WorldWideScience

Sample records for refueling station siting

  1. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  2. H2USA: Siting Refueling Stations in the Northeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Muratori, Matteo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zuboy, Jarett [Consultant; Ellis, Steve [Honda

    2017-11-01

    To achieve cost-effective deployment of both fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hydrogen stations, the number of vehicles and public stations must grow together in areas of highest demand. This fact sheet introduces two advanced modeling tools and presents preliminary analysis of the hydrogen refueling station locations needed to support early consumer demand for FCEVs in the Northeast United States. United States.

  3. Comparison of conventional vs. modular hydrogen refueling stations and on-site production vs. delivery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ethan S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    To meet the needs of public and private stakeholders involved in the development, construction, and operation of hydrogen fueling stations needed to support the widespread roll-out of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles, this work presents publicly available station templates and analyses. These ‘Reference Stations’ help reduce the cost and speed the deployment of hydrogen stations by providing a common baseline with which to start a design, enable quick assessment of potential sites for a hydrogen station, identify contributors to poor economics, and suggest areas of research. This work presents layouts, bills of materials, piping and instrumentation diagrams, and detailed analyses of five new station designs. In the near term, delivered hydrogen results in a lower cost of hydrogen compared to on-site production via steam methane reforming or electrolysis, although the on-site production methods have other advantages. Modular station concepts including on-site production can reduce lot sizes from conventional assemble-on-site stations.

  4. Enhanced methods for operating refueling station tube-trailers to reduce refueling cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgowainy, Amgad; Reddi, Krishna

    2017-08-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for operating a refueling station including source tube-trailers and at least one compressor to reduce refueling cost. The refueling station includes a gaseous fuel supply source including a plurality of tanks on a tube trailer coupled to a first control unit, and high pressure buffer storage having predefined capacity coupled to a second control unit and the first tanks by a pressure control valve and the first control unit, and at least one compressor. The refueling station is operated at different modes depending on a state of the refueling station at the beginning of each operational mode. The refueling system is assessed at the end of each operational mode to identify the state of the system and select a next mode of operation. The operational modes include consolidating hydrogen, or any gaseous fuel, within the tubes mounted on the trailer.

  5. Fire Protection Engineering Design Brief Template. Hydrogen Refueling Station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Groth, Katrina M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Building a hydrogen infrastructure system is critical to supporting the development of alternate- fuel vehicles. This report provides a methodology for implementing a performance-based design of an outdoor hydrogen refueling station that does not meet specific prescriptive requirements in NFPA 2, The Hydrogen Technologies Code . Performance-based designs are a code-compliant alternative to meeting prescriptive requirements. Compliance is demonstrated by comparing a prescriptive-based fueling station design with a performance-based design approach using Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) methods and hydrogen risk assessment tools. This template utilizes the Sandia-developed QRA tool, Hydrogen Risk Analysis Models (HyRAM), which combines reduced-order deterministic models that characterize hydrogen release and flame behavior with probabilistic risk models to quantify risk values. Each project is unique and this template is not intended to account for site-specific characteristics. Instead, example content and a methodology are provided for a representative hydrogen refueling site which can be built upon for new hydrogen applications.

  6. Manufacturing Competitiveness and Supply Chain Analyses for Hydrogen Refueling Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Ahmad T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Garland, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy

    2018-04-27

    This slide deck was presented in the monthly FCTO webinar series (May 2017). The goal of this presentation was to share our latest results and remarks on the manufacturing competitiveness analysis of the hydrogen refueling stations (HRS). Manufacturing cost models were developed for major systems in the HRS such as compressors, storage tanks, chillers, heat exchangers, and dispensers. In addition to the cost models, we also discussed important remarks from our analysis for the international trade flows and global supply chain for the hydrogen refueling stations. The last part of the presentation also highlights effect of economies of scale and high production volumes on lowering the cost of the hydrogen at the pump.

  7. Customer exposure to gasoline vapors during refueling at service stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkola, M A; Saarinen, L H

    2000-09-01

    Gasoline is a volatile complex mixture of hydrocarbon compounds that is easily vaporized during handling under normal conditions. Modern reformulated gasoline also contains oxygenates to enhance octane number and reduce ambient pollution. This study measured the difference in the exposure of customers to gasoline and oxygenate vapors during refueling in service stations with and without vapor recovery systems. Field measurements were carried out at two self-service stations. One was equipped with Stage I and the other with Stage II vapor recovery systems. At Stage I stations there is vapor recovery only during delivery from road tanker, and at Stage II stations additional vapor recovery during refueling. The exposure of 20 customers was measured at both stations by collecting air samples from their breathing zone into charcoal tubes during refueling with 95-octane reformulated gasoline. Each sample represented two consecutive refuelings. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory by gas chromatography using mass-selective detection for vapor components. The Raid vapor pressure of gasoline was 70 kPa and an oxygen content 2 wt%. Oxygenated gasoline contained 7 percent methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) and 5 percent methyl tert-amyl ether (MtAE). The geometric mean concentrations of hydrocarbons (C3-C11) in the customers' breathing zone was 85 mg/m3 (range 2.5-531 mg/m3) at the Stage I service station and 18 mg/m3 (range service station. The geometric mean of the exposure of customers to MtBE during refueling at the Stage I service station was 15.3 mg/m3 (range 1.8-74 mg/m3), and at the Stage II service station 3.4 mg/m3 (range 0.2-16 mg/m3). The differences in exposure were statistically significant (p station. The measurements were done on consecutive days at the various service stations. The temperature ranged from 10 to 17 degrees C, and wind velocity was 2-4 m/s. The climatic conditions were very similar on the measurement days. Based on this study it was found

  8. Hydrogen Refuelling Station Hamburg HafenCity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hustadt, Daniel [Vattenfall Europe Innovation GmbH (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Decoupling the growing road traffic and the related greenhouse gas emissions demand a major effort by research, OEMs as well as oil and energy companies. Above all the reduction of CO2-emissions is a growing need for climate protection. Bio fuels can help to reach those targets, however the available sources are not enough to guarantee a sustainable supply. Battery Electric Vehicles are today limited technically with regards to range and weight and will most likely be used in metropolitan regions. In this project the necessary infrastructure to refuel buses and cars of a bigger fleet will be installed. Doing so the prerequisite for using fuel cell based cars and buses as an alternative way of mobility is developed. The capability of new components for the productions, storage and distribution of larger amounts of hydrogen is shown. Additionally still existing potential optimizing on a technical and operational level shall be made available. (orig.)

  9. Hyapproval : final handbook for approval of hydrogen refuelling stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurster, R.; Landinger, H.; Machens, C.; Allidières, L.; Molag, M.; Barron, J.; Reijalt, M.; Hill, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    HyApproval is an EC co-financed Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) to develop a Handbook facilitating the approval of Hydrogen Refuelling Stations (HRS). The project, started in October 2005, will be performed over 24 months by a balanced partnership including 25 partners from industry, SMEs

  10. Some novel on-power refuelling features of CANDU stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erwin, D.; Pendlebury, B.; Watson, J.F.; Welch, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    Part A of the paper describes the reasons for, and advantages resulting from, the use of flow assisted refuelling in the CANDU type nuclear reactors at the Pickering Generating Station. A separate fuel handling system is used for each reactor unit, as distinct from the system employed at the Bruce Generating station, where the fuel handling system is shared among several units. Part B of the paper describes some of the advantages of the shared concept with particular emphasis on the availability of the fuel handling system. (author)

  11. Insights from Hydrogen Refueling Station Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Ahmad

    2015-12-18

    In work for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC), NREL is currently collaborating with Great Lakes Wind Network in conducting a comprehensive hydrogen refueling stations manufacturing competitiveness and supply chain analyses. In this project, CEMAC will be looking at several metrics that will facilitate understanding of the interactions between and within the HRS supply chain, such metrics include innovation potential, intellectual properties, learning curves, related industries and clustering, existing supply chains, ease of doing business, and regulations and safety. This presentation to Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition 2015 highlights initial findings from CEMAC's analysis.

  12. Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, B.; Bramwell, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG and E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California

  13. Refuelling: Swiss station will be semi-automated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, B.; Ribaux, P.

    1981-01-01

    The first semi-automated LWR refuelling machine in Europe has been supplied to the Leibstadt General Electric BWR in Switzerland. The system relieves operators of the boring and repetitive job of moving and accurately positioning the refuelling machine during fuelling operations and will thus contribute to plant safety. The machine and its mode of operation are described. (author)

  14. Status of small reactor designs without on-site refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    There is an ongoing interest in member states in the development and application of small and medium sized reactors (SMRs). In the near term, most new NPPs are likely to be evolutionary designs building on proven systems while incorporating technological advances and often the economics of scale, resulting from the reactor outputs of up to 1600 MW(e). For the longer term, the focus is on innovative designs aiming to provide increased benefits in the areas of safety and security, non-proliferation, waste management, resource utilization and economy, as well as to offer a variety of energy products and flexibility in design, siting and fuel cycle options. Many innovative designs are reactors within the small-to-medium size range, having an equivalent electric power less than 700 MW(e) or even less than 300 MW(e). A distinct trend in design and technology development, accounting for about half of the SMR concepts developed worldwide, is represented by small reactors without on-site refuelling. Such reactors, also known as battery-type reactors, could operate without reloading and shuffling of fuel in the core over long periods, from 5 to 25 years and beyond. Upon the advice and with the support of IAEA member states, within its Programme 1 'Nuclear Power, Fuel Cycle, and Nuclear Science', the IAEA provides a forum for the exchange of information by experts and policy makers from industrialized and developing countries on the technical, economic, environmental, and social aspects of SMRs development and implementation in the 21st century, and makes this information available to all interested Member States by producing status reports and other publications dedicated to advances in SMR technology. The objective of this report is to provide Member States, including those just considering the initiation of nuclear power programmes and those already having practical experience in nuclear power, with a balanced and objective information on important development trends and

  15. Computer simulation for risk management: Hydrogen refueling stations and water supply of a large region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Kozine, Igor

    2012-01-01

    in applying DES models to the analysis of large infrastructures for refueling stations and water supply. Two case studies are described which are concerned with the inherently safer supply and storage of hydrogen at refueling stations and an established drinking water supply system of a large metropolitan...... area, respectively. For both, the simulation aims at identifying points of potential improvement from the reliability point of view. This allows setting up a list of activities and safety measures to reduce risk and possible losses and mitigate the consequences of accidents. Based on the cases...

  16. Refueling Stop Activity Detection and Gas Station Extraction Using Crowdsourcing Vehicle Trajectory Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In view of the deficiencies of current surveying methods of gas station, an approach is proposed to extract gas station from vehicle traces. Firstly, the spatial-temporal characteristics of individual and collective refueling behavior of trajectory is analyzed from aspects of movement features and geometric patterns. Secondly, based on Stop/Move model, the velocity sequence linear clustering algorithm is proposed to extract refueling stop tracks. Finally, using the methods including Delaunay triangulation, Fourier shape recognition and semantic constraints to identify and extract gas station. An experiment using 7 days taxi GPS traces in Beijing verified the novel method. The experimental results of 482 gas stations are extracted and the correct rate achieves to 93.1%.

  17. Refueling availability for alternative fuel vehicle markets: Sufficient urban station coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melaina, Marc; Bremson, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Alternative fuel vehicles can play an important role in addressing the challenges of climate change, energy security, urban air pollution and the continued growth in demand for transportation services. The successful commercialization of alternative fuels for vehicles is contingent upon a number of factors, including vehicle cost and performance. Among fuel infrastructure issues, adequate refueling availability is one of the most fundamental to successful commercialization. A commonly cited source reports 164,300 refueling stations in operation nationwide. However, from the perspective of refueling availability, this nationwide count tends to overstate the number of stations required to support the widespread deployment of alternative fuel vehicles. In terms of spatial distribution, the existing gasoline station networks in many urban areas are more than sufficient. We characterize a sufficient level of urban coverage based upon a subset of cities served by relatively low-density station networks, and estimate that some 51,000 urban stations would be required to provide this sufficient level of coverage to all major urban areas, 33 percent less than our estimate of total urban stations. This improved characterization will be useful for engineering, economic and policy analyses. (author)

  18. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  19. Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1998-02-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

  20. H2moves.eu Scandinavia. ''Experience from operating a 70 MPa hydrogen refuelling station in Oslo''. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloth, M.

    2013-02-15

    As part of the H2MOVES Scandinavia project H2 Logic were to construct a large scale hydrogen refuelling station (HRS) in Oslo providing hydrogen for FCEV's from Daimler and Hyundai in the project. The effort has provided extensive results and lessons learned across the entire process from site selection, HRS design and manufacturing to the final installation and operation. An extensive site screening of more than 30 sites in Oslo was firstly conducted to identify the most optimal location for the HRS. A suitable site was identified at the research organisation SINTEF in Gaustad in the western part of Oslo. The location was strategically well located with regards to the other HRS's in the city ensuring good refuelling coverage in Oslo. The HRS was manufactured, installed and operated by H2 Logic based on the company's H2Station technology. The HRS provides 70MPa refuelling in accordance with the SAE J2601, and operation results have confirmed refuelling times consistently below four minutes for a full tank. The HRS includes onsite electrolysis production providing a 20kg/day base load supply, with potentially additional trucking-in of hydrogen up to a total capacity of 200kg/day. The installation of the HRS took in total 10 days, from arrival at site, until first refuelling was conducted. This included local inspection by third parties and authorities as well as several days of hydrogen production and compression to reach the necessary refuelling pressure. Before opening a refuelling recommendation process was successfully conducted by Daimler. The HRS opened on 21st November 2011 and has been operated for 13,5 months during the remainder project period (ending December 2012). The HRS is expected to continue operation beyond the project. Below are shown the major operation results from the HRS during the project: 1) 701 kg dispensed; 2) 313 refueling's conducted; 3) Average availability of 97% during first half of 2012; 4) 53% of all down

  1. Considering the dynamic refueling behavior in locating electric vehicle charging stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Sun, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) will certainly play an important role in addressing the energy and environmental challenges at current situation. However, location problem of EV charging stations was realized as one of the key issues of EVs launching strategy. While for the case of locating EV charging stations, more influence factors and constraints need to be considered since the EVs have some special attributes. The minimum requested charging time for EVs is usually more than 30minutes, therefore the possible delay time due to waiting or looking for an available station is one of the most important influence factors. In addition, the intention to purchase and use of EVs that also affects the location of EV charging stations is distributed unevenly among regions and should be considered when modelling. Unfortunately, these kinds of time-spatial constraints were always ignored in previous models. Based on the related research of refuelling behaviours and refuelling demands, this paper developed a new concept with dual objectives of minimum waiting time and maximum service accessibility for locating EV charging stations - named as Time-Spatial Location Model (TSLM). The proposed model and the traditional flow-capturing location model are applied on an example network respectively and the results are compared. Results demonstrate that time constraint has great effects on the location of EV charging stations. The proposed model has some obvious advantages and will help energy providers to make a viable plan for the network of EV charging stations.

  2. Design Status and Applications of Small reactors without On-site Refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.

    2006-01-01

    Small reactors without on-site refuelling are the reactors that can operate without reloading and shuffling of fuel for a reasonably long period, consistent with plant economy and considerations of energy security, with no fresh or spent fuel being stored at a site during reactor operation. Such reactors could simplify the implementation of safeguards and provide certain guarantees of sovereignty to those countries that would prefer to lease fuel from a foreign vendor or, perhaps, an international fuel cycle centre. About 30 concepts of such reactors are being analyzed or developed in 6 IAEA Member States. They cover all principle reactor lines: water cooled, fast gas cooled, sodium cooled, lead or lead bismuth cooled and molten salt cooled reactors. An increased refuelling interval could be achieved with reduced core power density, burnable absorbers, or high conversion ratio. The design goals for small reactors without on-site refuelling, inter alia, include: difficult unauthorized access to fuel; design provisions to facilitate the implementation of safeguards; capability to survive all postulated accident scenarios without requiring emergency response in the public domain; economic competitiveness for anticipated market conditions and applications; the capability to achieve higher manufacturing quality through factory mass production, design standardization and common basis for design certification; and a flexibility in siting and applications. Such reactors are often considered in conjunction with fuel or NPP leasing Small reactors without on-site refuelling have many common technology development issues related to the provision of lifetime core operation, economic competitiveness, high level of safety and proliferation resistance. Reestablishment of a practice of licensing by test and establishment of legal provisions and the insurance scheme for a transit of fuel loads or factory fabricated reactors through the territory of a third country are mentioned as

  3. HyApproval - Handbook for the approval of hydrogen refuelling stations - First preliminary achievements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurster, R.; Vandendungen, G.; Guichard, J.; Molag, M.; Barron, J.; Reijalt, M.; Hill, H.J.; Landinger, H.

    2007-05-15

    The EU-funded project HyApproval [www.hyapproval.org] aims at developing a universal Handbook to facilitate the approval process of Hydrogen Refuelling Stations (HRS) in Europe. The main goal of the HyApproval partnership with 22 partners from Europe and one each from China, Japan and the USA is to provide a Handbook of technical and regulatory requirements to assist authorisation officials, companies and organisations in the safe implementation and operation of HRS. Achievements during the first 15 months: analyses of HRS technology concepts and of equipment and safety distances/ Intermediate Design Paper/ Regulations, Codes and Standards (RCS) review and comparison/ first Handbook draft and first review sessions with HySafe experts/ safety matrix/ identification of accident scenarios/ agreement on safety documentation/ critical review of reliability data from collections and risk studies/ risk assessment (RA) criteria definition and RA/ matrix of acceptability and awareness levels/ database of Fire Associations and First Responders/ calendar of hydrogen events/ general description of CGH{sub 2} interfaces. (au)

  4. Study of Some Innovant Reactors without on- Site Refueling with Triso and Cermet Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    A.Chetaine; A. Benchrif; H. Amsil; V. Kuznetsov; Y. Shimazu

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of unit cell neutronic parameters and lifetime for some innovant reactors without on sit-refuling will be held in this work. the behavior of some small and medium reactors without on site refueling with triso and cermet fuel. For the FBNR long life except we propose to change the enrichment of the Cermet MFE to 9%. For the AFPR reactor we can see that the use of the Cermet MFE can extend the life of this reactor but to maintain the same life period for AFPR...

  5. Design and prototyping of an ionic liquid piston compressor as a new generation of compressors for hydrogen refueling stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin

    to investigate the heat transfer phenomena inside the compression chamber; the system performance is evaluated, followed by the design process. The model is developed based on the mass and energy balance of the hydrogen, and liquid bounded by the wall of the compression chamber. Therefore, at each time step...... and positional node, the model estimates the pressure and temperature of the hydrogen and liquid, the temperature of the compression chamber wall, and the amount of heat extracted from the hydrogen directly at the interface between the hydrogen and liquid, and through the wall. The results indicate......, fabrication, and control of the prototype is described in the presented work. The new compressor design has high potential to be used as an alternative to the conventional reciprocating compressors in hydrogen refueling stations, as it provides a simpler design with lower manufacturing costs, higher...

  6. Development of refueling support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Shoichi; Sano, Kazuya; Hochin, Koji; Iguchi, Yukihiro

    1992-01-01

    The refueling of Fugen Nuclear Power Station requires correct management of fuels, etc. And empirical knowledge is necessary for efficient planning and refueling. Fugen developed refueling support system and put it into practical operation. The system features a network of refueling equipment and AI rules aquired from operators knowledge. The system helps make an optimized plan, displays step-by-step guidance and prints out lists of fuel locations and movements. The system reduced the labor of the operators, optimized the management and improved the reliability of the refueling. (author)

  7. Redmedial Action Plan for the Risk-Based Remediation of Site ST14 (SWMU 68), LPSTID 104819; the Former Base Refueling Area (A0C7); the French Underdrain System (SWMU 64); and the North Oil/Water Separator (SWMU 67), Carswell Air Force Base, Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas. Volume 1: Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...) to prepare a remedial action plan (RAP) in support of a risk-based remediation decision for soil and groundwater contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons at Site ST14 at Carswell Air Force Base (AFB), Texas...

  8. Reevaluation of air surveillance station siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, K.; Jannik, T.

    2016-01-01

    DOE Technical Standard HDBK-1216-2015 (DOE 2015) recommends evaluating air-monitoring station placement using the analytical method developed by Waite. The technique utilizes wind rose and population distribution data in order to determine a weighting factor for each directional sector surrounding a nuclear facility. Based on the available resources (number of stations) and a scaling factor, this weighting factor is used to determine the number of stations recommended to be placed in each sector considered. An assessment utilizing this method was performed in 2003 to evaluate the effectiveness of the existing SRS air-monitoring program. The resulting recommended distribution of air-monitoring stations was then compared to that of the existing site perimeter surveillance program. The assessment demonstrated that the distribution of air-monitoring stations at the time generally agreed with the results obtained using the Waite method; however, at the time new stations were established in Barnwell and in Williston in order to meet requirements of DOE guidance document EH-0173T.

  9. Reevaluation of air surveillance station siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-06

    DOE Technical Standard HDBK-1216-2015 (DOE 2015) recommends evaluating air-monitoring station placement using the analytical method developed by Waite. The technique utilizes wind rose and population distribution data in order to determine a weighting factor for each directional sector surrounding a nuclear facility. Based on the available resources (number of stations) and a scaling factor, this weighting factor is used to determine the number of stations recommended to be placed in each sector considered. An assessment utilizing this method was performed in 2003 to evaluate the effectiveness of the existing SRS air-monitoring program. The resulting recommended distribution of air-monitoring stations was then compared to that of the existing site perimeter surveillance program. The assessment demonstrated that the distribution of air-monitoring stations at the time generally agreed with the results obtained using the Waite method; however, at the time new stations were established in Barnwell and in Williston in order to meet requirements of DOE guidance document EH-0173T.

  10. Design tool for offgrid hydrogen refuelling systems for aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncoso, E.; Lapeña-Rey, N.; Gonzalez, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A simulation tool for offgrid CPV-based hydrogen refuelling systems is presented. • Simulations of system configurations with specific UAS hydrogen demand scenarios. • Regarding system size & reliability the most critical components are the CPV array and batteries. • In terms of energy efficiency the most critical component is the electrolyser. - Abstract: To develop an environmentally acceptable refuelling solution for fuel cell-powered unmanned aerial systems (UASs) to operate in remote areas, hydrogen fuel must be produced on-site from renewable energy sources. This paper describes a Matlab-based simulation tool specifically developed to pre-design offgrid hydrogen refuelling systems for UAS applications. The refuelling system comprises a high concentrated PV array (CPV), an electrolyser, a hydrogen buffer tank and a diaphragm hydrogen compressor. Small composite tanks are also included for fast refuelling of the UAV platforms at any time during the year. The novel approach of selecting a CPV power source is justified on the basis of minimizing the system footprint (versus flat plat or low concentration PV), aiming for a containerized remotely deployable UAS offgrid refuelling solution. To validate the simulation tool a number of simulations were performed using experimental data from a prototype offgrid hydrogen refuelling station for UAVs developed by Boeing Research & Technology Europe. Solar irradiation data for a selected location and daily UAS hydrogen demands of between 2.8 and 15.8 Nm"3 were employed as the primary inputs, in order to calculate a recommended system sizing solution and assess the expected operation of the refuelling system across a given year. The specific energy consumption of the refuelling system obtained from the simulations is between 5.6 and 8.9 kW h_e per kg of hydrogen delivered to the UAVs, being lower for larger daily hydrogen demands. Increasing the CPV area and electrolyser size in order to supply higher

  11. Support services to refuelling exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castineira, M; Cortes, M.; Rayo, A.

    2010-01-01

    The refuelling period in nuclear power stations is very important due to the need to optimise its duration, large volumes of work and resources that have to be planned and coordinated and their impact on the subsequent operating cycle. Empresarios Agrupados has a permanent organisation, with specialised resources and extensive availability of human resources. (Author)

  12. Small Reactors without On-site Refuelling: Neutronic Characteristics, Emergency Planning and Development Scenarios. Final Report of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    Small reactors without on-site refuelling have a capability to operate without reloading or shuffling of fuel in their cores for reasonably long periods of time consistent with plant economy and considerations of energy security, with no fresh or spent fuel being stored at the site during reactor operation. In 2009, more than 25 design concepts of such reactors were analyzed or developed in IAEA Member States, representing both developed and developing countries. Small reactors without on-site refuelling are being developed for several reactor lines, including water cooled reactors, sodium cooled fast reactors, lead and lead bismuth cooled reactors, and also include some non-conventional concepts. Most of the concepts of small reactors without on-site refuelling reactors are at early design stages. To make such reactors viable, further research and development (R and D) is necessary, inter alia, to validate long-life core operation, define and validate new robust types of fuel, justify an option of plant location in the proximity to its users, and examine possible niches that such reactors could fill in future energy systems. To further research and development (R and D) in the areas mentioned above and several others, and to facilitate progress in Member States in design and technology development for small reactors without on-site refueling, the IAEA has conducted a dedicated Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled 'Small Reactors without On-site Refuelling' (CRPi25001). The project started late in 2004 and, after a review in 2008, was extended for one more year to be ended in 2009. The project has created a network of 18 research institutions from 10 Member States, representing both developed and developing countries. Over the CRP period, collaborative results were achieved for many of the abovementioned research areas. Some studies highlighted new directions of research to be furthered after the CRP completion. Some studies remained the efforts of

  13. WLAN Hot Spot services for the automotive and oil industries :a business analysis Or : "Refuel the car with petrol and information, both ways at the gas station"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L-F. Pau (Louis-François); M.H.P. Oremus

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWhile you refuel for gas ,why not refuel for information or download vehicle data ? This paper analyzes in extensive detail the user segmentation by vehicle usage , service offering , and full business models from WLAN hot spot services delivered to vehicles (private, professional ,

  14. Siting technology of underground nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, M.; Hibino, S.

    1989-01-01

    For the site of a nuclear power station, it may be possible to select a seaside mountain area, if the condition is suitable to excavate large rock caverns in which a reactor and other equipments are installed. As the case study on the siting technology for an underground nuclear power station, the following example was investigated. The site is a seaside steep mountain area, and almost all the equipments are installed in plural tunnel type caverns. The depth from the ground surface to the top of the reactor cavern is about 150 m, and the thickness of the rock pillar between the reactor cavern of 33 m W x 82 mH x 79 mD and the neighboring turbine cavern is 60 m. In this paper, the stability of rock caverns in this example, evaluated by numerical analysis, is described. The numerical analysis was carried out on the central cross section of the reactor cavern, taking the turbine cavern, geostress, the mechanical properties of rock mass and the process of excavation works in consideration. By the analysis, the underground caverns in this example were evaluated as stable, if the rock quality is equivalent to C H class or better according to the CRIEPI rock classification. (K.I.)

  15. LiquidPower-1. Development and proof-of-concept of core methanol reformer for stationary and motive fuel cell systems and hydrogen refuelling stations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogsgaard, J.; Mortensen, Henrik [H2 Logic A/S, Herning (Denmark); Skipper, T. [Dantherm Power A/S, Hobro (Denmark)

    2013-03-15

    LiquidPower-1 has developed laboratory test systems for methanol reforming and tested reformers from four different suppliers. This has contributed to determining the state-of-the-art level for methanol reforming and enabled an update of the LiquidPower R and D Roadmap onwards a commercialisation of the technology. The project has achieved the following results: 1) A detailed technical specification of methanol reformers for the fuel cell back-up power and hydrogen refueling station markets has been conducted; 2) Laboratory test systems for methanol reformers has been developed and established at Dantherm Power and H2 Logic; 3) Initial test of reformers from four suppliers has been conducted - with two suppliers being selected for continued tests; 4) Extensive laboratory tests conducted of reformers from two suppliers, with the aim to determine state-of-the-art for price, efficiency, capacity and lifetime. Several errors and break-downs were experienced during the test period, which revealed a need for further R and D to improve lifetime and stability; 5) The LiquidPower F and U Roadmap has been updated. Reformer TCO targets (Total Cost of Operation) for each of the markets have been calculated including updated targets for efficiency and cost. These targets also serve as the main ones to be pursued as part of the continued R and D roadmap execution. Compared to the previous edition of the Roadmap, the project has confirmed the viability of methanol reforming, but also revealed that stability and lifetime needs to be addressed and solved before commencing commercialization of the technology. If the Roadmap is successful a commercialization can commence beyond 2015. (Author)

  16. Optimization of hydrogen vehicle refueling via dynamic simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Mérida, W.; Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    loss in the vehicle's storage system is one of the main factors determining the mass flow and peak cooling requirements of the refueling process. The design of the refueling station does not influence the refueling of the vehicle when the requirements of the technical information report J2601 from...... Society of Automotive Engineers are met. However, by using multiple pressure stages in the tanks at the refueling station (instead of a single high-pressure tank), the total energy demand for cooling can be reduced by 12%, and the compressor power consumption can be reduced by 17%. The time between...

  17. The regional issues involved in the siting of power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the regional implications of power station siting in England and Wales and refers to the procedures used by the CEGB to find and develop sites. The resources required for a power station are outlined both for conventional and nuclear stations and the possible development of uses for the rejected heat from power stations as a result of the energy crisis is discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melaina, Marc W.

    2007-01-01

    During the first decades of the 20th century, a variety of gasoline refueling methods supported early US gasoline vehicles and successfully alleviated consumer concerns over refueling availability. The refueling methods employed included cans, barrels, home refueling outfits, parking garage refueling facilities, mobile stations, hand carts and curb pumps. Only after robust markets for gasoline vehicles had been firmly established did the gasoline service station become the dominant refueling method. The present study reviews this history and draws analogies with current and future efforts to introduce hydrogen as a fuel for vehicles. These comparisons hold no predictive power; however, there is heuristic value in an historical review of the first successful and large-scale introduction of a vehicle fuel. From an energy policy perspective, these comparisons reinforce the importance of a long-term and portfolio approach to support for technology development and innovation

  19. Hydrogen Production for Refuelling Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulteberg, Christian; Aagesen, Diane (Intelligent Energy, Long Beach, CA (United States))

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this work is to support the development of a high-profile demonstration of hydrogen generation technologies in a Swedish context. The overall objective of the demonstration is to deploy a reforming based hydrogen refilling station along the Swedish west coast; intermediate to the Malmoe refuelling station and planned stations in Goeteborg. In this way, the Norwegian hydrogen highway will be extended through the south of Sweden and down into Denmark. The aim of the project's first phase, where this constitutes the final report, was to demonstrate the ability to operate the IE reforming system on the E.On/SGC site-specific fuel. During the project, a preliminary system design has been developed, based on IE's proprietary reformer. The system has been operated at pressure, to ensure a stable operation of the downstream PSA; which has been operated without problems and with the expected hydrogen purity and recovery. The safe operation of the proposed and tested system was first evaluated in a preliminary risk assessment, as well as a full HazOp analysis. A thorough economic modelling has been performed on the viability of owning and operating this kind of hydrogen generation equipment. The evaluation has been performed from an on-site operation of such a unit in a refuelling context. The general conclusion from this modelling is that there are several parameters that influence the potential of an investment in a Hestia hydrogen generator. The sales price of the hydrogen is one of the major drivers of profitability. Another important factor is the throughput of the unit, more important than efficiency and utilization. Varying all of the parameters simultaneously introduce larger variations in the NPV, but 60% of the simulations are in the USD 90 000 to USD 180 000 interval. The chosen intervals for the parameters were: Hydrogen Sales Price (USD 5 - USD 7 per kg); Investment Cost (USD 70 000 - USD 130 000 per unit); Throughput (20 - 30 kg

  20. LINK2009 Phase 1: Development of 2. generation fuel cell vehicles and hydrogen refueling station. Final report; LINK2009 fase 1: Udvikling af 2. gen. braendselscelle koeretoejer og brinttankstation. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    LINK2009 project was to develop 2nd gen. technologies fuel cell systems for vehicles and 350bar hydrogen refueling stations. Also the LINK2009 project were to ensure a continuously positioning of Denmark and the Scandinavian Region within hydrogen for transport and continue to attract international car manufacturers to conduct demonstration and later market introduction in the region. The LINK2009 project is divided in two phases where this first phase only deals with the development of the 2nd generation technologies, whereas the following phase 2 will include the demonstration hereof as well as additional research activities. This Report describes the results of the phase 1 that was commenced in summer 2008 and ended in late 2009. Phase 1 has resulted in the development of new 2nd generation fuel cell technology for use in a city car and a service vehicle. Stated targets for price and efficiency have been reached and the following demonstration in Phase 2 is to confirm reaching of life time targets. The efficiency of the fuel cell system for the city car has been measured to be 42-48% at a power delivery of respectively 10kW and 2kW, which is significantly above the target of >40%. System simplifications and selection of new components have enabled a 50% reduction in the kW price for the fuel cell system, including 700bar hydrogen storage, now totalling Euro 4.500/kW. This creates sufficient basis for conducting demonstration of the system in vehicles. 9 vehicles are planned to be demonstrated in the following phase 2. Additional 8 vehicles were put in operation in Copenhagen in November 2009. Phase 1 has conducted development of 2nd gen. hydrogen refuelling technology that has resulted in concepts for both 350bar and 700bar refuelling as well as a concept for onsite hydrogen production at refuelling stations. In separate projects the developed 350bar technology has been brought to use in a newly established hydrogen station in Copenhagen, and the hydrogen

  1. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  2. Socioeconomic impacts: nuclear power station siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The rural industrial development literature is used to gain insights on the socioeconomic effects of nuclear power stations. Previous studies of large industrial facilities in small towns have important implications for attempts to understand and anticipate the impacts of nuclear stations. Even a cursory review of the nuclear development literature, however, reveals that industrialization research in rural sociology, economic geography and agricultural economics has been largely ignored

  3. Reactor refueling machine simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohosky, T.L.; Swidwa, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes in combination: a nuclear reactor; a refueling machine having a bridge, trolley and hoist each driven by a separate motor having feedback means for generating a feedback signal indicative of movement thereof. The motors are operable to position the refueling machine over the nuclear reactor for refueling the same. The refueling machine also has a removable control console including means for selectively generating separate motor signals for operating the bridge, trolley and hoist motors and for processing the feedback signals to generate an indication of the positions thereof, separate output leads connecting each of the motor signals to the respective refueling machine motor, and separate input leads for connecting each of the feedback means to the console; and a portable simulator unit comprising: a single simulator motor; a single simulator feedback signal generator connected to the simulator motor for generating a simulator feedback signal in response to operation of the simulator motor; means for selectively connecting the output leads of the console to the simulator unit in place of the refueling machine motors, and for connecting the console input leads to the simulator unit in place of the refueling machine motor feedback means; and means for driving the single simulator motor in response to any of the bridge, trolley or hoist motor signals generated by the console and means for applying the simulator feedback signal to the console input lead associated with the motor signal being generated by the control console

  4. Argentinian experience in selecting sites for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    One nuclear power station is in operation in the Republic of Argentina, a second is under construction, and the decision to build a third has been taken. According to existing plans, about ten nuclear power stations should go into operation during the next decade. The present paper analyses the experience acquired in selecting sites for the first units, commenting on the criteria and methods applied, the studies that were carried out, the specific problems encountered and the solutions adopted, as well as on the question of acceptance of the chosen sites by the public. It goes on to describe the current programme of selection and study of sites for future nuclear power stations

  5. Achievement report for fiscal 2000 on the phase II research and development for hydrogen utilizing international clean energy system technology (WE-NET). Task 7. Development of hydrogen refueling station; 2000 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) dai 2 ki kenkyu kaihatsu. Task 7. Suiso kyokyu station no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes the achievements in fiscal 2000 from the development of hydrogen refueling stand-alone stations for hydrogen fueled automobiles in the WE-NET. Supply capacity of practical size of 1/10, 30 Nm{sup 3} was selected as the object. For the natural gas reformed type hydrogen generator, discussions were given on design and manufacture of a reforming unit and a PSA device. The PCT diagram method was discussed to estimate the capacity of a hydrogen absorbing alloy type storing facility. Interface between fuel cell driven automobiles and the station was adjusted. For the solid polymer electrolyte water decomposition type, safety measures were discussed with a high-pressure filling system kept in mind. Detailed design was made on a water decomposing hydrogen generator. Fabrication was completed on the hydrogen absorbing alloy type storing facility, and verifications were given on the storage amount, hydrogen absorbing speed, and discharge capability. In the high-pressure refueling system, temperature rise was simulated at a pressure of 35 MPa. Refueling for ten minutes raised the gas temperature by 75 degrees C, and the container surface by 65 degrees C. Local temperature rise was forecasted in the actual work, which is a future discussion assignment. An outline method was discussed for the verification test. (NEDO)

  6. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project site release protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handy, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Richland, Washington field office of the DOE and its Remedial Actions Contractor, GE, took possession of the SSDP site in September 1984. In February of the following year, DOE-HQ issued generic, site independent guidelines taken from existing radiation protection standards. Basic generic dose limits were English equivalents of 1 mSv (100 mrem) per year averaged over the lifetime of any individual member of the general public. Hot spot limits were given. Occupied or habitable structures were limited to 5.2 x 10 -9 C/Kg h (20mR/h). Surface contamination was limited to standards plus average and maximum contact dose rates of 2 microGy (0.2 mrad) per hour and 10 microGy (1 mrad) per hour respectively. In addition, ''all exposures ... were to be limited to levels that (were) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).'' Authorized limits higher than these guidelines were allowed under given exceptional circumstances. GE determined the allowable radionuclide concentrations that could remain in soil and included rubble, and not dose the resident farmer to more than 1 mSv (100 mrem) per year. Under more conservative scenarios, however, exposures were controlled for buried, potentially occupationally occupiable, concrete substructures, to souvenir items, or to buried, but potentially exposed, concrete slabs. GE incorporated the scenario's pathways into a document implementing specific site release criteria which cannot be exceeded if the site is to be released unconditionally. 3 refs., 1 fig

  7. A TRIGA refueling exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Michael J [Kansas State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    In June 1973 the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission offered to assist the Department of Nuclear Engineering staff in refueling the KSU TRIGA Mkll - Nuclear Reactor. The replacement fuel was made available free of charge and a contract was negotiated between the Department of Nuclear Engineering and the A.E.C. to provide for costs incurred during the refueling operation. In addition, the A.E.C. aided in the fuel transfers by providing the names of contacts at the different laboratories and agencies concerned with fuel transfers. Data and numbers relevant to the entire reloading will be available in the short summary. (author)

  8. Refueling of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, J.W.; Swidwa, K.J.; Hornak, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for refueling a nuclear reactor, the reactor being disposed for refueling under water in a pit in a containment, the apparatus including a bridge to be mounted moveably over the pit on the containment, first means connected to the bridge, for moving the bridge forward and backward on the containment over the pit along a first path, a first pulse generator, connected to the moving means, responsive to the movement of the bridge, for producing pulses, means, connected to the generator,for counting the pulses, the count of the pulses being dependent on the distance of the movement of the bridge

  9. The hydrogen refuelling plant in Madrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giron, E.; Saez, A.; Julia, A.

    2005-07-01

    Since the late days of spring 2003, a hydrogen refuelling station is operating in Madrid to provide fuel to a set of four FC-buses running in the frame of the European demonstration projects CUTE and CITYCELLS. This station is located at one of the EMT(1) bus depot premises. The station was designed and built for the EMT by the consortium 'esH2' composed by the industrial gases manufacturer Air Liquide Espana, the energy utility Gas Natural SDG and the oil company Repsol YPF. (Author)

  10. Dungeness Power Station off-site emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This off-site Emergency Plan in the event of an accidental release of radioactivity at the Dungeness Nuclear power station sets out the necessary management and coordination processes between Nuclear Electric, operators of the site, the emergency services and relevant local authorities. The objectives promoting the aim are identified and the activities which will be undertaken to protect the public and the environment in the event of an emergency are outlined. (UK)

  11. A report on upgraded seismic monitoring stations in Myanmar: Station performance and site response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Hrin Nei; Min Htwe, Yin Myo; Kyaw, Tun Lin; Tun, Pa Pa; Min, Zaw; Htwe, Sun Hninn; Aung, Tin Myo; Lin, Kyaw Kyaw; Aung, Myat Min; De Cristofaro, Jason; Franke, Mathias; Radman, Stefan; Lepiten, Elouie; Wolin, Emily; Hough, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Myanmar is in a tectonically complex region between the eastern edge of the Himalayan collision zone and the northern end of the Sunda megathrust. Until recently, earthquake monitoring and research efforts have been hampered by a lack of modern instrumentation and communication infrastructure. In January 2016, a major upgrade of the Myanmar National Seismic Network (MNSN; network code MM) was undertaken to improve earthquake monitoring capability. We installed five permanent broadband and strong‐motion seismic stations and real‐time data telemetry using newly improved cellular networks. Data are telemetered to the MNSN hub in Nay Pyi Taw and archived at the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology Data Management Center. We analyzed station noise characteristics and site response using noise and events recorded over the first six months of station operation. Background noise characteristics vary across the array, but indicate that the new stations are performing well. MM stations recorded more than 20 earthquakes of M≥4.5 within Myanmar and its immediate surroundings, including an M 6.8 earthquake located northwest of Mandalay on 13 April 2016 and the Mw 6.8 Chauk event on 24 August 2016. We use this new dataset to calculate horizontal‐to‐vertical spectral ratios, which provide a preliminary characterization of site response of the upgraded MM stations.

  12. Expansion potential for existing nuclear power station sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, D. F.; Bauman, H. F.

    1977-09-26

    This report is a preliminary analysis of the expansion potential of the existing nuclear power sites, in particular their potential for development into nuclear energy centers (NECs) of 10 (GW(e) or greater. The analysis is based primarily on matching the most important physical characteristics of a site against the dominating site criteria. Sites reviewed consist mainly of those in the 1974 through 1976 ERDA Nuclear Power Stations listings without regard to the present status of reactor construction plans. Also a small number of potential NEC sites that are not associated with existing power stations were reviewed. Each site was categorized in terms of its potential as: a dispersed site of 5 GW(e) or less; a mini-NEC of 5 to 10 GW(e); NECs of 10 to 20 GW(e); and large NECs of more than 20 GW(e). The sites were categorized on their ultimate potential without regard to political considerations that might restrain their development. The analysis indicates that nearly 40 percent of existing sites have potential for expansion to nuclear energy centers.

  13. Expansion potential for existing nuclear power station sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, D.F.; Bauman, H.F.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a preliminary analysis of the expansion potential of the existing nuclear power sites, in particular their potential for development into nuclear energy centers (NECs) of 10 (GW(e) or greater. The analysis is based primarily on matching the most important physical characteristics of a site against the dominating site criteria. Sites reviewed consist mainly of those in the 1974 through 1976 ERDA Nuclear Power Stations listings without regard to the present status of reactor construction plans. Also a small number of potential NEC sites that are not associated with existing power stations were reviewed. Each site was categorized in terms of its potential as: a dispersed site of 5 GW(e) or less; a mini-NEC of 5 to 10 GW(e); NECs of 10 to 20 GW(e); and large NECs of more than 20 GW(e). The sites were categorized on their ultimate potential without regard to political considerations that might restrain their development. The analysis indicates that nearly 40 percent of existing sites have potential for expansion to nuclear energy centers

  14. Evolution of on-power refuelling system for 500 MWe PHWR based on experience from Rajasthan, Madras and Narora Atomic Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrier, S.R.; Inder Jit; Sanatkumar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The on-power fuel handling system design at Rajasthan and Madras Atomic Power Stations (RAPS and MAPS) is essentially based on the design of the fuel handling system at Douglas Point Station (CANADA) Although, a number of improvements have been carried out in the fuel handling system of RAPS and MAPS at the component and sub-assembly level, some problems of repetitive nature like frequent deterioration in the performance of B-ram ball screw, leak detector solenoid valves etc., still exist. Further, there are certain limitations and drawbacks in the fuelling systems of these stations. For example, FM carriage design would not meet current seismic qualification standards. Also there are chances of fuel transfer room getting contaminated during movement of a failed fuel bundle. In order to obviate these deficiencies, a new concept has been worked out for the fuel handling system of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) and accordingly, major changes have been made adopting a new layout. For example, FM head supporting arrangement has been changed to 'Suspension' type and a 'Linear-indexed' transfer magazine has been introduced in the fuel transfer system. Based on the experience gained from RAPS, MAPS and NAPS, design concept for 500 MWe fuel handling system has been evolved with further improvements especially in the layout. Also, a Calibration and Maintenance Facility for maintenance, testing calibration of FM head, sub-assemblies and components of fuel handling system has been introduced in the 500 MWe design. This paper discusses some of the experience gained from RAPS, MAPS and NAPS and also highlights the features of 500 MWe fuel handling system. (author)

  15. Decontamination of the site of an army gasoline service station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Katzer, W.; Scheidt, M.; Roll, S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report on the decontamination of the site of a gasoline service station at the Fuchsberg barracks at Salzwedel. Albeit that the accident is not spectacular for its magnitude, this case is interesting and exemplary because of the combined use of the most diverse decontamination methods. Soi air removal by suction, ground water decontamination, and microbiological soil decontamination were successfully used in conjunction. (orig.) [de

  16. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Station design alternatives report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report provides the results of investigating the basis for including Station Design Alternatives (SDAs) in the regulatory guidance given for nuclear plant environmental reports (ERs), explains approaches or processes for evaluating SDAs at the early site permit (ESP) stage, and applies one of the processes to each of the ten systems or subsystems considered as SDAS. The key objective o this report s to demonstrate an adequate examination of alternatives can be performed without the extensive development f design data. The report discusses the Composite Suitability Approach and the Established Cutoff Approach in evaluating station design alternatives and selects one of these approaches to evaluate alternatives for each of the plant or station that were considered. Four types of ALWRs have been considered due to the availability of extensive plant data: System 80+, AP600, Advanced Boiling Reactor (ABWR), and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). This report demonstrates the feasibility of evaluating station design alternatives when reactor design detail has not been determined, quantitatively compares the potential ental impacts of alternatives, and focuses the ultimate selection of a alternative on cost and applicant-specific factors. The range of alternatives system is deliberately limited to a reasonable number to demonstrate the or to the three most commonly used at operating plants

  17. 76 FR 82201 - General Site Suitability Criteria for Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... guidelines in identifying suitable candidate sites for nuclear power stations. The decision that a station... combination and a cost-benefit analysis comparing it with alternative site-plant combinations, as discussed in...

  18. AHTR Refueling Systems and Process Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, V.K.; Holcomb, D.E.; Bradley, E.C.; Zaharia, N.M.; Cooper, E.J.

    2012-07-15

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station-type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride salt–cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently undergoing development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR is approaching a preconceptual level of maturity. An initial integrated layout of its major systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and an initial, high-level sequence of operations necessary for constructing and operating the plant is nearing completion. An overview of the current status of the AHTR concept has been recently published [1], and a report providing a more detailed overview of the AHTR structures and mechanical systems is currently in preparation. This report documents the refueling components and processes envisioned at this early development phase. The report is limited to the refueling aspects of the AHTR and does not include overall reactor or power plant design information. The report, however, does include a description of the materials envisioned for the various components and the instrumentation necessary to control the refueling process. The report begins with an overview of the refueling strategy. Next a mechanical description of the AHTR fuel assemblies and core is provided. The reactor vessel upper assemblies are then described. Following this the refueling path structures and the refueling mechanisms and components are described. The sequence of operations necessary to fuel and defuel the reactor is then discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of the

  19. AHTR Refueling Systems and Process Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Zaharia, Nathaniel M [ORNL; Cooper, Eliott J [ORNL

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central station-type [1500 MW(e)] Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is currently undergoing development by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the US. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Reactor Concepts program. FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. The AHTR is approaching a preconceptual level of maturity. An initial integrated layout of its major systems, structures, and components (SSCs), and an initial, high-level sequence of operations necessary for constructing and operating the plant is nearing completion. An overview of the current status of the AHTR concept has been recently published and a report providing a more detailed overview of the AHTR structures and mechanical systems is currently in preparation. This report documents the refueling components and processes envisioned at this early development phase. The report is limited to the refueling aspects of the AHTR and does not include overall reactor or power plant design information. The report, however, does include a description of the materials envisioned for the various components and the instrumentation necessary to control the refueling process. The report begins with an overview of the refueling strategy. Next a mechanical description of the AHTR fuel assemblies and core is provided. The reactor vessel upper assemblies are then described. Following this the refueling path structures and the refueling mechanisms and components are described. The sequence of operations necessary to fuel and defuel the reactor is then discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of the

  20. A Distance-Adaptive Refueling Recommendation Algorithm for Self-Driving Travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanli Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking the maximum vehicle driving distance, the distances from gas stations, the route length, and the number of refueling gas stations as the decision conditions, recommendation rules and an early refueling service warning mechanism for gas stations along a self-driving travel route were constructed by using the algorithm presented in this research, based on the spatial clustering characteristics of gas stations and the urgency of refueling. Meanwhile, by combining ArcEngine and Matlab capabilities, a scenario simulation system of refueling for self-driving travel was developed by using c#.net in order to validate and test the accuracy and applicability of the algorithm. A total of nine testing schemes with four simulation scenarios were designed and executed using this algorithm, and all of the simulation results were consistent with expectations. The refueling recommendation algorithm proposed in this study can automatically adapt to changes in the route length of self-driving travel, the maximum driving distance of the vehicle, and the distance from gas stations, which could provide variable refueling recommendation strategies according to differing gas station layouts along the route. Therefore, the results of this study could provide a scientific reference for the reasonable planning and timely supply of vehicle refueling during self-driving travel.

  1. Development and operating performance of the refuelling machine of the Fugen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Jun; Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Takeshita, Norito; Ohta, Takeo

    1985-01-01

    In the advanced thermal reactor ''Fugen'' power station, with the refuelling machine the fuel replacement during operation is made through the reactor bottom. Its design was started in 1967 and up to 1975 various tests were conducted. Fugen's refuelling machine has thus been used from the initial fuel loading in 1978 and handled so far about 1300 fuel assemblies in seven times of the refuelling. In the stage of Fugen operation there occurred failure of the grab drive due to crud, etc. At present, with such troubles all eliminated, the refuelling machine is in steady operation with proper maintenance. The results with Fugen's refuelling machine are reflected in the development of the refuelling machine for the demonstration ATR. (Mori, K.)

  2. Robotic refueling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    One of the longest critical path operations performed during the outage is removing and replacing the fuel. A design is currently under development for a refueling machine which would allow faster, fully automated operation and would also allow the handling of two fuel assemblies at the same time. This design is different from current designs, (a) because of its lighter weight, making increased acceleration and speed possible, (b) because of its control system which makes locating the fuel assembly more dependable and faster, and (c) because of its dual handling system allowing simultaneous fuel movements. The new design uses two robotic arms to span a designated area of the vessel and the fuel storage area. Attached to the end of each robotic arm is a lightweight telescoping mast with a pendant attached to the end of each mast. The pendant acts as the base unit, allowing attachment of any number of end effectors depending on the servicing or inspection operation. Housed within the pendant are two television cameras used for the positioning control system. The control system is adapted from the robotics field using the technology known as machine vision, which provides both object and character recognition techniques to enable relative position control rather than absolute position control as in past designs. The pendant also contains thrusters that are used for fast, short distance, precise positioning. The new refueling machine system design is capable of a complete off load and reload of an 872 element core in about 5.3 days compared to 13 days for a conventional system

  3. Joint deployment of refuelling infrastructure and vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    2010-01-01

    A wide range of fuels will be used in future transportation technologies. This presentation discussed refuelling infrastructure solutions for alternative fuels. A well-placed demonstration infrastructure will help to accelerate market development. Stakeholder collaboration is needed to create high value business paradigms and identify stakeholder benefits. Infrastructure paradigms include the home; businesses; retail public refuelling forecourts; and multi-fuel waste heat recovery sites. Commercial nodes can be developed along major transportation routes. Stakeholder groups include technology providers, supply chain and service providers, commercial end-users, and government. A successful alternative fuel infrastructure model will consider market development priorities, time frames and seed investment opportunities. Applications must be market-driven in order to expand. A case study of the natural gas vehicle (NGV) program in Ontario was also discussed, as well as various hydrogen projects. tabs., figs.

  4. Fuel examination at SSEB Hunterston B power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, I.; Oldfield, D.

    1988-01-01

    After a brief description of Hunterston 'B' Power Station and its fuel, the need for post irradiation examination is established. Means of providing this on site at various stages of the fuel route are described, i.e. refuelling machine, dismantling cell and storage pond. Techniques used include the human eye, video recording and endoscopy. (author)

  5. Some issues on radiological consequences analysis in site selection for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqiu; Yue Huiguo

    2006-01-01

    The three considerations, Site safety and environmental protection and emergency preparedness, are the focus of attention in the evaluation of the suitability of a site for nuclear power station. This paper summarized the basic regulatory requirements for the siting of nuclear power station, described the existing problems on radiological consequences analyses during the siting stage and discussed the is- sues that need to concern in the reviewing of the radiological consequences analyses in the siting appraisal stage. (authors)

  6. Diablo Canyon refueling outage program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, W.B.; Irving, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    Management of outages has become one of the most talked about subjects in the nuclear power industry in the past several years. Many utilities do not perform refueling outages very well or in the past have had some outages that they would not like to repeat and in some cases do not even like to think about. With the growing cost of energy and the demands placed on utilities to improve capacity factors, it is very easy for management to focus on shortening refueling outage durations as a prime objective in improving overall corporate performance. So it is with Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the Diablo Canyon power plant. A review of their refueling outage performance reflects a utility that is responding to the nuclear industry's call for improved outage performance

  7. Biological field stations: research legacies and sites for serendipity

    Science.gov (United States)

    William K. Michener; Keith L. Bildstein; Arthur McKee; Robert R. Parmenter; William W. Hargrove; Deedra McClearn; Mark Stromberg

    2009-01-01

    Biological field stations are distributed throughout North America, capturing much of the ecological variability present at the continental scale and encompassing many unique habitats. In addition to their role in supporting research and education, field stations offer legacies of data, specimens, and accumulated knowledge. Such legacies often provide the only...

  8. The local economic and social effects of power station siting: anticipated, demonstrated and perceived

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasson, J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses the economic and social effects of power station siting at a local level using material based on the interim research findings from a project commissioned by the Central Electricity Generating Board. The cases for and against power station development are outlined and a review of the actual economic and social effects is presented, drawn from a study of a conventional power station at Drax and a nuclear power station at Sizewell. (U.K.)

  9. The application of AI-based refueling control system to the Fugen NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Koichi; Nakamura, Shinji; Kawasaki, Noboru; Nanko, Takashi; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Koichi

    1996-01-01

    In a refueling operation of the Advanced Thermal Reactor Fugen, it is essential to precisely handle fuel assemblies to guarantee quality and from the standpoint of safety guard. In order to plan and execute efficient operations, knowledge of experienced operators based on experiences is required. Therefore, an automatic control system based on the Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology has been developed, and has been put into operation in actual refueling operations. This system prepares an optimum refueling plan, controls the fuel handling facilities by that plan, displays and prints out the history of transfer and storage of items by automatically sampled data on a work station, a network to express fuel handling facilities and operational rules acquired through operating experiences. The development of this system has made it possible to optimize refueling schedule, save control labor of items and improve reliability of refueling. Firstly the development started the off-line system that prepares optimum refueling plan and gives to the operator step by step instructions for operation, secondly developed the on-line system that automatically controls facilities by that plan. The development of this system started in 1989, the off-line system has been put into practical operation in the 17th refueling in 1991, the 22nd (12th annual inspection) refueling in 1995 has been done by using the on-line system automatically

  10. Site selection model for new metro stations based on land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Chen, Xuewu

    2015-12-01

    Since the construction of metro system generally lags behind the development of urban land use, sites of metro stations should adapt to their surrounding situations, which was rarely discussed by previous research on station layout. This paper proposes a new site selection model to find the best location for a metro station, establishing the indicator system based on land use and combining AHP with entropy weight method to obtain the schemes' ranking. The feasibility and efficiency of this model has been validated by evaluating Nanjing Shengtai Road station and other potential sites.

  11. Risk assessment of LPG automotive refuelling facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchers, R.E. [University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia). Dept. of Civil, Surveying and Enviromental Engineering; Feutrill, W.R. [Wesfarmers Kleenheat Gas Pty. Ltd., Perth (Australia)

    2001-12-01

    Quantified risk analysis (QRA) was used for the revision of regulatory separation distances associated with medium size liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) refuelling facilities used in automotive service (gas) stations. Typically these facilities consist of a 7.5 kl pressure vessel, pump, pipework, dispensing equipment and safety equipment. Multi-tank installations are relatively uncommon. This paper describes the hazard scenarios considered, the risk analysis procedure and the selection and application of data for initiating events and for rates of failure of mechanical components and of the pressure vessel. Human errors and intervention possibilities were also considered. Because of the inapplicability of established consequence models and the relatively small scale of the facilities, a number of tests were performed to estimate flame length, flame impingement effects, ignition probabilities and the effectiveness of screening devices. (author)

  12. Gear failure of a PHWR refuelling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    After ten year service in Atucha Nuclear Station a gear belonging to a pressurized heavy water reactor refuelling machine, failed. The gear box was used to transmit motion to the inlet-outlet heavy-water valve of that machine. Visual examination of the gear device revealed an absence of lubricant and several gear teeth were broken off at the root. The gear motion was transmitted from a speed-reducing device with controlled adjustable times in order to produce a right fitness of the valve closure. The main cause of gear failure was due to misalignment produced during assembly or in-service operation. It is suggested to control periodically the level of oil lubricant. (orig./IHOE) [de

  13. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public enquiry: proof of evidence on coal fired power station sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fothergill, S.; Witt, S.

    1988-11-01

    The Coalfield Communities Campaign (CCC) has argued that if a new base-load power station is required it should be coal-fired rather than nuclear, and that it should use UK coal. Proposals for new power stations at both Hinkley Point and at Fawley have encountered very considerable local and regional opposition, and this is increasingly likely to be the case at many other sites especially in Southern England. In contrast the CCC has sought to demonstrate that its member authorities would generally welcome the development of new coal-fired capacity on appropriate sites within their areas. In particular, this proof establishes that there is a prima facie case for considering three sites - Thorpe Marsh, Hams Hall and Uskmouth - as potential locations for a new large coal-fired power station as an alternative to Hinkley Point C. The relevant local authorities have expressed their willingness to co-operate in more detailed planning or technical investigations to secure a coal-fired power station on these sites. The CCC considers this to be a major and unprecedented offer to the CEGB and its successor bodies, which could greatly speed the development of new power staion capacity and be of considerable economic and social benefit to coalfield communities.

  14. Hydrant refueling system as an optimisation of aircraft refuelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin HROMÁDKA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At large international airports, aircraft can be refuelled either by fuel trucks or using dedicated underground pipeline systems. The latter, hydrant refuelling, is considered to be an optimal fuelling method as it increases safety, shortens the aircraft turnaround time and cuts the overall costs. However, at smaller airports, implementation of this system can lead to high investment costs. Thus, the paper discusses the airport size from which this system may be efficient to implement. Various definitions of term “airport size” are assessed. Based on data collection, the hydrant system model is created within the paper. As a result, methodology for assessing the suitability of hydrant system implementation is set. This methodology can be used at every airport using three simple inputs.

  15. The siting of nuclear power stations in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    It is a fundamental precept that all prudent precautions should be taken. The secondary contribution to public safety derived by a proper choice of site must therefore be utilised. A siting policy should limit the choice of site but give the Utility sufficient freedom of choice to enable the more remote sites to be available for the adoption of new reactor types. For a significant release few people should be affected sufficiently to require evacuation, and account must also be taken of population centres possibly up to 20 miles from the site. (orig.) [de

  16. Riel Converter Station, Winnipeg: Site selection and environmental assessment status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    As part of its expansion plans, Manitoba Hydro is planning to construct a converter station east of Winnipeg to receive power from a 850-km dc transmission line which will be constructed to bring power from a new generating station in the north of the province. Work performed to date on site selection and preliminary environmental assessment of the converter station is reviewed. The role of the converter station is described and the potential impacts are summarized in such areas as employment opportunities, pollution and noise during construction, electric and magnetic field effects, and land use impacts. Site selection criteria are outlined and potential sites are identified and evaluated. The Deacon site has been chosen as the preferred site since it has a number of inherent advantages including existing ownership by Manitoba Hydro, proximity to existing transmission rights-of-way, and low visual and land-use impact. 12 figs

  17. Pellet refueling program at Risoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.; Chang, C.T.; Joergensen, L.W.; Nielsen, P.; Sillesen, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    The pellet refueling work at Riso has up to now been concentrated at studying the ablation rate of hydrogen pellets in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in the Puffatron device. The main results of these studies are well known and we shall only give a brief summary including some more recent results relating to the ablation process. The work on the Puffatron device has been completed and we are presently preparing to start ablation studies in a small Tokamak, Dante. This tokamak has only been constructed this summer and ablation studies are expected to begin in the beginning of 1978. We shall give the expected parameters of the tokamak plasma and indicate some of the planned work. In this presentation we shall also report on the theoretical work on refueling taking place at Riso. We have particularly been interested in the effect of α-particles which could significantly alter the conclusions made from present experiments

  18. Nuclear reactor machine refuelling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashen, W.S.; Erwin, D.

    1977-01-01

    Part of an on-line fuelling machine for a CANDU pressure-tube reactor is described. The present invention provides a refuelling machine wherein the fuelling components, including the fuel carrier and the closure adapter, are positively positioned and retained within the machine magazine or positively secured to the machine charge tube head, and cannot be accidentally disengaged as in former practice. The positive positioning devices include an arcuate keeper plate. Simplified hooked fingers are used. (NDH)

  19. Technical and economic analysis of hydrogen refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, Silviu; Dave, Saraansh; Fan, Zhong; Sooriyabandara, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical and economic models of a hydrogen station for vehicles refuelling. • Hydrogen demand from fuel cell electric vehicles modelled stochastically. • Study case based on a UK pilot project. • Operation of the H_2 station using combined energy from wind and power grid is preferred. • Return on investment of 5–10 years is possible for the hydrogen station. - Abstract: This paper focuses on technical and economic analysis of a hydrogen refilling station to provide operational insight through tight coupling of technical models of physical processes and economic models. This allows the dynamic relationships of the system to be captured and analysed to provide short/medium term analytical capability to support system design, planning, and financing. The modelling developed here highlights the need to closely link technical and economic models for technology led projects where technical capability and commercial feasibility are important. The results show that hydrogen fuel can be competitive with petrol on a GBP/KG basis if the return on investment period is over 10 years for PEM electrolysers and 5 for Alkaline electrolysers. We also show that subsidies on capital costs (as reflected by some R&D funding programs) make both PEM and Alkaline technologies cheaper than the equivalent price of petrol, which suggests more emphasis should be put on commercialising R&D funded projects as they have commercial advantages. The paper also shows that a combined wind and grid connected station is preferable so that a higher number of customers are served (i.e. minimum shortage of hydrogen).

  20. Principal facts for about 16,000 gravity stations in the Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.N.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.; Healey, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity includes portions of the Goldfield, Caliente, Death Valley, and Las Vegas. This report documents and consolidates previously published and recently compiled gravity data to establish a gravity data base of about 16,000 stations for the NTS and vicinity. While compiling data sets, redundant stations and stations having doubtful locations or gravity values were excluded. Details of compiling the gravity data sets are discussed in later sections. Where feasible, an accuracy code has been assigned to each station so that the accuracy or reliability of each station can be evaluated. This data base was used in preparing complete Bouguer and isostatic gravity maps of the NTS and vicinity. Since publication of the complete Bouguer gravity map, additional data were incorporated into the isostatic gravity map. Gravity data were compiled from five sources: 14,183 stations from the US Geological Survey (USGS), 326 stations from Exploration Data Consultants (EDCON) of Denver, Colorado, 906 stations from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), 212 stations from the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), and 48 stations from the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA). This investigation is an effort to study several areas for potential storage of high-level radioactive waste. Gravity stations established under YMP are shown. The objective of this gravity survey was to explore for the presence of plutons. 33 refs., 24 figs., 9 tabs

  1. Principal facts for about 16,000 gravity stations in the Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.N.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.; Healey, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity includes portions of the Goldfield, Caliente, Death Valley, and Las Vegas. This report documents and consolidates previously published and recently compiled gravity data to establish a gravity data base of about 16,000 stations for the NTS and vicinity. While compiling data sets, redundant stations and stations having doubtful locations or gravity values were excluded. Details of compiling the gravity data sets are discussed in later sections. Where feasible, an accuracy code has been assigned to each station so that the accuracy or reliability of each station can be evaluated. This data base was used in preparing complete Bouguer and isostatic gravity maps of the NTS and vicinity. Since publication of the complete Bouguer gravity map, additional data were incorporated into the isostatic gravity map. Gravity data were compiled from five sources: 14,183 stations from the US Geological Survey (USGS), 326 stations from Exploration Data Consultants (EDCON) of Denver, Colorado, 906 stations from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), 212 stations from the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), and 48 stations from the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA). This investigation is an effort to study several areas for potential storage of high-level radioactive waste. Gravity stations established under YMP are shown. The objective of this gravity survey was to explore for the presence of plutons. This volume contains only compiled data

  2. Automated refueling inventory control system at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C.R.

    1983-10-01

    The Refueling Inventory Control System (RICS) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) keeps track of all assemblies that reside in the various refueling facilities. The automated RICS allows the user to obtain information regarding any assembly under its control by displaying the data on a screen. It also provides a simulation mode which allows assembly moves on a duplicated data base. This simulation is used to verify the refueling documentation before it is issued

  3. Safety performance comparation of MOX, nitride and metallic fuel based 25-100 MWe Pb-Bi cooled long life fast reactors without on-site refuelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su'ud, Zaki

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the safety performance of 25-100 MWe Pb-Bi cooled long life fast reactors based on three types of fuels: MOX, nitride and metal is compared and discussed. In the fourth generation NPP paradigm, especially for Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors, inherent safety capability is necessary against some standard accidents such as unprotected loss of flow (ULOF), unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP), unprotected loss of heat sink (ULOHS). Selection of fuel type will have important impact on the overall system safety performance. The results of safety analysis of long life Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors without on-site fuelling using nitride, MOX and metal fuel have been performed. The reactors show the inherent safety pattern with enough safety margins during ULOF and UTOP accidents. For MOX fuelled reactors, ULOF accident is more severe than UTOP accident while for nitride fuelled cores UTOP accident may push power much higher than that comparable MOX fuelled cores. (author)

  4. Improving refueling outages through partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado, Angelo L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to reduce nuclear plant outage duration and cost through partnership. Partnership is defined as a long-term commitment between the utility and the vendor with the objective of achieving shared business goals by maximizing the effectiveness of each party's resources. The elements of an effective partnership are described. Specific examples are given as to how partnership has worked in the effective performance of refueling outages. To gain the full benefits of a partnership, both parties must agree to share information, define the scope early, communicate goals and expectations, and identify boundaries for technical ownership. (author)

  5. Compact toroid refueling of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Thomas, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded that the concept is not economically feasible. For typical ITER designs, the compact toroid fueling requires about 15 MW of electrical power, with about 5 MW of thermal power deposited in the plasma. At these power levels, ideal ignition (Q = ∞) is not possible, even for short-pulse burns. The pulsed power requirements for this technology are substantial. 6 ref., 1 figs

  6. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  7. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, C.K.; Maletskos, C.J.; Youngstrom, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of a six-year avian radioecology study at the site of a nuclear power plant in Massachusetts is reported. A completed historical summary is followed by a description of mathematical models developed to calculate the effects on bird body burdens of various changes in environmental radionuclide levels. Examples are presented. Radionuclide metabolism studies in which acute doses of /sup 131/I and /sup 137/Cs were administered to four species of wild birds are presented. Radionuclides were administered both intravenously and orally; no apparent differences in uptake or elimination rates were observed between the two methods.

  8. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, C.K.; Maletskos, C.J.; Youngstrom, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of a six-year avian radioecology study at the site of a nuclear power plant in Massachusetts is reported. A completed historical summary is followed by a description of mathematical models developed to calculate the effects on bird body burdens of various changes in environmental radionuclide levels. Examples are presented. Radionuclide metabolism studies in which acute doses of 131 I and 137 Cs were administered to four species of wild birds are presented. Radionuclides were administered both intravenously and orally; no apparent differences in uptake or elimination rates were observed between the two methods

  9. Method for refuelling a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method for refuelling a nuclear reactor core inside a reactor vessel. The technique allows a substantial reduction in the refuelling time as compared with previously known methods and permits fewer out of core operations and smaller temporary storage space. (U.K.)

  10. Refueling machine for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, E.F.; Hornak, L.P.; Swidwa, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved refuelling machine for inserting and removing fuel assemblies from a nuclear reactor is described which has been designed to increase the reliability of such machines. The system incorporates features which enable the refuelling operation to be performed more efficiently and economically. (U.K.)

  11. Assesment of Carbon Credits for Power Generation Systems at GSM Base Station Site

    OpenAIRE

    Ani, Vincent Anayochukwu; Ani, Emmanuel Onyeka

    2016-01-01

    Electricity production is often a source of CO2 emissions, for instance when fossil fuel is combusted in power plants. Therefore the root cause of pollution coming from telecommunication industry is the source of energy (diesel genset) the network operators used in running their Base station sites. Energy consumption of using diesel to power base station by telecom networks is a contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper presents the comparative carbon credits of hybrid ...

  12. The influence of the placement method of fuel dispenserson the refueling cycle of vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levin Ruslan Yur’evich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Logistics of production processes at a gas station is a critical point in the system of petroleum products, on the operation of which the effectiveness and sustainability of the transport sector depends. The provision and supply of road transportation of petroleum products is one of the most urgent tasks.Technological processes of reception, storage of fuel and refuelling of motor vehicles on petrol stations needs a scientific study of their structure and organization. At the design stage of a gas station, it is necessary to consider quite a lot of different factors: the configuration of the area under the gas station, the scheme of arrangement and the number of fuel dispensers, the trajectory of motion and the design of vehicles, calls to the station, distance between cars on duty, between the elements of buildings and equipment, as well as the requirements for fire, building, public, sanitary-epidemiological and state regulations. Therefore, the designer has a great opportunity for varying the parameters of the elements of the station, especially when considering the characteristics of the fueled vehicles.Typical projects at a same power station include various sizes, the seizure of land to build a station changes from planning decisions and the locations of all its technological elements. For increase of functioning efficiency of transportation systems of petroleum products in modern conditions on the basis of the design and technical innovations it is necessary to conduct special studies.Research planning decisions for a refueling station led to the conclusion that the placement of technological equipment in the refueling area has a certain impact on the length of vehicles service. Improving the layout of the refueling zone several times reduces the loss of the components of the refueling cycle time and increase the capacity of the station.Information base describing the stages of a gas station includes parts of refueling cycle time and

  13. Support services to refuelling exploitation; Servicios de apoyo a explotacion en recarga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castineira, M; Cortes, M.; Rayo, A.

    2010-07-01

    The refuelling period in nuclear power stations is very important due to the need to optimise its duration, large volumes of work and resources that have to be planned and coordinated and their impact on the subsequent operating cycle. Empresarios Agrupados has a permanent organisation, with specialised resources and extensive availability of human resources. (Author)

  14. Refueling and control of RFP burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebel, R.; Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    An earlier study of the stability of a fusion burn in a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) has been extended to include cold particle refueling. This refueling, coupled with anomalous transport, makes possible quasi-steady state operation which both flattens the wall-loading temporal dependence and significantly increases energy gain factors. This paper discusses results of these burn simulations along with parametric studies aimed at determining associated reactor scaling problems

  15. Analysis Methodology for Optimal Selection of Ground Station Site in Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, J.; Farjas, M.; Martínez, R.

    2013-12-01

    Optimization of ground station sites is especially important in complex missions that include several small satellites (clusters or constellations) such as the QB50 project, where one ground station would be able to track several spatial vehicles, even simultaneously. In this regard the design of the communication system has to carefully take into account the ground station site and relevant signal phenomena, depending on the frequency band. To propose the optimal location of the ground station, these aspects become even more relevant to establish a trusted communication link due to the ground segment site in urban areas and/or selection of low orbits for the space segment. In addition, updated cartography with high resolution data of the location and its surroundings help to develop recommendations in the design of its location for spatial vehicles tracking and hence to improve effectiveness. The objectives of this analysis methodology are: completion of cartographic information, modelling the obstacles that hinder communication between the ground and space segment and representation in the generated 3D scene of the degree of impairment in the signal/noise of the phenomena that interferes with communication. The integration of new technologies of geographic data capture, such as 3D Laser Scan, determine that increased optimization of the antenna elevation mask, in its AOS and LOS azimuths along the horizon visible, maximizes visibility time with spatial vehicles. Furthermore, from the three-dimensional cloud of points captured, specific information is selected and, using 3D modeling techniques, the 3D scene of the antenna location site and surroundings is generated. The resulting 3D model evidences nearby obstacles related to the cartographic conditions such as mountain formations and buildings, and any additional obstacles that interfere with the operational quality of the antenna (other antennas and electronic devices that emit or receive in the same bandwidth

  16. Characterization of site conditions for selected seismic stations in eastern part of Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, B.; Zaharia, B.; Diaconescu, M.; Bala, A.; Nastase, E.; Constantinescu, E.; Tataru, D.

    2018-02-01

    Strong motion data are essential for seismic hazard assessment. To correctly understand and use this kind of data is necessary to have a good knowledge of local site conditions. Romania has one of the largest strong motion networks in Europe with 134 real-time stations. In this work, we aim to do a comprehensive site characterization for eight of these stations located in the eastern part of Romania. We make use of a various seismological dataset and we perform ambient noise and earthquake-based investigations to estimate the background noise level, the resonance frequencies and amplification of each site. We also derive the Vs30 parameter from the surface shear-wave velocity profiles obtained through the inversion of the Rayleigh waves recorded in active seismic measurements. Our analyses indicate similar results for seven stations: high noise levels for frequencies larger than 1 Hz, well defined fundamental resonance at low frequencies (0.15-0.29 Hz), moderate amplification levels (up to 4 units) for frequencies between 0.15 and 5-7 Hz and same soil class (type C) according to the estimated Vs30 and Eurocode 8. In contrast, the eighth station for which the soil class is evaluated of type B exhibits a very good noise level for a wide range of frequencies (0.01-20 Hz), a broader fundamental resonance at high frequencies ( 8 Hz) and a flat amplification curve between 0.1 and 3-4 Hz.

  17. Guide for Identifying and Converting High-Potential Petroleum Brownfield Sites to Alternative Fuel Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.; Hettinger, D.; Mosey, G.

    2011-05-01

    Former gasoline stations that are now classified as brownfields can be good sites to sell alternative fuels because they are in locations that are convenient to vehicles and they may be seeking a new source of income. However, their success as alternative fueling stations is highly dependent on location-specific criteria. First, this report outlines what these criteria are, how to prioritize them, and then applies that assessment framework to five of the most popular alternative fuels--electricity, natural gas, hydrogen, ethanol, and biodiesel. The second part of this report delves into the criteria and tools used to assess an alternative fuel retail site at the local level. It does this through two case studies of converting former gasoline stations in the Seattle-Eugene area into electric charge stations. The third part of this report addresses steps to be taken after the specific site has been selected. This includes choosing and installing the recharging equipment, which includes steps to take in the permitting process and key players to include.

  18. Allowable Residual Contamination Levels in soil for decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1983-09-01

    As part of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, a fundamental concern is the determination of Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for radionuclides in the soil at the site. The ARCL method described in this report is based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for unrestricted use of the land after decommissioning. In addition to naturally occurring radionuclides and fallout from weapons testing, soil contamination could potentially come from five other sources. These include operation of the Shippingport Station as a pressurized water reactor, operations of the Shippingport Station as a light-water breeder, operation of the nearby Beaver Valley reactors, releases during decommissioning, and operation of other nearby industries, including the Bruce-Mansfield coal-fired power plants. ARCL values are presented for 29 individual radionculides and a worksheet is provided so that ARCL values can be determined for any mixture of the individual radionuclides for any annual dose limit selected. In addition, a worksheet is provided for calculating present time soil concentration value that will decay to the ARCL values after any selected period of time, such as would occur during a period of restricted access. The ARCL results are presented for both unconfined (surface) and confined (subsurface) soil contamination. The ARCL method and results described in this report provide a flexible means of determining unrestricted-use site release conditions after decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station

  19. Study of the legal problems raised by the siting of nuclear power stations in artificial islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, J.; Guieze, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The creation and operation of a nuclear power station on an artificial island in French waters are governed by domestic law and are subject to two types of procedure: the first concerns erection of the artificial island and the second the control of the public authorities over creation and operation of the nuclear power station. At administrative level, the setting up of an artificial island requires that it be attached to a commune as well as permission for occupancy from the maritime authorities. Furthermore, setting up of a nuclear power station on an artificial island is subject to the licensing procedure for large nuclear installations and to delivery of the licenses required for release of gaseous and liquid radioactive effluents. Given the proximity of the high seas and eventually, the borders of other States, siting of a nuclear power station on an artificial island imposes obligations at international level. These requirements, which concern prevention of transfrontier pollution, stem from the London (1972) and Paris (1974) Conventions on marine pollution. The third party liability regime for a nuclear incident caused by an installation sited in territorial seas is that of the 1960 Paris Convention on third party liability in the nuclear field and the 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention. Another problem likely to be raised is that of the right of innocent passage of ships near such installations [fr

  20. Requirements and criteria for choosing sites suitable for the construction of nuclear installations and power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    The present document explains the selection criteria for areas in Italy suitable for the installation of nuclear power stations to be included in the 'National Site Map' provided for in Section 23 of Act No 393 of 2 August 1975. It represents the results of a thorough investigation into the various aspects of the problem of siting nuclear power stations, at the present stage of technology, taking into account the effect of the installations on the environment and the effect of the environment on the installations. The essential aim is to demonstrate that the requirements derived from these analyses, and on which there was full consultation with the other controlling bodies of European countries (in particular, France, Great Britain and West Germany) ensure the optimum choice of areas from the point of view of safety and public health. (author)

  1. The behaviour of residual contaminants at a former station site, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, Jenny; Webster, Kerry; Nelson, Peter; Waterhouse, Emma

    2003-01-01

    Minor contamination by metals, phosphorus, and fuel products were found at a former research station site in Antarctica. - In 1994, New Zealand's only mainland Antarctic base, Vanda Station, was removed from the shores of Lake Vanda, in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Residual chemical contamination of the station site has been identified, in the form of discrete fuel spills, locally elevated Pb, Zn, Ag and Cd concentrations in soil and elevated Cu, Ni, Co and phosphate concentrations in suprapermafrost fluids in a gully formerly used for domestic washing water disposal. Pathways for contaminant transfer to Lake Vanda, potential environmental impacts and specific remediation/monitoring options are considered. While some contaminants (particularly Zn) could be selectively leached from flooded soil, during a period of rising lake level, the small area of contaminated soils exposed and low level of contamination suggests that this would not adversely affect either shallow lake water quality or the growth of cyanobacteria. Phosphate-enhanced growth of the latter may, however, be a visible consequence of the minor contamination occurring at this site

  2. Site of the First Spanish Nuclear Power Stations; Los Emplazamientos de las Primeras Centrales Nucleares Espanolas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual, F.; Alonso, A.; Norena, S.; Sevilla, A. [Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    1967-09-15

    The authors analyse and describe the sites of three Spanish nuclear power stations: the Zorita station (153 M W (e )) with a pressurized water reactor and single containment; the Santa Marfa de Garofia station (380 MW (e)), with a boiling water reactor and containment by steam condensation; and the Vandellos station (480 MW(e)), with a graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactor and integrated design of the EDF-4 type. The first two are located in the interior of the country and the third on the Mediterranean coast. The paper discusses the normal criteria and the safety considerations governing the choice of site, and points out the influence of Spanish orography on the transport of heavy equipment and hence its repercussions on the selection of power station sites. Reference is made to the experience acquired in transporting equipment for the Z-orita plant, and an analysis of the practical difficulties encountered in applying particular safety standards to the sites of stations of different types and designs is included. As the type of reactor and its containment system affect the practical value of applying particular standards which, moreover, have to be adapted to the special features of each country, safety standards for assessing power station sites should be applied in an appropriate and flexible manner. The paper describes the geological and meteorological features of the three sites and summarizes the studies carried out in these fields. It refers particularly to the hydrological studies carried out at Zorita and Santa Maria de Garofia and describes the weather stations set up at both sites, the diffusion experiments with neutcal-buoyancy balloons at Santa Maria de Garofia, and the results of these investigations. (author) [Spanish] Se analizan y describen los emplazamientos de tres centrales nucleares espanolas: la central de Zorita, de 153 MW(e), con reactor de agua a presion y sistema de contencion simple; la central de Santa Maria de Garofia, de 380 MW

  3. Prototype Environmental Assessment of the impacts of siting and construction of an SPS ground receiving station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J.

    1980-01-01

    A prototype assessment of the environmental impacts of siting and constructing a Satellite Power System (SPS) Ground Receiving Station (GRS) is reported. The objectives of the study were: (1) to develop an assessment of the nonmicrowave related impacts of the reference system SPS GRS on the natural environment; (2) to assess the impacts of GRS construction and operations in the context of actual baseline data for a site in the California desert; and (3) to identify critical GRS characteristics or parameters that are most significant in terms of the natural environment.

  4. Pn seismic wave travel time at the Semipalatinsk Test Site - Borovoe seismic station trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, V.A.; Kaazik, P.B.; Ovchinnikov, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper preparation involved 160 explosions at the Degelen Site conducted in 1961-1989 and 89 explosions at the Balapan Site conducted in 1968-1989. Pn wave travel time was tied to the sea level in accordance with velocity characteristics of the explosion hypocenter medium; and to average epicentral distance for every site basing on their local travel time curves of Pn wave relative to Borovoe station. Maximum amplitude of mean-year travel times variations is 0.3-0.5 s as at the Nevada Test Site - Borovoe trace and Mirniy (Antarctica). However, the linear trend in contrast to previous traces has negative sign (0.08 s for Degelen and 0.1 s for Balapan). Thus, Pn wave velocity increases with calendar time. (author)

  5. RFSP simulations of Darlington FINCH refuelling transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, E.V.; Chow, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Immediately after refuelling of a channel, the fresh bundles are free of fission products. Xenon-135, the most notable of the saturating fission products, builds up to an equilibrium level in about 30 h. The channel power of the refuelled channel would therefore initially peak and then drop to a steady-state level. The RFSP code can track saturating-fission-product transients and power transients. The Fully INstrumented CHannels (FINCHs) in Darlington NGS provides channel power data on the refuelling power transients. In this paper, such data has been used to identify the physical evidence of the fission-product transient effect on channel power, and to validate RFSP fission-product-driver calculation results. (author)

  6. Potential Release Site Sediment Concentrations Correlated to Storm Water Station Runoff through GIS Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    This research examined the relationship between sediment sample data taken at Potential Release Sites (PRSs) and storm water samples taken at selected sites in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The PRSs had been evaluated for erosion potential and a matrix scoring system implemented. It was assumed that there would be a stronger relationship between the high erosion PRSs and the storm water samples. To establish the relationship, the research was broken into two areas. The first area was raster-based modeling, and the second area was data analysis utilizing the raster based modeling results and the sediment and storm water sample results. Two geodatabases were created utilizing raster modeling functions and the Arc Hydro program. The geodatabase created using only Arc Hydro functions contains very fine catchment drainage areas in association with the geometric network and can be used for future contaminant tracking. The second geodatabase contains sub-watersheds for all storm water stations used in the study along with a geometric network. The second area of the study focused on data analysis. The analytical sediment data table was joined to the PRSs spatial data in ArcMap. All PRSs and PRSs with high erosion potential were joined separately to create two datasets for each of 14 analytes. Only the PRSs above the background value were retained. The storm water station spatial data were joined to the table of analyte values that were either greater than the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) benchmark value, or the Department of Energy (DOE) Drinking Water Defined Contribution Guideline (DWDCG). Only the storm water stations were retained that had sample values greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Separate maps were created for each analyte showing the sub-watersheds, the PRSs over background, and the storm water stations greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the

  7. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on local site related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammon, K.M.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom, adjacent to an existing nuclear power station. The CEGB evidence to the Inquiry on local site related issues begins by setting the proposed development within the context of local authority planning policies for the area. The implications of the development in terms of overall land needs, construction, access, buildings and works both temporary and permanent, are described. Environmental impacts, aesthetic and socio-economic factors are considered including possible effects on agriculture, nature conservation, water supply, transport and employment. (UK)

  8. Relationship between regional planning and site finding of power stations with regard to energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, I.

    1980-01-01

    Based on the discussion on energy policy generally brought in the fore, spatial relationships are discussed especially in the field of electricity supply. A review is given of the legal systematism in which electricity supply and regional planning are to be found. How state planners organize the provision with sites for high-capacity thermal power stations is described as the concrete development of systematic legal relationships, concepts of, and opportunities for, state and regional planning. In the main part, this paper focusses on the analysis of the course of development power station construction and the distribution system have taken with regard to the question as to whether and to what extent this technological character is also responsible for an emerging structure in which these plants are mainly centred in a special region. (orig.) [de

  9. Different methods of informing the public on projected sites of nuclear generating stations. Results in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taccoen, L.B.C.

    1977-01-01

    The situation in France of local public opinion concerning nuclear power stations is very different, according to the region in question. It seems that in industrialized regions, where the inhabitants are already familiar with nuclear energy, public opinion is much more open to the installation of new reactors. In regions which are only slightly industrialized, however, the prejudices of the population against nuclear energy can be very strong. This situation is quite serious because it could lead to an even greater widening of the development gap between various regions in France. Electricite de France has thus been led to develop a program of public information concerning the problems of nuclear energy. In practice, this program consists of: a policy of active presence in meeting and debates as well as at the actual site; eventual opening of information centers; and organization of visists of existing nuclear power stations [fr

  10. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    A refueling machine is disclosed having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images. 11 figs

  11. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

    1998-12-15

    A refueling machine is disclosed having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images. 11 figs.

  12. Moved range monitor of a refueling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Masaaki; Sakanaka, Tadao; Kayano, Hiroyuki.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To incorporate light receiving and emitting elements in a face monitor to thereby increase accuracy and reliability to facilitate handling in the refueling of a BWR power plant. Constitution: In the present invention, a refueling machine and a face monitoring light receiving and emitting elements are analogously coupled whereby the face monitoring light receiving and emitting elements may be moved so as to be analogous to a route along which the refueling machine has moved. A shielding plate is positioned in the middle of the light receiving and emitting elements, and the shielding plate is machined so as to be outside of action. The range of action of the refueling machine may be monitored depending on the light receiving state of the light receiving element. Since the present invention utilizes the permeating light as described above, it is possible to detect positions more accurately than the mechanical switch. In addition, the detection section is of the non-contact system and the light receiving element comprises a hot cell, and therefore the service life is extended and the reliability is high. (Nakamura, S.)

  13. Ichthyoplankton entrainment at Wylfa power station, Anglesey and implications for a further siting proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, C.H.; Rogers, S.I.

    1989-07-01

    A 12 month survey of ichthyoplankton in the cooling water system of Wylfa Power Station and the surrounding 40 km 2 of sea, was carried out between October 1986 and September 1987. The larvae of 31 species and the eggs of 8 species were identified in the survey. Samples taken from the cooling water system and by boat from offshore were largely similar in respect of species diversity and density. Estimates of annual losses due to entrainment are given both in terms of immediate losses and consequential losses of adults to the population. Estimates of losses of six commercially exploited species are considered in terms of loss to the commercial fishery. Assuming the 'worst case' of a 100% mortality of eggs and larvae passing through the cooling system, losses of ichthyoplankton due to entrainment at the existing 'magnox' nuclear power station at Wylfa Point are small and could have no significant adverse effect on fish populations of those species entrained. The operation of the proposed 'pressurised water reactor' nuclear power station on the same site would increase losses by up to 100%. Such an increase would still not alter the existing situation. No significant adverse effect is likely. (author)

  14. Management of individual and collective dosimetry at Fessenheim nuclear plant. Evaluation after refueling shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, D.; Waller, A.

    1980-01-01

    The principle of dosimetry management chosen by Fessenheim nuclear power station was originally consisted of two phases: - an automatic acquisition of individual doses realized by stylodosimeter readers; - a deferred data processing by computer. The whole system has not been used during the shutdown for the first refuelling of unit number one in view of encountered difficulties with perfecting of automatic readers prototype, this last phase has been replaced by a manual acquisition of doses. The dosimetry data processing has two main objects: - supervision of individual dosimetry for people who work in the nuclear power station; - knowledge of doses assigned for each working and equipment. Moreover, a first dosimetric result of the shutdown for refuelling of unit number one, enables to notice the workings which doses are the most important and written in percentage of total doses: regulatory controls: about 19%; - steam generators working: 16%; - working decontamination and making health physics screen (lock chamber) 10% [fr

  15. Recent Experience Using Active Love Wave Techniques to Characterize Seismographic Station Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. J.; Yong, A.; Salomone, L.

    2014-12-01

    Active-source Love waves recorded by the multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASLW) technique were recently analyzed in two site characterization projects. Between 2010 and 2011, the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded GEOVision to conduct geophysical investigations at 189 seismographic stations—185 in California and 4 in the Central Eastern U.S. (CEUS). The original project plan was to utilize active and passive Rayleigh wave-based techniques to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a minimum depth of 30 m and the time-averaged VS of the upper 30 meters (VS30). Early in the investigation it became evident that Rayleigh wave techniques, such as multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASRW), were not effective at characterizing all sites. Shear-wave seismic refraction and MASLW techniques were therefore applied. The MASLW technique was deployed at a total of 38 sites, in addition to other methods, and used as the primary technique to characterize 22 sites, 5 of which were also characterized using Rayleigh wave techniques. In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute funded characterization of 33 CEUS station sites. Based on experience from the ARRA investigation, both MASRW and MASLW data were acquired by GEOVision at 24 CEUS sites—the remaining 9 sites and 2 overlapping sites were characterized by University of Texas, Austin. Of the 24 sites characterized by GEOVision, 16 were characterized using MASLW data, 4 using both MASLW and MASRW data and 4 using MASRW data. Love wave techniques were often found to perform better, or at least yield phase velocity data that could be more readily modeled using the fundamental mode assumption, at shallow rock sites, sites with steep velocity gradients, and, sites with a thin, low velocity, surficial soil layer overlying stiffer sediments. These types of velocity structure often excite dominant higher modes in Rayleigh wave data, but not in Love wave data. At such sites, it may be possible

  16. On Power Refueling Management of HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Furui; Luo Yong; Gao Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The refueling management is an important work of nuclear power plant , directly affecting its safety and economy. At present, the ordinary commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has developed more mature in the refueling management, and formed a set of relatively complete system and methods.The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Pebble-modules Demonstration Project(HTR-PM) has significant differences with the ordinary PWR nuclear power plant in the fuel morphology and the refueling mode. It adopts the spherical fuel element and the on-power refueling. Therefore, the HTR-PM refueling management has its own unique characteristics, but currently there is no mature experience to use for reference across the world. This paper gives a brief introduction to the HTR-PM on power refueling management, including the refueling management system construction, the refueling strategy, the fuel element internal transportation,charging and discharging, etc. It aims at finding the befitting HTR-PM refueling management methods in view of its own unique characteristics in order to ensure the orderly development of the refueling management and the refueling safety. (author)

  17. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development.

  18. BWR Servicing and Refueling Improvement Program: Phase I summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.R.

    1978-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship, General Electric Co. (GE) undertook a study of boiling water reactor (BWR) refueling outages for the purpose of recommending the development and demonstration of critical path time savings improvements. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) joined the study as a subcontractor, providing monitoring assistance and making the Browns Ferry Site available for improvement demonstrations. Agreement was also reached with Georgia Power Co., Power Authority of the State of New York, and Commonwealth Edison Co. for monitoring and data collection at Hatch 1, FitzPatrick, and Quad Cities 1 nuclear plants, respectively. The objective was to identify, develop, and demonstrate improved refueling, maintenance, and inspection procedures and equipment. The improvements recommended in this study are applicable to BWR nuclear plants currently in operation as well as those in the design and construction phases. The recommendations and outage information can be used as a basis to plan and conduct the first outages of new plants and to improve the planning and facilities of currently operating plants. Many of the recommendations can readily be incorporated in plants currently in the design and construction phases as well as in the design of future plants. Many of these recommended improvements can be implemented immediately by utilities without further technical development

  19. Refueling system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschkin, J.N.; Ordynskij, G.V.; Schchijan, C.G.; Schapkin, A.F.; Fadeev, A.I.; Laptev, F.V.; Batjukov, V.I.; Korolkov, K.I.; Borodin, I.V.; Tschernomordik, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    With the refueling system fuel elements are transferred from the intermediate distributing chamber within the fast breeder reactor vessel to the storage tanks for new and irradiated fuel elements outside of the reactor vessel and vice versa. It consists of a hermetic chamber, filled with inert gas, within which the refueling machine, having got a vertical swing pipe, is placed. On the swing pipe there is mounted by means of a bracket a hanging support tube for a tube manipulator that can be moved over the openings to the fuel elements. At the end of the tube manipulator there is a gripping device whose drive mechanism is arranged within the support tube. The swing pipe is moved by means of a drive mechanism outside of the chamber. (DG) [de

  20. Aerial Refueling Boom/Receptacle Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Collision Beacon 22 9.6.2 Tanker Identity Platform Illumination 22 9.6.3 Formation Lights 22 9.6.4 Tanker/Receiver Aircraft...unlatch the receptacle door lock system, mechanical, electrical or hydraulic. Some airplanes will have a master refuel switch which energizes the...some receiver aircraft, pulling the manual door control handle to the detented “DOOR OPEN” position will release the receptacle door lock and

  1. Study of atmospheric stagnation, recirculation, and ventilation potential at Narora Atomic Power Station site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Kumar, Avinash; Kumar, Vimal; Rao, K.S.; Kumar, Jaivender; Ravi, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Atmosphere is an important pathway to be considered in assessment of the environmental impact of radioactivity releases from nuclear facilities. Estimation of concentration of released effluents in air and possible ground contamination needs an understanding of relevant atmospheric dispersion. This article describes the meteorological characteristics of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) site by using the integral parameters developed by Allwine and Whiteman. Meteorological data measured during the period 2006-2010 were analyzed. The integral quantities related to the occurrence of stagnation, recirculation, and ventilation characteristics were studied for NAPS site to assess the dilution potential of the atmosphere. Wind run and recirculation factors were calculated for a 24-h transport time using 5 years of hourly surface measurements of wind speed and direction. The occurrence of stagnation, recirculation, and ventilation characteristics during 2006-2010 at NAPS site is observed to be 33.8% of the time, 19.5% of the time, and 34.7% of the time, respectively. The presence of strong winds with predominant wind direction NW and WNW during winter and summer seasons leads to higher ventilation (48.1% and 44.3%) and recirculation (32.6% of the summer season). The presence of light winds and more dispersed winds during prewinter season with predominant wind directions W and WNW results in more stagnation (59.7% of the prewinter season). Thus, this study will serve as an essential meteorological tool to understand the transport mechanism of atmospheric radioactive effluent releases from any nuclear industry. (author)

  2. The activities of the IAEA in nuclear power station site studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farges, L.

    1980-01-01

    This short review of IAEA activities in nuclear power station site studies gives the impression of a multiform action of unequal importance according to the projects and geographically very dispersed. It should be realised that the Agency does not possess the initiative in the development of this action and is dependent upon its member states for the preparation and finalizing of programmes, and it cannot undertake studies on the spot without the formal request of the state concerned. Furthermore, it does not have limitless means and a selection is made among the requests from the various member states which sometimes takes into account criteria other than those of a scientific or technical nature [fr

  3. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling

  4. Fire protection devices in the controlled region of GKN nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, S.; Grauf, E.

    1976-01-01

    In the GKN nuclear power station ('Neckar reactor'), an 805 MW PWR reactor whose start-up is scheduled for the near future, fire protection measures have been realized that go far beyond those realized in other German nuclear power stations until now. One of the main reasons is that the authorities have been sensibilized by a fire in the refuelling cavity during construction and by the Browns Ferry fire and are therefore extremely thorough in their examination. Further subsections have been added to the fire prevention sections in order to provide better quenching devices for potential fire sites. (orig./AK) [de

  5. Nuclear power station siting experience in the United Kingdom: past and present and proposals for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, T.P.; Usher, E.F.F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Foremost of the many factors in site selection considerations are population distribution, cooling-water availability and amenity. Others are safety of potable water sources, geological stability and the risk of external hazards. Where cooling-water supplies are a limiting factor, the choica of reactor system is of major importance. To determine as early as possible the effect a station might have on its environment, desk studies, visual surveys and wind-tunnel tests are carried out. The Central Electricity Generating Board places great importance on obtaining the fullest degree of acceptance by the public for its nuclear stations and ensures that full consultation is provided with the relevant authorities at all stages of power-station development. It also provides public exhibitions, public meetings and liaison with the local inhabitants. Recruitment of station staff where possible from the immediate area of the station and formation of sports and social clubs are two of the practical steps which help to integrate the station into the local community. Whilst the current energy crisis has reinforced the need for a substantial nuclear programme, possible ways of further reducing the impact of nuclear stations on the environment are being considered. The paper concludes that sufficient nuclear sites can be provided for future needs but that continuing effort will be required to ensure public acceptance. (author)

  6. Determination of NEHRP Site Class of Seismic Recording Stations in the Northwest Himalayas and Its Adjoining Area Using HVSR Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinarayan, N. H.; Kumar, Abhishek

    2018-01-01

    Local site characteristics play an important role in controlling the damage pattern during earthquakes (EQs). These site characteristics may vary from simple to complex and can be estimated by various field tests. In addition, extended Nakamura's method, which uses horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) based on available EQ records also available for site class (SC) determination. In this study, SCs for 90 recording stations which are maintained by Program for Excellence in Strong Motion Studies (PESMOS), located in the northwestern Himalayas and the adjoining areas are determined using extended Nakamura's technique. Average HVSR curves obtained at majority of the recording stations are found matching with the existing literature. Predominant frequency ( f peak) from average HVSR curve at each recording station is then used for the determination of SC. Original SC given by PESMOS is purely based on geology and not based on comprehensive soil investigation exercise. In this study, the SC, which is based on the average HVSR curves is found matching with SC given by PESMOS for a majority of recording stations. However, for considerable number of recording stations, a mismatch is also found which is consistent with the existing literature. In addition, SC based on National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) scheme is proposed based on f peak for all the 90 recording stations.

  7. Site preparation and excavation works for the foundation of station main building among construction works for No. 1 unit in Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Pwer Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueyama, Koreyasu

    1982-01-01

    Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., is planning the nuclear power station of final capacity 8,000 MW (7 units) in the region spread over Kashiwazaki City and Kariwa Village in Niigata Prefecture. For No. 1 unit (1100 MWe BWR), the reactor installation license was obtained in September, 1977, the site preparation and road construction started in April, 1978, and harbour construction works started in August, 1979. The construction works are now at the peak, and the overall progressing rate as of the end of June, 1982, is about 51 %. The site is a hilly region of dune along the coast of the Sea of Japan, and No. 1 unit is located in the southern part of the site. This paper reports on the outline of the project, site preparation and excavation works for the foundation of the station main building. For the site preparation and the excavation works for the foundation the main building, the shape of slope cutting, the design of landslide-preventing wall for the vertical excavation for the reactor complex building, and the construction plan and the result are reported. For underground water impermeable wall works, its outline, groundwater condition, groundwater simulation analysis, the investigation of wall installation, the wall structure and construction are described in detail. Also the outline of the control of slope face measurement, the control standards and the measured results are reported. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. Site preparation and excavation works for the foundation of station main building among construction works for No. 1 unit in Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueyama, Koreyasu [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan)

    1982-09-01

    Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., is planning the nuclear power station of final capacity 8,000 MW (7 units) in the region spread over Kashiwazaki City and Kariwa Village in Niigata Prefecture. For No. 1 unit (1100 MWe BWR), the reactor installation license was obtained in September, 1977, the site preparation and road construction started in April, 1978, and harbour construction works started in August, 1979. The construction works are now at the peak, and the overall progressing rate as of the end of June, 1982, is about 51 %. The site is a hilly region of dune along the coast of the Sea of Japan, and No. 1 unit is located in the southern part of the site. This paper reports on the outline of the project, site preparation and excavation works for the foundation of the station main building. For the site preparation and the excavation works for the foundation the main building, the shape of slope cutting, the design of landslide-preventing wall for the vertical excavation for the reactor complex building, and the construction plan and the result are reported. For underground water impermeable wall works, its outline, groundwater condition, groundwater simulation analysis, the investigation of wall installation, the wall structure and construction are described in detail. Also the outline of the control of slope face measurement, the control standards and the measured results are reported.

  9. The network architecture and site test of DCIS in Lungmen nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C. K.

    2006-01-01

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Station (LMNPS) is located in North-Eastern Seashore of Taiwan. LMNPP has two units. Each unit generates 1350 Megawatts. It is the first ABWR Plant in Taiwan and is under-construction now. Due to contractual arrangement, there are seven large I and C suppliers/designers, which are GE NUMAC, DRS, Invensys, GEIS, Hitachi, MHI, and Stone and Webster company. The Distributed Control and Information System (DCIS) in Lungmen are fully integrated with the state-of-the-art computer and network technology. General Electric is the leading designer for integration of DCIS. This paper presents Network Architecture and the Site Test of DCIS. The network architectures are follows. GE NUMAC System adopts the point to point architecture, DRS System adopts Ring type architecture with SCRAMNET protocol, Inevnsys system adopts IGiga Byte Backbone mesh network with Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, GEIS adopts Ethernet network with EGD protocol, Hitachi adopts ring type network with proprietary protocol. MHI adopt Ethernet network with UDP. The data-links are used for connection between different suppliers. The DCIS architecture supports the plant automation, the alarm prioritization and alarm suppression, and uniform MMI screen for entire plant. The Test Program regarding the integration of different network architectures and Initial DCIS architecture Setup for 161KV Energization will be discussed. Test tool for improving site test schedule, and lessons learned from FAT will be discussed too. And conclusions are at the end of this paper. (authors)

  10. The network architecture and site test of DCIS in Lungmen nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. K. [Instrument and Control Section, Lungmen Nuclear Power Station, Taiwan Power Company, Taipei County Taiwan (China)

    2006-07-01

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Station (LMNPS) is located in North-Eastern Seashore of Taiwan. LMNPP has two units. Each unit generates 1350 Megawatts. It is the first ABWR Plant in Taiwan and is under-construction now. Due to contractual arrangement, there are seven large I and C suppliers/designers, which are GE NUMAC, DRS, Invensys, GEIS, Hitachi, MHI, and Stone and Webster company. The Distributed Control and Information System (DCIS) in Lungmen are fully integrated with the state-of-the-art computer and network technology. General Electric is the leading designer for integration of DCIS. This paper presents Network Architecture and the Site Test of DCIS. The network architectures are follows. GE NUMAC System adopts the point to point architecture, DRS System adopts Ring type architecture with SCRAMNET protocol, Inevnsys system adopts IGiga Byte Backbone mesh network with Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, GEIS adopts Ethernet network with EGD protocol, Hitachi adopts ring type network with proprietary protocol. MHI adopt Ethernet network with UDP. The data-links are used for connection between different suppliers. The DCIS architecture supports the plant automation, the alarm prioritization and alarm suppression, and uniform MMI screen for entire plant. The Test Program regarding the integration of different network architectures and Initial DCIS architecture Setup for 161KV Energization will be discussed. Test tool for improving site test schedule, and lessons learned from FAT will be discussed too. And conclusions are at the end of this paper. (authors)

  11. Performance Analyses of Renewable and Fuel Power Supply Systems for Different Base Station Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Lorincz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Base station sites (BSSs powered with renewable energy sources have gained the attention of cellular operators during the last few years. This is because such “green” BSSs impose significant reductions in the operational expenditures (OPEX of telecom operators due to the possibility of on-site renewable energy harvesting. In this paper, the green BSSs power supply system parameters detected through remote and centralized real time sensing are presented. An implemented sensing system based on a wireless sensor network enables reliable collection and post-processing analyses of many parameters, such as: total charging/discharging current of power supply system, battery voltage and temperature, wind speed, etc. As an example, yearly sensing results for three different BSS configurations powered by solar and/or wind energy are discussed in terms of renewable energy supply (RES system performance. In the case of powering those BSS with standalone systems based on a fuel generator, the fuel consumption models expressing interdependence among the generator load and fuel consumption are proposed. This has allowed energy-efficiency comparison of the fuel powered and RES systems, which is presented in terms of the OPEX and carbon dioxide (CO2 reductions. Additionally, approaches based on different BSS air-conditioning systems and the on/off regulation of a daily fuel generator activity are proposed and validated in terms of energy and capital expenditure (CAPEX savings.

  12. Investigating attitudes to hydrogen refuelling facilities and the social cost to local residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Garra, Tanya; Mourato, Susana; Pearson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Vehicles fuelled by hydrogen (H 2 ) have attracted increasing attention because of their potentially enhanced environmental profiles. Their penetration into the vehicle stock will be influenced by the spread of refuelling facilities. This study investigates local attitudes towards the proposed installation of H 2 storage facilities at existing refuelling stations throughout London. Using multinomial logit analysis, we identify the determinants of attitudes. Results suggest that residents living very close to a proposed H 2 facility are less likely to be opposed than residents living 200-500 m away. Opposition appears to be determined by a lack of trust in safety regulations, non-environmental attitudes, and concerns about the existing local refuelling station. The social cost to local residents of a local H 2 storage facility was estimated using a method developed by Atkinson et al. [2004. 'Amenity' or 'eyesore'? Negative willingness to pay for options to replace electricity transmission towers. Applied Economics Letters 11(4), 203-208], which elicits the amount of time respondents are willing to commit to oppose a new facility development. Using the leisure rate of time, the social cost is estimated at just under Pounds 14 per local opposed resident. Add to this the WTP to support opposition efforts by a local group, and the value comes to just under Pounds 25 per opposed resident

  13. Improvement of availability of PWR nuclear plants through the reduction of the time required for refueling/maintenance outages, Phase 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.A.

    1978-08-01

    The objective of this project is to identify improvements in procedures and equipment which will reduce the time required for refueling/maintenance outages at PWR nuclear power plants. The outage of Commonwealth Edison Zion Station Unit 1 in March through May of 1976 was evaluated to identify those items which caused delays and those work activities that offer the potential for significant improvements toward reducing its overall duration. Thus, the plant's availability for power production would be increased. Revisions in procedures and some equipment modifications were implemented and evaluated during the Zion Unit 2 refueling/maintenance outage beginning in January 1977. Analysis of the observed data has identified benefits available through improved refueling equipment and also areas where additional new, innovative refueling, or refueling-related equipment should be beneficial. A number of specific design concepts are recommended as a result of Phase 1. In addition, a new master planning mechanism is described for implementation during subsequent planned outages at Zion Station. This final report describes the recommended conceptual designs and planning mechanism and assesses their impact upon future outages. Their effect on savings in refueling time, labor, and radiation exposure is discussed. The estimated economic payoff for these concepts was found to be of such significance that an additional phase of the program is warranted. During this extended phase, a more detailed engineering study should be undertaken to determine the cost of implementation along with more specific estimates of the benefits for PWR plants already in operation or under construction

  14. Refueling system for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, B.C.

    1980-05-01

    Criteria specifically related to the handling of Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) fuel are briefly reviewed, and the most significant requirements with which the refueling system must comply are discussed. Each component of the refueling system is identified, and a functional description of the fuel handling machine is presented. An illustrated operating sequence describing the various functions involved in a typical refueling cycle is presented. The design status of components and subsystems selected for conceptual development is reviewed, and anticipated refueling time frames are given

  15. Net community production and metabolic balance at the oligotrophic ocean site, station ALOHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    le B. Williams, Peter J.; Morris, Paul J.; Karl, David M.

    2004-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that in oligotrophic areas of the ocean respiration exceeds production, a 12-month study was undertaken of in vitro-determined net oxygen production and consumption in the top 150 m of the water column at the extreme oligotrophic site, Station ALOHA, in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. Throughout the year the water column was observed to be in metabolic deficit, the calculated cumulative shortfall being 9±1.7 mol O2 m-2 a-1 (approximately 100 g C m-2 a-1), an amount equivalent to 40% of measured production (annual estimated rates of production and consumption were, respectively, 22 and 31 mol O2 m-2 a-1). We consider three possible explanations for the observed deficit: the in vitro oxygen rate measurements, in themselves, are fundamentally flawed and should be discounted, the observations are correct and the observed deficit is a true account of the balance of oxygen (and organic carbon) at Station ALOHA, or the observations are correct as they stand, but need not be interpreted as organic carbon imbalance for that ecosystem. We find no error unique to the oxygen rate measurements themselves. We find also no evidence that the associated organic carbon deficit can be sustained over the long-term by internal organic reserves or by external subsidy. Accordingly we accept the geochemical findings that calculated in situ oxygen flux requires the euphotic zone of the water column at this site to be slightly (circa 2 mol C m-2 a-1) autotrophic, in contrast to the simple analysis of our observations which gives a net heterotrophic water column. We discuss a number of processes that may give rise to the observed discrepancy. In part it may derive from the difficulty of reproducing the variations in the light field experienced by an algal cell due to vertical advection. It may also derive from the intermittency of production. This latter effect would manifest itself in the following manner. Because of its universal distribution in the food web

  16. On the refuelling of large divertor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Haas, G.; Ott, W.; Speth, E.

    1976-01-01

    The use of fast hydrogen atoms, molecules and clusters for refuelling large divertor-experiments like ASDEX is investigated. Three criteria for the choice among the various methods are discussed. It is shown that clusters suffer from lack of penetration. Molecules, created by fragmentation of clusters, offer the advantage of plasma-like energy combined with appreciable penetration. Large penetration and high ionization efficiency can only be achieved at energies for above the plasma temperature with H 0 -atoms of several tens of keV

  17. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, Michael M.; Lau, Louis K.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  18. Seismic velocity site characterization of 10 Arizona strong-motion recording stations by spectral analysis of surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert E.; Carkin, Brad A.; Corbett, Skye C.

    2017-10-19

    Vertical one-dimensional shear wave velocity (VS) profiles are presented for strong-motion sites in Arizona for a suite of stations surrounding the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The purpose of the study is to determine the detailed site velocity profile, the average velocity in the upper 30 meters of the profile (VS30), the average velocity for the entire profile (VSZ), and the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classification. The VS profiles are estimated using a non-invasive continuous-sine-wave method for gathering the dispersion characteristics of surface waves. Shear wave velocity profiles were inverted from the averaged dispersion curves using three independent methods for comparison, and the root-mean-square combined coefficient of variation (COV) of the dispersion and inversion calculations are estimated for each site.

  19. Industrial hygiene survey report of Millstone Nuclear Power Station No. 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaebst, D.D.; Herrick, R.

    1985-11-01

    Personal and area air samples were analyzed for total dust, organic solvent vapors, and metals during spray, brush, and roller painting and paint removal operations at Millstone Nuclear Power Station Number 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut, March 1981. Solvent exposures were generally well below their relevant standards. Total dust exposures during paint removal ranged up to 1,000 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) in the containment building. The OSHA standard for total dust is 15mg/m3. Exposures to lead dusts exceeded the OSHA standard of 0.05mg/m3 in the turbine, auxiliary, and containment buildings. Chromium exposures were generally below the OSHA standard of 1mg/m3, except for 2.4mg/m3 in a personal sample taken during paint removal in the containment building. Very few engineering controls other than 3M single use respirators were observed. The authors note that the chromium exposure data is difficult to interpret as the form of the chromium is not known. If the chromium existed as hexavalent chromium exposure was excessive. The authors conclude that in view of the measured exposures to total dust, lead, and chromium, engineering controls and respiratory protection are inadequate. Recommendations include implementing better controls and respiratory protection

  20. 76 FR 79228 - Combined Licenses at William States Lee III Nuclear Station Site, Units 1 and 2; Duke Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 52-018 and 52-019; NRC-2008-0170] Combined Licenses at William States Lee III Nuclear Station Site, Units 1 and 2; Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear.... SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Army Corps...

  1. Refueling strategy at the Budapest research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargitai, Timor

    1998-01-01

    Refueling strategy is very important for nuclear power plants and for highly utilized research reactors with power level in the megawatt range. New core design shall fulfill several demands and needs which can contradict each other sometimes. The loaded uranium quantity should assure the scheduled operation time (energy generation) and the maneuvering capability even at the end of the campaign. On the other hand the built in excess reactivity cannot be too high, because otherwise it would jeopardize the shutdown margin and reactor safety. Moreover the core arrangement should be optimum for in-core irradiation purposes and for the beam port experiments too. Sometimes this demand can be in contradiction with the desired burnup level. The achieved burnup level is very important from the fresh fuel consumption point of view, which has direct economic significance, however the generated spent fuel quantity is an important issue too. The refueling technique presented here allowed us at the Budapest Research Reactor to reach average burnup levels superseding 60%. (author)

  2. Information on the technical site visit to the primary seismic station in Nairobi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kianji, G.; Nyali, H.

    2002-01-01

    In 1963 the World Wide Standardized Seismograph Station (WWSSN) was installed at the University of Nairobi (UoN) Department of Geology by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Due to increased background seismic noise as a result of expanding infrastructure, the station was moved to Kilimambogo in 1994 and subsequently upgraded to IRIS digital station by the USGS. On the formation of CTBTO this tunnel type station was upgraded to the CTBTO standards. The system components and utilities are described. Comparison of data transmission through radio link at the University of Nairobi and the central station is provided. A map showing the location of the recent Tanzania earthquake incorporating CTBTO data and that of the local station is included

  3. Proposed Construction of Boulder Seismic Station Monitoring Sites, Boulder, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    boreholes at the Boulder Seismic Station for research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) as part of the U.S. Nuclear Treaty monitoring...14 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Location of the proposed Boulder Seismic Station, borehole locations and associated buffers...juncture of Spring Creek and Scab Creek Road (Figure 1). Currently, the Boulder Seismic Station has a 13-element array of seismometers on the property

  4. Algological studies on the site of the Fessenheim nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Systematic study of the algal flora at five stations situated on both sides of the nuclear power station at Fessenheim (department of Haut-Rhin, France). The analysis of the diatomaceae populations in 1977 and 1978, i.e. before and after the start of the reactors, does not indicate, in the composition and abundance of algae, any modifications susceptible to be directly connected to the implantation of the nuclear power station [fr

  5. Evaluating meteorological data from weather stations, and from satellites and global models for a multi-site epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colston, Josh M; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mahopo, Cloupas; Kang, Gagandeep; Kosek, Margaret; de Sousa Junior, Francisco; Shrestha, Prakash Sunder; Svensen, Erling; Turab, Ali; Zaitchik, Benjamin

    2018-04-21

    Longitudinal and time series analyses are needed to characterize the associations between hydrometeorological parameters and health outcomes. Earth Observation (EO) climate data products derived from satellites and global model-based reanalysis have the potential to be used as surrogates in situations and locations where weather-station based observations are inadequate or incomplete. However, these products often lack direct evaluation at specific sites of epidemiological interest. Standard evaluation metrics of correlation, agreement, bias and error were applied to a set of ten hydrometeorological variables extracted from two quasi-global, commonly used climate data products - the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) and Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) - to evaluate their performance relative to weather-station derived estimates at the specific geographic locations of the eight sites in a multi-site cohort study. These metrics were calculated for both daily estimates and 7-day averages and for a rotavirus-peak-season subset. Then the variables from the two sources were each used as predictors in longitudinal regression models to test their association with rotavirus infection in the cohort after adjusting for covariates. The availability and completeness of station-based validation data varied depending on the variable and study site. The performance of the two gridded climate models varied considerably within the same location and for the same variable across locations, according to different evaluation criteria and for the peak-season compared to the full dataset in ways that showed no obvious pattern. They also differed in the statistical significance of their association with the rotavirus outcome. For some variables, the station-based records showed a strong association while the EO-derived estimates showed none, while for others, the opposite was true. Researchers wishing to utilize publicly available climate data

  6. Siting of Carsharing Stations Based on Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation: A Case Study of Shanghai EVCARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carsharing is one of the effective ways to relieve the problems of traffic jams, parking difficulties, and air pollution. In recent years, the numbers of carsharing services and their members have remarkably increased around the world. The project of electric carsharing in Shanghai, called EVCARD, has also developed rapidly with very large demand and supply. Aiming to determine the optimal locations of future stations of the EVCARD, this research employs a novel method combining the analytic hierarchy process (AHP and geographical information system (GIS with big data. Potential users, potential travel demand, potential travel purposes, and distance from existing stations are selected as the decision criteria. A siting decision system is established, consisting of 15 evaluation indicators which are calculated from multi-source data on mobile phones, taxi trajectory, point of interests (POI, and the EVCARD operation. The method of the AHP is used to determine the indicator weights, and the “Spatial Analyst” tool of ArcGIS is adopted to generate the indicator values for every 1 km × 1 km decision unit. Finally, synthetic scores are calculated to evaluate the candidate sites of EVCARD stations. The results of the case study verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, which can provide a more scientific and feasible method for carsharing operators to site stations, avoiding aimless and random decisions.

  7. The achievement of on-load refuelling at Heysham 2 and Torness AGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterland, P.R.; MacPherson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Heysham 2 and Torness are the last of the advanced gas cooled reactors constructed for the Central Electricity Generating Board and the South of Scotland Electricity Board. They are now operated by Nuclear Electric (NE) and Scottish Nuclear Limited (SNL), respectively. They were designed for on-load refuelling at high power and, being based on the design used for Hinkley Point B and Hunterston B, have benefited from experience at these stations. This paper examines the analysis work which was carried out in order to provide a sound, long-term, mainly probabilistic safety case which supports on-load refuelling. A significant problem has been that the design reliability of the microprocessor-based control and protection systems, used for the fuel route, could not be justified, and a number of changes to the overall protection system have had to be introduced to compensate for this. The safety assessment has covered the fuelling machine pressure boundary, the hoist and fuel assembly components, possible faults and the protection which is necessary to prevent them, the fuel and fuelling machine cooling requirements, the mechanical and radiological consequences of dropping fuel, and the effect of refuelling transients on the reactor and conventional plant. The resultant safety case complies with the stringent safety standards adopted by NE and SNL and accepted by the UK safety authority, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). (author)

  8. New safety standards of nuclear power station with no requirements of site evaluation. No public dose limit published with possible inappropriateness of reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takitani, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Regulation Authority was preparing new safety standards in order to aim at starting safety reviews of existing nuclear power station in July 2013. This article commented on issues of major accident, which was defined as severely damaged core event. Accumulated dose at the site boundary of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station totaled to about 234 mSv on March just after the accident with rare gas of 500 PBq, iodine 131 of 500 PBq, cesium 134 of 10 PBq and cesium 137 of 10 PBq released to the atmosphere, which was beyond 100 mSv. As measures for preventing containment vessel failure after core severely damaged, filtered venting system was required to be installed for low radiological risk to the public. However filter was not effective to rare gas. Accumulated doses at the site boundary of several nuclear power stations after filtered venting with 100% release of rare gas could be estimated to be 2-37 Sv mostly depending on the site condition, which might be surely greater than 100 mSv. Omitting site evaluation for major accident, which was beyond design basis accident, was great concern. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Control Room Tasks During Refueling in Ringhals 1 Nuclear Power Plant - Operator performance during refuelling outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroebeck, Einar; Olausson, Jesper; Van Gemst, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance and tasks of the operators in the control room during refuelling outages. Analyses of such events have, during the last years, shown that the risk for nuclear accidents is not negligible compared with the risk at higher reactor power levels. Some experts have the opinion that, due to mistakes during an outage, the risk for such accidents during the outage and other accidents later on during power operation is higher than in other plant situations. The high risk level is mainly a result of errors at maintenance actions and supervision of lining up of safety systems. Most of the control rooms in existing NPPs were designed more than 10 years ago. At that time the activities and the tasks for the operators were not very well understood. Procedures for refuelling and other activities during the outages were not described very well. Often the utility organisation for refuelling outages was not established at the start of the control room design. Experience from operation during many years has shown that the performance of operators can be improved in existing plant, and thus risks be reduced, by upgrading the control room. These issues have been studied as a part of the modernisation project for Ringhals 1, an ABB Atom BWR owned by Vattenfall AB in Sweden. The paper will describe the working model for upgrading the control room and important issues to take care of with respect to refuelling outages. The identified issues will be used as the input for improving control room philosophy and the individual technical systems. (authors)

  10. Refueling outage data collection and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harshaw, K.; Quilliam, J.; Brinsfield, W.; Jeffries, J.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of an EPRI project to compile an industry generic refueling outage database applicable to alternate (non-full-power) modes of shutdown conditions at nuclear power plants. The project team evaluated five outages at two BWR plants. They obtained data primarily from control room logs, outage schedules, incident reports, and licensee event reports. The team organized the data by outage segment and time line. Due to its small sample size, this study produced no conclusive results related to initiating event frequencies, equipment failure rates, or human reliability estimates during shutdown conditions. However, it pointed out the problems of brief or inconsistent recordkeeping. A too brief record results in difficulty determining if the root cause of an event was mechanical or the result of human performance. Retrieval of data can be difficult and labor-intensive. There is a clear need for better, more comprehensive documentation

  11. Field testing of behavioral barriers for cooling water intake structures -test site 1 - Pickering Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, P.H.; McKinley, R.S.; Micheletti, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-year research program was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate the effectiveness of selected behavioral systems for fish exclusion at sites representative of different aquatic environments. The first test site was the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) located on Lake Ontario which represented the Great Lakes environment. A single pneumatic popper, a low frequency, high amplitude sound deterrent, was found to effectively exclude adult alewife, the principal species impinged at Pickering NGS. An air bubble curtain, used either alone or combined with strobe lights, was not a consistent deterrent. Effectiveness of air bubbles was only enhanced when used in association with a popper. Strobe lights were the least effective of the three devices tested. Operation of all three devices together did not surpass the effectiveness of the popper when used alone. Sound deterrents show promise for fish exclusion at generating stations located on the Great Lakes

  12. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on on-site radioactive waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passant, F.H.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom. The CEGB evidence to the Inquiry presented here provides information on the on-site management of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes both during station operation and during decommissioning. Estimates are given of current and projected future discharges of liquid and gaseous wastes from the site and packaging and transport arrangements for solid radioactive wastes are described. The framework of waste management policy, disposal strategy and legislation in the United Kingdom which will determine procedure at Hinkley Point ''C'' is given. (UK)

  13. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  14. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. T. Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS, northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking.A clear accumulation mode was observed during the darker months from October until mid-May, which became considerably more pronounced during the prominent Arctic haze months from March to mid-May. In contrast, nucleation- and Aitken-mode particles were predominantly observed during the summer months. Analysis of wind direction and wind speed indicated possible contributions of marine sources from the easterly side of the station to the observed summertime particle number concentrations, while southwesterly to westerly winds dominated during the darker months. NPF events lasting from hours to days were mostly observed from June until August, with fewer events observed during the months with less sunlight, i.e., March, April, September and October. The results tend to indicate that ozone (O3 might be weakly anti-correlated with particle number concentrations of the nucleation-mode range (10–30 nm in almost half of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air mass origin. A map of event occurrence probability was computed, indicating that southerly air masses from over the Greenland Sea were more likely linked to those

  15. Optimization of the overall energy consumption in cascade fueling stations for hydrogen vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    of refueling stations as a function of number of tanks, volume of the tanks and the pressure in the tanks. This is done for a complete refueling cycle. It is found that the energy consumption decreases with the number of tanks approaching an exponential function. The compressor accounts for app. 50......% of the energy consumption. Going from one tank to three tanks gives an energy saving of app. 30%. Adding more than four tanks the energy saving per extra added tank is less than 4%. The optimal numbers of tanks in the cascade system are three or four....... the vehicles. The cascade system at the station has to be refueled as the tank sizes are limited by the high pressures. The process of filling a vehicle and afterward bringing the tanks in refueling station back to same pressures, are called a complete refueling cycle. This study analyzes power consumption...

  16. Hygienic situation in the site of nuclear power stations in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Masatoshi

    1984-01-01

    In the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Station in Fukushima Prefecture, the hygienic statistics for ten years each before and after the start of the power station were compared between the surrounding radiation monitoring area and the reference area without such monitoring, both areas containing populations. There was no difference at all between the two areas. It was thus shown that the nuclear power generation had no adverse effect on the health of the people. The following statistics in both areas concerning the health of the populations are described: external exposure dose, internal exposure sources, whole-body exposure dose, the change of the hygienic state around the power station, the number of deaths and mortality in the areas, the deaths from cancer in the areas, the health of children, the causes of deaths in Fukushima Prefecture. (Mori, K.)

  17. Evaluation of environmental data relating to selected nuclear power plant sites: the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, I.P.

    1976-08-01

    Environmental monitoring data for the years 1973 and 1974 pertaining to the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 1, which began operation in early 1974, were analyzed by the most practical qualitative and quantitative methods. Terrestrial biotic resources were considered for this plant. The effects of the operation of Unit 1 on the local terrestrial organisms were found to be undetectable. Although the plant has not operated long enough to reveal long-term deleterious effects, the present indications do not lead to a concerned prediction that any are developing. The data acquired, method of analysis, and results obtained are presented in detail along with recommendations for improving monitoring techniques

  18. Evaluation of environmental data relating to selected nuclear power plant sites. The Zion Nuclear Power Station site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, I.P.; Policastro, A.; Daniels, E.; Ferrante, J.; Vaslow, F.

    1976-11-01

    Environmental monitoring data for the years 1972 through 1975 pertaining to the Zion Station, which began commercial operation in 1974, were analyzed by the most practical qualitative and quantitative methods. Thermal plume, water chemistry and aquatic biota data were evaluated and the results are presented. The results showed no significant immediate deleterious effects, thus confirming preoperational predictions. Although the plant has not operated long enough to reveal long-term deleterious effects, the present indications do not lead to a concerned prediction that any are developing. The data utilized, the methods of analysis, and the results obtained are presented in detail, along with recommendations for improving monitoring techniques

  19. Tracking of fission products release during refueling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Sharad; Prajapat, M.K.; Vyas, Shyam; Hussain, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    It has been always observed that the release of fission products increase during refueling operations. At RAPP-3 and 4 an attempt has been made to follow-up the change in fission products activity release at each stage of refueling operation and quantification of concentrations of various radionuclides. This exercise was also extended to refueling operation of the channels containing suspected failed fuel. A level of FPNG ( 133 Xe) was observed to increase by a factor of about 10-40 during refueling of failed channel as compared to healthy channel. It can be concluded that by monitoring FPNG levels in exhaust status of the healthiness of spent fuel can be found out. This report discusses in detail the experiment conducted for this purpose. (author)

  20. Continuous atmospheric monitoring of the injected CO2 behavior over geological storage sites using flux stations: latest technologies and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Madsen, Rodney; Feese, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    Flux stations have been widely used to monitor emission rates of CO2 from various ecosystems for climate research for over 30 years [1]. The stations provide accurate and continuous measurements of CO2 emissions with high temporal resolution. Time scales range from 20 times per second for gas concentrations, to 15-minute, hourly, daily, and multi-year periods. The emissions are measured from the upwind area ranging from thousands of square meters to multiple square kilometers, depending on the measurement height. The stations can nearly instantaneously detect rapid changes in emissions due to weather events, as well as changes caused by variations in human-triggered events (pressure leaks, control releases, etc.). Stations can also detect any slow changes related to seasonal dynamics and human-triggered low-frequency processes (leakage diffusion, etc.). In the past, station configuration, data collection and processing were highly-customized, site-specific and greatly dependent on "school-of-thought" practiced by a particular research group. In the last 3-5 years, due to significant efforts of global and regional CO2 monitoring networks (e.g., FluxNet, Ameriflux, Carbo-Europe, ICOS, etc.) and technological developments, the flux station methodology became fairly standardized and processing protocols became quite uniform [1]. A majority of current stations compute CO2 emission rates using the eddy covariance method, one of the most direct and defensible micrometeorological techniques [1]. Presently, over 600 such flux stations are in operation in over 120 countries, using permanent and mobile towers or moving platforms (e.g., automobiles, helicopters, and airplanes). Atmospheric monitoring of emission rates using such stations is now recognized as an effective method in regulatory and industrial applications, including carbon storage [2-8]. Emerging projects utilize flux stations to continuously monitor large areas before and after the injections, to locate and

  1. Aerial Refueling For NATO’s Smart Defence Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Rome: NATO Defense College, 2012, 148. 40 David A. Brown , "NATO Studying Development of Dedicated Refueling Unit Similar to Early Warning Force...accessed March 1, 2012). Brown , David A. "NATO Studying Development of Dedicated Refueling Unit Similar to Early Warning Force." Aviation Week...Aircraft. Coulsdon, Surrey: IHS Global Limited, 2011. Jennings, Gareth . "Nations Pool for NATO C-17A Fleet." Jane’s Defence Weekly, October 2008

  2. Image Dependent Relative Formation Navigation for Autonomous Aerial Refueling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    and local variations of the Earth’s surface make a mathematical model difficult to create and use. The definition of an equipotential surface ...controlled with flight control surfaces attached to it. To refuel using this method, the receiver pilot flies the aircraft to within a defined refueling...I-frame would unnecessarily complicate aircraft navigation that, by definition, is limited to altitudes relatively close to the surface of the Earth

  3. Research on constellation refueling based on formation flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Xu; Feng, Quansheng

    2011-06-01

    A new scheme for refueling satellite constellation is proposed in this paper. Compared with the traditional research, where the satellite refueling is implemented through spacecraft rendezvous and docking, the new pattern studied here is based on formation flying, and it is more feasible, safer and more reliable. On the grounds of the proposed pattern, two refueling strategies are studied. The first is called single supplier refueling (SSR) based on formation flying. In this scenario, one fuel-sufficient satellite called a supplier, departs from its parking orbit, and after a series of orbit maneuvers, arrives at the target constellation that consists of multiple fuel-deficient satellites called workers. It then transfers equal fuel to each worker within the prescribed mission time. The second strategy is called double suppliers refueling (DSR) based on formation flying. This time two suppliers take charge of refueling half of the workers respectively in the same way as SSR. Using a genetic algorithm, the orbit of a supplier with a minimum consumption of fuel can be obtained once the mission time is fixed. Simulation results indicate that DSR is superior to SSR and that this dominance will be more distinct as the number of workers increases and the mission time decreases.

  4. Classifying urban meteorological stations sites by 'local climate zones': Preliminary results for the city of Novi Sad (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Stevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional approach in the investigation of urban climate of Novi Sad has been done through simple urban-rural air temperature differences. These inter-urban air temperature differences showed how much is city warmer than its surroundings, so-called urban heat island (UHI effect. Temperature differences exist inside the city as well. To get to know the intensity of these intra-urban temperature differences, installation of meteorological stations in different parts of the city or mobile measurements are needed. In 2012 started IPA HUSRB project made by Department of Climatology and Landscape Ecology (University of Szeged and Faculty of Sciences (University of Novi Sad. The main goal of this project is the development and installation of wireless urban meteorological network (temperature and relative humidity sensors in Szeged and Novi Sad. Before the deployment of sensors, necessary metadata about each potential urban meteorological station site needs to be collected. Field work, collected metadata and Stewart and Oke climate-based classification system from 2012 were used for defining the potential urban meteorological stations sites on the territory of the city of Novi Sad (Serbia and its surroundings.

  5. Refueling system with small diameter rotatable plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a liquid-metal fastbreeder nuclear reactor comprising a reactor pressure vessel and closure head therefor, a reactor core barrel disposed within the reactor vessel and enclosing a reactor core having therein a large number of closely spaced fuel assemblies, and the reactor core barrel and the reactor core having an approximately concentric circular cross-sectional configuration with a geometric center in predetermined location within the reactor vessel. The improved refueling system described here comprises: a large controllably rotatable plug means comprising the substantial portion of the closure head, a reactor upper internals structure mounted from the large rotatable plug means. The large rotatable plug means has an approximately circular configuration which approximates the cross-sectional configuration of the reactor core barrel with a center of rotation positioned a first predetermined distance from the geometric center of the reactor core barrel so that the large rotatable plug means rotates eccentrically with respect to the reactor core barrel; a small controllably rotatable plug means affixed to the large rotatable plug means and rotatable with respect thereto. The small rotatable plug means has a center of rotation which is offset a second predetermined distance from the rotational center of the large rotatable plug means so that the small rotatable plug means rotates eccentrically with respect to the large rotatable plug means

  6. Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncals, Richard A.; Paik, Nam-Chin; Andre, Sandra V.; Porter, Charles A.; Rathbun, Roy W.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.; Petras, Diane S.

    1989-01-01

    Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

  7. Minimization of green house gases emission by using hybrid energy system for telephony base station site application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nema, Pragya; Rangnekar, Saroj; Nema, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mobile service is a rapidly expanding and a very competitive business worldwide, including developing countries. This paper proposes that the suitable alternative solution of grid power is the stand-alone PV/wind hybrid energy system with diesel generator as a backup for cellular mobile telephony base station site in isolated areas. It is expected that the newly developed and installed system would provide very good opportunities for mobile telephony base station in near future. In addition, protecting the environment and combating climate change are two of the most pressing challenges facing humankind. As energy prices soar, network operators are increasingly scrutinizing their environmental and social responsibilities. This system will be more cost effective and environmental friendly over the conventional diesel generator. Approximately 70-80% fuel cost over conventional diesel generator and the emission of CO 2 and other harmful gasses in environments were reduced. (author)

  8. Validation of physics model of FARE-Tool by comparison of RFSP flux simulations with measurements at discrete refuelling steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shad, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    In CANDU 6 the on-power refuelling is done in the direction of the coolant flow through the channel, flow being in alternate direction in adjacent channels. The channel flow pushes the fuel string (a total of 20 bundles with the 8-bundle fuelling scheme) towards the downstream Fuelling Machine (FM), obviating the need for the upstream FM to insert the rams into the active core to push the fuel. In some channels of the outer core region, however, the coolant flow is low and the hydraulic drag is not enough to push the fuel string. In these channels a Flow Assist Ram Extension (FARE) tool is used during refuelling to augment the flow and hence enhance the hydraulic drag required to push the fuel string. The FARE-Tool is a strong neutron absorber and its use results in a severe local flux depression. During the refuelling process, when the FARE-Tool travels in the immediate vicinity of a Reactor Regulating System (RRS) detector, the spatial control system causes a short-term zone-fill reduction in an attempt to maintain the reference zone powers. This short term zone drain may in turn result in a single channel ROP trip of the SDS l or SDS2 reactor protection system. Therefore, the control room operator is always interested in minimizing the occurrence of this category of trip for obvious economic reasons. The physics modelling of the FARE-Tool used in the 2-neutron-energy-group 3-dimensional diffusion code RFSP is validated by comparing the simulated response of the in-core detectors with the measured response of the same detectors during refuelling. These measurements were recorded during a specially scheduled refuelling of channel B09 at the Point Lepreau Generating Station on 1993 July 6 at 3591 Equivalent Full Power Days (EFPDs). 3 refs., 10 tabs., 1 fig

  9. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-D-3, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station. Attchment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-033

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Decommissioning and demolition of the 132-D-3 site, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1986. Decommissioning included removal of equipment, water, and sludge for disposal as radioactive waste. The at- and below-grade structure was demolished to at least 1 m below grade and the resulting rubble buried in situ. The area was backfilled to grade with at least 1 m of clean fill and contoured to the surrounding terrain. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling

  10. Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) Station and Site Description Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten; Kelly, Mark C.

    As part of the “Wind Atlas for South Africa” project, site inspection trips were carried out by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and Risø DTU in April and June of 2011. A total of 10 sites featuring instrumented 60-m masts were visited; the present report summarises...

  11. Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) Station and Site Description Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten; Kelly, Mark C.

    As part of the “Wind Atlas for South Africa” project, site inspection trips were carried out by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and Risø DTU in April and June of 2011. A total of 10 sites featuring instrumented 60-m masts were visited; the present report summarises...... the findings of the site inspection teams. The main results are descriptions and documentation of the meteorological masts, instruments and site conditions. For each site, the location and magnetic declination have been determined, as well as the sensor boom directions on the mast. Elevation maps have been...... constructed to show the surrounding terrain and photos taken to document the land cover. Finally, the observed wind roses and wind speed distribution as of 1 October 2013 are shown....

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles[mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a)

  13. Installing the earth station of Ka-band satellite frequency in Malaysia: conceptual framework for site decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M. R.; Reba, M. N. M.; Jaw, S. W.; Arsyad, A.; Ibrahim, M. A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper developed a conceptual framework in determining the suitable location in installing the earth station for Ka-band satellite communication in Malaysia. This current evolution of high throughput satellites experienced major challenge due to Malaysian climate. Because Ka-band frequency is highly attenuated by the rainfall; it is an enormous challenge to define the most appropriate site for the static communication. Site diversity, a measure to anticipate this conflict by choosing less attenuated region and geographically change the transmission strategy on season basis require accurate spatio-temporal information on the geographical, environmental and hydro-climatology at local scale. Prior to that request, this study developed a conceptual framework to cater the needs. By using the digital spatial data, acquired from site measurement and remote sensing, the proposed framework applied a multiple criteria analysis to perform the tasks of site selection. With the advancement of high resolution remotely sensed data, site determination can be conducted as in Malaysia; accommodating a new, fast, and effective satellite communication. The output of this study is one of the pioneer contributions to create a high tech-society.

  14. The DYFAMED time-series station: A reference site for environmental studies in the North Western Mediterranean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, J.C.; Vescovali, I.; Oubelkheir, K.; Stock, A.; Chiaverini, J.; Pizay, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The observation site is located in the central part of the Ligurian sea, at about 50 km off Nice, on the Nice Corsica transect. The Ligurian sea is characterised by three different areas. The coastal area is submitted to inputs from coast and from the liguro-provencal current. The frontal zone is delimited by the ligurian current and the central area. This frontal zone isolates the central part of the basin where is located the DYFAMED site. In this central area, the primary production is dependent on inputs of nutrients from deeper waters but also, for a badly evaluated part, on atmospheric inputs of nitrogen and some trace metals particularly during summer. Since 1987, data have been collected on the time series station, in the frame of the Jgofs-France program. Then, the scientific observation service has been officially created by INSU/CNRS in 1995

  15. Hinkley Point 'C' power station public inquiry: proof of evidence on potential off-site effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    A public inquiry has been set up to examine the planning application made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) for the construction of a 1200 MW Pressurized Water Reactor power station at Hinkley Point (Hinkley Point ''C'') in the United Kingdom. This evidence to the Inquiry is concerned with the potential of the proposed Hinkely Point ''C'' PWR to increase the exposure of members of the public offsite to radiation. The policy is to replicate the design of the Sizewell ''B'' reactor. The evidence examined in great detail at the Sizewell ''B'' Public Inquiry where the Inspector concluded that the risk would be very small. The purpose of this evidence is to provide an explicit account of the potential off-site effects of radiation at the Hinkley Point site, so that it can be seen that there is nothing specific to this location that could lead to a different conclusion. (author)

  16. Distinguishing Two Ammonium and Triazolium Sites of Interaction in a Three-Station [2]Rotaxane Molecular Shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waelès, Philip; Fournel-Marotte, Karine; Coutrot, Frédéric

    2017-08-25

    This paper reports on the synthesis of a tri-stable [2]rotaxane molecular shuttle, in which the motion of the macrocycle is triggered by either selective protonation/deprotonation or specific carbamoylation/decarbamoylation of an alkylbenzylamine. The threaded axle is surrounded by a dibenzo[24]crown[8] (DB24C8) macrocycle and contains three sites of different binding affinities towards the macrocycle. An N-methyltriazolium moiety acts as a molecular station that has weak affinity for the DB24C8 macrocycle and is located in the centre of the molecular axle. Two other molecular stations, arylammonium and alkylbenzylammonium moieties, sit on either side of the triazolium moiety along the molecular axle and have stronger affinities for the DB24C8 macrocycle. These two ammonium moieties are covalently linked to two different stopper groups at each extremity of the thread: a tert-butylphenyl group and a substituted DB24C8 unit. Owing to steric hindrance, the former does not allow any π-π stacking interactions with the encircling DB24C8 macrocycle, whereas the latter residue does; therefore, this allows the discrimination of the two ammonium stations by the surrounding DB24C8 macrocycle in the fully protonated state. In the deprotonated state, the contrasting reactivity of the amine functional groups, as either a base or a nucleophile, allows for selective reactions that trigger the controlled shuttling of the macrocycle around the three molecular stations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Site preparation works for No.3 plant in Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hisashi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Oshima, Teruhiko

    1986-01-01

    Ikata Power Station is only nuclear power station in Shikoku located at the root of Sadamisaki Peninsula. No.1 plant started the operation in September, 1977, and No.2 plant started the operation in March, 1982. By constructing No.3 plant of 890 MWe output, the total power output will be 2.022 million kW. No.3 plant is installed adjacently to No.1 and No.2 plants on their east side. In this place, the existing facilities of the harbor and others can be effectively utilized, the nature of ground is solid, and the fundamental condition of location is perfect, it is easy to obtain the cooperation of local people as No.1 and No.2 plants have been in operation, and it is advantageous in view of the construction period for the power supply plan. The site preparation works have progressed smoothly since the start in June, 1985. About 100,000 m 2 of the site is created by cutting natural ground, and about 54,000 m 2 is created by sea reclamation. About 5 million m 3 of earth and stone generated by cutting and excavation are utilized for reclamation, revetment and others. The topographic and geological features, sea condition, the outline of geological survey, the layout, and the construction works of revetment, cutting, the creation of substitute seaweed farm, appurtenant works, and the measures for environment preservation are described. (Kako, I.)

  18. Thermal mapping studies at Kadra reservoir near Kaiga generating station site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravi, P.M.; Nayak, P.D.; Sudhakar, J.; Mishra, D.G.; Hegde, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    An inherent problem in nuclear and thermal power plants are the release of heat energy into the environment through cooling system to water bodies such as lakes, rivers, estuaries and oceans. Two NPPs of Kaiga Generating Station, discharge the thermal effluent to the nearby Kadra reservoir. This paper presents the results of three year long comprehensive thermal mapping studies conducted by ESL, KGS as part of the Thermal Ecological Studies sponsored by Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy. Present studies clearly demonstrate that the thermally influenced zone in the reservoir is limited to a small volume of the reservoir and is not likely to lead any irreversible adverse impact on the ecosystem of the reservoir. (author)

  19. Etude de Dimensionnement optimal d’une station solaire autonome en site isolé.

    OpenAIRE

    Salaheddine, MANSOUR

    2014-01-01

    La situation géographique de l’Algérie favorise le développement de l’utilisation de l’énergie solaire, ce travail de mémoire a consisté à dimensionner Une station solaire parune méthode de dimensionnement optimal du générateur photovoltaïque ce qui a donc consisté à déterminer le nombre de panneaux et la capacité optimale en prenant en considération le critère économique. vu l’importance de l’intensité du rayonnement reçu ainsi que la durée de l’ensoleilleme...

  20. Preliminary design considerations for automatic refueling at N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Yount, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Refueling Enhancement Program is an effort to upgrade and improve the N Reactor refueling operation. Primary goals of this effort are to reduce personnel exposure, reduce effluents to the environment, and, where possible, increase the refueling rate. Recent advances in available commercial robotics systems have prompted a look at automating the Charge/Discharge (C/D) operations. Current efforts will culminate in a conceptual design report (CDR) and accompanying economic and risk analysis in January 1986. Based on the results in that report, DOE will review the viability of the approach as a future capital project. Implementation of automation in existing plants raises questions regarding both the programmatic (how does one implement such an effort) and technical (what equipment is available; how will it be applied) concerns. This paper addresses both aspects

  1. Factors relating to the selection of sites for nuclear power stations in certain industrial countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-08-01

    The subject is discussed under the following headings: framework conditions of energy supply (energy supply in general (economics, planning); supply of nuclear energy (objectives, national nuclear industry, technology, development, public conflict)); environmental planning (legal foundations, planning levels, public site-provision investigations, electrical utilities); general and statutory atomic licensing procedure, criteria. (U.K.)

  2. Optimal Site Selection of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations Based on a Cloud Model and the PROMETHEE Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunna Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The task of site selection for electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS is hugely important from the perspective of harmonious and sustainable development. However, flaws and inadequacies in the currently used multi-criteria decision making methods could result in inaccurate and irrational decision results. First of all, the uncertainty of the information cannot be described integrally in the evaluation of the EVCS site selection. Secondly, rigorous consideration of the mutual influence between the various criteria is lacking, which is mainly evidenced in two aspects: one is ignoring the correlation, and the other is the unconscionable measurements. Last but not least, the ranking method adopted in previous studies is not very appropriate for evaluating the EVCS site selection problem. As a result of the above analysis, a Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE method-based decision system combined with the cloud model is proposed in this paper for EVCS site selection. Firstly, the use of the PROMETHEE method can bolster the confidence and visibility for decision makers. Secondly, the cloud model is recommended to describe the fuzziness and randomness of linguistic terms integrally and accurately. Finally, the Analytical Network Process (ANP method is adopted to measure the correlation of the indicators with a greatly simplified calculation of the parameters and the steps required.

  3. Preparation of substituting seaweed field mounds accompanying site preparation for No.3 plant in Ikata Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hisashi; Oshima, Teruhiko; Fujisaki, Yuichi; Saeki, Taketoshi

    1987-01-01

    Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. is constructing No.3 plant adjacently to No.1 and No.2 plants in operation in Ikata Nuclear Power Station. In the coastal area of Iyo-nada, many seaweed fields are distributed, which are important biologically and for fishery. In the works of site preparation for No.3 plant, a part of the site is created by reclamation of sea area, therefore the natural seaweed fields in the area disappear. From the viewpoint of various circumstances and environment preservation, it was decided to create about 60,000 m 2 of seaweed field mounds on the seabed around the site as the substitute for disappearing natural seaweed fields. The Seaweed Field Study Group composed of the men of learning and experience was organized to obtain the guidance on the possibility of creating artificial seaweed fields, the techniques for creation and the effect on environment accompanying the creation of mounds. The creation works were started in October, 1985, and are in progress smoothly utilizing effectively the stones and rocks cut in the site preparation works. The topographic and geological features, sea conditions, the present state of seaweed fields, the experiment on creating artificial seaweed fields, the design and construction of mounds and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  4. Modelling a reliable wind/PV/storage power system for remote radio base station sites without utility power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitterlin, Ian F [Emerson Network Power Ltd., Globe Park, Marlow, SL7 1YG (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-22

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) cells has made steady progress from the early days, when only the USA space program could afford to deploy them, to now, seeing them applied to roadside applications even in our Northern European climes. The manufacturing cost per watt has fallen and the daylight-to-power conversion efficiency increased. At the same time, the perception that the sun has to be directly shining on it for a PV array to work has faded. On some of those roadside applications, particularly for remote emergency telephones or for temporary roadwork signage where a utility electrical power connection is not practical, the keen observer will spot, usually in addition to a PV array, a small wind-turbine and an electrical cabinet quite obviously (by virtue of its volume) containing a storage battery. In the UK, we have the lions share (>40%) of Europe's entire wind power resource although, despite press coverage of the 'anti-wind' lobby to the contrary, we have hardly started to harvest this clean and free energy source. Taking this (established and proven) roadside solution one step further, we will consider higher power applications. A cellular phone system is one where a multitude of remote radio base stations (RBS) are required to provide geographical coverage. With networks developing into the so called '3G' technologies the need for base stations has tripled, as each 3G cell covers only 1/3 the geographical area of its '2G' counterpart. To cover >90% of the UK's topology (>97% population coverage) with 3G cellular technology will requires in excess of 12,000 radio base stations per operator network. In 2001, there were around 25,000 established sites and, with an anticipated degree of collocation by necessity, that figure is forecast to rise to >47,000. Of course, the vast majority of these sites have a convenient grid connection. However, it is easy to see that the combination of wind and PV power generation and an energy storage system may be an

  5. Structural Analysis of Advanced Refueling Machine of APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. R.; Kim, Y. H.; Park, B. T.; Park, J. B.; Jung, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The Refueling Machine (RM) consists of two structural parts of bridge and trolley. The bridge structure is approximately 8.5 m long and 5 m wide and is primarily composed of two deep wide flange sections spanning the rector area at the operating level. The trolley is mounted on wheels that roll on the rails of the bridge. Vertical movements of trolley and bridge are restricted by guide rollers. In this paper, dynamic and structural analyses based on the earthquake spectrum are carried out to verify the structural integrity of advanced refueling machine. It is done by 3-dimensional finite element analysis using ANSYS software

  6. Final site environmental statement: Blue Hills Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2. Related to the determination of the suitability of Site G for eventual construction. Docket Nos. 50-510 and 50-511

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The site suitability analysis is based on the assumption that the Blue Hills Station will employ two pressurized water reactors to produce outputs of approximately 2814 MWt each. Two steam turbine generators will use the heat produced to provide approximately 957 MWe (gross) each. The exhaust steam will be cooled by four low-profile round mechanical-draft cooling towers. Assuming construction of a nuclear station at site G, a summary of environmental impacts and adverse effects is presented

  7. The achievement of on-load refuelling at Heysham 2 and Torness AGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterland, P.R.; MacPherson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Heysham 2 and Torness are the last of the advanced gas cooled reactors (AGR) constructed for the Central Electricity Generating Board and the South of Scotland Electricity Board. They are now operated by Nuclear Electric (NE) and Scottish Nuclear Limited (SNL) respectively. They were designed for on load refuelling at high power and being based on the design used for Hinkley Point B and Hunterston B, have benefited from experience at these stations. This paper examines the analysis work which was carried out in order to provide a sound, long term, mainly probabilistic safety case which supports on load refuelling. A significant problem has been that the design reliability of the microprocessor based control and protection systems, used for the fuel route, could not be justified and a number of changes to the overall protection system have had to be introduced to compensate for this. The resultant safety case complies with the stringent safety standards adopted by NE and SNL and accepted by the UK safety authority, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). (author)

  8. The Jungfraujoch high-alpine research station (3454 m) as a background clean continental site for the measurement of aerosol parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyeki, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Jost, D.T.; Weingartner, E.; Colbeck, I.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol physical parameter measurements are reported here for the first full annual set of data from the Jungfraujoch site. Comparison to NOAA background and regional stations indicate that the site may be designated as 'clean continental' during the free tropospheric influenced period 03:00 -09:00. (author) figs., tab., refs

  9. The Jungfraujoch high-alpine research station (3454 m) as a background clean continental site for the measurement of aerosol parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyeki, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Jost, D.T.; Weingartner, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Colbeck, I. [Essex Univ., Colchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    Aerosol physical parameter measurements are reported here for the first full annual set of data from the Jungfraujoch site. Comparison to NOAA background and regional stations indicate that the site may be designated as `clean continental` during the free tropospheric influenced period 03:00 -09:00. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  10. Improving regulatory effectiveness in Federal/State siting actions: Federal/State regulatory permitting actions in selected nuclear power station licensing cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroff, J.

    1977-06-01

    The Federal/State regulatory permitting actions in 12 case histories of nuclear power station licensing in nine different states are documented. General observations regarding Federal/State siting roles in the siting process are included. Eleven of the case histories are illustrated with a logic network that gives the actions of the utilities in addition to the Federal/State permits

  11. On the question of a site plan approval procedure for large-scale power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roemermann, K.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses the question whether a plan approval procedure for large-sclae power plants might contribute to shortening the period of time currently used for the licensing of such plants. On the basis of current practice which includes a planning and building permission by virtue of section 35 of the building law (BBauG) together with an approval of plans within the framework of regional planning, the author explains and discusses various models of site plan approval procedures, (a.o. section 38 of the Federal building law). (HP) [de

  12. Study of the food consumption of nuclear power station site populations (methodology and results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douguedroit, A.

    1980-01-01

    These studies were made in 1976 and 1977 by the Aix Geographical Institute (Aix-Marseille II University), then in 1978 by the B.E.G.E.A. under the scientific control of the Institute. Their subject concerns the food consumption of local populations for the subsequent determination of radioactive contamination levels. They make an inventory of the various local agricultural, animal rearing and fishing productions and determine the part they represent in the diet of the populations living near the sites [fr

  13. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, C.K.

    1975-01-01

    The continuation of a program demonstrating that free-ranging wild birds can be used to assess environmental radionuclide levels is described. Wild passerine birds are trapped at a nuclear power station site and at two control sites, uniquely marked, non-destructively counted for levels of gamma-emitting radionuclides, and released. Subsequent recapture rates are as high as 80 percent for certain species. Nuclides detected included 40 K, 95 Zr- 95 Nb, 137 Cs, and apparent 131 I, the latter at levels just above detection limits (0.07 pCi/g). Significant variations in mean 137 Cs body burdens in Blue Jays and Bobwhite have been observed between sites less than 6 km apart. A significant temporal decrease in 137 Cs body burdens has been observed in various species of birds only at the reactor site. Vegetation and meteorological studies have been initiated to help explain these body-burden differences. The effective half-life of 137 Cs in the Blue Jay is 6.7 +- 1.5 days. The highest observed level of 95 Zr- 95 Nb (1.08 +- 0.07 pCi/g) was in a Grey Catbird. The effective half-life of the 95 Zr- 95 Nb was 69.9 +- 15 days, corresponding to the physical half-life of this isotope pair (65.5d), and the activity abruptly disappeared after the twelfth day of captivity suggesting that it was present in particulate form either on the feathers or skin, or in the bird's pulmonary system. Inter-laboratory comparisons of radionuclide measurements are reported. The number of birds banded during the current reporting period is 2720, while 2047 specimens were radioassayed, an increase of 9 percent and 313 percent, respectively. An exercise to test the practicality of obtaining avian samples from remote sites (i.e., > 50 miles away) for radionuclide measurement was performed satisfactorily. (U.S.)

  14. [Study on pollution evaluation of heavy metal in surface soil of the original site of Qingdao North Station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Jia, Yong-gang; Pan, Yu-ying

    2013-09-01

    The determination of pollution extent and health risk assessment are the premise of heavy metal contaminated site remediation. The content of Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni in Qingdao North Station was detected, and the correlation of the 6 kinds of heavy metal content was analyzed. The pollution extent in excess of background values was characterized by anthropogenic influence multiple, and the pollution of heavy metal in soil was evaluated using geoaccumulation index and a new method which connects geoaccumulation index with Nemero index. Finally, human health risk assessment was carried out with health risk assessment model for heavy metal content. The results showed that Qingdao North Station soil were polluted by heavy metals. Six heavy metal pollution levels were: Cd > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr > Zn, and Cd had reached the severity pollution level, Cu and Ni followed by, Cr, Pb and Zn were in minor pollution level. The order of coefficient variation in all heavy metals was: Cd > Ni > Cr > Zn > Pb > Cu. Within the study area soil heavy metal distribution was different, but overall discrepancy was small. The order of non-cancer hazards of heavy metals in soil was Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cd > Zn, and the order of carcinogen risks of heavy metals was Ni > Cd. The non-cancer hazard and carcinogen risks values of metals were both lower than that their threshold values. They were not the direct threats to human health.

  15. Evaluation of the 3D high resolution seismic method at the Tournemire site around the IPSN experimental station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera Nunez, J.

    2003-01-01

    The IPSN experimental station of Tournemire is localized at a 200 m depth inside an abandoned railway tunnel dug in a Jurassic clayey formation. The a priori knowledge of the existing geologic structures of the clayey formations allows to test the reliability of the 3D high resolution seismic survey technique and its capability to detect these structures and discontinuities. This test study is reported in this technical note. It comprises several steps: a bibliographic synthesis and a state-of-the-art of the 3D seismic survey technique, the construction of a velocity model for the different strata of the site, a simulation of the possible seismic response of these strata with respect to the velocities chosen, the processing of the data and finally their interpretation. (J.S.)

  16. Improvement of availability of PWR nuclear plants through the reduction of the time required for refueling/maintenance outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayers, J.B.; Soth, L.G.

    1978-04-01

    The objective of the project, conducted by Commonwealth Research Corporation and Westinghouse Electric Corporation, is to identify improvements in procedures and equipment which will reduce the time required for refueling/maintenance outages at PWR nuclear power plants. The outage of Commonwealth Edison Zion Station Unit 1 in March through May of 1976 was evaluated to identify those items which caused delays and those work activities that offer the potential for significant improvements that could reduce the overall duration of the outage and achieve an improvement in the plant's availability for power production. Modifications in procedures have been developed and were evaluated during one or more outages in 1977. Conceptual designs have been developed for equipment modifications to the refueling system that could reduce the time required for the refueling portion of the outage. The purpose of the interim report is to describe those conceptual designs and to assess their impact upon future outages. Recommendations are included for the implementation of these equipment improvements in a continuation of this program as a demonstration of plant availability benefits that can be realized in PWR nuclear plants already in operation or under construction

  17. Surface wave site characterization at 27 locations near Boston, Massachusetts, including 2 strong-motion stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Baise, Laurie G.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The geotechnical properties of the soils in and around Boston, Massachusetts, have been extensively studied. This is partly due to the importance of the Boston Blue Clay and the extent of landfill in the Boston area. Although New England is not a region that is typically associated with seismic hazards, there have been several historical earthquakes that have caused significant ground shaking (for example, see Street and Lacroix, 1979; Ebel, 1996; Ebel, 2006). The possibility of strong ground shaking, along with heightened vulnerability from unreinforced masonry buildings, motivates further investigation of seismic hazards throughout New England. Important studies that are pertinent to seismic hazards in New England include source-parameter studies (Somerville and others, 1987; Boore and others, 2010), wave-propagation studies (Frankel, 1991; Viegas and others, 2010), empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) for computing ground-motion intensity (Tavakoli and Pezeshk, 2005; Atkinson and Boore, 2006), site-response studies (Hayles and others, 2001; Ebel and Kim, 2006), and liquefaction studies (Brankman and Baise, 2008). The shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles collected for this report are pertinent to the GMPE, site response, and liquefaction aspects of seismic hazards in the greater Boston area. Besides the application of these data for the Boston region, the data may be applicable throughout New England, through correlations with geologic units (similar to Ebel and Kim, 2006) or correlations with topographic slope (Wald and Allen, 2007), because few VS measurements are available in stable tectonic regions.Ebel and Hart (2001) used felt earthquake reports to infer amplification patterns throughout the greater Boston region and noted spatial correspondence with the dominant period and amplification factors obtained from ambient noise (horizontal-to-vertical ratios) by Kummer (1998). Britton (2003) compiled geotechnical borings in the area and produced a

  18. Integrated refuelling activity service; Servicio integrado de actividades de recarga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Valcarcel, M.; Lopez Garcia, J.L.

    2010-07-01

    Refuelling outages at nuclear power plants are subject to demanding improvement criteria in each and every one of the activities scheduled. In this article, the advantages of this general service performed by UTE-TWE for Asco and Vandellos II nuclear power plants, and their results and learned lessons are presented. (Author)

  19. Refueling outage services in Spanish Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landete, J. L.; Soto, M.; Nunuez, A.

    2007-01-01

    DOMINGUIS Group, through its 75 years of business development, has positioned as the Spanish leader Group in Services for the Nuclear Energy and Petrochemical Sectors. In this article, we present the most significant services summary that, through the companies that constitute DOMINGUIS Group, we have developed in Refueling Outage in Spanish Nuclear Power Plants. (Author)

  20. 40 CFR 86.152-98 - Vehicle preparation; refueling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle preparation; refueling test... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle...

  1. Study of Arkansas Nuclear One-1 13th refueling outage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiba, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    Recently performance of nuclear power plants in the USA has improved remarkably. Their average automatic shutdown rate has been sharply dropping, although it is still higher than that in Japan, and their average capacity factor has become higher than that in Japan in recent years. One of the main contributors is an extension of the operational period, and another is a shortening of refueling-outage time. It is considerably difficult to have accomplished both the improvement of plant reliability and shortening of refueling-outage time because their refueling outage corresponds to our periodical inspection which is central to maintenance activities in Japanese plants. In order to learn how they have been achieved, a visit to Arkansas Nuclear One-1 (ANO-1) which obtained the top-class result of SALP (Systematic Assessment of Licensee Performance) performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was planned and study of their 13th refueling outage was carried out. Their achievements result from performance-base maintenance and on-line maintenance, based on a proper preventive maintenance program, and untiring efforts of efficiency improvement, represented by the introduction of several on-line systems. And the reason behind this is severe competition concerning power generation cost reduction. (author)

  2. Study of Arkansas Nuclear One-1 13th refueling outage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashiba, Takashi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Recently performance of nuclear power plants in the USA has improved remarkably. Their average automatic shutdown rate has been sharply dropping, although it is still higher than that in Japan, and their average capacity factor has become higher than that in Japan in recent years. One of the main contributors is an extension of the operational period, and another is a shortening of refueling-outage time. It is considerably difficult to have accomplished both the improvement of plant reliability and shortening of refueling-outage time because their refueling outage corresponds to our periodical inspection which is central to maintenance activities in Japanese plants. In order to learn how they have been achieved, a visit to Arkansas Nuclear One-1 (ANO-1) which obtained the top-class result of SALP (Systematic Assessment of Licensee Performance) performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was planned and study of their 13th refueling outage was carried out. Their achievements result from performance-base maintenance and on-line maintenance, based on a proper preventive maintenance program, and untiring efforts of efficiency improvement, represented by the introduction of several on-line systems. And the reason behind this is severe competition concerning power generation cost reduction. (author)

  3. Principal facts of gravity stations with gravity and magnetic profiles from the southwest Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, as of January 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansma, P.E.; Snyder, D.B.; Ponce, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Three gravity profiles and principal facts of 2604 gravity stations in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site are documented in this data report. The residual gravity profiles show the gravity measurements and the smoothed curves derived from these points that were used in geophysical interpretations. The principal facts include station label, latitude, longitude, elevation, observed gravity value, and terrain correction for each station as well as the derived complete Bouguer and isostatic anomalies, reduced at 2.67 g/cm 3 . Accuracy codes, where available, further document the data

  4. THE KINETICS OF CONTAMINANTS ACCUMULATION IN THE JET FUEL DURING THE TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS OF ITS PREPARATION FOR AIRCRAFT REFUELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Brailko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Much attention is payed to the tasks for ensuring domestic and international aircraft safety and regularity, which are multifaceted and complex. One of them is the system of ensuring the quality of aviation fuel for refueling aircraft at airports. A significant influence of the quality, chemical composition and fuel range on the reliability and lifetime of components and parts of the aircraft fuel system was studied in the process of development and experience accumulation of aircraft operating, processes of aviation fuel production, as well as during storage, quality control, transportation, refueling preparation and aircraft refueling. Currently, work is being done to study the influence of fuel quality on the units of the technological scheme of fuel-filling complexes, which provide the required cleanliness of the fuel according to the regulations. The article describes the trend level of aviation fuel cleanliness at the stages from receipt to issuance to the refueling station. The evaluation of compliance with existing regulations on the level of jet fuel cleanliness and the efficiency of fuel cleaning facilities is carried out. It is stated that one of the problems of insufficient level of aviation fuel cleaning quality is a violation of the acceptable contamination level of the fuel before the filter. It was found that the disadvantage of the used filter paper is the fiber wash out process. According to this research it was found that while cleaning fuel from mechanical admixtures it is necessary to take into account the technical condition of the filtering element, and proposal was developed for fuel-filling systems to ensure aviation fuel cleanliness in compliance with regulations.

  5. Impact of offshore nuclear generating stations on recreational behavior at adjacent coastal sites. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.J.; Moss, D.J.; West, S.G.; Weyant, J.K.

    1977-12-01

    A multi-faceted investigation was undertaken to project the impact of offshore nuclear power plants on beach visitation at adjacent beaches. 1. Related literature was reviewed concerning human adjustment to natural hazards, risk-taking behavior, and public attitudes toward nuclear power. 2. Approximately 2400 people were interviewed at beaches in three states with respect to: (a) intended avoidance of beaches near a hypothetical floating nuclear plant (FNP), (b) relative importance of proximity to a FNP, when compared to other beach attributes, (c) onshore-offshore preference for coastal nuclear plant location, (d) behavioral impact of NRC licensing of FNP's, (e) relative tourism impact of coastal nuclear plant compared to coastal coal-fired plant, (f) public concerns about nuclear safety, (g) public attitudes toward alternative energy sources, (h) public confidence in sources of information about nuclear power, (i) visual impact of a FNP, and (j) knowledge about nuclear power. 3. Four beach areas near currently operating coastal nuclear power plants were studied to assess impacts on tourism resulting from plant construction. Data suggest that proximity of a FNP is less important than other beach attributes in determining beach attractiveness, probably no more than (and perhaps less than) 5% to 10% of current beach patrons would avoid a beach after FNP siting three miles directly offshore, and impact of a FNP would decrease exponentially as distance away increased

  6. Impact of offshore nuclear generating stations on recreational behavior at adjacent coastal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.J.; West, S.G.; Moss, D.J.; Weyant, J.K.

    1977-10-01

    A multi-faceted investigation was undertaken to project the impact of offshore nuclear power plants on beach visitation at adjacent beaches. Related literature was reviewed concerning human adjustment to natural hazards, risk-taking behavior, and public attitudes toward nuclear power. Approximately 2400 people were interviewed at beaches in three states with respect to: intended avoidance of beaches near a hypothetical floating nuclear plant (FNP), relative importance of proximity to a FNP, when compared to other beach attributes, onshore-offshore preference for coastal nuclear plant location, behavioral impact of NRC licensing of FNPs, relative tourism impact of coastal nuclear plant compared to coastal coal-fired plant, public concerns about nuclear safety, public attitudes toward alternative energy sources, public confidence in sources of information about nuclear power, visual impact of a FNP, and knowledge about nuclear power. Four beach areas near currently operating coastal nuclear power plants were studied to assess impacts on tourism resulting from plant construction. Data suggest that proximity of a FNP is less important than other beach attributes in determining beach attractiveness, probably no more than (and perhaps less than) 5% to 10% of current beach patrons would avoid a beach after FNP siting three miles directly offshore, and impact of a FNP would decrease exponentially as distance away increased

  7. Optimal refueling principle of research and test reactors and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Feng; Sun Shouhua; Bu Yongxi

    1993-01-01

    Based on basic formula for core refueling, the optimal refueling principle for cores with fuel assemblies of different burnup are suggested. Some conclusions derived from this principle are given. Calculation formula for different refueling scheme and computation programme are derived and used for the HFETR typical core loading with different refueling scheme. With the suggested core fuel consuming index, core fuel managements of 24 cycles in 10 years operation of HFETR were analyzed. Results show that the application of optimal refueling principle can greatly save the fuel consuming. Direction of HFETR core fuel management research was also di cussed

  8. Site classification for National Strong Motion Observation Network System (NSMONS) stations in China using an empirical H/V spectral ratio method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kun; Ren, Yefei; Wen, Ruizhi

    2017-10-01

    Reliable site classification of the stations of the China National Strong Motion Observation Network System (NSMONS) has not yet been assigned because of lacking borehole data. This study used an empirical horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratio (hereafter, HVSR) site classification method to overcome this problem. First, according to their borehole data, stations selected from KiK-net in Japan were individually assigned a site class (CL-I, CL-II, or CL-III), which is defined in the Chinese seismic code. Then, the mean HVSR curve for each site class was computed using strong motion recordings captured during the period 1996-2012. These curves were compared with those proposed by Zhao et al. (2006a) for four types of site classes (SC-I, SC-II, SC-III, and SC-IV) defined in the Japanese seismic code (JRA, 1980). It was found that an approximate range of the predominant period Tg could be identified by the predominant peak of the HVSR curve for the CL-I and SC-I sites, CL-II and SC-II sites, and CL-III and SC-III + SC-IV sites. Second, an empirical site classification method was proposed based on comprehensive consideration of peak period, amplitude, and shape of the HVSR curve. The selected stations from KiK-net were classified using the proposed method. The results showed that the success rates of the proposed method in identifying CL-I, CL-II, and CL-III sites were 63%, 64%, and 58% respectively. Finally, the HVSRs of 178 NSMONS stations were computed based on recordings from 2007 to 2015 and the sites classified using the proposed method. The mean HVSR curves were re-calculated for three site classes and compared with those from KiK-net data. It was found that both the peak period and the amplitude were similar for the mean HVSR curves derived from NSMONS classification results and KiK-net borehole data, implying the effectiveness of the proposed method in identifying different site classes. The classification results have good agreement with site classes

  9. Potential risk of a criticality event during refuelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurioux, V.; Deschamps, P

    2003-01-01

    Following a core unloading due to an unscheduled shutdown during the cycle of Dampierre unit 4, the plant operator had to operate the refuelling in its previous configuration. During this operation, the fuel assembly concerned by loading step no. 25 was left in the fuel building and the assembly for the following step, no. 26, was placed in the reactor vessel instead of the previous one, causing an irregularity in core pattern only detected at step no. 139. At that point, the refuelling machine operator realized that he was handling an assembly equipped with its rod cluster, whereas according to his handling sheet, the assembly should not be equipped with. Thanks to the favourable conditions (primary system boron concentration = 2345 ppm and cycle burn-up = 2 GWj/tU), the core remained subcritical. However, the incident analysis revealed a potential criticality risk under less favourable circumstances, i.e. refuelling with fresh 1. cycle fuel assemblies and a primary system boron concentration at the lower limit of the range allowed by the Technical Operating Specifications (2000 ppm). Moreover, further studies have shown that the two neutron source range channels (SRC) are able to provide a count rate (reflecting neutron flux) but would not detect a local increase in reactivity under refuelling conditions (normal or defective), unless a reactive pattern was formed in the immediate vicinity of one of the two channels. However, if the criticality is reached, the SRCs are able to diagnose the critical state from the significant power level of 0.1% rated power. The human error that had led to the administrative validation of a fuel handling step that had not been physically carried out highlighted both the fragility of organizational lines of defence and the inadequacy of I and C systems with regard to technical in-depth defence lines. Following these observations, and beyond the preventive measures supposed to limit the occurrence of a divergence during refuelling

  10. Ontario Hydro Pickering Generating Station fuel handling system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The report briefly describes the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) on-power fuel handling system and refuelling cycle. Lifetime performance parameters of the fuelling system are presented, including station incapability charged to the fuel handling system, cost of operating and maintenance, dose expenditure, events causing system unavailability, maintenance and refuelling strategy. It is concluded that the 'CANDU' on-power fuelling system, by consistently contributing less than 1% to the PNGS incapability, has been credited with a 6 to 20% increase in reactor capacity factor, compared to off-power fuelling schemes. (author)

  11. Performance of a rapidly-refuelable aluminum-air battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, D. J.; Hollandsworth, R. P.; Gonzales, E. M.; Littauer, E. L.

    The Al-air battery is being developed to provide an electric vehicle with conventional automobile performance. A rapidly-refuelable, 6-cell battery (200-sq cm electrodes) was evaluated. RX-808 aluminum anodes and air cathodes were used with a flowing alkaline electrolyte. Peak power was found to increase with temperature, decrease with aluminate concentration and be unaffected by electrolyte flow. The best performance was 5.28 kW/sq m peak power density, 2.08 kWh/kg Al energy density and 80 percent coulombic efficiency. Anode refueling is rapid and 100 percent utilization is achieved. Additional evaluation included cathode catalysts, a thermal balance and monitoring electrolyte composition.

  12. Refueling device for a nuclear reactor with fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemev, L.N.; Vitalevitsch, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The refueling device has got a drum-shaped cartridge containing cells for unirradiated fuel assemblies and control rods as well as a grab for manipulation. The cells for the fuel assemblies are identical with those for the control rods. For the control rods in stock and those on the way from the drum-shaped magazine to the refueling mechanism there are provided cup-shaped casings (adapters) adapting their ends to the dimensions of the fuel assemblies. The casing is clamped to an annular tee-slot below the top by means of a collet. By this means fuel assemblies as well as control rods can be handled with the grab. By means of a stop on the grab the casing can be detached from the control rod. (DG) [de

  13. Television alignment of mast assembly in refueling of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, J.W.; Swidwa, K.J.; Hornak, L.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes the refueling of a nuclear reactor having component assemblies of at least one type and being disposed in a pit in a containment under water, the refueling being carried out with a mast movable axially and circumferentially for raising and lowering the component assemblies, a mechanism, connected to an end of the mast, cooperative with the mast, for engaging a component assembly to be raised by the mast, a television camera, and a television monitor having an image-reference indication, the mechanism being connected to the mast movable with the mast; the method of positioning the mechanism to engage the component assembly appropriately for raising and lowering. It comprises: mounting the camera on the mechanism movable therewith, suspending the mast in the water of the pit with the mechanism extending from the end of the mast in the pit in position to engage the component assembly

  14. New Evidence for the Expansion of an Upper Pleistocene Population out of East Africa, from the Site of Station One, Northern Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Jeffrey I.

    2004-01-01

    Evidence for a hunter-gatherer range-expansion is indicated by the site of Station One in the northern Sudan, a surface scatter of chipped stone debris systematically collected almost 40 years ago, though not studied until present. Based on technological and typological correlates in East Africa, the predominant use of quartz pebbles for raw material, and the production of small bifacial tools, the site can be classified as Middle Stone Age. While often appearing in East African assemblages, ...

  15. A system for radiation monitoring at the site for emergency planning and response in a nuclear station potentialities and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakov, V.; Moskovska, N.; Madzharov, M.; Angelov, V.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the existing system for radiation monitoring of the NPP region. The location of the devices puts a number of problems as maintenance of the radiometric equipment and urgent collecting and processing of the measuring data. Undeniably, to get an effective and timely decision, it is necessary to have on hand information as complete and prompt as possible, about the radiological situation in the regions, towns, villages and sites. As a result of daily observation and registration, an amount of enough in volume data could be accumulated. This data may be used as a base in case of a sudden change of the radiological situation and/or in case of arising of some local contaminations as a result of a volley type of emission, accidents at the nuclear power stations and releases fractions of radioactive and rare gases. The data obtained for a comparatively large region (about 700 square kilometers) with a high degree of gamma detectors distribution density are discussed. In the conditions of a progressively complicating radiological situation, they allow to determine the possible directions of the emission and also to undertake some response actions for protection of the population in time. (author)

  16. Business fleet refueling assessment. Final report, March 1992-November 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudier, A.

    1993-01-01

    The report investigates refueling characteristics and capabilities for the light-duty market sector, particularly business automobile fleets. It develops a profile of the characteristics of light-duty and automobile business fleets in 22 designated non-attainment areas, as well as Pittsburgh and Salt Lake City. Reliable data on these subjects will enable better analysis of the market potential for natural gas in the surveyed areas

  17. On the Drag Effect of a Refuelling Pellet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Michelsen, Poul

    1981-01-01

    A refueling pellet is subjected mainly to two kinds of drags: (1) inertial drag caused by the motion of the pellet relative to the surrounding plasma, and (2) ablation drag caused by an uneven ablation rate of the front and the rear surface of the pellet in an inhomogeneous plasma. Computational ...... results showed that for reasonable combinations of pellet size and injection speed, the drag effect is hardly detectable for plasma conditions prevailing in current large tokamaks....

  18. The structural evolution of the coastal area between Danger Point and Struisbaai in the southern Cape Fold Belt, with implications for the siting of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.J.B.; Andreoli, M.A.G.

    1990-01-01

    A structural analysis of the coastal area between Danger Point and Struisbaai in the Southern Cape has been undertaken, using the technique of structural domain analysis coupled with geophysical interpretation and geological mapping. This study forms part of the country-wide geological investigations that are being carried out for the purpose of siting South Africa's future nuclear power stations. 30 refs., 18 figs

  19. RBMK full scope simulator gets virtual refuelling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoudiakov, M.; Slonimsky, V.; Mitrofanov, S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a continuation of efforts of an international Russian-Norwegian joint team to drastically increase operational safety during the refuelling process of an RBMK-type reactor by implementing a training simulator based on an innovative Virtual Reality (VR) approach. During the preceding stage of the project a display-based simulator was extended with VR models of the real Refueling Machine (RM) and its environment in order to improve both the learning process and operation's effectiveness. The simulator's challenge is to support the performance (operational activity) of RM operational staff firstly and to take major part in developing basic knowledge and skills as well as to keep skilled staff in close touch with the complex machinery of the Refueling Machine. At the given 2nd stage the functional scope of the VR-simulator was greatly enhanced - firstly, by connecting to the RBMK-unit full-scope simulator, and, secondly, by a training program and simulator model upgrade. (author)

  20. Automated Aerial Refueling Hitches a Ride on AFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer L.; Murray, James E.; Bever, Glenn; Campos, Norma V.; Schkolnik, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    The recent introduction of uninhabited aerial vehicles [UAVs (basically, remotely piloted or autonomous aircraft)] has spawned new developments in autonomous operation and posed new challenges. Automated aerial refueling (AAR) is a capability that will enable UAVs to travel greater distances and loiter longer over targets. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), the Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet, and the Air Force Research Laboratory, rapidly conceived and accomplished an AAR flight research project focused on collecting a unique, high-quality database on the dynamics of the hose and drogue of an aerial refueling system. This flight-derived database would be used to validate mathematical models of the dynamics in support of design and analysis of AAR systems for future UAVs. The project involved the use of two Dryden F/A-18 airplanes and an S-3 hose-drogue refueling store on loan from the Navy. In this year-long project, which was started on October 1, 2002, 583 research maneuvers were completed during 23 flights.

  1. Engineering study of frequent refueling for improved uranium utilization in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, I.

    1981-05-01

    The most practical alternative to annual refueling appeared to be semiannual refueling, with a short midyear refueling-only outage scheduled during minimum power demand and an annual outage during which maintenance outage tasks would be performed. A method for economic evaluation of frequent refueling was developed using fuel loading requirements, refueling frequency, replacement power costs and the price of uranium oxide as parameters and the economics evaluated with the costs anticipated for the year 1995. It was determined that to obtain breakeven energy costs, the extra semiannual refueling outage would have to be accomplished in six to nine days for most plants. Although it could not practicably be reduced to that level, proposed changes to arrangement, procedures and equipment indicated that an outage of from eleven to thirteen days was possible. Total cost of implementing these changes is estimated at less than 4% of the overall physical plant cost. This cost can be justified based on the time saved during refueling outages over the reactor lifetime. These changes were generally defined while a detailed design review was made of a fuel-handling system which utilizes two cantilever-supported refueling machines and two transfer systems, allowing independent and simultaneous handling of two fuel assemblies during the refueling sequence. A review of the critical path annual maintenance items indicated that these items would probably control the length of the annual refueling outage

  2. Fifteen-foot diameter modular space station Kennedy Space Center launch site support definition (space station program Phase B extension definition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorn, L. C.; Martin, M. L.; Murphy, C. W.; Niebla, J. F., V

    1971-01-01

    This document defines the facilities, equipment, and operational plans required to support the MSS Program at KSC. Included is an analysis of KSC operations, a definition of flow plans, facility utilization and modifications, test plans and concepts, activation, and tradeoff studies. Existing GSE and facilities that have a potential utilization are identified, and new items are defined where possible. The study concludes that the existing facilities are suitable for use in the space station program without major modification from the Saturn-Apollo configuration.

  3. Understanding the design and economics of distributed tri-generation systems for home and neighborhood refueling - Part I: Single family residence case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M. [University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The potential benefits of hydrogen as a transportation fuel will not be achieved until hydrogen vehicles capture a substantial market share. However, although hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) technology has been making rapid progress, the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure remains a major barrier for FCV adoption and commercialization. The high cost of building an extensive hydrogen station network and the foreseeable low utilization in the near term discourages private investment. Based on the past experience of fuel infrastructure development for motor vehicles, innovative, distributed, small-volume hydrogen refueling methods may be required to refuel FCVs in the near term. Among small-volume refueling methods, home and neighborhood tri-generation systems (systems that produce electricity and heat for buildings, as well as hydrogen for vehicles) stand out because the technology is available and has potential to alleviate consumer's fuel availability concerns. In addition, it has features attractive to consumers such as convenience and security to refuel at home or in their neighborhood. The objective of this paper is to provide analytical tools for various stakeholders such as policy makers, manufacturers and consumers, to evaluate the design and the technical, economic, and environmental performances of tri-generation systems for home and neighborhood refueling. An interdisciplinary framework and an engineering/economic model is developed and applied to assess home tri-generation systems for single family residences (case studies on neighborhood systems will be provided in a later paper). Major tasks include modeling yearly system operation, exploring the optimal size of a system, estimating the cost of electricity, heat and hydrogen, and system CO{sub 2} emissions, and comparing the results to alternatives. Sensitivity analysis is conducted, and the potential impacts of uncertainties in energy prices, capital cost reduction (or increase), government

  4. Understanding the design and economics of distributed tri-generation systems for home and neighborhood refueling - Part I: Single family residence case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential benefits of hydrogen as a transportation fuel will not be achieved until hydrogen vehicles capture a substantial market share. However, although hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) technology has been making rapid progress, the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure remains a major barrier for FCV adoption and commercialization. The high cost of building an extensive hydrogen station network and the foreseeable low utilization in the near term discourages private investment. Based on the past experience of fuel infrastructure development for motor vehicles, innovative, distributed, small-volume hydrogen refueling methods may be required to refuel FCVs in the near term. Among small-volume refueling methods, home and neighborhood tri-generation systems (systems that produce electricity and heat for buildings, as well as hydrogen for vehicles) stand out because the technology is available and has potential to alleviate consumer's fuel availability concerns. In addition, it has features attractive to consumers such as convenience and security to refuel at home or in their neighborhood. The objective of this paper is to provide analytical tools for various stakeholders such as policy makers, manufacturers and consumers, to evaluate the design and the technical, economic, and environmental performances of tri-generation systems for home and neighborhood refueling. An interdisciplinary framework and an engineering/economic model is developed and applied to assess home tri-generation systems for single family residences (case studies on neighborhood systems will be provided in a later paper). Major tasks include modeling yearly system operation, exploring the optimal size of a system, estimating the cost of electricity, heat and hydrogen, and system CO 2 emissions, and comparing the results to alternatives. Sensitivity analysis is conducted, and the potential impacts of uncertainties in energy prices, capital cost reduction (or increase), government incentives and

  5. Development and implementation of full-automatic supervision and control programme for CEFR refueling control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hao; Dong Shengguo; Ma Hongsheng; Zhao Lixia

    2011-01-01

    In order to make the process of CEFR refueling more convenient and reliable, the computer supervision and control system was designed according to the CEFR refueling technology. Meanwhile, the supervision and control function and database function were developed on the basis of KingView and SQL Server2000. The fuel of reactor core was fully loaded by the system, and full-automation of CEFR refueling process was implemented. (authors)

  6. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward F. Kiczek

    2007-08-31

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

  7. Hydrogen for buses in London: A scenario analysis of changes over time in refuelling infrastructure costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shayegan, S.; Pearson, P.J.G.; Hart, D.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of a hydrogen refuelling infrastructure is one of the major obstacles to the introduction of the hydrogen vehicles to the road transport market. To help overcome this hurdle a likely transitional solution is to introduce hydrogen for niche applications such as buses or other types of fleet vehicles for which fuel demand is predictable and localised. This paper analyses the costs of different hydrogen production-delivery pathways, via a case study of buses in London. Scenario analysis over time (2007-2025) is used to investigate potential changes to the cost of hydrogen as a result of technology development, growing demand for hydrogen and changes in energy prices (gas and electricity). It is found that factors related to hydrogen demand have the greatest effect on the unit cost of hydrogen, while for the whole of the analysis period, on-site SMR (steam methane reforming) remains the least-cost production-delivery pathway. (author)

  8. Siting of nuclear power stations and the scope of preoperational investigations with special considerations of demographic aspects and the economic utilization of the neighbouring areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijak, J.

    1976-01-01

    The studies are presented on the location of atomic power stations in Poland made so far. The methods used in the studies are described which were done in two stages: preliminary location studies on the macroregional scale, and location studies on one or more of the chosen locations. Part one deals with general conditions which have to be met for location of atomic power stations and with preliminary assumptions accepted by GBS i PE ''Energoprojekt'' for location studies. Regulations and recommendations for establishing sites for atomic power stations are also given. Special location conditions are dealt with more extensively, the enviromental hazards and the need for their studies being particularly emphasized. Part two describes the scope of studies made prior to and after the time location investigations. Demographic studies and the economic utilization of the neighbouring areas are presented in more detail. (author)

  9. Siting of nuclear power stations and the scope of preoperational investigations with special considerations of demographic aspects and the economic utilization of the neighbouring areas. [Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijak, J [Biuro Studiow i Projektow ' Energoprojekt' , Warsaw (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    Studies are presented on the location of atomic power stations in Poland. The methods used in the studies are described which were done in two stages: preliminary location studies on the macroregional scale, and location studies on one or more of the chosen locations. Part one deals with general conditions which have to be met for location of atomic power stations and with preliminary assumptions accepted by GBS i PE ''Energoprojekt'' for location studies. Regulations and recommendations for establishing sites for atomic power stations are also given. Special location conditions are dealt with more extensively, the enviromental hazards and the need for their studies being particularly emphasized. Part two describes the scope of studies made prior to and after the time location investigations. Demographic studies and the economic utilization of the neighbouring areas are presented in more detail.

  10. Contamination awareness at the Dresden Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, D.J.; Rath, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    Dresden Nuclear Power Station, which is located ∼ 60 miles southwest of Chicago near Morris, Illinois, has been generating electricity since 1960. Owned by Commonwealth Edison, Dresden was the nation's first privately financed nuclear station. On its site are three boiling water reactors (BWRs). Due to the contamination potential inherent with a reactor, a contamination trending program was created at the station. Studies had indicated a rise in contamination events during refueling outages. Further increases were due to specific work projects such as hydrolyzing operations. The investigations suggested that contract personnel also increased the number of events. In 1983, a contamination awareness program was created. The 1984 contamination awareness program was comprised of the following: (1) a statistical review in which trended contamination events were discussed. (2) A demonstration of protective clothing removal by an individual making various mistakes. (3) Scenarios were developed for use in mock work areas. (4) Upper management involvement. Because of the 1984 program, favorable attention has been focused on Dresden from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations

  11. Design of hydrogen fueling station for Vancouver BC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tura, A.; Dikeos, J.; St Germain, L.; Smolak, T.; Owen, T.; Hass, J.; Songprakorp, R.; Sodouri, P.; Maddaloni, J.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' A public hydrogen refueling station has been designed to service a minimum daily capacity of 50 light-duty hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, each requiring 3 kg of compressed gaseous hydrogen at 5000 psi. The station can accommodate a peak hourly fueling rate of 20 kg, or slightly less than 7 cars. The station is designed around liquid hydrogen, and energy efficient liquid compression. On-site storage with centralized production allows for great flexibility in the design and the simple fueling process results in fewer potential failure modes. High customer demand can easily be accommodated due to a four minute filling time, made possible by a low temperature hydrogen filling system. The overall well to wheel pathway of this fueling process generates up to 95% less CO2 and requires up to 42% less energy than gasoline. The proposed design requires a low capital investment, and uses components easily available from a proven supplier base. An economic analysis shows that the delivered hydrogen cost is between $0.11/mile and $0.18/mile, based on a ten year discounted cash flow analysis. This design was the grand prize winner in the NHA/DOE sponsored 2004 University Design Contest. (author)

  12. Liquefied petroleum gas cold burn sustained while refueling a car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, Bronwyn; Mitra, Biswadev; Maini, Amit; Cleland, Heather

    2010-02-01

    There have been few cases of cold burn related to the exposure of liquid petroleum gas (LPG). We present the case of a young woman exposed to LPG while refueling her car who sustained partial thickness burns to the dorsum of her hand. Contact with LPG leaking from a pressurized system causes tissue damage because of cold injury. Immediate management of LPG is extrapolated from the management of frostbite. The increasing use of LPG mandates an awareness of prevention strategies and management principles in the setting of adverse events.

  13. Lainsa refueling specific services. Ideas of an evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Tomas, M.

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge evolution, in relation to works to develop in Refueling, related to the Cleaning and Decontamination, changed from almost total ignorance to be a reality, thanks personnel support and external organizations, already knowledgeable of the same, and to the human team effort highly involved in the fulfillment of the management development. We search where to find knowledge and we did it. We had ideas and we became them truth. The evolutionary process was positive. Some stages, equipment and developed services are commented, which allow us to offer High Quality Services and in agreed time term, especially during c ritical path . (Author)

  14. CLEO: A knowledge-based refueling assistant at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.E.; Kocher, L.F.; Seeman, S.E.

    1985-07-01

    CLEO is computer software system to assist in the planning and performance of the reactor refueling operations at the Fast Flux Test Facility. It is a recently developed application of artificial intelligence software with both expert systems and automated reasoning aspects. The computer system seeks to organize the sequence of core component movements according to the rules and logic used by the expert. In this form, CLEO has aspects which tie it to both the expert systems and automated reasoning areas within the artificial intelligence field

  15. Evaluation of sub-soil geo-electric properties in a proposed power sub-station site at Ebubu, Rivers State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    T.K.S. Abam; S.A. Ngah

    2014-01-01

    Electrical resistivity survey was carried out in a site proposed for the construction and installation of a Power sub-station. The project will involve subsurface installation of cables and other objects that easily conduct electricity. Extant laws including EIA also require knowledge of subsurface distribution of resistivity in construction projects that would involve burial of steel pipes and cables. The imperative of this is emphasized by the location of the project in an area of shallow g...

  16. A systematic analysis of directional site effects at stations of the Italian Seismic Network to test the role of local topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischiutta, Marta; Cianfarra, Paola; Salvini, Francesco; Cara, Fabrizio; Vannoli, Paola

    2018-03-01

    Directional site effects observed at seismological stations on pronounced relief are analyzed. We investigate the ground motion properties calculating horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios and horizontal polarization of both ambient vibrations and earthquake records using broadband seismograms of the Italian Seismic Network. We find that a subset of 47 stations with pronounced relief, results in a significant (>2) directional amplification of the horizontal component, with a well defined, site-specific direction of motion. However, the horizontal spectral response of sites is not uniform, varying from an isolated (resonant) frequency peak to a broadband amplification, interesting frequency bands as large as 1-10 Hz in many cases. Using the 47 selected stations, we have tried to establish a relation between directional amplification and topography geometry in a 2D-vision, when applicable, through a morphological analysis of the Digital Elevation Model using Geographic Information Systems. The procedure computes the parameters that characterize the geometry of topographic irregularities (size and slope), in combination with a principal component analysis that automatically yields the orientation of the elongated ridges. In seeking a relation between directional amplification and the surface morphology, we have found that it is impossible to fit the variety of observations with a resonant topography model as well as to identify common features in the ground motion behavior for stations with similar topography typologies. We conclude that, rather than the shape of the topography, local structural complexities and details of the near-surface structure must play a predominant role in controlling ground motion properties at sites with pronounced relief.

  17. Experimental measurement at the seismic station Ostrava-Krásné Pole (OKC): preliminary results and remarks on site effect at the studied locality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lednická, Markéta; Rušajová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2016), s. 137-147 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008; GA ČR GP13-07027P Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : seismic station OKC * spectral ratio * site effect Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016 https://www.irsm.cas.cz/index.php?page=acta_content_doi&id_cislo=17

  18. Optimal Refueling Pattern Search for a CANDU Reactor Using a Genetic Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quang Binh, DO; Gyuhong, ROH; Hangbok, CHOI

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results from the application of genetic algorithms to a refueling optimization of a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor. This work aims at making a mathematical model of the refueling optimization problem including the objective function and constraints and developing a method based on genetic algorithms to solve the problem. The model of the optimization problem and the proposed method comply with the key features of the refueling strategy of the CANDU reactor which adopts an on-power refueling operation. In this study, a genetic algorithm combined with an elitism strategy was used to automatically search for the refueling patterns. The objective of the optimization was to maximize the discharge burn-up of the refueling bundles, minimize the maximum channel power, or minimize the maximum change in the zone controller unit (ZCU) water levels. A combination of these objectives was also investigated. The constraints include the discharge burn-up, maximum channel power, maximum bundle power, channel power peaking factor and the ZCU water level. A refueling pattern that represents the refueling rate and channels was coded by a one-dimensional binary chromosome, which is a string of binary numbers 0 and 1. A computer program was developed in FORTRAN 90 running on an HP 9000 workstation to conduct the search for the optimal refueling patterns for a CANDU reactor at the equilibrium state. The results showed that it was possible to apply genetic algorithms to automatically search for the refueling channels of the CANDU reactor. The optimal refueling patterns were compared with the solutions obtained from the AUTOREFUEL program and the results were consistent with each other. (authors)

  19. Flywheel-Based Distributed Bus Signalling Strategy for the Public Fast Charging Station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragicevic, Tomislav; Sucic, Stepjan; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Fast charging stations (FCS) are able to recharge plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (pHEVs) in less than half an hour, thus representing an appealing concept to vehicle owners since the off-road time is similar as for refuelling at conventional public gas stations. However, since these FCS plugs...

  20. Modeling Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure to Support Passenger Vehicles †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Muratori

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The year 2014 marked hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs first becoming commercially available in California, where significant investments are being made to promote the adoption of alternative transportation fuels. A refueling infrastructure network that guarantees adequate coverage and expands in line with vehicle sales is required for FCEVs to be successfully adopted by private customers. In this paper, we provide an overview of modelling methodologies used to project hydrogen refueling infrastructure requirements to support FCEV adoption, and we describe, in detail, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s scenario evaluation and regionalization analysis (SERA model. As an example, we use SERA to explore two alternative scenarios of FCEV adoption: one in which FCEV deployment is limited to California and several major cities in the United States; and one in which FCEVs reach widespread adoption, becoming a major option as passenger vehicles across the entire country. Such scenarios can provide guidance and insights for efforts required to deploy the infrastructure supporting transition toward different levels of hydrogen use as a transportation fuel for passenger vehicles in the United States.

  1. Options for shortening nuclear power plant refueling outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastl, H.

    2001-01-01

    Deregulation of the European electricity market on 01.01.1999 forced a large number of electric utilities- especially nuclear power plant operators - to find ways of drastically cutting down their costs in order to be able to compete successfully within the new market environment. Nuclear power plants currently in operation mainly have three potential ways of reducing their power generating costs: by increasing plant availability, reducing fuel costs and cutting down operating costs. The optimization of plant refueling outages offers considerable potential for enhancing plant availability, but also helps bring down operating costs by reducing expenditure on maintenance. In order to optimize an outage in terms of its duration and costs, a variety of approaches are possible - all of which, however, involve certain key factors such as good organization, planning, logistics and control, improvement of equipment and tools, as well as motivation of personnel. Another aspect is the introduction of innovative technologies. In the last few years, such technologies have frequently enabled maintenance effort to be reduced, thus saving considerable time, and have also resulted in a need for fewer personnel to carry out the work, thus reducing radiation exposure. In many instances they have also improved the quality of work and outage performance as a whole. The paper uses recent examples to show how innovative technologies can contribute to-wards reducing nuclear plant maintenance costs and shorten the duration of refueling out-ages. (author)

  2. Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity of Long-Term Occupational Exposure to Low Levels of BTEX in Gas Station Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX can lead to multiple health injuries. However, what remains uncertain is the effect of long-term exposure to low levels of BTEX. Thus, we determined the BTEX levels in the air from the refueling and office areas in gas stations. Then we collected workers’ (200 refueling vs. 52 office workers peripheral blood samples to analyze the serum total-superoxide dismutase (T-SOD, glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG levels. DNA damage was analyzed by the comet assay and micronucleus test in buccal epithelial cells. We found that the levels of BTEX in refueling areas were significantly higher than those in office areas (p < 0.001. The serum T-SOD and GSH of refueling workers were significantly lower than those in office workers (p < 0.001. By contrast, the serum MDA and 8-OHdG of refueling workers were significantly higher than those of office workers (p < 0.001, MDA; p = 0.025, 8-OHdG. Furthermore, tail and Olive tail moments in refueling workers were longer (p = 0.004, tail moment; p = 0.001, Olive tail moment, and the micronucleus rate was higher (p < 0.001 than those in office workers. Taken together, long-term exposure to low levels of BTEX may reduce the antioxidant ability and increase the risk of DNA damage in refueling workers of gas stations.

  3. 40 CFR 86.1825-08 - Durability demonstration procedures for refueling emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., statistical analyses, additional data, or other information which is relevant to the decision. The... Durability demonstration procedures for refueling emissions. This section applies to 2008 and later model...-duty rules as allowed under the provisions of § 86.1801-01(c)(1) which are subject to refueling loss...

  4. Plasma density measurements on refuelling by solid hydrogen pellets in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, L.W.; Sillesen, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    The refuelling of a plasma by solid hydrogen pellets situated in the plasma is investigated. Nearly half of the pellet material is evaporated and seems to be completely ionized, resulting in an increase of the amount of plasma equivalent to one third of the total amount of plasma without refuelling. The gross behaviour of the plasma is not changed. (author)

  5. The Feasibility of Pellet Re-Fuelling of a Fusion Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Jørgensen, L. W.; Nielsen, P.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of re-fuelling a fusion reactor by injecting pellets of frozen hydrogen isotopes is reviewed. First a general look is taken of the dominant energy fluxes received by the pellet, the re-fuelling rate required and the relation between pellet size, injection speed and frequency...

  6. 1200 FPD refuelling simulation of RUFIC fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon Young; Jeong, Chang Joon; Min, Byung Joo; Suk, Ho Chun

    2001-07-01

    The refuelling strategy of RUFIC (Recovered Uranium Fuel in CANDU) fuel as a high-burnup fuel for a CANDU 6 reactor is studied to determine the achievable operation characteristics of the fuel and reactor. In this study, three refuelling schemes of 4-, 2-, and 3-bundle shift for 0.92 w/o RUFIC fuel in an CANDU 6 reactor were individually evaluated through 1200 FPD(Full Power Day)refuelling simulaltions where the 0.92 w/o RUFIC is equivalent to CANFLEX 0.9 w/o SEU(Slightly Enriched Uranium) in reactivity and burnup respects. The computer code system used for this study is WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP. The results simulated for the case of 4-bundle shift refueling scheme shows that the peak maximum channel power and peak maximum CPPF(Channel Power Peaking Factor)of 7228 kW and 1.175, respectively, seems too high to maintain the available operating margins, because some data of the maximum channel power exceed the operating limit(7070 kW based on the Technical Specifications of Wolsong 3 and 4 Units). Whereas, the results simulated for the case of 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme shows that sufficient operating margin could be secured where the peak maximum channel power and peak maximum CPPF were 6889 kW and 1.094, respectively. However, the channel refuelling rate (channels/day) of the 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme is twice that of the 4-bundle shift refuelling scheme, and hence the 2-bundle shift refuelling would not be an economical refuelling scheme for the RUFIC fuel bundles. Therefore, a 3-bundle shift refuelling scheme for the RUFIC fuel in CANDU 6 reactor was also studied by the 1200 FPD refuelling simulation. As a result, it is found that all the operating parameters in the 3-bundle shift case are achivable for the CANDU 6 reactor operation, and the channel refuelling rate of 2.88 channels/day seems to be attractive compared to the refuelling rate of 4.32 channels/day in the 2-bundle shift case.

  7. Management of main generator condition during long term plant shut down at Higashidori Nuclear Power Station Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Higashidori Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 shut down on February 6, 2011 to start 4th refuel outage. On March 11, 2011, we keep going refuel outage on this moment a large earthquake occurred and tsunami was generated following it which called 'Great East Japan Earthquake'. Refuel outage takes 3 ∼ 5 months normally but Higashidori NPS still keeping shut down over 3 years due to some issues. In this paper, we introduce about management of Main generator condition during long term plant shut down situation in addition to normal plant shut down situation to keep well. (author)

  8. New selection criteria for channel refueling of a Candu-6 reactor: introduction to floppy rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissette, D.

    2001-01-01

    A revised set of rules is in use at Gentilly-2 NGS for the selection of channels for refuelling. Traditional hard channel rejection rules (of go/no-go type) have been replaced by a more efficient set of soft evaluation rules based on concepts borrowed to the Fuzzy Logic. New evaluation rules, labelled as 'Floppy Rules', enable to assess and rate the channel suitability for refuelling by using a smooth and natural continuum of values qualifying excellent, good, fair and poor choices. Global channel suitability for refuelling is measured by combining separate ratings obtained from individual evaluation rules. Each evaluation rule is based on a specific control parameter related to local or lumped core properties. Two new software codes (NEWRULES and REFUEL) designed around the concept of Floppy Rules enable to perform a very efficient selection of optimized channel refuelling sequences either in manual and automatic mode. (author)

  9. A new multiparametric geophysical station to detect self-potential and seismometric signals at Tito site (Southern Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasco, M.; Lapenna, V.; Chianese, D.; Gallipoli, M. R. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Ist. di Metodologie Avanzate di Analisi Ambientale, Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy); Di Bello, G. [Potenza Universita' della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente

    2001-04-01

    In this work are presented the main features of a new multiparametric station able to jointly detect self-potential and seismometric signals in a seismic active area of Southern Italy. The new station has been designed and installed at the Tito Laboratories of National Research Council (Italy) that are located in the Southern Apennines, one of the most tectonically active areas of the whole Mediterranean. It combines advanced technologies for data acquisition with robust statistical techniques to pick out extreme events from self-potential recordings. The completely automatic station is equipped with electrical and seismometric sensors (16 channels, A/D 24 bit, sampling rate of 0.25 Hz, range dynamics of 133 dB). After a preliminary filtering procedure, mainly devoted to removing any influence of meteo-climatic conditions and/or cultural electrical noise, it was evaluated the performance of the new monitoring station investigating the possible correlation between anomalous patterns of the self-potential signals and local seismic activity. Objective criteria and robust statistical tools have been applied to identify extreme events in electrical measurements and to select the earthquakes that may be responsible for strain effects at the measuring point. The short period of the measuring activity does not allow anybody to give firm conclusions, however the first results encourage everybody to continue the monitoring activity by increasing the number of remote stations and improving the use of statistical packages for data processing. It was identified a well based monitoring strategy that in the near future could be useful to better understand the possible correlation between anomalous self-potential signals and local seismic activity.

  10. Design study for KALIMER upper internal structure and reactor refueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ho

    1996-09-01

    The design study for the KALIMER upper internal structure (UIS) and reactor refueling system has been described. Two distinct features are plug-in UIS and extended refueling outage. For the UIS system, the functional, structural and material requirements have been determined and the accommodation approaches to meet these functional requirements described. For the refueling system, the functional, structural, process and I and C (Instrument and Control) requirements have been established and the accommodation approaches for the functional and process requirements described. The impact on plant availability due to extension of the refueling outage has also been investigated. The accommodation approaches for UIS system show that the design concept of the system will satisfy the functional requirements with a few design issues to be resolved, such as UIS plug in/out handling system and cask design. It is also shown that the functional and process requirements of the refueling system are achievable with the design of the IVTM cask and related transfer system and the extended refueling outage has little effect (within 1%) on the plant availability if extra refueling time do not exceed 1 week. 1 refs. (Author)

  11. Design study for KALIMER upper internal structure and reactor refueling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    The design study for the KALIMER upper internal structure (UIS) and reactor refueling system has been described. Two distinct features are plug-in UIS and extended refueling outage. For the UIS system, the functional, structural and material requirements have been determined and the accommodation approaches to meet these functional requirements described. For the refueling system, the functional, structural, process and I and C (Instrument and Control) requirements have been established and the accommodation approaches for the functional and process requirements described. The impact on plant availability due to extension of the refueling outage has also been investigated. The accommodation approaches for UIS system show that the design concept of the system will satisfy the functional requirements with a few design issues to be resolved, such as UIS plug in/out handling system and cask design. It is also shown that the functional and process requirements of the refueling system are achievable with the design of the IVTM cask and related transfer system and the extended refueling outage has little effect (within 1%) on the plant availability if extra refueling time do not exceed 1 week. 1 refs. (Author).

  12. (Shippingport Atomic Power Station). Quarterly operating report, third quarter 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    At the beginning of the third quarter of 1979, the Shippingport Atomic Power Station remained shutdown to complete repairs of the turbine generator hydrogen circulation fan following discovery of a rubbing noise on May 24, 1979. The Station was in a cooldown condition at approximately 180/sup 0/F and 300 psig with a steam bubble in the pressurizer and the reactor coolant pumps in slow speed. The reactor plant cooldown heat exchanger was in service to maintain coolant temperature. The 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D reactor coolant loops and the 1AC and 1BD purification loops remained in service. All expended PWR Core 2 fuel elements have previously been shipped off-site. The remaining irradiated PWR Core 2 core barrel and miscellaneous refueling tools were in storage under shielding water in the deep pit of the Fuel Handling Building. The LWBR Core has generated 12,111.00 EFPH from startup through the end of the quarter.

  13. Design of a hydrogen fueling station for Vancouver, BC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikeos, J.; Haas, J.; Maddaloni, J.; Owen, T.; Smolak, T.; Songprakorp, R.; Sodouri, P.; St Germain, L.; Tura, A.; Rowe, A.

    2004-01-01

    A public hydrogen refueling station has been designed to service a minimum daily capacity of 50 light-duty hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, each requiring 3 kg of compressed gaseous hydrogen at 5000 psi. A peak hourly fueling rate of 20 kg, or slightly less than 7 cars, can be accommodated. The station is designed around bulk liquid hydrogen storage, and energy efficient liquid compression. On-site storage with centralized production allows for great flexibility in the design and the simple fueling process results in fewer potential failure modes. High customer demand can easily be accommodated due to a four minute filling time, made possible by a low temperature hydrogen filling system. The overall well to wheel pathway of this fueling process generates up to 95% less CO 2 and requires up to 42% less energy than gasoline. The proposed design requires a low capital investment, and uses components easily available from a proven supplier base. An economic analysis shows that the delivered hydrogen cost is between $0.11/mile and $0.18/mile, based on a ten year discounted cash flow analysis. (author)

  14. Safety approach to the selection of design criteria for the CRBRP reactor refueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisl, C.J.; Berg, G.E.; Sharkey, N.F.

    1979-01-01

    The selection of safety design criteria for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) refueling systems required the extrapolation of regulations and guidelines intended for Light Water Reactor refueling systems and was encumbered by the lack of benefit from a commercially licensed predecessor other than Fermi. The overall approach and underlying logic are described for developing safety design criteria for the reactor refueling system (RRS) of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). The complete selection process used to establish the criteria is presented, from the definition of safety functions to the finalization of safety design criteria in the appropriate documents. The process steps are illustrated by examples

  15. Fuel management study on quarter core refueling for Ling Ao NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Li Jinggang

    2012-01-01

    The fuel management study on quarter core refueling is introduced for Ling Ao NPP. Starting from the selection of the objective of fuel management for quarter core refueling, the code and method used and the analysis carried out are explained in details to reach the final loading pattern chosen. The start-up physics test results are listed to demonstrate the realized quarter core fuel management. In the end, the advantage and disadvantage after turning to quarter core refueling has been given for the power plant from the fuel management point of view. (authors)

  16. Assessment of occupational exposure to BTEX compounds at a bus diesel-refueling bay: A case study in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolla, Raeesa; Curtis, Christopher J; Knight, Jasper

    2015-12-15

    Of increasing concern is pollution by volatile organic compounds, with particular reference to five aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and two isomeric xylenes; BTEX). These pollutants are classified as hazardous air pollutants. Due to the potential health risks associated with these pollutants, BTEX concentrations were monitored at a bus diesel-refueling bay, in Johannesburg, South Africa, using gas chromatography, coupled with a photo-ionization detector. Results indicate that o-xylene (29-50%) and benzene (13-33%) were found to be the most abundant species of total BTEX at the site. Benzene was within South African occupational limits, but above international occupational exposure limits. On the other hand, occupational concentrations of toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes were within national and international occupational limits throughout the monitoring period, based on 8-hour workday weighted averages. Ethyl-benzene and p-xylene concentrations, during winter, correspond to activity at the site, and thus idling of buses during refueling may elevate results. Overall, occupational air quality at the refueling bay is a matter of health concern, especially with regards to benzene exposure, and future reduction strategies are crucial. Discrepancies between national and international limit values merit further investigation to determine whether South African guidelines for benzene are sufficiently precautionary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear power station achievement 1968-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howles, L.R.

    This report reviews and gives an analysis of the achievement of operating nuclear power stations in the Western world on three relevant bases: (1) both annual and cumulative achievement of all nuclear power stations at a particular time; (2) cumulative achievement of all nuclear power stations at the end of the first and subsequent years of their lives to show trends with age; (3) achievement based on refuelling period considerations. Nowhere in the report are any operating details ignored, omitted or eliminated in the method of analysis. Summarising the results of the reviews shows: an improvement with time from initial electricity generation on all bases; that initially, larger sizes of reactor/turbine operate less well than smaller sizes (except for PHWR's); that after an initial number of years, the largest size units operate as well as the intermediate and smaller sizes, or better in the PHWR case; that a 75 per cent cumulative load factor achievement in the middle years of a reactor/turbines life can be expected on the refuelling period considerations base; that at June 1980, 35 nuclear power stations achieved an annual load factor over 75 per cent; that the above achievement was possible despite the repercussions following the Three Mile Island 'accident' and the shutdowns in the USA for piping system seismic adequacy checks required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for five nuclear power stations; and that even when reactors/turbines are reaching towards the end of their design life, there is no rapid deterioration in their achievements. (author)

  18. Radioecology applied to the studies of nuclear power station sites. Radioecological study of the middle Rhone. Pt.1. Trial interpretation of 'in situ' determination of sedimentary activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picat, P.; Debeuns, G.; Maubert, H.; Cartier, Y.; Lacroix, D.; Angeli, A.; Diraison, J.; Caudoux, B.; Tempier, C.

    1980-01-01

    The Rhone section investigated over a distance of around 100 km includes many nuclear facilities in operation, under construction or projected; such as gas diffusion and reprocessing plants, graphite-gas, PWR type and breeder reactors. It is worthwhile defining the radioecological situation on the basis of existing discharges and with the prospect of the complete commissioning of six nuclear power station sites. The study of the activity of sediments and fishes has been selected. The results are analyzed in terms of the future prospects of nuclear sitings. It would appear that attention should be focused on the effects of the discharge technique (duration, method of dilution) and the follow-up of quantities and activity levels of the liquid effluents in relation with the changes in the hydrological components of the river. Such an approach aims to define those areas most sensitive to the total impact of the fall-out and of the nuclear industry [fr

  19. Technical specifications, Catawba Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-413). Appendix A to License No. NPF-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Information is presented concerning safety limits for operation of reactor control systems, power distribution, instrumentation, reactor coolant system, emergency core cooling system, containment system, electrical power systems, refueling operations, radioactive effluents, environmental monitoring, reactor site, and administrative aspects

  20. 太阳能光伏电站场址选择问题的探讨%Discussion on Site Selection of Solar Photovoitaic Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛思禹; 许文年; 侯燕梅; 祝立群; 张成

    2011-01-01

    太阳能是环保、安全的可再生能源,伴随能源危机和环境污染问题的出现受到了越来越广泛的关注.基于太阳能发电的需求,全面认识太阳能光伏发电的原理和光伏发电系统的组成,把握影响光伏电站发电量的因素具有现实意义.结合云南省某光伏电站工程实例,探讨了太阳能光伏电站场址选择的相关技术问题,并对其进行了总结,为太阳能光伏发电场址选择提供借鉴.%As an environmental and safe renewable energy, solar energy attracts extensive attention along with the emergence of energy crisis and environmental pollution. Basing on the demand of solar power generation, it is practically significant to comprehensively understand the principle and system composition of solar photovoltaic power generation, and to grasp the factors affecting output of photovoltaic power station. Combining with an engineering example of photovoltaic power station in Yunnan province, the paper summarizes and probes into the related technical problems of the solar photovoltaic power station's site selection, so as to provide reference for the site selection of solar photovoltaic power generation.

  1. Optimal Siting of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles Based on Fuzzy Delphi and Hybrid Multi-Criteria Decision Making Approaches from an Extended Sustainability Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Optimal siting of electric vehicle charging stations (EVCSs is crucial to the sustainable development of electric vehicle systems. Considering the defects of previous heuristic optimization models in tackling subjective factors, this paper employs a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM framework to address the issue of EVCS siting. The initial criteria for optimal EVCS siting are selected from extended sustainability theory, and the vital sub-criteria are further determined by using a fuzzy Delphi method (FDM, which consists of four pillars: economy, society, environment and technology perspectives. To tolerate vagueness and ambiguity of subjective factors and human judgment, a fuzzy Grey relation analysis (GRA-VIKOR method is employed to determine the optimal EVCS site, which also improves the conventional aggregating function of fuzzy Vlsekriterijumska Optimizacijia I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR. Moreover, to integrate the subjective opinions as well as objective information, experts’ ratings and Shannon entropy method are employed to determine combination weights. Then, the applicability of proposed framework is demonstrated by an empirical study of five EVCS site alternatives in Tianjin. The results show that A3 is selected as the optimal site for EVCS, and sub-criteria affiliated with environment obtain much more attentions than that of other sub-criteria. Moreover, sensitivity analysis indicates the selection results remains stable no matter how sub-criteria weights are changed, which verifies the robustness and effectiveness of proposed model and evaluation results. This study provides a comprehensive and effective method for optimal siting of EVCS and also innovates the weights determination and distance calculation for conventional fuzzy VIKOR.

  2. Current status of the development of the refuelable aluminum-air battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.; Kraftick, K. A.; McKinley, B. J.

    1983-05-01

    The technical status of a refuelable aluminum air battery using flowing caustic aluminate electrolyte at 50 to 700 C is reviewed. Four distinct designs for rapidly refuelable cells were evaluated in single or multicell modules on an engineering scale (167 to 1000 cm(2)/cell). Consideration is given to cells of the wedge configuration, which allow partial recharge, high anode utilization, and rapid refueling. Kinetic models developed for aluminum trihydroxide precipitation are used to predict the behavior of integrated cell/crystallizer systems. Drive cycle life and polarization data are reviewed for air electrodes under simulated vehicle operating conditions. Problems in the development of cost effective anode alloys are described. These results are interpreted from the perspective of the potential of an aluminum air battery to provide an electric vehicle with the range, acceleration and rapid refueling capabilities of common automobiles.

  3. Improvement in or relating to methods and apparatus for refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumyakin, E.P.; Sabir-de-Ribas, K.I.; Druzhinsky, I.A.; Kondratiev, P.V.; Andreichikov, B.I.; Slepov, L.M.; Borisjuk, E.V.; Smirnov, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to improvements in the methods and in the apparatus used for refuelling liquid metal cooled fast reactors and in particular to systems for cooling the fuel assemblies as they are removed from the reactor. (UK)

  4. Relative position control design of receiver UAV in flying-boom aerial refueling phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shuai; Yuan, Suozhong

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes the design of the relative position-keeping control of the receiver unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with the time-varying mass in the refueling phase utilizing an inner-outer loop structure. Firstly, the model of the receiver in the refueling phase is established. And then tank model is set up to analyze the influence of fuel transfer on the receiver. Subsequently, double power reaching law based sliding mode controller is designed to control receiver translational motion relative to tanker aircraft in the outer loop while active disturbance rejection control technique is applied to the inner loop to stabilize the receiver. In addition, the closed-loop stabilities of the subsystems are established, respectively. Finally, an aerial refueling model under various refueling strategies is utilized. Simulations and comparative analysis demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed controllers. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

    2008-07-01

    DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

  6. Air Force Air Refueling: The KC-X Aircraft Acquisition Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knight, William; Bolkcom, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    ... to accomplish air refueling missions. The program is expected to cost approximately $35 billion. Both Boeing and a consortium consisting of Northrop Grumman and European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company...

  7. Ground-water flow in the surficial aquifer system and potential movement of contaminants from selected waste-disposal sites at Naval Station Mayport, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer system at Naval Station Mayport near Jacksonville, Florida, was simulated with a two-layer finite-difference model as part of an investigation conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The model was calibrated to 229 water-level measurements from 181 wells during three synoptic surveys (July 17, 1995; July 31, 1996; and October 24, 1996). A quantifiable understanding of ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer was needed to evaluate remedial-action alternatives under consideration by the Naval Station Mayport to control the possible movement of contaminants from sites on the station. Multi-well aquifer tests, single-well tests, and slug tests were conducted to estimate the hydraulic properties of the surficial aquifer system, which was divided into three geohydrologic units?an S-zone and an I-zone separated by a marsh-muck confining unit. The recharge rate was estimated to range from 4 to 15 inches per year (95 percent confidence limits), based on a chloride-ratio method. Most of the simulations following model calibration were based on a recharge rate of 8 inches per year to unirrigated pervious areas. The advective displacement of saline pore water during the last 200 years was simulated using a particle-tracking routine, MODPATH, applied to calibrated steady-state and transient models of the Mayport peninsula. The surficial aquifer system at Naval Station Mayport has been modified greatly by natural and anthropogenic forces so that the freshwater flow system is expanding and saltwater is being flushed from the system. A new MODFLOW package (VAR1) was written to simulate the temporal variation of hydraulic properties caused by construction activities at Naval Station Mayport. The transiently simulated saltwater distribution after 200 years of displacement described the chloride distribution in the I-zone (determined from measurements made during 1993 and 1996) better than the steady-state simulation. The

  8. Transfrontier problems in connection with the site selection of power stations and energy facilities with environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manz, P.; Kanton Basel-Landschaft, Liestal

    1977-01-01

    This contribution deals with the subjects politics and environmental protection, site selection procedures and their consequences, and tasks of international commissions, and concludes that cooperation, research and agreement are essential for environmental and energy policies which are to be beneficial to all. (RW) [de

  9. Exposure to regular gasoline and ethanol oxyfuel during refueling in Alaska.

    OpenAIRE

    Backer, L C; Egeland, G M; Ashley, D L; Lawryk, N J; Weisel, C P; White, M C; Bundy, T; Shortt, E; Middaugh, J P

    1997-01-01

    Although most people are thought to receive their highest acute exposures to gasoline while refueling, relatively little is actually known about personal, nonoccupational exposures to gasoline during refueling activities. This study was designed to measure exposures associated with the use of an oxygenated fuel under cold conditions in Fairbanks, Alaska. We compared concentrations of gasoline components in the blood and in the personal breathing zone (PBZ) of people who pumped regular unleade...

  10. Refueling emissions from cars in Japan: Compositions, temperature dependence and effect of vapor liquefied collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Refueling emissions from cars available on the Japanese market, which were not equipped with specific controlling devices, were investigated. For the composition analysis, a proton transfer reaction plus switchable reagent ion mass spectrometry (PTR + SRI-MS), which is capable of real-time measurement, was used. In addition, the performance of a vapor liquefied collection system (VLCS), which is a recently developed controlling device, was evaluated and compared with an onboard refueling vapor recovery (ORVR) system. The refueling emission factor of uncontrolled vehicles at 20 °C was 1.02 ± 0.40 g/L in the case dispensing 20 L of fuel. The results of composition analysis indicated that the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) of refueling emissions in Japan was 3.49 ± 0.83. The emissions consist of 80% alkanes and 20% alkenes, and aromatics and di-enes were negligible. C4 alkene had the highest impact on the MIR of refueling emissions. The amounts of refueling emissions were well reproduced by a function developed by MOVE2010 in the temperature range of 5-35 °C. The compositions of the refueling emissions varied in this temperature range, but the change in MIR was negligible. The trapping efficiency of VLCS was the same level as that of the ORVR (over 95%). The MIRs of refueling and evaporative emissions were strongly affected by that of the test fuel. This study and our previous study indicated that MIRbreakthrough ≈ MIRrefueling ≈ MIRfuel + 0.5 and MIRpermeation ≈ MIRfuel. The real-world estimated average MIRfuel in Japan was about 3.0.

  11. Advanced CANDU reactors fuel analysis through optimal fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingle, C.P.; Bonin, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of alternate CANDU fuels along with natural uranium-based fuel was carried out from the view point of optimal in-core fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium. The alternate fuels considered in the present work include thorium containing oxide mixtures (MOX), plutonium-based MOX, and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel recycled in CANDU reactors (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU (DUPIC)); these are compared with the usual natural UO 2 fuel. The focus of the study is on the 'Approach to Refuelling Equilibrium' period which immediately follows the initial commissioning of the reactor. The in-core fuel management problem for this period is treated as an optimization problem in which the objective function is the refuelling frequency to be minimized by adjusting the following decision variables: the channel to be refuelled next, the time of the refuelling and the number of fresh fuel bundles to be inserted in the channel. Several constraints are also included in the optimisation problem which is solved using Perturbation Theory. Both the present 37-rod CANDU fuel bundle and the proposed CANFLEX bundle designs are part of this study. The results include the time to reach refuelling equilibrium from initial start-up of the reactor, the average discharge burnup, the average refuelling frequency and the average channel and bundle powers relative to natural UO 2 . The model was initially tested and the average discharge burnup for natural UO 2 came within 2% of the industry accepted 199 MWh/kgHE. For this type of fuel, the optimization exercise predicted the savings of 43 bundles per full power year. In addition to producing average discharge burnups and other parameters for the advanced fuels investigated, the optimisation model also evidenced some problem areas like high power densities for fuels such as the DUPIC. Perturbation Theory has proven itself to be an accurate and valuable optimization tool in predicting the time between

  12. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    Phase I Due to the growing interest in establishing a domestic hydrogen infrastructure, several hydrogen fueling stations already have been established around the country as demonstration units. While these stations help build familiarity with hydrogen fuel in their respective communities, hydrogen vehicles are still several years from mass production. This limited number of hydrogen vehicles translates to a limited demand for hydrogen fuel, a significant hurdle for the near-term establishment of commercially viable hydrogen fueling stations. By incorporating a fuel cell and cogeneration system with a hydrogen fueling station, the resulting energy station can compensate for low hydrogen demand by providing both hydrogen dispensing and combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The electrical power generated by the energy station can be fed back into the power grid or a nearby facility, which in turn helps offset station costs. Hydrogen production capacity not used by vehicles can be used to support building heat and power loads. In this way, an energy station can experience greater station utility while more rapidly recovering capital costs, providing an increased market potential relative to a hydrogen fueling station. At an energy station, hydrogen is generated on-site. Part of the hydrogen is used for vehicle refueling and part of the hydrogen is consumed by a fuel cell. As the fuel cell generates electricity and sends it to the power grid, excess heat is reclaimed through a cogeneration system for use in a nearby facility. Both the electrical generation and heat reclamation serve to offset the cost of purchasing the equivalent amount of energy for nearby facilities and the energy station itself. This two-phase project assessed the costs and feasibility of developing a hydrogen vehicle fueling station in conjunction with electricity and cogenerative heat generation for nearby Federal buildings. In order to determine which system configurations and operational

  13. A repeatedly refuelable mediated biofuel cell based on a hierarchical porous carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shuji; Yamanoi, Shun; Murata, Kenichi; Mita, Hiroki; Samukawa, Tsunetoshi; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Sakai, Hideki; Tokita, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    Biofuel cells that generate electricity from renewable fuels, such as carbohydrates, must be reusable through repeated refuelling, should these devices be used in consumer electronics. We demonstrate the stable generation of electricity from a glucose-powered mediated biofuel cell through multiple refuelling cycles. This refuelability is achieved by immobilizing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), an electron-transfer mediator, and redox enzymes in high concentrations on porous carbon particles constituting an anode while maintaining their electrochemical and enzymatic activities after the immobilization. This bioanode can be refuelled continuously for more than 60 cycles at 1.5 mA cm-2 without significant potential drop. Cells assembled with these bioanodes and bilirubin-oxidase-based biocathodes can be repeatedly used to power a portable music player at 1 mW cm-3 through 10 refuelling cycles. This study suggests that the refuelability within consumer electronics should facilitate the development of long and repeated use of the mediated biofuel cells as well as of NAD-based biosensors, bioreactors, and clinical applications.

  14. A Comparative Study on the Refueling Simulation Method for a CANDU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Quang Binh; Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor calculation is typically performed by the RFSP code to obtain the power distribution upon a refueling. In order to assess the equilibrium behavior of the CANDU reactor, a few methods were suggested for a selection of the refueling channel. For example, an automatic refueling channel selection method (AUTOREFUEL) and a deterministic method (GENOVA) were developed, which were based on a reactor's operation experience and the generalized perturbation theory, respectively. Both programs were designed to keep the zone controller unit (ZCU) water level within a reasonable range during a continuous refueling simulation. However, a global optimization of the refueling simulation, that includes constraints on the discharge burn-up, maximum channel power (MCP), maximum bundle power (MBP), channel power peaking factor (CPPF) and the ZCU water level, was not achieved. In this study, an evolutionary algorithm, which is indeed a hybrid method based on the genetic algorithm, the elitism strategy and the heuristic rules for a multi-cycle and multi-objective optimization of the refueling simulation has been developed for the CANDU reactor. This paper presents the optimization model of the genetic algorithm and compares the results with those obtained by other simulation methods.

  15. Laser driven pellet refuelling for JET (and reactor) uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, I.J.

    1978-11-01

    Published estimates of pellet sizes and velocities required to refuel JET and post-JET experiments are summarized. Possible advantages and difficulties of accelerating solid, unconstrained hydrogenic (and also jacketed) pellets to these velocities using laser techniques are then discussed. An essential problem to be solved is adequate axial guidance of the pellet during its acceleration, since laser pulse durations of many sound-transit times (in the solid D 2 ) are necessary to avoid shock-heating the pellet. It is shown that Culham's multikilojoule CO 2 TROJAN laser facility is well suited to testing many of the concepts proposed. In particular it is shown that successful verification, and subsequent optimization, of such (novel) techniques would permit single shot tests of contemporary pellet ablation theories by the injection of approximately 1 mm diameter D 2 pellets at velocities 6 cm s -1 into the JET plasma. Means for scaling these techniques to repetition rates of order 10 Hz, and to the 1 cm pellet diameters possibly required in a working Tokamak reactor, are also discussed. (author)

  16. Refueling the RPI reactor facility with low-enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Rodriguez-Vera, F.; Wicks, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The RPI Critical Facility has operated since 1963 with a core of thin, highly enriched fuel plates in twenty-five fuel assembly boxes. A program is underway to refuel the reactor with 4.81 w/o enriched SPERT (F-1) fuel rods. Use of these fuel rods will upgrade the capabilities of the reactor and will eliminate a security risk. Adequate quantities of SPERT (F-1) fuel rods are available, and their use will result in a great cost saving relative to manufacturing new low-enrichment fuel plates. The SPERT fuel rods are 19 inches longer than are the present fuel plates, so a modified core support structure is required. It is planned to support and position the SPERT fuel pins by upper and lower lattice plates, thus avoiding the considerable cost of new fuel assembly boxes. The lattice plates will be secured to the existing top and bottom plates. The design permits the fabrication and use of other lattice plates for critical experiment research programs in support of long-lived full development for power reactors. (author)

  17. Study of Site Effect at Seismic Station Located in Undermined Area of Karviná Region (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lednická, Markéta; Kaláb, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 5 (2016), s. 1715-1730 ISSN 1895-7455 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-07027P Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Karviná region * site effect * SSR * HVSR * mining induced seismicity Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.968, year: 2016 http://agp.igf.edu.pl/files/64/5/Lednicka-Kalab.pdf

  18. Near surface geotechnical and geophysical data cross validated for site characterization applications. The cases of selected accelerometric stations in Crete island (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupasakis, Constantinos; Tsangaratos, Paraskevas; Rozos, Dimitrios; Rondoyianni, Theodora; Vafidis, Antonis; Steiakakis, Emanouil; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Soupios, Pantelis; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Sarris, Apostolos; Mangriotis, Maria-Dafni; Dikmen, Unal

    2015-04-01

    The near surface ground conditions are highly important for the design of civil constructions. These conditions determine primarily the ability of the foundation formations to bear loads, the stress - strain relations and the corresponding deformations, as well as the soil amplification and corresponding peak ground motion in case of dynamic loading. The static and dynamic geotechnical parameters as well as the ground-type/soil-category can be determined by combining geotechnical and geophysical methods, such as engineering geological surface mapping, geotechnical drilling, in situ and laboratory testing and geophysical investigations. The above mentioned methods were combined for the site characterization in selected sites of the Hellenic Accelerometric Network (HAN) in the area of Crete Island. The combination of the geotechnical and geophysical methods in thirteen (13) sites provided sufficient information about their limitations, setting up the minimum tests requirements in relation to the type of the geological formations. The reduced accuracy of the surface mapping in urban sites, the uncertainties introduced by the geophysical survey in sites with complex geology and the 1-D data provided by the geotechnical drills are some of the causes affecting the right order and the quantity of the necessary investigation methods. Through this study the gradual improvement on the accuracy of the site characterization data in regards to the applied investigation techniques is presented by providing characteristic examples from the total number of thirteen sites. As an example of the gradual improvement of the knowledge about the ground conditions the case of AGN1 strong motion station, located at Agios Nikolaos city (Eastern Crete), is briefly presented. According to the medium scale geological map of IGME the station was supposed to be founded over limestone. The detailed geological mapping reveled that a few meters of loose alluvial deposits occupy the area, expected

  19. Construction on a new deep ice coring site at Dome Fuji Station -Operations carried out by the JARE-44 Dome Fuji overwintering team-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Kameda

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Eight members of the 44th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-44 stayed at Dome Fuji Station (77°19′01″S, 39°42′11″E; 3810 m a.s.l.; ice thickness 3028±15 m; mean air temperature -54.4°C; lowest air temperature -79.7°C from January 19, 2003 to January 25, 2004 for glaciological, meteorological, and upper atmospheric observations, and for construction at a new ice coring site for deep ice coring. The construction was a continuation of the activities of JARE-43; JARE-44 primarily carried out interior work at the ice coring site. The following works were carried out during the overwintering period and are described in this paper: retrieval of casing pipes from the borehole, enlargement of the borehole, insertion of casing pipes into the borehole, movement of the winch system from the old to the new ice coring sites (44.5 m apart, floor construction, construction and preparation of a 10 m depth pit for the rotating mast, construction of stairs between the old and the new ice coring sites, construction of working tables, assembling the mast and the small goliath crane, setting up a lifter, testing the winch system, setting the winch for the chip collector, cable replacement for deep ice coring, assembling of a deep ice core drill, adjustment of a rotating mast, enlargement of caves for ice core storage, and general electrical work in the new ice coring site. The total working time for the above operations was 593.5 person-days. Since the average working time was 6 h/day, the total working time was 3561 person-hours. Preparations for borehole temperature measurements in a 2503 m borehole and the ice coring operation that was mainly conducted by the JARE-45 team are briefly described.

  20. Optimal Site Selection of Wind-Solar Complementary Power Generation Project for a Large-Scale Plug-In Charging Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The wind-solar hybrid power generation project combined with electric vehicle charging stations can effectively reduce the impact on the power system caused by the random charging of electric cars, contribute to the in-situ wind-solar complementary system and reduce the harm arising from its output volatility. In this paper, the site selection index system of a landscape complementary power generation project is established by using the statistical methods and statistical analysis in the literature. Subsequently, using the Analytic Network Process to calculate the index weight, a cloud model was used in combination with preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluations to transform and sort uncertain language information. Finally, using the results of the decision-making for the location of the Shanghai wind-solar complementary project and by carrying out contrast analysis and sensitivity analysis, the superiority and stability of the decision model constructed in this study was demonstrated.

  1. Permanent magnetic field treatment of nonpenetrating corneal injuries at oil drilling site medical aid stations in Udmurt ASSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaykova, M.V.; Gorkunov, E.S.; Liyaskin, M.I.; Osipov, N.A.; Koshevoy, V.P.; Vlasova, E.F.; Solovev, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Therapeutic trials were conducted with permanent magnetic field magnetotherapy in the management of nonpenetrating corneal injuries. The low intensity fields (10 mTesla) were applied to closed eyelids of 100 workers, 20-30 years of age, injured at oil drilling sites in Udmurtia, with another 100 workers treated in the conventional manner without adjunct magnetotherapy to provide a control group. Treatment consisted of 3-20 half-hour sessions following foreign body removal. In the experimental group 98% of the patients showed recovery of 0.9-1.0 visual acuity, with superficial traumatic keratitis evident in only 2% of the subjects. Full recovery of visual acuity was obtained in only 89% of the control group, with 11% of the patients in that group presenting with traumatic keratitis. In addition, discharge time for the former group was 2.5 days on the average, and 4.5 days for the control group. The severity of complications in the magnetotherapy group was also less pronounced than in the control cohort.

  2. Investigation of ground-water contamination at a drainage ditch, Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, 2005–06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Casey, Clifton C.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, used newly developed sampling methods to investigate ground-water contamination by chlorobenzenes beneath a drainage ditch on the southwestern side of Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, during 2005-06. The drainage ditch, which is a potential receptor for ground-water contaminants from Installation Restoration Site 4, intermittently discharges water to Corpus Christi Bay. This report uses data from a new type of pore-water sampler developed for this investigation and other methods to examine the subsurface contamination beneath the drainage ditch. Analysis of ground water from the samplers indicated that chlorobenzenes (maximum detected concentration of 160 micrograms per liter) are present in the ground water beneath the ditch. The concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the samples (less than 0.05-0.4 milligram per liter) showed that the ground water beneath and near the ditch is anaerobic, indicating that substantial chlorobenzene biodegradation in the aquifer beneath the ditch is unlikely. Probable alternative mechanisms of chlorobenzene removal in the ground water beneath the drainage ditch include sorption onto the organic-rich sediment and contaminant depletion by cattails through uptake, sorption, and localized soil aeration.

  3. A simplified burnup calculation strategy with refueling in static molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Gupta, Anurag; Krishnani, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactors, by nature can be refuelled and reprocessed online. Thus, a simulation methodology has to be developed which can consider online refueling and reprocessing aspect of the reactor. To cater such needs a simplified burnup calculation strategy to account for refueling and removal of molten salt fuel at any desired burnup has been identified in static molten salt reactor in batch mode as a first step of way forward. The features of in-house code ITRAN has been explored for such calculations. The code also enables us to estimate the reactivity introduced in the system due to removal of any number of considered nuclides at any burnup. The effect of refueling fresh fuel and removal of burned fuel has been studied in batch mode with in-house code ITRAN. The effect of refueling and burnup on change in reactivity per day has been analyzed. The analysis of removal of 233 Pa at a particular burnup has been carried out. The similar analysis has been performed for some other nuclides also. (author)

  4. Anti-disturbance rapid vibration suppression of the flexible aerial refueling hose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zikang; Wang, Honglun; Li, Na

    2018-05-01

    As an extremely dangerous phenomenon in autonomous aerial refueling (AAR), the flexible refueling hose vibration caused by the receiver aircraft's excessive closure speed should be suppressed once it appears. This paper proposed a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) based refueling hose servo take-up system for the vibration suppression of the flexible refueling hose. A rapid back-stepping based anti-disturbance nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode (NFTSM) control scheme with a specially established finite-time convergence NFTSM observer is proposed for the PMSM based hose servo take-up system under uncertainties and disturbances. The unmeasured load torque and other disturbances in the PMSM system are reconstituted by the NFTSM observer and to be compensated during the controller design. Then, with the back-stepping technique, a rapid anti-disturbance NFTSM controller is proposed for the PMSM angular tracking to improve the tracking error convergence speed and tracking precision. The proposed vibration suppression scheme is then applied to PMSM based hose servo take-up system for the refueling hose vibration suppression in AAR. Simulation results show the proposed scheme can suppress the hose vibration rapidly and accurately even the system is exposed to strong uncertainties and probe position disturbances, it is more competitive in tracking accuracy, tracking error convergence speed and robustness.

  5. Extension of the time-average model to Candu refueling schemes involving reshuffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouben, Benjamin; Nichita, Eleodor

    2008-01-01

    Candu reactors consist of a horizontal non-pressurized heavy-water-filled vessel penetrated axially by fuel channels, each containing twelve 50-cm-long fuel bundles cooled by pressurized heavy water. Candu reactors are refueled on-line and, as a consequence, the core flux and power distributions change continuously. For design purposes, a 'time-average' model was developed in the 1970's to calculate the average over time of the flux and power distribution and to study the effects of different refueling schemes. The original time-average model only allows treatment of simple push-through refueling schemes whereby fresh fuel is inserted at one end of the channel and irradiated fuel is removed from the other end. With the advent of advanced fuel cycles and new Candu designs, novel refueling schemes may be considered, such as reshuffling discharged fuel from some channels into other channels, to achieve better overall discharge burnup. Such reshuffling schemes cannot be handled by the original time-average model. This paper presents an extension of the time-average model to allow for the treatment of refueling schemes with reshuffling. Equations for the extended model are presented, together with sample results for a simple demonstration case. (authors)

  6. The development of AI-based refueling control system to the FUGEN NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanko, Takashi; Tanaka, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    Since even skilled workers spent a considerable time to perform the refueling work previously, an automatic control system was developed by using φNET, an AI tool and its application to refueling works was started in practice. In this system, the optimum plan for the refueling work was constructed using a network which allows to present the equipments to handle the fuel, as well as the operational roles obtained from the worker's experiences. Based on the plan, the instruments concerned were automatically operated to collect the data on the actual operation, the expression and/or printing was made on the movement histories of the articles and the status of their storages. By the development of the system, optimization of refueling works, rationalization of the management and the improvement of reliability for the works became possible. The development was performed in the following two steps; the first was development of an off-line system providing an operational guidance ot the operator according to the optimum operation plan and the second was development of an on-line system which allows to automatically control the instruments according to the operational plan. The off-line system has been put into practice since 1991 and the automatic operation of refueling has been started with the on-line system from 1995. (M.N.)

  7. Natural gas fuelling stations installation code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrigar, C; Burford, G; Adragna, M; Hawryn, S

    2004-07-01

    This Canadian Standard applies to natural gas fuelling stations that can be used for fleet and public dispensing operations. This document is divided into 11 sections that address the scope of the Standard; definitions and reference publications; general requirements; compressors; storage; dispensing; flow control devices; storage vessel dispatch and receiving; design, installation and testing of piping, tubing and fittings; and installation of vehicle refuelling appliances (VRAs) connected to storage piping. The most recent revision to the Standard includes requirements for indoor fuelling of natural gas vehicles. This Standard, like all Canadian Standards, was subject to periodic review and was most recently reaffirmed in 2004. tabs., figs.

  8. Technical specifications: McGuire Nuclear Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, F.

    1983-03-01

    Information is presented concerning safety limits for operation; control systems; power distribution limits; instrumentation; primary coolant circuit; emergency core cooling systems; containment systems; steam turbines and secondary coolant circuits; electrical equipment; refueling operations; radioactive effluents; and reactor site

  9. Experiences with the upgraded SKP system during refuelling Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranyai, A.; Hetzmann, A.

    1997-01-01

    In order to control the neutron flux during the refueling period, new measuring chains were developed and put into operation by the experts of KFKI-RegTron Co., Ltd. and the Paks Nuclear Power Plant with the purpose of partially substituting the original Refuelling Neutron Monitoring system (SKP) of WWER-440 reactor units. The modified monitoring system processes the signals of detectors located in channels outside the core. The outputs of measurement amplifiers equipped with up-to-date electronics fit in the original system perfectly. Use of the out-of-core measuring technique confirmed the preliminary expectations: interference sensitivity has decreased, the neutron/gamma ration increased and refueling time has become shorter by one to one-and-a-half day. The paper details the reasons for upgrading, the essence of utilized solutions and the operational experience. (author)

  10. Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). This file provides information on the numbers and distribution (latitude/longitude) of air monitoring sites...

  11. Automated Aerial Refueling Presentation to 2007 ARSAG Conference (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    this technology allows manned or unmanned platforms to fly formation in IFR conditions. 3 3Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...conducted in conjunction with the DARPA TTNT China Lake test It was determine that TTNT needed slight modifications which have been incorporated. Station

  12. Integrated services as the key to the optimisation of refueling outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Juan; Gonzalez, Roberto; Gutierrez, Jose E.

    2010-01-01

    Refueling outages at nuclear power plants are subject to demanding improvement criteria in each and every one of the activities scheduled. The management of activities on the refueling floor, including the phases of opening and closing of the reactor vessel and associated tasks relating to the reactor internals, the unloading, loading and management of the irradiated fuel and activities requested for the in-service inspection of essential primary circuit components, are interventions that have an impact on the refueling critical path and whose overall integration allows for significant optimization of the entire management of this fundamental refueling activity. For several years now, ENUSA, as the company specializing in irradiated fuel services, TECNATOM as the company responsible for the in-service inspection of critical primary side components and Westinghouse as the technology provider and specialist in the supply of plant support services, have together formed a solid working team offering this integrated refueling service to the Spanish plants. Today, the new and heightened demands regarding the training and specialization of the personnel participating in refueling outages, the need to consider contingencies in the activities scheduled and the objectives relating to the ALARA concept and safe operations require that this service include new activities providing synergies and leading to higher levels of commitment to excellence. This paper will present the service model developed, the most significant activities integrated in the service and the advantages and milestones achieved and reached during this period, compared to the conventional distributed functions model. Likewise, an analysis will be made of the new challenges that are being addressed, with a view to bringing about a more global integration. (authors)

  13. Pellets for fusion reactor refueling. Annual progress report, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, R.J.; Kim, K.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the feasibility of refueling fusion reactors using solid pellets composed of fuel elements. A solid hydrogen pellet generator has been constructed and experiments have been done to inject the pellets into the ORMAK Tokamak. A theory has been developed to describe the pellet ablation in the plasma, and an excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiment. Techniques for charging the pellets have been developed in order to accelerate and control them. Other works currently under way include the development of techniques for accelerating the pellets for refueling purpose. Evaluation of electrostatic acceleration has also been performed

  14. Atmospheric trace elements and Pb isotopes at an offshore site, Ieodo Ocean Research Station, in the East China Sea from June to October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Han, C.; Shin, D.; Hur, S. D.; Jun, S. J.; Kim, Y. T.; Hong, S.

    2016-12-01

    East Asia, especially China, has become a major anthropogenic source region of trace elements due to the rapid industrialization and urbanization in the past decades. Numerous studies reported that anthropogenic pollutants from East Asia are transported by westerly winds during winter to spring across the Pacific to North America and beyond. Here we report elemental concentrations and Pb isotope ratios in airborne particles from Ieodo Ocean Research Station (IORS) located in the middle of the East China Sea (32.07o N, 125.10o E). A total of 30 aerosol samples (PM2.5-10) were collected between 18 June and 30 October 2015 and analyzed for trace elements (Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, Tl, and Pb) and Pb isotopes using ICP-SFMS and TIMS, respectively. The mean concentrations of trace elements ranged from 0.06 ng m-3 for Tl to 10.1 ng m-3 for Zn. These values are much lower (up to several orders) than those at unban sites in East Asia, confirming a low level of air pollution at IORS due to the remoteness of the site from major sources of anthropogenic pollutants. On the other hand, the mean crustal enrichment factors, calculated using Ba as a conservative crustal element, are much higher than unity (84 for Tl, 100 for Mo, 140 for Pb, 166 for Zn, 262 for As, 526 for Cd, and 570 for Sb, respectively), indicating that these elements are of anthropogenic origin. Combining the Pb isotope ratios and the HYSPLIT model 5-day backward trajectory analysis, we have identified episodic long-range transport of air pollutants from diverse source regions of China, Korea, Japan and Taiwan to the site in summer (June to August). By comparison, an increasing long-range transport of pollution from China was observed in autumn (September and October). Finally, our study shows that IORS is an ideal background site for monitoring levels of concentrations and source origins of atmospheric trace elements in East Asia.

  15. Ground-water flow in the surficial aquifer system and potential movement of contaminants from selected waste-disposal sites at Cecil Field Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the Installation Restoration Program, Cecil Field Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, is considering remedialaction alternatives to control the possible movement of contaminants from sites that may discharge to the surface. This requires a quantifiable understanding of ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer system and how the system will respond to any future stresses. The geologic units of interest in the study area consist of sediments of Holocene to Miocene age that extend from land surface to the base of the Hawthorn Group. The hydrogeology within the study area was determined from gamma-ray and geologists? logs. Ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer system was simulated with a seven-layer, finite-difference model that extended vertically from the water table to the top of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Results from the calibrated model were based on a long-term recharge rate of 6 inches per year, which fell in the range of 4 to 10 inches per year, estimated using stream hydrograph separation methods. More than 80 percent of ground-water flow circulates within the surficial-sand aquifer, which indicates that most contaminant movement also can be expected to move through the surficial-sand aquifer alone. The surficial-sand aquifer is the uppermost unit of the surficial aquifer system. Particle-tracking results showed that the distances of most flow paths were 1,500 feet or less from a given site to its discharge point. For an assumed effective porosity of 20 percent, typical traveltimes are 40 years or less. At all of the sites investigated, particles released 10 feet below the water table had shorter traveltimes than those released 40 feet below the water table. Traveltimes from contaminated sites to their point of discharge ranged from 2 to 300 years. The contributing areas of the domestic supply wells are not very extensive. The shortest traveltimes for particles to reach the domestic supply wells from their respective

  16. Air and radiation monitoring stations

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)582709

    2015-01-01

    CERN has around 100 monitoring stations on and around its sites. New radiation measuring stations, capable of detecting even lower levels of radiation, were installed in 2014. Two members of HE-SEE group (Safety Engineering and Environment group) in front of one of the new monitoring stations.

  17. An intercomparison of dissolved iron speciation at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site: Results from GEOTRACES Crossover Station A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Nicolle Buck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The organic complexation of dissolved iron (Fe was determined in depth profile samples collected from GEOTRACES Crossover Station A, the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site, as part of the Dutch and U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic programs in June 2010 and November 2011, respectively. The two groups employed distinct competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdCSV methods, and resulting ligand concentrations and conditional stability constants from each profile were compared. Excellent agreement was found between the total ligand concentrations determined in June 2010 and the strongest, L1-type, ligand concentrations determined in November 2011. Yet a primary distinction between the datasets was the number of ligand classes observed: a single ligand class was characterized in the June 2010 profile while two ligand classes were observed in the November 2011 profile. To assess the role of differing interpretation approaches in determining final results, analysts exchanged titration data and accompanying parameters from the profiles for reinterpretation. The reinterpretation exercises highlighted the considerable influence of the sensitivity (S parameter applied on interpretation results, consistent with recent intercalibration work on interpretation of copper speciation titrations. The potential role of titration data structure, humic-type substances, differing dissolved Fe concentrations, and seasonality are also discussed as possible drivers of the one versus two ligand class determinations between the two profiles, leading to recommendations for future studies of Fe-binding ligand cycling in the oceans.

  18. [CFD numerical simulation onto the gas-liquid two-phase flow behavior during vehicle refueling process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Jin-Hui; Zhu, Ling; Shang, Chao

    2011-12-01

    With the gradual improvement of environmental regulations, more and more attentions are attracted to the vapor emissions during the process of vehicle refueling. Research onto the vehicle refueling process by means of numerical simulation has been executed abroad since 1990s, while as it has never been involved so far domestically. Through reasonable simplification about the physical system of "Nozzle + filler pipe + gasoline storage tank + vent pipe" for vehicle refueling, and by means of volume of fluid (VOF) model for gas-liquid two-phase flow and Re-Normalization Group kappa-epsilon turbulence flow model provided in commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software Fluent, this paper determined the proper mesh discretization scheme and applied the proper boundary conditions based on the Gambit software, then established the reasonable numerical simulation model for the gas-liquid two-phase flow during the refueling process. Through discussing the influence of refueling velocity on the static pressure of vent space in gasoline tank, the back-flowing phenomenon has been revealed in this paper. It has been demonstrated that, the more the flow rate and the refueling velocity of refueling nozzle is, the higher the gross static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank. In the meanwhile, the variation of static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank can be categorized into three obvious stages. When the refueling flow rate becomes higher, the back-flowing phenomenon of liquid gasoline can sometimes be induced in the head section of filler pipe, thus making the gasoline nozzle pre-shut-off. Totally speaking, the theoretical work accomplished in this paper laid some solid foundation for self-researching and self-developing the technology and apparatus for the vehicle refueling and refueling emissions control domestically.

  19. Fire Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Fire Stations in the United States Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  20. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  1. Space Station flight telerobotic servicer functional requirements development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberright, John; Mccain, Harry; Whitman, Ruth I.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station flight telerobotic servicer (FTS), a flight robotic system for use on the first Space Station launch, is described. The objectives of the FTS program include: (1) the provision of an alternative crew EVA by supporting the crew in assembly, maintenance, and servicing activities, and (2) the improvement of crew safety by performing hazardous tasks such as spacecraft refueling or thermal and power system maintenance. The NASA/NBS Standard Reference Model provides the generic, hierarchical, structured functional control definition for the system. It is capable of accommodating additional degrees of machine intelligence in the future.

  2. Experience from the construction and operation of Tarapur and Rajasthan Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.C.; Pardiwala, T.F.; Kothare, V.V.; Rao, M.H.P.; Nanjundeswaran, K.

    1977-01-01

    India's experience in construction and operation of nuclear power stations so far covers two BWR and four PHWR Units in three power stations. Two more PHWR units are at an early stage of construction. The twin unit Tarapur Station (2x210 MWe BWR) was built as a turnkey project which restricted participation of Indian engineers in design and construction considerably. The contrasting approach adopted for Rajasthan Station (2x220 MWe PHWR) involved Indian personnel and contractors fully in construction and commissioning, with Canadians providing supervisory assistance in Rajasthan I and essentially consultative help for Rajasthan II. Subsequent stations are wholly Indian efforts. Tarapur went into commercial operation in 1969, 60 months after breaking of ground. Construction was essentially uneventful, major problems faced being stress corrosion induced cracks in the reactor lining and complete change of steam generator tubes. In its seven years of operations, Tarapur has faced several problems mainly arising from rather early designs, indifferent fuel performance, constraints of twin-unit approach and operations in an inadequately developed grid system apart from those generally stemming from assimilation of an advanced technology in a developing country. The Station has undergone six refuellings during this period. Most of the problems have been overcome by design changes, system augmentations and experience and the Station operation since mid 1974 have generally been steady at around 90% of the rated capacity. Construction of Rajasthan I at a remote and isolated site proceeded relatively slowly. Local availability of skilled and semi-skilled manpower was poor, affecting construction. Inadequate roads impeded movements of overdimensioned components. Observing strict Quality Assurance standards required several major rectifications at site. Rajasthan I went on line in 1973 after overcoming major turbine bearing problems during commissioning. Since then, while

  3. Obrigheim nuclear power station. Annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, C.

    1988-01-01

    The Obrigheim nuclear power station was operated at full load during the year 1987; 7.351 operating hours procuded electrical energy of 2.607 GWh. This is the fifth best annual result during Obrigheim's operating period. Since commissioning in October 1968, 139.310 hours of operation have generated 46.681 GWh (gross) and from test operation in March 1969 until the end of 1987, 138.530 hours of operation have generated 46.569 GWh. This is an availability of power of 81.6% in this period and a time availability of 83.9%. In 1987, the plant was shut down for 1.222 hours for the 18th refueling including testing, inspection and repair work. Apart from refueling, the plant had a good time availability and therefore contributed 5% to the safe, economical and environmentally acceptable electricity supply of the Land Baden-Wuerttemberg. The power station is of great significance to the region, both in terms of power supply and the economy. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Analysis on engineering application of CNP1000 in-containment refueling water storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bin; Wang Yong; Qiu Jian; Weng Minghui

    2005-01-01

    Based on the basic design of CNP1000 (three loops), which is self-reliance designed by China National Nuclear Cooperation, and investigation results from abroad advanced nuclear power plant design of In-containment Refueling Water Storage tank, this paper describe the system flowsheet, functional requirements, structural design and piping arrangement about In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank. The design takes the lower structural space as the IRWST. Four areas are configured to meet the diverse functional requirements, including depressurization area, water collection area, safety injection and/or containment spray suction area, TSP storage area / reactor cavity flooding holdup tank. Also the paper depict the corresponding analysis and demonstration, such as In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank pressure transient on depressurization area of IRWST, suction and internal flow stream of IRWST, configuration of strains, the addition method and amount of chemical addition, design and engineering applicant of Reactor Cavity Flooding System. All the analysis results show the basic design of IRWST meeting with the Utility Requirement Document's requirements on performance of safety function, setting of overfill passage, overpressure protection, related interference, etc., and show the reliability of Engineering Safety Features being improved for CNP1000 (three loops). Meanwhile, it is demonstrated that the design of In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank can apply on the future nuclear power plant project in China. (authors)

  5. Strength analysis of refueling machine for large PWR in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xiaofeng; Zhou Guofeng; Bi Xiangjun; Ji Shunying

    2010-01-01

    The refueling machine of PWR plays important roles in nuclear power plant operation,and the dynamic analysis and strength assessment should be carried out to check its safety. In this paper, the finite element model (FEM) was established with the software ANSYS 12 for the refueling machine structure of large 1 000 MW PWR. The dynamic computations were performed under three work conditions, i.e. normal (cart starting and braking), abnormal (OBE) and accident(SSE) conditions, respectively. The structure responses (internal force and stress) of refueling machine under earthquake response spectrum in three directions were combined with the method of square root of square sum (SRSS). Moreover, the static response under gravity was also considered to construct the most critical conditions. With the simulated results, the strength of main structure, bold and weld joint,and the stability of landing leg for additional crane were assessed based on the RCCM code. At last, the local stress analysis of finger-form hook, which function is to take fuel assemblies, was also analyzed, while its strength was also assessed. The results show that the strengths of the refueling machine under various working conditions can meet the safety requirements. (authors)

  6. 14 CFR 29.979 - Pressure refueling and fueling provisions below fuel level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.979 Pressure refueling and fueling provisions below fuel level. (a) Each fueling connection... from that tank in case of malfunction of the fuel entry valve. (b) For systems intended for pressure...

  7. Pellets for fusion reactor refueling. Annual progress report, 1 January 1975--31 December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors using pellets of deuterium-tritium is discussed. A pellet injector has been constructed and experiments have been done injecting solid pellets into the ORMAK machine. Theoretical explanations of the results from these experiments have been successful. Other experiments underway include techniques for charging the pellets in order to accelerate and control them

  8. Report on the Fourth Reactor Refueling. Laguna Verde Nuclear Central. Unit 1. April-May 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza L, A.; Flores C, E.; Lopez G, C.P.F.

    1995-01-01

    The fourth refueling of the Unit 1 of Laguna Verde Nuclear Central was executed in the period of April 17 to May 31 of 1995 with the participation of a task group of 358 persons, included technicians and radiation protection officials and auxiliaries.The radiation monitoring and radiological surveillance to the workers was present length ways the refueling process and always attached to the ALARA criteria. The check points for radiation levels were set at: primary container or dry well, reloading floor, decontamination room (level 10.5), turbine building and radioactive waste building. To take advantage of the refueling process, rooms 203 and 213 of the turbine buildings were subject to inspection and maintenance work in valves, heaters and drains of heaters. Management aspects as personnel selection and training, costs, and countable are also presented in this report. Owing to the high cost of man-hour of the members of the ININ staff, its participation in the refueling process was in smaller number than years before. (Author)

  9. Central Station Design Options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    . The work identifies the architecture, sizing and siting of prospective Central Stations in Denmark, which can be located at shopping centers, large car parking lots or gas stations. Central Stations are planned to be integrated in the Danish distribution grid. The Danish island of Bornholm, where a high...... overloading, more reference points might be necessary to represent various transformer loading levels. The subject of safety in Central Station is also addressed. A number of safety rules based on European standards apply to AC charging equipment up to 44 kW. The connection interlock and the automatic de......-energization are identified as fundamental requirements for safety in such a charging station. The connection interlock is a solution which ensures that no power is applied to the DC cable when the EV connector is not connected. The automatic de-energization device ensures that whenever a strain on the cable is detected, e...

  10. Reliable, fault tolerant control systems for nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, T.O.; Olmstead, R.A.; Schafer, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two operational features of CANDU Nuclear Power Stations provide for high plant availability. First, the plant re-fuels on-line, thereby eliminating the need for periodic and lengthy refuelling 'outages'. Second, the all plants are controlled by real-time computer systems. Later plants are also protected using real-time computer systems. In the past twenty years, the control systems now operating in 21 plants have achieved an availability of 99.8%, making significant contributions to high CANDU plant capacity factors. This paper describes some of the features that ensure the high degree of system fault tolerance and hence high plant availability. The emphasis will be placed on the fault tolerant features of the computer systems included in the latest reactor design - the CANDU 3 (450MWe). (author)

  11. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internally induced flooding events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandini, V.; Staple, B.; Kirk, H.; Whitehead, D.; Forester, J.

    1994-07-01

    An estimate of the contribution of internal flooding to the mean core damage frequency at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station was calculated for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Pursuant to this objective, flood zones and sources were identified and flood volumes were calculated. Equipment necessary for the maintenance of plant safety was identified and its vulnerability to flooding was determined. Event trees and fault trees were modified or developed as required, and PRA quantification was performed using the IRRAS code. The mean core damage frequency estimate for GGNS during POS 5 was found to be 2.3 E-8 per year

  12. Operation feedback of hydrogen filling station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregassame, S.; Barral, K.; Allidieres, L.; Charbonneau, T.; Lacombe, Y.

    2004-01-01

    One of the technical challenges of hydrogen technology is the development of hydrogen infrastructures which satisfy either safety requirements and reliability of filling processes. AIR LIQUIDE realized an hydrogen filling station in Sassenage (France) operational since September 2003. This station is able to fill 3 buses a day up to 350bar by equilibrium with high pressure buffers. In parallel with commercial stations, the group wanted to create a testing ground in real conditions running with several objectives: validate on a full scale bench a simulation tool able to predict the temperature of both gas and cylinder's materials during filling processes; define the best filling procedures in order to reach mass, temperature and filling time targets; analyse the temperature distribution and evolution inside the cylinder; get a general knowledge about hydrogen stations from safety and reliability point of view; operate the first full scale refuelling station in France. The station is also up-graded for 700bar filling from either a liquid hydrogen source or a gas booster, with cold filling possibility. This paper presents the results concerning 350bar filling : thermal effects, optimal filling procedures and influence of parameters such as climatic conditions are discussed. (author)

  13. New concepts for small power reactors without on-site refuelling for non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.W.; Hasberger, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The report discusses the preliminary requirements and a technical approach for developing small reactors and the rationale for selecting them. It then discusses the four nuclear system technologies and how they might proceed to meet the requirements. Brief discussions are provided on the approaches to stimulating the appropriate international and industrial participation necessary to finance development of a design with improved proliferation resistance that is useful to the developing countries. (author)

  14. Amtrak Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Updated database of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA) Amtrak Station database. This database is a geographic data set containing Amtrak intercity railroad...

  15. Automated procedure for selection of optimal refueling policies for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, B.I.; Zolotar, B.; Weisman, J.

    1979-01-01

    An automated procedure determining a minimum cost refueling policy has been developed for light water reactors. The procedure is an extension of the equilibrium core approach previously devised for pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Use of 1 1/2-group theory has improved the accuracy of the nuclear model and eliminated tedious fitting of albedos. A simple heuristic algorithm for locating a good starting policy has materially reduced PWR computing time. Inclusion of void effects and use of the Haling principle for axial flux calculations extended the nuclear model to boiling water reactors (BWRs). A good initial estimate of the refueling policy is obtained by recognizing that a nearly uniform distribution of reactivity provides low-power peaking. The initial estimate is improved upon by interchanging groups of four assemblies and is subsequently refined by interchanging individual assemblies. The method yields very favorable results, is simpler than previously proposed BWR fuel optimization schemes, and retains power cost as the objective function

  16. REFUEL. The harvest so far. Papers to the 15th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, May 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The REFUEL project is designed to encourage a greater market penetration of biofuels. To help achieve this goal, we will develop a biofuels road map, consistent with EU biofuel policies and supported by stakeholders involved in the biofuels field. Starting early 2006, the project involves seven renowned partners and will take 24 months to complete. Refuel is financed by the European Commission under the 'Intelligent Energy - Europe' programme. This report contains papers that were presented at the title conference

  17. Environmental and biological monitoring of benzene during self-service automobile refueling.

    OpenAIRE

    Egeghy, P P; Tornero-Velez, R; Rappaport, S M

    2000-01-01

    Although automobile refueling represents the major source of benzene exposure among the nonsmoking public, few data are available regarding such exposures and the associated uptake of benzene. We repeatedly measured benzene exposure and uptake (via benzene in exhaled breath) among 39 self-service customers using self-administered monitoring, a technique rarely used to obtain measurements from the general public (130 sets of measurements were obtained). Benzene exposures averaged 2.9 mg/m(3) (...

  18. Optimal mission planning of GEO on-orbit refueling in mixed strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-qian; Yu, Jing

    2017-04-01

    The mission planning of GEO on-orbit refueling (OOR) in Mixed strategy is studied in this paper. Specifically, one SSc will be launched to an orbital slot near the depot when multiple GEO satellites are reaching their end of lives. The SSc replenishes fuel from the depot and then extends the lifespan of the target satellites via refueling. In the mixed scenario, only some of the target satellites could be served by the SSc, and the remaining ones will be fueled by Pseudo SScs (the target satellite which has already been refueled by the SSc and now has sufficient fuel for its operation as well as the fuel to refuel other target satellites is called Pseudo SSc here). The mission sequences and fuel mass of the SSc and Pseudo SScs, the dry mass of the SSc are used as design variables, whereas the economic benefit of the whole mission is used as design objective. The economic cost and benefit models are stated first, and then a mathematical optimization model is proposed. A comprehensive solution method involving enumeration, particle swarm optimization and modification is developed. Numerical examples are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the model and solution method. Economic efficiencies of different OOR strategies are compared and discussed. The mixed strategy would perform better than the other strategies only when the target satellites satisfy some conditions. This paper presents an available mixed strategy scheme for users and analyzes its advantages and disadvantages by comparing with some other OOR strategies, providing helpful references to decision makers. The best strategy in practical applications depends on the specific demands and user preference.

  19. Unmanned Carrier-Based Aircraft System: Debate over Systems Role Led to Focus on Aerial Refueling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Unmanned Carrier-Based Aircraft System: Debate over System’s Role Led to Focus on Aerial Refueling Prior to February 2016, the Navy had planned to...Background In a May 2015 report, we found that the intended mission and required capabilities of UCLASS were under review as there was debate ...environments, or largely strike with limited surveillance capability operating in highly contested environments.2 This debate delayed the expected

  20. Management of refuelling, modifications and accidental shut-down of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document is the appendix of HAF 0300 (91) 'Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plant Operation', which was promulgated by the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) on March 2, 1994, and has the same legal effect. This appendix is applicable to establish the administrative management procedures for refuelling, modifications and accidental shut-down in the period of operation of pressurized water thermal neutron reactor of nuclear power plants. The NNSA shall be responsible for interpretation of this document

  1. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

    2014-05-01

    Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

  2. Natural circulation analysis for the advanced neutron source reactor refueling process 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, R.F.; Dasardhi, S.; Elkassabgi, Y. [Texas A& M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States); Yoder, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    During the refueling process of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR), the spent fuel elements must be moved from the primary coolant loop (containing D{sub 2}O), through a heavy water pool, and finally into a light water spent fuel storage area. The present refueling scheme utilizes remote refueling equipment to move the spent fuel elements through a D{sub 2}O filled stack and tunnel into a temporary storage canal. A transfer lock is used to move the spent fuel elements from the D{sub 2}O-filled interim storage canal to a light water pool. Each spent fuel element must be cooled during this process, using either natural circulation or forced convection. This paper presents a summary of the numerical techniques used to analyze natural circulation cooling of the ANSR fuel elements as well as selected results of the calculations. Details of the analysis indicate that coolant velocities below 10 cm/s exist in the coolant channels under single phase natural circulation conditions. Also, boiling does not occur within the channels if power levels are below a few hundred kW when the core transitions to natural circulation conditions.

  3. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Topical Report is a synopsis of the decontamination of plant components and structures at the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP). The information is provided as a part of the Technology Transfer Program to document the preparation activities in support of the shipment of radioactive wastes and the unconditional release of the site and structural materials. 1 ref., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Point Lepreau generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganong, G.H.D.; Strang, A.E.; Gunter, G.E.; Thompson, T.S.

    Point Lepreau-1 reactor is a 600 MWe generating station expected to be in service by October 1979. New Brunswick is suffering a 'catch up' phenomenon in load growth and needs to decrease dependence on foreign oil. The site is on salt water and extensive study has gone into corrosion control. Project management, financing and scheduling have unique aspects. (E.C.B.)

  5. 47 CFR 73.1201 - Station identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... public file. The notice must state that the station's public file is available for inspection and that consumers can view it at the station's main studio and on its Web site. At least one of the announcements...

  6. Mineralogical, chemical, organic and microbial properties of subsurface soil cores from Mars Desert Research Station (Utah, USA): Phyllosilicate and sulfate analogues to Mars mission landing sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoker, C.R.; Clarke, J.; Oliveira Lebre Direito, M.S.; Martin, K.; Zavaleta, J.; Blake, D.; Foing, B.H.

    2011-01-01

    We collected and analysed soil cores from four geologic units surrounding Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) Utah, USA, including Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison formation (Brushy Basin member) and Summerville formation. The area is an important geochemical and morphological analogue to

  7. Meet the Maximally Exposed Member of the Public: The Service Station Attendant for Spent Nuclear Fuel Going to Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H. E.; Gathers, R.; Halstead, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    According to the 1999 Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site, members of the public along transportation routes by which spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) is shipped will receive annual radiation doses less than 100 mrem/yr, the international (ICRP) and national (Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission) radiation limit for members of the public. For the ''Mostly Truck'' national transportation scenario, the DEIS specifically concludes that the maximally exposed member of the public, a service station attendant along the primary shipping route will receive no more than 100 mrem/yr, or 2.4 rem over 24 years. Based on the assumptions in the DEIS scenarios, however, it is highly likely that service station attendants along shipping routes will be called upon to fuel and service the rigs carrying SNF and HLW to Yucca Mountain. After reevaluating the DEIS, and making realistic alternative assumptions where necessary, the authors conclude that these attendants are likely to receive substantially more than 100 mrem/yr external dose, and perhaps several times that dose (up to 500 mrem/yr), unless mitigating measures are adopted. This is particularly true in Western states where refueling opportunities are limited, and the distances between fuel sources in rural areas may be up to 100 miles

  8. Reference Design for a Simple, Durable and Refuelable Interplanetary Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, B. S.; Tolley, A. M.

    This article describes a reference design for interplanetary vessels, composed mostly of water, that utilize simplified RF engines for low thrust, long duration propulsion, and hydrogen peroxide for short duration, high thrust burns. The electrothermal engines are designed to heat a wide range of liquid materials, possibly also milled solids or surface dusts. The system emphasizes simple components and processes based on older technologies, many well known since the 1960s, that are understandable, can process a variety of materials, and are easily serviced in flight. The goal is to radically simplify systems and their inter-dependencies, to a point where a reasonably skilled person can learn to operate these vessels, not unlike a sailboat, and to eliminate many design and testing bottlenecks in their construction. The use of water, or hydrogen peroxide generated in situ from that water, is multiply advantageous because it can be used for structure, consumption, irrigation, radiation and debris shielding, and thermal regulation, and thus greatly reduce dead weight by creating an almost fully consumable ship. This also enables the ship to utilize a wide range of in situ materials, and eventually obtain reaction mass from lower gravity sites. The ability to switch between low thrust, constant power and high thrust, short duration maneuvers will enable these ships to travel freely and reach many interesting destinations throughout the solar system. One can think of them as “spacecoaches”, not unlike the prairie schooners of the Old West, which were rugged, serviceable by tradesmen, and easily maintained.

  9. Islands for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, E.F.F.W.; Fraser, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    The safety principles, design criteria and types of artificial island for an offshore nuclear power station are discussed with particular reference to siting adjacent to an industrial island. The paper concludes that the engineering problems are soluble and that offshore nuclear power stations will eventually be built but that much fundamental work is still required. (author)

  10. The Princess Elisabeth Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berte, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Aware of the increasing impact of human activities on the Earth system, Belgian Science Policy Office (Belspo) launched in 1997 a research programme in support of a sustainable development policy. This umbrella programme included the Belgian Scientific Programme on Antarctic Research. The International Polar Foundation, an organization led by the civil engineer and explorer Alain Hubert, was commissioned by the Belgian Federal government in 2004 to design, construct and operate a new Belgian Antarctic Research Station as an element under this umbrella programme. The station was to be designed as a central location for investigating the characteristic sequence of Antarctic geographical regions (polynia, coast, ice shelf, ice sheet, marginal mountain area and dry valleys, inland plateau) within a radius of 200 kilometers (approx.124 miles) of a selected site. The station was also to be designed as "state of the art" with respect to sustainable development, energy consumption, and waste disposal, with a minimum lifetime of 25 years. The goal of the project was to build a station and enable science. So first we needed some basic requirements, which I have listed here; plus we had to finance the station ourselves. Our most important requirement was that we decided to make it a zero emissions station. This was both a philosophical choice as we thought it more consistent with Antarctic Treaty obligations and it was also a logistical advantage. If you are using renewable energy sources, you do not have to bring in all the fuel.

  11. Status of innovative small and medium sized reactor designs 2005. Reactors with conventional refuelling schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    research and development (R and D) programmes in Member States, and non-technical factors and arrangements that could facilitate successful development and deployment of innovative reactors within the small-to-medium power range. The annexes, intended mostly for designers and technical managers, provide detailed design descriptions of innovative SMRs under development worldwide and are patterned along a newly developed common format, which makes it possible to identify the design philosophy, objectives and approaches, as well as technical features and non-technical factors and arrangements with a potential to provide solutions in the specific areas of concern associated with future nuclear energy systems. Detailed design descriptions in this report were prepared firsthand by the designers and reviewed, updated and approved for publication by the respective vendors, research and design organizations and academic institutions in Member States. The scope of this report is limited to reactors with conventional, proven in operation refuelling schemes and does not include small reactors that could operate without reloading and shuffling of fuel for a long period, from 10 years and more, with no fresh or spent fuel being stored at the site during reactor operation. Because of a large number of inputs, such reactors would require a separate dedicated publication

  12. WVU Hydrogen Fuel Dispensing Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, William [West Virginia University Research Corporation, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was to construct a site similar to the site at Central West Virginia Regional Airport in Charleston, WV to show that duplication of the site was a feasible method of conducting hydrogen stations. Phase II of the project was necessitated due to a lack of funding that was planned for the development of the station in Morgantown. The US Department of Energy determined that the station in Charleston would be dismantled and moved to Morgantown and reassembled at the Morgantown site. This necessitated storage of the components of the station for almost a year at the NAFTC Headquarters which caused a number of issues with the equipment that will be discussed in later portions of this report. This report will consist of PHASE I and PHASE II with discussions on each of the tasks scheduled for each phase of the project.

  13. A comparative study of radiofrequency emission from roof top mobile phone base station antennas and tower mobile phone base antennas located at some selected cell sites in Accra, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atakpa, K. G.

    2014-07-01

    RF radiation exposure from antennas mounted on rooftop mobile phone base stations have become a serious issue in recent years due to the rapidly developing technologies in wireless telecommunication. The heightening numbers of base station and their closeness to the general public has led to possible health concerns as a result of exposure to RF radiations. The primary objective of this study was to assess the level of RF radiation emitted from roof top mobile phone base station antennas and compare the measured results with the guidelines set by International Commission on Non-ionization Radiation. The maximum and minimum average power density measured from the rooftop sites inside buildings were 2.46xI0 -2 and 1.68x10 -3 W/m 2 respectively whereas that for outside buildings at the same rooftop site was also 7.44x 10 -5 and 3.35x 10 -3 W/m 2 respectively. Public exposure quotient also ranged between 3.74x10 -10 to 1.31x10 -07 inside buildings whilst that for outside varied between 7.44x 10 -10 to 1.65x 10 -06 . Occupational exposure quotient inside buildings varied between 1.66x 10 -11 to 2.11 x 10 -09 whereas that for outside ranged from 3.31x10 -09 to 3.30x10 -07 all at the rooftop site. The results obtained for a typical tower base station also indicated that the maximum and minimum average power density was 4.57x10 -1 W/m 2 and 7.13x10 -3 W/m 2 respectively. The public exposure quotient varied between 1.58x10 -09 to 1.01x10 -07 whilst that for occupational exposure quotient ranged between 3.17x10 -10 to 2.03x10 -08 . The values of power densities levels inside buildings at rooftop sites are low compared to that of tower sites. This could be due to high attenuation caused by thick concrete walls and ceilings. The results obtained were found to be in compliance with ICNIRP and FCC guidance levels of 4.5 W/m 2 and 6 W/m 2 respectively. (au)

  14. Station blackout calculations for Peach Bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    A calculational procedure for the Station Blackout Severe Accident Sequence at Browns Ferry Unit One has been repeated with plant-specific application to one of the Peach Bottom Units. The only changes required in code input are with regard to the primary continment concrete, the existence of sprays in the secondary containment, and the size of the refueling bay. Combustible gas mole fractions in the secondary containment of each plant during the accident sequence are determined. It is demonstrated why the current state-of-the-art corium/concrete interaction code is inadequate for application to the study of Severe Accident Sequences in plants with the BWR MK I or MK II containment design

  15. Techno-economic analysis of stand alone solar pv systems for remote base stations in Ghana. (a case study at Abofrem vodafone cell site)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denkyira, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) have become an important part of today’s global economy. ICT infrastructural development is developing at a very fast pace in Ghana. Growth is above the 1.1% average for Sub-Saharan Africa. The growth in the sector has meant a massive investment in telecommunication infrastructure such as base stations from telecom companies such as Vodafone, Millicom, Glo, Espresso, MTN etc. Hundreds of base stations have been installed all over the country. Currently base stations depend mainly on the national grid, with diesel generators as backups, for its power requirement. In some remote or hilly areas where there are no grid supplied electricity, base stations are usually powered with diesel fuelled generators since lengthy grid extensions may not be cost effective. In addition to high fuel delivery and consumption costs, maintenance of the generators can also be expensive in terms of parts and labour time working on the unit. There are also concerns about environmental pollution using diesel generators. Photovoltaic technology has the ability to convert solar energy into electricity consuming no fossil fuels, using no moving parts, creating no pollution and noise, and lasting for years with little maintenance. The environmental, noise, reliability and power availability benefits of the PV system make it an attractive option. Ghana, being a few degrees north of the equator, is endowed with enormous solar energy resource spread across the entire country. Daily solar radiation level ranges from 4 kWh/m 2 to 6 kWh/m 2 . The annual sunshine duration ranges between 1800 to 3000 hours offering very high potential for grid connected and off grid applications. In this thesis work, the use of solar PV technology as a cost effective source of power for cellular base stations in remote or hilly areas, far off the national grid, is reviewed. RETScreen software is used to determine the technical and financial viability of the PV system

  16. Variability of benzene exposure among filling station attendants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carere, A.; Iacovella, N.; Turrio Baldassarri, L.; Fuselli, S.; Iavarone, I.; Lagorio, S.; Proietto, A.R.

    1996-12-01

    A monitoring survey of filling station attendants aimed at identifying sources of variability of exposure to benzene and other aromatics was carried out. Concurrent samples of the worker's breathing zone air, atmospheric air in the service station proximity, and gasoline were collected, along with information about daily workloads and other exposure-related factors. Benzene personal exposure was characterised by a small between-worker variability and a predominant within-worker variance component. Such elevated day-to-day variability yields to imprecise estimates of mean personal exposure. Almost 70% of the overall personal exposure variance was explained by a model including daily benzene from dispensed fuel, presence of a shelter over the refueling area, amount of fuel supplied to the station if a delivery occurred, and background atmospheric benzene concentration

  17. Station Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2011-01-01

    the probability of conflicts and the minimum headway times into account. The last method analyzes how optimal platform tracks are used by examining the arrival and departure pattern of the trains. The developed methods can either be used separately to analyze specific characteristics of the capacity of a station......Stations are often limiting the capacity of railway networks. This is due to extra need of tracks when trains stand still, trains turning around, and conflicting train routes. Although stations are often the capacity bottlenecks, most capacity analysis methods focus on open line capacity. Therefore...... for platform tracks and the probability that arriving trains will not get a platform track immediately at arrival. The third method is a scalable method that analyzes the conflicts in the switch zone(s). In its simplest stage, the method just analyzes the track layout while the more advanced stages also take...

  18. Towards a standardized grasping and refuelling on-orbit servicing for geo spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Alberto; Tomassini, Angelo; Suatoni, Matteo; Avilés, Marcos; Solway, Nick; Coxhill, Ian; Paraskevas, Iosif S.; Rekleitis, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Krenn, Rainer; Brito, André; Sabbatinelli, Beatrice; Wollenhaupt, Birk; Vidal, Christian; Aziz, Sarmad; Visentin, Gianfranco

    2017-05-01

    Exploitation of space must benefit from the latest advances in robotics. On-orbit servicing is a clear candidate for the application of autonomous rendezvous and docking mechanisms. However, during the last three decades most of the trials took place combining extravehicular activities (EVAs) with telemanipulated robotic arms. The European Space Agency (ESA) considers that grasping and refuelling are promising near-mid-term capabilities that could be performed by servicing spacecraft. Minimal add-ons on spacecraft to enhance their serviceability may protect them for a changing future in which satellite servicing may become mainstream. ESA aims to conceive and promote standard refuelling provisions that can be installed in present and future European commercial geostationary orbit (GEO) satellite platforms and scientific spacecraft. For this purpose ESA has started the ASSIST activity addressing the analysis, design and validation of internal provisions (such as modifications to fuel, gas, electrical and data architecture to allow servicing) and external provisions (such as integrated berthing fixtures with peripheral electrical, gas, liquid connectors, leak check systems and corresponding optical and radio markers for cooperative rendezvous and docking). This refuelling approach is being agreed with European industry (OHB, Thales Alenia Space) and expected to be consolidated with European commercial operators as a first step to become an international standard; this approach is also being considered for on-orbit servicing spacecraft, such as the SpaceTug, by Airbus DS. This paper describes in detail the operational means, structure, geometry and accommodation of the system. Internal and external provisions will be designed with the minimum possible impact on the current architecture of GEO satellites without introducing additional risks in the development and commissioning of the satellite. End-effector and berthing fixtures are being designed in the range of few

  19. Development of a dose database in the refuelling scenario of a nuclear power plant for a virtual reality application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Zarza, I.; Pascual, A.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Operators in Nuclear Power Plants can receive high doses during refuelling operation. A training program simulating refuelling operations will be useful to reduce doses received by workers as well as to minimise operation time. With this goal in mind a Virtual Reality application is developed in the frame of CIPRES Project (Calculos Interactivos de Proteccion Radiologica en un Entorno de Simulacion - Interactive Calculations of Radiological Protection in a Simulation Environment), a RD project sponsored by IBERINCO and developed jointly by IBERINCO and the Nuclear Engineering Department of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. The Virtual Reality application requires the possibility of displaying doses, both instantaneous and accumulated, at all times during the operator training. Therefore, it is necessary to elaborate a database containing dose rates at every point of the refuelling plant. This database is elaborated from Radiological Protection Surveillance data measured throughout the plant during refuelling operation. To estimate doses throughout the refuelling plant some interpolation routines have been used. Different assumptions have been adopted in order to perform the interpolation and obtain consistent data. In this paper, procedures developed to elaborate the dose database for the Virtual Reality application are presented and analysed

  20. Ground-motion site effects from multimethod shear-wave velocity characterization at 16 seismograph stations deployed for aftershocks of the August 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Williams, Robert A.; Angster, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We characterize shear-wave velocity versus depth (Vs profile) at 16 portable seismograph sites through the epicentral region of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Mineral (Virginia, USA) earthquake to investigate ground-motion site effects in the area. We used a multimethod acquisition and analysis approach, where active-source horizontal shear (SH) wave reflection and refraction as well as active-source multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive-source refraction microtremor (ReMi) Rayleigh wave dispersion were interpreted separately. The time-averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (Vs30), interpreted bedrock depth, and site resonant frequency were estimated from the best-fit Vs profile of each method at each location for analysis. Using the median Vs30 value (270–715 m/s) as representative of a given site, we estimate that all 16 sites are National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class C or D. Based on a comparison of simplified mapped surface geology to median Vs30 at our sites, we do not see clear evidence for using surface geologic units as a proxy for Vs30 in the epicentral region, although this may primarily be because the units are similar in age (Paleozoic) and may have similar bulk seismic properties. We compare resonant frequencies calculated from ambient noise horizontal:vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) at available sites to predicted site frequencies (generally between 1.9 and 7.6 Hz) derived from the median bedrock depth and average Vs to bedrock. Robust linear regression of HVSR to both site frequency and Vs30 demonstrate moderate correlation to each, and thus both appear to be generally representative of site response in this region. Based on Kendall tau rank correlation testing, we find that Vs30 and the site frequency calculated from average Vs to median interpreted bedrock depth can both be considered reliable predictors of weak-motion site effects in the epicentral region.

  1. Automatic refueling platform and CRD remote handling device for BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Takagi, Kaoru

    1978-01-01

    In BWR plants, machines for replacing fuel assemblies and control rod drives are usually operated directly by personnel. An automatic refueling platform and a CRD remote handling device aiming at radiation exposure reduction and handling perfectness are described, which are already used in BWR plants. Automation of the former is achieved in transporting fuel assemblies between a reactor pressure vessel and a fuel storage pool, shuffling fuel assemblies in a reactor core and moving fuel assemblies in a fuel storage pool. In the latter, replacement of CRDs is nearly all performed remotely. (Mori, K.)

  2. Extending the features of RBMK refuelling machine simulator with a training tool based on virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoudiakov, M.; Slonimsky, V.; Mitrofanov, S.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes a continuation of efforts of an international Russian - Norwegian joint team to improve operational safety during the refuelling process of an RBMK-type reactor by implementing a training simulator based on an innovative Virtual Reality (VR) approach. During the preceding 1st stage of the project a display-based simulator was extended with VR models of the real Refuelling Machine (RM) and its environment in order to improve both the learning process and operation's effectiveness. The simulator's challenge is to support the performance (operational activity) of RM operational staff firstly by helping them to develop basic knowledge and skills as well as to keep skilled staff in close touch with the complex machinery of the Refuelling Machine. During the 2nd stage of the joint project the functional scope of the VR-simulator was greatly enhanced - firstly, by connecting to the RBMK-unit full-scope simulator, and, secondly, by including a training program and simulator model upgrade. The present 3rd stage of the Project is primarily oriented towards the improvement of the training process for maintenance and operational personnel by means of a development of the Training Support Methodology and Courses (TSMC) to be based on Virtual Reality and enlarged functionality of 3D and process modelling. The TMSC development is based on Russian and International Regulatory Bodies requirements and recommendations. Design, development and creation of a specialised VR-based Training System for RM Maintenance Personnel are very important for the Russian RBMK plants. The main goal is to create a powerful, autonomous VR-based simulator for training technical maintenance personnel on the Refuelling Machine. VR based training is expected to improve the effect of training compared to the current training based on traditional methods using printed documentation. The LNPP management and the Regulatory Bodies supported this goal. The VR-based Training System should

  3. The development of calculational methods and assessment standards for AGR refuelling safety cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.W.; Grant, R.J.; Thomas, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper considers the methods used to assess the protection needed against hazards in the AGR fuel route. These methods are all directed towards the objective of showing that all postulated events taking place during refuelling are acceptable within agreed criteria of severity versus frequency. The methods allow the determination of temperatures arising in various hazards, from which estimates can be made of the radiological release, if any, which would occur. Comparison of this estimate with the level considered acceptable at the fault frequency leads to the requirement for protection. (author)

  4. Integrated head area design of KNGR to reduce refueling outage duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Tae; Park, Chi Yong; Kim, In Hwan; Kim, Dae Woong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In the design of KNGR (Korea Next Generation Reactor), we believe that economy is one of the most important factors to be considered. Thus, we reviewed and evaluated the consequences of designing the head area into an integrated package from an economical point of view. The refueling outage durations of the nuclear power plants currently in operation in Korea, some having and others not having integrated head package, are compared. This paper discusses the characteristics of head area design and the critical design issues of KNGR head area to evaluate the effect of the head area characteristics on the outage duration. 8 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  5. Integrated head area design of KNGR to reduce refueling outage duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Tae; Park, Chi Yong; Kim, In Hwan; Kim, Dae Woong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In the design of KNGR (Korea Next Generation Reactor), we believe that economy is one of the most important factors to be considered. Thus, we reviewed and evaluated the consequences of designing the head area into an integrated package from an economical point of view. The refueling outage durations of the nuclear power plants currently in operation in Korea, some having and others not having integrated head package, are compared. This paper discusses the characteristics of head area design and the critical design issues of KNGR head area to evaluate the effect of the head area characteristics on the outage duration. 8 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  6. The design and use of proficiency based BWR reactor maintenance and refuelling training mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the ABB experience with the design and use of boiling water reactor training facilities. The training programs were developed and implemented in cooperation with the nuclear utilities. ABB operates two facilities, the ABB ATOM Light Water Reactor Service Center located in Vasteras, Sweden, and the ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations BWR Training Center located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA. The focus of the training centers are reactor maintenance and refueling activities plus the capability to develop and qualify tools, procedures and repair techniques

  7. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  8. Study of decision framework of offshore wind power station site selection based on ELECTRE-III under intuitionistic fuzzy environment: A case of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yunna; Zhang, Jinying; Yuan, Jianping; Geng, Shuai; Zhang, Haobo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel MCDM framework is applied to assist group decision in OWPS site selection. • The index system consisting of veto and evaluation criteria is constructed. • A case study is carried five sites in coastal areas of Shandong in East China. - Abstract: Offshore wind power projects have been rapidly proposed in China due to policy promotion. Site selection immensely decides the success of any offshore wind power development and is a complex multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problem. However, canonical MCDM methods tend to fail the site selection process due to the following three problems. Firstly, the compensation problem exists in information processing. Secondly, there exists the problem of incomplete utilization of decision information and information loss in the decision process. Thirdly, the interaction problem in the fuzzy environment is easy to be ignored. To deal with the above problems, this study builds a framework for offshore wind farm site selection decision utilizing Elimination et Choix Traduisant la Realité-III (ELECTRE-III) in the intuitionistic fuzzy environment. First of all, the comprehensive index system of OWPS site selection consisting of veto criteria and evaluation criteria is constructed. Then, the intuitionistic fuzzy set is used in the group decision for the decision makers to express the imperfect knowledge. Moreover, the generalized intuitionistic fuzzy ordered weighted geometric interaction averaging (GIFWGIA) operator is applied to deal with the interaction problem. Together with the likelihood-based valued comparisons, imprecise decision information is reasonably used and information loss problem is rationally avoided. Then a case of China is studied based on the proposed framework, demonstrating the site selection methodology valid and practical. This study implements evaluation method for offshore wind power site selection and also provides a theoretical basis for the development of offshore wind power

  9. Drogue tracking using 3D flash lidar for autonomous aerial refueling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-I.; Stettner, Roger

    2011-06-01

    Autonomous aerial refueling (AAR) is an important capability for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to increase its flying range and endurance without increasing its size. This paper presents a novel tracking method that utilizes both 2D intensity and 3D point-cloud data acquired with a 3D Flash LIDAR sensor to establish relative position and orientation between the receiver vehicle and drogue during an aerial refueling process. Unlike classic, vision-based sensors, a 3D Flash LIDAR sensor can provide 3D point-cloud data in real time without motion blur, in the day or night, and is capable of imaging through fog and clouds. The proposed method segments out the drogue through 2D analysis and estimates the center of the drogue from 3D point-cloud data for flight trajectory determination. A level-set front propagation routine is first employed to identify the target of interest and establish its silhouette information. Sufficient domain knowledge, such as the size of the drogue and the expected operable distance, is integrated into our approach to quickly eliminate unlikely target candidates. A statistical analysis along with a random sample consensus (RANSAC) is performed on the target to reduce noise and estimate the center of the drogue after all 3D points on the drogue are identified. The estimated center and drogue silhouette serve as the seed points to efficiently locate the target in the next frame.

  10. REFUEL. Potential and realizable cost reduction of 2nd generation biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londo, H.M.; Deurwaarder, E.P.; Lensink, S.M.; Junginer, H.M.; De Wit, M.

    2007-05-01

    In the REFUEL project steering possibilities for and impacts of a greater market penetration of biofuels are assessed. Several benefits are attributed to second generation biofuels, fuels made from lignocellulosic feedstock, such as higher productivity, less impacts on land use and food markets and improved greenhouse gas emission reductions. The chances of second generation biofuels entering the market autonomously are assessed and several policy measures enhancing those changes are evaluated. It shows that most second generation biofuels might become competitive in the biofuel market, if the production of biodiesel from oil crops becomes limited by land availability. Setting high biofuel targets, setting greenhouse gas emissions caps on biofuel and setting subtargets for second generation biofuels, all have a similar impact of stimulating second generation's entrance into the biofuel market. Contrary, low biofuel targets and high imports can have a discouraging impact on second generation biofuel development, and thereby on overall greenhouse gas performance. Since this paper shows preliminary results from the REFUEL study, one is advised to contact the authors before quantitatively referring to this paper

  11. Use of an advanced document system in post-refuelling updating of nuclear power plant documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puech Suanzes, P.; Cortes Soler, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of the extensive use of an advanced document system to update documentation prepared by traditional methods and affected by changes in the period between two plant refuellings. The implementation of a system for the capture, retrieval and storage of drawings using optical discs is part of a plan to modernize production and management tools and to thus achieve better control of document configuration. These processes are consequently optimized in that: 1. The deterioration of drawings is detained with the help of an identical, updated, legible, reliable support for all users. 2. The time required to update documentation is reduced. Given the large number of drawings, the implementation method should effectively combine costs and time. The document management tools ensure optical disc storage control so that from the moment a drawing resides in the system, any modification to it is made through the system utilities, thus ensuring quality and reducing schedules. The system described was used to update the electrical drawings of Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant. Changes made during the eighth refuelling of Unit I were incorporated and the time needed to issue the updated drawings was reduced by one month. (author)

  12. Optimization of refueling-shuffling scheme in PWR core by random search strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuan

    1991-11-01

    A random method for simulating optimization of refueling management in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core is described. The main purpose of the optimization was to select the 'best' refueling arrangement scheme which would produce maximum economic benefits under certain imposed conditions. To fulfill this goal, an effective optimization strategy, two-stage random search method was developed. First, the search was made in a manner similar to the stratified sampling technique. A local optimum can be reached by comparison of the successive results. Then the other random experiences would be carried on between different strata to try to find the global optimum. In general, it can be used as a practical tool for conventional fuel management scheme. However, it can also be used in studies on optimization of Low-Leakage fuel management. Some calculations were done for a typical PWR core on a CYBER-180/830 computer. The results show that the method proposed can obtain satisfactory approach at reasonable low computational cost

  13. Power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawte, H.; Philpott, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The object is to provide a method of operating a dual purpose power station so that the steam supply system is operated at a high load factor. The available steam not required for electricity generation is used to provide process heat and the new feature is that the process plant capacity is determined to make the most economic use of the steam supply system, and not to match the passout capacity of the turbine of the turbogenerator. The product of the process plant should, therefore, be capable of being stored. A dual-purpose power station with a nuclear-powered steam source, turbogenerating means connected to the steam source and steam-powered process plant susceptible to wide variation in its rate of operation is described. (U.K.)

  14. Study of infrastructure considerations for microwave energy ground receiving stations. Satellite Power System (SPS) offshore rectenna siting study in western Europe. An executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresters, A.R.

    1980-11-01

    The feasibility of offshore rectenna sites in the North Sea based on a reference SPS concept of 5 GW was investigated. Site criteria include a 20 km wide safety zone between the site and the shore, a 300 km limit to centers of power consumption, and a water depth of 30 m. Artificial islands, polders, atolls and exposed gravity or jacket structures were considered. Only the island and polder concept permit antenna installation without modifications to the reference design. The polder concept was selected, costing half that of the artificial island (160 km sq). Construction material requirements are given for the dikes. Total construction time is 8.5 years. Costs range between 4.7 and 5.4 billion in 1980 dollars, or $0.02 per kw hr over 30 years. (ESA)

  15. UMTS Network Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, C.

    2010-09-01

    The weakness of small island electrical grids implies a handicap for the electrical generation with renewable energy sources. With the intention of maximizing the installation of photovoltaic generators in the Canary Islands, arises the need to develop a solar forecasting system that allows knowing in advance the amount of PV generated electricity that will be going into the grid, from the installed PV power plants installed in the island. The forecasting tools need to get feedback from real weather data in "real time" from remote weather stations. Nevertheless, the transference of this data to the calculation computer servers is very complicated with the old point to point telecommunication systems that, neither allow the transfer of data from several remote weather stations simultaneously nor high frequency of sampling of weather parameters due to slowness of the connection. This one project has developed a telecommunications infrastructure that allows sensorizadas remote stations, to send data of its sensors, once every minute and simultaneously, to the calculation server running the solar forecasting numerical models. For it, the Canary Islands Institute of Technology has added a sophisticated communications network to its 30 weather stations measuring irradiation at strategic sites, areas with high penetration of photovoltaic generation or that have potential to host in the future photovoltaic power plants connected to the grid. In each one of the stations, irradiance and temperature measurement instruments have been installed, over inclined silicon cell, global radiation on horizontal surface and room temperature. Mobile telephone devices have been installed and programmed in each one of the weather stations, which allow the transfer of their data taking advantage of the UMTS service offered by the local telephone operator. Every minute the computer server running the numerical weather forecasting models receives data inputs from 120 instruments distributed

  16. Developing a virtual reality application for training Nuclear Power Plant operators: Setting up a database containing dose rates in the refuelling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Zarza, I.; Burgos, M. C.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    Operators in Nuclear Power Plants can receive high doses during refuelling operations. A training programme for simulating refuelling operations will be useful in reducing the doses received by workers as well as minimising operation time. With this goal in mind, a virtual reality application is developed within the framework of the CIPRES project. The application requires doses, both instantaneous and accumulated, to be displayed at all times during operator training. Therefore, it is necessary to set up a database containing dose rates at every point in the refuelling plant. This database is based on radiological protection surveillance data measured in the plant during refuelling operations. Some interpolation routines have been used to estimate doses through the refuelling plant. Different assumptions have been adopted in order to perform the interpolation and obtain consistent data. In this paper, the procedures developed to set up the dose database for the virtual reality application are presented and analysed. (authors)

  17. Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, Gopal [HD Systems

    2013-06-01

    Automobile manufacturers leading the development of mass-market fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) were interviewed in Japan, Korea, Germany and the United States. There is general agreement that the performance of FCVs with respect to durability, cold start, packaging, acceleration, refueling time and range has progressed to the point where vehicles that could be brought to market in 2015 will satisfy customer expectations. However, cost and the lack of refueling infrastructure remain significant barriers. Costs have been dramatically reduced over the past decade, yet are still about twice what appears to be needed for sustainable market success. While all four countries have plans for the early deployment of hydrogen refueling infrastructure, the roles of government, industry and the public in creating a viable hydrogen refueling infrastructure remain unresolved. The existence of an adequate refueling infrastructure and supporting government policies are likely to be the critical factors that determine when and where hydrogen FCVs are brought to market.

  18. The CEA Cadarache site. Additional safety assessment with respect to the accident which occurred in the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    After a presentation of some characteristics of the CEA Cadarache site (internal and external industrial environment, crisis management organization at the CEA level and at the local level), this document reports the identification of structures and equipment concerned by crisis management (site support functions, critical structures and equipment concerned by additional safety assessments). Then, it addresses the different risks: earthquake (sizing of critical structures and equipment, margin assessment), flooding (possible origins, alarm measures), other extreme natural events (extreme meteorological conditions, extreme earthquake with induced flooding, forest fire), and loss of electric supplies and of cooling systems. The last parts address the organization of accident management in situation typically related to additional safety management), and subcontracting conditions and practices

  19. Preparative engineering on the Tomari Nuclear Power Station Unit 3. In-site measurement on wave pressure working to new type bank protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoriaki; Hoshi, Hideki; Amano, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    The Tomari Nuclear Power Station Unit 3 is planned to construct it at sea-side area adjacent to southern-east portion of Unit 1 and 2, and has been carried out its preparative engineerings such as bank protection with about 670 m in length, its development, and so on, corresponding to it. Among them, as type of landfill for protection of important construction at its background the Amahata covered-block type bank protection developed by a series of hydrologic tests was adopted. This engineering was begun on March, 2001, and most of establishment on the landfill bank protection was finished on June, 2003. Then, an in-situ measurement aiming to obtain actual testing data and so on of wave pressure at this type of bank protection, was planned, to carry out its measurement at winter (October, 2002 to February, 2003) showing the highest wave at this sea area. Here were reported on relationship between incident wave and wave pressure feature working at new type bank protection together with describing on outlines of the in-situ measurement. (G.K.)

  20. STAR-H2: a long-refueling interval battery reactor for hydrogen and water supply to cities of developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D. C.; Doctor, R. D.; Sienicki, J. J.; Matonis, D. T.; Faibish, R. S.; Moisseytsev, A. V.

    2004-01-01

    The STAR-H2 concept is devised to attain Gen-IV goals by responding to foreseen mid century needs and market conditions. It is targeted for support of urban centers in developing countries and is designed to fit within a hierarchical hub-spoke architecture based on regional fuel cycle centers, nuclear fuel and hydrogen as long distance energy carriers and distributed electricity generation to mesh with urban energy distribution infrastructures using grid delivery of electricity, hydrogen, potable water, and communications (and sewage return) through a common grid of easements. Long (20 year) refueling interval and full core cassette refueling supported from client country consortia-owned regional fuel cycle (front and back end) service centers, operating under international oversight are intended to make nuclear-based energy security available to countries which don't wish to emplace an indigenous front to back fuel cycle infrastructure. The regional centers, infrequent cassette refueling and full transuranic recycle (both reload and spent fuel cassettes meet the spent fuel standard of self protection) are intended to provide barriers to misuse of materials and facilities for military purposes. Fuel cassette refueling and shipments are conducted by Regional Center personnel. Reactor fissile self sufficient operation and full transuranic multi recycle both extracts the full energy content of the uranium ore, and consigns only fission products to waste. Small to mid sizing permits incremental deployments where capital financing is dear and/or indigenous infrastructure is at an early stage of development. Modular construction, factory fabrication, and delivery of a turnkey heat source reactor to the client's site where a non safety grade balance of plant has already been emplaced by local labor to local standards will facilitate rapid assembly and initiation of revenue generation. The concept employs extensive levels of passive safety to be consistent with a worldwide

  1. GPS navigation algorithms for Autonomous Airborne Refueling of Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanafseh, Samer Mahmoud

    Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) have recently generated great interest because of their potential to perform hazardous missions without risking loss of life. If autonomous airborne refueling is possible for UAVs, mission range and endurance will be greatly enhanced. However, concerns about UAV-tanker proximity, dynamic mobility and safety demand that the relative navigation system meets stringent requirements on accuracy, integrity, and continuity. In response, this research focuses on developing high-performance GPS-based navigation architectures for Autonomous Airborne Refueling (AAR) of UAVs. The AAR mission is unique because of the potentially severe sky blockage introduced by the tanker. To address this issue, a high-fidelity dynamic sky blockage model was developed and experimentally validated. In addition, robust carrier phase differential GPS navigation algorithms were derived, including a new method for high-integrity reacquisition of carrier cycle ambiguities for recently-blocked satellites. In order to evaluate navigation performance, world-wide global availability and sensitivity covariance analyses were conducted. The new navigation algorithms were shown to be sufficient for turn-free scenarios, but improvement in performance was necessary to meet the difficult requirements for a general refueling mission with banked turns. Therefore, several innovative methods were pursued to enhance navigation performance. First, a new theoretical approach was developed to quantify the position-domain integrity risk in cycle ambiguity resolution problems. A mechanism to implement this method with partially-fixed cycle ambiguity vectors was derived, and it was used to define tight upper bounds on AAR navigation integrity risk. A second method, where a new algorithm for optimal fusion of measurements from multiple antennas was developed, was used to improve satellite coverage in poor visibility environments such as in AAR. Finally, methods for using data-link extracted

  2. Performance of on-power fuelling equipment at Rajasthan Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayabarathan, S.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    1977-01-01

    Natural uranium reactors on account of their intrinsically low reactivity need frequent refuelling. The Rajasthan Atomic Power Station based on natural uranium reactors has, therefore, been provided with on-power fuel handling system which was installed in 1972. Its performance has met the design intent and operational objectives which are enumerated. However, continuous fuelling 7 to 10 days has not been possible because frequent maintenance of refuelling system is needed on account of certain deficiencies major of which is the heavy water leakage. For better performance, installation of a programmable logic controller is suggested. Mention has also been made of inadequate number of skilled man-power required for maintenance which leads to quick depletion of man-rem of all the available personnel trained for maintenance work. (M.G.B.)

  3. A frequency conversion mode for dispenser in the service station based on flow rate signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y J; Tang, D; Huang, J B; Liu, J; Jia, P F

    2012-01-01

    Dispenser is an integrated fuel transport and measurement system at the service station. In this paper, we developed a frequency conversion mode for the dispenser, based on the flow rate signal which is obtained from the converter measuring flow capacity. After introducing the frequency conversion mode to dispenser, we obtained that pump rotates at a high speed when fuelled with high flow rate, and it rotates at a low speed when fuelled with low flow rate. This makes the fuel dispenser more energy-efficient and controllable. We also did some valve optimizations on the dispenser and developed a new control mode for preset refuelling based on the frequency conversion mode, Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that the new dispenser not only can meet the national standards, but also performs better than the ordinary one especially in preset refuelling.

  4. Investigation of in-cabin volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in taxis; influence of vehicle's age, model, fuel, and refueling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, Reza; Hadei, Mostafa; Hopke, Philip K; Shahsavani, Abbas; Rastkari, Noushin; Kermani, Majid; Yarahmadi, Maryam; Ghaderpoori, Afshin

    2018-06-01

    The air pollutant species and concentrations in taxis' cabins can present significant health impacts on health. This study measured the concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde in the cabins of four different taxi models. The effects of taxi's age, fuel type, and refueling were investigated. Four taxi models in 3 age groups were fueled with 3 different fuels (gas, compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)), and the concentrations of 6 air pollutants were measured in the taxi cabins before and after refueling. BTEX, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde sampling were actively sampled using NIOSH methods 1501, 2541, and 2538, respectively. The average BTEX concentrations for all taxi models were below guideline values. The average concentrations (±SD) of formaldehyde in Model 1 to Model 4 taxis were 889 (±356), 806 (±323), 1144 (±240), and 934 (±167) ppbv, respectively. Acetaldehyde average concentrations (±SD) in Model 1 to Model 4 taxis were 410 (±223), 441 (±241), 443 (±210), and 482 (±91) ppbv, respectively. Refueling increased the in-vehicle concentrations of pollutants primarily the CNG and LPG fuels. BTEX concentrations in all taxi models were significantly higher for gasoline. Taxi age inversely affected formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. In conclusion, it seems that refueling process and substitution of gasoline with CNG and LPG can be considered as solutions to improve in-vehicle air concentrations for taxis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Design for air-to-air refuelling operations; new passenger and tanker aircraft design for AAR scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Air-to-air refuelling is a way to improve fuel efficiency of the overall transport system without waiting for the improvement of basic aviation technology. To take full advantage of such an operation, both passenger aircraft and tanker aircraft (which deliver required fuel to the passenger aircraft

  6. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core

  7. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core.

  8. Skipping swans : Fuelling rates and wind conditions determine differential use of migratory stopover sites of Bewick's Swans Cygnus bewickii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, JH; Nolet, BA; Klaassen, M

    2002-01-01

    Some migratory birds refuel at stopover sites that they by-pass on the return trip. In theory, this skipping behaviour is only expected in time-selected migrants when the overflown site is of a lower quality than the departure site. We provide empirical evidence that quality differences in stopover

  9. Skipping swans: Fuelling rates and wind conditions determine differential use of migratory stopover sites of Bewick's Swans Cygnus bewickii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, J.H.; Nolet, B.A.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Some migratory birds refuel at stopover sites that they by-pass on the return trip. In theory, this skipping behaviour is only expected in time-selected migrants when the overflown site is of a lower quality than the departure site. We provide empirical evidence that quality differences in stopover

  10. Mineralogical, chemical, organic and microbial properties of subsurface soil cores from Mars Desert Research Station (Utah, USA): Phyllosilicate and sulfate analogues to Mars mission landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Carol R.; Clarke, Jonathan; Direito, Susana O. L.; Blake, David; Martin, Kevin R.; Zavaleta, Jhony; Foing, Bernard

    2011-07-01

    We collected and analysed soil cores from four geologic units surrounding Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) Utah, USA, including Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison formation (Brushy Basin member) and Summerville formation. The area is an important geochemical and morphological analogue to terrains on Mars. Soils were analysed for mineralogy by a Terra X-ray diffractometer (XRD), a field version of the CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission (2012 landing). Soluble ion chemistry, total organic content and identity and distribution of microbial populations were also determined. The Terra data reveal that Mancos and Morrison soils are rich in phyllosilicates similar to those observed on Mars from orbital measurements (montmorillonite, nontronite and illite). Evaporite minerals observed include gypsum, thenardite, polyhalite and calcite. Soil chemical analysis shows sulfate the dominant anion in all soils and SO4>>CO3, as on Mars. The cation pattern Na>Ca>Mg is seen in all soils except for the Summerville where Ca>Na. In all soils, SO4 correlates with Na, suggesting sodium sulfates are the dominant phase. Oxidizable organics are low in all soils and range from a high of 0.7% in the Mancos samples to undetectable at a detection limit of 0.1% in the Morrison soils. Minerals rich in chromium and vanadium were identified in Morrison soils that result from diagenetic replacement of organic compounds. Depositional environment, geologic history and mineralogy all affect the ability to preserve and detect organic compounds. Subsurface biosphere populations were revealed to contain organisms from all three domains (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya) with cell density between 3.0×106 and 1.8×107 cells ml-1 at the deepest depth. These measurements are analogous to data that could be obtained on future robotic or human Mars missions and results are relevant to the MSL mission that will investigate phyllosilicates on Mars.

  11. Feasibility study on application of WIMS-AECL to Wolsong-1 refueling simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-01-01

    'Full text:' At present, in Wolsong nuclear power plant, all of the reactor physics calculations are based on the cell code POWDERPUFS-V (PPV). PPV code use semi-empirical approximation rather than direct solving of transport equation with robust methodology. Switch from PPV to more robust transport solver is world-wide trend in addition to GAI issued from Canadian regulatory body (CNSC). In this paper, feasibility study on the replacement of cell code POWDERPUFS-V (PPV) with WIMS-AECL was performed for Wolsong-1 NPP. The impact of the cell code replacement on physics design parameters and refueling simulation was assessed. First, fuel isotopic composition affecting core reactivity is compared between PPV and WIMS-AECL. Generally it was shown that WIMS-AECL predicts higher uranium fissile concentration while less plutonium concentration as fuel burnup increases compared with prediction of PPV. Infinite multiplication factor of WIMS-AECL is slightly less predicted than that of PPV. Also core reactivity change from operating condition change such as moderator temperature, coolant temperature, fuel temperature and coolant density were compared for both fresh fuel and equilibrium fuel. Specially the analysis of void reactivity which is current hot issue for positive reactivity insertion in LOCA was also performed. As a result of this study, all of WIMS-AECL results were similar to PPV based calculation in the fresh fuel. However, there is a tendency that the deviation between the two codes increases as the fuel burn-up increases. This is because PPV code was made from the laboratory condition with fresh fuel and low fuel temperature. Second, refueling simulation with WIMS-AECL based RFSP was tried to compare with current PPV based RFSP simulation for about 20 months (5775FPD ∼ 6324FPD). To cover wide range of operating parameter condition such as purity of moderator and coolant and boron concentration, tremendous amount of computation time is needed with WIMS

  12. Detection and Tracking Strategies for Autonomous Aerial Refuelling Tasks Based on Monocular Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Yin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection and tracking strategies based on monocular vision are proposed for autonomous aerial refuelling tasks. The drogue attached to the fuel tanker aircraft has two important features. The grey values of the drogue's inner part are different from the external umbrella ribs, as shown in the image. The shape of the drogue's inner dark part is nearly circular. According to crucial prior knowledge, the rough and fine positioning algorithms are designed to detect the drogue. Particle filter based on the drogue's shape is proposed to track the drogue. A strategy to switch between detection and tracking is proposed to improve the robustness of the algorithms. The inner dark part of the drogue is segmented precisely in the detecting and tracking process and the segmented circular part can be used to measure its spatial position. The experimental results show that the proposed method has good performance in real-time and satisfied robustness and positioning accuracy.

  13. Operational transparency: an advanced safeguards strategy for future on-load refuelled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.J.; Trask, D.

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA's system for tracking fuel movement in an on-load refuelled heavy-water reactor is robust, but an opportunity remains to exploit the wealth of data streaming from the reactor vault during operation and provide real-time, third-party monitoring of reactor status and history. This concept of Operational Transparency would require that large amounts of operational data be reduced in near-real time to a small subset of high-level information. Operational Transparency would enhance the IAEA's ability to monitor the state of the core to an unprecedented level. This paper provides an overview of the novel concept of Operational Transparency in heavy water reactors, using potential application to CANDU reactors as an example, and explores some of the technical challenges that will need to be solved for efficient implementation. (author)

  14. Device for refueling a nuclear reactor having a core comprising a plurality of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Santen, A.; Elofsson, K.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor formed of fuel assemblies each including a plurality of parallel fuel rods arranged in a predetermined fuel rod lattice, which rods are freely extractable and insertable at one end of the fuel assembly, is refueled by extracting from one of the fuel assemblies a number of fuel rods substantially less than the total number of fuel rods and replacing these by inserting new fuel rods into the vacated positions. The removal and return of the rods is produced by a tool having a plurality of gripping members capable of engaging shoulders beneath heads formed on the upper ends of the fuel rods. This may be accomplished by providing a tool having a number of gripping members attached to the tool body corresponding to the lattice positions of the fuel rods to be extracted, having gripping members which can be pushed together to grip beneath shoulders on the upper ends of the fuel rods. (Official Gazette)

  15. General empirical model for 60Co generation in pressurized water reactors with continuous refueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrutia, G.A.; Blesa, M.A.; Fernandez-Prini, R.; Maroto, A.J.G.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified model is presented that permits one to calculate the average activity on the fuel elements of a reactor that operates under continuous refueling, based on the assumption of crud interchange between fuel element surface and coolant in the form of particulate material only and using the crud specific activity as an empirical parameter determined in plant. The net activity flux from core to out-of-core components is then calculated in the form of parametric curves depending on crud specific activity and rate of particulate release from fuel surface. In pressure vessel reactors, contribution to out-ofcore radionuclide inventory arising in the release of activated materials from core components must be taken into account. The contribution from in situ activation of core components is calculated from the rates of release and the specific activities corresponding to the exposed surface of the component (calculated in a straightforward way on the basis of core geometry and neutron fluxes). The rates of release can be taken from the literature, or in the case of cobalt-rich alloys, can be calculated from experimentally determined cobalt contents of structural components and crud. For pressure vessel reactors operating under continuous refueling, activation of deposited crud and release of activated materials are compared; the latter, in certain cases, may represent a sizable (and even the largest) fraction of the total cobalt activity. It is proposed that the ratio of activities of 59 Fe to 54 Mn may be used as a diagnostic tool for in situ activation of structural materials; available data indicate ratios close to unity for pressure tube heavy water reactors (no in situ activation) and ratios around 4 to 10 for pressure vessel, heavy water reactors

  16. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:15 Miscellaneous Pipelines Associated with the 132-F-6, 1608-F Waste Water Pumping Station. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-031

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    The 100-F-26:15 waste site consisted of the remnant portions of underground process effluent and floor drain pipelines that originated at the 105-F Reactor. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  17. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  18. Cortical and trabecular bone microstructure did not recover at weight-bearing skeletal sites and progressively deteriorated at non-weight-bearing sites during the year following international space station missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vico, L.; van Rietbergen, B.; Vilayphiou, N.; Linossier, M.T.; Locrelle, H.; Normand, M.; Zouch, M.; Gerbaix, M.; Bonnet, N.; Novikov, V.; Thomas, T.; Vassilieva, G.

    2017-01-01

    Risk for premature osteoporosis is a major health concern in astronauts and cosmonauts; the reversibility of the bone lost at the weight-bearing bone sites is not established, although it is suspected to take longer than the mission length. The bone three-dimensional structure and strength that

  19. On the sub-micron aerosol size distribution in a coastal-rural site at El Arenosillo Station (SW – Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sorribas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the analysis of the sub-micron aerosol characteristics at El Arenosillo Station, a rural and coastal environment in South-western Spain between 1 August 2004 and 31 July 2006 (594 days. The mean total concentration (NT was 8660 cm−3 and the mean concentrations in the nucleation (NNUC, Aitken (NAIT and accumulation (NACC particle size ranges were 2830 cm−3, 4110 cm−3 and 1720 cm−3, respectively. Median size distribution was characterised by a single-modal fit, with a geometric diameter, median number concentration and geometric standard deviation of 60 nm, 5390 cm−3 and 2.31, respectively. Characterisation of primary emissions, secondary particle formation, changes to meteorology and long-term transport has been necessary to understand the seasonal and annual variability of the total and modal particle concentration. Number concentrations exhibited a diurnal pattern with maximum concentrations around noon. This was governed by the concentrations of the nucleation and Aitken modes during the warm seasons and only by the nucleation mode during the cold seasons. Similar monthly mean total concentrations were observed throughout the year due to a clear inverse variation between the monthly mean NNUC and NACC. It was related to the impact of desert dust and continental air masses on the monthly mean particle levels. These air masses were associated with high values of NACC which suppressed the new particle formation (decreasing NNUC. Each day was classified according to a land breeze flow or a synoptic pattern influence. The median size distribution for desert dust and continental aerosol was dominated by the Aitken and accumulation modes, and marine air masses were dominated by the nucleation and Aitken modes. Particles

  20. Use of knowledge and experience gained from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident to establish the technical basis for strategic off-site response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kaname; Saito, Kimiaki; Iijima, Kazuki; McKinley, Ian; Hardie, Susan

    2015-03-01

    This report provides a concise overview of knowledge and experience gained from the activities for environmental remediation after the Fukushima Daiichi (1F) accident. It is specifically tailored for international use, to establish or refine the technical basis for strategic, off-site response to nuclear incidents. It reflects JAEA's key role in the research associated with both remediation of contaminated areas and also the natural contamination migration processes in non-remediated areas, in collaboration with other Japanese and international organisations and research institutes. Environmental monitoring and mapping to define boundary conditions in terms of the distribution of radioactivity and resultant doses, guides the resultant response. Radiation protection considerations set constraints, with approaches developed to estimate doses to different critical groups and set appropriate dose reduction targets. Decontamination activities, with special emphasis on associated waste management, provide experience in evaluation of the effectiveness of decontamination and the pros and cons of different approaches / technologies. The assessment of the natural behaviour of contaminant radionuclides and their mobility in the environment is now focused almost entirely on radiocaesium. Here, the impact of natural mobility in terms of self-cleaning / re-concentration in cleaned areas is discussed, along with possible actions to modify such transport or manage potential areas of radiocaesium accumulation. Many of the conditions in Fukushima are similar to those following past contamination events in other countries, where natural self-cleaning alone has allowed recovery to such an extent that the original incident is now largely forgotten. Decontamination efforts in Japan will certainly accelerate this process. On-going remediation work is based on a good technical understanding of the movement of radiocaesium in the environment and this understanding is being translated into

  1. Environmental assessment, proposed generating station for Darlington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    This document indicates the intention of Ontario Hydro to seek approval from the Provincial Government for its plan to construct and operate a 3400 MWe nuclear generating station at the Darlington site, west of Bowmanville. This preliminary proposal also contains the environmental assessment. The environmental section of this proposal describes and assesses the existing environment and the environmental influences which would occur due to the construction and operation of a nuclear generating station, consisting of four 850 MW units, at the Darlington site. This proposed station is similar to the Bruce GS A station presently under construction. (author)

  2. A Coupled Epipelagic-Meso/Bathypelagic Particle Flux Model for the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS)/Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, D. M.; Conte, M.

    2002-12-01

    Of considerable scientific interest is the role remineralization plays in the global carbon cycle. It is the ``biological pump'' that fixes carbon in the upper water column and exports it for long time periods to the deep ocean. From a global carbon cycle point-of-view, it is the processes that govern remineralization in the mid- to deep-ocean waters that provide the feedback to the biogeochemical carbon cycle. In this study we construct an ecosystem model that serves as a mechanistic link between euphotic processes and mesopelagic and bathypelagic processes. We then use this prognostic model to further our understanding of the unparalleled time-series of deep-water sediment traps (21+ years) at the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) and the euphotic zone measurements (10+ years) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Site (BATS). At the core of this mechanistic ecosystem model of the mesopelagic zone is a model that consists of an active feeding habit zooplankton, a passive feeding habit zooplankton, large detritus (sinks), small detritus (non-sinking), and a nutrient pool. As the detritus, the primary source of food, moves through the water column it is fed upon by the active/passive zooplankton pair and undergoes bacterially mediated remineralization into nutrients. The large detritus pool at depth gains material from the formation of fecal pellets from the passive and active zooplankton. Sloppy feeding habits of the active zooplankton contribute to the small detrital pool. Zooplankton mortality (both classes) also contribute directly to the large detritus pool. Aggregation and disaggregation transform detrital particles from one pool to the other and back again. The nutrients at each depth will gain from detrital remineralization and zooplankton excretion. The equations that model the active zooplankton, passive zooplankton, large detritus, small detritus, and nutrients will be reviewed, results shown and future model modifications discussed.

  3. Beaver Valley Power Station and Shippingport Atomic Power Station. 1977 annual environmental report: radiological. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The environmental monitoring conducted during 1977 in the vicinity of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Shippingport Atomic Power Station is described. The environmental monitoring program consists of onsite sampling of water, gaseous, and air effluents, as well as offsite monitoring of water, air, river sediments, and radiation levels in the vicinity of the site. The report discusses releases of small quantities of radioactivity to the Ohio River from the Beaver Valley Power Station and Shippingport Atomic Power Station during 1977

  4. Refueling and density control in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Watt, R.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Buechl, K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of pellet injection and gas puff refueling have been studied in the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch. Multiple deuterium pellets (≤ 6 x 10 19 D atoms/pellet) with velocities ranging from 300 to 700 m/sec have been injected into plasmas with n-bar/sub e/ ∼1 to 5 X 10 19 m -3 , I/sub phi/ ∼100 to 250 kA, T/sub e/(0) ∼150 to 300 eV and discharge durations of ≤ 20 msec. Photographs and an array D/sub α/ detectors show substantial deflection of the pellet trajectory in both the poloidal and toroidal planes, due to asymmetric ablation of the pellet by electrons streaming along field lines. To compensate for the poloidal deflection, the injector was moved up +14 cm off-axis, allowing the pellets to curve down to the midplane. In this fashion, central peaking of the pellet density deposition profile can be obtained. Both electron and ion temperatures fall in response to the density rise, such that β/sub θ/(β/sub θ/ identical to n-bar/sub e/(T/sub e/(0) + T/sub i/)/(B/sub θ/(a)) 2 ) remains roughly constant. Energy confinement is momentarily degraded, and typically a decrease in F (F identical to B/sub phi/(a)/(B/sub phi/)) is seen as magnetic energy is converted to plasma energy when the pellet ablates. As a result of pellet injection at I/sub phi/ = 150 kA we observe T/sub e/(0) α n-bar/sub e//sup -.9 +- .1/, while the helicity based resistivity eta/sub k/ transiently varies as n-bar/sub e//sup .7 +- .1/. While the achievement of center-peaked density profiles is possible with pellet injection, gas puffing at rates strong enough to show a 50% increase in n-bar/sub e/ over a period of 10 msec (∼150 torr-litres/sec) leads to hollow density profiles. The refueling requirements for parameters expected in the next generation RFPs (ZTH, RFX) can be extrapolated from these data using modified tokamak pellet ablation codes

  5. How to handle station black outs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisch, Frigyes

    1986-01-01

    Station black out is defined as the loss of ail high voltage alternating current at a nuclear power site. An international study was made to survey the practices in the different countries. The best way to handle station black out is to avoid it therefore briefly the normal off site and emergency on site power supplies are discussed. The ways in use to enhance nuclear power plants using Boiling Water Reactors or Pressurized Water Reactors to cope with a station black out are discussed in some detail. (author)

  6. How to handle station black outs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisch, Frigyes [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, S-10252 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1986-02-15

    Station black out is defined as the loss of ail high voltage alternating current at a nuclear power site. An international study was made to survey the practices in the different countries. The best way to handle station black out is to avoid it therefore briefly the normal off site and emergency on site power supplies are discussed. The ways in use to enhance nuclear power plants using Boiling Water Reactors or Pressurized Water Reactors to cope with a station black out are discussed in some detail. (author)

  7. An analysis of fast reactor fuel assembly performance taking into account their mechanical interaction in the core and refuelling line capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksha, Yu.K.; Zabudko, L.M.; Kravchenko, I.N.; Matveenko, L.V.; Meshkov, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    An approach to assessment of fast reactor fuel assembly performance has been considered. A concept of passive restraint of fuel assemblies in a reactor adopted in the USSR is described. Some methods for calculating the interassembly interactions during operation are briefly outlined, some calculated results are presented. A problem of fuel assembly performance during refuelling taking into account the refuelling line capabilities is considered. Some results from fuel assemblies operation experience in the BN-600 reactor are given. (author)

  8. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyekyoon.

    1987-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of a railgun accelerator to inject hydrogen pellets into a magnetic fusion reactor for refueling purposes. Specific studies in this paper include: 1.5 mm-diameter two-stage fuseless plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun, construction and testing of a 3.2 mm-diameter two-stage railgun and a theoretical analysis of the behavior of a railgun plasma-arc armature inside a railgun

  9. THE KINETICS OF CONTAMINANTS ACCUMULATION IN THE JET FUEL DURING THE TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS OF ITS PREPARATION FOR AIRCRAFT REFUELING

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Brailko

    2017-01-01

    Much attention is payed to the tasks for ensuring domestic and international aircraft safety and regularity, which are multifaceted and complex. One of them is the system of ensuring the quality of aviation fuel for refueling aircraft at airports. A significant influence of the quality, chemical composition and fuel range on the reliability and lifetime of components and parts of the aircraft fuel system was studied in the process of development and experience accumulation of aircraft operati...

  10. Sizewell 'B' power station public inquiry: CEGB proof of evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    The systems benefits of the selection of the Sizewell site for a PWR power station are dealt with. The transmission modifications which would be needed to provide effective connection of this station to the system are considered. (U.K.)

  11. Technical specifications, La Salle County Station, Unit No. 1. Appendix A to License No. NPF-11, Docket No. 50-373

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    Specifications are presented concerning safety limits; reactivity control systems; power distribution limits; instrumentation; reactor coolant system; emergency core cooling system; containment systems; plant systems; electrical power systems; refueling operations; special test exceptions; radioactive effluents; radiological environmental monitoring; reactor site; fuel storage; and plant operations

  12. Technical specifications, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-528). Appendix A to License No. NPF-34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Technical specifications are presented concerning operating safety limits for reactivity control systems, power distribution, instrumentation, coolant system, emergency core cooling system, containment systems, plant systems, electrical power systems, refueling operations, radioactive effluents, and radiological environmental monitoring; design features of the reactor site, containment, reactor core, coolant system, and fuel storage; and administrative controls

  13. Technical specifications: Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit No. 1. Docket No. 50-416, Appendix A to License No. NPF-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    Technical specifications are presented concerning safety limits; limiting safety system settings; reactivity control systems; power distribution limits; instrumentation; reactor coolant system; emergency core cooling systems; containment systems; plant systems; electrical power systems; refueling operations; radioactive effluents; radiological environmental monitoring; site; and administrative controls

  14. Generalized model development for a cryo-adsorber and 1-D results for the isobaric refueling period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V. Senthil [India Science Lab, General Motors Global R and D, Creator Building, International Technology Park, Bangalore 560066 (India); Kumar, Sudarshan [Chemical Sciences and Material Systems Lab, General Motors Global R and D, Warren Technical Center Campus, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    We have developed 3-D model equations for a cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage tank, where the energy balance accommodates the temperature and pressure variation of all the thermodynamic properties. We then reduce the 3-D model to the 1-D isobaric system and study the isobaric refueling period, for simplified geometry and charging conditions. The hydrogen capacity evolution predicted by the 1-D axial bed model is significantly different than that predicted by the lumped-parameter model because of the presence of sharp temperature gradients during refueling. The 1-D model predicts a higher hydrogen capacity than the lumped-parameter model. This observation can be rationalized by the fact that a bed with temperature gradients on equilibration should desorb gas, whenever the adsorbed phase entropy is lower than the gas phase entropy. The 1-D analysis of the isobaric refueling period does not show any significant difference in hydrogen capacity evolution among the axial, single and multicartridge annular bed designs. Hence, a multicartridge annular design, though giving a slightly lower pressure drop, does not offer any heat and mass transfer enhancement over the single cartridge design. And, the single cartridge annular design appears to be optimal. (author)

  15. Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

  16. Key Issues for the control of refueling outage duration and costs in PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrave, Claude

    2002-01-01

    For several years, EDF, within the framework of the CIDEM1 project and in collaboration with some German Utilities, has undertaken a detailed review of the operating experience both of its own NPP and of foreign units, in order to improve the performances of future units under design, particularly the French-German European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) project. This review made it possible to identify the key issues allowing to decrease the duration of refueling and maintenance outages. These key issues can be classified in 3 categories Design, Maintenance and Logistic Support, Outage Management. Most of the key issues in the design field and some in the logistic support field have been studied and could be integrated into the design of any future PWR unit, as for the EPR project. Some of them could also be adapted to current plants, provided they are feasible and profitable. The organization must be tailored to each country, utility or period: it widely depends on the power production environment, particularly in a deregulation context. (author)

  17. Key issues for the control of refueling outage duration and costs in PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrave, C.; Martin-Onraet, M.

    2000-01-01

    For several years, EDF, within the framework of the CIDEM project and in collaboration with some German Utilities, has undertaken a detailed review of the operating experience both of its own NPP and of foreign units, in order to improve the performances of future units under design, particularly the French-German European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) project. This review made it possible to identify the key issues allowing to decrease the duration of refueling and maintenance outages. These key issues can be classified in 3 categories: Design; Maintenance and Logistic Support; Outage Management. Most key issues in the design field and some in the logistic support field have been studied and could be integrated into the design of any future PWR unit, as for the EPR project. Some of them could also be adapted to current plants, provided they are feasible and profitable. The organization must be tailored to each country, utility or period: it widely depends on the power production environment, particularly in a deregulation context. (author)

  18. A guidance law for UAV autonomous aerial refueling based on the iterative computation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Delin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The rendezvous and formation problem is a significant part for the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV autonomous aerial refueling (AAR technique. It can be divided into two major phases: the long-range guidance phase and the formation phase. In this paper, an iterative computation guidance law (ICGL is proposed to compute a series of state variables to get the solution of a control variable for a UAV conducting rendezvous with a tanker in AAR. The proposed method can make the control variable converge to zero when the tanker and the UAV receiver come to a formation flight eventually. For the long-range guidance phase, the ICGL divides it into two sub-phases: the correction sub-phase and the guidance sub-phase. The two sub-phases share the same iterative process. As for the formation phase, a velocity coordinate system is created by which control accelerations are designed to make the speed of the UAV consistent with that of the tanker. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed ICGL is effective and robust against wind disturbance.

  19. Drogue pose estimation for unmanned aerial vehicle autonomous aerial refueling system based on infrared vision sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanjun; Duan, Haibin; Deng, Yimin; Li, Cong; Zhao, Guozhi; Xu, Yan

    2017-12-01

    Autonomous aerial refueling is a significant technology that can significantly extend the endurance of unmanned aerial vehicles. A reliable method that can accurately estimate the position and attitude of the probe relative to the drogue is the key to such a capability. A drogue pose estimation method based on infrared vision sensor is introduced with the general goal of yielding an accurate and reliable drogue state estimate. First, by employing direct least squares ellipse fitting and convex hull in OpenCV, a feature point matching and interference point elimination method is proposed. In addition, considering the conditions that some infrared LEDs are damaged or occluded, a missing point estimation method based on perspective transformation and affine transformation is designed. Finally, an accurate and robust pose estimation algorithm improved by the runner-root algorithm is proposed. The feasibility of the designed visual measurement system is demonstrated by flight test, and the results indicate that our proposed method enables precise and reliable pose estimation of the probe relative to the drogue, even in some poor conditions.

  20. Dual winch nuclear fuel transfer system providing more reliable fuel transfer during refueling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Harper, M.J.; Stefko, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a nuclear power plant having an auxiliary building, a containment building having the wall, a track extending through a transfer tube within the containment wall, and a fuel transfer system for moving fuel assemblies along the track between the auxiliary building side and the containment building side of the containment wall. It comprises: a car having wheels for movement along spaced rails of the track and further having a carrying basket for one or more fuel assemblies; winch means located on the auxiliary building side of the containment wall and above the water level existing over the track during refueling operations to drive the car along the track; first cable means and second cable means extending substantially vertically downward from the winch means to the tack level; first sheave means for directing the first and the second cable means substantially in the horizontal direction along the track; means for securing the first cable means to the car so that winch pulling force on the first cable means drives the car away from the containment building; second sheave means located near the containment end of the transfer tube

  1. Scaling and Parametric Studies of Condensation Oscillation in an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Hyung; No, Hee Cheon

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the condensation oscillation phenomena by steam-jetting into subcooled water through a multihole sparger, implementing a scaling methodology and the similarity correlation between the test facility and model prototype. To corroborate the scaling methodology, various experimental tests were conducted. The thickness of the boundary layer that encloses the steam cavity was found to be equal to the maximum length of the steam cavity formed. Three key scaling parameters were identified and correlated with the maximum amplitude of pressure oscillation: flow restriction coefficient, area ratio of discharge hole to steam cavity, and density ratio of water to steam. Variations of the oscillation amplitude were small when steam-jetting directions were altered. The concept of a reduction factor was introduced for estimating the oscillation amplitude of the multihole sparger with test data from a single-hole sparger. The results of this study can provide suitable guidelines for sparger design utilized in the in-containment refueling water storage tank for the Advanced Power Reactor 1400

  2. Pellet acceleration studies relating to the refuelling of a steady-state fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimock, D.; Jensen, K.; Jensen, V.O.; Joergensen, L.W.; Pecseli, H.L.; Soerensen, H.; Oester, F.

    1975-11-01

    Several methods for refuelling a steady state-fusion reactor have been proposed, and the pellet method seems advantageous if the pellet can be accelerated to the necessary velocity. A study group was formed to analyze this acceleration problem. Two pellet velocity values were considered: 10 4 m/s and 300 m/s. A pellet velocity of 10 4 m/s may be suitable in the case of a reactor, whereas 300 m/s is believed to be a reasonable velocity at which to perform realistic ablation experiments in the near future. A pneumatic acceleration method was found promising. The pressure is either supplied separately or by evaporation of a part of the pellet. In the latter case, a spark behind the pellet should provide the evoporation and the necessary heating of the driving gas. A preliminary test at room temperature with pellets made of beeswax (the density being ten times that of solid hydrogen, and plastic properties similar to those of solid hydrogen) resulted in a pellet velocity of 100 m/s at a modest value of the energy supplied to the spark. (Auth.)

  3. Finite element modelling of different CANDU fuel bundle types in various refuelling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M. R.; Ionescu, D. V.; Olteanu, G.; Florea, S.; Radut, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a finite element model for static strength analysis of the CANDU standard with 37 elements fuel bundle and the SEU43 with 43 elements fuel bundle design for various refuelling conditions. The computer code, ANSYS7.1, is used to simulate the axial compression in CANDU type fuel bundles subject to hydraulic drag loads, deflection of fuel elements, stresses and displacements in the end plates. Two possible situations for the fuelling machine side stops are considered in our analyses, as follows: the last fuel bundle is supported by the two side stops and a side stop can be blocked therefore, the last fuel bundle is supported by only one side stop. The results of the analyses performed are briefly presented and also illustrated in a graphical form. The finite element model developed in present study is verified against test results for endplate displacement and element bowing obtained from strength tests with fuel bundle string and fuelling machine side-stop simulators. Comparison of ANSYS model predictions with these experimental results led to a very good agreement. Despite the difference in hydraulic load between SEU43 and CANDU standard fuel bundles strings, the maximum stress in the SEU43 endplate is about the same with the maximum stress in the CANDU standard endplate. The comparative assessment reveals that SEU43 fuel bundle is able to withstand high flow rate without showing a significant geometric instability. (authors)

  4. Single-Station Sigma for the Iranian Strong Motion Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarani, H.; Soghrat, M. R.

    2017-11-01

    In development of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), the residuals are assumed to have a log-normal distribution with a zero mean and a standard deviation, designated as sigma. Sigma has significant effect on evaluation of seismic hazard for designing important infrastructures such as nuclear power plants and dams. Both aleatory and epistemic uncertainties are involved in the sigma parameter. However, ground-motion observations over long time periods are not available at specific sites and the GMPEs have been derived using observed data from multiple sites for a small number of well-recorded earthquakes. Therefore, sigma is dominantly related to the statistics of the spatial variability of ground motion instead of temporal variability at a single point (ergodic assumption). The main purpose of this study is to reduce the variability of the residuals so as to handle it as epistemic uncertainty. In this regard, it is tried to partially apply the non-ergodic assumption by removing repeatable site effects from total variability of six GMPEs driven from the local, Europe-Middle East and worldwide data. For this purpose, we used 1837 acceleration time histories from 374 shallow earthquakes with moment magnitudes ranging from M w 4.0 to 7.3 recorded at 370 stations with at least two recordings per station. According to estimated single-station sigma for the Iranian strong motion stations, the ratio of event-corrected single-station standard deviation ( Φ ss) to within-event standard deviation ( Φ) is about 0.75. In other words, removing the ergodic assumption on site response resulted in 25% reduction of the within-event standard deviation that reduced the total standard deviation by about 15%.

  5. Occupational radiation exposures at Canadian CANDU nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Taylor, G.F.

    1982-09-01

    In Canada, methods to reduce the radiation exposure to workers at nuclear power reactors have been studied and implemented since the early days of the CANDU reactor program. Close collaboration between the designers, the operators, and the manufacturers has reduced the total exposure at each station, the dose requirement to operate and maintain each successive station compared with earlier stations, and the average annual exposure per worker. Specific methods developed to achieve dose reduction include water chemistry; corrosion resistant materials; low cobalt materials; decontamination; hot filtration, improved equipment reliability, maintainability, and accessibility; improved shielding design and location; planning of work for low exposure; improved operating and maintenance procedures; removal of tritium from D 2 O systems and work environments; improved protective clothing; on-power refuelling; worker awareness and training; and many other small improvements. The 1981 occupational dose productivity factors for Pickering A and Bruce A nuclear generating stations were respectively 0.43 and 0.2 rem/MW(e).a

  6. VANTAGE 5 PWR fuel assembly demonstration program at Virgil C. Summer nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.C.; Orr, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    VANTAGE 5 is an improved PWR fuel product designed and manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The VANTAGE 5 fuel design features integral fuel burnable absorbers, intermediate flow mixer grids, axial blankets, high burnup capability, and a reconstitutable top nozzle. A demonstration program for this fuel design commenced in late 1984 in cycle 2 of the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station. Objectives for VANTAGE 5 fuel are reduced fuel cycle costs, better core operating margins, and increased design and operating flexibility. Inspections of the VANTAGE 5 demonstration assemblies are planned at each refueling outage

  7. 180 meteorological stations data analysis to find out a meteodiffusivity index of sites; Analisi dei dati relativi a 180 stazioni meteorologiche al fine di individuare un indice per la caratterizzazione meteodiffusiva dei siti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagnetti, P.; Grandoni, G.; Mammarella, M.C.; Pellegrini, A.; Racalbuto, S.; Boccadoro, M.; Fedele, P. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The present work has been done during the preparatory events of the National Conference on Energy and Environment (CNEA), studying the diffusive properties of the lower layers of the atmosphere, in order to find out a set of air quality indicators for urban areas. The data of 180 meteorological stations of the Italian Air Force Meteorological Service cover the whole Italian territory and are easily available; for this reason, this study, is based on those data. By analysing the available data, the variability range of the considered parameters was investigated and then an attempt was done to combine those parameters in order to describe, with a general index related to each site, the higher or lower attitude to diffuse pollutants released in the atmosphere. After that, the sites have been classified by their capacity of dispersion in atmosphere, making use of the meteo-diffusivity index described above, and pointing out the importance of meteorology in the study of the air quality of urban sites. [Italian] Questo lavoro e' stato svolto durante gli eventi preparatori della Conferenza Nazionale Energia Ambiente (CNEA), con lo scopo di individuare un set di indicatori della qualita' dell'aria in aree urbane, sulla base di studi e ricerche sui parametri meteodiffusivi dei bassi strati dell'atmosfera. Sono stati presi in considerazione, perche' subito fruibili e a diffusione nazionale, i dati provenienti dalle 180 stazioni meteorologiche dell'Areonautica Militare. Dopo un'analisi di tali dati al fine di individuare l'intervallo di variabilita' dei parametri meteorologici presi in considerazione, e' stata proposta una combinazione di tali parametri in grado di descrivere, sotto forma di un indice generale ed in relazione a tutti i siti considerati, la maggiore o minore tendenza alla diffusione degli inquinanti immessi in atmosfera. Sulla base di tale definizione di un indice di meteodiffusivita', sono stati

  8. Guidelines for Learning Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrle, Carl C.; Schulz, Jolene

    Guidelines for designing and planning learning stations for pupils at the elementary grade level include suggestions on how to develop a station that will be successful in meeting the learners' needs. Instructions for the use of tapes at a station and matching pupils with stations are given, as are guidelines on classroom arrangement and record…

  9. Future combustion technology for synthetic and renewable fuels in compression ignition engines (REFUEL). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakko-Saksa, P.; Brink, A.; Happonen, M. [and others

    2012-07-01

    This domestic project, Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Compression Ignition Engines (ReFuel), was part of a Collaborative Task 'Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Transport' of International Energy Agency (IEA) Combustion Agreement. This international Collaborative Task is coordinated by Finland. The three-year (2009-2011) prooject was a joint research project with Aalto University (Aalto), Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and Aabo Akademi University (AAU). The project was funded by TEKES, Waertsilae Oyj, Agro Sisu Power, Aker Arctic Technology Oy and the research partners listed above. Modern renewable diesel fuels have excellent physical and chemical properties, in comparison to traditional crude oil based fuels. Purely paraffinic fuels do not contain aromatic compounds and they are totally sulphur free. Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil (HVO) was studied as an example of paraffinic high cetane number (CN) diesel fuels. HVO has no storage and low temperature problems like the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) have. The combustion properties are better than those of crude oil based fuels and FAME, because they have very high cetane numbers and contain no polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). With low HVO density, viscosity and distillation temperatures, these advantageous properties allow far more advanced combustion strategies, such as very high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates or extreme Miller timings, than has been possible with current fossil fuels. The implementation of these advanced combustion technologies, together with the novel renewable diesel fuel, brought significant nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), particulate matter (PM) emission reductions with no efficiency losses. (orig.)

  10. Alcohol-fueled vehicles: An alternative fuels vehicle, emissions, and refueling infrastructure technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, G.A.; Kerstetter, J.; Lyons, J.K. [and others

    1993-06-01

    Interest in alternative motor vehicle fuels has grown tremendously over the last few years. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the California Clean Air Act are primarily responsible for this resurgence and have spurred both the motor fuels and vehicle manufacturing industries into action. For the first time, all three U.S. auto manufacturers are offering alternative fuel vehicles to the motoring public. At the same time, a small but growing alternative fuels refueling infrastructure is beginning to develop across the country. Although the recent growth in alternative motor fuels use is impressive, their market niche is still being defined. Environmental regulations, a key driver behind alternative fuel use, is forcing both car makers and the petroleum industry to clean up their products. As a result, alternative fuels no longer have a lock on the clean air market and will have to compete with conventional vehicles in meeting stringent future vehicle emission standards. The development of cleaner burning gasoline powered vehicles has signaled a shift in the marketing of alternative fuels. While they will continue to play a major part in the clean vehicle market, alternative fuels are increasingly recognized as a means to reduce oil imports. This new role is clearly defined in the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The Act identifies alternative fuels as a key strategy for reducing imports of foreign oil and mandates their use for federal and state fleets, while reserving the right to require private and municipal fleet use as well.

  11. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  12. Shippingport Station decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is in the process of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station located on the Ohio River, 30 miles northwest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Shippingport Station is the first commercial size nuclear power plant to undergo decommissioning in the United Staes. The plant is located on approximately 7 acres of land owned by the Duquesne Light Company (DLC) and leased to the U.S. Government. DLC operates two nuclear power plants, Beaver Valley 1 and 2, located immediately adjacent to the site and the Bruce Mansfield coal-fired power plant is also within the immediate area. The Station was shutdown in October, 1982. Defueling operations began in 1983 and were completed by September, 1984. The Shippingport Station consists of a 275' x 60' fuel handling building containing the reactor containment chamber, the service building, the turbine building, the radioactive waste processing building, the administration building and other smaller support buildings. The Station has four coolant loops and most of the containment structures are located below grade. Structures owned by the U.S. Government including the fuel handling building, service building, contaminated equipment room, the boiler chambers, the radioactive waste processing building and the decontamination and laydown buildings will be dismantled and removed to 3 feet below grade. The area will then be filled with clean soil and graded. The turbine building, testing and training building and the administration building are owned by DLC and will remain

  13. Beaver Valley Power Station and Shippingport Atomic Power Station. 1984 Annual environmental report, radiological. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted during 1984 in the vicinity of the Beaver Valley Power Station and the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The Radiological Environmental Program consists of on-site sampling of water and gaseous effluents and off-site monitoring of water, air, river sediments, soils, food pathway samples, and radiation levels in the vicinity of the site. This report discusses the results of this monitoring during 1984. The environmental program outlined in the Beaver Valley Power Station Technical Specifications was followed throughout 1984. The results of this environmental monitoring program show that Shippingport Atomic Power Station and Beaver Valley Power Station operations have not adversely affected the surrounding environment. 23 figs., 18 tabs

  14. Fuel management for off-load annual refuelling of the D-HHT 600 MW(e) reference core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U

    1973-03-16

    The reference design for the Dragon-HHT reactor has been optimised for on-load continuous refuelling. The possiblity to operate the reactor on a discontinuous annual reloading schedule might prove of interest and/or necessity. In this paper the influence of an annual 4-batch fuel management scheme on the core physics and fuel cycle economics is investigated. The results of the present investigation give a good indication of the relative merits of the two fuel management schemes. Although a broader parameter survey and a more detailed scrutinising of special cases would be desirable, we feel that the main conclusions are correct and that the principle differences have been elicited.

  15. A contribution to severe accident monitoring: Level measurement of the Incontainment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), design and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumilov, A.; Weber, P.; Esteves, S.

    2012-07-01

    A level measurement sensor for monitoring the water level in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) of the EPRTM (generation 3+ pressurized water reactor) during leakage and severe accidents has been developed by AREVA. The development has been accompanied by many functional and material analyses as well as tests to assure the resistivity under extreme conditions, such as high irradiation dose of 5 MGy, increased temperature up to 160 degree centigrade in conjunction with saturated steam conditions. Moreover, the sensor has been designed and experimentally verified to resist the impact of seismic events and airplane crashes as well.

  16. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for on-load refueled power reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in an on-load refueled power reactor facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following SSAC elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  17. Shippingport station communications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stote, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    At the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project, the central idea of the communications program that was developed for use was purposely designed to be as uncomplicated as possible. The central theme, that was developed and communicated, is that all nuclear plants will someday need to be retired and also decommissioned. The Shippingport Plant, originally constructed as a demonstration nuclear power plant, was now being decommissioned as a demonstration to the world-wide nuclear industry that this evolution can be done in a safe and cost-effective manner. Furthermore, the technology currently exists to complete this process. The new phase of the communications program was initiated even before the responsibility for the plant was transferred from Duquesne Light to GE. With such a change forthcoming, it was necessary to inform local officials of these plans, and the reasons for them. Equally important was the need to inform a variety of agencies and offices in the three-state area of the changes, and the continuing need to involve them in the Site Emergency Plan. This document was also revised in recognition of changing site conditions, as well as the changes in responsibility. 1 ref

  18. Do Lessons in Nature Boost Subsequent Classroom Engagement? Refueling Students in Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kuo

    2018-01-01

    afterward, lessons in nature may actually leave students more able to engage in the next lesson, even as students are also learning the material at hand. Such “refueling in flight” argues for including more lessons in nature in formal education.

  19. Reference Climatological Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Reference Climatological Stations (RCS) network represents the first effort by NOAA to create and maintain a nationwide network of stations located only in areas...

  20. Streamflow Gaging Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  1. Fire Stations - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Station Locations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed at or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  2. Hammond Bay Biological Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), located near Millersburg, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). HBBS was established by...

  3. Water Level Station History

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Images contain station history information for 175 stations in the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON). The NWLON is a network of long-term,...

  4. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  5. Big Game Reporting Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Point locations of big game reporting stations. Big game reporting stations are places where hunters can legally report harvested deer, bear, or turkey. These are...

  6. Ocean Station Vessel

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean Station Vessels (OSV) or Weather Ships captured atmospheric conditions while being stationed continuously in a single location. While While most of the...

  7. Fire Stations - 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Fire Stations in Kansas Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their jobs is...

  8. Newport Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Newport Research Station is the Center's only ocean-port research facility. This station is located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center,...

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of Nuclear Power Station Siting from the Point of View of Safety; Evaluacion Cuantitativa del Emplazamiento de Centrales Nucleoelectricas desde el Punto de Vista de la Seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serment Cabrero, V. [Comision Nacional de Energia Nuclear y Universidad Nacional Autonomia de Mexico (Mexico); Velez, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional y Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    1967-09-15

    Apart from the minimum operational and safety requirements for the siting of nuclear power stations, the paper proposes introducing the total mean dose to the general population as an additional criterion. Although the calculation of this dose presupposes a detailed knowledge of the main pathways by which the population may be irradiated in case of an accident, the present state of power reactor technology makes it possible to tackle the problem already. An estimate of the total mean dose per unit time involves the safety aspects of the reactor, the features of the site considered, and the way in which these features affect safety. The authors derive the general formula expressing the total mean dose as a function of all the parameters concerned. It is pointed out that in the case of accidents in which the release of fission products is independent of the mechanisms of irradiation, this formula is considerably simplified and makes it possible to establish a classification of the relative suitability, from the safety point of view, of the sites proposed, without touching upon the difficult problem of the definition of accidents and their probabilities of occurrence. A further simplification accrues when there exist predominant mechanisms governing the accidental irradiation of the population. The approach adopted is particularly well suited to calculations with digital computers, and helps to identify the areas in which information is lacking and to direct research intended to remove these deficiencies. (author) [Spanish] Ademas de los requisitos mfnimos opecacionales y de seguridad para el emplazamiento de centrales nucleoelectricas, se sugiere utilizar como criterio adicional la dosis total promedio a la poblacion. Aunque el calculo de esa dosis implica el conocimiento detallado de los caminos principales por los cuales la poblacion puede ser irradiada en el caso de un accidente, el estado actual de la tecnologia de los reactores nucleares de potencia permite ya

  10. Autonomous Aerial Refueling Ground Test Demonstration—A Sensor-in-the-Loop, Non-Tracking Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-I Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An essential capability for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV to extend its airborne duration without increasing the size of the aircraft is called the autonomous aerial refueling (AAR. This paper proposes a sensor-in-the-loop, non-tracking method for probe-and-drogue style autonomous aerial refueling tasks by combining sensitivity adjustments of a 3D Flash LIDAR camera with computer vision based image-processing techniques. The method overcomes the inherit ambiguity issues when reconstructing 3D information from traditional 2D images by taking advantage of ready to use 3D point cloud data from the camera, followed by well-established computer vision techniques. These techniques include curve fitting algorithms and outlier removal with the random sample consensus (RANSAC algorithm to reliably estimate the drogue center in 3D space, as well as to establish the relative position between the probe and the drogue. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method on a real system, a ground navigation robot was designed and fabricated. Results presented in the paper show that using images acquired from a 3D Flash LIDAR camera as real time visual feedback, the ground robot is able to track a moving simulated drogue and continuously narrow the gap between the robot and the target autonomously.

  11. CDIP Station Data Collection - All Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego — The Coastal Data Information Program's station data collection consists of all publicly-released coastal environment measurements taken over the program's history, a...

  12. Application of Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring under the CAFF Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program: Designing and Implementing Terrestrial Monitoring to Establish the Canadian High Arctic Research Station as a Flagship Arctic Environmental Monitoring Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, D.; Kehler, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS) is scheduled for completion in July 2017 and is the northern science component of Polar Knowledge Canada (POLAR). A mandated goal for POLAR is to establish the adjacent Experimental and Reference Area (ERA) as an Arctic Flagship monitoring site that will track change in Arctic terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. Situated in the community of Cambridge Bay, CHARS provides the opportunity to draw on the Indigenous Knowledge of local residents to help design and conduct the monitoring, and to operate 12 months a year. Monitoring at CHARS will be linked to networks nationally and internationally, and is being designed so that change in key indicators can be understood in terms of drivers and processes, modeled and scaled up regionally, and used to predict important changes in critical indicators. As a partner in the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP), the monitoring design for terrestrial ecosystems follows approaches outlined by the CBMP Terrestrial Expert Monitoring Group, who have listed key monitoring questions and identified a list of important Focal Ecosystem Components (FECs). To link drivers to FECs we are proposing a multi-scaled approach: 1) an Intensive Monitoring Area to establish replicated monitoring plots that track change in snow depth and condition, active layer depth, soil temperature, soil moisture, and soil solution chemistry that are spatially and temporally linked to changes in microbiological activity, CO2/CH4 net ecosystem flux, vegetation relative frequency, species composition, growth and foliar nutrient concentration, arthropod abundance, lemming abundance and health, and shorebird/songbird abundance and productivity. 2) These intensive observations are supported by watershed scale measures that will monitor, during the growing season, lemming winter nest abundance, songbird, shorebird and waterfowl staging and nesting, and other observations; in the winter we will

  13. Sizewell 'B' power station public inquiry: CEGB proof of evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, B.

    1982-11-01

    Architectural concepts and design proposals associated with the proposed Sizewell B power station are outlined. The figures are in a separate volume. They consist of the site layout plan, an axonometric drawing of the site, an elevations drawing and a colour perspective drawing of 'A', 'B' and 'C' stations. (U.K.)

  14. Shippingport Atomic Power Station Operating Experience, Developments and Future Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.; Oldham, G.M.; Stiefel, J.T.

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates five years of operation and test of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and discusses the current technical developments and future plans of the Shippingport programme. This programme is directed towards development of the basic technology of light-water reactors to provide the basis for potential reduction in the costs of nuclear power. The Shippingport reactor plant has operated for over five years and has been found to integrate readily into a utility system either as a base load or peak load unit. Plant component performance has been reliable. There have been no problems in contamination or waste disposal. Access to primary coolant components for maintenance has been good, demonstrating the integrity of fuel elements. Each of the three refuelling operations performed since start-up of Shippingport has required successively less time to accomplish. Recently, the third seed was refuelled in 32 working days, about one quarter the time required for the first refuelling. The formal requirements of personnel training, written administrative procedures, power plant manuals, etc., which have been a vital factor in the successful implementation of the Shippingport programme, are described. The results obtained from the comprehensive test programme carried out at Shippingport are compared with calculations, and good agreement has been obtained. Reactor core performance, plant stability, and response to load changes, fuel element and control rod performance, long-term effects such as corrosion and radiation level build-up, component performance, etc., are discussed in this paper. The principal objective of the current and future programmes of the Shippingport Project in advancing the basic technology of water-cooled reactors is discussed. This programme includes the continued operation of the Shippingport plant, and the development, design, manufacture and test operation of a long-life, highpower density second core - Core 2. At its

  15. NASA Glenn Research Center Solar Cell Experiment Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew G.; Wolford, David S.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies , William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; Mcnatt, Jeremiah S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Accurate air mass zero (AM0) measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has flown an experiment designed to measure the electrical performance of several solar cells onboard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Missions (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4) on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Four industry and government partners provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment was positioned on the exterior of the station for approximately eight months, and was completely self-contained, providing its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four-junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multi-junction (IMM) cells were evaluated and the results will be compared to ground-based measurement methods.

  16. Non-Coop Station History

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Station history documentation for stations outside the US Cooperative Observer network. Primarily National Weather Service stations assigned WBAN station IDs. Other...

  17. Swedish encapsulation station review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Sven Olof; Brunzell, P.; Heibel, R.; McCarthy, J.; Pennington, C.; Rusch, C.; Varley, G.

    1998-06-01

    In the Encapsulation Station (ES) Review performed by NAC International, a number of different areas have been studied. The main objectives with the review have been to: Perform an independent review of the cost estimates for the ES presented in SKB's document 'Plan 1996'. This has been made through comparisons between the ES and BNFL's Waste Encapsulation Plant (WEP) at Sellafield as well as with the CLAB facility. Review the location of the ES (at the CLAB site or at the final repository) and its interaction with other parts of the Swedish system for spent fuel management. Review the logistics and plant capacity of the ES. Identify important safety aspects of the ES as a basis for future licensing activities. Based on NAC International's experience of casks for transport and storage of spent fuel, review the basic design of the copper/steel canister and the transport cask. This review insides design, manufacturing, handling and licensing aspects. Perform an overall comparison between the ES project and the CLAB project with the objective to identify major project risks and discuss their mitigation

  18. Swedish encapsulation station review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Sven Olof; Brunzell, P.; Heibel, R.; McCarthy, J.; Pennington, C.; Rusch, C.; Varley, G. [NAC International, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1998-06-01

    In the Encapsulation Station (ES) Review performed by NAC International, a number of different areas have been studied. The main objectives with the review have been to: Perform an independent review of the cost estimates for the ES presented in SKB`s document `Plan 1996`. This has been made through comparisons between the ES and BNFL`s Waste Encapsulation Plant (WEP) at Sellafield as well as with the CLAB facility. Review the location of the ES (at the CLAB site or at the final repository) and its interaction with other parts of the Swedish system for spent fuel management. Review the logistics and plant capacity of the ES. Identify important safety aspects of the ES as a basis for future licensing activities. Based on NAC International`s experience of casks for transport and storage of spent fuel, review the basic design of the copper/steel canister and the transport cask. This review insides design, manufacturing, handling and licensing aspects. Perform an overall comparison between the ES project and the CLAB project with the objective to identify major project risks and discuss their mitigation 19 refs, 9 figs, 35 tabs

  19. Decommissioning of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    In the United Kingdom the Electricity Boards, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) and BNFL cooperate on all matters relating to the decommissioning of nuclear plant. The Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB) policy endorses the continuing need for nuclear power, the principle of reusing existing sites where possible and the building up of sufficient funds during the operating life of a nuclear power station to meet the cost of its complete clearance in the future. The safety of the plant is the responsibility of the licensee even in the decommissioning phase. The CEGB has carried out decommissioning studies on Magnox stations in general and Bradwell and Berkeley in particular. It has also been involved in the UKAEA Windscale AGR decommissioning programme. The options as to which stage to decommission to are considered. Methods, costs and waste management are also considered. (U.K.)

  20. Rapid changes in the size of different functional organ and muscle groups during refueling in a long-distance migrating shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Lilliendahl, K; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.

    1999-01-01

    The adaptive value of size changes in different organ and muscle groups was studied in red knots (Calidris canutus islandica) in relation to their migration. Birds were sampled on five occasions: at arrival in Iceland in May 1994, two times during subsequent refueling, at departure toward, and on

  1. Base Station Performance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Barbara; Farrell, Ronan

    2005-01-01

    At present the testing of power amplifiers within base station transmitters is limited to testing at component level as opposed to testing at the system level. While the detection of catastrophic failure is possible, that of performance degradation is not. This paper proposes a base station model with respect to transmitter output power with the aim of introducing system level monitoring of the power amplifier behaviour within the base station. Our model reflects the expe...

  2. Joint scientific publication by the INSERM and IRSN concerning child leukaemia about French nuclear power stations on the Internet site of the 'International Journal of Cancer' the 4 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document describes the cooperation between the INSERM and IRSN in the field of child leukaemia about nuclear power stations, and presents the published study: context and objectives, methodology (epidemiological data, geographical data), and obtained results (risks and comparison with a German study)

  3. Amtrak Rail Stations (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Updated database of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA) Amtrak Station database. This database is a geographic data set containing Amtrak intercity railroad...

  4. Cooperative Station History Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Various forms, photographs and correspondence documenting the history of Cooperative station instrumentation, location changes, inspections, and...

  5. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for light water moderated (off-load refueled) power reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report is intended to provide the technical details of an effective State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC) which Member States may use, if they wish, to establish and maintain their SSACs. It is expected that systems designed along the lines described would be effective in meeting the objectives of both national and international systems for nuclear material accounting and control. This document accordingly provides a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in an off-load refueled light water moderated power reactor facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system to comply with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and to facilitate application of IAEA safeguards. The scope of this document is limited to descriptions of the following elements: (1) Nuclear Material Measurements; (2) Measurement Quality; (3) Records and Reports; (4) Physical Inventory Taking; (5) Material Balance Closing

  6. Ensuring safety of fuel cell applications and hydrogen refuelling. Legislation and standards; Polttokennosovellusten ja vetytankkauksen turvallisuuden varmistaminen. Saeaedoeksiae ja standardeja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissila, M.; Sarsama, J.

    2013-09-15

    Fuel cell technology is considered a promising alternative in terms of viable energy systems. The advantages of fuel cell systems include a good efficiency rate and the lack of harmful environmental emissions. Factors which may slow down the commercialisation of fuel cell technology, e.g. fuel cell vehicles, include the high price of hydrogen and the insufficiency of the infrastructure required for the distribution of hydrogen. A large proportion of major car manufacturers are committed to introducing fuel cell cars to the market by 2014-2016. In order to ensure a successful market introduction of fuel cell vehicles, this has to be aligned with the development of the necessary hydrogen infrastructure. In the early commercialisation stages of a new technology, it is important to give the public correct, justified and understandable information on the safety of the fuel cell applications, and also on the measures taken to ensure the safety of applications. A lack of necessary information, inaccurate perceptions and prejudices can have an adverse effect on the public acceptance of fuel cell applications. Hazards and potential accidents related to fuel cell systems are mainly associated with the flammable substances (e.g. hydrogen, methane) used as fuel, the high pressure of hydrogen, electrical hazards, and dangers concerning technical systems in general. The fuel cell applications reviewed in this publication are transport applications and stationary applications and the refuelling system of gaseous hydrogen. The publication concentrates on fuel cells using hydrogen as fuel. The publication gives an overview of how EU-legislation (mainly various directives) and Finnish legislation applies to fuel cell systems and applications, and what kind of safety requirements the legislation sets. In addition, a brief overview of safety standards concerning fuel cell systems and hydrogen refuelling is presented. (orig.)

  7. H2FIRST Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Terlip, Danny [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elgowainy, Amgad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-04-20

    This report presents near-term station cost results and discusses cost trends of different station types. It compares various vehicle rollout scenarios and projects realistic near-term station utilization values using the station infrastructure rollout in California as an example. It describes near-term market demands and matches those to cost-effective station concepts. Finally, the report contains detailed designs for five selected stations, which include piping and instrumentation diagrams, bills of materials, and several site-specific layout studies that incorporate the setbacks required by NFPA 2, the National Fire Protection Association Hydrogen Technologies Code. This work identified those setbacks as a significant factor affecting the ability to site a hydrogen station, particularly liquid stations at existing gasoline stations. For all station types, utilization has a large influence on the financial viability of the station.

  8. Nuclear Station Facilities Improvement Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooks, R. W.; Lunardini, A. L.; Zaben, O.

    1991-01-01

    An effective facilities improvement program will include a plan for the temporary relocation of personnel during the construction of an adjoining service building addition. Since the smooth continuation of plant operation is of paramount importance, the phasing plan is established to minimize the disruptions in day-to-day station operation and administration. This plan should consider the final occupancy arrangements and the transition to the new structure; for example, computer hookup and phase-in should be considered. The nuclear industry is placing more emphasis on safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. In order to do this, more emphasis is placed on operations and maintenance. This results in increased size of managerial, technical and maintenance staffs. This in turn requires improved office and service facilities. The facilities that require improvement may include training areas, rad waste processing and storage facilities, and maintenance facilities. This paper discusses an approach for developing an effective program to plan and implement these projects. These improvement projects can range in magnitude from modifying a simple system to building a new structure to allocating space for a future project. This paper addresses the planning required for the new structures with emphasis on site location, space allocation, and internal layout. Since facility planning has recently been completed by Sargent and Leyden at six U. S. nuclear stations, specific examples from some of those plants are presented. Site planning and the establishment of long-range goals are of the utmost importance when undertaking a facilities improvement program for a nuclear station. A plan that considers the total site usage will enhance the value of both the new and existing facilities. Proper planning at the beginning of the program can minimize costs and maximize the benefits of the program

  9. Secure base stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Brusilovsky, Alec; McLellan, Rae; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of the third generation (3G) Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) base station router (BSR) and fourth generation (4G) base stations, such as the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE) Evolved Node B (eNB), it has become important to

  10. INTERACT Station Catalogue - 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    INTERACT stations are located in all major environmental envelopes of the Arctic providing an ideal platform for studying climate change and its impact on the environment and local communities. Since alpine environments face similar changes and challenges as the Arctic, the INTERACT network also ...... catalogue includes descriptions of 73 research stations included in the network at the time of printing....

  11. Meyrin Petrol Station

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please note that the Meyrin petrol station will be closed for maintenance work on Tuesday 19 and Wednesday 20 December 2006. If you require petrol during this period we invite you to use the Prévessin petrol station, which will remain open. TS-IC-LO Section Tel.: 77039 - 73793

  12. Nuclear power stations licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solito, J.

    1978-04-01

    The judicial aspects of nuclear stations licensing are presented. The licensing systems of the United States, Spain, France and Federal Republic of Germany are focused. The decree n 0 60.824 from July 7 sup(th), 1967 and the following legislation which define the systematic and area of competence in nuclear stations licensing are analysed [pt

  13. SPS rectifier stations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The first of the twelves SPS rectifier stations for the bending magnets arrived at CERN at the end of the year. The photograph shows a station with the rectifiers on the left and in the other three cubicles the chokes, capacitors and resistor of the passive filter.

  14. Ondergronds Station Blijdorp, Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijma, M.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266562426; Cohen, K.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185633374

    2014-01-01

    Het is in de herfst van 2005. Een lief meisje, Marieke, rijdt op haar vouwfiets door Rotterdam. Bij het Centraal Station is het al tijden een grote bouwplaats. Onder de nieuwe hal komt een veel groter metrostation en ook onder de Statenweg in Blijdorp is een grote bouwput voor een nieuw station.

  15. Tokai earthquakes and Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Hiroo

    1981-01-01

    Kanto district and Shizuoka Prefecture are designated as ''Observation strengthening districts'', where the possibility of earthquake occurrence is high. Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., is at the center of this district. Nuclear power stations are vulnerable to earthquakes, and if damages are caused by earthquakes in nuclear power plants, the most dreadful accidents may occur. The Chubu Electric Power Co. underestimates the possibility and scale of earthquakes and the estimate of damages, and has kept on talking that the rock bed of the power station site is strong, and there is not the fear of accidents. However the actual situation is totally different from this. The description about earthquakes and the rock bed in the application of the installation of No.3 plant was totally rewritten after two years safety examination, and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry approved the application in less than two weeks thereafter. The rock bed is geologically evaluated in this paper, and many doubtful points in the application are pointed out. In addition, there are eight active faults near the power station site. The aseismatic design of the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station assumes the acceleration up to 400 gal, but it may not be enough. The Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station is intentionally neglected in the estimate of damages in Shizuoka Prefecture. (Kako, I.)

  16. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC)

  17. [STEM on Station Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundebjerg, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    The STEM on Station team is part of Education which is part of the External Relations organization (ERO). ERO has traditional goals based around BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal). The BHAG model is simplified to a saying: Everything we do stimulates actions by others to advance human space exploration. The STEM on Station education initiate is a project focused on bringing off the earth research and learning into classrooms. Educational resources such as lesson plans, activities to connect with the space station and STEM related contests are available and hosted by the STEM on Station team along with their partners such as Texas Instruments. These educational activities engage teachers and students in the current happenings aboard the international space station, inspiring the next generation of space explorers.

  18. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's final environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The following items are covered: the site, the station, environmental effects of site preparation and station construction, environmental effects of station operation, effluent and environmental monitoring programs, environmental effects of accidents, need for BFRSS, benefit-cost analysis of alternatives, generic environmental impact statements, and discussion of and response to comments received on the draft environmental statement

  19. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, F.A.; Lea, T.G.; Douglas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  20. Space Station technology testbed: 2010 deep space transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1993-01-01

    telepresence/kinetic processes), (3) subsystem tests of advanced nuclear power, nuclear propulsion and communication systems (using boom extensions, remote station-keeping platforms and mobile EVA crew and robots), and (4) logistics support (crew and equipment) and command and control of deep space transport assembly, maintenance, and refueling (using a station-keeping platform).

  1. Space station operations management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kathleen V.

    1989-01-01

    Space Station Freedom operations management concepts must be responsive to the unique challenges presented by the permanently manned international laboratory. Space Station Freedom will be assembled over a three year period where the operational environment will change as significant capability plateaus are reached. First Element Launch, Man-Tended Capability, and Permanent Manned Capability, represent milestones in operational capability that is increasing toward mature operations capability. Operations management concepts are being developed to accomodate the varying operational capabilities during assembly, as well as the mature operational environment. This paper describes operations management concepts designed to accomodate the uniqueness of Space Station Freedoom, utilizing tools and processes that seek to control operations costs.

  2. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  3. Measurements and trend analysis of O2, CO2 and δ13C of CO2 from the high altitude research station Junfgraujoch, Switzerland - A comparison with the observations from the remote site Puy de Dome, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentino, Francesco L.; Leuenberger, Markus; Uglietti, Chiara; Sturm, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric O 2 and CO 2 flask measurements from the high altitude research station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, and from the observatory at Puy de Dome, France, are presented. Additionally, the Jungfraujoch δ 13 C record of CO 2 is discussed. The observations on flask samples collected at the Jungfraujoch station show, since 2003, an enhancement of the oxygen trend which amounts to about 45 per meg/year with a corresponding CO 2 increase of around 2.4 ppm/year. This enhancement is comparable with that observed at the Puy de Dome station where oxygen, since mid 2002, has decreased with a rate of about 50 per meg/year whilst the CO 2 increase was of around 1.7 ppm/year but exhibiting a higher variability. Several processes influence δO 2 /N 2 . However, these processes are marked with different oxidation ratios (O 2 :CO 2 ) that can be used to distinguish them. The apparent slopes calculated from correlation plots between de-trended CO 2 and δO 2 /N 2 records as well as between corresponding trends are significantly larger than the observed terrestrial exchange and fossil fuel emission slopes indicating a strong oceanic influence. Since ocean-atmosphere exchange can have very variable O 2 :CO 2 ratios depending on processes within the ocean, it is to our understanding the only possibility to explain our observations. The stability of the δO 2 /N 2 scale is critical in this regard, therefore, it is addressed here and we found no significant scale drift which would influence our trend calculations. In our view more important are criterions on the data selection before trend analysis

  4. "Central Station" Londonis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Londoni galeriis Milch seitsme läti, leedu ja eesti kunstniku projekt "Central Station". Kuraatorid Lisa Panting, Sally Tallant. Eestist osalevad Hanno Soans (Catarina Campinoga koostöös valminud video), Kiwa, Kai Kaljo

  5. Materials Test Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — When completed, the Materials Test Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will meet mission need. MTS will provide the only fast-reactor-like irradiation...

  6. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKernan, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station was located on the Ohio River in Shippingport Borough (Beaver County), Pennsylvania, USA. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) constructed the plant in the mid-1950s on a seven and half acre parcel of land leased from Duquesne Light Company (DLC). The purposes were to demonstrate and to develop Pressurized Water Recovery technology and to generate electricity. DLC operated the Shippingport plant under supervision of (the successor to AEC) the Department of Energy (DOE)-Naval Reactors (NR) until operations were terminated on October 1, 1982. NR concluded end-of-life testing and defueling in 1984 and transferred the Station's responsibility to DOE Richland Operations Office (RL), Surplus Facility Management Program Office (SFMPO5) on September 5, 1984. SFMPO subsequently established the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project and selected General Electric (GE) as the Decommissioning Operations Contractor. This report is intended to provide an overview of the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project

  7. Active Marine Station Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Active Marine Station Metadata is a daily metadata report for active marine bouy and C-MAN (Coastal Marine Automated Network) platforms from the National Data...

  8. Electrostatic pickup station

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    Electrostatic pickup station, with 4 interleaved electrodes, to measure beam position in the horizontal and vertical plane. This type is used in the transfer lines leaving the PS (TT2, TT70, TTL2). See also 7904075.

  9. Public Transit Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — fixed rail transit stations within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of transit that are serviced...

  10. Mukilteo Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research at the Mukilteo Research Station focuses on understanding the life cycle of marine species and the impacts of ecosystem stressors on anadromous and marine...

  11. Maine Field Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2000 NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service established the Maine Field Station in Orono, ME to have more direct involvement in the conservation of the living...

  12. FEMA DFIRM Station Start

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This table contains information about station starting locations. These locations indicate the reference point that was used as the origin for distance measurements...

  13. Natural Weathering Exposure Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corps of Engineers' Treat Island Natural Weathering Exposure Station is a long-term natural weathering facility used to study concrete durability. Located on the...

  14. Routes and Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — he Routes_Stations table is composed of fixed rail transit systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico....

  15. USRCRN Station Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Documentation of United States Regional Climate Reference Network (USRCRN) installations in 2009. Installations documented are for USRCRN pilot project stations in...

  16. Gas Stations, US, 2010, NAVTEQ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Gas_Stations dataset is derived from the Navteq 'AUTOSVC' SDC layer (FAC_TYPE=5540) and contains gas stations and petrol stations. This NAVTEQ dataset is...

  17. Enhanced Master Station History Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Enhanced Master Station History Report (EMSHR) is a compiled list of basic, historical information for every station in the station history database, beginning...

  18. Tobruk power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boergardts, B

    1978-01-01

    In February of 1975, the Electricity Corporation Benghazi (ECB) awarded a contract for the construction of a turnkey power station and seawater desalination plant in Tobruk, Libya to a consortium under the leadership of BBC Mannheim. This power station has an output of 129 MW and supplies about 24,000 m/sup 3/ of drinking water daily. It went into operation in 1977, two and a half years after the contract was awarded.

  19. Space Station galley design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabanino, Rudy; Murphy, George L.; Yakut, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    An Advanced Food Hardware System galley for the initial operating capability (IOC) Space Station is discussed. Space Station will employ food hardware items that have never been flown in space, such as a dishwasher, microwave oven, blender/mixer, bulk food and beverage dispensers, automated food inventory management, a trash compactor, and an advanced technology refrigerator/freezer. These new technologies and designs are described and the trades, design, development, and testing associated with each are summarized.

  20. Leadership at Antarctic Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    Claseification 6. No. Pegees LEADERSHIP AT ANTARTIC STATIONS hxIs i4 5, C =r~eta(C), 17 Rfs~W (R, Udusiied U)J 7. No Refs 8. Author(s) Edocumesnt I...whether there is a "best" approach to leadership at an Antartic Station and what leadership style may have the most to offer. 3~~ __ ___ Tipesis to be

  1. National Seismic Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    The National Seismic Station was developed to meet the needs of regional or worldwide seismic monitoring of underground nuclear explosions to verify compliance with a nuclear test ban treaty. The Station acquires broadband seismic data and transmits it via satellite to a data center. It is capable of unattended operation for periods of at least a year, and will detect any tampering that could result in the transmission of unauthentic seismic data

  2. Hydrogen Car Cartridges: A New Strategy for Hydrogen Storage, Delivering and Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to introduce a sustainable model in the automotive field, guarantying the Kyoto agreements. The aim of the project is to develop an innovative hydrogen tank able to power an hydrogen fuel cell car with the same performance of liquid fuelled cars. Most of the system performance are expected to satisfy the Department of Energy (DOE) goals for 2015. The hydrogen releasing system is based on solid NaBH4 which is hydrolyzed with water or steam to obtain hydrogen. Sodium borate is obtained as by-product and it has to be recycled. Pure and humidified hydrogen, ready to be utilized in a fuel cell, is obtained by a simple and sure way. Hydrogen is produced only when it is requested and therefore there is never pressurized hydrogen or hydrogen overproduction The system works at atmospheric pressure avoiding the problems related to handling and storing pressurized gas. The car fuelling could be performed in area like the present service stations. The used cartridges can be removed and substituted by new cartridges. Contemporarily a water tank should be refilled. To improve the total energetic yield it was also proposed a NaBH4 regeneration process directly starting from the products of hydrolysis. (auth)

  3. Ecological studies in the Bays and other waterways near Little Egg Inlet and in the Ocean in the vicinity of the proposed site for the Atlantic Generating Station, New Jersey (NODC Accession 7500270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In September, 1971, Ichthyological Associates began an ecological study of Ocean sites off Long Beach Island and Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey, for Public Service...

  4. Station black out of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 was not caused by tsunamis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Station black out (SBO) of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 would be concluded to be caused before 15:37 on March 11, 2011 because losses of emergency ac power A system was in 15:36 and ac losses of B system in 15:37 according to the data published by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) in May 10, 2013. Tsunami attacked the site of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station passed through the position of wave amplitude meter installed at 1.5 km off the coast after 15:35 and it was also recognized tsunami arrived at the coast of Unit 4 sea side area around in 15:37 judging from a series of photographs taken from the south side of the site and general knowledge of wave propagation. From a series of photographs and witness testimony, tsunami didn't attack Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station uniformly and tsunami's arrival time at the site of Unit 1 would be far later than arrival time at the coast of Unit 4 sea side area, which suggested it would be around in 15:39. TEPCO insisted tsunami passed through 1.5 km off the coast around in 15:33 and clock of wave amplitude meter was incorrect, which might be wrong. Thus SBO of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 occurred before tsunami's arrival at the site of Unit 1 and was not caused by tsunami. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Sizewell 'B' power station public inquiry: CEGB proof of evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.D.

    1982-11-01

    The NNC construction programme for the Sizewell B nuclear power station is outlined. The following topics are considered: constructability aspects of the Sizewell B design; overall project programme and organization; NNC target construction programme; construction planning; material quantities and installation rates; site construction manpowers; construction contracting policy; site industrial relations and productivity; site management. (U.K.)

  6. Further Analyses of the NASA Glenn Research Center Solar Cell and Photovoltaic Materials Experiment Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate air mass zero (AM0) measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has flown an experiment designed to measure the electrical performance of several solar cells onboard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4) on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Four industry and government partners provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment was positioned on the exterior of the station for approximately eight months, and was completely self-contained, providing its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four-junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multi-Junction (IMM) cells were evaluated and the results will be compared to ground-based measurement methods.

  7. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    A draft of the environmental impact statement for the Barnwell Fuel Receiving and Storage Station is presented. This facility is being constructed on a 1700 acre site about six miles west of the city of Barnwell in Barnwell County, South Carolina. The following topics are discussed: the site, the station, environmental effects of site preparation and station construction, environmental effects of station operation, effluent and environmental monitoring programs, environmental effects of accidents , need for the station, benefit-cost analysis of alternatives, and conclusions. (U.S.)

  8. Investigation of MTBE and aromatic compound concentrations at a gas service station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Wen; Chiang, Song-Bor; Lu, San-Ju

    2005-06-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a fuel additive at levels of 2-11% in Taiwan for the past decade. The purpose of this additive is to enhance the octane, replace the use of lead-based anti-knock gasoline additives and reduce aromatic hydrocarbons. However, it is possible that oxygenated fuel has a potential health impact. To determine the air quality impact of MTBE, measurements were made of ambient MTBE and other gasoline constituents at a service station. Additionally, environmental conditions (wind speed, wind direction, and temperature, etc.) that could affect concentrations of emission constituents were measured. Gas samples were analyzed for target MTBE and volatile organic compounds, e.g., benzene and toluene. Ambient samples were collected using Tenax adsorbent tubes for mass spectrometric analysis at a service station located in Changhua County, Taiwan. The resulting measured ambient air concentrations were compared with Taiwan's regulatory standards for hazardous air pollutants. Subsequently, the factors controlling the formation of high-VOC levels at the service station and in the residential neighborhoods were identified. Additionally, the results can provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of Taiwan with useful information and prompt them to mandate this gas service station to install a refueling vapor recovery system.

  9. Exact docking flight controller for autonomous aerial refueling with back-stepping based high order sliding mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zikang; Wang, Honglun; Li, Na; Yu, Yue; Wu, Jianfa

    2018-02-01

    Autonomous aerial refueling (AAR) exact docking control has always been an intractable problem due to the strong nonlinearity, the tight coupling of the 6 DOF aircraft model and the complex disturbances of the multiple environment flows. In this paper, the strongly coupled nonlinear 6 DOF model of the receiver aircraft which considers the multiple flow disturbances is established in the affine nonlinear form to facilitate the nonlinear controller design. The items reflecting the influence of the unknown flow disturbances in the receiver dynamics are taken as the components of the "lumped disturbances" together with the items which have no linear correlation with the virtual control variables. These unmeasurable lumped disturbances are estimated and compensated by a specially designed high order sliding mode observer (HOSMO) with excellent estimation property. With the compensation of the estimated lumped disturbances, a back-stepping high order sliding mode based exact docking flight controller is proposed for AAR in the presence of multiple flow disturbances. Extensive simulation results demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of the proposed docking controller.

  10. CEGB nuclear power stations basic emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The introduction states that this is a typical emergency plan for a nuclear power station employing about 500 people, having two reactors and a total electrical output of 500 Megawatts in an intensively farmed rural area. The document has the following headings: definitions ('site incident', etc); functions of the site emergency organization; conditions for taking emergency action; persons empowered to declare or cancel a site incident or an emergency; emergency actions by staff; control centres; communication; collaboration with other bodies; warnings; transport; house rules; public information centre. (U.K.)

  11. Aseismic foundation system for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolivet, F.; Richli, M.

    1977-01-01

    The aseismic foundation system, as described in this paper, is a new development, which makes it possible to build standard nuclear power stations in areas exposed to strong earthquakes. By adopting proven engineering concepts in design and construction of components, great advantages are achieved in the following areas: safety and reliability; efficiency; design schedule; cost. The need for an aseismic foundation system will arise more and more, as a large part of nuclear power station sites are located in highly seismic zones or must meet high intensity earthquake criteria due to the lack of historic data. (Auth.)

  12. Technical Specifications, Byron Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. STN 50-454 and STN 50-455). Appendix A to license No. NPF-37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    The Byron Station, Unit No. 1 and Unit No. 2 Technical Specifications were prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to a nuclear reactor facility as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. Specifications are presented for limiting conditions for operation for the reactor control system, power distribution limits, instrumentation, primary coolant circuit, ECCS, containment systems, plant systems, electrical power systems, refueling operations, radioactive effluents, and radiological environmental monitoring

  13. Nuclear power stations. Information paper no. 1. Controls on the building and running of nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Controls and constraints which govern the development and running of nuclear power stations are briefly examined. Government policy, permission to build, authority to start building, site acquisition building, running and public opinion are briefly discussed.

  14. Satellite Servicing's Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Testbed on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naasz, Bo J.; Strube, Matthew; Van Eepoel, John; Barbee, Brent W.; Getzandanner, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Servicing Capabilities Project (SSCP) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been tasked with developing systems for servicing space assets. Starting in 2009, the SSCP completed a study documenting potential customers and the business case for servicing, as well as defining several notional missions and required technologies. In 2010, SSCP moved to the implementation stage by completing several ground demonstrations and commencing development of two International Space Station (ISS) payloads-the Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM) and the Dextre Pointing Package (DPP)--to mitigate new technology risks for a robotic mission to service existing assets in geosynchronous orbit. This paper introduces the DPP, scheduled to fly in July of 2012 on the third operational SpaceX Dragon mission, and its Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) instruments. The combination of sensors and advanced avionics provide valuable on-orbit demonstrations of essential technologies for servicing existing vehicles, both cooperative and non-cooperative.

  15. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    . A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling......This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up...

  16. Meteorology in site operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    During the site selection and design phases of a plant, meteorological assistance must be based on past records, usually accumulated at stations not actually on the site. These preliminary atadvices will be averages and extremes that might be expected. After a location has been chosen and work has begun, current and forecast weather conditions become of immediate concern. On-site meteorological observations and forecasts have many applications to the operating program of an atomic energy site. Requirements may range from observations of the daily minimum temperatures to forecasts of radiation dosages from airborne clouds

  17. Space Station Habitability Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearwater, Yvonne A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose and scope of the Habitability Research Group within the Space Human Factors Office at the NASA/Ames Research Center is described. Both near-term and long-term research objectives in the space human factors program pertaining to the U.S. manned Space Station are introduced. The concept of habitability and its relevancy to the U.S. space program is defined within a historical context. The relationship of habitability research to the optimization of environmental and operational determinants of productivity is discussed. Ongoing habitability research efforts pertaining to living and working on the Space Station are described.

  18. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forester, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L.; Forester, J.; Johnson, J.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively

  20. The remote security station (RSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletta, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that, as an outgrowth of research into physical security systems, Sandia is investigating robotic technologies for improving physical security performance and flexibility. Robotic systems have the potential to allow more effective utilization of security personnel, especially in scenarios where they might be exposed to harm. They also can supplement fixed site installations where sensors have failed or where transient assets are present. The Remote Security Station (RSS) program for the defense Nuclear Agency is developing a proof-of-principle robotic system which will be used to evaluate the role, and associated cost, of robotic technologies in exterior physical security systems. The RSS consists of three primary elements: a fixed but quickly moveable tripod with intrusion detection sensors and assessment camera; a mobile robotic platform with a functionally identical security module; and a control console which allows an operator to perform security functions and teleoperate the mobile platform