. The total content of the second third components is 1 to 200 parts per million to 100 parts of the first component, while the content of the fourth component is from 1 to 400 parts. The water content in the composition is 5 to 1,000 percent of the total content of the first three components. The patented composition is characterized by high stability, strength, chemical stability, resistance to water and good adhesion properties.

  2. Adventitious shoot regeneration from the leaves of in vitro grown 'Zhongli 1' pear (Pyrus spp.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie LIU; Xi ZHANG; Bharat Kumar POUDYAL; Yuxing ZHANG; Zhan JIAO; Jing QI

    2009-01-01

    The pear (Pyrus spp.) is one of the most important temperate fruit crops. The technique of adven-titious shoot regeneration from leaves is considered to be one of the shortcuts in the research on pear genetic modification and cellular engineering, which, however, has not been widely used. As the regeneration frequency of pear leaves is usually very low, the research on adventi-tious shoot regeneration from pear leaves is eagerly needed. In this experiment, the factors affecting shoot and bud regeneration from the leaves of 'Zhongli 1' pear were studied, and an efficient protocol for shoot regenera-tion was established. The results showed that different types of basic media, different combinations of plant growth regulators, leaf placement on medium, periods of dark culture and the use of silver nitrate (AgNO3) on culture media all significantly affected the adventitious shoot regeneration frequency of 'Zhongli 1' pear. The details are as follows: (1) Among three kinds of basic media, NN69 was better for 'Zhongli 1' shoot regenera- tion, followed by half(1/2) MS, while full MS had no effect on shoot regeneration; (2) Thidiazuron (TDZ) was better than 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) for 'Zhongli 1' regen-eration, with an optimal concentration of 1.5 mg.L-1, and the regeneration rate under this concentration could reach 85%, with 2.72 buds per leaf. 0.5 mg .L-1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), which induced a higher regeneration fre-quency, was a better choice for pear regeneration compared with 0.3 mg.L-1 naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Among the different combinations of plant growth regulators, TDZ + IBA was better for inducing high regeneration frequency; (3) The abaxial surface of leaves touching the medium was beneficial for leaves to uptake nutrients from the medium, and because of that, the regeneration fre-quency of leaves was significantly higher than that of leaves touching the medium with their adaxial surfaces (obverse side of leaf); (4) Dark culture was necessary

  3. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  4. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  5. The primacy of octacalcium phosphate collagen composites in bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Shinji; Sasaki, Kazuo; Homma, Takahiro; Honda, Yoshitomo; Anada, Takahisa; Echigo, Seishi; Suzuki, Osamu

    2007-12-01

    We have engineered a scaffold constructed of synthetic octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and porcine collagen sponge (OCP/Col), and reported that OCP/Col drastically enhanced bone regeneration. In this study, we investigated whether OCP/Col would enhance bone regeneration more than beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) collagen composite (beta-TCP/Col) or hydroxyapatite (HA) collagen composite (HA/Col). Discs of OCP/Col, beta-TCP/Col, or HA/Col were implanted into critical-sized defects in rat crania and fixed at 4 or 12 weeks after implantation. The newly formed bone and the remaining granules of implants in the defect were determined by histomorphometrical analysis, and radiographic and histological examinations were performed. Statistical analysis showed that the newly formed bone by the implantation of OCP/Col was significantly more than that of beta-TCP/Col or HA/Col. In contrast, the remaining granules in OCP/Col were significantly lower than those in beta-TCP/Col or HA/Col. Bone regeneration by OCP/Col was based on secured calcified collagen and bone nucleation by OCP, whereas bone regeneration by beta-TCP/Col or HA/Col was initiated by poorly calcified collagen and osteoconductivity by beta-TCP or HA. This study showed that the implantation of OCP/Col in a rat cranial defect enhanced more bone regeneration than beta-TCP/Col and HA/Col.

  6. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world.

  7. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth.

  8. Recent developments in scaffold-guided cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shi, Kun; Ding, Qiuxia; Qu, Ying; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage repair is one of the most challenging problems in biomedical engineering because the regenerative capacity of cartilage is intrinsically poor. The lack of efficient treatment modalities motivates researches into cartilage tissue engineering such as combing cells, scaffolds and growth factors. In this review we summarize the current developments on scaffold systems available for cartilage tissue engineering. The factors that are critical to successfully design an ideal scaffold for cartilage regeneration were discussed. Then we present examples of selected material types (natural polymers and synthetic polymers) and fabricated forms of the scaffolds (three-dimensional scaffolds, micro- or nanoparticles, and their composites). In the end of review, we conclude with an overview of the ways in which biomedical nanotechnology is widely applied in cartilage tissue engineering, especially in the design of composite scaffolds. This review attempts to provide recommendations on the combination of qualities that would produce the ideal scaffold system for cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. Microwave regenerated particulate trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, A.C. Jr.; Yonushonis, T.M. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Haberkamp, W.C.; Mako, F.; Len, L.K,; Silberglitt, R.; Ahmed, I. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    It has been demonstrated that a fibrous particulate filter can extract particulate matter from the diesel exhaust. However, additional engineering efforts remains to achieve the design target of 90%. It has also be shown that with minor modifications magnetrons produced for home ovens can endure a simulated diesel operating environment. Much work remains to develop a robust product ready to complete extensive engine testing and evaluation. These efforts include: (1) additional environmental testing of magnetrons; (2) vibration testing of the filter in the housing; (3) evaluating alternative methods/designs to seal the center bore; and (4) determining the optimum coating thickness that provides sufficient structural integrity while maintaining rapid heating rates.

  10. Biomaterials & scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Every day thousands of surgical procedures are performed to replace or repair tissue that has been damaged through disease or trauma. The developing field of tissue engineering (TE aims to regenerate damaged tissues by combining cells from the body with highly porous scaffold biomaterials, which act as templates for tissue regeneration, to guide the growth of new tissue. This article describes the functional requirements, and types, of materials used in developing state of the art of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, it describes the challenges and where future research and direction is required in this rapidly advancing field.

  11. Muscle repair and regeneration: stem cells, scaffolds, and the contributions of skeletal muscle to amphibian limb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Derek J; Cameron, Jo Ann

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses a robust innate capability for repair of tissue damage. Natural repair of muscle damage is a stepwise process that requires the coordinated activity of a number of cell types, including infiltrating macrophages, resident myogenic and non-myogenic stem cells, and connective tissue fibroblasts. Despite the proficiency of this intrinsic repair capability, severe injuries that result in significant loss of muscle tissue overwhelm the innate repair process and require intervention if muscle function is to be restored. Recent advances in stem cell biology, regenerative medicine, and materials science have led to attempts at developing tissue engineering-based methods for repairing severe muscle defects. Muscle tissue also plays a role in the ability of tailed amphibians to regenerate amputated limbs through epimorphic regeneration. Muscle contributes adult stem cells to the amphibian regeneration blastema, but it can also contribute blastemal cells through the dedifferentiation of multinucleate myofibers into mononuclear precursors. This fascinating plasticity and its contributions to limb regeneration have prompted researchers to investigate the potential for mammalian muscle to undergo dedifferentiation. Several works have shown that mammalian myotubes can be fragmented into mononuclear cells and induced to re-enter the cell cycle, but mature myofibers are resistant to fragmentation. However, recent works suggest that there may be a path to inducing fragmentation of mature myofibers into proliferative multipotent cells with the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies.

  12. An experimental study of passive regenerator geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Pryds, Nini

    2011-01-01

    this article studies the effects of regenerator geometry on performance for flat plate regenerators. This paper investigates methods of improving the performance of flat plate regenerators for use in AMR systems and studies how manufacturing variation affects regenerator performance. In order to eliminate...... experimental uncertainty associated with magnetocaloric material properties, all regenerators are made of aluminum. The performance of corrugated plates and dimpled plates are compared to traditional flat plate regenerators for a range of cycle times and utilizations. Each regenerator is built using 18...

  13. Synthesis of flat-top gain response in fiber phase sensitive amplifiers with improved phase noise regeneration tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Ning; Seoane, Jorge; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Flat-top gain responses can be obtained together with two-level flat phase responses in fiber phase sensitive amplifiers by introducing moderate saturation together with dispersion engineering, resulting in an improved phase regeneration performance.......Flat-top gain responses can be obtained together with two-level flat phase responses in fiber phase sensitive amplifiers by introducing moderate saturation together with dispersion engineering, resulting in an improved phase regeneration performance....

  14. Regenerative engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Laurencin, Cato T

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative Engineering: The Future of Medicine Saadiq F. El-Amin III , MD , PhD; Joylene W.L. Thomas, MD ; Ugonna N. Ihekweazu, MD ; Mia D. Woods, MS; and Ashim Gupta, MSCell Biology Gloria Gronowicz, PhD and Karen Sagomonyants, DMDStem Cells and Tissue Regeneration Kristen Martins-Taylor, PhD; Xiaofang Wang, MD , PhD; Xue-Jun Li, PhD; and Ren-He Xu, MD , PhDIntroduction to Materials Science Sangamesh G. Kumbar, PhD and Cato T. Laurencin, MD , PhDBiomaterials A. Jon Goldberg, PhD and Liisa T. Kuhn, PhDIn Vitro Assessment of Cell-Biomaterial Interactions Yong Wang, PhDHost Response to Biomate

  15. Regenerable Contaminant Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Regenerable Contaminant Removal System (RCRS) is an innovative method to remove sulfur and halide compounds from contaminated gas streams to part-per-billion...

  16. Instructive composites for bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, D.

    2012-01-01

    Developing new biomaterials for tissue regeneration requires careful balance between many factors, which is challenging because, on one side, such materials must provide complex information, through their physicochemical properties to actively interact with the biological surroundings and induce tis

  17. Dental-derived Stem Cells and whole Tooth Regeneration: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The need for new dental tissue-replacement therapies is evident in recent reports which reveal startling statistics regarding the high incidence of tooth decay and tooth loss. Recent advances in the identification and characterization of dental stem cells, and in dental tissue-engineering strategies, suggest that bioengineering approaches may successfully be used to regenerate dental tissues and whole teeth. Interest in dental tissue-regeneration applications continues to increase as clinical...

  18. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; O’Meara, Caitlin C.; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M.; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B.; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F.; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A.; Poss, Kenneth D.; Lee, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte...

  19. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogels for central nervous system regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Pi, Bin; Wang, Hui; Wang, Xiu-Mei

    2015-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) presents a complex regeneration problem due to the inability of central neurons to regenerate correct axonal and dendritic connections. However, recent advances in developmental neurobiology, cell signaling, cell-matrix interaction, and biomaterials technologies have forced a reconsideration of CNS regeneration potentials from the viewpoint of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The applications of a novel tissue regeneration-inducing biomaterial and stem cells are thought to be critical for the mission. The use of peptide nanofiber hydrogels in cell therapy and tissue engineering offers promising perspectives for CNS regeneration. Self-assembling peptide undergo a rapid transformation from liquid to gel upon addition of counterions or pH adjustment, directly integrating with the host tissue. The peptide nanofiber hydrogels have mechanical properties that closely match the native central nervous extracellular matrix, which could enhance axonal growth. Such materials can provide an optimal three dimensional microenvironment for encapsulated cells. These materials can also be tailored with bioactive motifs to modulate the wound environment and enhance regeneration. This review intends to detail the recent status of self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogels for CNS regeneration.

  20. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G. [Institute of Crystallography, CNR, via Salaria Km 29.300, I-00015, Monterotondo Roma (Italy); Fratini, M. [Centro Fermi -Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' Enrico Fermi' , Roma (Italy); Ricci, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Burghammer, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B. P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, and Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale dell' Università di Genova and AUO San Martino Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132, Genova (Italy); Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A. [Institute for Chemical and Physical Process, CNR, c/o Physics Dep. at Sapienza University, P-le A. Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  1. Bioceramics: from bone regeneration to cancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet-Regí, María; Ruiz-Hernández, Eduardo

    2011-11-23

    Research on biomaterials has been growing in the last few years due to the clinical needs in organs and tissues replacement and regeneration. In addition, cancer nanomedicine has recently appeared as an effective means to combine nanotechnology developments towards a clinical application. Ceramic materials are suitable candidates to be used in the manufacturing of bone-like scaffolds. Bioceramic materials may also be designed to deliver biologically active substances aimed at repairing, maintaining, restoring or improving the function of organs and tissues in the organism. Several materials such as calcium phosphates, glasses and glass ceramics able to load and subsequently release in a controlled fashion drugs, hormones, growth factors, peptides or nucleic acids have been developed. In particular, to prevent post surgical infections bioceramics may be surface modified and loaded with certain antibiotics, thus preventing the formation of bacterial biofilms. Remarkably, mesoporous bioactive glasses have shown excellent characteristics as drug carrying bone regeneration materials. These bioceramics are not only osteoconductive and osteoproductive, but also osteoinductive, and have therefore been proposed as ideal components for the fabrication of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. A recent promising development of bioceramic materials is related to the design of magnetic mediators against tumors. Magnetic composites are suitable thermoseeds for cancer treatment by hyperthermia. Moreover, magnetic nanomaterials offer a wide range of possibilities for diagnosis and therapy. These nanoparticles may be conjugated with therapeutic agents and heat the surrounding tissue under the action of alternating magnetic fields, enabling hyperthermia of cancer as an effective adjunct to chemotherapy regimens.

  2. Innovative Approaches to Regenerate Enamel and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthippi Chatzistavrou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of tooth mineralization and the role of molecular control of cellular behavior during embryonic tooth development have attracted much attention the last few years. The knowledge gained from the research in these fields has improved the general understanding about the formation of dental tissues and the entire tooth and set the basis for teeth regeneration. Tissue engineering using scaffold and cell aggregate methods has been considered to produce bioengineered dental tissues, while dental stem/progenitor cells, which can differentiate into dental cell lineages, have been also introduced into the field of tooth mineralization and regeneration. Some of the main strategies for making enamel, dentin, and complex tooth-like structures are presented in this paper. However, there are still significant barriers that obstruct such strategies to move into the regular clinic practice, and these should be overcome in order to have the regenerative dentistry as the important mean that can treat the consequences of tooth-related diseases.

  3. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Mod II engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Albert E.; Huang, Shyan-Cherng

    1987-01-01

    The testing of a prototype of an automotive Stirling engine, the Mod II, is discussed. The Mod II is a one-piece cast block with a V-4 single-crankshaft configuration and an annular regenerator/cooler design. The initial testing of Mod II concentrated on the basic engine, with auxiliaries driven by power sources external to the engine. The performance of the engine was tested at 720 C set temperature and 820 C tube temperature. At 720 C, it is observed that the power deficiency is speed dependent and linear, with a weak pressure dependency, and at 820 C, the power deficiency is speed and pressure dependent. The effects of buoyancy and nozzle spray pattern on the heater temperature spread are investigated. The characterization of the oil pump and the operating cycle and temperature spread tests are proposed for further evaluation of the engine.

  5. Neurotrophic regulation of fibroblast dedifferentiation during limb skeletal regeneration in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Akira; Cummings, Gillian M C; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2010-01-15

    The ability of animals to repair tissue damage is widespread and impressive. Among tissues, the repair and remodeling of bone occurs during growth and in response to injury; however, loss of bone above a threshold amount is not regenerated, resulting in a "critical-size defect" (CSD). The development of therapies to replace or regenerate a CSD is a major focus of research in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Adult urodeles (salamanders) are unique in their ability to regenerate complex tissues perfectly, yet like mammals do not regenerate a CSD. We report on an experimental model for the regeneration of a CSD in the axolotl (the Excisional Regeneration Model) that allows for the identification of signals to induce fibroblast dedifferentiation and skeletal regeneration. This regenerative response is mediated in part by BMP signaling, as is the case in mammals; however, a complete regenerative response requires the induction of a population of undifferentiated, regeneration-competent cells. These cells can be induced by signaling from limb amputation to generate blastema cells that can be grafted to the wound, as well as by signaling from a nerve and a wound epithelium to induce blastema cells from fibroblasts within the wound environment.

  6. Study on Braking Energy Regeneration System for City Bus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Zheng-yao; CHEN Ru-wen; YANG Xue-mei; LIU Gou-bing; JIN Jia-jun

    2011-01-01

    Braking of the urban vehicles of public service wastes a large number of engine energy in the condition of starting and stopping frequently. Aiming at the problem, an electro-mechanical braking energy regeneration system was proposed which adopted a high-speed flywheel and a battery to recover the braking energy and achieve the secondary traction for the auxiliary start function. The system strategy was designed and the braking simulation was processed to validate its feasibility. The experiment results show that the system can effectively recover the braking energy, improve the starting performance of the city bus and it can be applied to the engineering.

  7. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Soleas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990. In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium.

  8. Whole meniscus regeneration using polymer scaffolds loaded with fibrochondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hua-ding; CAI Dao-zhang; WU Gang; WANG Kun; SHI De-hai

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of regenerating a whole menisci using poly-(3- hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) scaffolds loaded with meniscal cells in rabbits undergoing total meniscectomy, and to explore its protective effect on cartilage degeneration. Methods: A solvent casting and particulate leaching technique was employed to fabricate biodegradable PHBV scaffolds into a meniscal shape. The proliferated meniscal cells were seeded onto the polymer scaffolds, transplanted into rabbit knee joints whose lateral menisci had been removed. Eight to 18 weeks after transplantation, the regenerated neomenisci were evaluated by gross and histological observations. Cartilage degeneration was assessed by Mankin score. Results: Eighteen weeks after transplantation, the implants formed neomenisci. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining of the neomenisci sections revealed regeneration of fibrocartilage. Type Ⅰ collagen in the neomenisci was also proved similar to normal meniscal tissue by immunohistochemical analysis and Sirius scarlet trinitrophenol staining. Articular cartilage degeneration was observed 8 weeks after implantation. It was less severe as compared with that in total meniscectomy controls and no further degeneration was observed at 18 weeks. At that time, the regenerated neomenisci strongly resembled normal meniscal fibrocartilage in gross and histological appearance, and its mechanical property was also close to that of normal meniscus. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates the feasibility of tissue-engineering a whole meniscal structure in total meniscectomy rabbit models using biodegradable PHBV scaffolds together with cultured allogeneic meniscal cells. Cartilage degeneration is decreased. But long-term in vivo investigations on the histological structure and cartilage degeneration of the neomenisci regenerated by this method are still necessary to determine the clinical potential of this tissue engineering avenue.

  9. a Low Temperature Regenerator Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.

    2008-03-01

    Testing regenerators presents an interesting challenge. When incorporated into a cryocooler, a regenerator is intimately coupled to the other components: expander, heat exchangers, and compressor. It is difficult to isolate the performance of any single component. We have developed a low temperature test facility that will allow us to separate the performance of the regenerator from the rest of the cryocooler. The purpose of the facility is the characterization of test regenerators using novel materials and/or geometries in temperature ranges down to 15 K. It consists of the following elements: The test column has two regenerators stacked in series. The coldest stage regenerator is the device under test. The warmer stage regenerator contains a stack of stainless steel screen, a well-characterized material. A commercial cryocooler is used to fix the temperatures at both ends of the test regenerator, cooling both heat exchangers flanging the regenerator stack. Heaters allow varying the temperatures and allow measurement of the remaining cooling power, and thus, regenerator effectiveness. A linear compressor delivers an oscillating pressure to the regenerator assembly. An inertance tube and reservoir provide the proper phase difference between mass flow and pressure. This phase shift, along with the imposed temperature differential, simulates the conditions of the test regenerator when used in an actual pulse tube cryocooler. This paper presents development details of the regenerator test facility, and test results on a second stage, stainless steel screen test regenerator.

  10. Bone morphogenetic proteins: Periodontal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam M Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in attachment loss and bone loss. Regeneration of the periodontal tissues entails de novo formation of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Several different approaches are currently being explored to achieve complete, reliable, and reproducible regeneration of periodontal tissues. The therapeutic management of new bone formation is one of the key issues in successful periodontal regeneration. Bone morphogenetic proteins form a unique group of proteins within the transforming growth factor superfamily of genes and have a vital role in the regulation in the bone induction and maintenance. The activity of bone morphogenetic proteins was first identified in the 1960s, but the proteins responsible for bone induction were unknown until the purification and cloning of human bone morphogenetic proteins in the 1980s, because of their osteoinductive potential. Bone morphogenetic proteins have gained a lot of interest as therapeutic agents for treating periodontal defects. A systematic search for data related to the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for the regeneration of periodontal defects was performed to recognize studies on animals and human (PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and Google search. All the studies included showed noticeable regeneration of periodontal tissues with the use of BMP.

  11. Contemporaryperspective on endogenous myocardial regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Considering the complex nature of the adult heart,it is no wonder that innate regenerative processes,while maintaining adequate cardiac function, fall shortin myocardial jeopardy. In spite of these enchaining limitations, cardiac rejuvenation occurs as well asrestricted regeneration. In this review, the backgroundas well as potential mechanisms of endogenousmyocardial regeneration are summarized. We presentand analyze the available evidence in three subsequentsteps. First, we examine the experimental researchdata that provide insights into the mechanisms andorigins of the replicating cardiac myocytes, includingcell populations referred to as cardiac progenitor cells(i.e. , c-kit+ cells). Second, we describe the role ofclinical settings such as acute or chronic myocardialischemia, as initiators of pathways of endogenousmyocardial regeneration. Third, the hitherto conductedclinical studies that examined different approachesof initiating endogenous myocardial regeneration infailing human hearts are analyzed. In conclusion, wepresent the evidence in support of the notion thatregaining cardiac function beyond cellular replacementof dysfunctional myocardium via initiation of innateregenerative pathways could create a new perspectiveand a paradigm change in heart failure therapeutics.Reinitiating cardiac morphogenesis by reintroducingdevelopmental pathways in the adult failing heart mightprovide a feasible way of tissue regeneration. Basedon our hypothesis "embryonic recall", we present firstsupporting evidence on regenerative impulses in themyocardium, as induced by developmental processes.

  12. Automotive gas turbine ceramic regenerator design and reliability program. Final annual report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.A.; Fucinari, C.A.; Lingscheit, J.N.; Rahnke, C.J.

    1976-10-01

    The primary objective of the ERDA/Ford Ceramic Regenerator Design and Reliability Program is to develop ceramic regenerator cores that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Specific durability objectives are defined as achieving a B/sub 10/ life of 10,000 hours on a truck/industrial gas turbine engine duty cycle. Previous reports, under this program, summarized operating experience on lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) ceramic regenerator cores obtained at Ford Motor Company. The primary cause of failure of these regenerators was determined to be chemical attack of the LAS material. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines late in 1974. A description is given of the results of 18,500 hours of turbine engine durability testing accumulated during the period from July 1, 1975 to Sept. 30, 1976. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. Regenerator cores made from aluminum silicate show no evidence of chemical attack damage after 5600 hours of engine test.

  13. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  14. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi, E-mail: taguchi.tetsushi@nims.go.jp [Biofunctional Materials Unit, Nano-Bio Field, Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  15. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsushi Taguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  16. Collagen based barrier membranes for periodontal guided bone regeneration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Qureshi, Javairia; Alshahrani, Abdullah M; Nassar, Heba; Ikeda, Yuichi; Glogauer, Michael; Ganss, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Certain cell populations within periodontal tissues possess the ability to induce regeneration, provided they have the opportunity to populate the wound or defect. Guided regeneration techniques have been investigated for regenerating periodontal tissues and such therapies usually utilize barrier membranes. Various natural and synthetic barrier membranes have been fabricated and tested to prevent epithelial and connective tissue cells from invading while allowing periodontal cells to selectively migrate into the defect. This paper focuses on the literature relevant to the use and potential of resorbable collagen membranes in GBR procedures, sites of periodontal and intrabony defects, in cases of socket and alveolar ridge preservation and at implant sites. The results of their use in GBR procedures has shown them to be effective and comparable with non-resorbable membranes with regards to clinical attachment gain, probing depth reduction and defect bone filling. They have also shown to prevent epithelial ingrowth into the defect space during the initial wound healing phase postsurgically. Collagen membranes have also been used for root coverage and GBR procedures and have shown good success rates comparable to subepithelial connective tissue grafts and expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membranes. The future for periodontal tissue engineering is very exciting with the use of barrier membranes expected to continue playing a critical role. However, long-term clinical trials are required to further evaluate and confirm the efficacy of the available collagen barrier membranes for periodontal and bone regeneration use.

  17. Coupled cellular therapy and magnetic targeting for airway regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordidge, Katherine L; Gregori, Maria; Kalber, Tammy L; Lythgoe, Mark F; Janes, Sam M; Giangreco, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Airway diseases including COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), cystic fibrosis and lung cancer are leading causes of worldwide morbidity and mortality, with annual healthcare costs of billions of pounds. True regeneration of damaged airways offers the possibility of restoring lung function and protecting against airway transformation. Recently, advances in tissue engineering have allowed the development of cadaveric and biosynthetic airway grafts. Although these have produced encouraging results, the ability to achieve long-term functional airway regeneration remains a major challenge. To promote regeneration, exogenously delivered stem and progenitor cells are being trialled as cellular therapies. Unfortunately, current evidence suggests that only small numbers of exogenously delivered stem cells engraft within lungs, thereby limiting their utility for airway repair. In other organ systems, magnetic targeting has shown promise for improving long-term robust cell engraftment. This technique involves in vitro cell expansion, magnetic actuation and magnetically guided cell engraftment to sites of tissue damage. In the present paper, we discuss the utility of coupling stem cell-mediated cellular therapy with magnetic targeting for improving airway regeneration.

  18. Octacalcium phosphate combined with collagen orthotopically enhances bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Shinji; Sasaki, Kazuo; Honda, Yoshitomo; Anada, Takahisa; Suzuki, Osamu

    2006-11-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is resorbable bone regenerative material, but its brittleness makes it difficult to maintain its shape without restraint. We have engineered a scaffold constructed of synthetic OCP and porcine collagen sponge (OCP/Collagen) and investigated whether OCP/Collagen composite could improve bone regeneration. To examine this hypothesis, bone regeneration by the implantation of OCP/Collagen was compared with those by OCP and collagen. Radiographic and histological examination was performed and the percentage of newly formed bone (n-Bone%) in the defect was determined by a histomorphometrical analysis. OCP/Collagen, OCP, or collagen was implanted into the critical-sized defects in rat crania and fixed at 2, 4, or 8 weeks after implantation. OCP/Collagen improved the handling performance than the granules of OCP, and synergistically enhanced the bone regeneration beyond expectation, which were composed of bone nucleation by OCP and cell infiltration by collagen. Histomorphometrical analysis showed that n-Bone% +/- standard error treated with OCP/Collagen (48.4 +/- 5.14) was significantly higher than those with OCP (27.6 +/- 4.04) or collagen (27.4 +/- 5.69) in week 8. The present study suggests that the combination OCP with collagen elicited the synergistic effect for bone regeneration.

  19. Membrane supported scaffold : architectures for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettahalli, Narasimha Murthy Srivatsa

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at restoring or regenerating a damaged tissue. Often the tissue recreation occurs by combining cells, derived from a patient biopsy, onto a 3D porous matrix, functioning as a scaffold. One of the current limitations of tissue engineering is the inability to provide sufficie

  20. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... myopathies. We investigated regeneration in muscle biopsies from 61 genetically well-defined patients affected by mitochondrial myopathy. Our results show that the perturbed energy metabolism in mitochondrial myopathies causes ongoing muscle regeneration in a majority of patients, and some were even affected...... by a dystrophic morphology. The results add to the complexity of the pathogenesis underlying mitochondrial myopathies, and expand the knowledge about the impact of energy deficiency on another aspect of muscle structure and function....

  1. Some principles of regeneration in mammalian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bruce M

    2005-11-01

    This article presents some general principles underlying regenerative phenomena in vertebrates, starting with the epimorphic regeneration of the amphibian limb and continuing with tissue and organ regeneration in mammals. Epimorphic regeneration following limb amputation involves wound healing, followed shortly by a phase of dedifferentiation that leads to the formation of a regeneration blastema. Up to the point of blastema formation, dedifferentiation is guided by unique regenerative pathways, but the overall developmental controls underlying limb formation from the blastema generally recapitulate those of embryonic limb development. Damaged mammalian tissues do not form a blastema. At the cellular level, differentiation follows a pattern close to that seen in the embryo, but at the level of the tissue and organ, regeneration is strongly influenced by conditions inherent in the local environment. In some mammalian systems, such as the liver, parenchymal cells contribute progeny to the regenerate. In others, e.g., skeletal muscle and bone, tissue-specific progenitor cells constitute the main source of regenerating cells. The substrate on which regeneration occurs plays a very important role in determining the course of regeneration. Epimorphic regeneration usually produces an exact replica of the structure that was lost, but in mammalian tissue regeneration the form of the regenerate is largely determined by the mechanical environment acting on the regenerating tissue, and it is normally an imperfect replica of the original. In organ hypertophy, such as that occurring after hepatic resection, the remaining liver mass enlarges, but there is no attempt to restore the original form.

  2. The role of a platelet Lysate-Based compartmentalized system as a carrier of cells and platelet-origin cytokines for periodontal tissue regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Babo, Pedro Miguel Sousa; Xinjie Cai; Plachokova, A.; Reis, R. L.; Jansen, John A.; Gomes, Manuela E.; Walboomers, X. Frank

    2016-01-01

    Currently available clinical therapies are not capable to regenerate tissues that are lost by periodontitis. Tissue engineering can be applied as a strategy to regenerate reliably the tissues and function of damaged periodontium. A prerequisite for this regeneration is the colonization of the defect with the adequate cell populations. In this study, we proposed a bilayered system composed of (1) a platelet lysate (PL)-based construct produced by crosslinking of PL proteins with genipin (gP...

  3. Repair and regeneration in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L M; Rosenberg, P A

    2011-10-01

    The ideal objective of treatment of established diseases, including irreversible pulpitis and apical periodontitis, is to achieve wound healing. Wound healing can result in repair or regeneration. The ultimate goal of wound healing is to restore the original architecture and biological function of the injured tissue or organ. Although humans are equipped with powerful innate and adaptive immune defence mechanisms, many intrinsic and extrinsic factors can affect wound healing. Complete regeneration following injury in humans can occur only in the pre-natal foetus within 24 weeks of gestation. Post-natal wounds including irreversible pulpitis or apical periodontitis always heal by repair or by a combination of repair and regeneration. Somatic cells, such as fibroblasts, macrophages, cementoblasts and osteoblasts, in the pulp and periapical tissues have limited potential for regeneration following injury and lack of telomerase. Wound healing of irreversible pulpitis and apical periodontitis requires recruitment and differentiation of progenitor/stem cells into tissue-committed somatic cells. Stem cell differentiation is regulated by intrinsic factors and extrinsic micro-environmental cues. Functionality of stem cells appears to show an age-related decline because of the change in intrinsic properties and diminished signals within the extrinsic local and systemic environment that modulate the function of stem cells or their progeny. Infection induces an immuno-inflammatory response and tissue destruction, which hinders the potential of tissue regeneration. Therefore, prevention, early detection and treatment of inflammation/infection of pulpal and periapical disease can enhance regeneration and minimize the repair of pulpal and periapical tissues after endodontic therapy. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  4. Social Capital, Local Communities and Culture-led Urban Regeneration Processes: The Sydney Olympic Park Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Hugh Prior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Culture has become increasingly important in regeneration processes designed to deal with urban futures. Urban regeneration processes in which culture has played a prominent role range from large-scale public investments in cultural facilities and artefacts as ‘hallmarks’ of urban regeneration projects (e.g. Guggenheim Bilbao, through to the use of ‘one shot’ cultural events such as the Olympic Games as a catalyst and engine for regenerating urban areas. The aim of this paper is to examine the association between social capital (SC, local communities and the culture-led regeneration process at Sydney Olympic Park (SOP, New South Wales, Australia. The catalyst for the transformation of an industrial wasteland into SOP was the awarding of the Olympics to Sydney in 1993. A convenience sample of 47 professional reports associated with the regeneration process at SOP between 1993 and 2010 were analyzed, the aim being to understand how local communities had been linked to the regeneration process through SC. Results from the analysis identified three principal associations between SC, local communities and the ongoing SOP regeneration process. The first association related to how, during the early years of the regeneration process, SC was used as a means of expressing concern about how governance mechanisms implemented at SOP might adversely impact the ability of local communities to engage in decision making that affected their local environment. The second related to the use of community development programs to build SC in local communities through the SOP development. The third related to a call for the development of measures to understand how the development of SOP impacts on the SC in local communities. Eight in-depth interviews with professionals involved in the regeneration process were used to provide further insights into the three principal associations. The paper discusses findings through reference to broader arguments surrounding

  5. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  6. EMERGE: Engineered Materials that Create Environments for ReGenerationvia Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0542 TITLE: EMERGE: Engineered Materials that Create Environments for ReGeneration via Electric Field PRINCIPAL...23 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EMERGE: Engineered Materials that Create Environments for ReGeneration via Electric Field ...Create Environments for ReGeneration via Electric Fields . The objective of the project is to develop a next-generation ocular implant material with

  7. Some heat engine cycles in which liquids can work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P. C.; Paulson, D. N.; Wheatley, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Liquids can work in heat engine cycles that employ regeneration. Four such cycles are discussed: Stirling, Malone, Stirling-Malone, and Brayton. Both regeneration and the role of the second thermodynamic medium are treated, and the principles are verified by quantitative measurements with propylene in a Stirling-Malone cycle. PMID:16592952

  8. Microfabrication of a Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator, Testing in a Sunpower Stirling Convertor and Supporting Modeling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Tew, Roy C.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Under Phase II of a NASA Research Award contract, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated via LiGA and tested in the NASA/Sunpower oscillating-flow test rig. The resulting figure-of-merit was about twice that of the approx.90% porosity random-fiber material currently used in the small 50-100 W Stirling engines recently manufactured for NASA. That work was reported at the 2007 International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in St. Louis, was also published as a NASA report, NASA/TM-2007-2149731, and has been more completely described in a recent NASA Contractor Report, NASA/CR-2007-2150062. Under a scaled-back version of the original Phase III plan, a new nickel segmentedinvolute- foil regenerator was microfabricated and has been tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator been made from a low-conductivity material. Also the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator's low flow resistance; thus the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) is included. The report also includes recommendations for accomplishing further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  9. Temporal regulation of planarian eye regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Deochand, Michelle E.; Birkholz, Taylor R.; Wendy S Beane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While tissue regeneration is typically studied using standard injury models, in nature injuries vary greatly in the amount and location of tissues lost. Planarians have the unique ability to regenerate from many different injuries (including from tiny fragments with no brain), allowing us to study the effects of different injuries on regeneration timelines. We followed the timing of regeneration for one organ, the eye, after multiple injury types that involved tissue loss (single‐ an...

  10. Biomaterial scaffold in dental pulp tissue engineering and regeneration%牙髓组织工程和再生中生物支架材料的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷鸣; 高丽娜

    2013-01-01

    胶原、聚酯纤维、藻酸盐和羟基磷灰石等目前常用的生物支架材料,复合干细胞后虽都实现了连续的软组织和新生牙本质的形成,近年来研究开发的自组装多肽水凝胶和细胞膜片技术作为新型的细胞支架构建方法,具有独特的优势,有望为真正意义上的牙髓再生开辟新的空间.本文就上述相关内容作一综述.%Biomaterials, such as collagen, polyester, chitosan or hydroxyapatite combined with stem cells may induce the generation of connective tissue and dentin. Self-assembling peptide hydrogels and cell sheet are promising biomaterial scaffod in dental pulp tissue engineering and regenaration. Related study were reviewed in this paper.

  11. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarygin, Konstantin N.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable. PMID:28210629

  12. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Strategies: Electrically Stimulating Polymer Based Nerve Growth Conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew; Shelke, Namdev B.; Manoukian, Ohan S.; Yu, Xiaojun; McCullough, Louise D.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of large peripheral nerve damages ranges from the use of an autologous nerve graft to a synthetic nerve growth conduit. Biological grafts, in spite of many merits, show several limitations in terms of availability and donor site morbidity, and outcomes are suboptimal due to fascicle mismatch, scarring, and fibrosis. Tissue engineered nerve graft substitutes utilize polymeric conduits in conjunction with cues both chemical and physical, cells alone and or in combination. The chemical and physical cues delivered through polymeric conduits play an important role and drive tissue regeneration. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied toward the repair and regeneration of various tissues such as muscle, tendon, nerve, and articular tissue both in laboratory and clinical settings. The underlying mechanisms that regulate cellular activities such as cell adhesion, proliferation, cell migration, protein production, and tissue regeneration following ES is not fully understood. Polymeric constructs that can carry the electrical stimulation along the length of the scaffold have been developed and characterized for possible nerve regeneration applications. We discuss the use of electrically conductive polymers and associated cell interaction, biocompatibility, tissue regeneration, and recent basic research for nerve regeneration. In conclusion, a multifunctional combinatorial device comprised of biomaterial, structural, functional, cellular, and molecular aspects may be the best way forward for effective peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27278739

  13. Bone regeneration in rat cranium critical-size defects induced by Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Serrano

    Full Text Available Gene therapy approaches to bone and periodontal tissue engineering are being widely explored. While localized delivery of osteogenic factors like BMPs is attractive for promotion of bone regeneration; method of delivery, dosage and side effects could limit this approach. A novel protein, Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1, has recently been shown to promote regeneration of periodontal tissues. In order to address the possibility that CEMP1 can be used to regenerate other types of bone, experiments were designed to test the effect of hrCEMP1 in the repair/regeneration of a rat calvaria critical-size defect. Histological and microcomputed tomography (µCT analyses of the calvaria defect sites treated with CEMP1 showed that after 16 weeks, hrCEMP1 is able to induce 97% regeneration of the defect. Furthermore, the density and characteristics of the new mineralized tissues were normal for bone. This study demonstrates that hrCEMP1 stimulates bone formation and regeneration and has therapeutic potential for the treatment of bone defects and regeneration of mineralized tissues.

  14. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions as a working concept for oral mucosa regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiarong; Mao, Jeremy J; Chen, Lili

    2011-02-01

    Oral mucosa consists of two tissue layers, the superficial epithelium and the underlying lamina propria. Together, oral mucosa functions as a barrier against exogenous substances and pathogens. In development, interactions of stem/progenitor cells of the epithelium and mesenchyme are crucial to the morphogenesis of oral mucosa. Previous work in oral mucosa regeneration has yielded important clues for several meritorious proof-of-concept approaches. Tissue engineering offers a broad array of novel tools for oral mucosa regeneration with reduced donor site trauma and accelerated clinical translation. However, the developmental concept of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) is rarely considered in oral mucosa regeneration. EMIs in postnatal oral mucosa regeneration likely will not be a simple recapitulation of prenatal oral mucosa development. Biomaterial scaffolds play an indispensible role for oral mucosa regeneration and should provide a conducive environment for pivotal EMIs. Autocrine and paracrine factors, either exogenously delivered or innately produced, have rarely been and should be harnessed to promote oral mucosa regeneration. This review focuses on a working concept of epithelial and mesenchymal interactions in oral mucosa regeneration.

  15. Semiconductor devices for all-optical regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Bischoff, Svend; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    We review different implementations of semiconductor devices for all-optical regeneration. A general model will be presented for all-optical regeneration in fiber links, taking into consideration the trade-off between non-linearity and noise. Furthermore we discuss a novel regenerator type, based...

  16. REGENERATION OF DRY DEBRIS-CONTAMINATED LUBRICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ahmetov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial testing of regenerated lubricant in the process of wire drawing showed satisfactory quality (absence of gloss. It is determined that consumption of regenerated lubricant does not differ from consumption of new lubricant. Regenerated lubricant corresponds to the requirements of normative documents.

  17. Deer antler regeneration: cells, concepts, and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Szuwart, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    The periodic replacement of antlers is an exceptional regenerative process in mammals, which in general are unable to regenerate complete body appendages. Antler regeneration has traditionally been viewed as an epimorphic process closely resembling limb regeneration in urodele amphibians, and the terminology of the latter process has also been applied to antler regeneration. More recent studies, however, showed that, unlike urodele limb regeneration, antler regeneration does not involve cell dedifferentiation and the formation of a blastema from these dedifferentiated cells. Rather, these studies suggest that antler regeneration is a stem-cell-based process that depends on the periodic activation of, presumably neural-crest-derived, periosteal stem cells of the distal pedicle. The evidence for this hypothesis is reviewed and as a result, a new concept of antler regeneration as a process of stem-cell-based epimorphic regeneration is proposed that does not involve cell dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation. Antler regeneration illustrates that extensive appendage regeneration in a postnatal mammal can be achieved by a developmental process that differs in several fundamental aspects from limb regeneration in urodeles.

  18. All optical regeneration using semiconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne

    All-optical regeneration is a key functionality for implementing all-optical networks. We present a simple theory for the bit-error-rate in links employing all-optical regenerators, which elucidates the interplay between the noise and and nonlinearity of the regenerator. A novel device structure ...... is analyzed, emphasizing general aspects of active semiconductor waveguides....

  19. Skeletal muscle development and regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2007-01-01

    In the late stages of muscle development, a unique cell population emerges that is a key player in postnatal muscle growth and muscle regeneration. The location of these cells next to the muscle fibers triggers their designation as satellite cells. During the healing of injured muscle tissue, satell

  20. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A

    2011-01-01

    cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed....

  1. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  2. Bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amir, L.R.; Everts, V.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. During distraction osteogenesis, the renewal of bone is enhanced by gradual stretching of the soft connec- tive tissues in the gap area between two separated bone segments. This procedure has received much clinical atten- tion as a way to co

  3. Skeletal muscle development and regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2007-01-01

    In the late stages of muscle development, a unique cell population emerges that is a key player in postnatal muscle growth and muscle regeneration. The location of these cells next to the muscle fibers triggers their designation as satellite cells. During the healing of injured muscle tissue,

  4. Mechanical device for tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Maij, E.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a mechanical device for tissue- regeneration inside a patient, comprising means (2, 3) to place a scaffold for the tissue under mechanical stress. Said means comprise a first device-part (2) and a second device-part (3) which parts are arranged to be movable with respect to

  5. Scaffold-based Drug Delivery for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative engineering is an advanced field comprising the collective benefit of biodegradable polymers with cells and tissue inducing factors. Current method of replacing the defective organ is through transplantation, but is limited due to immune rejection and availability. As a solution, new polymeric biomaterial-based three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in combination with cells and inducing factors were aroused to fulfil the existing demands. These scaffolds apply material science, biomedical technology and translational medicine to develop functional tissue engineering constructs. Presence of small molecules and growth factors guides the cell phenotypes to specific organ development. The 3D scaffold thus could also be favorably used as carriers for various types of drugs and genes, with the release profile fine-tuned by modulation of the scaffold's morphology, porosity, and composition. An increasing trend was observed in recent years toward the combination of scaffolds and growth factors to fabricate a bioactive system, which not only provide a biomimetic biodegradable physical support for tissue growth but also explores biological signals to modulate tissue regeneration. In this review, along with general aspects of tissue engineering, we also discuss the importance of various scaffold architectures like nanofibers, hydrogels, beads, meshes, microspheres etc. in combination with specific drugs, growth factors and small molecules for cartilage regeneration. Growth factors may be incorporated into scaffolds by direct blending, physical adsorption, drop casting, surface grafting, covalent bonding, chemical immobilization, coaxial electrospinning, microparticle incorporation etc. This offers new possibilities for the development of biomimetic scaffolds that are endowed with a hierarchical architecture and sophisticated release kinetics of the growth factors. This review portrait the fundamentals of tissue engineering with emphasis on the role of inducing factors

  6. Experimental Study on Vehicle Integration of a Compound Regeneration System for Diesel Particulate Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Xinyun; Zhang, Weifeng; Yao, Guangtao; Xu, Zhengfei; He, Jinyong

    A compound regeneration system has shown potential in DPF regeneration. The system consists of FBC, burner and DOC to adapt to high sulfur in China. An aging test of 60,000 km and environmental compatibility test in cold zone, tropical zone and plateau is carried out, with the system integrated on Foton BJ1049V9JD6-SB light duty diesel. Statistics show aging of DPF promotes filtration efficiency because of microstructure change. Both DOC and engine aging are important elements of HC and CO increase. The working effect in cold zone and tropical zone and adaptability of regeneration device in plateau are discussed. The results reflect strong adaptability of regeneration device and discover the main difficulty for system application, which refers to overproof emissions due to aged DOC.

  7. Odontogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells for tooth regeneration: necessity, possibility, and strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wei; Wu, Ling; Lin, Yunfeng; Liu, Lei; Tang, Wei; Tian, Weidong

    2008-01-01

    Tooth regeneration using tissue engineering concepts is a promising biological approach to solving problems of tooth loss in elderly patients. The seeding cells, however, for tooth regeneration such as odontoblasts from dental germ, stem cells from dental pulp and deciduous teeth, and ectomesenchymal cells from the first branchial arch are difficult, even impossible to harvest in clinic. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have odontogenic capacity, but their differentiation abilities significantly decrease with the increasing age of the donors. Therefore, the cells mentioned above are not practical in the clinical application of tooth regeneration in the old. Adipose derived stem cells have many clinical advantages over bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, and their differentiation potential can be maintained with aging. Here we propose the hypothesis that adipose derived stem cells could be induced into odontogenic lineage and might be used as suitable seeding cells for tooth regeneration to replace the lost tooth of elderly patients.

  8. Tissue and organ regeneration in adults extension of the paradigm to several organs

    CERN Document Server

    Yannas, Ioannis V

    2015-01-01

    This textbook describes the basic principles of induced organ regeneration in skin and peripheral nerves and extends the original successful paradigm to other organs. A set of trans-organ rules is established and its use in regeneration of several organs is illustrated from the works of several independent investigators who worked with a variety of organs, such as the lung, the bladder, and the Achilles tendon, using collagen-based scaffolds somewhat similar to the original one. These critical medical treatments fill the clinical need that is not met by organ transplantation. New to this second edition: New information extending the paradigm of tissue regeneration from organ regeneration in skin and peripheral nerves to other organs Guidelines, known as trans-organ rules, are described for the first time for extending this unique medical treatment to organs of several medical specialties The work serves as a comprehensive text and reference for students and practitioners of tissue engineering  

  9. Biological performance of a novel biodegradable polyamidoamine hydrogel as guide for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaghi, Valerio; Conte, Vincenzo; Procacci, Patrizia; Pivato, Giorgio; Cortese, Paolo; Cavalli, Erika; Pajardi, Giorgio; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Fenili, Fabio; Manfredi, Amedea; Ferruti, Paolo

    2011-07-01

    Polyamidoamines (PAAs) are a well-known family of synthetic biocompatible and biodegradable polymers, which can be prepared as soft hydrogels characterized by low interfacial tension and tunable elasticity. For the first time we report here on the in vivo performance of a PAA hydrogel implant as scaffold for tissue engineering. In particular, an amphoteric agmatine-deriving PAA hydrogel shaped as small tubing was obtained by radical polymerization of a soluble functional oligomeric precursor and used as conduit for nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve cut model. The animals were analyzed at 30, 90, and 180 days post-surgery. PAA tubing proved to facilitate nerve regeneration. Good surgical outcomes were achieved with no signs of inflammation or neuroma. Moreover, nerve regeneration was morphologically sound and the quality of functional recovery satisfactory. In conclusion, PAA hydrogel scaffolds may represent a novel and promising material for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  10. Nanobiotechnology and bone regeneration: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusić, Nadomir; Ivković, Alan; VaFaye, John; Vukasović, Andreja; Ivković, Jana; Hudetz, Damir; Janković, Saša

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current developments in bone tissue engineering, with special focus on the promising role of nanobiotechnology. This unique fusion between nanotechnology and biotechnology offers unprecedented possibilities in studying and modulating biological processes on a molecular and atomic scale. First we discuss the multiscale hierarchical structure of bone and its implication on the design of new scaffolds and delivery systems. Then we briefly present different types of nanostructured scaffolds, and finally we conclude with nanoparticle delivery systems and their potential use in promoting bone regeneration. This review is not meant to be exhaustive and comprehensive, but aims to highlight concepts and key advances in the field of nanobiotechnology and bone regeneration.

  11. Regenerated cellulose/wool blend enhanced biomimetic hydroxyapatite mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ahmed; El-Sakhawy, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The current article investigates the effect of bioactive cellulose/wool blend on calcium phosphate biomimetic mineralization. Regenerated cellulose/wool blend was prepared by dissolution-regeneration of neat cellulose and natural wool in 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride [Bmim][Cl], as a solvent for the two polymers. Crystalline hydroxyapatite nanofibers with a uniform size, shape and dimension were formed after immersing the bioactive blend in simulated body fluid. The cytotoxicity of cellulose/wool/hydroxyapatite was studied using animal fibroblast baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) and the result displayed good cytocompatability. This research work presents a green processing method for the development of novel cellulose/wool/hydroxyapatite hybrid materials for tissue engineering applications.

  12. A four-channel microelectronic system for neural signal regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Shushan; Wang Zhigong; Li Wenyuan [Institute of RF- and OE-ICs, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lue Xiaoying; Pan Haixian, E-mail: zgwang@seu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Bio-Electronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents a microelectronic system which is capable of making a signal record and functional electric stimulation of an injured spinal cord. As a requirement of implantable engineering for the regeneration microelectronic system, the system is of low noise, low power, small size and high performance. A front-end circuit and two high performance OPAs (operational amplifiers) have been designed for the system with different functions, and the two OPAs are a low-noise low-power two-stage OPA and a constant-g{sub m} RTR input and output OPA. The system has been realized in CSMC 0.5-{mu}m CMOS technology. The test results show that the system satisfies the demands of neuron signal regeneration. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  13. Advances and Future Applications of Augmented Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Salazar; Eisenberg, Howard M; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-07

    Peripheral nerve injuries remain a significant source of long lasting morbidity, disability, and economic costs. Much research continues to be performed in areas related to improving the surgical outcomes of peripheral nerve repair. In this review, the physiology of peripheral nerve regeneration and the multitude of efforts to improve surgical outcomes are discussed. Improvements in tissue engineering that have allowed for the use of synthetic conduits seeded with neurotrophic factors are highlighted. Selected pre-clinical and available clinical data using cell based methods such as Schwann cell, undifferentiated, and differentiated stem cell transplantation to guide and enhance peripheral nerve regeneration are presented. The limitations that still exist in the utility of neurotrophic factors and cell-based therapies are outlined. Strategies that are most promising for translation into the clinical arena are suggested.

  14. A four-channel microelectronic system for neural signal regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Shushan; Wang Zhigong; Lü Xiaoying; Li Wenyuan; Pan Haixian

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a microelectronic system which is capable of making a signal record and functional electric stimulation of an injured spinal cord. As a requirement of implantable engineering for the regeneration microelectronic system, the system is of low noise, low power, small size and high performance. A front-end circuit and two high performance OPAs (operational amplifiers) have been designed for the system with different functions,and the two OPAs are a low-noise low-power two-stage OPA and a constant-g_m RTR input and output OPA. The system has been realized in CSMC 0.5-μm CMOS technology. The test results show that the system satisfies the demands of neuron signal regeneration.

  15. Extracellular matrix as a driver for lung regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Jenna L; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular matrix has manifold roles in tissue mechanics, guidance of cellular behavior, developmental biology, and regenerative medicine. Over the past several decades, various pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that many connective tissues may be replaced and/or regenerated using suitable extracellular matrix scaffolds. More recently, decellularization of lung tissue has shown that gentle removal of cells can leave behind a "footprint" within the matrix that may guide cellular adhesion, differentiation and homing following cellular repopulation. Fundamental issues like understanding matrix composition and micro-mechanics remain difficult to tackle, largely because of a lack of available assays and tools for systematically characterizing intact matrix from tissues and organs. This review will critically examine the role of engineered and native extracellular matrix in tissue and lung regeneration, and provide insights into directions for future research and translation.

  16. Advances and Future Applications of Augmented Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar Jones

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries remain a significant source of long lasting morbidity, disability, and economic costs. Much research continues to be performed in areas related to improving the surgical outcomes of peripheral nerve repair. In this review, the physiology of peripheral nerve regeneration and the multitude of efforts to improve surgical outcomes are discussed. Improvements in tissue engineering that have allowed for the use of synthetic conduits seeded with neurotrophic factors are highlighted. Selected pre-clinical and available clinical data using cell based methods such as Schwann cell, undifferentiated, and differentiated stem cell transplantation to guide and enhance peripheral nerve regeneration are presented. The limitations that still exist in the utility of neurotrophic factors and cell-based therapies are outlined. Strategies that are most promising for translation into the clinical arena are suggested.

  17. Pulp-dentin Regeneration: Current State and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Song, M; Kim, E; Shon, W; Chugal, N; Bogen, G; Lin, L; Kim, R H; Park, N-H; Kang, M K

    2015-11-01

    The goal of regenerative endodontics is to reinstate normal pulp function in necrotic and infected teeth that would result in reestablishment of protective functions, including innate pulp immunity, pulp repair through mineralization, and pulp sensibility. In the unique microenvironment of the dental pulp, the triad of tissue engineering would require infection control, biomaterials, and stem cells. Although revascularization is successful in resolving apical periodontitis, multiple studies suggest that it alone does not support pulp-dentin regeneration. More recently, cell-based approaches in endodontic regeneration based on pulpal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated promising results in terms of pulp-dentin regeneration in vivo through autologous transplantation. Although pulpal regeneration requires the cell-based approach, several challenges in clinical translation must be overcome-including aging-associated phenotypic changes in pulpal MSCs, availability of tissue sources, and safety and regulation involved with expansion of MSCs in laboratories. Allotransplantation of MSCs may alleviate some of these obstacles, although the long-term stability of MSCs and efficacy in pulp-dentin regeneration demand further investigation. For an alternative source of MSCs, our laboratory developed induced MSCs (iMSCs) from primary human keratinocytes through epithelial-mesenchymal transition by modulating the epithelial plasticity genes. Initially, we showed that overexpression of ΔNp63α, a major isoform of the p63 gene, led to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and acquisition of stem characteristics. More recently, iMSCs were generated by transient knockdown of all p63 isoforms through siRNA, further simplifying the protocol and resolving the potential safety issues of viral vectors. These cells may be useful for patients who lack tissue sources for endogenous MSCs. Further research will elucidate the level of potency of these iMSCs and assess their

  18. Photofabricated gelatin-based nerve conduits: nerve tissue regeneration potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Eduardo; Goto, Yoshinobu; Nagata, Kengo; Iwaki, Toru; Sasaki, Tomio; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2004-01-01

    There is a strong demand for development of nerve guide conduit with prompt nerve regeneration potential for injury-induced nerve defect. Prior to study on nerve tissue engineering using Schwann cells or nerve stem cells, the effectiveness of photofabricated scaffolds based on photocurable gelatin was examined. This study describes the evaluation of in vivo nerve tissue regeneration potentials of three custom-designed and -fabricated prostheses (inner diameter, 1.2 mm; outer diameter, 2.4 mm; wall thickness, 0.60 mm; and length, 15 mm) made of photocured gelatin: a plain photocured gelatin tube (model I), a photocured gelatin tube packed with bioactive substances (laminin, fibronectin, and nerve growth factor) coimmobilized in a photocured gelatin rod (model II), and a photocured gelatin tube packed with bioactive substances coimmobilized in multifilament fibers (model III). These prostheses were implanted between the proximal and distal stumps 10 mm of the dissected right sciatic nerve of 70 adult male Lewis rats for up to 1 year. The highest regenerative potentials were found using the model III prosthesis, followed by the model II prosthesis. Markedly retarded neural regeneration was observed using the model I prosthesis. These were evaluated from the viewpoints of functional recovery, electrophysiological responses, and tissue morphological regeneration. The significance of the synergistic cooperative functions of multifilaments, which serve as a platform that provides contact guidance to direct longitudinal cell movement and tissue ingrowth and as a cell adhesive matrix with high surface area, and immobilized bioactive substances, which enhance nerve regeneration via biological stimulation, is discussed.

  19. Bioresorbable and nonresorbable polymers for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girones Molera, Jordi; Mendez, José Alberto; San Roman, Julio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, bone tissue engineering has emerged as one of the main research areas in the field of regenerative biomedicine. Frequency and relevance age-related diseases, such as healing and regeneration of bone tissues, are rising due to increasing life expectancy. Even though bone tissue has excellent self-regeneration ability, when bone defects exceed a critical size, impaired bone formation can occur and surgical intervention becomes mandatory. Bone tissue engineering represents an alternative approach to conventional bone transplants. The main aim of tissue engineering is to repair, regenerate or reconstruct damaged or degenerative tissue. This review presents an overview on the main materials, techniques and strategies in the field of bone tissue engineering. Whilst presenting some reviews recently published that deepen on each of the sections of the paper, this review article aims to present some of the most relevant advances, both in terms of new materials and strategies, currently being developed for bone repair and regeneration.

  20. Optical Regeneration and Noise in Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip

    2005-01-01

    In this report all-optical 2R-regeneration in optical communication systems is investigated. A simple regenerator device based on concatenated semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and electro absorbers (EAs) is introduced and examined. Experiments show that the monolithic SOA-EA 2R-regenerator......In this report all-optical 2R-regeneration in optical communication systems is investigated. A simple regenerator device based on concatenated semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and electro absorbers (EAs) is introduced and examined. Experiments show that the monolithic SOA-EA 2R...

  1. OPTIMIZATION RESULTS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR REPARATIVE REGENERATION BY NITINOL MATRICES (Experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Dyuryagin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Through the experiments on animals, mandibular fragments reparative regeneration and osteohistogenesis in the post-resection period using different ways of their optimization by artifi cial nitinol matrices were investigated.Materials and methods. Rabbits (two groups were subjected to similar resections of mandibular right branch fragments with articular head exarticulation. In the fi rst group (n = 10 extrafocal matrix structures placement option towards regeneration foci (sagittal dislocation was used, in the second one (n = 10 intrafocal matrix bone and periosteum nitinol constructions placement option was used.Results. In the fi rst group, the following reconstructive results were received: organ-like osteogenic regenerates fully displaced mandibular defects in 12 months. In the second group reconstructive results were the following: tissue-engineered composites fully displaced mandibular defects in 3 months. Biological, biometric, radiological, histological, immunohistochemical, morphometric, statistical methods were used to evaluate the results.Conclusion. Reparative regeneration and osteohistogenesis at extrafocal placement of artifi cial matrix structures are able to reconstruct independently mandibular fragments due to natural regeneration. Reparative regeneration and osteohistogenesis at intrafocal placement of artifi cial matrix structures are able to reconstruct independently mandibular fragments due to bone and periosteum tissue-engineered composites forming. Four-fold advantage of mandibular reconstruction dynamics by tissue-engineered composites being equal in functional effi ciency with natural regeneration results testifi es to their availability for usage in clinical practice.

  2. How Does Stirling Engine Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Tashiro, Yusuke; Yazaki, Taichi

    In this paper the working mechanism of Stirling engine is studied from the standpoint of thermoacoustic framework. The work flux measurement is performed in a glass tube equipped with/without a regenerator-heat exchanger assembly. An atmospheric pressure air confined in the tube is periodically perturbed by two speakers at the same frequency (=48Hz) but out of phase. It is experimentally demonstrated that the phasing of two pistons in the Stirling engine (alpha arrangement type) plays the role in creating a steady work flux from the compression piston to the expansion piston, whereas a differentially heated regenerator in the engine operates as a power amplifier for the traveling wave propagating up the temperature gradient.

  3. Regeneration of tissues of the oral complex: current clinical trends and research advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thomas T; Mui, Brennan; Mehrabzadeh, Mahsa; Chea, Yannie; Chaudhry, Zoya; Chaudhry, Kamran; Tran, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative therapy in oral health care is limited by both the body's natural capacity for regeneration and the materials and methods currently available. Research on various aspects of regenerative therapy, such as tissue engineering and stem cell and gene therapy, has produced promising results. Compelling advances, ranging from the discovery and characterization of stem cell populations in oral tissue to the engineering and transplantation of whole tooth structures, could result in exciting new treatment methods for clinicians in the near future. In this review, we discuss the limitations of natural healing and regeneration of various tissues of the oral complex, including teeth, periodontium and salivary glands, and summarize current treatment methods for tissue damage as well as research advances in oral tissue regeneration.

  4. Limb Regeneration in Xenopus laevis Froglet

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    Makoto Suzuki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Limb regeneration in amphibians is a representative process of epimorphosis. This type of organ regeneration, in which a mass of undifferentiated cells referred to as the “blastema” proliferate to restore the lost part of the amputated organ, is distinct from morphallaxis as observed, for instance, in Hydra, in which rearrangement of pre-existing cells and tissues mainly contribute to regeneration. In contrast to complete limb regeneration in urodele amphibians, limb regeneration in Xenopus, an anuran amphibian, is restricted. In this review of some aspects regarding adult limb regeneration in Xenopus laevis, we suggest that limb regeneration in adult Xenopus, which is pattern/tissue deficient, also represents epimorphosis.

  5. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; O'Meara, Caitlin C; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Poss, Kenneth D; Lee, Richard T

    2015-08-24

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte proliferation following injury. Specifically, pharmacological inhibition of cholinergic nerve function reduces cardiomyocyte proliferation in the injured hearts of both zebrafish and neonatal mice. Direct mechanical denervation impairs heart regeneration in neonatal mice, which was rescued by the administration of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) recombinant proteins. Transcriptional analysis of mechanically denervated hearts revealed a blunted inflammatory and immune response following injury. These findings demonstrate that nerve function is required for both zebrafish and mouse heart regeneration.

  6. The Stirling engine mechanism optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Podešva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A special type of the gas engine with external combustion is called Stirling engine. The mechanism has two pistons with two volumes inside. The pistons are connected together through cooler, regenerator and warmer. The engine effectivity depends on the piston movement behaviour. The usual sinusoidal time curve leads to low effectiveness. The quick movement from lower to upper position with a certain delay in both top and bottom dead centres is more effective. The paper deals with three types of mechanisms, analyzing the piston movement, and their behavior. Special emphasize is taken to the piston movement regime.

  7. Stem Cell-Based Dental Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Zivkovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of biological and biomaterial sciences profiled tissue engineering as a new and powerful tool for biological replacement of organs. The combination of stem cells and suitable scaffolds is widely used in experiments today, in order to achieve partial or whole organ regeneration. This review focuses on the use of tissue engineering strategies in tooth regeneration, using stem cells and stem cells/scaffold constructs. Although whole tooth regeneration is still not possible, there are promising results. However, to achieve this goal, it is important to understand and further explore the mechanisms underlying tooth development. Only then will we be able to mimic the natural processes with the use of stem cells and tissue engineering techniques.

  8. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a "water-tight" barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis.

  9. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Green

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a water-tight barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachement complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement.. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organising cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis.

  10. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  11. Cardiac regeneration from activated epicardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram van Wijk

    Full Text Available In contrast to lower vertebrates, the mammalian heart has a very limited regenerative capacity. Cardiomyocytes, lost after ischemia, are replaced by fibroblasts. Although the human heart is able to form new cardiomyocytes throughout its lifespan, the efficiency of this phenomenon is not enough to substitute sufficient myocardial mass after an infarction. In contrast, zebrafish hearts regenerate through epicardial activation and initiation of myocardial proliferation. With this study we obtain insights into the activation and cellular contribution of the mammalian epicardium in response to ischemia. In a mouse myocardial infarction model we analyzed the spatio-temporal changes in expression of embryonic epicardial, EMT, and stem cell markers and the contribution of cells of the Wt1-lineage to the infarcted area. Though the integrity of the epicardial layer overlaying the infarct is lost immediately after the induction of the ischemia, it was found to be regenerated at three days post infarction. In this regenerated epicardium, the embryonic gene program is transiently re-expressed as well as proliferation. Concomitant with this activation, Wt1-lineage positive subepicardial mesenchyme is formed until two weeks post-infarction. These mesenchymal cells replace the cardiomyocytes lost due to the ischemia and contribute to the fibroblast population, myofibroblasts and coronary endothelium in the infarct, and later also to the cardiomyocyte population. We show that in mice, as in lower vertebrates, an endogenous, epicardium-dependent regenerative response to injury is induced. Although this regenerative response leads to the formation of new cardiomyocytes, their number is insufficient in mice but sufficient in lower vertebrates to replace lost cardiomyocytes. These molecular and cellular analyses provide basic knowledge essential for investigations on the regeneration of the mammalian heart aiming at epicardium-derived cells.

  12. ETV TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES: LUBRIZOL ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEMS PURIFILTER SC17L

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Lubrizol Engine Control Systems Purifilter SC17L manufactured by Lubrizol Engine Control Systems. The technology is a precious and base metal, passively regenerated particulate filter...

  13. A study on the regeneration performance characteristics of an internally heated regenerator in a liquid desiccant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Ji Hyun [Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Dong Soon; Kim, Young Lyoul; Kim, Seon Chang [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This paper presents a study on the regeneration performance characteristics of an internally heated regenerator applicable to a liquid desiccant system. The internally heated regenerator used in this study was designed and manufactured to provide better regeneration performance. An experimental setup was established to examine the regeneration performance. LiCl aqueous solution was used as working fluid. Variables to evaluate regeneration performance characteristics of the internally heated regenerator were dry bulb temperature, relative humidity and velocity of regeneration air, mass flow rate, temperature and concentration of the LiCl aqueous solution. The experimental conditions were chosen by using a 1/2 fractional factorial DOE. Regeneration rate and regeneration effectiveness were taken as results. From the results, solution concentration and regeneration air relative humidity have strong effects on the regeneration rate. The regeneration effectiveness was affected mostly by regeneration air velocity.

  14. Stem Cell Therapy in Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2016-08-01

    a novel approach to many diseases. SUMMARY: Wound healing therapies continue to rapidly evolve, with advances in basic science and engineering research heralding the development of new therapies, as well as ways to modify existing treatments. Stem cell-based therapy is one of the most promising therapeutic concepts for wound healing. Advances in stem cell biology have enabled researchers and clinicians alike with access to cells capable of actively modulating the healing response.  KEYWORDS: wound healing, tissue regeneration, stem cells therapy

  15. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  16. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  17. Role of angiogenesis in endodontics: contributions of stem cells and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to dental pulp regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-06-01

    Dental pulp regeneration is a part of regenerative endodontics, which includes isolation, propagation, and re-transplantation of stem cells inside the prepared root canal space. The formation of new blood vessels through angiogenesis is mandatory to increase the survival rate of re-transplanted tissues. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting capillaries, which has great importance in pulp regeneration and homeostasis. Here the contribution of human dental pulp stem cells and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to angiogenesis process and regeneration of dental pulp is reviewed. A search was performed on the role of angiogenesis in dental pulp regeneration from January 2005 through April 2014. The recent aspects of the relationship between angiogenesis, human dental pulp stem cells, and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in regeneration of dental pulp were assessed. Many studies have indicated an intimate relationship between angiogenesis and dental pulp regeneration. The contribution of stem cells and mechanical and chemical factors to dental pulp regeneration has been previously discussed. Angiogenesis is an indispensable process during dental pulp regeneration. The survival of inflamed vital pulp and engineered transplanted pulp tissue are closely linked to the process of angiogenesis at sites of application. However, the detailed regulatory mechanisms involved in initiation and progression of angiogenesis in pulp tissue require investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Low temperature differential thermoacoustic Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Hasegawa, Daichi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2010-07-01

    To what extent can we lower the critical temperature ratio (CTR) necessary to start a thermoacoustic engine? We present an experimental method for predicting the CTR before the temperature ratio arrives at it using quality factor measurements. Based on the experimental quality factors, we tried to decrease the CTR of a thermoacoustic Stirling engine consisting of a looped tube and a branch resonator. Installation of the multiple regenerators at suitable positions can markedly enhance acoustic power production while overcoming energy dissipation. Results show that the CTR is decreased from 1.76 to 1.19 using five differentially heated regenerators.

  19. Study of Stirling Engine Efficiency Coefficient under Conditions Being Close to Real Ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abramian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An absolute internal efficiency coefficient of the Stirling engine has been obtained without regenerator and with regenerator under conditions when van der Waals gas serves as a working medium. The paper reveals that while taking into account own volume of molecules thermal efficiency coefficient of the Stirling engine depends on mole number of the working medium  and it is slightly increasing  in comparison with the case of an ideal gas. The paper gives consideration to heat losses while the Stirling machine operates with heat regeneration. Dependence of regeneration rate on time of heat transfer has been obtained in the paper. 

  20. Stem cells in tooth tissue regeneration--challenges and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanç, Bülend; Elçin, Y Murat

    2011-09-01

    The accelerated pace of research in the stem cell field in recent decades and the accumulated body of knowledge has spurred the interest in potential clinical applications of stem cells in all branches of medicine including regenerative dentistry. In humans, embryonic and adult stem cells are two major groups of cells that can serve as a donor source in tissue engineering strategies based on ex-vivo cellular expansion. It has been shown that adult stem cell populations are present in all examined living tissues of the organism, thus being a crucial source of tissue homeostasis and regeneration, and offering a target population for in situ stimulation of extensive tissue regeneration. Experimental findings indicate that in the complex structure of the tooth organ, both periodontal and endodontic tissues harbour adult stem cells with characteristics peculiar to early stages of cellular differentiation. Myriad of strategies incorporating both embryonic and adult stem cells for the regeneration of a particular tooth structure or the whole teeth were proposed; however their successful application to solve real problems encountered in the clinical practice of dentistry remains an elusive and challenging objective.

  1. Guard cell protoplasts: isolation, culture, and regeneration of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Guard cell protoplasts have been used extensively in short-term experiments designed to elucidate the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate stomatal movements. The utility of uard cell protoplasts for other types of longer-term signal transduction experiments is just now being realized. Because highly purified, primary isolates of guard cell protoplasts are synchronous initially, they are uniform in their responses to changes in culture conditions. Such isolates have demonstrated potential to reveal mechanisms that underlie hormonal signalling for plant cell survival, cell cycle re-entry, reprogramming of genes during dedifferentiation to an embryogenic state, and plant cell thermotolerance. Plants have been regenerated from cultured guard cell protoplasts of two species: Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, and Beta vulgaris, sugar beet. Plants genetically engineered for herbicide tolerance have been regenerated from cultured guard cell protoplasts of B. vulgaris. The method for isolating, culturing, and regenerating plants from guard cell protoplasts of N. glauca is described here. A recently developed procedure for large-scale isolation of these cells from as many as nine leaves per experiment is described. Using this protocol, yields of 1.5-2 x 10(7) per isolate may be obtained. Such yields are sufficient for standard methods of molecular, biochemical, and proteomic analysis.

  2. Fenestration defects in the rabbit jaw: an inadequate model for studying periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oortgiesen, Daniel A W; Meijer, Gert J; Bronckers, Antonius L J J; Walboomers, X Frank; Jansen, John A

    2010-02-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the support of the teeth, eventually leading to loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Effective procedures for periodontal tissue engineering or regeneration require preclinical models before market introduction. Research has been performed in either small or large animals. Unfortunately, there is no intermediate-sized in vivo model available for periodontal regeneration studies, such as, for instance, rabbits. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rabbit as a new experimental model to study periodontal regeneration. In 12 rabbits, periodontal defects were created in a 4 x 6 mm bone window. The animals were sacrificed after 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks. Up to 6 weeks, the fenestration defects healed partly by repair and partly by regeneration. After 6 weeks the root had erupted to such an extent that the original root defect shifted into the oral cavity. This signifies that the periodontal ligament (PDL) bordering the original bone defect site is newly formed during the natural eruption process and not locally regenerated. Apparently, the new PDL originates from mesenchymal cells that arise from the apical part (sheath of Hertwig) and subsequently developed into PDL fibroblasts. At 12 weeks, no signs of surgery were present anymore. On the basis of our observation that the defect of the PDL was replaced rather than restored, we conclude that the rabbit model has disadvantages and is less suitable for studies of regeneration of PDL.

  3. Integrated microfluidics platforms for investigating injury and regeneration of CNS axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Park, Jeong Won; Byun, Jae Hwan; Vahidi, Behrad; Rhee, Seog Woo; Jeon, Noo Li

    2012-06-01

    We describe the development of experimental platforms to quantify the regeneration of injured central nervous system (CNS) neurons by combining engineering technologies and primary neuronal cultures. Although the regeneration of CNS neurons is an important area of research, there are no currently available methods to screen for drugs. Conventional tissue culture based on Petri dish does not provide controlled microenvironment for the neurons and only provide qualitative information. In this review, we introduced the recent advances to generate in vitro model system that is capable of mimicking the niche of CNS injury and regeneration and also of testing candidate drugs. We reconstructed the microenvironment of the regeneration of CNS neurons after injury to provide as in vivo like model system where the soluble and surface bounded inhibitors for regeneration are presented in physiologically relevant manner using microfluidics and surface patterning methods. The ability to control factors and also to monitor them using live cell imaging allowed us to develop quantitative assays that can be used to compare various drug candidates and also to understand the basic mechanism behind nerve regeneration after injury.

  4. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  5. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside.

  6. Mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2016-08-04

    Platelets have multiple functions beyond their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelets support liver regeneration, which is required after partial hepatectomy and acute or chronic liver injury. Although it is widely assumed that platelets stimulate liver regeneration by local excretion of mitogens stored within platelet granules, definitive evidence for this is lacking, and alternative mechanisms deserve consideration. In-depth knowledge of mechanisms of platelet-mediated liver regeneration may lead to new therapeutic strategies to treat patients with failing regenerative responses.

  7. Regeneration: the ultimate example of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawala, Prayag; Tanaka, Elly M; Currie, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    The outcome of wound repair in mammals is often characterized by fibrotic scaring. Vertebrates such as zebrafish, frogs, and salamanders not only heal scarlessly, but also can regenerate lost appendages. Decades of study on the process of animal regeneration has produced key insights into the mechanisms of how complex tissue is restored. By examining our current knowledge of regeneration, we can draw parallels with mammalian wound healing to identify the molecular determinants that produce such differing outcomes.

  8. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish caudal fin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sandeep; Singh, Sachin K; Lakshmi, Mula G Meena; Meghah, Vuppalapaty; Bhatti, Bhawna; Swamy, Cherukuvada V Brahmendra; Sundaram, Curam S; Idris, Mohammed M

    2012-06-01

    The epimorphic regeneration of zebrafish caudal fin is rapid and complete. We have analyzed the biomechanism of zebrafish caudal fin regeneration at various time points based on differential proteomics approaches. The spectrum of proteome changes caused by regeneration were analyzed among controls (0 h) and 1, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postamputation involving quantitative differential proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and differential in-gel electrophoresis Orbitrap analysis. A total of 96 proteins were found differentially regulated between the control nonregenerating and regenerating tissues of different time points for having at least 1.5-fold changes. 90 proteins were identified as differentially regulated for regeneration based on differential in-gel electrophoresis analysis between the control and regenerating tissues. 35 proteins were characterized for its expression in all of the five regenerating time points against the control samples. The proteins identified and associated with regeneration were found to be directly allied with various molecular, biological, and cellular functions. Based on network pathway analysis, the identified proteome data set for regeneration was majorly associated in maintaining cellular structure and architecture. Also the proteins were found associated for the cytoskeleton remodeling pathway and cellular immune defense mechanism. The major proteins that were found differentially regulated during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration includes keratin and its 10 isoforms, cofilin 2, annexin a1, skeletal α1 actin, and structural proteins. Annexin A1 was found to be exclusively undergoing phosphorylation during regeneration. The obtained differential proteome and the direct association of the various proteins might lead to a new understanding of the regeneration mechanism.

  9. Tissue engineering and peripheral nerve regeneration (III) -- Sciatic nerve regeneration with PDLLA nerve guide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Shenguo

    2001-01-01

    Chitosans with various degrees of deacetylation (D.D.), which were used as standard sample for FTIR determination, were prepared from completely deacetylated chitosan by homogeneous N-acetylation reaction. By combining four probable probe bands, i.e. 1655, 1560, 1380 and 1320 cm-1, eight probable reference bands, i.e. 3430, 2920, 2880, 1425, 1155, 1070, 1030 and 895 cm-1 and two baseline methods, the most suitable ratios Aprobe band/Areference band from IR spectra to determine the degree of acetylation of chitosan were evaluated from 48 combinations to be A1560/A2880, A1560/A2920 and A1655/A3430(A1560/A2880 is mostly recommended). The second baseline method, i.e. linking between adjacent two valleys, was better for measuring the absorbances of 1560 and 1655 cm-1 bands. The determination range of the D.D. (1%-100%) covered almost the whole range. The standard curves with A1560/A2880 and A1655/A3430 were also suitable for the determination of degree of substitution of other N-acylated chitosan, such as N-propionyl chitosan, N-butyryl chitosan and N-hexanoyl chitosan.

  10. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Min Jung Kwon; Hyuk Jun Yoon; Byung Gon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Axons in central nervous system (CNS) do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for th...

  11. Microenvironment of liver regeneration in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han-Min; Ye, Zhi-Hua

    2017-07-01

    The occurrence and development of liver cancer are essentially the most serious outcomes of uncontrolled liver regeneration. The progression of liver cancer is inevitably related to the abnormal microenvironment of liver regeneration. The deterioration observed in the microenvironment of liver regeneration is a necessary condition for the occurrence, development and metastasis of cancer. Therefore, the use of a technique to prevent and treat liver cancer via changes in the microenvironment of liver regeneration is a novel strategy. This strategy would be an effective way to delay, prevent or even reverse cancer occurrence, development and metastasis through an improvement in the liver regeneration microenvironment along with the integrated regulation of multiple components, targets, levels, channels and time sequences. In addition, the treatment of "tonifying Shen (Kidney) to regulate liver regeneration and repair by affecting stem cells and their microenvironment" can regulate "the dynamic imbalance between the normal liver regeneration and the abnormal liver regeneration"; this would improve the microenvironment of liver regeneration, which is also a mechanism by which liver cancer may be prevented or treated.

  12. Angiogenesis is inhibitory for mammalian digit regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Yan, Mingquan; Simkin, Jennifer; Ketcham, Paulina D; Leininger, Eric; Han, Manjong; Muneoka, Ken

    2014-06-01

    The regenerating mouse digit tip is a unique model for investigating blastema formation and epimorphic regeneration in mammals. The blastema is characteristically avascular and we previously reported that blastema expression of a known anti-angiogenic factor gene, Pedf, correlated with a successful regenerative response (Yu, L., Han, M., Yan, M., Lee, E. C., Lee, J. & Muneoka, K. (2010). BMP signaling induces digit regeneration in neonatal mice. Development, 137, 551-559). Here we show that during regeneration Vegfa transcripts are not detected in the blastema but are expressed at the onset of differentiation. Treating the amputation wound with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances angiogenesis but inhibits regeneration. We next tested bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9), another known mediator of angiogenesis, and found that BMP9 is also a potent inhibitor of digit tip regeneration. BMP9 induces Vegfa expression in the digit stump suggesting that regenerative failure is mediated by enhanced angiogenesis. Finally, we show that BMP9 inhibition of regeneration is completely rescued by treatment with pigment epithelium-derived factor. These studies show that precocious angiogenesis is inhibitory for regeneration, and provide compelling evidence that the regulation of angiogenesis is a critical factor in designing therapies aimed at stimulating mammalian regeneration.

  13. Angiogenesis is inhibitory for mammalian digit regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Yan, Mingquan; Simkin, Jennifer; Ketcham, Paulina D.; Leininger, Eric; Han, Manjong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The regenerating mouse digit tip is a unique model for investigating blastema formation and epimorphic regeneration in mammals. The blastema is characteristically avascular and we previously reported that blastema expression of a known anti‐angiogenic factor gene, Pedf, correlated with a successful regenerative response (Yu, L., Han, M., Yan, M., Lee, E. C., Lee, J. & Muneoka, K. (2010). BMP signaling induces digit regeneration in neonatal mice. Development, 137, 551–559). Here we show that during regeneration Vegfa transcripts are not detected in the blastema but are expressed at the onset of differentiation. Treating the amputation wound with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances angiogenesis but inhibits regeneration. We next tested bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9), another known mediator of angiogenesis, and found that BMP9 is also a potent inhibitor of digit tip regeneration. BMP9 induces Vegfa expression in the digit stump suggesting that regenerative failure is mediated by enhanced angiogenesis. Finally, we show that BMP9 inhibition of regeneration is completely rescued by treatment with pigment epithelium‐derived factor. These studies show that precocious angiogenesis is inhibitory for regeneration, and provide compelling evidence that the regulation of angiogenesis is a critical factor in designing therapies aimed at stimulating mammalian regeneration. PMID:27499862

  14. Emerin increase in regenerating muscle fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Squarzoni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The fate of emerin during skeletal muscle regeneration was investigated in an animal model by means of crush injury. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and mRNA analysis demonstrated that emerin level is increased in regenerating rat muscle fibers with respect to normal mature myofibers. This finding suggests an involvement of emerin during the muscle fiber regeneration process, in analogy with its reported involvement in muscle cell differentiation in vitro. The impairment of skeletal muscle physiological regeneration or reorganization could be a possible pathogenetic mechanism for Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

  15. The spark of life: electricity and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Jonathan M W

    2007-09-25

    A recent paper shows that a proton pump, the vacuolar-type adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase), is necessary for Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration. The V-ATPase is synthesized in distal cells of the regeneration bud as an early response to amputation, and its role in regeneration is specifically to pump H+ out of cells. Although the downstream effects of proton movement are not known, they may be mediated through changes in membrane potential. This work could reopen a consideration of the role of electric fields in regeneration, an issue that has caused much controversy in the past.

  16. Multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Doral, M Nedim; Karlsson, Jon; Egol, Kenneth A; Jazrawi, Laith M; Coelho, Paulo G; Martinez, Amaury; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Owens, Brett D; Ochi, Mitsuo; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Atala, Anthony; Fu, Freddie H; Lu, Helen H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the recent developments in the field of tissue engineering as they relate to multilayer scaffold designs in musculoskeletal regeneration. Clinical and basic research studies that highlight the current knowledge and potential future applications of the multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering were evaluated and the best evidence collected. Studies were divided into three main categories based on tissue types and interfaces for which multilayer scaffolds were used to regenerate: bone, osteochondral junction and tendon-to-bone interfaces. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the use of stratified scaffolds composed of multiple layers with distinct compositions for regeneration of distinct tissue types within the same scaffold and anatomic location is feasible. This emerging tissue engineering approach has potential applications in regeneration of bone defects, osteochondral lesions and tendon-to-bone interfaces with successful basic research findings that encourage clinical applications. Present data supporting the advantages of the use of multilayer scaffolds as an emerging strategy in musculoskeletal tissue engineering are promising, however, still limited. Positive impacts of the use of next generation scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering can be expected in terms of decreasing the invasiveness of current grafting techniques used for reconstruction of bone and osteochondral defects, and tendon-to-bone interfaces in near future.

  17. Early hepatic regeneration index and completeness of regeneration at 6 months after partial hepatectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kele, P. G.; de Boer, M.; van der Jagt, E. J.; Lisman, T.; Porte, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The liver is known to regenerate following partial hepatectomy (PH), but little is known about the timing and completeness of regeneration relative to the resected volume. This study examined whether liver volume regeneration following PH and its completeness 6 months after surgery is re

  18. Invasive cervical root resorption: Engineering the lost tissue by regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexton Antony Johns

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical resorption (ICR is a localized resorptive process that commences on the surface of the root below the epithelial attachment and the coronal aspect of the supporting alveolar process, namely the zone of the connective tissue attachment′ early diagnosis, elimination of the resorption and restorative management are the keys to a successful outcome. Treatment done was a combined non-surgical root canal therapy, surgical treatment to expose the resorptive defect and the resorptive defect was filled up with reverse sandwich technique and finally the bony defect filled with platelet rich fibrin (PRF, hydroxylapatite and PRF membrane. Significant bone fill was obtained in our case after a 2 year follow-up period. This case report presents a treatment strategy that might improve the healing outcomes for patients with ICR.

  19. Lymphatic Vascular Regeneration : The Next Step in Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huethorst, Eline; Krebber, Merle M; Fledderus, Joost O; Gremmels, Hendrik; Xu, Yan Juan; Pei, Jiayi; Verhaar, Marianne C; Cheng, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays a crucial role in interstitial fluid drainage, lipid absorption, and immunological defense. Lymphatic dysfunction results in lymphedema, fluid accumulation, and swelling of soft tissues, as well as a potentially impaired immune response. Lymphedema significantly reduces qu

  20. Advances in regeneration of dental pulp--a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay Sharma, Lavanya; Sharma, Ajay; Dias, George J

    2015-05-01

    This review summarizes the biological response of dentin-pulp complexes to a variety of stimuli and responses to current treatment therapies and reviews the role of tissue engineering and its application in regenerative endodontics. An electronic search was undertaken based on keywords using Medline/PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Ovid database resources up to March 2012 to identify appropriate articles, supplemented by a manual search using reference lists from relevant articles. Inclusion criteria were mainly based on different combinations of keywords and restricted to articles published in English language only. Biological approaches based on tissue engineering principles were found to offer the possibility of restoring natural tooth vitality, with distinct evidence that regeneration of lost dental tissues is possible. Studies to formulate an ideal restorative material with regenerative properties, however, are still under way. Further research with supporting clinical studies is required to identify the most effective and safe treatment therapy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Fibroblast growth factors as tissue repair and regeneration therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin M. Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell communication is central to the integration of cell function required for the development and homeostasis of multicellular animals. Proteins are an important currency of cell communication, acting locally (auto-, juxta-, or paracrine or systemically (endocrine. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF family contributes to the regulation of virtually all aspects of development and organogenesis, and after birth to tissue maintenance, as well as particular aspects of organism physiology. In the West, oncology has been the focus of translation of FGF research, whereas in China and to an extent Japan a major focus has been to use FGFs in repair and regeneration settings. These differences have their roots in research history and aims. The Chinese drive into biotechnology and the delivery of engineered clinical grade FGFs by a major Chinese research group were important enablers in this respect. The Chinese language clinical literature is not widely accessible. To put this into context, we provide the essential molecular and functional background to the FGF communication system covering FGF ligands, the heparan sulfate and Klotho co-receptors and FGF receptor (FGFR tyrosine kinases. We then summarise a selection of clinical reports that demonstrate the efficacy of engineered recombinant FGF ligands in treating a wide range of conditions that require tissue repair/regeneration. Alongside, the functional reasons why application of exogenous FGF ligands does not lead to cancers are described. Together, this highlights that the FGF ligands represent a major opportunity for clinical translation that has been largely overlooked in the West.

  2. Biomimetic 3D tissue printing for soft tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Han, Hyun Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Engineered adipose tissue constructs that are capable of reconstructing soft tissue with adequate volume would be worthwhile in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Tissue printing offers the possibility of fabricating anatomically relevant tissue constructs by delivering suitable matrix materials and living cells. Here, we devise a biomimetic approach for printing adipose tissue constructs employing decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) matrix bioink encapsulating human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). We designed and printed precisely-defined and flexible dome-shaped structures with engineered porosity using DAT bioink that facilitated high cell viability over 2 weeks and induced expression of standard adipogenic genes without any supplemented adipogenic factors. The printed DAT constructs expressed adipogenic genes more intensely than did non-printed DAT gel. To evaluate the efficacy of our printed tissue constructs for adipose tissue regeneration, we implanted them subcutaneously in mice. The constructs did not induce chronic inflammation or cytotoxicity postimplantation, but supported positive tissue infiltration, constructive tissue remodeling, and adipose tissue formation. This study demonstrates that direct printing of spatially on-demand customized tissue analogs is a promising approach to soft tissue regeneration.

  3. Review scaffold design and stem cells for tooth regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Current dental treatments for the missing teeth depend largely on dentures and implants crowned with prosthetic caps to restore some functionality of the teeth. However, these devices cannot mimic the biological teeth, do not remodel and they have poor integration with the host. The concept of tissue engineering is based on that fact that by cultivating postnatal dental stem cells (DSCs on a well-designed bioengineered three dimensional scaffold, it is possible to regenerate tooth organogenesis. To date, a range of biomaterial scaffolds with different sources of cells have been proposed to regenerate substitutes to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM analogs. The design of scaffold is critical as it should be capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation and has the appropriate mechanical properties. Moreover, there are a number of parameters that must be examined in constructing the scaffold, including porosity, the mechanical integrity and effect of surface morphology on cell adhesion and proliferation. In this paper a brief review of literature is presented together with a discussion on the future directions and the challenges ahead in the areas of periodontal dental stem cells DSCs and the scaffold design and manufacturing techniques that are of particular significant for tooth tissue engineering.

  4. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed.

  5. Regenerative endodontics: regeneration or repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Stéphane R J; Tomson, Phillip L; Berdal, Ariane

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and translational research have made it possible to provide treatment modalities that protect the vital pulp, allow manipulation of reactionary and reparative dentinogenesis, and, more recently, permit revascularization of an infected root canal space. These approaches are referred to as regenerative procedures. The method currently used to determine the origin of the tissue secreted during the repair/regeneration process is largely based on the identification of cellular markers (usually proteins) left by cells that were responsible for this tissue production. The presence of these proteins in conjunction with other indicators of cellular behavior (especially biomineralization) and analysis of the structure of the newly generated tissue allow conclusions to be made of how it was formed. Thus far, it has not been possible to truly establish the biological mechanism controlling tertiary dentinogenesis. This article considers current therapeutic techniques to treat the dentin-pulp complex and contextualize them in terms of reparative and regenerative processes. Although it may be considered a semantic argument rather than a biological one, the definitions of regeneration and repair are explored to clarify our position in this era of regenerative endodontics. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Liver Development, Regeneration, and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet W. C. Kung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of putative liver stem cells has brought closer the previously separate fields of liver development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Significant overlaps in the regulation of these processes are now being described. For example, studies in embryonic liver development have already provided the basis for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. As a result, the understanding of the cell biology of proliferation and differentiation in the liver has been improved. This knowledge can be used to improve the function of hepatocyte-like cells for drug testing, bioartificial livers, and transplantation. In parallel, the mechanisms regulating cancer cell biology are now clearer, providing fertile soil for novel therapeutic approaches. Recognition of the relationships between development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis, and the increasing evidence for the role of stem cells in all of these areas, has sparked fresh enthusiasm in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and has led to new targeted therapies for liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancers.

  7. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research.

  8. Regeneration of Pelargonium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wojtania

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pelargonium sp. has been a subject of numerous studies to deterimine the effec tiveness of in vitro techniques to produce a large number of pathogen-free plants. Regeneration of pelargonium plants from the different initial explants as well via organogenesis as via somatic embryogenesis has been obtained. The most effective adventitious shoot formation has been achieved from shoot tips and axillary buds using cytokinin or cytokinin/auxin combinations. Leaf explants, whose general have lower organogenic potency, regenerate better in the presence of thidiazuron. This growth regulator stimulate the somatic embryos production from hypocotyl and cotyledone explants too. The main problem in tissue culture propagation of Pelargonium has been the high tendency to formation of vigorously growing callus with low organogenic potency and rapid senescence of cultures. Moreover, the significant differen ces in requirements to the medium composition (minerals, organic compounds and growth regulators between Pelargonium cultivars has been observed. This makes difficult to develop an universaI method of Pelargonium micropropagation.

  9. Calcium Signalling and Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Garcin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available After partial hepatectomy (PH the initial mass of the organ is restored through a complex network of cellular interactions that orchestrate both proliferative and hepatoprotective signalling cascades. Among agonists involved in this network many of them drive Ca2+ movements. During liver regeneration in the rat, hepatocyte cytosolic Ca2+ signalling has been shown on the one hand to be deeply remodelled and on the other hand to enhance progression of hepatocytes through the cell cycle. Mechanisms through which cytosolic Ca2+ signals impact on hepatocyte cell cycle early after PH are not completely understood, but at least they include regulation of immediate early gene transcription and ERK and CREB phosphorylation. In addition to cytosolic Ca2+, there is also evidence that mitochondrial Ca2+ and also nuclear Ca2+ may be critical for the regulation of liver regeneration. Finally, Ca2+ movements in hepatocytes, and possibly in other liver cells, not only impact hepatocyte progression in the cell cycle but more generally may regulate cellular homeostasis after PH.

  10. Axon Regeneration Requires A Conserved MAP Kinase Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Hammarlund, Marc; Nix, Paola; Hauth, Linda; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Bastiani, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Regeneration of injured neurons can restore function, but most neurons regenerate poorly or not at all. The failure to regenerate in some cases is due to a lack of activation of cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. Thus, these pathways might be targeted for the development of therapies that can restore neuron function after injury or disease. Here, we show that the DLK-1 MAP kinase pathway is essential for regeneration in C. elegans motor neurons. Loss of this pathway eliminates regeneration...

  11. Growth Factor Interactions in Bone Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, Diederik H. R.; Creemers, Laura B.; Alblas, Jacqueline; Lu, Lichun; Verbout, Abraham J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Dhert, Wouter J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Bone regeneration is a complex process regulated by a large number of bioactive molecules. Many growth factors and cytokines involved in the natural process of bone healing have been identified and tested as potential therapeutic candidates to enhance the regeneration process. Although many of these

  12. Axonal regeneration and remyelination evaluation of chitosan/gelatin-based nerve guide combined with transforming growth factor-β1 and Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xin; Deng, Manjing; Yang, Maojin; Liu, Luchuan; Zhang, Yongjie; Wen, Xiujie

    2014-01-01

    Despite efforts in peripheral nerve injury and regeneration, it is difficult to achieve a functional recovery following extended peripheral nerve lesions. Even if artificial nerve conduit, cell components and growth factors can enhance nerve regeneration, integration in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration remains yet to be explored. For this study, we used chitosan/gelatin nerve graft constructed with collagenous matrices as a vehicle for Schwann cells and transforming growth factor-β1 to bridge a 10-mm gap of the sciatic nerve and explored the feasibility of improving regeneration and reinnervation in rats. The nerve regeneration was assessed with functional recovery, electrophysiological test, retrograde labeling, and immunohistochemistry analysis during the post-operative period of 16 weeks. The results showed that the internal sides of the conduits were compact enough to prevent the connective tissues from ingrowth. Nerve conduction velocity, average regenerated myelin area, and myelinated axon count were similar to those treated with autograft (p > 0.05) but significantly higher than those bridged with chitosan/gelatin nerve graft alone (p regeneration and remyelination. A designed graft incorporating all of the tissue-engineering strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration may provide great progress in tissue engineering for nerve repair.

  13. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  14. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned lfuid inlfuence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-shuai Li; Qing-feng Li; Ming-min Dong; Tao Zan; Shuang Ding; Lin-bo Liu

    2016-01-01

    Nerve regeneration conditioned lfuid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the pro-teinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned lfuid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis conifrmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8β and complement factor D) in the nerve regeneration conditioned lfuid and each varied at different time points. These ifndings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  15. Chitin Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Furuike

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering/regeneration is based on the hypothesis that healthy stem/progenitor cells either recruited or delivered to an injured site, can eventually regenerate lost or damaged tissue. Most of the researchers working in tissue engineering and regenerative technology attempt to create tissue replacements by culturing cells onto synthetic porous three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds, which is currently regarded as an ideal approach to enhance functional tissue regeneration by creating and maintaining channels that facilitate progenitor cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The requirements that must be satisfied by such scaffolds include providing a space with the proper size, shape and porosity for tissue development and permitting cells from the surrounding tissue to migrate into the matrix. Recently, chitin scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible nature. The advantage of chitin as a tissue engineering biomaterial lies in that it can be easily processed into gel and scaffold forms for a variety of biomedical applications. Moreover, chitin has been shown to enhance some biological activities such as immunological, antibacterial, drug delivery and have been shown to promote better healing at a faster rate and exhibit greater compatibility with humans. This review provides an overview of the current status of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine research using chitin scaffolds for bone, cartilage and wound healing applications. We also outline the key challenges in this field and the most likely directions for future development and we hope that this review will be helpful to the researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  16. Current Bioengineering Methods for Whole Kidney Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichiro Yamanaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney regeneration is likely to provide an inexhaustible source of tissues and organs for immunosuppression-free transplantation. It is currently garnering considerable attention and might replace kidney dialysis as the ultimate therapeutic strategy for renal failure. However, anatomical complications make kidney regeneration difficult. Here, we review recent advances in the field of kidney regeneration, including (i the directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells/embryonic stem cells into kidney cells; (ii blastocyst decomplementation; (iii use of a decellularized cadaveric scaffold; (iv embryonic organ transplantation; and (v use of a nephrogenic niche for growing xenoembryos for de novo kidney regeneration from stem cells. All these approaches represent potentially promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Although many obstacles to kidney regeneration remain, we hope that innovative strategies and reliable research will ultimately allow the restoration of renal function in patients with end-stage kidney disease.

  17. Engineering Encounters: Reverse Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Veronica Cassone; Ventura, Marcia; Bell, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This column presents ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue shares information on how students' everyday experiences can support science learning through engineering design. In this article, the authors outline a reverse-engineering model of instruction and describe one example of how it looked in our fifth-grade…

  18. Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for skeletal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Siyeon; Im, Gun-Il

    2014-10-01

    Tissue engineering for skeletal tissues including bone and cartilage have been focused on the use of adult stem cells. Although there are several pioneering researches on skeletal tissue regeneration from embryonic stem cells (ESCs), ethical issues and the possibility of immune rejection clouded further attention to the application of ESCs for nonlethal orthopedic conditions. However, the recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) led to reconsider the use of these pluripotential cells for skeletal regeneration. The purpose of this review was to summarize the current knowledge of osteogenic and chondrogenic induction from ESCs and iPSCs and to provide a perspective on the application of iPSCs for skeletal regeneration.

  19. Modeling of a stacked-screen regenerator in an oscillatory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu Han; Biwa, Tetsushi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we model tortuous flow channels of a stacked-screen regenerator as a bundle of cylindrical tubes to analyze and design thermoacoustic Stirling engines. The oscillatory flow resistance of stacked-screen regenerators is measured and compared with those obtained using empirical equations to verify the applicability of those empirical equations to oscillating flows of pressurized Ar and He gases. It is then converted to an effective radius parameterized by Re h and r 0/δν, where Re h represents the Reynolds number based on velocity oscillation amplitude, r 0 is Ueda’s effective radius ( = \\sqrt{d\\text{h}D} /2, where d h is the hydraulic diameter and D is the mesh wire diameter), and δν denotes the viscous penetration depth. The applicability of the proposed effective radius is demonstrated experimentally when the axial temperature gradient is imposed on the regenerator.

  20. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi eOtsu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  1. In situ regeneration of bioactive coatings enabled by an evolved Staphylococcus aureus sortase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Hyun Ok; Qu, Zheng; Haller, Carolyn A.; Dorr, Brent M.; Dai, Erbin; Kim, Wookhyun; Liu, David R.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2016-04-01

    Surface immobilization of bioactive molecules is a central paradigm in the design of implantable devices and biosensors with improved clinical performance capabilities. However, in vivo degradation or denaturation of surface constituents often limits the long-term performance of bioactive films. Here we demonstrate the capacity to repeatedly regenerate a covalently immobilized monomolecular thin film of bioactive molecules through a two-step stripping and recharging cycle. Reversible transpeptidation by a laboratory evolved Staphylococcus aureus sortase A (eSrtA) enabled the rapid immobilization of an anti-thrombogenic film in the presence of whole blood and permitted multiple cycles of film regeneration in vitro that preserved its biological activity. Moreover, eSrtA transpeptidation facilitated surface re-engineering of medical devices in situ after in vivo implantation through removal and restoration film constituents. These studies establish a rapid, orthogonal and reversible biochemical scheme to regenerate selective molecular constituents with the potential to extend the lifetime of bioactive films.

  2. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsu, Keishi; Kumakami-Sakano, Mika; Fujiwara, Naoki; Kikuchi, Kazuko; Keller, Laetitia; Lesot, Hervé; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue) stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry) by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  3. Extracellular matrices, artiifcial neural scaffolds and the promise of neural regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian B.Ricks; Samuel S.Shin; Christopher Becker; Ramesh Grandhi

    2014-01-01

    Over last 20 years, extracellular matrices have been shown to be useful in promoting tissue re-generation. Recently, they have been used and have had success in achieving neurogenesis. Recent developments in extracellular matrix design have allowed their successful in vivo incorporation to engender an environment favorable for neural regeneration in animal models. Promising treatments under investigation include manipulation of the intrinsic extracellular matrix and incorporation of engineered naometer-sized scaffolds through which inhibition of molecules serving as barriers to neuroregeneration and delivery of neurotrophic factors and/or cells for successful tissue regeneration can be achieved. Further understanding of the changes incurred within the extracellular matrix following central nervous system injury will undoubtedly help design a clinically efifcacious extracellular matrix scaffold that can mitigate or reverse neural de-generation in the clinical setting.

  4. Introduction to tissue engineering applications and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Birla, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Covering a progressive medical field, Tissue Engineering describes the innovative process of regenerating human cells to restore or establish normal function in defective organs. As pioneering individuals look ahead to the possibility of generating entire organ systems, students may turn to this textbook for a comprehensive understanding and preparation for the future of regenerative medicine. This book explains chemical stimulations, the bioengineering of specific organs, and treatment plans for chronic diseases. It is a must-read for tissue engineering students and practitioners.

  5. PLA-based foams: tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco Perero, José Ignacio; Antunes, Marcelo de Sousa Pais

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable porous scaffolds with or without bioactive molecules prepared by clean techniques attract an enormous interest for tissue engineering applications. Scaffolds work as structural support for both cell implantation and growth, favoring the regeneration or formation of new tissue. Scaffold requisites for tissue engineering applications include a proper material selection, which has to be biocompatible and biodegradable and with a good balance of mechanical properties, as...

  6. Stirling engine with air working fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A Stirling engine capable of utilizing air as a working fluid which includes a compact heat exchange module which includes heating tube units, regenerator and cooler positioned about the combustion chamber. This arrangement has the purpose and effect of allowing the construction of an efficient, high-speed, high power-density engine without the use of difficult to seal light gases as working fluids.

  7. Single domain antibodies in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, Emilie Dooms

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to demonstrate the potential of VHH in tissue engineering applications, with a focus on bone and cartilage tissue regeneration. After a general introduction to this thesis in chapter 1, the selection of VHH targeting growth factors is described in chapter 2. VHH were select

  8. Two piston V-type Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A two piston Stirling engine which includes a heat exchanger arrangement placing the cooler and regenerator directly adjacent the compression space for minimal cold duct volume; a sealing arrangement which eliminates the need for piston seals, crossheads and piston rods; and a simplified power control system.

  9. Single bank NOx adsorber for heavy duty diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genderen, M. van; Aken, M.G. van

    2003-01-01

    In a NOx adsorber programme the feasibility for applying this technology to heavy duty diesel engines was investigated. After modelling and simulations for realising best λ < 1 engine conditions a platform was build which was used to obtain good NOx adsorber regeneration settings in a number of stea

  10. Effect of Adding a Regenerator to Kornhauser's MIT "Two-Space" (Gas-Spring+Heat Exchanger) Test Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Gidugu, Praveen

    2008-01-01

    This study employed entropy-based second law post-processing analysis to characterize the various thermodynamic losses inside a 3-space solution domain (gas spring+heat exchanger+regenerator) operating under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating flow. The 3- space solution domain is adapted from the 2-space solution domain (gas spring+heat exchanger) in Kornhauser's MIT test rig by modifying the heat exchanger space to include a porous regenerator system. A thermal nonequilibrium model which assumes that the regenerator porous matrix and gas average temperatures can differ by several degrees at a given axial location and time during the cycle is employed. An important and primary objective of this study is the development and application of a thermodynamic loss post-processor to characterize the major thermodynamic losses inside the 3-space model. It is anticipated that the experience gained from thermodynamic loss analysis of the simple 3-space model can be extrapolated to more complex systems like the Stirling engine. It is hoped that successful development of loss post-processors will facilitate the improvement of the optimization capability of Stirling engine analysis codes through better understanding of the heat transfer and power losses. It is also anticipated that the incorporation of a successful thermal nonequilibrium model of the regenerator in Stirling engine CFD analysis codes, will improve our ability to accurately model Stirling regenerators relative to current multidimensional thermal-equilibrium porous media models.

  11. Gene therapy: implications for craniofacial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Erica L; Villa-Diaz, Luis G; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy in the craniofacial region provides a unique tool for delivery of DNA to coordinate protein production in both time and space. The drive to bring this technology to the clinic is derived from the fact that more than 85% of the global population may at one time require repair or replacement of a craniofacial structure. This need ranges from mild tooth decay and tooth loss to temporomandibular joint disorders and large-scale reconstructive surgery. Our ability to insert foreign DNA into a host cell has been developing since the early uses of gene therapy to alter bacterial properties for waste cleanup in the 1980s followed by successful human clinical trials in the 1990s to treat severe combined immunodeficiency. In the past 20 years, the emerging field of craniofacial tissue engineering has adopted these techniques to enhance regeneration of mineralized tissues, salivary gland, and periodontium and to reduce tumor burden of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Studies are currently pursuing research on both biomaterial-mediated gene delivery and more clinically efficacious, although potentially more hazardous, viral methods. Although hundreds of gene therapy clinical trials have taken place in the past 20 years, we must still work to ensure an ideal safety profile for each gene and delivery method combination. With adequate genotoxicity testing, we can expect gene therapy to augment protein delivery strategies and potentially allow for tissue-specific targeting, delivery of multiple signals, and increased spatial and temporal control with the goal of natural tissue replacement in the craniofacial complex.

  12. Electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promises in providing successful treatments of human body tissue loss that current methods are unable to treat or unable to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes. In scaffold-based tissue engineering, a highperformance scaffold underpins the success of a tissue engineering strategy and a major direction in the field is to create multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds for enhanced biological performance and for regenerating complex body tissues. Electrospinning can produce nanofibrous scaffolds that are highly desirable for tissue engineering. The enormous interest in electrospinning and electrospun fibrous structures by the science, engineering and medical communities has led to various developments of the electrospinning technology and wide investigations of electrospun products in many industries, including biomedical engineering, over the past two decades. It is now possible to create novel, multicomponent tissue engineering scaffolds with multiple functions. This article provides a concise review of recent advances in the R & D of electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds. It also presents our philosophy and research in the designing and fabrication of electrospun multicomponent scaffolds with multiple functions.

  13. Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Rio; Inoue, Takeshi; Yamada, Shigehito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-02-01

    Urodele amphibians, such as newts, can regenerate a functional limb, including joints, after amputation at any level along the proximal-distal axis of the limb. The blastema can regenerate the limb morphology largely independently of the stump after proximal-distal identity has been established, but the remaining and regenerated tissues must be structurally reintegrated (matched in size and shape). Here we used newt joint regeneration as a model to investigate reintegration, because a functionally interlocking joint requires structural integration between its opposing skeletal elements. After forelimbs were amputated at the elbow joint, the joint was regenerated between the remaining and regenerated skeletal elements. The regenerated cartilage was thick around the amputated joint to make a reciprocally interlocking joint structure with the remaining bone. Furthermore, during regeneration, the extracellular matrix of the remaining tissues was lost, suggesting that the remaining tissues might contribute to the morphogenesis of regenerating cartilage. Our results showed that the area of the regenerated cartilage matched the area of the apposed remaining cartilage, thus contributing to formation of a functional structure.

  14. Meniscus repair and regeneration: review on current methods and research potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Scotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus regeneration is an unsolved clinical challenge. Despite the wide acceptance of the degenerative consequences of meniscectomy, no surgical procedure has succeeded to date in regenerating a functional and long-lasting meniscal fibrocartilage. Research proposed a number of experimental approaches encompassing all the typical strategies of regenerative medicine: cell-free scaffolds, gene therapy, intra-articular delivery of progenitor cells, biological glues for enhanced bonding of reparable tears, partial and total tissue engineered meniscus replacement. None of these approaches has been completely successful and can be considered suitable for all patients, as meniscal tears require specific and patient-related treatments depending on the size and type of lesion. Recent advances in cell biology, biomaterial science and bioengineering (e.g., bioreactors have now the potential to drive meniscus regeneration into a series of clinically relevant strategies. In this tutorial paper, the clinical need for meniscus regeneration strategies will be explained, and past and current experimental studies on meniscus regeneration will be reported.

  15. Improved method of in vitro regeneration in Leucaena leucocephala - a leguminous pulpwood tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor M; Arha, Manish; Nookaraju, A; Gupta, Sushim K; Srivastava, Sameer; Yadav, Arun K; Kulkarni, Pallavi S; Abhilash, O U; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Singh, Somesh; Tatkare, Rajeshri; Chinnathambi, Kannan; Rawal, Shuban K; Khan, Bashir M

    2009-10-01

    Leucaena leucocephala is a fast growing multipurpose legume tree used for forage, leaf manure, paper and pulp. Lignin in Leucaena pulp adversely influences the quality of paper produced. Developing transgenic Leucaena with altered lignin by genetic engineering demands an optimized regeneration system. The present study deals with optimization of regeneration system for L. leucocephala cv. K636. Multiple shoot induction from the cotyledonary nodes of L. leucocephala was studied in response to cytokinins, thidiazuron (TDZ) and N(6)-benzyladenine (BA) supplemented in half strength MS (½-MS) medium and also their effect on in vitro rooting of the regenerated shoots. Multiple shoots were induced from cotyledonary nodes at varied frequencies depending on the type and concentration of cytokinin used in the medium. TDZ was found to induce more number of shoots per explant than BA, with a maximum of 7 shoots at an optimum concentration of 0.23 µM. Further increase in TDZ concentration resulted in reduced shoot length and fasciation of the shoots. Liquid pulse treatment of the explants with TDZ did not improve the shoot production further but improved the subsequent rooting of the shoots that regenerated. Regenerated shoots successfully rooted on ½-MS medium supplemented with 0.54 µM α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Rooted shoots of Leucaena were transferred to coco-peat and hardened plantlets showed ≥ 90 % establishment in the green house.

  16. Development of hybrid scaffolds using ceramic and hydrogel for articular cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jeong, Wonju; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-04-01

    The regeneration of articular cartilage consisting of hyaline cartilage and hydrogel scaffolds has been generally used in tissue engineering. However, success in in vivo studies has been rarely reported. The hydrogel scaffolds implanted into articular cartilage defects are mechanically unstable and it is difficult for them to integrate with the surrounding native cartilage tissue. Therefore, it is needed to regenerate cartilage and bone tissue simultaneously. We developed hybrid scaffolds with hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue and with ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue. For in vivo study, hybrid scaffolds were press-fitted into osteochondral tissue defects in a rabbit knee joints and the cartilage tissue regeneration in blank, hydrogel scaffolds, and hybrid scaffolds was compared. In 12th week after implantation, the histological and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the cartilage tissue regeneration. In the blank and hydrogel scaffold groups, the defects were filled with fibrous tissues and the implanted hydrogel scaffolds could not maintain their initial position; in the hybrid scaffold group, newly generated cartilage tissues were morphologically similar to native cartilage tissues and were smoothly connected to the surrounding native tissues. This study demonstrates hybrid scaffolds containing hydrogel and ceramic scaffolds can provide mechanical stability to hydrogel scaffolds and enhance cartilage tissue regeneration at the defect site.

  17. Regeneration method for condensate desalting device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsurumi, Takeshi; Kashimura, Makoto

    1998-09-02

    Regeneration of a condensate desalting device in a PWR type power plant is conducted by separating a mixed bed into an anion exchange resin layer and a cation exchange resin layer by back washing after stoppage of passage of water. Regeneration of an anion exchange resin layer is conducted by injecting alkali (hydrogen) carbonate such as sodium carbonate and potassium hydrogen carbonate, and extruding them with purified water and then injecting alkali hydroxide, extruding and further washing with purified water. Regeneration of a cation exchange resin layer is conducted by injecting acids such as hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid followed by extrusion and washing. It is preferable that a liquid formed by mixing the regenerated liquid wastes of the anion exchange resin containing alkali (hydro) carbonate and regenerated liquid wastes of the cationic exchange resin containing acids and allowing generated carbon dioxide to be absorbed to alkali hydroxide is used as alkali (hydrogen) carbonate for the next regeneration. With such procedures, anion exchange resin which adsorbs decomposed products of amines can be regenerated efficiently. (I.N.)

  18. Guided bone regeneration using individualized ceramic sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, J; Anderud, J; Abrahamsson, P; Wälivaara, D-Å; Isaksson, S G; Adolfsson, E

    2016-10-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) describes the use of membranes to regenerate bony defects. A membrane for GBR needs to be biocompatible, cell-occlusive, non-toxic, and mouldable, and possess space-maintaining properties including stability. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe a new method of GBR using individualized ceramic sheets to perfect bone regeneration prior to implant placement; bone regeneration was assessed using traditional histology and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric changes in the bone and soft tissue. Three patients were included. After full-thickness flap reflection, the individualized ceramic sheets were fixed. The sites were left to heal for 7 months. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 7 months postoperative using cone beam computed tomography and 3D optical equipment. Samples of the regenerated bone and soft tissue were collected and analyzed. The bone regenerated in the entire interior volume of all sheets. Bone biopsies revealed newly formed trabecular bone with a lamellar structure. Soft tissue biopsies showed connective tissue with no signs of an inflammatory response. This was considered to be newly formed periosteum. Thus ceramic individualized sheets can be used to regenerate large volumes of bone in both vertical and horizontal directions independent of the bone defect and with good biological acceptance of the material.

  19. Epoxyeicosanoids promote organ and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, Dipak; Kalish, Brian T; Huang, Sui; Bielenberg, Diane R; Le, Hau D; Yang, Jun; Edin, Matthew L; Lee, Craig R; Benny, Ofra; Mudge, Dayna K; Butterfield, Catherine E; Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Inceoglu, Bora; Jenkins, Roger L; Simpson, Mary A; Akino, Tomoshige; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Ingber, Donald E; Hammock, Bruce D; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L; Kaipainen, Arja; D'Amore, Patricia A; Puder, Mark; Zeldin, Darryl C; Kieran, Mark W

    2013-08-13

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), lipid mediators produced by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases, regulate inflammation, angiogenesis, and vascular tone. Despite pleiotropic effects on cells, the role of these epoxyeicosanoids in normal organ and tissue regeneration remains unknown. EETs are produced predominantly in the endothelium. Normal organ and tissue regeneration require an active paracrine role of the microvascular endothelium, which in turn depends on angiogenic growth factors. Thus, we hypothesize that endothelial cells stimulate organ and tissue regeneration via production of bioactive EETs. To determine whether endothelial-derived EETs affect physiologic tissue growth in vivo, we used genetic and pharmacological tools to manipulate endogenous EET levels. We show that endothelial-derived EETs play a critical role in accelerating tissue growth in vivo, including liver regeneration, kidney compensatory growth, lung compensatory growth, wound healing, corneal neovascularization, and retinal vascularization. Administration of synthetic EETs recapitulated these results, whereas lowering EET levels, either genetically or pharmacologically, delayed tissue regeneration, demonstrating that pharmacological modulation of EETs can affect normal organ and tissue growth. We also show that soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors, which elevate endogenous EET levels, promote liver and lung regeneration. Thus, our observations indicate a central role for EETs in organ and tissue regeneration and their contribution to tissue homeostasis.

  20. Low-intensity ultrasound for regeneration of injured peripheral nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhou; Wenzhi Chen; Kun Zhou; Zhibiao Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound is a kind of mechanical wave and characterized by mechanical effect,heat affect and physical and chemical effect.Ultrasound can promote regeneration of peripheral nerves after a slight injury based on its mechanical effect.However,whether it can promote regeneration of peripheral nerves after a severe injury or not is still unclear.OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of low-intensity ultrasound(LIU)on regeneration of injured peripheral nerve,throgh examining sciatic nerve function index,the sensory nerve conduction velocity and the thickness of myelin sheath.DESIGN: Single factor design of contrast observation.SETTING: Institute of Ultrasound Engineering,Chongqing Medical University.MATERIALS:A total of 64 female Wistar rats,of clean grade,age 3 moths,weighing 200-250g ,were provided by Experimental Animal Center of Chongqing Medical University. All rats were randomly divided into treatment group and control group with 32 in each group. In addition rats were observed at 4 time points, including 2,4,6 and 8 weeks,with 8 at each time point.The main equipments were detailed as follows:forceps (Medical Treatment Apparatus Company,Chongqing),low-intensity ultrasound treatment instrument(Institute of Ulrasound Engineering in Medicine),the analysis instrument of diagram resembles and arithmetic figure(the United States Bio-RAD Company),ultrasound coupling agent(Xunde Image material factory,Hangzhou),Osmium Tetraoxide(Next Chimicam,South Africa).METHODS:The experiment was carried out in Institute of Ultrasound Engineering of Chongqing Medical University from December 2003 to May 2004.The right sciatic nerves of 64 rats were crushed with forceps for 30 s to form the experimental animal models.Then they were treated at 3 days after operation.Rats in the treatment group received the LIU exposure.LIU was applied every other day to the crush site of rats,which had a spatial peak,time-averaged intensity of 0.25 W/cm2 operated at 1 MHz for 1 minute per

  1. Differential expression of GAP-43 and neurofilament during peripheral nerve regeneration through bio-artificial conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriel, Víctor; Garzón, Ingrid; Campos, Antonio; Cornelissen, Maria; Alaminos, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Nerve conduits are promising alternatives for repairing nerve gaps; they provide a close microenvironment that supports nerve regeneration. In this sense, histological analysis of axonal growth is a determinant to achieve successful nerve regeneration. To evaluate this process, the most-used immunohistochemical markers are neurofilament (NF), β-III tubulin and, infrequently, GAP-43. However, GAP-43 expression in long-term nerve regeneration models is still poorly understood. In this study we analysed GAP-43 expression and its correlation with NF and S-100, using three tissue-engineering approaches with different regeneration profiles. A 10 mm gap was created in the sciatic nerve of 12 rats and repaired using collagen conduits or collagen conduits filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels or with hydrogels containing autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs). After 12 weeks the conduits were harvested for histological analysis. Our results confirm the long-term expression of GAP-43 in all groups. The expression of GAP-43 and NF was significantly higher in the group with ADMSCs. Interestingly, GAP-43 was observed in immature, newly formed axons and NF in thicker and mature axons. These proteins were not co-expressed, demonstrating their differential expression in newly formed nerve fascicles. Our descriptive and quantitative histological analysis of GAP-43 and NFL allowed us to determine, with high accuracy, the heterogenic population of axons at different stages of maturation in three tissue-engineering approaches. Finally, to perform a complete assessment of axonal regeneration, the quantitative immunohistochemical evaluation of both GAP-43 and NF could be a useful quality control in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Intrinsic determinants of optic nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Rui-lin; CHO Kin-Sang; GUO Chen-ying; CHEW Justin; CHEN Dong-feng; YANG Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the functions of these intracellular signals in their regulation of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon regeneration.Data sources Relevant articles published in English or Chinese from 1970 to present were selected from PubMed.Searches were made using the terms "intrinsic determinants,axon regeneration,RGC,optic nerve regeneration,and central nervous system axon regeneration."Study selection Articles studying the mechanisms controlling RGC and central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration were reviewed.Articles focusing on the intrinsic determinants of axon regeneration were selected.Results Like other CNS neurons of mammals,RGCs undergo a developmental loss in their ability to grow axons as they mature,which is a critical contributing factor to the failure of nerve regeneration and repair after injury.This growth failure can be attributed,at least in part,by the induction of molecular programs preventing cellular overgrowth and termination of axonal growth upon maturation.Key intracellular signals and transcription factors,including B cell lymphoma/leukemia 2,cyclic adenine monophosphate,mammalian target of rapamycin,and Krüppel-like transcription factors,have been identified to play central roles in this process.Conclusions Intense effort and substantial progress have been made to identify the various intrinsic growth pathways that regulate RGC axon regeneration.More work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of and the interrelationship between the actions of these factors and to successfully achieve regeneration and repair of the severed RGC axons.

  3. Pulp regeneration: Current approaches and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen eYANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative endodontics aims to replace inflamed/necrotic pulp tissues with regenerated pulp-like tissues to revitalize teeth and improve life quality. Pulp revascularization case reports, which showed successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, indicated the possible clinical application of pulp regeneration via cell homing strategy. From a clinical point of view, functional pulp-like tissues should be regenerated with the characterization of vascularization, re-innervation, and dentin deposition with a regulated rate similar to that of normal pulp. Efficient root canal disinfection and proper size of the apical foramen are the two requisite preconditions for pulp regeneration. Progress has been made on pulp regeneration via cell homing strategies. This review focused on the requisite preconditions and cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration. In addition to the traditionally used mechanical preparation and irrigation, antibiotics, irrigation assisted with EndoVac apical negative-pressure system, and ultrasonic and laser irradiation are now being used in root canal disinfection. In addition, pulp-like tissues could be formed with the apical foramen less than 1 mm, although more studies are needed to determine the appropriate size. Moreover, signaling molecules including stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1α, basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF, Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF, stem cell factor (SCF, and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF were used to achieve pulp-like tissue formation via a cell homing strategy. Studies on the cell sources of pulp regeneration might give some indications on the signaling molecular selection. The active recruitment of endogenous cells into root canals to regenerate pulp-like tissues is a novel concept that may offer an unprecedented opportunity for the near-term clinical translation of current biology-based therapies for dental pulp regeneration.

  4. Pulp Regeneration: Current Approaches and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingwen; Yuan, Guohua; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics aims to replace inflamed/necrotic pulp tissues with regenerated pulp-like tissues to revitalize teeth and improve life quality. Pulp revascularization case reports, which showed successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, indicated the possible clinical application of pulp regeneration via cell homing strategy. From a clinical point of view, functional pulp-like tissues should be regenerated with the characterization of vascularization, re-innervation, and dentin deposition with a regulated rate similar to that of normal pulp. Efficient root canal disinfection and proper size of the apical foramen are the two requisite preconditions for pulp regeneration. Progress has been made on pulp regeneration via cell homing strategies. This review focused on the requisite preconditions and cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration. In addition to the traditionally used mechanical preparation and irrigation, antibiotics, irrigation assisted with EndoVac apical negative-pressure system, and ultrasonic and laser irradiation are now being used in root canal disinfection. In addition, pulp-like tissues could be formed with the apical foramen less than 1 mm, although more studies are needed to determine the appropriate size. Moreover, signaling molecules including stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1α), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), stem cell factor (SCF), and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) were used to achieve pulp-like tissue formation via a cell homing strategy. Studies on the cell sources of pulp regeneration might give some indications on the signaling molecular selection. The active recruitment of endogenous cells into root canals to regenerate pulp-like tissues is a novel concept that may offer an unprecedented opportunity for the near-term clinical translation of current biology-based therapies for dental pulp regeneration.

  5. Pulp Regeneration: Current Approaches and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingwen; Yuan, Guohua; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics aims to replace inflamed/necrotic pulp tissues with regenerated pulp-like tissues to revitalize teeth and improve life quality. Pulp revascularization case reports, which showed successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, indicated the possible clinical application of pulp regeneration via cell homing strategy. From a clinical point of view, functional pulp-like tissues should be regenerated with the characterization of vascularization, re-innervation, and dentin deposition with a regulated rate similar to that of normal pulp. Efficient root canal disinfection and proper size of the apical foramen are the two requisite preconditions for pulp regeneration. Progress has been made on pulp regeneration via cell homing strategies. This review focused on the requisite preconditions and cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration. In addition to the traditionally used mechanical preparation and irrigation, antibiotics, irrigation assisted with EndoVac apical negative-pressure system, and ultrasonic and laser irradiation are now being used in root canal disinfection. In addition, pulp-like tissues could be formed with the apical foramen less than 1 mm, although more studies are needed to determine the appropriate size. Moreover, signaling molecules including stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1α), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), stem cell factor (SCF), and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) were used to achieve pulp-like tissue formation via a cell homing strategy. Studies on the cell sources of pulp regeneration might give some indications on the signaling molecular selection. The active recruitment of endogenous cells into root canals to regenerate pulp-like tissues is a novel concept that may offer an unprecedented opportunity for the near-term clinical translation of current biology-based therapies for dental pulp regeneration. PMID:27014076

  6. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  7. Recent Strategies Combining Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Bone, Liver and Skin Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Sabrina; Salerno, Simona; Ahmed, Haysam Mohamed Magdy; Piscioneri, Antonella; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the combination of biomaterials with stem cells as a promising strategy for bone, liver and skin regeneration. At first, we describe stem cell-based constructs for bone tissue engineering with special attention to recent advanced approaches based on the use of biomaterial scaffolds with renewable stem cells that have been used for bone regeneration. We illustrate the strategies to improve liver regeneration by using liver stem cells and biomaterials and/or devices as therapeutic approaches. In particular, examples of biomaterials in combination with other technologies are presented since they allow the differentiation of stem cells in hepatocytes. After a description of the role and the benefit of MSCs in wound repair and in skin substitutes we highlight the suitability of biomaterials in guiding stem cell differentiation for skin regeneration and cutaneous repair in both chronic and acute wounds. Finally, an overview of the types of bioreactors that have been developed for the differentiation of stem cells and are currently in use, is also provided. The examples of engineered microenvironments reported in this review indicate that a detailed understanding of the various factors and mechanisms that control the behavior of stem cells in vivo has provided useful information for the development of advanced bioartificial systems able to control cell fate.

  8. Reparative inflammation takes charge of tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Michael; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-21

    Inflammation underlies many chronic and degenerative diseases, but it also mitigates infections, clears damaged cells and initiates tissue repair. Many of the mechanisms that link inflammation to damage repair and regeneration in mammals are conserved in lower organisms, indicating that it is an evolutionarily important process. Recent insights have shed light on the cellular and molecular processes through which conventional inflammatory cytokines and Wnt factors control mammalian tissue repair and regeneration. This is particularly important for regeneration in the gastrointestinal system, especially for intestine and liver tissues in which aberrant and deregulated repair results in severe pathologies.

  9. Chitosan Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Chitosan, the N-deacetylated form of chitin, has good biocompatibility and biodegradability.This paper investigates the feasibility of using chitosan conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration.Cell culture experiments were used to test the material's cytotoxicity and affinity to nerve cells.Conduit implantation experiments were used to study the degradation of the material and the regeneration of injured sciatic nerves.The primary results indicate that chitosan has good mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability and it may be a promising biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  10. Engineer Ethics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae Sik; Kim, Yeong Pil; Kim, Yeong Jin

    2003-03-15

    This book tells of engineer ethics such as basic understanding of engineer ethics with history of engineering as a occupation, definition of engineering and specialized job and engineering, engineer ethics as professional ethics, general principles of ethics and its limitation, ethical theory and application, technique to solve the ethical problems, responsibility, safety and danger, information engineer ethics, biotechnological ethics like artificial insemination, life reproduction, gene therapy and environmental ethics.

  11. Do you have the nerves to regenerate? The importance of neural signalling in the regeneration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotte, Nicky; Leynen, Nathalie; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The importance of nerve-derived signalling for correct regeneration has been the topic of research for more than a hundred years, but we are just beginning to identify the underlying molecular pathways of this process. Within the current review, we attempt to provide an extensive overview of the neural influences during early and late phases of both vertebrate and invertebrate regeneration. In general, denervation impairs limb regeneration, but the presence of nerves is not essential for the regeneration of aneurogenic extremities. This observation led to the "neurotrophic factor(s) hypothesis", which states that certain trophic factors produced by the nerves are necessary for proper regeneration. Possible neuron-derived factors which regulate regeneration as well as the denervation-affected processes are discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Regenerating America: Meeting the Challenge of Building Local Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Medard; And Others

    The document includes five papers on the implications and applications of regeneration by the Regeneration Project, based in Emmaus, Pa. The first paper, "Regenerating America: Meeting the Challenge of Building Local Economies," (Medard Gabel) defines regeneration as economic recovery and growth, fostered by diversification within a…

  13. Chitosan Degradation Products Promote Nerve Regeneration by Stimulating Schwann Cell Proliferation via miR-27a/FOXO1 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjun; Zhao, Yahong; Sun, Cheng; Hu, Wen; Zhao, Jing; Li, Guicai; Zhang, Luzhong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Yan; Ding, Fei; Yang, Yumin; Gu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    Natural polysaccharides are biomaterials widely used for constructing scaffolds in tissue engineering. While natural polysaccharides have been shown to robustly promote tissue regeneration, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we show that chitooligosaccharides (COS), the intermediate products of chitosan degradation, stimulate peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. Our experiment also shows that COS stimulate the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) during nerve regeneration. By analyzing the transcriptome and gene regulatory network, we identified the miR-27a/FOXO1 axis as the main signaling pathway for mediating the proliferative effects of COS on SCs. COS increase the expression level of miR-27a and cause a reduction of FOXO1, which subsequently accelerates the cell cycle and stimulates SC proliferation to stimulate nerve regeneration. These findings define a basic pathway for oligosaccharides-mediated cell proliferation and reveal a novel aspect of polysaccharide biomaterials in tissue engineering.

  14. fgf20 is essential for initiating zebrafish fin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Geoffrey G; Makino, Shinji; Lien, Ching-Ling; Keating, Mark T

    2005-12-23

    Epimorphic regeneration requires the presence or creation of pluripotent cells capable of reproducing lost organs. Zebrafish fin regeneration is mediated by the creation of blastema cells. Here, we characterize the devoid of blastema (dob) mutant that fails fin regeneration during initial steps, forms abnormal regeneration epithelium, and does not form blastema. This mutation has no impact on embryonic survival. Dob results from an fgf20a null mutation, Y148S. Fgf20a is expressed during initiation of fin regeneration at the epithelial-mesenchymal boundary and later overlaps with the blastema marker msxb. Thus, fgf20a has a regeneration-specific requirement, initiating fin regeneration, and controlling blastema formation.

  15. Muscle regeneration in amphibians and mammals: passing the torch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Bruce M

    2003-02-01

    Skeletal muscle in both amphibians and mammals possesses a high regenerative capacity. In amphibians, a muscle can regenerate in two distinct ways: as a tissue component of an entire regenerating limb (epimorphic regeneration) or as an isolated entity (tissue regeneration). In the absence of epimorphic regenerative ability, mammals can regenerate muscles only by the tissue mode. This review focuses principally on the regeneration of entire muscles and covers what is known and what remains to be elucidated about fundamental mechanisms underlying muscle regeneration at this level.

  16. Marine-derived biological macromolecule-based biomaterials for wound healing and skin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that depends on the wound condition, the patient's health, and the physicochemical support given through external materials. The development of bioactive molecules and engineered tissue substitutes to provide physiochemical support to enhance the wound healing process plays a key role in advancing wound-care management. Thus, identification of ideal molecules in wound treatment is still in progress. The discovery of natural products that contain ideal molecules for skin tissue regeneration has been greatly advanced by exploration of the marine bioenvironment. Consequently, tremendously diverse marine organisms have become a great source of numerous biological macromolecules that can be used to develop tissue-engineered substitutes with wound healing properties. This review summarizes the wound healing process, the properties of macromolecules from marine organisms, and the involvement of these molecules in skin tissue regeneration applications.

  17. Adult stem cells in the use of jaw bone regeneration: current and prospective research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Khoury, Nizar; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-02-01

    Concomitant to the increased use of dental implants to replace lost dentition, there is a growing need to regenerate atrophic jaw bone to allow dental implant placement. Current surgical techniques for jaw bone augmentation share several limitations, such as operator sensitivity and relatively low predictability and high morbidity rates. Therefore, alternative treatment approaches have been developed in the field of tissue engineering. Bone tissue engineering integrates the use of different scaffolds, growth factors, and stem cells. This method aims to induce bone augmentation of large bone defects by mimicking biologic processes that occur during embryogenesis. This review will present available sources for adult stem cells, the rationale for using stem cells for bone regeneration, and recent studies that use mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induce bone augmentation.

  18. A novel osteogenesis technique: The expansible guided bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Zakaria

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Guided bone regeneration is a unique osteogenesis technique that requires a barrier membrane under periosteum to create space for bone regeneration. However, creating sizeable spaces is clinically not commonly feasible. A titanium plate and a thin silicone membrane were surgically layered on each calvaria of eight rabbits. Then, the periphery of the silicone membrane was fixed by a plastic ring to the underlying bone using titanium micro screws. After 1 week, a 5-mm-length titanium screw was used to elevate the titanium plate, which in turn elevated the silicone membrane together with overlying soft tissue in a rate of 1 mm/day for 5 days to create a secluded space. Animals were killed at 2 months (n = 4, group 1 and 4 months (n = 4, group 2 after the elevation. Histological and microradiographical analyses demonstrated creation of an amount of de novo bone formation (68.2 ± 22 mm3 in group 1 and 70.3 ± 14 mm3 in group 2 in the sizeable created spaces (207.1 ± 31 mm3 in group 1 and 202 ± 21 mm3 in group 2 without exposure of the device. This novel osteogenesis technique, “expansible guided bone regeneration,” created a substantial in vivo incubator without applying growth factors or osteoprogenitor cells. Creating a growing space over the secluded surface allowed the development of normal biological healing process occurring on the bone surface into a regenerative process, generating bone outside the genetically determined skeletal bone. This technique is a new tissue engineering approach stimulating endogenous tissue repair without applying cells or factors exogenously.

  19. Tissue regeneration in vivo within recombinant spidroin 1 scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Pustovalova, Olga; Shackelford, Julia; Vasiljeva, Tamara V; Druzhinina, Tatiana V; Kamenchuk, Yana A; Guzeev, Vitaly V; Sokolova, Olga S; Bogush, Vladimir G; Debabov, Vladimir G; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Agapov, Igor I

    2012-05-01

    One of the major tasks of tissue engineering is to produce tissue grafts for the replacement or regeneration of damaged tissue, and natural and recombinant silk-based polymer scaffolds are promising candidates for such grafts. Here, we compared two porous scaffolds made from different silk proteins, fibroin of Bombyx mori and a recombinant analog of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1 known as rS1/9, and their biocompatibility and degradation behavior in vitro and in vivo. The vascularization and intergrowth of the connective tissue, which was penetrated with nerve fibers, at 8 weeks after subcutaneous implantation in Balb/c mice was more profound using the rS1/9 scaffolds. Implantation of both scaffolds into bone defects in Wistar rats accelerated repair compared to controls with no implanted scaffold at 4 weeks. Based on the number of macrophages and multinuclear giant cells in the subcutaneous area and the number of osteoclasts in the bone, regeneration was determined to be more effective after the rS1/9 scaffolds were implanted. Microscopic examination of the morphology of the matrices revealed differences in their internal microstructures. In contrast to fibroin-based scaffolds, the walls of the rS1/9 scaffolds were visibly thicker and contained specific micropores. We suggest that the porous inner structure of the rS1/9 scaffolds provided a better micro-environment for the regenerating tissue, which makes the matrices derived from the recombinant rS1/9 protein favorable candidates for future in vivo applications.

  20. A novel internal fixator device for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Wilson, Robin E; Love, James M; Fisher, John P; Shah, Sameer B

    2013-06-01

    Recovery from peripheral nerve damage, especially for a transected nerve, is rarely complete, resulting in impaired motor function, sensory loss, and chronic pain with inappropriate autonomic responses that seriously impair quality of life. In consequence, strategies for enhancing peripheral nerve repair are of high clinical importance. Tension is a key determinant of neuronal growth and function. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that moderate levels of imposed tension (strain) can encourage axonal outgrowth; however, few strategies of peripheral nerve repair emphasize the mechanical environment of the injured nerve. Toward the development of more effective nerve regeneration strategies, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel, modular nerve-lengthening device, which allows the imposition of moderate tensile loads in parallel with existing scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair. This concept would enable nerve regeneration in two superposed regimes of nerve extension--traditional extension through axonal outgrowth into a scaffold and extension in intact regions of the proximal nerve, such as that occurring during growth or limb-lengthening. Self-sizing silicone nerve cuffs were fabricated to grip nerve stumps without slippage, and nerves were deformed by actuating a telescoping internal fixator. Poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) constructs mounted on the telescoping rods were apposed to the nerve stumps to guide axonal outgrowth. Neuronal cells were exposed to PLGA using direct contact and extract methods, and they exhibited no signs of cytotoxic effects in terms of cell morphology and viability. We confirmed the feasibility of implanting and actuating our device within a sciatic nerve gap and observed axonal outgrowth following device implantation. The successful fabrication and implementation of our device provides a novel method for examining mechanical influences on nerve regeneration.

  1. Hyperbaric Oxygen Promotes Proximal Bone Regeneration and Organized Collagen Composition during Digit Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi C Sammarco

    Full Text Available Oxygen is critical for optimal bone regeneration. While axolotls and salamanders have retained the ability to regenerate whole limbs, mammalian regeneration is restricted to the distal tip of the digit (P3 in mice, primates, and humans. Our previous study revealed the oxygen microenvironment during regeneration is dynamic and temporally influential in building and degrading bone. Given that regeneration is dependent on a dynamic and changing oxygen environment, a better understanding of the effects of oxygen during wounding, scarring, and regeneration, and better ways to artificially generate both hypoxic and oxygen replete microenvironments are essential to promote regeneration beyond wounding or scarring. To explore the influence of increased oxygen on digit regeneration in vivo daily treatments of hyperbaric oxygen were administered to mice during all phases of the entire regenerative process. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT and histological analysis showed that the daily application of hyperbaric oxygen elicited the same enhanced bone degradation response as two individual pulses of oxygen applied during the blastema phase. We expand past these findings to show histologically that the continuous application of hyperbaric oxygen during digit regeneration results in delayed blastema formation at a much more proximal location after amputation, and the deposition of better organized collagen fibers during bone formation. The application of sustained hyperbaric oxygen also delays wound closure and enhances bone degradation after digit amputation. Thus, hyperbaric oxygen shows the potential for positive influential control on the various phases of an epimorphic regenerative response.

  2. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-02-27

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  3. A numerical analysis of a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator with a parallel-plate regenerator geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thomas Frank; Pryds, Nini; Smith, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional model of a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator(AMR) with a regenerator made of parallel plates arranged in a stack configuration. The time dependent,two-dimensional model solves the Navier-Stokes equations for the heat transfer fluid and the coupled heat...... transfer equations for the regenerator and the fluid. The model is implemented using the Finite Element Method. The model can be used to study both transient and steady-state phenomena in the AMR for any ratio of regenerator to fluid heat capacity. Results on the AMR performance for different design...

  4. Hyperbaric Oxygen Promotes Proximal Bone Regeneration and Organized Collagen Composition during Digit Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, Mimi C; Simkin, Jennifer; Cammack, Alexander J; Fassler, Danielle; Gossmann, Alexej; Marrero, Luis; Lacey, Michelle; Van Meter, Keith; Muneoka, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is critical for optimal bone regeneration. While axolotls and salamanders have retained the ability to regenerate whole limbs, mammalian regeneration is restricted to the distal tip of the digit (P3) in mice, primates, and humans. Our previous study revealed the oxygen microenvironment during regeneration is dynamic and temporally influential in building and degrading bone. Given that regeneration is dependent on a dynamic and changing oxygen environment, a better understanding of the effects of oxygen during wounding, scarring, and regeneration, and better ways to artificially generate both hypoxic and oxygen replete microenvironments are essential to promote regeneration beyond wounding or scarring. To explore the influence of increased oxygen on digit regeneration in vivo daily treatments of hyperbaric oxygen were administered to mice during all phases of the entire regenerative process. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) and histological analysis showed that the daily application of hyperbaric oxygen elicited the same enhanced bone degradation response as two individual pulses of oxygen applied during the blastema phase. We expand past these findings to show histologically that the continuous application of hyperbaric oxygen during digit regeneration results in delayed blastema formation at a much more proximal location after amputation, and the deposition of better organized collagen fibers during bone formation. The application of sustained hyperbaric oxygen also delays wound closure and enhances bone degradation after digit amputation. Thus, hyperbaric oxygen shows the potential for positive influential control on the various phases of an epimorphic regenerative response.

  5. Regeneration-associated macrophages:a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Jung Kwon; Hyuk Jun Yoon; Byung Gon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Axons in central nervous system (CNS) do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration fail-ure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failurein vivo still remains elusive. Recent exper-imental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neu-rons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of en-hanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs). Ma-nipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries.

  6. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yoon, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Byung Gon

    2016-09-01

    Axons in central nervous system (CNS) do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of enhanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs). Manipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries.

  7. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Axons in central nervous system (CNS do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of enhanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs. Manipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries.

  8. Four Engineers...

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    There are four engineers traveling in a car;a mechanical engineer,a chemical engi-neer,an electrical engineer and a comput-er engineer.The car breaks down.“Sounds to me as if the pistons have seized.We ll have to strip down the engine before we canget the car working again,”says the mechanical

  9. Molecular mechanism of bone formation and regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Yamaguchi

    2008-01-01

    @@ Bone formation and regeneration are mediated by the coordinate action of various factors. Among these, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) play crucial roles in bone formation.

  10. SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS AND PLANT REGENERATION FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Florets were excised from panicles after six days of artificial crossing, and cultured in. Murashige ... were regenerated into plantlets in half MS medium without plant growth regulators. Plantlets of .... 13 cm diameter, containing light soils in the.

  11. Adventitious shoots induction and plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-08

    Jul 8, 2015 ... vitro plant regeneration for three watermelon cultivars. To achieve optimal .... watermelon genotypes gave shoot differentiation fre- quencies of 8.33-83.33% on MB5 .... They thought cells competent for shoot formation are not ...

  12. Plant Regeneration and Genetic Transformation in Eggplant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Harmander Gill

    2014-02-05

    Feb 5, 2014 ... 2School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, 141004 India. Accepted 5 ... media affect its regeneration potential (Kantharajah and .... Rogor and Kitazin in relation to their concentrations also.

  13. Skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during salamander limb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Simon, András

    2016-10-01

    Salamanders can regenerate entire limbs throughout their life. A critical step during limb regeneration is formation of a blastema, which gives rise to the new extremity. Salamander limb regeneration has historically been tightly linked to the term dedifferentiation, however, with refined research tools it is important to revisit the definition of dedifferentiation in the context. To what extent do differentiated cells revert their differentiated phenotypes? To what extent do progeny from differentiated cells cross lineage boundaries during regeneration? How do cell cycle plasticity and lineage plasticity relate to each other? What is the relationship between dedifferentiation of specialized cells and activation of tissue resident stem cells in terms of their contribution to the new limb? Here we highlight these problems through the case of skeletal muscle.

  14. Adult stem cells underlying lung regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Despite the massive toll in human suffering imparted by degenerative lung disease, including COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ARDS, the scientific community has been surprisingly agnostic regarding the potential of lung tissue, and in particular the alveoli, to regenerate. However, there is circumstantial evidence in humans and direct evidence in mice that ARDS triggers robust regeneration of lung tissue rather than irreversible fibrosis. The stem cells responsible for this remarkable regenerative process has garnered tremendous attention, most recently yielding a defined set of cloned human airway stem cells marked by p63 expression but with distinct commitment to differentiated cell types typical of the upper or lower airways, the latter of which include alveoli-like structures in vitro and in vivo. These recent advances in lung regeneration and distal airway stem cells and the potential of associated soluble factors in regeneration must be harnessed for therapeutic options in chronic lung disease.

  15. Chronological protein synthesis in regenerating rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinjun; Hao, Shuai; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Fuzheng; Huang, Lingyun; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng

    2015-07-01

    Liver regeneration has been studied for decades; however, its regulation remains unclear. In this study, we report a dynamic tracing of protein synthesis in rat regenerating liver with a new proteomic technique, (35) S in vivo labeling analysis for dynamic proteomics (SiLAD). Conventional proteomic techniques typically measure protein alteration in accumulated amounts. The SiLAD technique specifically detects protein synthesis velocity instead of accumulated amounts of protein through (35) S pulse labeling of newly synthesized proteins, providing a direct way for analyzing protein synthesis variations. Consequently, protein synthesis within short as 30 min was visualized and protein regulations in the first 8 h of regenerating liver were dynamically traced. Further, the 3.5-5 h post partial hepatectomy (PHx) was shown to be an important regulatory turning point by acute regulation of many proteins in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  16. Extrinsic and intrinsic determinants of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby A. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After central nervous system (CNS injury axons fail to regenerate often leading to persistent neurologic deficit although injured peripheral nervous system (PNS axons mount a robust regenerative response that may lead to functional recovery. Some of the failures of CNS regeneration arise from the many glial-based inhibitory molecules found in the injured CNS, whereas the intrinsic regenerative potential of some CNS neurons is actively curtailed during CNS maturation and limited after injury. In this review, the molecular basis for extrinsic and intrinsic modulation of axon regeneration within the nervous system is evaluated. A more complete understanding of the factors limiting axonal regeneration will provide a rational basis, which is used to develop improved treatments for nervous system injury.

  17. The neurochemistry of peripheral nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Andreea; Zor, Fatih; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Marinescu, Bogdan; Gorantla, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) can be most disabling, resulting in the loss of sensitivity, motor function and autonomic control in the involved anatomical segment. Although injured peripheral nerves are capable of regeneration, sub-optimal recovery of function is seen even with the best reconstruction. Distal axonal degeneration is an unavoidable consequence of PNI. There are currently few strategies aimed to maintain the distal pathway and/or target fidelity during regeneration across the zone of injury. The current state of the art approaches have been focussed on the site of nerve injury and not on their distal muscular targets or representative proximal cell bodies or central cortical regions. This is a comprehensive literature review of the neurochemistry of peripheral nerve regeneration and a state of the art analysis of experimental compounds (inorganic and organic agents) with demonstrated neurotherapeutic efficacy in improving cell body and neuron survival, reducing scar formation and maximising overall nerve regeneration. PMID:28615804

  18. De Novo Kidney Regeneration with Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Yokote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported on techniques to mobilize and activate endogenous stem-cells in injured kidneys or to introduce exogenous stem cells for tissue repair. Despite many recent advantages in renal regenerative therapy, chronic kidney disease (CKD remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality and the number of CKD patients has been increasing. When the sophisticated structure of the kidneys is totally disrupted by end stage renal disease (ESRD, traditional stem cell-based therapy is unable to completely regenerate the damaged tissue. This suggests that whole organ regeneration may be a promising therapeutic approach to alleviate patients with uncured CKD. We summarize here the potential of stem-cell-based therapy for injured tissue repair and de novo whole kidney regeneration. In addition, we describe the hurdles that must be overcome and possible applications of this approach in kidney regeneration.

  19. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  20. DIAGNOSTICS AND REGENERATION OF COMMON RAIL INJECTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz KONIECZNY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the methodology of Common Rail injector diagnostic, regeneration and regulation with use of professional test stands. The EPS 815 machine can be used to test and repair all BOSCH injectors fully satisfying the producer requirements and standards. The article describes an example injector diagnosis with use of such test stand and additionally presents appropriate injector regeneration and encoding techniques

  1. Missing Concepts in De Novo Pulp Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, G.T.-J.; Garcia-Godoy, F.

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has gained much attention in the past decade because it offers an alternative approach in treating endodontically involved teeth. Instead of filling the canal space with artificial materials, it attempts to fill the canal with vital tissues. The objective of regeneration is to regain the tissue and restore its function to the original state. In terms of pulp regeneration, a clinical protocol that intends to reestablish pulp/dentin tissues in the canal space has been d...

  2. Erythropoietin stimulates hepatocyte regeneration after liver resection

    OpenAIRE

    Schön, Michael R.; Hogrebe, Esther; Hengstler, Jan Georg; Donaubauer, Bernd; Faber, Sonya C.; Bauer, Alexander; Pietsch, Uta-Carolin; Jelkmann, Wolfgang; Thiery, Joachim; Hauss, Johann Peter; Tannapfel, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The increased relevance of liver surgery and transplantation as a therapeutic modality over the last two decades mandates the development of novel strategies to improve liver regeneration. Here we studied whether erythropoietin (EPO) improves liver regeneration after hepatectomy in pigs. Eighteen female pigs underwent laparoscopic left lateral liver resection and were allocated randomly into three groups. No EPO was administered to the control group (group 1, n=6). Group 2 (...

  3. On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jr., John L.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

  4. Cell healing: calcium, repair and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Alison; Golding, Adriana E.; Bement, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell repair is attracting increasing attention due to its conservation, its importance to health, and its utility as a model for cell signaling and cell polarization. However, some of the most fundamental questions concerning cell repair have yet to be answered. Here we consider three such questions: 1) How are wound holes stopped? 2) How is cell regeneration achieved after wounding? 3) How is calcium inrush linked to wound stoppage and cell regeneration? PMID:26514621

  5. The nuclear events guiding successful nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiko eKiryu-Seo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nervous system (PNS neurons survive and regenerate after nerve injury, whereas central nervous system (CNS neurons lack the capacity to do so. The inability of the CNS to regenerate results from a lack of intrinsic growth activity and a permissive environment. To achieve CNS regeneration, we can learn from successful nerve regeneration in the PNS. Neurons in the PNS elicit dynamic changes in gene expression in response to permissive environmental cues following nerve injury. To switch gene expression on and off in injured neurons, transcription factors and their networks should be carefully orchestrated according to the regeneration program. This is the so-called intrinsic power of axonal growth. There is an increasing repertoire of candidate transcription factors induced by nerve injury. Some of them potentiate the survival and axonal regeneration of damaged neurons in vivo; however, our knowledge of transcriptional events in injured neurons is still limited. How do these transcription factors communicate with each other? How does the transcriptional machinery regulate the wide variety of regeneration-associated genes (RAGs in the properly coordinated manner? In this review, we describe our current understanding of the injury-inducible transcriptional factors that enhance the intrinsic growth capacity, and propose a potential role for specificity protein 1 (Sp1, which provides a platform to recruit injury-inducible transcription factors, in simultaneous gene regulation. Finally, we discuss an additional mechanism that is involved in epigenetic modifications in damaged neurons. A comprehensive understanding of the nuclear events in injured neurons will provide clues to clinical interventions for successful nerve regeneration.

  6. Emdogain--periodontal regeneration based on biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrelius, S; Lyngstadaas, S P; Hammarström, L

    2000-06-01

    Biomimicry has been introduced as a term for innovations inspired by nature [1]. Such innovations may appear in almost every part of modern society. This review on the effects of enamel matrix proteins on the formation of cementum and the development of emdogain for regeneration of periodontal tissues lost due to periodontitis shows an example of biomimicry in dentistry. Findings from clinical and laboratory investigations are summarized and the biological basis for enamel matrix-induced periodontal regeneration is discussed.

  7. Brownfield regeneration: Towards strengthening social cohesion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minić Marta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In broader terms, the paper refers to the topic of brownfield regeneration, as one of the most complex mechanisms for sustainable spatial development. In addition to the fact that brownfield regeneration demands a variety of instruments, such as: tax subsidies, the change of land use ownership, soil remediation, planning regulative amendments, etc., the complexity of brownfield regeneration is primarily seen in a number of stakeholders participating in such a process. Thus, the paper focuses on the social aspect of brownfield regeneration - precisely, on researching the community role and reviewing the possibilities for achieving the 'local' interests in complex developmental processes. The main research hypothesis is that brownfield regeneration positively affects the creation of and strengthening the social cohesion in the areas close to the brownfield site. More precisley, the paper presents the ways towards strenghtening social cohesion in the initial phase of the brownfield regeneration process, as well as the effects of such a process in its operationalisation phase on social cohesion. The thesis is examined by two main parameters: 1 participation of local community, and 2 social costs and benefits of brownfield regeneration versus greenfield investment. The research results are presented in the form of argumentative essay. In fact, the critical overview of arguments for and against the main research hypothesis is provided based on the review of interdisciplinary literature in the domain of brownfield regeneration. Such research organisation ensures the identification and description of the measures needed for strengthening social cohesion, as an utmost goal of this research. The final research contribution is about offering the guidelines for similar methodological approach in urban research.

  8. Ear wound regeneration in the African spiny mouse Acomys cahirinus

    OpenAIRE

    Matias Santos, Dino; Rita, Ana Martins; Casanellas, Ignasi; Brito Ova, Adélia; Araújo, Inês Maria; Power, Deborah; Tiscornia, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While regeneration occurs in a number of taxonomic groups across the Metazoa, there are very few reports of regeneration in mammals, which generally respond to wounding with fibrotic scarring rather than regeneration. A recent report described skin shedding, skin regeneration and extensive ear punch closure in two rodent species, Acomys kempi and Acomys percivali. We examined these striking results by testing the capacity for regeneration of a third species, Acomys cahirinus, and fou...

  9. Guided Tissue Regeneration in Heart Valve Replacement: From Preclinical Research to First-in-Human Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Iop, L.; Gerosa, G.

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve tissue-guided regeneration aims to offer a functional and viable alternative to current prosthetic replacements. Not requiring previous cell seeding and conditioning in bioreactors, such exceptional tissue engineering approach is a very fascinating translational regenerative strategy. After in vivo implantation, decellularized heart valve scaffolds drive their same repopulation by recipient’s cells for a prospective autologous-like tissue reconstruction, remodeling, and adaptation...

  10. Bioactive polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Stratton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A variety of engineered scaffolds have been created for tissue engineering using polymers, ceramics and their composites. Biomimicry has been adopted for majority of the three-dimensional (3D scaffold design both in terms of physicochemical properties, as well as bioactivity for superior tissue regeneration. Scaffolds fabricated via salt leaching, particle sintering, hydrogels and lithography have been successful in promoting cell growth in vitro and tissue regeneration in vivo. Scaffold systems derived from decellularization of whole organs or tissues has been popular due to their assured biocompatibility and bioactivity. Traditional scaffold fabrication techniques often failed to create intricate structures with greater resolution, not reproducible and involved multiple steps. The 3D printing technology overcome several limitations of the traditional techniques and made it easier to adopt several thermoplastics and hydrogels to create micro-nanostructured scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering and drug delivery. This review highlights scaffold fabrication methodologies with a focus on optimizing scaffold performance through the matrix pores, bioactivity and degradation rate to enable tissue regeneration. Review highlights few examples of bioactive scaffold mediated nerve, muscle, tendon/ligament and bone regeneration. Regardless of the efforts required for optimization, a shift in 3D scaffold uses from the laboratory into everyday life is expected in the near future as some of the methods discussed in this review become more streamlined.

  11. Development and regeneration of the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Tao; White, Patricia M; Segil, Neil

    2009-07-01

    Loss of sensory hair cells is the leading cause of deafness in humans. The mammalian cochlea cannot regenerate its complement of sensory hair cells. Thus at present, the only treatment for deafness due to sensory hair cell loss is the use of prosthetics, such as hearing aids and cochlear implants. In contrast, in nonmammalian vertebrates, such as birds, hair cell regeneration occurs following the death of hair cells and leads to the restoration of hearing. Regeneration in birds is successful because supporting cells that surround the hair cells can divide and are able to subsequently differentiate into new hair cells. However, supporting cells in mammals do not normally divide or transdifferentiate when hair cells are lost, and so regeneration does not occur. To understand the failure of mammalian cochlear hair cell regeneration, we need to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie cell division control and hair cell differentiation, both during embryogenesis and in the postnatal mouse. In this review, we present a discussion of the regulation of cell proliferation in embryogenesis and during postnatal maturation. We also discuss the role of the Cip/Kip cell cycle inhibitors and Notch signaling in the control of stability of the differentiated state of early postnatal supporting cells. Finally, recent data indicate that some early postnatal mammalian supporting cells retain a latent capacity to divide and transdifferentiate into sensory hair cells. Together, these observations make supporting cells important therapeutic targets for continued efforts to induce hair cell regeneration.

  12. Development of tin-plated regenerator material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M. Y.; Morie, T.; Tsuchiya, A.

    2017-02-01

    To improve the efficiency of a cryocooler, it is vital to improve the regenerator. In general, the heat capacity of materials decreases as temperature decreases. Thus, when temperature is below 50 K, lead spheres are often used as a regenerator material. However, the pressure drop through a sphere regenerator is larger than that through a screen regenerator. To overcome this dilemma, a new, low pressure loss tin-plated screen is proposed. A comparison test was performed with a two-stage GM cryocooler by replacing part of the first stage regenerator material, bronze screens with tin-plated screens. Compared to a regenerator filled with bronze screens, the cooling capacity of the first stage increased by about 14% at 40 K and 90% at 30 K with such tin-plated screens. The ratio of the wire diameter before and after the deposition was also optimized. An optimum cooling capacity of 53.5 W at 40 K was obtained at a diameter ratio of about 1.4. The detailed experimental results are reported in this paper.

  13. Limb Regeneration in Axolotl: Is It Superhealing?

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    Stéphane Roy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of axolotls to regenerate their limbs is almost legendary. In fact, urodeles such as the axolotl are the only vertebrates that can regenerate multiple structures like their limbs, jaws, tail, spinal cord, and skin (the list goes on throughout their lives. It is therefore surprising to realize, although we have known of their regenerative potential for over 200 years, how little we understand the mechanisms behind this achievement of adult tissue morphogenesis. Many observations can be drawn between regeneration and other disciplines such as development and wound healing. In this review, we present new developments in functional analysis that will help to address the role of specific genes during the process of regeneration. We also present an analysis of the resemblance between wound healing and regeneration, and discuss whether axolotls are superhealers. A better understanding of these animals' regenerative capacity could lead to major benefits by providing regenerative medicine with directions on how to develop therapeutic approaches leading to regeneration in humans.

  14. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferli, Catherine; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme-derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self-renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap-junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research.

  15. Silymarin Accelerates Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ping Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial hepatectomy (PHx is a liver regeneration physiological response induced to maintain homeostasis. Liver regeneration evolved presumably to protect wild animals from catastrophic liver loss caused by toxins or tissue injury. Silymarin (Sm ability to stimulate liver regeneration has been an object of curiosity for many years. Silymarin has been investigated for use as an antioxidant and anticarcinogen. However, its use as a supportive treatment for liver damage is elusive. In this study, we fed silymarin (Sm, 25 mg/kg to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 weeks. Surgical 2/3 PHx was then conducted on the rats at 6 hrs, 24 hrs, and 72 hrs. Western blot and RT-PCR were conducted to detect the cell cycle activities and silymarin effects on hepatic regeneration. The results showed that silymarin enhanced liver regeneration by accelerating the cell cycle in PHx liver. Silymarin led to increased G1 phase (cyclin D1/pRb, S phase (cyclin E/E2F, G2 phase (cyclin B, and M phase (cyclin A protein and mRNA at 6 hrs, 24 hrs, and 72 hrs PHx. HGF, TGFα, and TGFβ1 growth factor expressions were also enhanced. We suggest that silymarin plays a crucial role in accelerated liver regeneration after PHx.

  16. Promise of periodontal ligament stem cells in regeneration of periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hidefumi; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Wada, Naohisa; Akamine, Akifumi

    2011-07-28

    A great number of patients around the world experience tooth loss that is attributed to irretrievable damage of the periodontium caused by deep caries, severe periodontal diseases or irreversible trauma. The periodontium is a complex tissue composed mainly of two soft tissues and two hard tissues; the former includes the periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue and gingival tissue, and the latter includes alveolar bone and cementum covering the tooth root. Tissue engineering techniques are therefore required for regeneration of these tissues. In particular, PDL is a dynamic connective tissue that is subjected to continual adaptation to maintain tissue size and width, as well as structural integrity, including ligament fibers and bone modeling. PDL tissue is central in the periodontium to retain the tooth in the bone socket, and is currently recognized to include somatic mesenchymal stem cells that could reconstruct the periodontium. However, successful treatment using these stem cells to regenerate the periodontium efficiently has not yet been developed. In the present article, we discuss the contemporary standpoints and approaches for these stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine in dentistry.

  17. Laminin-111 enriched fibrin hydrogels for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinczyk, Madison; Elmashhady, Hady; Talovic, Muhamed; Dunn, Andrew; Bugis, Faiz; Garg, Koyal

    2017-10-01

    Laminin (LM)-111 supplementation has improved muscle regeneration in several models of disease and injury. This study investigated a novel hydrogel composed of fibrinogen and LM-111. Increasing LM-111 concentration (50-450 μg/mL) in fibrin hydrogels resulted in highly fibrous scaffolds with progressively thinner interlaced fibers. Rheological testing showed that all hydrogels had viscoelastic behavior and the Young's modulus ranged from 2-6KPa. C2C12 myobalsts showed a significant increase in VEGF production and decrease in IL-6 production on LM-111 enriched fibrin hydrogels as compared to pure fibrin hydrogels on day 4. Western blotting results showed a significant increase in MyoD and desmin protein quantity but a significant decrease in myogenin protein quantity in myoblasts cultured on the LM-111 (450 μg/mL) enriched fibrin hydrogel. Combined application of electromechanical stimulation significantly enhanced the production of VEGF and IGF-1 from myoblast seeded fibrin-LM-111 hydrogels. Taken together, these observations offer an important first step toward optimizing a tissue engineered constructs for skeletal muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ota Naoshi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration.

  19. Recent prospective of nanofiber scaffolds fabrication approaches for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Aghkand, Fateme; Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Shiva; Panahi, Yunes; Daraee, Hadis; Gorjikhah, Fateme; Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Sara; Hsanzadeh, Arash; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-11-01

    The largest organ of human body is skin, which acting as a barrier with immunologic, sensorial and protective functions. It is always in exposure to the external environment, which can result many different types of damage and injury with loss of variable volumes of extracellular matrix (ECM). For the treatment of skin lesions and damages, several approaches are now accessible, such as the application of allografts, autografts, and tissue-engineered substitutes, wound dressings and nanofiber scaffolds approaches. Even though proven clinically effective, these methods are still characterized by main drawbacks such as patient inadequate vascularization, morbidity, the inability to reproduce skin appendages, low adherence to the wound bed and high manufacturing costs. Advanced approaches based on nanofiber scaffolds approaches offer a permanent, viable and effective substitute to explain the drawbacks of skin regeneration and repair by combining growth factors, cells, and biomaterials and advanced biomanufacturing methods. This review details recent advances of nanofiber scaffolds in skin regeneration and repair strategies, and describes a synthesis method of nanofiber scaffolds.

  20. Naturally and synthetic smart composite biomaterials for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Román A; Won, Jong-Eun; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-04-01

    The development of smart biomaterials for tissue regeneration has become the focus of intense research interest. More opportunities are available by the composite approach of combining the biomaterials in the form of biopolymers and/or bioceramics either synthetic or natural. Strategies to provide smart capabilities to the composite biomaterials primarily seek to achieve matrices that are instructive/inductive to cells, or that stimulate/trigger target cell responses that are crucial in the tissue regeneration processes. Here, we review in-depth, recent developments concerning smart composite biomaterials available for delivery systems of biofactors and cells and scaffolding matrices in tissue engineering. Smart composite designs are possible by modulating the bulk and surface properties that mimic the native tissues, either in chemical (extracellular matrix molecules) or in physical properties (e.g. stiffness), or by introducing external therapeutic molecules (drugs, proteins and genes) within the structure in a way that allows sustainable and controllable delivery, even time-dependent and sequential delivery of multiple biofactors. Responsiveness to internal or external stimuli, including pH, temperature, ionic strength, and magnetism, is another promising means to improve the multifunctionality in smart scaffolds with on-demand delivery potential. These approaches will provide the next-generation platforms for designing three-dimensional matrices and delivery systems for tissue regenerative applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.