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Sample records for refractive x-ray lenses

  1. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-02-05

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  2. Polymer Compund Refractive Lenses for Hard X-ray Nanofocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Krywka, Christina; Last, Arndt; Marschall, Felix; Markus, Otto; Georgi, Sebastian; Mueller, Martin; Mohr, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Compound refractive lenses fabricated out of SU-8 negative photoresist have been used to generate a nanofocused, i.e. sub-μm sized X-ray focal spot at an X-ray nanodiffraction setup. X-ray microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have conceptually different demands on nanofocusing optical elements and so with the application of X-ray nanodiffraction in mind, this paper presents the results of an initial characterization of polymer lenses used as primary focusin...

  3. Linear parabolic single-crystal diamond refractive lenses for synchrotron X-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, Sergey; Polikarpov, Maxim; Snigireva, Irina; Di Michiel, Marco; Zholudev, Sergey; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    Linear parabolic diamond refractive lenses are presented, designed to withstand high thermal and radiation loads coming from upgraded accelerator X-ray sources. Lenses were manufactured by picosecond laser treatment of a high-quality single-crystal synthetic diamond. Twelve lenses with radius of curvature at parabola apex R = 200 µm, geometrical aperture A = 900 µm and length L = 1.5 mm were stacked as a compound refractive lens and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline. A focal spot of size 2.2 µm and a gain of 20 were measured at 8 keV. The lens profile and surface quality were estimated by grating interferometry and X-ray radiography. In addition, the influence of X-ray glitches on the focusing properties of the compound refractive lens were studied.

  4. Compound refractive lenses as prefocusing optics for X-ray FEL radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimann, Philip, E-mail: paheim@slac.stanford.edu [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); MacDonald, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); University of Michigan, 500 South State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nagler, Bob; Lee, Hae Ja; Galtier, Eric; Arnold, Brice; Xing, Zhou [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-02-17

    A prefocusing compound refractive lens was implemented for the Matter under Extreme Conditions Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. A significant improvement in the beamline transmission was calculated and observed at 5 keV. The performance of X-ray free-electron laser beamlines may be limited by the angular aperture. Compound refractive lenses (CRLs) can be employed to prefocus the X-ray beam, thereby increasing the beamline transmission. A prefocusing CRL was implemented in the X-ray transport of the Matter under Extreme Conditions Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. A significant improvement in the beamline transmission was calculated over the 3–10 keV photon energy range. At 5 keV, the relative X-ray intensity was measured and a factor of four increase was seen in the beamline transmission. The X-ray focus was also determined by the ablation imprint method.

  5. A microscope for hard x-rays based on parabolic compound refractive lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, C. G.; Lengeler, B.; Benner, B.; Günzler, F.; Tümmler, J.; Drakopoulos, M.; Weitkamp, T.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.

    2000-05-01

    We describe refractive x-ray lenses with parabolic profile that are genuine imaging devices, similar to glass lenses for visible light. They open considerable possibilities in x-ray microscopy, tomography, microanalysis, and coherent scattering. Based on these lenses a microscope for hard x-rays is described, that can operate in the range from 2 to 60 keV, allowing for magnifications up to 50. At present, using aluminum lenses, it is possible to image an area of about 300μm in diameter with a resolving power of 0.3μm. Using beryllium as a lens material, the resolution can be increased below 0.1μm. The microscope allows to image opaque samples without destructive sample preparation and without the need of a vacuum chamber. It is particularly useful for in situ studies of wet samples, like biological and geological specimens. Imaging in both absorption and phase contrast is possible.

  6. Diamond planar refractive lenses for third- and fourth-generation X-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöhammer, Bernd; Hoszowska, Joanna; Freund, Andreas K; David, Christian

    2003-03-01

    The fabrication and testing of planar refractive hard X-ray lenses made from bulk CVD diamond substrates is reported. The lens structures were generated by electron-beam lithography and transferred by reactive-ion etching into the diamond. Various lens designs were fabricated and tested at 12.4 and 17.5 keV photon energy. Efficiencies of up to 71% and gains of up to 26 were achieved. A line focus of 3.2 micro m (FWHM) was measured. These lenses should be able to withstand the extreme flux densities expected at the planned fourth-generation X-ray sources.

  7. Imaging with parabolic refractive X-ray lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Benner, Boris

    2005-01-01

    When Wilhelm C. Roentgen discovered the x-ray radiation in 1895, he made use of its large penetration depth in matter to create projections of different opaque objects, and also of bones inside the body. The imaging of dense matter inside the body has rapidly found wide use in medicine and is nowadays an important diagnostic tool. But imaging with x-ray radiation is also used in research and technology. The development of 3 dimensional imaging by means of tomographic reconstruction in the lat...

  8. A theoretical method based on Fourier spectrum analysis for the focusing performances of the X-ray compound refractive lenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Ye(叶坚); Zichun Le(乐孜纯); Jingqiu Liang(梁静秋); Kai Liu(刘恺); Bisheng Quan(全必胜); Yali Qin(覃亚丽); Guangxin Zhu(朱广信)

    2004-01-01

    It is important to predict the intensity distribution in focusing plane for designing the X-ray compound refractive lenses. On the basis of analyzing the structure of X-ray compound lenses and comparing it with Fraunhofer diffraction system, it is concluded that the X-ray focusing system can be regarded as a kind of Fraunhofer diffraction system. Therefore, a method based on Fourier spectrum analysis is presented to predict the intensity distribution in the focusing plane for the X-ray lenses. A brief analysis on the relationship between the parameters of X-ray lenses and their focusing performance is also given in this paper.

  9. A method based on diffraction theory for predicting 3D focusing performance of compound refractive X-ray lenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zichun Le; Kai Liu; Jingqiu Liang

    2005-01-01

    A method based on the diffraction theory for estimating the three-dimensional (3D) focusing performance of the compound refractive X-ray lenses is presented in this paper. As a special application, the 3D X-ray intensity distribution near the focus is derived for a plano-concave compound refractive X-ray lens.Moreover, the computer codes are developed and some results of 3D focusing performance for a compound refractive X-ray lens with Si material are shown and discussed.

  10. Parabolic single-crystal diamond compound refractive lenses for coherent x-ray imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir D.; Polyakov, Sergey; Zholudev, Sergey; Snigirev, Anatoly A.; Polikarpov, Maxim; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Qian, Jun; Zhou, Hua; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate parabolic single-crystal diamond compound refractive lenses [1] designed for coherent x-ray imaging resilient to extreme thermal and radiation loading expected from next generation light sources. To ensure the preservation of coherence and resilience, the lenses are manufactured from the highest-quality single-crystalline synthetic diamond material grown by a high-pressure high-temperature technique. Picosecond laser milling is applied to machine lenses to parabolic shapes with a 1-micron precision and surface roughness. A compound refractive lens comprised of six lenses with a radius of curvature R=200 microns at the vertex of the parabola and a geometrical aperture A=900 microns focuses 10 keV x-ray photons from an undulator source at the Advanced Photon Source facility to a focal spot size of 10x40 microns^2 with a gain factor of 100. [1] S. Terentyev, V. Blank, S. Polyakov, S. Zholudev, A. Snigirev, M. Polikarpov, T. Kolodziej, J. Qian, H. Zhou, and Yu. Shvyd'ko Applied Physics Letters 107, 111108 (2015); doi: 10.1063/1.4931357

  11. Efficient Analytical Approaches to the Optics of Compound Refractive Lenses for Use with Synchrotron X-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2014-01-01

    The properties of compound refractive lenses (CRLs) of biconcave parabolic lenses for focusing and imaging synchrotron X-rays have been investigated theoretically by ray transfer matrix analysis and Gaussian beam propagation. We present approximate analytical expressions, that allow fast estimation...

  12. Application of the probability theory in predicting 3D focusing behaviors of compound X-ray refractive lenses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zichun Le; Xinjian Zhao; Jingqiu Liang; Yaping Sun; Kai Liu; Ming Zhang; Shuqin Guo; Bisheng Quan

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical method based on the diffractive theory is used for predicting three-dimensional (3D) focusing performances of the compound X-rays refractive lenses (CRLs). However, the derivation of the 3D intensity distribution near focus for the X-ray refractive lenses is quite complicated. In this paper, we introduce a simple theoretical method that is based on the first and second moments in the theory of probability. As an example, the 3D focusing performance of a CRL with Si material is predicted. Moreover, the results are compared with those obtained by the diffractive theory. It is shown that the method introduced in this paper is accurate enough.

  13. Combining flat crystals, bent crystals and compound refractive lenses for high-energy X-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, S D

    2004-03-01

    Compound refractive lenses (CRLs) are effective for collimating or focusing high-energy X-ray beams (50-100 keV) and can be used in conjunction with crystal optics in a variety of configurations, as demonstrated at the 1-ID undulator beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. As a primary example, this article describes the quadrupling of the output flux when a collimating CRL, composed of cylindrical holes in aluminium, is inserted between two successive monochromators, i.e. a modest-energy-resolution premonochromator followed by a high-resolution monochromator. The premonochromator is a cryogenically cooled divergence-preserving bent double-Laue Si(111) crystal device delivering an energy width DeltaE/E approximately 10(-3), which is sufficient for most experiments. The high-resolution monochromator is a four-reflection flat Si(111) crystal system resembling two channel-cuts in a dispersive arrangement, reducing the bandwidth to less than 10(-4), as required for some applications. Tests with 67 and 81 keV photon energies show that the high-resolution monochromator, having a narrow angular acceptance of a few microradians, exhibits a fourfold throughput enhancement due to the insertion of a CRL that reduces the premonochromatized beam's vertical divergence from 29 micro rad to a few microradians. The ability to focus high-energy X-rays with CRLs having long focal lengths (tens of meters) is also shown by creating a line focus of 70-90 micro m beam height in the beamline end-station with both the modest-energy-resolution and the high-energy-resolution monochromatic X-rays.

  14. Injection molded polymeric hard X-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik; Simons, Hugh; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen;

    2015-01-01

    A novel and economical approach for fabricating compound refractive lenses for the purpose of focusing hard X-rays is described. A silicon master was manufactured by UV-lithography and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Sacrificial structures were utilized, which enabled accurate control of the et......A novel and economical approach for fabricating compound refractive lenses for the purpose of focusing hard X-rays is described. A silicon master was manufactured by UV-lithography and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Sacrificial structures were utilized, which enabled accurate control...... of the etching profile and were removed after DRIE. By electroplating, an inverse nickel sample was obtained, which was used as a mold insert in a commercial polymer injection molding machine. A prototype lens made of polyethylene with a focal length of 350 mm was tested using synchrotron radiation at photon...

  15. Microfabrication of hard x-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik

    heights and improved uniformity compared to what is currently available. To this end, established fabrication procedures are improved and the toolbox used for lens development is enriched. The central theme of this thesis is x-ray microscopy (XRM). As a spearhead of today’s materials research it provides...... in turn asks for highly precise metrology. Therefore, a mix of techniques including optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to obtain reliable information about the detailed three-dimensional shapes of the lenses. Adequate sample preparation and measuring procedures have been...... of space for sample surroundings and ensure low-divergent and wide x-ray beams with narrow waists. Both results are substantial improvements to what was available at the start of this thesis work. The challenge of making x-ray objectives in silicon by interdigitation of lenslets alternately focusing...

  16. Single-crystal diamond refractive lens for focusing X-rays in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, S.; Baryshev, Sergey; Butler, J. E.; Antipova, O.; Liu, Zunping; Stoupin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication and performance evaluation of single-crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses of which the surfaces are paraboloids of revolution for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously are reported. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses were stacked together to form a standard compound refractive lens (CRL). Owing to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs could become indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources for secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  17. Single-crystal diamond refractive lens for focusing X-rays in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, S; Baryshev, S V; Butler, J E; Antipova, O; Liu, Z; Stoupin, S

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication and performance evaluation of single-crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses of which the surfaces are paraboloids of revolution for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously are reported. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses were stacked together to form a standard compound refractive lens (CRL). Owing to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs could become indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources for secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  18. Single Crystal Diamond Refractive Lens for Focusing X-rays in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Antipov, S; Butler, J E; Antipova, O; Liu, Z; Stoupin, S

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication and performance evaluation of single crystal diamond refractive X-ray lenses with a paraboloid of rotation form factor for focusing X-rays in two dimensions simultaneously. The lenses were manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining process and tested using X-ray synchrotron radiation. Such lenses can be stacked together to form a traditional compound refractive lens (CRL). Due to the superior physical properties of the material, diamond CRLs are enabling and indispensable wavefront-preserving primary focusing optics for X-ray free-electron lasers and the next-generation synchrotron storage rings. They can be used for highly efficient refocusing of the extremely bright X-ray sources on secondary optical schemes with limited aperture such as nanofocusing Fresnel zone plates and multilayer Laue lenses.

  19. Refraction contrast in X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Keyrilaeinen, J; Suortti, P

    2002-01-01

    A two-crystal diffractometer in the non-dispersive configuration is used for measurement of the effects of refraction in weakly absorbing test objects. Characteristic K alpha sub 1 radiation from a fine-focus X-ray tube with Mo anode is used. The probing beam is about 70 mu m wide and 3 mm high. The sample is placed between the monochromator and analyzer, and it is scanned through the beam. The analyzer is tuned to reflect at the low-angle slope, at the top, or at the high-angle slope of the rocking curve, when the sample is not in the beam. Refraction changes the angle of incidence on the analyzer causing changes in intensity. The observed intensity distributions are exactly reproduced by a calculation, where only the effects of refraction are included. The effects of in-beam interference are negligible or very small, which is also verified by changing the distance between the object and the detector.

  20. X-ray lenses with large aperture; Roentgenlinsen mit grosser Apertur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Markus

    2010-07-01

    Up to now, most X-ray imaging setups are based on absorption contrast imaging. There is a demand for focused X-rays in many X-ray analysis applications, either to increase the resolution of an imaging system, or, to reduce the time effort of an experiment through higher photon flux. For photon energies higher than 15 keV refractive X-ray optics are more efficient in comparison to non-refractive X-ray optics. The aim of this work was to develop X-ray lenses with large apertures and high transparency. By increasing the number of refracting surfaces while removing unnecessary lens material such lenses have been developed. Utilizing this approach the overall beam deflection angle is large with respect to the lens material it propagates through and so the transparency of the lens is increased. Within this work, X-ray lenses consisting of several thousands of prisms with an edge length in the range of micrometers have been developed and fabricated by deep X-ray lithography. Deep X-ray lithography enables high precision microstrucures with smooth sidewalls and large aspect ratios. The aperture of high-transparency X-ray lenses made this way is greater than 1 mm. They are suitable for photon energies in the range of 8 keV to 24 keV and offer a focal width of smaller than 10 {mu}m at a transparency of around 40%. Furthermore, rolled X-ray lenses have been developed, that are made out of a microstructured polyimide film, which is cut according to the requirements regarding focal length and photon energy. The microstructured film is fabricated by molding, using an anisotropically etched silicon wafer as molding tool. Its mean roughness is in the range of nanometers. The film features prismatic structures, its surface topology is similar to an asparagus field. The measured diameter of the point focus was 18 {mu}m to 31 {mu}m, the calculated opticla efficiency was 37%. Future work will concentrate on increasing the aspect ratio of Prism Lenses and on increasing the rolling

  1. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens developed at Indus-2 deep X-ray lithography beamline

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V P Dhamgaye; M K Tiwari; K J S Sawhney; G S Lodha

    2014-07-01

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance sources are compared.

  2. Fabrication of polycrystalline diamond refractive X-ray lens by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kononenko, T.V.; Ralchenko, V.G.; Ashkinazi, E.E.; Konov, V.I. [General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Polikarpov, M.; Ershov, P. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Functional Nanomaterials, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, S.; Yunkin, V. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Snigireva, I. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2016-03-15

    X-ray planar compound refractive lenses were fabricated from a polycrystalline diamond plate grown by chemical vapor deposition, by precise through cutting with femtosecond laser pulses. The lens geometry and the surface morphology were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while the material structure modification was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The results of the preliminary lens test at 9.25-keV X-rays are presented. (orig.)

  3. Abell 611. II. X-ray and strong lensing analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Donnarumma, A; Meneghetti, M; Gavazzi, R; Fort, B; Moscardini, L; Romano, A; Fu, L; Giordano, F; Radovich, M; Maoli, R; Scaramella, R; Richard, J

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present the results of our analyses of the X-ray emission and of the strong lensing system in the galaxy cluster Abell 611 [z=0.288]. This cluster appears as an optimal candidate for a comparison of the mass reconstructions obtained through X-ray and lensing techniques, for its very relaxed dynamical appearance and its exceptional strong lensing system. We infer the X-ray mass estimate deriving the density and temperature profile of the Intra-Cluster Medium through a non-parametric approach, taking advantage of the high spatial resolution of the publicly available Chandra observation of this cluster. Assuming that the cluster is in hydrostatic equilibrium and adopting a matter density profile, we can recover the total mass distribution of Abell 611 via the X-ray data. Moreover, we derive the total projected mass in the central regions of Abell 611 performing a parametric analysis of its strong lensing features through the public analysis software Lenstool. The results obtained with both method...

  4. Fabrication and evaluation of variable focus X-ray lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khounsary, Ali; Dufresne, Eric M.; Kewish, Cameron M.; Qian, Jun; Assoufid, Lahsen; Conley, Ray

    2007-11-01

    We report on the fabrication, preliminary metrology, and X-ray transmission results of variable-focus cylindrical beryllium lenses. Each lens consists of a number of 1-mm-diameter lenslets made by precision computer numerical control (CNC) drilling into a beryllium substrate. The substrate is then cut into five parts, each having a different number of lenslets, ranging from 10 to 50. Each lens is then cut diagonally, using an electron discharge machine, to provide it with focusing ability. Unlike the traditional lenses having a fixed focal distance for a given energy, the present lenses provide for a wide range of photon energies and focal distances. Additionally, X-ray transmission through the lens is enhanced by reducing lenslet wall thickness to about 50 μm, the thinnest reported to date.

  5. Simulating and optimizing compound refractive lens-based X-ray microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Hugh; Ahl, Sonja Rosenlund; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Detlefs, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive optical description of compound refractive lenses (CRLs) in condensing and full-field X-ray microscopy applications is presented. The formalism extends ray-transfer matrix analysis by accounting for X-ray attenuation by the lens material. Closed analytical expressions for critical imaging parameters such as numerical aperture, spatial acceptance (vignetting), chromatic aberration and focal length are provided for both thin- and thick-lens imaging geometries. These expressions show that the numerical aperture will be maximized and chromatic aberration will be minimized at the thick-lens limit. This limit may be satisfied by a range of CRL geometries, suggesting alternative approaches to improving the resolution and efficiency of CRLs and X-ray microscopes.

  6. X-ray refractive index of laser-dressed atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Buth, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the complex index of refraction in the x-ray regime of atoms in laser light. The laser (intensity up to 10^13 W/cm^2, 800nm) modifies the atomic states but, by assumption, does not excite or ionize the atoms in their electronic ground state. Using quantum electrodynamics, we devise an ab initio theory to calculate the dynamic dipole polarizability and the photoabsorption cross section, which are subsequently used to determine the real and imaginary part, respectively, of the refractive index. The interaction with the laser is treated nonperturbatively; the x-ray interaction is described in terms of a one-photon process. We numerically solve the resolvents involved using a single-vector Lanczos algorithm. Finally, we formulate rate equations to copropagate a laser and an x-ray pulse through a gas cell. Our theory is applied to argon. We study the x-ray polarizability and absorption near the argon K edge over a large range of dressing-laser intensities. We find electromagnetically induced transp...

  7. Refraction effects in soft x-ray multilayer blazed gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, D L; Salmassi, F; Meyer-Ilse, J; Gullikson, E M; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2016-05-30

    A 2500 lines/mm Multilayer Blazed Grating (MBG) optimized for the soft x-ray wavelength range was fabricated and tested. The grating coated with a W/B4C multilayer demonstrated a record diffraction efficiency in the 2nd blazed diffraction order in the energy range from 500 to 1200 eV. Detailed investigation of the diffraction properties of the grating demonstrated that the diffraction efficiency of high groove density MBGs is not limited by the normal shadowing effects that limits grazing incidence x-ray grating performance. Refraction effects inherent in asymmetrical Bragg diffraction were experimentally confirmed for MBGs. The refraction affects the blazing properties of the MBGs and results in a shift of the resonance wavelength of the gratings and broadening or narrowing of the grating bandwidth depending on diffraction geometry. The true blaze angle of the MBGs is defined by both the real structure of the multilayer stack and by asymmetrical refraction effects. Refraction effects can be used as a powerful tool in providing highly efficient suppression of high order harmonics.

  8. Polymer refractive crossed long lens: a new optical component for nanoimaging and nanofocussing in the hard X-ray region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazmov, V.; Simon, R.; Reznikova, E.; Mohr, J.; Saile, V.

    2012-07-01

    A set of X-ray refractive long polymer lenses was developed to provide focusing into a spot down to 80 nm. The short focal distance of a long refractive lens with respect to the long focal distance of a short lens allows for a dramatic reduction of the image of the X-ray source. Fluorescence mapping of gold test spheres of 80 nm in diameter was conducted at 22 keV at the ANKA FLUO beamline. Single gold spheres and gold spheres within a residual organic film are successfully detected.

  9. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 μm which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  10. Diffraction theory applied to X-ray imaging with clessidra prism array lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Liberato; Jark, Werner

    2008-03-01

    Clessidra (hourglass) lenses, i.e. two large prisms each composed of smaller identical prisms or prism-like objects, can focus X-rays. As these lenses have a periodic structure perpendicular to the incident radiation, they will diffract the beam like a diffraction grating. Refraction in the prisms is responsible for blazing, i.e. for the concentration of the diffracted intensity into only a few diffraction peaks. It is found that the diffraction of coherent radiation in clessidra lenses needs to be treated in the Fresnel, or near-field, regime. Here, diffraction theory is applied appropriately to the clessidra structure in order to show that blazing in a perfect structure with partly curved prisms can indeed concentrate the diffracted intensity into only one peak. When the lens is entirely composed of identical perfect prisms, small secondary peaks are found. Nevertheless, the loss in intensity in the central peak will not lead to any significant widening of this peak. Clessidras with perfect prisms illuminated by full coherent X-ray radiation can then provide spatial resolutions, which are consistent with the increased aperture, and which are far below the height of the single small prisms.

  11. Deep reactive ion etching of silicon moulds for the fabrication of diamond x-ray focusing lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, A. M.; Fox, O. J. L.; Alianelli, L.; Korsunsky, A. M.; Stevens, R.; Loader, I. M.; Wilson, M. C.; Pape, I.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; May, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    Diamond is a highly desirable material for use in x-ray optics and instrumentation. However, due to its extreme hardness and resistance to chemical attack, diamond is difficult to form into a structure suitable for x-ray lenses. Refractive lenses are capable of delivering x-ray beams with nanoscale resolution. A moulding technique for the fabrication of diamond lenses is reported. High-quality silicon moulds were made using photolithography and deep reactive ion etching. The study of the etch process conducted to achieve silicon moulds with vertical sidewalls and minimal surface roughness is discussed. Issues experienced when attempting to deposit diamond into a high-aspect-ratio mould by chemical vapour deposition are highlighted. Two generations of lenses have been successfully fabricated using this transfer-moulding approach with significant improvement in the quality and performance of the optics observed in the second iteration. Testing of the diamond x-ray optics on the Diamond Light Source Ltd synchrotron B16 beamline has yielded a line focus of sub-micrometre width.

  12. High spatial resolution hard X-ray microscope using X-ray refractive lens and phase contrast imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Suzuki, Y; Ishikawa, T; Ohigashi, T; Yokosuka, H

    2001-01-01

    A high spatial resolution X-ray microscope was constructed using an X-ray refractive lens as an objective. The spatial resolution was tested using 18 keV X-ray. A 0.4 mu m line and 0.4 mu m space tantalum test pattern was successfully resolved. Using the similar setup with the addition of a phase plate, a Zernike type phase-contrast microscopy experiment was carried out for the phase retrieval of the samples. Two-dimensional phase-contrast images were successfully taken for the first time in the hard X-ray region. Images of a gold mesh sample were analyzed and the validity of this method was indicated. An improvement of the lens, however, is required for the precise phase retrieval of the samples.

  13. X-ray tomography using the full complex index of refraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Lauridsen, Torsten; Thomsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on x-ray tomography using the full complex index of refraction recorded with a grating-based x-ray phase-contrast setup. Combining simultaneous absorption and phase-contrast information, the distribution of the full complex index of refraction is determined and depicted in a bivariate...

  14. Measurements with compound refractive lenses at the “BAMline”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, E.; Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U.; Riesemeier, H.; Reznikova, E.

    2008-05-01

    A set of compound refractive lenses (CRLs), mounted on a silicon wafer, was obtained from the Institut für Mikrostrukturtechnik Karlsruhe. The CRLs were characterized at the BAMline at the synchrotron BESSYII in Berlin. It could be demonstrated that beam diameters below 1 μm can be obtained. The beam size accepted by the lenses is (140 × 140) μm2, thus the intensity gain in the micrometer spot, including absorption, is about 15,000. It is possible to switch between different beam energies within a few minutes. First results of scans and the application of the lenses for MicroXANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) measurements are presented in this paper. Also, the possibility of MicroEXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) measurements is discussed.

  15. Extended X-ray Monitoring of Gravitational Lenses with Chandra and Joint Constraints on X-ray Emission Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Guerras, Eduardo; Steele, Shaun; Liu, Ang; Kochanek, Christopher S; Chartas, George; Morgan, Christopher W; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We present an X-ray photometric analysis of six gravitationally lensed quasars spanning from 5 to 14 years, measuring the total (0.83-21.8 keV restframe), soft (0.83-3.6 keV), and hard (3.6-21.8 keV) band image flux ratios for each epoch. Using the ratios of the model-predicted macro-magnifications as baselines, we build differential microlensing curves and obtain joint likelihood functions for the average X-ray emission region sizes. Our analysis yields a Probability Distribution Function for the average half-light radius of the X-Ray emission region in the sample that peaks slightly above 1 gravitational radius, and yields nearly indistinguishable 68 % confidence (one-sided) upper limits of 17.8 (18.9) gravitational radii for the soft (hard) X-ray emitting region, assuming a mean stellar mass of 0.3 solar masses. We see hints of energy dependent microlensing between the soft and hard bands in two of the objects. In a separate analysis on the root-mean-square (RMS) of the microlensing variability, we find si...

  16. Optical performance of materials for X-ray refractive optics in the energy range 8-100 keV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrennikov, Dmitry; Clementyev, Evgeny; Semenov, Alexander; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-11-01

    A quantitative analysis of the crucial characteristics of currently used and promising materials for X-ray refractive optics is performed in the extended energy range 8-100 keV. According to the examined parameters, beryllium is the material of choice for X-ray compound refractive lenses (CRLs) in the energy range 8-25 keV. At higher energies the use of CRLs made of diamond and the cubic phase of boron nitride (c-BN) is beneficial. It was demonstrated that the presence of the elements of the fourth (or higher) period has a fatal effect on the functional X-ray properties even if low-Z elements dominate in the compound, like in YB66. Macroscopic properties are discussed: much higher melting points and thermal conductivities of C and c-BN enable them to be used at the new generation of synchrotron radiation sources and X-ray free-electron lasers. The role of crystal and internal structure is discussed: materials with high density are preferable for refractive applications while less dense phases are suitable for X-ray windows. Single-crystal or amorphous glass-like materials based on Li, Be, B or C that are free of diffuse scattering from grain boundaries, voids and inclusions are the best candidates for applications of highly coherent X-ray beams.

  17. A CFH12k lensing survey of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters - II. Weak lensing analysis and global correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardeau, S.; Soucail, G.; Kneib, J.-P.; Czoske, O.; Ebeling, H.; Hudelot, P.; Smail, I.; Smith, G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. We present a wide-field multi-color survey of a homogeneous sample of eleven clusters of galaxies for which we measure total masses and mass distributions from weak lensing. This sample, spanning a small range in both X-ray luminosity and redshift, is ideally suited to determining the normalis

  18. Full-field hard x-ray microscopy with interdigitated silicon lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, Hugh; Michael-Lindhard, Jonas; Jensen, Flemming; Hansen, Ole; Detlefs, Carsten; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2015-01-01

    Full-field x-ray microscopy using x-ray objectives has become a mainstay of the biological and materials sciences. However, the inefficiency of existing objectives at x-ray energies above 15 keV has limited the technique to weakly absorbing or two-dimensional (2D) samples. Here, we show that significant gains in numerical aperture and spatial resolution may be possible at hard x-ray energies by using silicon-based optics comprising 'interdigitated' refractive silicon lenslets that alternate their focus between the horizontal and vertical directions. By capitalizing on the nano-manufacturing processes available to silicon, we show that it is possible to overcome the inherent inefficiencies of silicon-based optics and interdigitated geometries. As a proof-of-concept of Si-based interdigitated objectives, we demonstrate a prototype interdigitated lens with a resolution of ~255 nm at 17 keV.

  19. Weak lensing observation of potentially X-ray underluminous galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, J P; Popesso, P; Zhang, Y -Y; Lombardi, M; Böhringer, H

    2009-01-01

    Optically selected clusters of galaxies display a relation between their optical mass estimates and their X-ray luminosities Lx with a large scatter. A substantial fraction of optically selected clusters have Lx estimates or upper limits significantly below the values expected from the Lx-mass relation established for X-ray selected clusters, i.e., these clusters are X-ray underluminous for their mass. Here we aim to confirm or falsify the X-ray underluminous nature of two clusters, Abell 315 and Abell 1456, with weak gravitational lensing as a third and independent measure of the clusters' masses. We obtained optical wide-field imaging data and selected background galaxies using their colors and measured the shear exerted by the tidal field of the foreground galaxy clusters. We then fitted parametrized models to our shear catalogs. After accounting for projections of large-scale structure and halo triaxiality we find that A~315 is significantly X-ray underluminous for its mass, while no significant lensing s...

  20. Large-acceptance diamond planar refractive lenses manufactured by laser cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikarpov, Maxim; Snigireva, Irina; Morse, John; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, single-crystal diamond planar refractive lenses have been fabricated by laser micromachining in 300 µm-thick diamond plates which were grown by chemical vapour deposition. Linear lenses with apertures up to 1 mm and parabola apex radii up to 500 µm were manufactured and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline. The large acceptance of these lenses allows them to be used as beam-conditioning elements. Owing to the unsurpassed thermal properties of single-crystal diamond, these lenses should be suitable to withstand the extreme flux densities expected at the planned fourth-generation X-ray sources.

  1. Universal Profiles of the Intracluster Medium from Suzaku X-Ray and Subaru Weak Lensing Obesrvations

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, N; Tamura, T; Fujita, Y; Takizawa, M; Zhang, Y -Y; Matsushita, K; Hamana, T; Fukazawa, Y; Futamase, T; Kawaharada, M; Miyazaki, S; Mochizuki, Y; Nakazawa, K; Ohashi, T; Ota, N; Sasaki, T; Sato, K; Tam, S I

    2014-01-01

    We conduct a joint X-ray and weak-lensing study of four relaxed galaxy clusters (Hydra A, A478, A1689 and A1835) observed by both Suzaku and Subaru out to virial radii, with an aim to understand recently-discovered unexpected feature of the ICM in cluster outskirts. We show that the average hydrostatic-to-lensing total mass ratio for the four clusters decreases from \\sim 70% to \\sim 40% as the overdensity contrast decreases from 500 to the virial value.The average gas mass fraction from lensing total mass estimates increases with cluster radius and agrees with the cosmic mean baryon fraction within the virial radius, whereas the X-ray-based gas fraction considerably exceeds the cosmic values due to underestimation of the hydrostatic mass. We also develop a new advanced method for determining normalized cluster radial profiles for multiple X-ray observables by simultaneously taking into account both their radial dependence and multivariate scaling relations with weak-lensing masses. Although the four clusters ...

  2. Refractive X-ray lens for high pressure experiments at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Ohishi, Y; Ishii, M; Ishikawa, T; Shimomura, O

    2001-01-01

    A stacked compound refractive X-ray lens was designed to produce an efficiently focused (phi (cursive,open) Greek<0.1 mm) beam for high-pressure experiments at SPring-8. High-pressure X-ray diffraction requires an intense, high-energy and monochromatic X-ray beam in order to penetrate the absorptive window of a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Our lens, producing a focal spot of 120x275 mu m sup 2 and a peak gain of 12, is well matched to these requirements. It is composed of many plastic chips made by molding, which allows many identical chips to be made precisely. Other advantages of this lens include high throughput, simple energy tunability and easy installation.

  3. Refractive X-ray lens for high pressure experiments at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohishi, Y. E-mail: ohishi@spring8.or.jp; Baron, A.Q.R.; Ishii, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Shimomura, O

    2001-07-21

    A stacked compound refractive X-ray lens was designed to produce an efficiently focused (phi (cursive,open) Greek<0.1 mm) beam for high-pressure experiments at SPring-8. High-pressure X-ray diffraction requires an intense, high-energy and monochromatic X-ray beam in order to penetrate the absorptive window of a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Our lens, producing a focal spot of 120x275 {mu}m{sup 2} and a peak gain of 12, is well matched to these requirements. It is composed of many plastic chips made by molding, which allows many identical chips to be made precisely. Other advantages of this lens include high throughput, simple energy tunability and easy installation.

  4. Method of time resolved refractive index measurements of x-ray laser heated solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G. O.; Kuenzel, S.; Fajardo, M. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Chung, H.-K. [Atomic and Molecular Data Unit, Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vinko, S. M. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Sardinha, A. B. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Technique Avancees, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7639, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Zeitoun, Ph. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Technique Avancees, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7639, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    With the advent of new x-ray light-sources worldwide, the creation of dense, uniformly heated plasma states arising from intense x-ray irradiation of solids has been made possible. In the early stages of x-ray solid heating, before significant hydrodynamic motion occurs, the matter exists in a highly non-equilibrium state. A method based on wavefront sensing is proposed to probe some of the fundamental properties of these states. The deflection and absorption of a high harmonic probe beam propagated through the plasma can be measured with a wavefront sensor, and allow for the determination of the complex refractive index (RI) of the plasma, giving a 2D map of the optical properties as function of time in a pump-probe arrangement. A solid heating model has been used to estimate the expected temperatures of x-ray heated thin foils, and these temperatures are used in three separate models to estimate the changes in the refractive index. The calculations show the changes induced on an extreme ultra-violet (XUV) probe beam by a solid density thin foil plasma are significant, in terms of deflection angle and absorption, to be measured by already existing XUV Hartmann wavefront sensors. The method is applicable to a wide range of photon energies in the XUV (10 s to several 100 s of eV) and plasma parameters, and can add much needed experimental data to the fundamental properties of such dense plasma states.

  5. Holographic X-ray optical elements: transition between refraction and diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Snigireva, I; Rau, C; Weitkamp, T; Aristov, V; Grigoriev, M; Kuznetsov, S; Shabelnikov, L; Yunkin, V; Hoffmann, M; Voges, E

    2001-01-01

    Planar microelectronics technology, involving photolithography and highly anisotropic plasma etching techniques, was applied to fabricate refractive and diffractive (kinoform) lenses. Focusing properties in terms of focus spot and efficiency in the energy range 8-25 keV for both types of lenses were tested at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID22 beamline. Focal spot of 1.5 mu m with a gain of 25 was measured at 15 keV.

  6. Is the Variable X-ray Source in M82 due to Gravitational Lensing?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We explore the possibility of attributing the recent discovery of the variable hard X-ray source CXO M82 J095550.2+694047 in M82 to the gravitational magnification by an intervening stellar object along the line of sight acting as a mi-crolens. The duration of the event (> 84 days) allows us to set robust constraints on the mass and location of the microlensing object when combined with the dynam-ical properties of the Galactic halo, M82 and typical globular clusters. Except for the extremely low probability, the microlensing magnification by MACHO in either the Galactic halo or M82 halo is able to explain the X-ray variability of CXO M82 J095550.2+694047. It is hoped that the lensing hypothesis can be tested soon by measurement of the light curve.

  7. Lense-Thirring precession in neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Jeroen

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with low frequencies (0.01-70 Hz) have been observed in the X-ray light curves of most neutron-star and black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. Despite having been discovered more than 25 years ago, their origin is still not well understood. Similarities between the low-frequency QPOs in the two types of systems suggest that they have a common origin in the accretion flows around black holes and neutron stars. Some of the proposed models that attempt to explain low- frequency QPOs invoke a General Relativistic effect known as Lense-Thirring precession (or "frame dragging"). However, for Lense-Thirring precession to produce substantial modulations of the X-ray flux through relativistic beaming and gravitational lensing, the rotation axis of the inner part of the accretion disk needs to have a substantial tilt (10-20 degrees) with respect to the spin axis of the compact object. We argue that observational evidence for such titled inner accretion disks can be found in the variability of neutron- star low-mass X-ray binaries that are viewed at inclination angles of 60-80 degrees. In these systems low-frequency QPOs at ~0.1-15 Hz are observed that modulate the emission from the neutron star by quasi-periodic obscuration, presumably by a titled inner disc. The goal of our proposed program is to test whether the frequency evolution and spectral state dependence of these QPOs is similar to what is observed for the low-frequency QPOs that are observed in lower-inclination neutron-star X-ray binaries. To make such a comparison, we need to better characterize the properties and behavior of these QPOs. Our study will make use of almost 1300 RXTE observations of 11 sources, totaling 5.7 Ms of data. Signatures of strong gravity have long been sought after in accreting compact objects. While strong evidence from spectral features has emerged in the last decade (e.g. gravitationally broadened iron emission lines), there have only been hints of such

  8. Compensation of X-ray mirror shape-errors using refractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Kawal; Laundy, David; Dhamgaye, Vishal; Pape, Ian

    2016-08-01

    Focusing of X-rays to nanometre scale focal spots requires high precision X-ray optics. For nano-focusing mirrors, height errors in the mirror surface retard or advance the X-ray wavefront and after propagation to the focal plane, this distortion of the wavefront causes blurring of the focus resulting in a limit on the spatial resolution. We describe here the implementation of a method for correcting the wavefront that is applied before a focusing mirror using custom-designed refracting structures which locally cancel out the wavefront distortion from the mirror. We demonstrate in measurements on a synchrotron radiation beamline a reduction in the size of the focal spot of a characterized test mirror by a factor of greater than 10 times. This technique could be used to correct existing synchrotron beamline focusing and nanofocusing optics providing a highly stable wavefront with low distortion for obtaining smaller focus sizes. This method could also correct multilayer or focusing crystal optics allowing larger numerical apertures to be used in order to reduce the diffraction limited focal spot size.

  9. Negative Refraction Does Not Make Perfect Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    The widely-accepted theoretical treatment of the electromagnetic boundary problem of evanescent wave transfer at an interface between a normal medium of n=1 and an ideal negative index medium of n=-1 neglects the non-zero induced surface current and charge densities at the interface and is self-inconsistent. We re-solve the electromagnetic boundary problem by taking into account the non-zero induced surface current and charge densities that have been neglected so far by others. We give the exact induced surface current and charge distributions for this special case and solve the refracted and reflected fields analytically using Green's function method. The self-consistent solution yields a transmission coefficient of 1 and reflection coefficient of 0 for all evanescent waves. Accordingly, we found that, on the contrary to the popular belief, negative index of refraction does not make perfect lenses.

  10. Determination of minimum detectable refraction angle in X-ray diffraction-enhanced imaging via standard test piece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kaoru; Ikeya, Hitoshi; Inoue, Kenzou; Fujimori, Akane; Okamoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a standard test piece (termed a phantom) was designed to determine the minimum detectable refraction angle in X-ray diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The phantom had an acrylic exterior and a pentagonal prism shape with a continuously variable angle α that corresponded to the supplementary angle of two X-ray irradiated planes. The refraction angle was affected by the inclination angle of the two irradiation planes when the X-rays were normally incident to the surface. Thus, the minimum detectable refraction angle was determined from the observed contrast. The boundary of the phantom between the slant face area and the flat plane area was clearly recognized for a large angle α. However, the boundary image was not observed for extremely small α values. In the latter case, the refraction angle for the X-ray beam was less than the angular resolution of the DEI equipment used. In the present study, the minimum detectable refraction angle for the DEI apparatus in the optical system constructed in a vertical-wiggler beamline (the BL-14B beamline) at the Japanese KEK-PF synchrotron facility was determined. The results indicated that the minimum detectable refraction angle was 3.8 × 10-6 rad for a 30 keV X-ray beam, as determined using an asymmetric 440 reflection collimator with a 10° off-angle and a symmetric 440 reflection analyzer.

  11. Further Evidence that Quasar X-Ray Emitting Regions Are Compact: X-Ray and Optical Microlensing in the Lensed Quasar Q J0158-4325

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Christopher W; Chen, Bin; Tewes, Malte; Kochanek, Christopher S; Dai, Xinyu; Kozlowski, Szymon; Blackburne, Jeffrey A; Mosquera, Ana M; Chartas, George; Courbin, Frederic; Meylan, Georges

    2012-01-01

    We present four new seasons of optical monitoring data and six epochs of X-ray photometry for the doubly-imaged lensed quasar Q J0158-4325. The high-amplitude, short-period microlensing variability for which this system is known has historically precluded a time delay measurement by conventional methods. We attempt to circumvent this limitation by application of a Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique, but we are only able to prove that the delay must have the expected sign (image A leads image B). Despite our failure to robustly measure the time delay, we successfully model the microlensing at optical and X-ray wavelengths to find a half light radius for soft X-ray emission log(r_{1/2,X,soft}/cm) = 14.3^{+0.4}_{-0.5}, an upper limit on the half-light radius for hard X-ray emission log(r_{1/2,X,hard}/cm) <= 14.6 and a refined estimate of the inclination-corrected scale radius of the optical R-band (rest frame 3100 Angstrom) continuum emission region of log(r_s/cm) = 15.6+-0.3.

  12. Weak lensing calibration of mass bias in the REFLEX+BCS X-ray galaxy cluster catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simet, Melanie; Battaglia, Nicholas; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uroš

    2017-04-01

    The use of large, X-ray-selected Galaxy cluster catalogues for cosmological analyses requires a thorough understanding of the X-ray mass estimates. Weak gravitational lensing is an ideal method to shed light on such issues, due to its insensitivity to the cluster dynamical state. We perform a weak lensing calibration of 166 galaxy clusters from the REFLEX and BCS cluster catalogue and compare our results to the X-ray masses based on scaled luminosities from that catalogue. To interpret the weak lensing signal in terms of cluster masses, we compare the lensing signal to simple theoretical Navarro-Frenk-White models and to simulated cluster lensing profiles, including complications such as cluster substructure, projected large-scale structure and Eddington bias. We find evidence of underestimation in the X-ray masses, as expected, with = 0.75 ± 0.07 stat. ±0.05 sys. for our best-fitting model. The biases in cosmological parameters in a typical cluster abundance measurement that ignores this mass bias will typically exceed the statistical errors.

  13. Polarization modulation from Lense-Thirring precession in X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, Adam; Poutanen, Juri; Krawczynski, Henric

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognised that quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray light curves of accreting black hole and neutron star binaries have the potential to be powerful diagnostics of strong field gravity. However, this potential cannot be fulfilled without a working theoretical model, which has remained elusive. Perhaps the most promising model associates the QPO with Lense-Thirring precession of the inner accretion flow, with the changes in viewing angle and Doppler boosting modulating the flux over the course of a precession cycle. Here, we consider the polarization signature of a precessing inner accretion flow. We use simple assumptions about the Comptonization process generating the emitted spectrum and take all relativistic effects into account, parallel transporting polarization vectors towards the observer along null geodesics in the Kerr metric. We find that both the degree of linear polarization and the polarization angle should be modulated on the QPO frequency. We calculate the predicted...

  14. Further Evidence that Quasar X-Ray Emitting Regions Are Compact: X-Ray and Optical Microlensing in the Lensed Quasar Q J0158-4325

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Christopher W.; Hainline, Laura J.; Chen, Bin; Tewes, Malte; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dai, Xinyu; Kozlowski, Szymon; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Mosquera, Ana M.; Chartas, George; Courbin, Frederic; Meylan, Georges

    2012-01-01

    We present four new seasons of optical monitoring data and six epochs of X-ray photometry for the doubly-imaged lensed quasar Q J0158-4325. The high-amplitude, short-period microlensing variability for which this system is known has historically precluded a time delay measurement by conventional methods. We attempt to circumvent this limitation by application of a Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique, but we are only able to prove that the delay must have the expected sign (image A lea...

  15. Optimizing shape uniformity and increasing structure heights of deep reactive ion etched silicon x-ray lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Frederik; Wright, Jonathan; Simons, Hugh; Michael-Lindhard, Jonas; Hübner, Jörg; Jensen, Flemming; Hansen, Ole; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2015-12-01

    Line-focusing compound silicon x-ray lenses with structure heights exceeding 300 μm were fabricated using deep reactive ion etching. To ensure profile uniformity over the full height, a new strategy was developed in which the perimeter of the structures was defined by trenches of constant width. The remaining sacrificial material inside the lens cavities was removed by etching through the silicon wafer. Since the wafers become fragile after through-etching, they were then adhesively bonded to a carrier wafer. Individual chips were separated using laser micro machining and the 3D shape of fabricated lenses was thoroughly characterized by a variety of means. Optical testing using synchrotron radiation with a photon energy of 56 keV yielded a 300 μm wide beam with a waist of 980 nm (full width at half maximum) at a focal length of 1.3 m. Optical aberrations are discussed in the context of the shape analysis, where a slight bowing of the lens sidewalls and an insufficiently uniform apex region are identified as resolution-limiting factors. Despite these, the proposed fabrication route proved a viable approach for producing x-ray lenses with large structure heights and provides the means to improve the resolution and capabilities of modern x-ray techniques such as x-ray microscopy and 3D x-ray diffraction.

  16. A Study of Multiple Refractive Scattering of Monoenergetic X-Rays from Ensembles of Monodisperse Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Khromova, Anastasiya

    2010-01-01

    A Monte Carlo program based on a three dimensional vector approach was developed to model multiple refractive scattering of X-ray photons in objects with a fine structure. A particular interest was paid to the investigation of lung tissue. Alveoli are low contrast and low absorbing structures. Hence, they are not visible in the conventional radiography which is based on the changes in the absorption arising from density differences and from variation in the thickness and composition of the object. Another possibility to image fine structure objects is to use the phase imaging techniques. As known, the phase change constant delta at low energies (15-30 keV) is 1000 times larger than the absorption constant beta. The Diffraction Enhance Imaging (DEI) technique is one of the recent phase sensitive techniques based on the use of an analyzer crystal placed between the sample and the detector.

  17. Optimizing shape uniformity and increasing structure heights of deep reactive ion etched silicon x-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik; Wright, Jonathan; Simons, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    . The remaining sacrificial material inside the lens cavities was removed by etching through the silicon wafer. Since the wafers become fragile after through-etching, they were then adhesively bonded to a carrier wafer. Individual chips were separated using laser micro machining and the 3D shape of fabricated......Line-focusing compound silicon x-ray lenses with structure heights exceeding 300 μm were fabricated using deep reactive ion etching. To ensure profile uniformity over the full height, a new strategy was developed in which the perimeter of the structures was defined by trenches of constant width...... the resolution and capabilities of modern x-ray techniques such as x-ray microscopy and 3D x-ray diffraction....

  18. Hard X-ray index of refraction tomography of a whole rabbit knee joint: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasilov, S; Mittone, A; Horng, A; Geith, T; Bravin, A; Baumbach, T; Coan, P

    2016-12-01

    We report results of the computed tomography reconstruction of the index of refraction in a whole rabbit knee joint examined at the photon energy of 51keV. Refraction based images make it possible to delineate the bone, cartilage, and soft tissues without adjusting the contrast window width and level. Density variations, which are related to tissue composition and are not visible in absorption X-ray images, are detected in the obtained refraction based images. We discuss why refraction-based images provide better detectability of low contrast features than absorption images. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Full-field hard x-ray microscopy with interdigitated silicon lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simons, Hugh; Stöhr, Frederik; Michael-Lindhard, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Full-field x-ray microscopy using x-ray objectives has become a mainstay of the biological and materials sciences. However, the inefficiency of existing objectives at x-ray energies above 15 keV has limited the technique to weakly absorbing or two-dimensional (2D) samples. Here, we show...

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation of X-rays Multiple Refractive Scattering from Fine Structure Objects imaged with the DEI Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Khromova, A N; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Besch, H J; Plothow-Besch, H; 10.1109/NSSMIC.2004.1466758

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a novel 3D Monte Carlo photon transport program for simulation of multiple refractive scattering based on the refractive properties of X-rays in highly scattering media, like lung tissue. Multiple scattering reduces not only the quality of the image, but contains also information on the internal structure of the object. This information can be exploited utilizing image modalities such as Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). To study the effect of multiple scattering a Monte Carlo program was developed that simulates multiple refractive scattering of X-ray photons on monodisperse PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) microspheres representing alveoli in lung tissue. Eventually, the results of the Monte Carlo program were compared to the measurements taken at the SYRMEP beamline at Elettra (Trieste, Italy) on special phantoms showing a good agreement between both data.

  1. Specific features of measuring the optical power of artificial refractive and diffractive-refractive eye lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkova, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Methods for monitoring the optical power of artificial refractive eye lenses (intraocular lenses) based on measuring focal lengths in air and in medium are analyzed. The methods for determining the refraction of diffractive-refractive lenses (in particular, of MIOL-Akkord type), with allowance for the specific features of the diffractive structure, are considered. A computer simulation of the measurement of the focal length of MIOL-Akkord lenses is performed. The effective optical power of the diffractive component of these lenses is shown to depend on the diaphragm diameter. The optimal diaphragm diameter, at which spherical aberrations do not affect the position of foci, is found to be 3 mm. Possible errors in measuring the focal lengths are analyzed, and the necessary corrections that must be introduced into measurement results and calculations of refractions are determined.

  2. Polycapillary lenses for Soft-X-ray transmission: Model, comparison with experiments and potential application for tomographic measurements in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazon, D., E-mail: Didier.Mazon@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Abadie, Q. [Ecole Centrale de Marseille (France); Dorchies, F. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA, UMR5107, Talence 33405 (France); Lecherbourg, L. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA, UMR5107, Talence 33405 (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mollard, A. [ENSAM ParisTech (France); Malard, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dabagov, S. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi, 40, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    In tokamaks, plasma emits as a volumetric Soft-X-ray (SXR) source. Emitted X-rays can give very useful information about plasma stability, shape and impurity content. Measuring the Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation ([0.1–20 keV]) of magnetic fusion plasmas is a standard way of accessing valuable information on particle transport and MagnetoHydroDynamic. Generally, like at Tore Supra in France, the analysis is performed with a 2D tomographic system composed of several cameras equipped with detectors like Silicon Barrier Diodes spread in periphery of the tokamak. Unfortunately, the strong constraints imposed by the environment of a tokamak reactor (high neutron fluxes, gamma and hard X-ray emission, high magnetic field and high radiofrequency powers) do not authorize to install in a close vicinity of the machine such detectors. We have thus investigated the possibility of using polycapillary lenses to transport the SXR information to several meters from the plasma, not necessarily in a straight line. The idea is to protect the SXR detector from the entire environment by a proper shielding. Different polycapillary lenses could be used for that purpose and have been tested in collaboration with CELIA (CEA–CNRS) of Bordeaux. Transmission of the order of 20% where observed for the low energetic part of the spectrum (down to 3 keV) while still 10% were observed for the remaining part (from 3 to 10 keV). In parallel a model of polycapillary transmission has been developed and validated against experiment. Results are presented confirming the great potential of polycapillary lenses for SXR transmission in tokamak plasma. Studies of the influence of geometrical parameters like diameter and curvature of the channels, on the photons transmission is also presented.

  3. Polycapillary lenses for Soft-X-ray transmission: Model, comparison with experiments and potential application for tomographic measurements in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, D.; Abadie, Q.; Dorchies, F.; Lecherbourg, L.; Mollard, A.; Malard, P.; Dabagov, S.

    2015-07-01

    In tokamaks, plasma emits as a volumetric Soft-X-ray (SXR) source. Emitted X-rays can give very useful information about plasma stability, shape and impurity content. Measuring the Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation ([0.1-20 keV]) of magnetic fusion plasmas is a standard way of accessing valuable information on particle transport and MagnetoHydroDynamic. Generally, like at Tore Supra in France, the analysis is performed with a 2D tomographic system composed of several cameras equipped with detectors like Silicon Barrier Diodes spread in periphery of the tokamak. Unfortunately, the strong constraints imposed by the environment of a tokamak reactor (high neutron fluxes, gamma and hard X-ray emission, high magnetic field and high radiofrequency powers) do not authorize to install in a close vicinity of the machine such detectors. We have thus investigated the possibility of using polycapillary lenses to transport the SXR information to several meters from the plasma, not necessarily in a straight line. The idea is to protect the SXR detector from the entire environment by a proper shielding. Different polycapillary lenses could be used for that purpose and have been tested in collaboration with CELIA (CEA-CNRS) of Bordeaux. Transmission of the order of 20% where observed for the low energetic part of the spectrum (down to 3 keV) while still 10% were observed for the remaining part (from 3 to 10 keV). In parallel a model of polycapillary transmission has been developed and validated against experiment. Results are presented confirming the great potential of polycapillary lenses for SXR transmission in tokamak plasma. Studies of the influence of geometrical parameters like diameter and curvature of the channels, on the photons transmission is also presented.

  4. Testing of the Mirrors for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope with a Refractive Null

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehan, John; Hadimichael, T.; Skocik, C.

    2007-01-01

    We present an introduction to the use of a refractive null lens for testing grazing incidence x-ray mirrors for the Constellation-X mission. The singular role of mirror mounting in glass shell mirror metrology is also touched upon. We compare results achieved to date with mission requirements along with some of the unique properties of the null lens. Additionally, uses beyond mirror metrology are briefly discussed.

  5. Polycapillary lenses for soft x-ray transmission in ITER: Model, comparison with experiments, and potential application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, D.; Liegeard, C.; Jardin, A.; Barnsley, R.; Walsh, M.; O'Mullane, M.; Sirinelli, A.; Dorchies, F.

    2016-11-01

    Measuring Soft X-Ray (SXR) radiation [0.1 keV; 15 keV] in tokamaks is a standard way of extracting valuable information on the particle transport and magnetohydrodynamic activity. Generally, the analysis is performed with detectors positioned close to the plasma for a direct line of sight. A burning plasma, like the ITER deuterium-tritium phase, is too harsh an environment to permit the use of such detectors in close vicinity of the machine. We have thus investigated in this article the possibility of using polycapillary lenses in ITER to transport the SXR information several meters away from the plasma in the complex port-plug geometry.

  6. Polycapillary lenses for soft x-ray transmission in ITER: Model, comparison with experiments, and potential application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazon, D., E-mail: Didier.Mazon@cea.fr; Jardin, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Liegeard, C. [Ecole Polytechnique de Paris, Paris (France); Barnsley, R.; Walsh, M.; Sirinelli, A. [ITER Organization, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); O’Mullane, M. [Department of Physics SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG (United Kingdom); Dorchies, F. [University Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA, UMR5107, Talence 33405 (France)

    2016-11-15

    Measuring Soft X-Ray (SXR) radiation [0.1 keV; 15 keV] in tokamaks is a standard way of extracting valuable information on the particle transport and magnetohydrodynamic activity. Generally, the analysis is performed with detectors positioned close to the plasma for a direct line of sight. A burning plasma, like the ITER deuterium-tritium phase, is too harsh an environment to permit the use of such detectors in close vicinity of the machine. We have thus investigated in this article the possibility of using polycapillary lenses in ITER to transport the SXR information several meters away from the plasma in the complex port-plug geometry.

  7. Development of multilayer Laue Lenses for soft X-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, Tobias; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [Institut fuer Materialphysik, Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Reese, Michael; Grossmann, Peter; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen e.V. (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Despite the improvements of fabrication techniques for Fresnel zone plates as diffractive optics for X-ray microscopy, the spatial resolution with high diffraction efficiencies has reached a limit mostly. A novel approach to focusing soft X-rays in the water window regime (2.3-4.4 nm) is to prepare non-periodic multilayer structures using as 1-dimensional zone plates in Laue diffraction geometry. For this purpose ZrO{sub 2}/Ti multilayers were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on Si(111) substrates in ultrahigh vacuum. The interfaces within the multilayer are positioned according to the Fresnel zone plate law. In this contribution, results of the Laue Lens fabrication by focused ion beam (FIB) and lens characteristics measured by a table-top X-ray source are presented.

  8. CLASH-X: A Comparison of Lensing and X-ray Techniques for Measuring the Mass Profiles of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Megan; Mahdavi, Andisheh; Umetsu, Keiichi; Ettori, Stefano; Merten, Julian; Postman, Marc; Hoffer, Aaron; Baldi, Alessandro; Coe, Dan; Czakon, Nicole; Bartelmann, Mattias; Benitez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Ford, Holland; Gastaldello, Fabio; Grillo, Claudio; Infante, Leopoldo; Jouvel, Stephanie; Koekemoer, Anton; Kelson, Daniel; Lahav, Ofer; Lemze, Doron; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Molino, Alberto; Moustakas, John; Moustakas, Leonidas A; Nonino, Mario; Rosati, Piero; Sayers, Jack; Seitz, Stella; Van der Wel, Arjen; Zheng, Wei; Zitrin, Adi

    2014-01-01

    We present profiles of temperature, gas mass, and hydrostatic mass estimated from X-ray observations of CLASH clusters. We compare measurements from XMM and Chandra and compare both sets to CLASH gravitational lensing mass profiles. We find that Chandra and XMM measurements of electron density and enclosed gas mass as functions of radius are nearly identical, indicating that any differences in hydrostatic masses inferred from X-ray observations arise from differences in gas-temperature estimates. Encouragingly, gas temperatures measured in clusters by XMM and Chandra are consistent with one another at ~100 kpc radii but XMM temperatures systematically decline relative to Chandra temperatures as the radius of the temperature measurement increases. One plausible reason for this trend is large-angle scattering of soft X-ray photons in excess of that amount expected from the standard XMM PSF correction. We present the CLASH-X mass-profile comparisons in the form of cosmology-independent and redshift-independent c...

  9. CLASH-X: A comparison of lensing and X-ray techniques for measuring the mass profiles of galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. Mark; Hoffer, Aaron; Baldi, Alessandro [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Mahdavi, Andisheh [San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ettori, Stefano [INFN, Sezione di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Merten, Julian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bartelmann, Mattias [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Benitez, Narciso [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), C/Camino Bajo de Huétor 24, Granada E-18008 (Spain); Bouwens, Rychard [Leiden Observatories, Niels Bohrweb 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Broadhurst, Tom [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Ford, Holland [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gastaldello, Fabio [INAF-IASF, via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Grillo, Claudio [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Infante, Leopoldo, E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu [Dept Astronomía-Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, 22 Santiago (Chile); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present profiles of temperature, gas mass, and hydrostatic mass estimated from new and archival X-ray observations of CLASH clusters. We compare measurements derived from XMM and Chandra observations with one another and compare both to gravitational lensing mass profiles derived with CLASH Hubble Space Telescope and Subaru Telescope lensing data. Radial profiles of Chandra and XMM measurements of electron density and enclosed gas mass are nearly identical, indicating that differences in hydrostatic masses inferred from X-ray observations arise from differences in gas-temperature measurements. Encouragingly, gas temperatures measured in clusters by XMM and Chandra are consistent with one another at ∼100-200 kpc radii, but XMM temperatures systematically decline relative to Chandra temperatures at larger radii. The angular dependence of the discrepancy suggests that additional investigation on systematics such as the XMM point-spread function correction, vignetting, and off-axis responses is yet required. We present the CLASH-X mass-profile comparisons in the form of cosmology-independent and redshift-independent circular-velocity profiles. We argue that comparisons of circular-velocity profiles are the most robust way to assess mass bias. Ratios of Chandra hydrostatic equilibrium (HSE) mass profiles to CLASH lensing profiles show no obvious radial dependence in the 0.3-0.8 Mpc range. However, the mean mass biases inferred from the weak-lensing (WL) and SaWLens data are different. As an example, the weighted-mean value at 0.5 Mpc is (b) = 0.12 for the WL comparison and (b) = –0.11 for the SaWLens comparison. The ratios of XMM HSE mass profiles to CLASH lensing profiles show a pronounced radial dependence in the 0.3-1.0 Mpc range, with a weighted mean mass bias value rising to (b) ≳ 0.3 at ∼1 Mpc for the WL comparison and (b) ≈ 0.25 for the SaWLens comparison. The enclosed gas mass profiles from both Chandra and XMM rise to a value ≈1/8 times the total

  10. [Intraocular lenses for the correction of refraction errors. Part 1: phakic anterior chamber lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnen, T; Baumeister, M; Cichocki, M

    2005-10-01

    In this overview, the current status of intraocular lens surgery to correct refractive error is reviewed. The interventions are divided into additive surgery with intraocular lens implantation without extraction of the crystalline lens (phakic intraocular lens, PIOL) or the removal of the crystalline lens with implantation of an IOL (refractive lens exchange, RLE). Phakic IOLs are constructed as angle-supported or iris-fixated anterior chamber lenses and posterior chamber lenses that are fixated in the ciliary sulcus. The implantation of phakic IOLs has been demonstrated to be an effective, safe, predictable and stable procedure to correct higher refractive errors. Complications are rare and differ for the three types of PIOL; for anterior chamber lenses these are mainly pupil ovalization and endothelial cell loss.

  11. Extended formalism for simulating compound refractive lens-based x-ray microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, Hugh; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Detlefs, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive formalism for the simulation and optimisation of CRLs in both condensing and full-field imaging configurations. The approach extends ray transfer matrix analysis to account for x-ray attenuation by the lens material. Closed analytical expressions for critical imaging parameters such as numerical aperture, vignetting, chromatic aberration and focal length are provided for both thin- and thick-lens imaging geometries.

  12. Effect of single vision soft contact lenses on peripheral refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Fan, Yvonne; Oh, Kelly; Trac, Kevin; Zhang, Frank; Swarbrick, Helen

    2012-07-01

    To investigate changes in peripheral refraction with under-, full, and over-correction of central refraction with commercially available single vision soft contact lenses (SCLs) in young myopic adults. Thirty-four myopic adult subjects were fitted with Proclear Sphere SCLs to under-correct (+0.75 DS), fully correct, and over-correct (-0.75 DS) their manifest central refractive error. Central and peripheral refraction were measured with no lens wear and subsequently with different levels of SCL central refractive error correction. The uncorrected refractive error was myopic at all locations along the horizontal meridian. Peripheral refraction was relatively hyperopic compared to center at 30 and 35° in the temporal visual field (VF) in low myopes and at 30 and 35° in the temporal VF and 10, 30, and 35° in the nasal VF in moderate myopes. All levels of SCL correction caused a hyperopic shift in refraction at all locations in the horizontal VF. The smallest hyperopic shift was demonstrated with under-correction followed by full correction and then by over-correction of central refractive error. An increase in relative peripheral hyperopia was measured with full correction SCLs compared with no correction in both low and moderate myopes. However, no difference in relative peripheral refraction profiles were found between under-, full, and over-correction. Under-, full, and over-correction of central refractive error with single vision SCLs caused a hyperopic shift in both central and peripheral refraction at all positions in the horizontal meridian. All levels of SCL correction caused the peripheral retina, which initially experienced absolute myopic defocus at baseline with no correction, to experience absolute hyperopic defocus. This peripheral hyperopia may be a possible cause of myopia progression reported with different types and levels of myopia correction.

  13. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  14. Refractive lenses as a beam diagnostics tool for high-energy synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Weitkamp, T; Drakopoulos, M; Souvorov, A; Snigireva, I; Snigirev, A; Guenzler, F; Schrör, C; Lengeler, B

    2001-01-01

    Parabolic compound refractive lenses (CRLs) for hard X rays have been used to image the electron beam at undulator and bending-magnet beamlines at the ESRF. The measurements yield the shape and size of the synchrotron radiation source, and show that CRLs with paraboloid surface shape can be used as a beam diagnostics tool at high-energy electron storage rings. The optical resolution of the imaging setup can be as small as 4 mu m. This is smaller than typical values of the electron beam size in third-generation synchrotron sources. We report measurements at two ESRF beamlines and resolution calculations taking into account the properties of synchrotron radiation and the transmission characteristics of the CRLs used.

  15. The effect of multifocal soft contact lenses on peripheral refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Fan, Yvonne; Oh, Kelly; Trac, Kevin; Zhang, Frank; Swarbrick, Helen A

    2013-07-01

    To compare changes in peripheral refraction with single-vision (SV) and multifocal (MF) correction of distance central refraction with commercially available SV and MF soft contact lenses (SCLs) in young myopic adults. Thirty-four myopic adult subjects were fitted with Proclear Sphere and Proclear Multifocal SCLs to correct their manifest central refractive error. Central and peripheral refraction were measured with no lens wear and subsequently with the two different types of SCL correction. At baseline, refraction was myopic at all locations along the horizontal meridian. Peripheral refraction was relatively hyperopic compared with center at 30 and 35 degrees in the temporal visual field (VF) in low myopes, and at 30 and 35 degrees in the temporal VF, and 10, 30, and 35 degrees in the nasal VF in moderate myopes. Single-vision and MF distance correction with Proclear Sphere and Proclear Multifocal SCLs, respectively, caused a hyperopic shift in refraction at all locations in the horizontal VF. Compared with SV correction, MF SCL correction caused a significant relative myopic shift at all locations in the nasal VF in both low and moderate myopes and also at 35 degrees in the temporal VF in moderate myopes. Correction of central refractive error with SV and MF SCLs caused a hyperopic shift in both central and peripheral refraction at all positions in the horizontal meridian. Single-vision SCL correction caused the peripheral retina, which initially experienced absolute myopic defocus at baseline with no correction to experience an absolute hyperopic defocus. Multifocal SCL correction resulted in a relative myopic shift in peripheral refraction compared with SV SCL correction. This myopic shift may explain recent reports of reduced myopia progression rates with MF SCL correction.

  16. Origami with negative refractive index to generate super-lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenneau, Fanny; Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Guenneau, Sebastien; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2014-10-08

    Negative refractive index materials (NRIM) enable unique effects including superlenses with a high degree of sub-wavelength image resolution, a capability that stems from the ability of NRIM to support a host of surface plasmon states. Using a generalized lens theorem and the powerful tools of transformational optics, a variety of focusing configurations involving complementary positive and negative refractive index media can be generated. A paradigm of such complementary media are checkerboards that consist of alternating cells of positive and negative refractive index, and are associated with very singular electromagnetics. We present here a variety of multi-scale checkerboard lenses that we call origami lenses and investigate their electromagnetic properties both theoretically and computationally. Some of these meta-structures in the plane display thin bridges of complementary media, and this highly enhances their plasmonic response. We demonstrate the design of three-dimensional checkerboard meta-structures of complementary media using transformational optics to map the checkerboard onto three-dimensional corner lenses, the only restriction being that the corresponding unfolded structures in the plane are constrained by the four color-map theorem.

  17. Unveiling the Three-dimensional Structure of Galaxy Clusters: Resolving the Discrepancy Between X-ray and Lensing Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Andrea; Pedersen, Kristian; Limousin, Marceau

    2010-04-01

    We present the first determination of the intrinsic three-dimensional (3D) shapes and the physical parameters of both dark matter (DM) and intracluster medium (ICM) in a triaxial galaxy cluster. While most previous studies rely on the standard spherical modeling, our approach allows us to infer the properties of the non-spherical intracluster gas distribution sitting in hydrostatic equilibrium within triaxial DM halos by combining X-ray, weak-lensing, and strong-lensing observations. We present an application of our method to the galaxy cluster MACS J1423.8+2404. This source is an example of a well-relaxed object with a unimodal mass distribution, and we infer shape and physical properties of the ICM and the DM for this source. We found that this is a triaxial galaxy cluster with DM halo axial ratios 1.53 ± 0.15 and 1.44 ± 0.07 on the plane of the sky and along the line of sight, respectively. We show that accounting for the 3D geometry allows us to solve the long-standing discrepancy between galaxy cluster masses determined from X-ray and gravitational-lensing observations. We also focus on the determination of the inner slope of the DM density profile α, since the cuspiness of DM density profiles in the central regions is one of the critical tests of the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm for structure formation: we measure α = 0.94 ± 0.09 by accounting explicitly for the 3D structure for this cluster, a value that is close to the CDM predictions, while the standard spherical modeling leads to the biased value α = 1.24 ± 0.07. Our study proves that it is not possible to disprove the manifestation of the DM with ~0.25% of error in failing to reject the null hypothesis. Our findings provide further evidences that support the CDM scenario and open a new window in recovering the intrinsic shapes and desired physical parameters of galaxy clusters in a bias-free way. This has important consequences in using galaxy clusters as cosmological probes.

  18. Mathematical simulation of pressing X-ray lenses from nanocrystalline beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, V. V.; Shishov, I. A.; Glukhov, P. A.; Zabrodin, A. V.; Semenov, A. A.; Brylev, D. A.; Anikin, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    A computer model is developed to describe the pressing of a beryllium lens using the Deform software package. This model takes into account the rheological properties of beryllium and the deforming tool. The state of stress of a workpiece is determined at various stages of pressing, and the probability of fracture of nanocrystalline beryllium is estimated using the normalized Cockcroft-Latham criterion. The temperature dependence of the limiting values of the fracture criterion is found and used to choose the pressing conditions that exclude fracture of lenses.

  19. Correcting lateral chromatic aberrations in non-monochromatic X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falch, Ken Vidar; Detlefs, Carsten; Di Michiel, Marco; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.

    2016-08-01

    Lateral chromatic aberration in microscopy based on refractive optics may be reduced significantly by adjustments to the illumination scheme. By taking advantage of a broadened bandwidth illumination, the proposed scheme could open for x-ray microscopy with spatial resolution in the range 150-200 nm at millisecond frame rates. The scheme is readily implemented and is achievable using only standard refractive x-ray lenses, which has the advantage of high efficiency. It also maximizes the transmission and removes the spatial filtering effects associated with absorption in x-ray lenses.

  20. A Weak Lensing Study of X-ray Groups in the COSMOS survey: Form and Evolution of the Mass-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Leauthaud, A; Taylor, J E; Massey, R; Rhodes, J; Ilbert, O; Bundy, K; Tinker, J; George, M R; Capak, P; Koekemoer, A M; Johnston, D E; Cappelluti, N; Ellis, Richard S; Elvis, M; Heymans, C; Le Fèvre, O; Lilly, S; McCraken, H J; Mellier, Y; Réfrégier, A; Salvato, M; Scoville, N; Smoot, G; Tanaka, M; Van Waerbeke, L; Wolk, M

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of X-ray scaling laws are critical for improving cosmological constraints derived with the halo mass function and for understanding the physical processes that govern the heating and cooling of the intracluster medium. In this paper, we use a sample of 206 X-ray selected galaxy groups to investigate the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (Lx) and halo mass (M00) where M200 is derived via stacked weak gravitational lensing. This work draws upon a broad array of multi-wavelength COSMOS observations including 1.64 square degrees of contiguous imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and deep XMM-Newton/Chandra imaging. The combined depth of these two data-sets allows us to probe the lensing signals of X-ray detected structures at both higher redshifts and lower masses than previously explored. Weak lensing profiles and halo masses are derived for nine sub-samples, narrowly binned in luminosity and redshift. The COSMOS data alone are well fit by a power law, M200 ~ Lx^a, with a slope...

  1. Unveiling the three-dimensional structure of galaxy clusters: resolving the discrepancy between X-ray and lensing masses

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, A; Limousin, M

    2009-01-01

    [Abridged] We present the first determination of the intrinsic shapes and the physical parameters of both dark matter (DM) and intra-cluster medium (ICM) in a triaxial galaxy cluster. While most previous studies rely on the standard spherical modeling, our approach allows to infer the properties of the non-spherical intra-cluster gas distribution sitting in hydrostatic equilibrium within triaxial DM halos by combining X-ray, weak and strong lensing observations. We present an application of our method to the galaxy cluster MACS J1423.8+2404. This source is an example of a well relaxed object with a unimodal mass distribution and we infer shape and physical properties of the ICM and the DM for this source. We found that this is a triaxial galaxy cluster with DM halo axial ratios 1.53\\pm 0.15 and 1.44\\pm 0.07 on the plane of the sky and along the line of sight, respectively. We show that accounting for the three-dimensional geometry allows to solve the long-standing discrepancy between galaxy cluster masses det...

  2. Energy spectra of X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations in the Lense-Thirring precession model

    CERN Document Server

    Zycki, Piotr T; Ingram, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We model the energy dependence of a quasi periodic oscillation (QPOs) produced by Lense-Thirring precession of a hot inner flow. We use a fully 3-dimensional Monte-Carlo code to compute the Compton scattered flux produced by the hot inner flow intercepting seed photons from an outer truncated standard disc. The changing orientation of the precessing torus relative to the line of sight produces the observed modulation of the X-ray flux. We consider two scenarios of precession. First, we assume that the precession axis is perpendicular to the plane of the outer disc. In this scenario the relative geometry of the cold disc and the hot torus does not change during precession, so the emitted spectrum does not change, and the modulation is solely due to the changing viewing angle. In the second scenario the precession axis is tilted with respect to the outer disc plane. This leads to changes in the relative geometry of the hot flow and cold plasma, possibly resulting in variations of the plasma temperature and thus...

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction and refractive index analyses of Ti-doped lithium niobate (Ti:LiNbO3) nonlinear optical single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kumar; S Moorthy Babu; S Perero; Rajamaniccam L Sai; I Bhaumik; S Ganesamoorthy; A K Karnal

    2010-11-01

    Congruent LiNbO3 single crystals with Ti ion dopants (2 and 5 mol%) were successfully grown by Czochralski technique in the automatic diameter control facility. As-grown crystal boules were oriented into (0 0 1) direction cut and optically polished for all measurements. Influence of Ti-ion incorporation into LiNbO3 was studied by core level XPS analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on doped lithium niobate for phase identification. High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique was used to study the crystalline quality through full-width at half-maximum values. The refractive index values are more for doped samples than for pure sample as determined by prism coupling technique with different laser sources.

  4. Peripheral refraction with eye and head rotation with contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela P; Neves, Helena I F; Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Queirós, António; Fernandes, Paulo R B; González-Méijome, José M

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of eye and head rotation in the measurement of peripheral refraction with an open-field autorefractometer in myopic eyes wearing two different center-distance designs of multifocal contact lenses (MFCLs). Nineteen right eyes from 19 myopic patients (average central M ± SD = -2.67 ± 1.66 D) aged 20-27 years (mean ± SD = 23.2 ± 3.3 years) were evaluated using a Grand-Seiko autorefractometer. Patients were fitted with one multifocal aspheric center-distance contact lens (Biofinity Multifocal D(®)) and with one multi-concentric MFCL (Acuvue Oasys for Presbyopia). Axial and peripheral refraction were evaluated by eye rotation and by head rotation under naked eye condition and with each MFCL fitted randomly and in independent sessions. For the naked eye, refractive pattern (M, J0 and J45) across the central 60° of the horizontal visual field values did not show significant changes measured by rotating the eye or rotating the head (p > 0.05). Similar results were obtained wearing the Biofinity D, for both testing methods, no obtaining significant differences to M, J0 and J45 values (p > 0.05). For Acuvue Oasys for presbyopia, also no differences were found when comparing measurements obtained by eye and head rotation (p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis did not showed a significant interaction between testing method and lens type neither with measuring locations (MANOVA, p > 0.05). There were significant differences in M and J0 values between naked eyes and each MFCL. Measurements of peripheral refraction by rotating the eye or rotating the head in myopic patients wearing dominant design or multi-concentric multifocal silicone hydrogel contact lens are comparable. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Polymeric nanolayered gradient refractive index lenses: technology review and introduction of spherical gradient refractive index ball lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shanzuo; Yin, Kezhen; Mackey, Matthew; Brister, Aaron; Ponting, Michael; Baer, Eric

    2013-11-01

    A nanolayered polymer films approach to designing and fabricating gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses with designer refractive index distribution profiles and an independently prescribed lens surface geometry have been demonstrated to produce a new class of optics. This approach utilized nanolayered polymer materials, constructed with polymethylmethacrylate and a styrene-co-acrylonitrile copolymer with a tailorable refractive index intermediate to bulk materials, to fabricate discrete GRIN profile materials. A process to fabricate nanolayered polymer GRIN optics from these materials through thermoforming and finishing steps is reviewed. A collection of technology-demonstrating previously reported nanolayered GRIN case studies is presented that include: (1) the optical performance of a f/# 2.25 spherical GRIN plano-convex singlet with one quarter (2) the weight of a similar BK7 lens and a bio-inspired aspheric human eye GRIN lens. Original research on the fabrication and characterization of a Luneburg inspired GRIN ball lens is presented as a developing application of the nanolayered polymer technology.

  6. The discovery of lensed radio and X-ray sources behind the Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 with the JVLA and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Jones, C; Forman, W R; Andrade-Santos, F; Bonafede, A; Brüggen, M; Bulbul, E; Clarke, T E; Churazov, E; David, L; Dawson, W A; Donahue, M; Goulding, A; Kraft, R P; Mason, B; Merten, J; Mroczkowski, T; Murray, S S; Nulsen, P E J; Rosati, P; Roediger, E; Randall, S W; Sayers, J; Umetsu, K; Vikhlinin, A; Zitrin, A

    2015-01-01

    We report on high-resolution JVLA and Chandra observations of the HST Frontier Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. MACS J0717.5+3745 offers the largest contiguous magnified area of any known cluster, making it a promising target to search for lensed radio and X-ray sources. With the high-resolution 1.0-6.5 GHz JVLA imaging in A and B configuration, we detect a total of 51 compact radio sources within the area covered by the HST imaging. Within this sample we find 7 lensed sources with amplification factors larger than $2$. None of these sources are identified as multiply-lensed. Based on the radio luminosities, the majority of these sources are likely star forming galaxies with star formation rates of 10-50 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ located at $1 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 2$. Two of the lensed radio sources are also detected in the Chandra image of the cluster. These two sources are likely AGN, given their $2-10$ keV X-ray luminosities of $\\sim 10^{43-44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. From the derived radio luminosity function, we find evidence...

  7. Constraining the Scatter in the Mass-Richness Relation of maxBCG Clusters With Weak Lensing and X-ray Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U.; McKay, Timothy; /Michigan U.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Hao, Jiangang; /Michigan U.; Hansen, Sarah; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin; /New York U.; Johnston, David; /Houston U.; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2009-08-03

    We measure the logarithmic scatter in mass at fixed richness for clusters in the maxBCG cluster catalog, an optically selected cluster sample drawn from SDSS imaging data. Our measurement is achieved by demanding consistency between available weak lensing and X-ray measurements of the maxBCG clusters, and the X-ray luminosity-mass relation inferred from the 400d X-ray cluster survey, a flux limited X-ray cluster survey. We find {sigma}{sub lnM|N{sub 200}} = 0.45{sub -0.18}{sup +0.20} (95%CL) at N{sub 200} {approx} 40, where N{sub 200} is the number of red sequence galaxies in a cluster. As a byproduct of our analysis, we also obtain a constraint on the correlation coefficient between lnL{sub X} and lnM at fixed richness, which is best expressed as a lower limit, r{sub L,M|N} {ge} 0.85 (95% CL). This is the first observational constraint placed on a correlation coefficient involving two different cluster mass tracers. We use our results to produce a state of the art estimate of the halo mass function at z = 0.23 - the median redshift of the maxBCG cluster sample - and find that it is consistent with the WMAP5 cosmology. Both the mass function data and its covariance matrix are presented.

  8. Constraining the Scatter in the Mass-Richness Relation of maxBCG Clusters With Weak Lensing and X-ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Rozo, Eduardo; Evrard, August; Becker, Matthew; McKay, Timothy; Wechsler, Risa H; Koester, Benjamin P; Hao, Jiangang; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    We measure the logarithmic scatter in mass at fixed richness for clusters in the maxBCG cluster catalog, an optically selected cluster sample drawn from SDSS imaging data. Our measurement is achieved by demanding consistency between available weak lensing and X-ray measurements of the maxBCG clusters, and the X-ray luminosity--mass relation inferred from the 400d X-ray cluster survey, a flux limited X-ray cluster survey. We find \\sigma_{\\ln M|N_{200}}=0.45^{+0.20}_{-0.18} (95% CL) at N_{200} ~ 40, where N_{200} is the number of red sequence galaxies in a cluster. As a byproduct of our analysis, we also obtain a constraint on the correlation coefficient between \\ln Lx and \\ln M at fixed richness, which is best expressed as a lower limit, r_{L,M|N} >= 0.85 (95% CL). This is the first observational constraint placed on a correlation coefficient involving two different cluster mass tracers. We use our results to produce a state of the art estimate of the halo mass function at z=0.23 -- the median redshift of the ...

  9. The Dark Matter Halos of Moderate Luminosity X-ray AGN as Determined from Weak Gravitational Lensing and Host Stellar Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Leauthaud, A; Civano, F; Coil, A L; Bundy, K; Massey, R; Schramm, M; Schulze, A; Capak, P; Elvis, M; Kulier, A; Rhodes, J

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the dark matter halos in which they reside is key to constraining how black-hole fueling is triggered and regulated. Previous efforts have relied on simple halo mass estimates inferred from clustering, weak gravitational lensing, or halo occupation distribution modeling. In practice, these approaches remain uncertain because AGN, no matter how they are identified, potentially live a wide range of halo masses with an occupation function whose general shape and normalization are poorly known. In this work, we show that better constraints can be achieved through a rigorous comparison of the clustering, lensing, and cross-correlation signals of AGN hosts to a fiducial stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) derived for all galaxies. Our technique exploits the fact that the global SHMR can be measured with much higher accuracy than any statistic derived from AGN samples alone. Using 382 moderate luminosity X-ray AGN at z<1 fro...

  10. A simple non destructive method for the determination of the refractive indices of finished lenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ramakrishna Rao

    1962-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid method for the determination of the refractive indices of finished lenses has been described which depends upon immersion refractometry. Observations taken on some lenses of known material to establish the validity of the method have also been reported.

  11. Mass, shape and thermal properties of A1689 by a multi-wavelength X-ray, lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, Mauro; Umetsu, Keiichi; Baldi, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of mass and concentration of galaxy clusters is crucial to understand their formation and evolution. Unbiased estimates require the understanding of the shape and orientation of the halo as well as its equilibrium status. We propose a novel method to determine the intrinsic properties of galaxy clusters from a multi-wavelength data set spanning from X-ray spectroscopic and photometric data to gravitational lensing to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZe). The method relies on two quite non informative geometrical assumptions: the distributions of total matter or gas are approximately ellipsoidal and co-aligned; they have different, constant axial ratios but share the same degree of triaxiality. Weak and strong lensing probe the features of the total mass distribution in the plane of the sky. X-ray data measure size and orientation of the gas in the plane of the sky. Comparison with the SZ amplitude fixes the elongation of the gas along the line of sight. These constraints are deprojected thanks to Bay...

  12. Determination of refractive indices of biconvex lenses by use of a Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhaniwal, Vani K; Anand, Arun; Narayanamurthy, C S

    2006-06-10

    Measurements of lens parameters such as focal length, radius of curvature, and refractive index are important. We describe a measurement method that utilizes a Michelson interferometer to determine parameters of thin, convex lenses. The real fringe system formed by a Michelson interferometer is used to determine the focal lengths and the radii of curvature of the lenses. The refractive index of the lens material is determined from the thin-lens formula. We were able to determine the refractive indices to an accuracy as great as 99.97%. A detailed theoretical and experimental analysis is given.

  13. Tunable plasmon lensing in graphene-based structure exhibiting negative refraction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Shifeng; Lu, Yanxin; Li, Chao; Xu, Haixia; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve tunable plasmon focusing in graphene/photonic-crystal hybrid structure exhibiting all-angle negative refraction at terahertz frequencies. A two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods is constructed on the substrate of a graphene sheet to provide the hyperbolic dispersion relations of the graphene plasmon, giving rise to the all-angle plasmonic negative refraction. Plasmon lensing induced from the negative refraction is...

  14. The Structure of the X-ray and Optical Emitting Regions of the Lensed Quasar Q 2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Mosquera, A M; Chen, B; Dai, X; Blackburne, J A; Chartas, G

    2013-01-01

    We use gravitational microlensing to determine the size of the X-ray and optical emission regions of the quadruple lens system Q 2237+0305. The optical half-light radius, log(R_{1/2,V}/cm)=16.41\\pm0.18 (at lambda_{rest}=2018 \\AA), is significantly larger than the observed soft, log(R_{1/2,soft}/cm)=15.76^{+0.41}_{-0.34} (1.1-3.5 keV in the rest frame), and hard, log(R_{1/2,hard}/cm)=15.46^{+0.34}_{-0.29} (3.5-21.5 keV in the rest frame), band X-ray emission. There is a weak evidence that the hard component is more compact than the soft, with log(R_{1/2,soft}/R_{1/2,hard}) \\sim 0.30^{+0.53}_{-0.45}. This wavelength-dependent structure agrees with recent results found in other lens systems using microlensing techniques, and favors geometries in which the corona is concentrated near the inner edge of the accretion disk. While the available measurements are limited, the size of the X-ray emission region appears to be roughly proportional to the mass of the central black hole.

  15. A Weak Lensing Study of X-ray Groups in the Cosmos Survey: Form and Evolution of the Mass-Luminosity Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Taylor, James E.; Massey, Richard; Rhodes, Jason; Ilbert, Olivier; Bundy, Kevin; Tinker, Jeremy; George, Matthew R.; Capak, Peter; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Johnston, David E.; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Cappelluti, Nico; Ellis, Richard S.; Elvis, Martin; Giodini, Stefania; Heymans, Catherine; Le Fèvre, Oliver; Lilly, Simon; McCracken, Henry J.; Mellier, Yannick; Réfrégier, Alexandre; Salvato, Mara; Scoville, Nick; Smoot, George; Tanaka, Masayuki; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Wolk, Melody

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of X-ray scaling laws are critical for improving cosmological constraints derived with the halo mass function and for understanding the physical processes that govern the heating and cooling of the intracluster medium. In this paper, we use a sample of 206 X-ray-selected galaxy groups to investigate the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L X) and halo mass (M 200) where M 200 is derived via stacked weak gravitational lensing. This work draws upon a broad array of multi-wavelength COSMOS observations including 1.64 degrees2 of contiguous imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to a limiting magnitude of I F814W = 26.5 and deep XMM-Newton/Chandra imaging to a limiting flux of 1.0 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. The combined depth of these two data sets allows us to probe the lensing signals of X-ray-detected structures at both higher redshifts and lower masses than previously explored. Weak lensing profiles and halo masses are derived for nine sub-samples, narrowly binned in luminosity and redshift. The COSMOS data alone are well fit by a power law, M 200 vprop (L X)α, with a slope of α = 0.66 ± 0.14. These results significantly extend the dynamic range for which the halo masses of X-ray-selected structures have been measured with weak gravitational lensing. As a result, tight constraints are obtained for the slope of the M-L X relation. The combination of our group data with previously published cluster data demonstrates that the M-L X relation is well described by a single power law, α = 0.64 ± 0.03, over two decades in mass, M 200 ~ 1013.5-1015.5 h -1 72 M sun. These results are inconsistent at the 3.7σ level with the self-similar prediction of α = 0.75. We examine the redshift dependence of the M-L X relation and find little evidence for evolution beyond the rate predicted by self-similarity from z ~ 0.25 to z ~ 0.8. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope

  16. [Intraocular lenses for the correction of refraction errors. Part II. Phakic posterior chamber lenses and refractive lens exchange with posterior chamber lens implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnen, T; Kasper, T; Terzi, E

    2005-11-01

    In this overview, the current status of intraocular lens surgery to correct refractive error is reviewed. The interventions are divided into additive surgery with intraocular lens implantation without extraction of the crystalline lens (phakic intraocular lens, PIOL) or removal of the crystalline lens with implantation of an IOL (refractive lens exchange, RLE). Phakic IOLs are constructed as angle-supported or iris-fixated anterior chamber lenses and posterior chamber lenses which are fixated in the ciliary sulcus. The implantation of phakic IOLs has been demonstrated to be an effective, safe, predictable and stable procedure to correct higher refractive errors. Complications are rare and differ for the three types of PIOL; for posterior chamber lenses these are mainly cataract formation and pigment dispersion. RLE is preferable in cases of high ametropia in which the natural lens has lost its accommodative effect. The main complications for myopic RLA include retinal detachment, while hyperopic refractive lens exchange may be associated with surgical problems in the narrower anterior eye segment.

  17. Tomographic x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, C. G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Gunzler, T. F.; Lengeler, B.; Richwin, M.; Griesebock, B.; Lutzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Ziegler, E.; Mashayekhi, A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Grunwaldt, J. -D.; Baiker, A.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Aachen Univ.; HASYLAB at DESY; Bergische Univ. Wuppertal; ESRF; Inst. for Chemical and Bioengineering

    2004-01-01

    Hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy is combined with scanning microtomography to reconstruct full near edge spectra of an elemental species at each point on an arbitrary virtual section through a sample. These spectra reveal the local concentration of different chemical compounds of the absorbing element inside the sample and give insight into the oxidation state and the local projected free density of states. The method is implemented by combining a quick scanning monochromator and data acquisition system with a scanning microprobe setup based on refractive x-ray lenses. The full XANES spectra reconstructed at each point of the tomographic slice allow one to detect slight variations in concentration of the chemical compounds, such as Cu and Cu(I){sub 2}O.

  18. Comparing Masses in Literature (CoMaLit)-I. Bias and scatter in weak lensing and X-ray mass estimates of clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The first building block for using galaxy clusters in astrophysics and cosmology is an accurate determination of their mass, which can be estimated with weak lensing (WL) determinations or X-ray analyses assuming hydrostatic equilibrium (HE). By comparing the two mass proxies in well observed samples of rich clusters, we determined the intrinsic scatters, sigma_{WL}~15 per cent for WL masses and sigma_{HE}~25 per cent for HE masses. The certain assessment of the bias is hampered by differences as large as ~40 per cent in either WL or HE mass estimates reported by different groups. If the scatter in the mass proxy is not considered, the slope of any scaling relation `mass--observable' is biased towards shallower values, whereas the intrinsic scatter of the scaling is over-estimated.

  19. JOINT ANALYSIS OF CLUSTER OBSERVATIONS. II. CHANDRA/XMM-NEWTON X-RAY AND WEAK LENSING SCALING RELATIONS FOR A SAMPLE OF 50 RICH CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, Andisheh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94131 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Babul, Arif; Bildfell, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Jeltema, Tesla [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Henry, J. Patrick [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    We present a study of multiwavelength X-ray and weak lensing scaling relations for a sample of 50 clusters of galaxies. Our analysis combines Chandra and XMM-Newton data using an energy-dependent cross-calibration. After considering a number of scaling relations, we find that gas mass is the most robust estimator of weak lensing mass, yielding 15% {+-} 6% intrinsic scatter at r{sub 500}{sup WL} (the pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} yields a consistent scatter of 22% {+-} 5%). The scatter does not change when measured within a fixed physical radius of 1 Mpc. Clusters with small brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) to X-ray peak offsets constitute a very regular population whose members have the same gas mass fractions and whose even smaller (<10%) deviations from regularity can be ascribed to line of sight geometrical effects alone. Cool-core clusters, while a somewhat different population, also show the same (<10%) scatter in the gas mass-lensing mass relation. There is a good correlation and a hint of bimodality in the plane defined by BCG offset and central entropy (or central cooling time). The pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} does not discriminate between the more relaxed and less relaxed populations, making it perhaps the more even-handed mass proxy for surveys. Overall, hydrostatic masses underestimate weak lensing masses by 10% on the average at r{sub 500}{sup WL}; but cool-core clusters are consistent with no bias, while non-cool-core clusters have a large and constant 15%-20% bias between r{sub 2500}{sup WL} and r{sub 500}{sup WL}, in agreement with N-body simulations incorporating unthermalized gas. For non-cool-core clusters, the bias correlates well with BCG ellipticity. We also examine centroid shift variance and power ratios to quantify substructure; these quantities do not correlate with residuals in the scaling relations. Individual clusters have for the most part forgotten the source of their departures from self-similarity.

  20. Refractive surgery or contact lenses – how and when to decide?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Kunyong Xu1, Vishal Jhanji2 1Michael G DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Abstract: Correction of refractive errors can be achieved with spectacles, contact lenses, and refractive surgery. The past decade has seen a surge in the availability of alternatives for patients and surgeons in terms of both surgical and nonsurgical options for the management of refractive errors. Newer generation contact lenses provide enhanced safety and better handling, whereas modern-day refractive surgery presents a plethora of choices based on the clinical characteristics and requirements of patients. We have moved from an era of "one size fits all" to a purely customized way of treating patients with refractive errors. This review presents the background, advantages, and disadvantages of the two most commonly used options for correction of ametropia, ie, contact lenses and refractive surgery. Keywords: laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, contact lens, patient selection, complications, outcomes

  1. Hard x-ray broad band Laue lenses (80 - 600 keV): building methods and performances

    CERN Document Server

    Virgilli, E; Rosati, P; Liccardo, V; Squerzanti, S; Carassiti, V; Caroli, E; Auricchio, N; Stephen, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present the status of the laue project devoted to develop a technology for building a 20 meter long focal length Laue lens for hard x-/soft gamma-ray astronomy (80 - 600 keV). The Laue lens is composed of bent crystals of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs, 220) and Germanium (Ge, 111), and, for the first time, the focusing property of bent crystals has been exploited for this field of applications. We show the preliminary results concerning the adhesive employed to fix the crystal tiles over the lens support, the positioning accuracy obtained and possible further improvements. The Laue lens petal that will be completed in a few months has a pass band of 80 - 300 keV and is a fraction of an entire Laue lens capable of focusing X-rays up to 600 keV, possibly extendable down to 20 - 30 keV with suitable low absorption crystal materials and focal length. The final goal is to develop a focusing optics that can improve the sensitivity over current telescopes in this energy band by 2 orders of magnitude.

  2. Non-invasive airway health measurement using synchrotron x-ray microscopy of high refractive index glass microbeads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelley, Martin, E-mail: martin.donnelley@adelaide.edu.au; Farrow, Nigel; Parsons, David [Respiratory & Sleep Medicine, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Robinson Research Institute, University of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Morgan, Kaye; Siu, Karen [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-01-28

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a gene defect that compromises the ability of the mucociliary transit (MCT) system to clear the airways of debris and pathogens. To directly characterise airway health and the effects of treatments we have developed a synchrotron X-ray microscopy method that non-invasively measures the local rate and patterns of MCT behaviour. Although the nasal airways of CF mice exhibit the CF pathophysiology, there is evidence that nasal MCT is not altered in CF mice1. The aim of this experiment was to determine if our non-invasive local airway health assessment method could identify differences in nasal MCT rate between normal and CF mice, information that is potentially lost in bulk MCT measurements. Experiments were performed on the BL20XU beamline at the SPring-8 Synchrotron in Japan. Mice were anaesthetized, a small quantity of micron-sized marker particles were delivered to the nose, and images of the nasal airways were acquired for 15 minutes. The nasal airways were treated with hypertonic saline or mannitol to increase surface hydration and MCT. Custom software was used to locate and track particles and calculate individual and bulk MCT rates. No statistically significant differences in MCT rate were found between normal and CF mouse nasal airways or between treatments. However, we hope that the improved sensitivity provided by this technique will accelerate the ability to identify useful CF lung disease-modifying interventions in small animal models, and enhance the development and efficacy of proposed new therapies.

  3. An x-ray scattering study into the structural basis of corneal refractive function in an avian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Siân R; Dooley, Erin P; Hocking, Paul M; Inglehearn, Chris F; Ali, Manir; Sorensen, Thomas L-M; Meek, Keith M; Boote, Craig

    2013-06-18

    Avian vision diseases in which eye growth is compromised are helping to define what governs corneal shape and ultrastructural organization. The highly specific collagen architecture of the main corneal layer, the stroma, is believed to be important for the maintenance of corneal curvature and hence visual quality. Blindness enlarged globe (beg) is a recessively inherited condition of chickens characterized by retinal dystrophy and blindness at hatch, with secondary globe enlargement and loss of corneal curvature by 3-4 months. Here we define corneal ultrastructural changes as the beg eye develops posthatch, using wide-angle x-ray scattering to map collagen fibril orientation across affected corneas at three posthatch time points. The results disclosed alterations in the bulk alignment of corneal collagen in beg chicks compared with age-matched controls. These changes accompanied the eye globe enlargement and corneal flattening observed in affected birds, and were manifested as a progressive loss of circumferential collagen alignment in the peripheral cornea and limbus in birds older than 1 month. Progressive remodeling of peripheral stromal collagen in beg birds posthatch may relate to the morphometric changes exhibited by the disease, likely as an extension of myopia-like scleral remodeling triggered by deprivation of a retinal image.

  4. Recent developments in hard X-ray tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, C; Snigirev, A; Schrör, C; Tümmler, J; Lengeler, B

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for magnified hard X-ray tomography using compound refractive lenses (CRLs) has been tested. A full-field X-ray microscope was included into a conventional microtomography setup at a synchrotron undulator beamline. Experiments were carried out at 19.7 keV with a monochromatic beam as well as with the so-called 'pink' beam using a larger energy bandwidth. During this pilot experiment a resolution of about 1 mu m was already achieved, which corresponds to the best resolution obtained with phase-contrast enhanced microtomography. The technique has the potential to increase the spatial resolution of hard-X-ray microtomography to a scale of several hundred nanometers.

  5. Mass, shape and thermal properties of Abell 1689 using a multiwavelength X-ray, lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, Mauro; Ettori, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Baldi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the mass and concentration of galaxy clusters is crucial for an understanding of their formation and evolution. Unbiased estimates require an understanding of the shape and orientation of the halo as well as its equilibrium status. We propose a novel method to determine the intrinsic properties of galaxy clusters from a multiwavelength data set, spanning from X-ray spectroscopic and photometric data to gravitational lensing to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The method relies on two non-informative geometrical assumptions: the distributions of total matter or gas are approximately ellipsoidal and co-aligned; they have different, constant axial ratios but share the same degree of triaxiality. Weak and strong lensing probe the features of the total mass distribution in the plane of the sky. X-ray data measure the size and orientation of the gas in the plane of the sky. Comparison with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich amplitude fixes the elongation of the gas along the line of sight. These constraints are deprojected as a result of Bayesian inference. The mass distribution is described as a Navarro-Frenk-White halo with arbitrary orientation, and the gas density and temperature are modelled with parametric profiles. We have applied the method to Abell 1689. Independently of the priors, the cluster is massive, M200 = (1.3 ± 0.2) × 1015 M⊙, and overconcentrated, c200 = 8 ± 1, but it is still consistent with theoretical predictions. The total matter is triaxial (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.5 ± 0.1, exploiting priors from N-body simulations) with the major axis nearly orientated along the line of sight. The gas is rounder (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.6 ± 0.1) and deviates from hydrostatic equilibrium. The contribution of non-thermal pressure is ˜20-50 per cent in the inner regions, ≲ 300 kpc, and ˜25 ± 5 per cent at ˜1.5 Mpc. This picture of A1689 was obtained with a small number of assumptions and in a single framework, suitable for application to a

  6. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angélica M V; Barros, Paulo S M; Morelhão, Sérgio L

    2006-07-01

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength lambda=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  7. Simulation of imperfections in plastic lenses - transferring local refractive index changes into surface shape modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasa, Josep; Pizarro, Carles; Blanco, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Injection molded plastic lenses have continuously improved their performance regarding optical quality and nowadays are as usual as glass lenses in image forming devices. However, during the manufacturing process unavoidable fluctuations in material density occur, resulting in local changes in the distribution of refractive index, which degrade the imaging properties of the polymer lens. Such material density fluctuations correlate to phase delays, which opens a path for their mapping. However, it is difficult to transfer the measured variations in refractive index into conventional optical simulation tool. Thus, we propose a method to convert the local variations in refractive index into local changes of one surface of the lens, which can then be described as a free-form surface, easy to introduce in conventional simulation tools. The proposed method was tested on a commercial gradient index (GRIN) lens for a set of six different object positions, using the MTF sagittal and tangential cuts to compare the differences between the real lens and a lens with homogenous refractive index, and the last surface converted into a free-form shape containing the internal refractive index changes. The same procedure was used to reproduce the local refractive index changes of an injected plastic lens with local index changes measured using an in-house built polariscopic arrangement, showing the capability of the method to provide successful results.

  8. Peripheral refraction in myopic children wearing orthokeratology and gas-permeable lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Swarbrick, Helen

    2011-04-01

    To investigate changes in peripheral refraction after orthokeratology (OK) and rigid gas-permeable (GP) lens wear in progressing myopic children and to compare these peripheral defocus changes with reported changes in adults wearing OK. Sixteen myopic children subjects were fitted with an OK lens in one eye for overnight wear and a GP lens in the other eye for daily wear. Central and peripheral refraction were measured at baseline and then after 3 mo of lens wear. At baseline, myopic children showed relative peripheral hyperopia compared with central refraction at and beyond 20° in the temporal visual field (VF) and 30° in the nasal VF. Three months of OK lens wear produced hyperopic shifts in refraction between 30° in the temporal VF and 20° in the nasal VF. Peripheral refraction was similar to center at all positions in the temporal VF while remaining significantly myopic at all locations in the nasal VF. No change in either central or peripheral refraction was found after 3 mo in the eye assigned for GP lens wear. OK significantly reduced myopia in the central 20° VF in myopic children, converting relative peripheral hyperopia measured at baseline to relative peripheral myopia. These changes in children are similar to changes reported in myopic adults wearing OK lenses. No change in either central or peripheral refraction was found after 3 mo of daily GP lens wear. OK lenses can be used to induce myopic defocus in the periphery in myopic children and may thus provide a potential mechanism for myopia control.

  9. Tunable plasmon lensing in graphene-based structure exhibiting negative refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shifeng; Lu, Yanxin; Li, Chao; Xu, Haixia; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2017-02-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve tunable plasmon focusing in graphene/photonic-crystal hybrid structure exhibiting all-angle negative refraction at terahertz frequencies. A two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods is constructed on the substrate of a graphene sheet to provide the hyperbolic dispersion relations of the graphene plasmon, giving rise to the all-angle plasmonic negative refraction. Plasmon lensing induced from the negative refraction is observed. We show that the ultracompact graphene-based system can produce sub-diffraction-limited images with the resolution significant smaller than the wavelength of the incident terahertz wave. Moreover, by adjusting the Fermi energy of the graphene, the imaging performance of the proposed system can remain almost invariant for different frequencies. Our results may find applications in diverse fields such as subwavelength spatial light manipulation, biological imaging, and so forth.

  10. Tunable plasmon lensing in graphene-based structure exhibiting negative refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shifeng; Lu, Yanxin; Li, Chao; Xu, Haixia; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve tunable plasmon focusing in graphene/photonic-crystal hybrid structure exhibiting all-angle negative refraction at terahertz frequencies. A two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods is constructed on the substrate of a graphene sheet to provide the hyperbolic dispersion relations of the graphene plasmon, giving rise to the all-angle plasmonic negative refraction. Plasmon lensing induced from the negative refraction is observed. We show that the ultracompact graphene-based system can produce sub-diffraction-limited images with the resolution significant smaller than the wavelength of the incident terahertz wave. Moreover, by adjusting the Fermi energy of the graphene, the imaging performance of the proposed system can remain almost invariant for different frequencies. Our results may find applications in diverse fields such as subwavelength spatial light manipulation, biological imaging, and so forth. PMID:28150750

  11. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  12. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  13. A Unified Lense-Thirring Precession Model for Optical and X-Ray Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Black Hole Binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veledina, A.; Poutanen, J.; Ingram, A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations of accreting black holes reveal the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) in the optical power density spectra. The corresponding oscillation periods match those found in X-rays, implying a common origin. Among the numerous suggested X-ray QPO mechanisms, some may also wo

  14. Peripheral refraction with dominant design multifocal contact lenses in young myopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Neves, Helena; Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Queirós, António; Villa-Collar, César; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to show the potential of a commercial center-distance multifocal soft contact lens to induce relative peripheral myopic defocus in myopic eyes. Methods Twenty-eight myopic right eyes from 28 patients (mean age: 22.0 ± 2.0 years) were evaluated. The measurements of axial and off-axis refraction were made using a Grand-Seiko WAM-5500 open-field autorefractometer without lens and with multifocal contact lenses (Proclear Multifocal D® Design) of +2.00 D and +3.00 D add power applied randomly. Central mean spherical equivalent refraction was −2.24 ± 1.33 D. Ocular refraction was measured at center and at eccentricities between 35° nasal and 35° temporal (in 5° steps). Results Baseline relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) as spherical equivalent (M) was −0.69 ± 1.14 D and −0.46 ± 1.38 D at 35° in the nasal and temporal degrees of visual field, respectively. Both add powers increased the relative peripheral myopic defocus up to −0.82 ± 1.23 D (p = 0.002) and −1.42 ± 1.45 D (p < 0.001) at 35° in the nasal field; and −0.87 ± 1.42 D (p = 0.003) and −2.00 ± 1.48 D (p < 0.001) at 35° in the temporal retina with +2.00 D and +3.00 D add lenses, respectively. Differences between +2.00 and +3.00 D add lenses were statistically significant beyond 20° in the nasal visual field and 10° in the temporal visual field. Conclusion It is possible to induce significant changes in the pattern of relative peripheral refraction in the myopic direction with commercially available dominant design multifocal contact lenses. The higher add (+3.00 D) induced an significantly higher effect than the +2.00 D add lens, although an increase of 1 D in add power does not correspond to the same amount of increase in RPRE.

  15. Peripheral refraction with different designs of progressive soft contact lenses in myopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinjawi, Kareem; Sharanjeet-Kaur, Sharanjeet-Kaur; Akhir, Saadah Mohamed; Mutalib, Haliza Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in relative peripheral refractive error produced by two different designs of progressive soft contact lenses in myopic schoolchildren. Methods: Twenty-seven myopic schoolchildren age between 13 to 15 years were included in this study. The measurements of central and peripheral refraction were made using a Grand-Seiko WR-5100K open-field autorefractometer without correction (baseline), and two different designs of progressive contact lenses (PCLs) (Multistage from SEED & Proclear from Cooper Vision) with an addition power of +1.50 D. Refractive power was measured at center and at eccentricities between 35º temporal to 35º nasal visual field (in 5º steps). Results: Both PCLs showed a reduction in hyperopic defocus at periphery. However, this reduction was only significant for the Multistage PCL (p= 0.015), (Proclear PCL p= 0.830).  Conclusion: Multistage PCLs showed greater reduction in peripheral retinal hyperopic defocus among myopic schoolchildren in comparison to Proclear PCLs.

  16. Experimental characterization of X-ray transverse coherence in the presence of beam transport optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chubar, O.; Fluerasu, A.; Chu, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    be significantly affected by the new shape of the focused beam phase-space. At the same time, optical element imperfections still have a negative impact on the transverse coherence. In such situations, which are frequently encountered in experiments at beamlines, the quantitative interpretation of a measured...... propagation based simulations show, in particular, that new generation 1D Beryllium Compound Refractive Lenses [3, 4] do not reduce the X-ray transverse coherence in any significant manner. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd....

  17. X-ray Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, H; Guigay, J P; Detlefs, C

    2016-01-01

    Following the recent developement of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) in the visible range by Zheng et al. (2013), we propose an adaptation for hard x-rays. FPM employs ptychographic reconstruction to merge a series of low-resolution, wide field of view images into a high-resolution image. In the x-ray range this opens the possibility to overcome the limited numerical aperture of existing x-ray lenses. Furthermore, digital wave front correction (DWC) may be used to charaterize and correct lens imperfections. Given the diffraction limit achievable with x-ray lenses (below 100 nm), x-ray Fourier ptychographic microscopy (XFPM) should be able to reach resolutions in the 10 nm range.

  18. Chest X Ray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are ...

  19. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  20. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Benefits The discovery of X-rays and the invention of CT represented major advances in medicine. X- ... in X-ray and CT Examinations — X-ray definition, dose measurement, safety precautions, risk, and consideration with ...

  1. Focusing of white synchrotron radiation using large-acceptance cylindrical refractive lenses made of single – crystal diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polikarpov, M., E-mail: polikarpov.maxim@mail.ru [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14a, 23600 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Snigireva, I. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38043 (France); Snigirev, A. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14a, 23600 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2016-07-27

    Large-aperture cylindrical refractive lenses were manufactured by laser cutting of single-crystal diamond. Five linear single lenses with apertures of 1 mm and the depth of the structure of 1.2 mm were fabricated and tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline performing the focusing of white-beam synchrotron radiation. Uniform linear focus was stable during hours of exposure, representing such lenses as pre-focusing and collimating devices suitable for the front-end sections of today synchrotron radiation sources.

  2. Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical cross-correlation with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids

    OpenAIRE

    Eckert, S.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L.; Khalil, M.; Huse, N.; Föhlisch, A.; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M.; Ochmann, M.; Ross, M.; Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical cross correlation techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical cross ...

  3. Principles of femtosecond X-ray/optical cross-correlation with X-ray induced transient optical reflectivity in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, S., E-mail: sebastian.eckert@helmholtz-berlin.de, E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Beye, M., E-mail: sebastian.eckert@helmholtz-berlin.de, E-mail: martin.beye@helmholtz-berlin.de; Pietzsch, A.; Quevedo, W.; Hantschmann, M. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Ochmann, M.; Huse, N. [Institute for Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg, Germany and Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ross, M.; Khalil, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Minitti, M. P.; Turner, J. J.; Moeller, S. P.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Föhlisch, A. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-02-09

    The discovery of ultrafast X-ray induced optical reflectivity changes enabled the development of X-ray/optical cross correlation techniques at X-ray free electron lasers worldwide. We have now linked through experiment and theory the fundamental excitation and relaxation steps with the transient optical properties in finite solid samples. Therefore, we gain a thorough interpretation and an optimized detection scheme of X-ray induced changes to the refractive index and the X-ray/optical cross correlation response.

  4. 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductoscopy of high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with casting type calcifications using refraction-based X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami; Maksimenko, Anton; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Eiko; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Mori, Kensaku; Arai, Yoshinori; Endo, Tokiko

    2008-01-01

    Stereomicroscopic observations of thick sections, or three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from serial sections, have provided insights into histopathology. However, they generally require time-consuming and laborious procedures. Recently, we have developed a new algorithm for refraction-based X-ray computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study is to apply this emerging technology to visualize the 3-D structure of a high-grade ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) of the breast. The high-resolution two-dimensional images of the refraction-based CT were validated by comparing them with the sequential histological sections. Without adding any contrast medium, the new CT showed strong contrast and was able to depict the non-calcified fine structures such as duct walls and intraductal carcinoma itself, both of which were barely visible in a conventional absorption-based CT. 3-D reconstruction and virtual endoscopy revealed that the high-grade DCIS was located within the dichotomatous branches of the ducts. Multiple calcifications occurred in the necrotic core of the continuous DCIS, resulting in linear and branching (casting type) calcifications, a hallmark of high-grade DCIS on mammograms. In conclusion, refraction-based X-ray CT approaches the low-power light microscopic view of the histological sections. It provides high quality slice data for 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductosocpy.

  5. A dedicated endstation for waveguide-based X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbfleisch, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    X-ray microscopy has emerged as a powerful and versatile imaging technique in many fields of science over the last years, offering insights in opaque media at high spatial resolution. A major challenge remains the fabrication of suitable X-ray lenses, e.g., Fresnel zone plates or compound refractive lenses. In an alternative approach of a lensless imaging scheme the sample is illuminated by a coherent X-ray beam. The sample information is then reconstructed from the recorded diffraction signal by numerical iterative algorithms. Within this thesis the basics of lensless holographic imaging with X-Ray waveguides are summarised and extended to the concept of waveguide-based X-ray interferometry. The specific instrumentation required for the conceptual experiments of waveguidebased holographic imaging is explained and illustrated by the obtained results. Based on the results of these conceptual experiments a dedicated synchrotron endstation for waveguide-based holographic imaging was designed and built. The specifications and properties of the Kirkpatrick-Baez focussing mirrors and other mechanical and optical components are described in detail, along with the instrument control system and various available detectors. First commissioning results prove the imaging abilities of the presented endstation.

  6. On the influence of monochromator thermal deformations on X-ray focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimonov, M. A.; Khounsary, A. M.; Sandy, A. R.; Narayanan, S.; Navrotski, G.

    2016-06-01

    A cooled double crystal monochromator system is used on many high heat load X-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines in order to select, by diffraction, a narrow spectrum of the beam. Thermal deformation of the first crystal monochromator - and the potential loss of beam brightness - is often a concern. However, if downstream beam focusing is planned, the lensing effect of the monochromator must be considered even if thermal deformations are small. In this paper we report on recent experiments at an Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline that focuses the X-ray beam using compound refractive lenses downstream of an X-ray monochromator system. Increasing the X-ray beam power by increasing the storage ring current from 100 mA to 130 mA resulted in an effective doubling of the focal distance. We show quantitatively that this is due to a lensing effect of the distorted monochromator that results in the creation of a virtual source downstream of the actual source. An analysis of the defocusing and options to mitigate this effect are explored.

  7. On the influence of monochromator thermal deformations on X-ray focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antimonov, M.A. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Khounsary, A.M., E-mail: amk@iit.edu [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Sandy, A.R.; Narayanan, S.; Navrotski, G. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A cooled double crystal monochromator system is used on many high heat load X-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines in order to select, by diffraction, a narrow spectrum of the beam. Thermal deformation of the first crystal monochromator – and the potential loss of beam brightness – is often a concern. However, if downstream beam focusing is planned, the lensing effect of the monochromator must be considered even if thermal deformations are small. In this paper we report on recent experiments at an Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline that focuses the X-ray beam using compound refractive lenses downstream of an X-ray monochromator system. Increasing the X-ray beam power by increasing the storage ring current from 100 mA to 130 mA resulted in an effective doubling of the focal distance. We show quantitatively that this is due to a lensing effect of the distorted monochromator that results in the creation of a virtual source downstream of the actual source. An analysis of the defocusing and options to mitigate this effect are explored.

  8. All-angle negative refraction and active flat lensing of ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Agrawal, Amit; Abashin, Maxim; Chau, Kenneth J; Lezec, Henri J

    2013-05-23

    Decades ago, Veselago predicted that a material with simultaneously negative electric and magnetic polarization responses would yield a 'left-handed' medium in which light propagates with opposite phase and energy velocities--a condition described by a negative refractive index. He proposed that a flat slab of left-handed material possessing an isotropic refractive index of -1 could act like an imaging lens in free space. Left-handed materials do not occur naturally, and it has only recently become possible to achieve a left-handed response using metamaterials, that is, electromagnetic structures engineered on subwavelength scales to elicit tailored polarization responses. So far, left-handed responses have typically been implemented using resonant metamaterials composed of periodic arrays of unit cells containing inductive-capacitive resonators and conductive wires. Negative refractive indices that are isotropic in two or three dimensions at microwave frequencies have been achieved in resonant metamaterials with centimetre-scale features. Scaling the left-handed response to higher frequencies, such as infrared or visible, has been done by shrinking critical dimensions to submicrometre scales by means of top-down nanofabrication. This miniaturization has, however, so far been achieved at the cost of reduced unit-cell symmetry, yielding a refractive index that is negative along only one axis. Moreover, lithographic scaling limits have so far precluded the fabrication of resonant metamaterials with left-handed responses at frequencies beyond the visible. Here we report the experimental implementation of a bulk metamaterial with a left-handed response to ultraviolet light. The structure, based on stacked plasmonic waveguides, yields an omnidirectional left-handed response for transverse magnetic polarization characterized by a negative refractive index. By engineering the structure to have a refractive index close to -1 over a broad angular range, we achieve Veselago

  9. At-wavelength metrology of x-ray optics at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon G.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2014-09-01

    Modern, third-generation synchrotron radiation sources provide coherent and extremely bright beams of X-ray radiation. The successful exploitation of such beams depends to a significant extent on imperfections and misalignment of the optics employed on the beamlines. This issue becomes even more critical with the increasing use of active optics, and the desire to achieve diffraction-limited and coherence-preserving X-ray beams. In recent years, significant progress has been made to improve optic testing and optimization techniques, especially those using X-rays for so-called atwavelength metrology. These in-situ and at-wavelength metrology methods can be used not only to optimize the performance of X-ray optics, but also to correct and minimize the collective distortions of upstream beamline optics, including monochromators, and transmission windows. An overview of at-wavelength metrology techniques implemented at Diamond Light Source is presented, including grating interferometry and X-ray near-field speckle based techniques. Representative examples of the application of these techniques are also given, including in-situ and atwavelength calibration and optimization of: active, piezo bimorph mirrors; Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors; and refractive optics such as compound refractive lenses.

  10. Professor Peter Choyce: an early pioneer of intraocular lenses and corneal/refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Suresh K; Apple, David J

    2005-06-01

    Professor Peter Choyce, FRCS, DOMS, MS, was one of the pioneers of intraocular lens implant surgery. He developed an interest in artificial lens implantation following cataract surgery, a procedure that was widely criticized by the ophthalmic establishment in the UK, Europe, North America and other countries. Owing to the opposition to the intraocular lenses, Peter Choyce together with Sir Harold Ridley co-founded the International Intraocular Implant Club in 1966, which was responsible for the gradual acceptance of artificial lens implantation. Peter Choyce developed several models of intraocular lens, but did not patent the majority of them. The Choyce Mark IX, manufactured by Rayner Intraocular Lenses, became the first US Food and Drug Administration-approved intraocular lens in 1981. A review of Peter Choyce's record confirms a significant number of original innovations in the field of anterior segment surgery, including many procedures taken for granted today, but not associated with his name. These include early work on both kerato- and intraocular lens-refractive procedures, keratoprosthesis, pioneering paediatric implant procedures and others. Unfortunately his tenacious adherence to anterior chamber lens technology, while in general clinically sound, caused many to question his influence and hence he remained poorly understood even until after his death. He passed away on 8 August 2001 after a long fight with colon cancer. In this article, we provide evidence and elaborate Peter Choyce's accomplishments, which places him as one of the most innovative ophthalmologist in his surgical field in the twentieth century.

  11. The massive galaxy cluster XMMU J1230.3+1339 at z ˜ 1: colour-magnitude relation, Butcher-Oemler effect, X-ray and weak lensing mass estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchster, M.; Seitz, S.; Brimioulle, F.; Fassbender, R.; Rovilos, M.; Böhringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Kilbinger, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Quintana, H.; Bender, R.

    2011-03-01

    We present results from the multiwavelength study of XMMU J1230.3+1339 at z˜ 1. We analyse deep multiband wide-field images from the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), multi-object spectroscopy observations from VLT, as well as space-based serendipitous observations, from the GALEX and Chandra X-ray observatories. We apply a Bayesian photometric redshift code to derive the redshifts using the far-UV (FUV), near-UV (NUV) and the deep U, B, V, r, i, z data. We make further use of spectroscopic data from FORS2 to calibrate our photometric redshifts, and investigate the photometric and spectral properties of the early-type galaxies. We achieve an accuracy of ▵z/(1 +z)= 0.07 (0.04) and the fraction of catastrophic outliers is η= 13 (0) per cent, when using all (secure) spectroscopic data, respectively. The i-z against z colour-magnitude relation of the photo-z members shows a tight red sequence with a zero-point of 0.935 mag, and slope equal to -0.027. We observe evidence for a truncation at the faint end of the red-cluster-sequence and the Butcher-Oemler effect, finding a fraction of blue galaxies fb≈ 0.5. Further, we conduct a weak lensing analysis of the deep 26 × 26 arcmin r-band LBC image. The observed shear is fitted with a Single-Isothermal-Sphere and a Navarro-Frenk-White model to obtain the velocity dispersion and the model parameters, respectively. Our best-fitting values are, for the velocity dispersion σSIS= 1308 ± 284 km s-1, concentration parameter c= 4.0+14-2 and scale radius rs= 345+50-57 kpc. From a 38 ks Chandra X-ray observation we obtain an independent estimate of the cluster mass. In addition, we create a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) map for the detection of the matter mass distribution of the cluster using the mass-aperture technique. We find excellent agreement of the mass concentration identified with weak lensing and the X-ray surface brightness. Combining our mass estimates from the kinematic, X-ray and weak lensing analyses we obtain a

  12. Mapping the chemical states of an element inside a sample using tomographic x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, C G; Kuhlmann, M; Gunzler, T F; Lengeler, B; Richwin, M; Griesebock, B; Lutzenkirchen-Hect, D; Frahm, R; Ziegler, E; Mashayekhi, A; Haeffner, D R; Grunwaldt, J -D; Baiker, A; XFD,

    2003-05-12

    Hard x-ray absorption spectroscopy is combined with scanning microtomography to reconstruct full near-edge spectra of an elemental species at each location on an arbitrary virtual section through a sample. These spectra reveal the local concentrations of different chemical compounds of the absorbing element inside the sample and give insight into the oxidation state, the local atomic structure, and the local projected free density of states. The method is implemented by combining a quick scanning monochromator and data acquisition system with a scanning microprobe setup based on refractive x-ray lenses.

  13. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    nanolithographic techniques for improved spatial resolution and efficiency of zone plates. Development of large, perfect single crystals of materials other than silicon for use as beam splitters, seeding monochromators, and high-resolution analyzers. Development of improved thin-film deposition methods for fabrication of multilayer Laue lenses and high-spectral-resolution multilayer gratings. Development of supports, actuator technologies, algorithms, and controls to provide fully integrated and robust adaptive X-ray optic systems. Development of fabrication processes for refractive lenses in materials other than silicon. The workshop participants also addressed two important nontechnical areas: our relationship with industry and organization of optics within the light source facilities. Optimization of activities within these two areas could have an important effect on the effectiveness and efficiency of our overall endeavor. These are crosscutting managerial issues that we identified as areas that needed further in-depth study, but they need to be coordinated above the individual facilities. Finally, an issue that cuts across many of the optics improvements listed above is routine access to beamlines that ideally are fully dedicated to optics research and/or development. The success of the BES X-ray user facilities in serving a rapidly increasing user community has led to a squeezing of beam time for vital instrumentation activities. Dedicated development beamlines could be shared with other R&D activities, such as detector programs and novel instrument development. In summary, to meet the challenges of providing the highest-quality X-ray beams for users and to fully utilize the high-brightness sources of today and those that are on the horizon, it will be critical to make strategic investments in X-ray optics R&D. This report can provide guidance and direction for effective use of investments in the field of X-ray optics and potential approaches to develop a better

  14. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    nanolithographic techniques for improved spatial resolution and efficiency of zone plates. Development of large, perfect single crystals of materials other than silicon for use as beam splitters, seeding monochromators, and high-resolution analyzers. Development of improved thin-film deposition methods for fabrication of multilayer Laue lenses and high-spectral-resolution multilayer gratings. Development of supports, actuator technologies, algorithms, and controls to provide fully integrated and robust adaptive X-ray optic systems. Development of fabrication processes for refractive lenses in materials other than silicon. The workshop participants also addressed two important nontechnical areas: our relationship with industry and organization of optics within the light source facilities. Optimization of activities within these two areas could have an important effect on the effectiveness and efficiency of our overall endeavor. These are crosscutting managerial issues that we identified as areas that needed further in-depth study, but they need to be coordinated above the individual facilities. Finally, an issue that cuts across many of the optics improvements listed above is routine access to beamlines that ideally are fully dedicated to optics research and/or development. The success of the BES X-ray user facilities in serving a rapidly increasing user community has led to a squeezing of beam time for vital instrumentation activities. Dedicated development beamlines could be shared with other R&D activities, such as detector programs and novel instrument development. In summary, to meet the challenges of providing the highest-quality X-ray beams for users and to fully utilize the high-brightness sources of today and those that are on the horizon, it will be critical to make strategic investments in X-ray optics R&D. This report can provide guidance and direction for effective use of investments in the field of X-ray optics and potential approaches to develop a better

  15. Two-dimensional relative peripheral refractive error induced by Fractal Contact Lenses for myopia control

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Vallejo, Manuel; Monsoriu, Juan A; Ferrando, Vicente; Furlan, Walter D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the peripheral refraction induced by Fractal Contact Lenses (FCLs) in myopic eyes by means of a two-dimensional Relative Peripheral Refractive Error (RPRE) map. Methods: FCLs prototypes were specially manufactured and characterized. This study involved twenty-six myopic subjects ranging from -0.50 D to -7.00 D. The two-dimensional RPRE was measured with an open-field autorefractor by means of tracking targets distributed in a square grid from -30 degrees (deg) nasal to 30 deg temporal and 15 deg superior to -15 deg inferior. Corneal topographies were taken in order to assess correlations between corneal asphericity, lens decentration and RPRE represented in vector components M, J0 and J45. Results: The mean power of the FCLs therapeutic zones was 1.32 +/- 0.28 D. Significant correlations were found between the corneal asphericity and vector components of the RPRE in the nacked eyes. FCLs were decentered a mean of 0.7 +/- 0.19 mm to the temporal cornea. M decreased asymmetrically between nas...

  16. Design and fabrication of cascaded X-ray planar parab olic comp ound refractive lens%级联式平面抛物面型X射线组合折射透镜的设计与制作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付明磊; 乐孜纯; 周寒青; 张明; 全必胜; 王华; 毛成文; 王昌辉; 沈小燕

    2014-01-01

    Due to its attractive features such as compact size, simple to align and wide working range of photon energy, the X-ray compound refractive lens (CRL) has gradually become one of the standard accessories to focus the X-ray beams from the synchrotron radiation light source. In this paper, a cascaded planar parabolic CRL is designed and fabricated. The novel CRL is composed of type I and type II refractive elements in order to achieve a small spot size while maintaining the transmission. In type I refractive element, the parabolic geometry aperture (R0) is large, while, in type II refractive element, the radius of curvature (R) at the parabolic vertex is small. So N1 numbers of type I and N2 numbers of type II refractive elements are cascaded to form a single-chip CRL. A cascaded X-ray planar parabolic CRL is constructed using PMMA material by means of LIGA techniques. The main structural parameters of type I refractive elements are:N1 =15, R1 =200 µm, 2R01 =564 µm. The main structural parameters of type II refractive elements are: N2 =20, R2 = 50 µm, 2R02 = 140 µm. The cascaded planar parabolic CRL is tested on the beam line whose original incident X-ray spot is 200 µm × 100 µm at Shanghai synchrotron radiation facility. The measured lateral focusing spot size is 24.9 µm@8 keV, the transmission rate is 2.19%and the focal length is 1.052 m.%X射线组合折射透镜(CRL)已逐步成为同步辐射光源下X射线聚焦光学器件的标准配件之一,它具有结构紧凑、易调节校准、适用光子能量范围大等优点.本文设计了一种级联式平面抛物面型CRL,它将N1个具有较大抛物面几何孔径(R0)的折射单元I与N2个具有较小抛物面顶点曲率半径(R)的折射单元II级联,以解决常规CRL设计过程中焦斑尺寸与透过率的矛盾.采用PMMA材料,利用LIGA技术制作了一组级联式平面抛物面型CRL,其中折射单元I的主要结构参数为N1=15, R1=200µm,2R01=564µm;折射单元II

  17. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  18. Diffractive X-ray Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted space- time in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  19. Field-induced refractive index variation in the dark conglomerate phase for polarization-independent switchable liquid crystal lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, H E; Nagaraj, M; Kaur, S; Jones, J C; Morgan, P B; Gleeson, H F

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystal lenses are an emerging technology that can provide variable focal power in response to applied voltage. Many designs for liquid-crystal-based lenses are polarization dependent, so that 50% of light is not focused as required, making polarization-independent technologies very attractive. Recently, the dark conglomerate (DC) phase, which is an optically isotropic liquid crystalline state, has been shown to exhibit a large change in refractive index in response to an applied electric field (Δn=0.04). This paper describes computational modeling of the electrostatic solutions for two different types of 100 μm diameter liquid crystal lenses, which include the DC phase, demonstrating that it shows great potential for efficient isotropic optical switching in lenses. A feature of the field dependence of the refractive index change in the DC phase is that it is approximately linear in a certain range, leading to the prediction of excellent optical quality for driving fields in this regime. Interestingly, a simulated microlens is shown to exhibit two modes of operation: a positive lens based upon a uniform bulk change in refractive index at high voltages, and a negative lens resulting from the induction of a gradient index effect at intermediate voltages.

  20. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  1. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... degenerative) Bone tumor Broken bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Arthritis Other conditions for which the test ... Bone tumor Bone x-ray Broken bone Clubfoot Osteomyelitis X-ray Review Date 7/3/2016 Updated ...

  2. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are, or may be, pregnant. Alternative Names Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also ...

  3. X-Ray Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1--100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.

  4. X-Ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band soft X-ray polarimeters based on Bragg reflection. Developments in scintillator and solid-state hard X-ray detectors facilitate construction of both modular, large area Compton scattering polarimeters and compact devices suitable for use with focusing X-ray telescopes.

  5. Measurement of the refractive index of soft contact lenses during wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varikooty, Jalaiah; Keir, Nancy; Woods, Craig A; Fonn, Desmond

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether the refractive index (RI) of a soft contact lens can be evaluated using refractometry while the lens remains on the eye and to compare this with more traditional ex vivo RI measurements. A slitlamp apparatus was modified to incorporate a customized Atago hand refractometer. With a double-masked study design, nine adapted symptomatic soft contact lens wearers wore a contact lens in each eye (lotrafilcon B and etafilcon A) in a randomized order. In vivo RI was determined from the relative Brix scale measurements immediately after lens insertion and after 1 and 10 hr of lens wear. Ex vivo refractometry was performed after 10 hr of lens wear for comparison. Means +/- standard errors of the means are reported. In vivo RI values at baseline were 1.422 +/- 0.0004 (lotrafilcon B) and 1.405 +/- 0.0021 (etafilcon A); after 1 hr of lens wear, values were 1.423 +/- 0.0006 and 1.408 +/- 0.0007, respectively; and after 10 hr of lens wear, values were 1.424 +/- 0.0004 and 1.411 +/- 0.0010, respectively. Ex vivo RI values at the end of the 10 hr wearing period were 1.424 +/- 0.0003 (lotrafilcon B) and 1.412 +/- 0.0017 (etafilcon A). The change in in vivo RI across the day was statistically significant for the etafilcon A lens (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P0.05). This novel adaptation of refractometry was able to measure the RI of soft contact lenses during wear (without lens removal). End of day RI measurements using in vivo and ex vivo refractometry were comparable with each other. Future work is required to determine whether this in vivo method can improve our understanding of the relationships between soft contact lens RI, hydration, on-eye lens performance, and symptomology.

  6. Optical-CT 3D Dosimetry Using Fresnel Lenses with Minimal Refractive-Index Matching Fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Bache

    Full Text Available Telecentric optical computed tomography (optical-CT is a state-of-the-art method for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional dose distributions in radiochromic dosimeters. In this work a prototype telecentric system (DFOS-Duke Fresnel Optical-CT Scanner is evaluated which incorporates two substantial design changes: the use of Fresnel lenses (reducing lens costs from $10-30K t0 $1-3K and the use of a 'solid tank' (which reduces noise, and the volume of refractively matched fluid from 1 ltr to 10 cc. The efficacy of DFOS was evaluated by direct comparison against commissioned scanners in our lab. Measured dose distributions from all systems were compared against the predicted dose distributions from a commissioned treatment planning system (TPS. Three treatment plans were investigated including a simple four-field box treatment, a multiple small field delivery, and a complex IMRT treatment. Dosimeters were imaged within 2 h post irradiation, using consistent scanning techniques (360 projections acquired at 1 degree intervals, reconstruction at 2mm. DFOS efficacy was evaluated through inspection of dose line-profiles, and 2D and 3D dose and gamma maps. DFOS/TPS gamma pass rates with 3%/3mm dose difference/distance-to-agreement criteria ranged from 89.3% to 92.2%, compared to from 95.6% to 99.0% obtained with the commissioned system. The 3D gamma pass rate between the commissioned system and DFOS was 98.2%. The typical noise rates in DFOS reconstructions were up to 3%, compared to under 2% for the commissioned system. In conclusion, while the introduction of a solid tank proved advantageous with regards to cost and convenience, further work is required to improve the image quality and dose reconstruction accuracy of the new DFOS optical-CT system.

  7. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, USP, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: antunes@if.usp.br; Hoennicke, M.G. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil); Safatle, A.M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, USP, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil); Moraes Barros, P.S. [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, USP, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Morelhao, S.L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, USP, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-08-15

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed.

  8. A Hubble Space Telescope Lensing Survey of X-ray Luminous Galaxy Clusters A Multiply-imaged Extremely Red Galaxy at z=1.6

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, G P; Kneib, J P; Davis, C J; Takamiya, M; Ebeling, H; Czoske, O; Smith, Graham P.; Smail, Ian

    2002-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of EROJ003707+0909.5, the brightest of three gravitationally-lensed images of an Extremely Red Object (ERO) at z=1.6, in the field of the massive cluster A68 (z=0.255). We exploit the superlative resolution of our HST data and the enhanced spatial resolution and sensitivity afforded by the lens amplification to reconstruct the source-plane properties of this ERO. Our morphological and photometric analysis reveals that EROJ003707 is an L* early-type disk-galaxy and we estimate that ~10 per cent of EROs with (R-K)>=5.3 and K<=21 may have similar properties. The unique association of passive EROs with elliptical galaxies therefore appears to be too simplistic. We speculate on the evolution of EROJ003707: if gas continues to cool onto this galaxy in the manner predicted by hierarchical galaxy formation models, then by the present day, EROJ003707 could evolve into a very luminous spiral galaxy.

  9. Focusing high-energy x-rays by a PMMA compound x-ray lens on Beijing synchrotron radiation facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le Zi-Chun; Liang Jing-Qiu; Dong Wen; Zhu Pei-Ping; Peng Liang-Qiang; Wang Wei-Biao; Huang Wan-Xia; Yuan Qing-Xi; Wang Jun-Yue

    2007-01-01

    The x-ray compound lens is a novel refractive x-ray optical device. This paper reports the authors' recent research on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) compound x-ray lens. Firstly the designing and LIGA fabrication process for the PMMA compound x-ray lens are briefly described. Then, a method for theoretical analysis, as well as the experimental system for measurement is also introduced. Finally, the focusing spots for 8keV monochromatic x-rays by the PMMA compound x-ray lens are measured and analysed. According to the experimental results, it is concluded that the PMMA compound x-ray lens promises a good focusing performance under the high-energy x-rays.

  10. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may be allowed to remain with your child during the test. If you remain in the room during the X-ray exposure, you'll likely be asked to wear a lead apron to shield you from unnecessary exposure. After the X-ray ...

  11. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation. The x-rays penetrate the body to form ... for detecting cavities, unless the decay is very advanced and deep. Many ... The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than ...

  12. X-Ray Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Perri, M

    1998-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the field of X-ray surveys, especially in the hard (2-10 and 5-10 keV) bands, is given. A new detailed comparison between the measurements in the hard band and extrapolations from ROSAT counts, that takes into proper account the observed distribution of spectral slopes, is presented. Direct comparisons between deep ROSAT and BeppoSAX images show that most hard X-ray sources are also detected at soft X-ray energies. This may indicate that heavily cutoff sources, that should not be detectable in the ROSAT band but are expected in large numbers from unified AGN schemes, are in fact detected because of the emerging of either non-nuclear components, or of reflected, or partially transmitted nuclear X-rays. These soft components may complicate the estimation of the soft X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of AGN.

  13. X-ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T.

    In spite of the recent advances in X-ray instrumentation, polarimetry remains an area which has been virtually unexplored in the last 20 years. The scientific motivation to study polarization has increased during this time: emission models designed to repro- duce X-ray spectra can be tested using polarization, and polarization detected in other wavelength bands makes clear predictions as to the X-ray polarization. Polarization remains the only way to infer geometrical properties of sources which are too small to be spatially resolved. At the same time, there has been recent progress in instrumen- tation which is likely to allow searches for X-ray polarization at levels significantly below what was possible for early detectors. In this talk I will review the history of X-ray polarimetry, discuss some experimental techniques and the scientific problems which can be addressed by future experiments.

  14. Towards brilliant, compact x-ray sources: a new x-ray photonic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Brian; Mandal, Sudeep; Salisbury, Joshua; Edic, Peter; Hopkins, Forrest; Lee, Susanne M.

    2017-05-01

    General Electric has designed an innovative x-ray photonic device that concentrates a polychromatic beam of diverging x-rays into a less divergent, parallel, or focused x-ray beam. The device consists of multiple, thin film multilayer stacks. X-rays incident on a given multilayer stack propagate within a high refractive index transmission layer while undergoing multiple total internal reflections from a novel, engineered multilayer containing materials of lower refractive index. Development of this device could lead to order-of-magnitude flux density increases, over a large broadband energy range from below 20 keV to above 300 keV. In this paper, we give an overview of the device and present GE's progress towards fabricating prototype devices.

  15. The Massive Galaxy Cluster XMMU J1230.3+1339 at z ~ 1: Colour-magnitude relation, Butcher-Oemler effect, X-ray and weak lensing mass estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Lerchster, M; Brimioulle, F; Fassbender, R; Rovilos, M; Böhringer, H; Pierini, D; Kilbinger, M; Finoguenov, A; Quintana, H; Bender, R

    2010-01-01

    We present results from the multi-wavelength study of XMMU J1230.3+1339 at z ~ 1. We analyze deep multi-band wide-field images from the Large Binocular Telescope, multi-object spectroscopy observations from VLT, as well as space-based serendipitous observations, from the GALEX and Chandra X-ray observatories. We apply a Bayesian photometric redshift code to derive the redshifts using the FUV, NUV and the deep U, B, V, r, i, z data. We achieve an accuracy of $\\triangle z/(1+z)$ = 0.07 (0.04) and the fraction of catastrophic outliers is $\\eta$ = 13 (0)%, when using all (secure) spectroscopic data, respectively. The i - z against z colour-magnitude relation of the photo-z members shows a tight red-sequence with a zero point of 0.935 mag, and slope equal to -0.027. We observe evidence for a truncation at the faint end of the red-cluster-sequence and the Butcher-Oemler effect, finding a fraction of blue galaxies $f_b \\approx$ 0.5. Further we conduct a weak lensing analysis of the deep 26' $\\times$ 26' r-band LBC i...

  16. Refractive behavior changes with six months daily wear of high and low oxygen permeability hydrogel contact lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.D.H. Gillan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The investigation of myopia and soft contact lenses is not new. Many reports show  that  the  wearing  of  silicone  hydrogel lenses as opposed to conventional disposable hydrogel lenses results in little progression of myopia in the eyes wearing silicone hydrogels. Method: Six subjects wore a silicone hydro-gel lens on one eye while the other eye wore a habitual disposable hydrogel lens for six months of daily wear. Fifty measurements of refractive state in each eye were taken prior to the subjects wearing a silicone lens in one eye and a conven-tional hydrogel lens in the other eye. After six months of daily wear another fifty measurements of refractive state were taken for each subject. Results:  Although  there  is  no  statisti-cal  support  for  the  findings  of  this  study, comet stereo-pairs are used to show the chang-es in refractive state for each subject. Four of  the  six  subjects  showed  an  increase  in myopia in the eye wearing the silicone lens. Discussion:  The  increase  in  myopia in eyes wearing a silicone hydrogel lens is contrary  to  the  findings  of  other  studies.

  17. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  18. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  20. Bone x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  1. Hand x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include fractures, bone tumors , degenerative bone conditions, and osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection). ... chap 46. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Osteomyelitis X-ray Review Date 9/8/2014 Updated ...

  2. Pelvis x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Spotlight October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month Recently posted: Medical Imaging Costs Magnetoencephalography ( ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  6. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... x-ray particles pass through the body. A computer or special film records the images. Structures that ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  7. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  9. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT of the Heart Video: Radioiodine I-131 Therapy Radiology and You ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  12. First set of gated x-ray imaging diagnostics for the Laser Megajoule facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, R.; Trosseille, C.; Caillaud, T.; Allouche, V.; Bourgade, J. L.; Briat, M.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Le Breton, J. P.; Llavador, P.; Loupias, B.; Miquel, J. L.; Oudot, G.; Perez, S.; Raimbourg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Rubbelynck, C.; Stemmler, P.; Troussel, P.; Ulmer, J. L.; Wrobel, R.; Beauvais, P.; Pallet, M.; Prevot, V.

    2016-03-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility located at CEA/CESTA started to operate in the early 2014 with two quadruplets (20 kJ at 351 nm) focused on target for the first experimental campaign. We present here the first set of gated x-ray imaging (GXI) diagnostics implemented on LMJ since mid-2014. This set consists of two imaging diagnostics with spatial, temporal, and broadband spectral resolution. These diagnostics will give basic measurements, during the entire life of the facility, such as position, structure, and balance of beams, but they will also be used to characterize gas filled target implosion symmetry and timing, to study x-ray radiography and hydrodynamic instabilities. The design requires a vulnerability approach, because components will operate in a harsh environment induced by neutron fluxes, gamma rays, debris, and shrapnel. Grazing incidence x-ray microscopes are fielded as far as possible away from the target to minimize potential damage and signal noise due to these sources. These imaging diagnostics incorporate microscopes with large source-to-optic distance and large size gated microchannel plate detectors. Microscopes include optics with grazing incidence mirrors, pinholes, and refractive lenses. Spatial, temporal, and spectral performances have been measured on x-ray tubes and UV lasers at CEA-DIF and at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt BESSY II synchrotron prior to be set on LMJ. GXI-1 and GXI-2 designs, metrology, and first experiments on LMJ are presented here.

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray is taken with the ... an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) ... diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist, an individual specially ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray is taken with the ... an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  18. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp.

  19. Null Lens Assembly for X-Ray Mirror Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a null lens assembly that allows laser interferometry of 60 deg. slumped glass mirror segments used in x-ray mirrors. The assembly consists of four lenses in precise alignment to each other, with incorporated piezoelectric nanometer stepping actuators to position the lenses in six degrees of freedom for positioning relative to each other.

  20. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of liquid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Pershan, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented.......A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented....

  1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of liquid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Pershan, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented.......A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented....

  2. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  3. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  4. Spherical Aberration Correction Using Refractive-Diffractive Lenses with an Analytic-Numerical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Vázquez-Montiel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an alternative method to design diffractive lenses free of spherical aberration for monochromatic light. Our method allows us to design diffractive lenses with the diffraction structure recorded on the last surface; this surface can be flat or curved with rotation symmetry. The equations that we propose calculate the diffraction profiles for any substratum, for any f-number, and for any position of the object. We use the lens phase coefficients to compensate the spherical aberration. To calculate these coefficients, we use an analytic-numerical method. The calculations are exact, and the optimization process is not required.

  5. X-Ray Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1955-01-01

    15,000. • When developed In Kodak liquid X-ray developer for 5 min at a temperature of 200 C. b Film sensitivities vary with photon energy by the...for example temporomandibular -joint exposures where a skin dose of 25 r or more may be obtained during a single exposure with 65 kvp, 1.5 mm aluminum...communication. W. J. Updegrave, Temporomandibular articulation-X-ray examina- tion, Dental Radiography and Photography 26, No. 3, 41 (1953). H. 0. Wyckoff, R. J

  6. X-ray Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    Material irradiated by X-rays produces backscattered radiation which is commonly known as the Reflection Spectrum. It consists of a structured continuum, due at high energies to the competition between photoelectric absorption and electron scattering enhanced at low energies by emission from the material itself, together with a complex line spectrum. We briefly review the history of X-ray reflection in astronomy and discuss various methods for computing the reflection spectrum from cold and ionized gas, illustrated with results from our own work reflionx. We discuss how the reflection spectrum can be used to obtain the geometry of the accretion flow, particularly the inner regions around black holes and neutron stars.

  7. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  9. Developing Ideas of Refraction, Lenses and Rainbow through the Use of Historical Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines different ways of using historical resources in teaching refraction related subjects. Experimental procedures can be taught by using Ptolemy's and Al Haytham's methods. The student can check the validity of the approximations or rules which were presented by different people. The interpretation of the relations is another…

  10. Diffraction of partially coherent X-rays in clessidra prism arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Liberato; Jark, Werner; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Matteucci, Marco

    2008-11-01

    When small triangular prisms are arranged in arrays which have an overall appearance like an hourglass (in Italian: clessidra) they can focus X-rays owing to a combined action of diffraction and refraction. From the optical point of view these objects can be regarded as a Fresnel variant of concave transmission lenses. Consequently they can provide larger apertures than purely refractive lenses. However, one has to recognize that clessidra lenses will strongly diffract as the lens structure is periodic in the direction perpendicular to the incident beam. In experiments the diffraction is reduced because it is difficult to illuminate the large apertures with a full spatially coherent wavefront. So the illumination is at best partially coherent. In order to interpret available experimental data for this condition, diffraction theory has been applied appropriately to the clessidra structure, taking into account the limited spatial coherence. The agreement between the theoretical simulations and experimental data is very good, keeping the lens properties at their projected values and allowing for only two free model parameters. The first is the lateral spatial coherence; the second is a lens defect, a rounding of all edges and tips in the structure. Both values obtained from the simulations have been found to be in agreement with expectations.

  11. X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  12. X-ray lithography masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  13. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  16. Soft X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses ... assess trauma patients in emergency departments. A CT scan can image complicated fractures, subtle fractures or dislocations. ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

  3. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small dose ... to produce pictures of the inside of the abdominal cavity. It is used to evaluate the stomach, liver, ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it ... organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations ... patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is used to: ... and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  9. Can a Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube be an X-Ray Waveguide?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-Jie; CHENG Yao; WANG Feng; LI Jia-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the transport efficiency for x-rays of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in theory. Three effects,i.e. refraction, absorption and x-ray tunneling loss, are considered. Our calculation shows that the SWCNT cannot be an x-ray waveguide due to the large x-ray tunneling loss. If the tunneling loss can be reduced effectively, a nanotube could be a waveguide.

  10. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: brazo What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  17. X-ray selected BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Ceballos, M; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Esquej, P; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S; Rosen, S; Schwope, A; Streblyanska, A; Symeonidis, M; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2016-01-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index alpha=0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, alpha_OX, of the X-ray selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of 1.69 +- 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically-selected BALQSOs typically have much larger alpha_OX and so are characterised as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray sp...

  18. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  19. VISUAL ACUITY AND CLINICAL REFRACTION FOLLOWING IMPLANTATION OF VARIOUS MULTIFOCAL INTRAOCULAR LENSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Temirov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze visual acuity, clinical refraction, and defocusing tolerance after the implantation of monofocal IOL with rotational asymmetric optic (Lentis Mplus 313 MF compared with Acrysof ReSTOR SN6AD1.Materials and methods. Phacoemulsification was performed in a total of 194 patients (288 eyes, i.e., 144 patients (188 eyes with cataract and 50 patients (100 eyes with presbyopia and high ametropia. The patients were divided into two groups. Study group included 132 patients (194 eyes implanted with Lentis Mplus while control group included 62 patients (94 eyes implanted with Acrysof ReSTOR. Uncorrected distance (5 m, intermediate (50‑70 cm, and near (20‑40 cm visual acuity under photopic (85 cd/m2 and mesopic (8 cd/m2 conditions were measured, objective and subjective refractometry were performed, and defocusing tolerance was evaluated.Results. Postoperatively, uncorrected distance and near visual acuity was high while intermediate visual acuity was moderately low. Lentis Mplus patients had better near and intermediate visual acuity under mesopic conditions as compared with Acrysof ReSTOR patients. Emmetropia (target refraction was achieved in 90.2% of study group patients and in 87.2% of control group patients. In patients implanted with Lentis Mplus, refraction was measured by subjective method. Optimal A-constant for Lentis Mplus and Acrysof ReSTOR was 118.0 and 118.6, respectively. Under defocusing, Lentis Mplus patients had better visual acuity than Acrysof ReSTOR patients. This indirectly confirms better intermediate vision.Conclusions. Lentis Mplus provides better vision at various distances that does not almost depend on light levels and induces minimal dysphotopsia. 

  20. VISUAL ACUITY AND CLINICAL REFRACTION FOLLOWING IMPLANTATION OF VARIOUS MULTIFOCAL INTRAOCULAR LENSES

    OpenAIRE

    N. N. Temirov; N. E. Temirov

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To analyze visual acuity, clinical refraction, and defocusing tolerance after the implantation of monofocal IOL with rotational asymmetric optic (Lentis Mplus 313 MF) compared with Acrysof ReSTOR SN6AD1.Materials and methods. Phacoemulsification was performed in a total of 194 patients (288 eyes), i.e., 144 patients (188 eyes) with cataract and 50 patients (100 eyes) with presbyopia and high ametropia. The patients were divided into two groups. Study group included 132 patients (194 eyes...

  1. Design and fabrication of one-dimensional focusing X-ray compound lens with Al material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zichun Le; Ming Zhang; Jingqiu Liang; Wen Dong; Kai Liu; Bisheng Quan

    2006-01-01

    @@ A method based on Fourier spectrum analysis for predicting the performances of the X-ray compound lenses is briefly introduced,the theoretical result obtained is the same as that of Fresnel-Kirchhoff approach.A kind of technique named moulding is developed for fabricating the one-dimensional (1D) compound X-ray lens with Al material and the fabrication process is presented.In addition,a two-time coating method is used to improve the numerical apertures of the compound lenses.Furthermore,the focusing performance of the Al compound X-ray lens under the high energy X-rays is measured.

  2. SMM x ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  3. X-ray today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, U. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    The interest attracted by the new imaging modalities tends to overshadow the continuing importance of projection radiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless, projection techniques still represent by far the greatest proportion of diagnostic imaging examinations, and play an essential role in the growing number of advanced interventional procedures. This article describes some of the latest developments in X-ray imaging technology, using two products from the Philips range as examples: the Integris Allura cardiovascular system with 3D image reconstruction, and the BV Pulsera: a high-end, multi-functional mobile C-arm system with cardiac capabilities. (orig.)

  4. Lens coupled tunable Young's double pinhole system for hard X-ray spatial coherence characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubomirskiy, Mikhail; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-06-13

    We have implemented a modified Young's double slit experiment using pinholes with tunable separation distance coupled with compound refractive lens for hard X-ray spatial coherence characterization. Varying distance between the apertures provides a high sensitivity to the determination of spatial coherence across a wide range of experimental parameters. The use of refractive lenses as a Fourier transformer ensures far field registration conditions and allows the realization of a very compact experimental setup in comparison with the classical Young technique and its derivatives. The tunable double aperture interferometer was experimentally tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline in the energy range from 8 to 25 keV. The spatial coherence and the source size were measured by evaluating the visibility of the interference fringes at various separation distances between the apertures and this value agrees very well with the data obtained by other techniques. The proposed scheme can be used for comprehensive characterization of the coherence properties of the source on low emittance synchrotrons in the hard X-ray region.

  5. X-ray lithography source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  6. X-ray phase imaging with a grating interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitkamp, Timm; Diaz, Ana; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco; Cloetens, Peter; Ziegler, Eric

    2005-08-08

    Using a high-efficiency grating interferometer for hard X rays (10-30 keV) and a phase-stepping technique, separate radiographs of the phase and absorption profiles of bulk samples can be obtained from a single set of measurements. Tomographic reconstruction yields quantitative three-dimensional maps of the X-ray refractive index, with a spatial resolution down to a few microns. The method is mechanically robust, requires little spatial coherence and monochromaticity, and can be scaled up to large fields of view, with a detector of correspondingly moderate spatial resolution. These are important prerequisites for use with laboratory X-ray sources.

  7. Equivalences between refractive index and equilibrium water content of conventional and silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses from automated and manual refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Méijome, José M; López-Alemany, Antonio; Lira, Madalena; Almeida, José B; Oliveira, M Elisabete C D Real; Parafita, Manuel A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop mathematical relationships that allow obtaining equilibrium water content and refractive index of conventional and silicone hydrogel soft contact lenses from refractive index measures obtained with automated refractometry or equilibrium water content measures derived from manual refractometry, respectively. Twelve HEMA-based hydrogels of different hydration and four siloxane-based polymers were assayed. A manual refractometer and a digital refractometer were used. Polynomial models obtained from the sucrose curves of equilibrium water content against refractive index and vice-versa were used either considering the whole range of sucrose concentrations (16-100% equilibrium water content) or a range confined to the equilibrium water content of current soft contact lenses (approximately 20-80% equilibrium water content). Values of equilibrium water content measured with the Atago N-2E and those derived from the refractive index measurement with CLR 12-70 by the applications of sucrose-based models displayed a strong linear correlation (r2 = 0.978). The same correlations were obtained when the models are applied to obtain refractive index values from the Atago N-2E and compared with those (values) given by the CLR 12-70 (r2 = 0.978). No significantly different results are obtained between models derived from the whole range of the sucrose solution or the model limited to the normal range of soft contact lens hydration. Present results will have implications for future experimental and clinical research regarding normal hydration and dehydration experiments with hydrogel polymers, and particularly in the field of contact lenses. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Refraction test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that measures a person's prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses. ... can be done as part of a routine eye exam. The purpose is to determine whether you have a refractive error (a need for glasses or contact lenses). For people over age 40 who have normal ...

  9. Coherence properties of focused X-ray beams at high brilliance synchrotron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, A

    2013-01-01

    An analytical approach describing properties of focused partially coherent X-ray beams is presented. The method is based on the results of statistical optics and gives both the beam size and transverse coherence length at any distance behind an optical element. In particular, here we consider Gaussian Schell-model beams and thin optical elements. Limiting cases of incoherent and fully coherent illumination of the focusing element are discussed. The effect of the beam defining aperture, typically used in combination with focusing elements at synchrotron sources to improve transverse coherence, is also analyzed in detail. As an example the coherence properties in the focal region of compound refractive lenses at the PETRA III synchrotron source are analyzed.

  10. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  11. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  12. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  13. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  14. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  15. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of bragg-Fresnel optics etched on multilayer structures. Application: lenses for X-Ray imaging; Etude experimentale et theorique d`optiques de bragg-Fresnel gravees sur miroirs interferentiels multicouches. Application: lentilles pour l`imagerie X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soullie, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work concerns the study of a new type of X-ray focusing optics known as Bragg-Fresnel lenses developed for imaging in the X and X-UV range. These optics, etched on multilayer structure, combine the focusing properties of zone plate with the Bragg reflection of multilayer used like support. Using synchrotron sources and a plasma source produced by a laser, we tested the efficiency and the spatial resolution of these lenses. With a monochromatic beam, we first obtained the image of a object by using the first order diffraction of an elliptical off-axis Bragg-Fresnel lens. By using only one part of a lens, the superposition of different diffraction orders in focal plane can be avoided, thus improving the image contrast. In order to evaluate the chromatic aberrations of these lenses, we have summed on the same image, three exposures at different energies in the band pass of the multilayer. To reduce these kind of aberrations, we used a system composed of two off-axis lenses. To simplify the alignment, we tested an elliptical off-axis lens associated with a lamellar grating. Thus we are able to validate the theoretical approximation of an off-axis Bragg-Fresnel lens to a variable spaced grating. Finally, to show the perturbation brought by the zeroth order, we successively imaged a laser plasma source with a centred and an off-axis elliptical lenses. As with the synchrotron source, a set of images of a test object enabled us to improve the spatial resolution. (author).

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays to pass through them. As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air ...

  19. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  20. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  1. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  2. Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwiatkowski, Kris K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapustinsky, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-02

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ({approx}> 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are (a) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  3. Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, C L; Kapustinsky, J S; Kwiatkowski, K; Luo, S-N

    2012-10-01

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays (> or approximately equal to 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  4. Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhehui; Kapustinsky, J S; Kwiatkowski, K; Luo, S -N

    2012-01-01

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ($\\gtrsim$ 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are a.) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and b.) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  5. Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhehui; Morris, C. L.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Luo, S.-N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  6. NSLS-II X-ray diagnostics development

    CERN Document Server

    Ilinski, Petr

    2013-01-01

    NSLS-II x-ray diagnostics will provide continuous online data of electron beam dimensions, which will be used to derive electron beam emittance and energy spread. It will also provide information of electron beam tilt for coupling evaluation. X-ray diagnostics will be based on imaging of bending magnet and three-pole wiggler synchrotron radiation sources. Diagnostics from three-pole wiggler source will be used to derive particles energy spread. Beta and dispersion functions will have to be evaluated for emittance and particles energy spread calculations. Due to small vertical source sizes imaging need to be performed in x-ray energy range. X-ray optics with high numerical aperture, such as compound refractive lens, will be used to achieve required spatial resolution. Optical setups with different magnifications in horizontal and vertical directions fill be employed to deal with large aspect ratio of the source. X-ray diagnostics setup will include x-ray imaging optics, monochromatization, x-ray imaging and re...

  7. X-ray monitoring optical elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvydko, Yury; Katsoudas, John; Blank, Vladimir D.; Terentyev, Sergey A.

    2016-12-27

    An X-ray article and method for analyzing hard X-rays which have interacted with a test system. The X-ray article is operative to diffract or otherwise process X-rays from an input X-ray beam which have interacted with the test system and at the same time provide an electrical circuit adapted to collect photoelectrons emitted from an X-ray optical element of the X-ray article to analyze features of the test system.

  8. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment.

  9. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertin, F., E-mail: fauzia.albertin@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Astolfo, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Stampanoni, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); ETHZ, Zürich (Switzerland); Peccenini, Eva [University of Ferrara (Italy); Technopole of Ferrara (Italy); Hwu, Y. [Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kaplan, F. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-01-30

    The heavy-element content of ink in ancient administrative documents makes it possible to detect the characters with different synchrotron imaging techniques, based on attenuation or refraction. This is the first step in the direction of non-interactive virtual X-ray reading. Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page ‘reading’. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project.

  10. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bony fragments following treatment of a fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement ... A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone x-ray makes images of any ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  16. CELESTIAL X-RAY SOURCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    sources, (4) the physical conditions in the pulsating x-ray source in the Crab Nebula , and (5) miscellaneous related topics. A bibliography of all work performed under the contract is given. (Author)

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... asked to wait until the radiologist determines that all the necessary images have been obtained. A bone ... while it may be barely seen, if at all, on a hip x-ray. For suspected spine ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency ... diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient's condition. Ultrasound imaging, which uses sound waves instead of ionizing ...

  19. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the ... individual patient's condition. Ultrasound imaging, which uses sound waves instead of ionizing radiation to create diagnostic images, ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... are easily accessible and are frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose ... bone x-ray makes images of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... patients and physicians. Because x-ray imaging is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency ... 06, 2016 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes and other locations, making it convenient for ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ... radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray images were maintained on large film sheets (much like a large photographic negative). Today, most ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in a hospital ... so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... code: Phone no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  13. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  14. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  15. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  16. X-ray Sensitive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    these published reports. There were two main types of X-ray detection methods: “indirect,” which uses a scintillation material coupled to a light...Reference 3), inorganic semiconductors (silicon [Si], cadmium zinc telluride [CdZnTe]) (Reference 4) and selenium (References 5 and 6), Ne-Xe...metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) X-ray dosimeters (Reference 24). Electrets may be charged by a range of methods

  17. X-ray laser; Roentgenlaser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Emil J.; Breiby, Dag W.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray is among the most important research tools today, and has given priceless contributions to all disciplines within the natural sciences. State of the art in this field is called XFEL, X-ray Free Electron Laser, which may be 10 thousand million times stronger than the x-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble. In addition XFEL has properties that allow the study of processes which previously would have been impossible. Of special interest are depictions on atomic- and molecular level by the use of x-ray holographic methods, and being able to study chemical reactions in nature's own timescale, the femtosecond. Conclusion: The construction of x-ray lasers is a natural development in a scientific field which has an enormous influence on the surrounding society. While the discovery of x-ray was an important breakthrough in itself, new applications appear one after the other: Medical depiction, dissemination, diffraction, DNA and protein structures, synchrotron radiation and tomography. There is reason to believe that XFEL implies a technological leap as big as the synchrotrons some decades ago. As we are now talking about studies of femtosecond and direct depiction of chemical reactions, it is obvious that we are dealing with a revolution to come, with extensive consequences, both scientifically and culturally. (EW)

  18. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most ...

  19. Optical properties of X-rays--dynamical diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier, André

    2012-01-01

    The first attempts at measuring the optical properties of X-rays such as refraction, reflection and diffraction are described. The main ideas forming the basis of Ewald's thesis in 1912 are then summarized. The first extension of Ewald's thesis to the X-ray case is the introduction of the reciprocal lattice. In the next step, the principles of the three versions of the dynamical theory of diffraction, by Darwin, Ewald and Laue, are given. It is shown how the comparison of the dynamical and geometrical theories of diffraction led Darwin to propose his extinction theory. The main optical properties of X-ray wavefields at the Bragg incidence are then reviewed: Pendellösung, shift of the Bragg peak, fine structure of Kossel lines, standing waves, anomalous absorption, paths of wavefields inside the crystal, Borrmann fan and double refraction. Lastly, some of the modern applications of the dynamical theory are briefly outlined: X-ray topography, location of adsorbed atoms at crystal surfaces, optical devices for synchrotron radiation and X-ray interferometry.

  20. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  1. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, F.; Astolfo, A.; Stampanoni, M.; Peccenini, Eva; Hwu, Y.; Kaplan, F.; Margaritondo, G.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page ‘reading’. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project. PMID:25723946

  2. Development of microchannel plate x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research program was to develop a novel technique for focusing x-rays based on the optical system of a lobster's eye. A lobster eye employs many closely packed reflecting surfaces arranged within a spherical or cylindrical shell. These optics have two unique properties: they have unlimited fields of view and can be manufactured via replication of identical structures. Because the angular resolution is given by the ratio of the size of the individual optical elements to the focal length, optical elements with size on the order of one hundred microns are required to achieve good angular resolution with a compact telescope. We employed anisotropic etching of single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of micron-scale optical elements. This technique, commonly referred to as silicon micromachining, is based on silicon fabrication techniques developed by the microelectronics industry. We have succeeded in producing silicon lenses with a geometry suitable for a 1-d focusing x-ray optics. These lenses have an aspect ratio (40:1) suitable for x-ray reflection and have very good optical surface alignment. We have developed a number of process refinements which improved the quality of the lens geometry and the repeatability of the etch process. In addition to the silicon fabrication, an x-ray beam line was constructed at Columbia for testing the optics. Most recently, we have done several experiments to find the fundamental limits that the anisotropic etch process placed on the etched surface roughness.

  3. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  4. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  5. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  6. Contextual Multivariate Segmentation of Pork Tissue from Grating-Based Multimodal X-Ray Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Nielsen, Mikkel S.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2013-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is increasingly used as a nondestructive method for studying three dimensional food structures. For meat products, studies have focused mainly on fat and protein content due to limited contrast capabilities of absorption based techniques. Recent advances in X-ray imaging...... have made novel X-ray image modalities available, where the refraction and scattering of X-rays is obtained simultaneously with the absorption properties, providing enhanced contrast for soft biological tissues. This paper demonstrates how data obtained from grating-based imaging can be segmented...

  7. Matching microlensing events with X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sartore, N

    2011-01-01

    The detection of old neutron stars and black holes in isolation is one of the cornerstones of compact object astrophysics. Microlensing surveys may help on this purpose since the lensing mechanism is independent of the emission properties of the lens. Indeed, several black hole candidates deriving through microlensing observations have been reported in the literature. The identification of counterparts, especially in the X-rays, would be a strong argument in favor of the compact nature of these lenses. We perform a cross-correlation between the catalogs of microlensing events by the OGLE, MACHO and MOA teams, and those of X-rays sources from XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. Based on our previous work, we select only microlensing events longer than 100 days, which should contain a large fraction of lenses as compact objects. Our matching criterion takes into account the positional coincidence in the sky. We find a single match between a microlensing event OGLE 2004-BLG-81 and the X-ray source 2XMM J180540.5-...

  8. An X-ray BBB Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John P; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuetgens, Ulrich; Materlik, Gerhard; Nishino, Yoshinori; Rostomyan, Armen; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina

    2004-09-01

    A new X-ray Michelson interferometer based on the BBB interferometer of Bonse and Hart and designed for X-rays of wavelength approximately 1 A was described in a previous paper. Here, a further test carried out at the SPring-8 1 km beamline BL29XUL is reported. One of the BBB's mirrors was displaced by a piezo to introduce the required path-length difference. The resulting variation of intensity with piezo voltage as measured by an avalanche photodiode could be ascribed to the phase variation resulting from the path-length change, with a small additional contribution from the change of the position of the lattice planes of the front mirror relative to the rest of the crystal. This 'Michelson fringe' interpretation is supported by the observed steady movement across the output beam of the interference fringes produced by a refractive wedge when the piezo voltage was ramped. The front-mirror displacement required for one complete fringe at the given wavelength is only 0.675 A; therefore, a quiet environment is vital for operating this device, as previous experiments have shown.

  9. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  10. Portable X-Ray Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  11. Coherent X-ray diffraction studies of mesoscopic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalin, Anatoly

    2015-12-15

    This thesis is devoted to three separate projects, which can be considered as independent. First, the dynamical scattering effects in the Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI) method are discussed. Based on the simulation results, a straightforward method for correction for the refraction and absorption artifacts in the Bragg CXDI reconstruction is suggested. The second part summarizes the results of an Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging experiment with a single colloidal crystal grain. A remarkable result is that positions of individual particles in the crystal lattice have been resolved in three dimensions. The third project is devoted to X-ray diffraction experimental studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystalline films upon incremental heating. Based on the results of the analysis a model of structural evolution of a colloidal crystal upon heating on nanoscopic and mesoscopic length scales is suggested.

  12. Elemental x-ray imaging using Zernike phase contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi-Gang; Chen, Jian; Wali, Faiz; Bao, Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Tian, Yang-Chao; Gao, Kun

    2016-10-01

    We develop an element-specific x-ray microscopy method by using Zernike phase contrast imaging near absorption edges, where a real part of refractive index changes abruptly. In this method two phase contrast images are subtracted to obtain the target element: one is at the absorption edge of the target element and the other is near the absorption edge. The x-ray exposure required by this method is expected to be significantly lower than that of conventional absorption-based x-ray elemental imaging methods. Numerical calculations confirm the advantages of this highly efficient imaging method. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825801) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11505188, and 11305173).

  13. Monte Carlo simulation applied in total reflection x-ray fluorescence: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meira, Luiza L. C.; Inocente, Guilherme F.; Vieira, Leticia D.; Mesa, Joel [Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica - Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    The X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a technique for the qualitative and quantitative determination of chemical constituents in a sample. This method is based on detection of the characteristic radiation intensities emitted by the elements of the sample, when properly excited. A variant of this technique is the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) that utilizes electromagnetic radiation as excitation source. In total reflection of X-ray, the angle of refraction of the incident beam tends to zero and the refracted beam is tangent to the sample support interface. Thus, there is a minimum angle of incidence at which no refracted beam exists and all incident radiation undergoes total reflection. In this study, we evaluated the influence of the energy variation of the beam of incident x-rays, using the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo NParticle) based on Monte Carlo method.

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ... This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation ... x-ray images are among the clearest, most detailed views of ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  16. X-rays and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray ( ... are the fastest and easiest way for your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area of the body being imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning devices will be used to help you maintain the ...

  19. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  20. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  3. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dislocations. In elderly or patients with osteoporosis, a hip fracture may be clearly seen on a CT scan, while it may be barely seen, if at all, on a hip x-ray. For suspected spine injury or other ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  6. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  7. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  8. Fo cusing p erformance of hard X-ray single Kinoform lens%Kinoform单透镜的硬X射线聚焦性能∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈直; 许良; 陈荣昌; 杜国浩; 邓彪; 谢红兰; 肖体乔

    2015-01-01

    Kinoform单透镜可以高效聚焦硬X射线至纳米量级,在X射线纳米显微学和纳米光谱学领域有着重要的应用前景。基于衍射光学和傅里叶光学理论,给出了X射线经由Kinoform单透镜聚焦的物理模型,基于数值模拟,研究了不同材料、光子能量、台阶数量和顶点曲率半径对Kinoform单透镜聚焦性能的影响。结果表明,孔径为1 mm的Kinoform单透镜对30 keV的X射线聚焦,可以得到14 nm焦斑、62µm焦深,且可实现4个量级的光强增益和大于30%的光强透过率。%Nowadays, X-ray nanoprobe plays an important role in many research fields, ranging from materials science to geophysics and environmental science, to biophysics and protein crystallography. Refractive lenses, mirrors, and Laue lenses, can all focus X-rays into a spot with a size of less than 50 nm. To design a refractive lens at fixed wavelengths, absorption in the lens material can be significantly reduced by removing 2π phase-shifting regions. This permits short focal length devices to be fabricated with small radii of curvatures at the lens apex. This feature allows one to obtain a high efficiency X-ray focusing. The reduced absorption loss also enables optics with a larger aperture, and hence improving the resolution for focusing. Since the single Kinoform lens can focus hard X-ray into a spot on a nanoscale efficiently, it has very important application prospect in X-ray nano-microscopy and nano-spectroscopy. We present a theoretical analysis of optical properties of the single Kinoform lens. Using Fermat’s principle of least time, an exact solution of the single Kinoform lens figure is derived. The X-ray diffraction theory is reviewed. The complex amplitude transmittance function of the X-ray single Kinoform lens is derived. According to Fourier optics and optical diffraction theory, we set up the physical model of X-ray single Kinoform lens focusing. Employing this physical model, we study

  9. Implementation of transformed lenses in bed of nails reducing refractive index maximum value and sub-unity regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Daniel R; Osipov, Andrey V; Quevedo-Teruel, Oscar

    2015-03-15

    Transformation optics with quasi-conformal mapping is applied to design a Generalized Maxwell Fish-eye Lens (GMFEL) which can be used as a power splitter. The flattened focal line obtained as a result of the transformation allows the lens to adapt to planar antenna feeding systems. Moreover, sub-unity refraction index regions are reduced because of the space compression effect of the transformation, reducing the negative impact of removing those regions when implementing the lens. A technique to reduce the maximum value of the refractive index is presented to compensate for its increase because of the transformation. Finally, the lens is implemented with the bed of nails technology, employing a commercial dielectric slab to improve the range of the effective refractive index. The lens was simulated with a 3D full-wave simulator to validate the design, obtaining an original and feasible power splitter based on a dielectric lens.

  10. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  11. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  12. Be/X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called "Be phenomenon", such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass transfer. Until recently, it was thought that the Be stars' disc was not significantly affected by the neutron star. In this review, I present the observational evidence accumulated in recent years on the interaction between the circumstellar disc and the compact companion. The most obvious effect is the tidal truncation of the disc. As a result, the equatorial discs in Be/X-ray binaries are smaller and denser than those around isolat...

  13. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  14. X-ray diagnostic developments in the perspective of DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Causa, F.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Choe, W.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, S.; Jang, J.; Hong, J.; Jeon, T.; Lee, H.

    2014-08-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostics at present are not adequate for a burning plasma experiment, neither in term of hardware nor as diagnostic conception. Detectors have to be radiation tolerant, easily shielded, with low sensitivity to neutrons and gammas and with energy discrimination. Layout and viewing capability should be more flexible, thanks to the use also of optical devices, going toward a configuration intermediate between discrete tomography and pure imaging. The general conception of these diagnostics should therefore evolve in the direction of pattern recognition for a real time feedback. This work is focused on the diagnostic developments undertaken at the ENEA- Frascati X-ray Laboratory, following in particular three directions: gas detector for fast and advanced high density tomography, C-MOS solid state imaging detectors for slow control and X-ray polycapillary optics. GEM gas detectors in photon counting mode (noise free) were developed in the range 1-30 keV having high efficiency, high time resolution (up to microseconds), energy discrimination in bands and optical flexibility. Discrimination of X-rays, neutrons and gammas has been demonstrated, thanks to the combination of intrinsic gain and discrimination thresholds, at neutron fluxes (107 n/s*cm2) comparable with the expected ones at the ports of ITER. GEM detectors are also extremely flexible in the design, allowing optimization of the measurements and solutions for shielding or minimization of the effect of background radiation. Two solid state C-MOS imagers working in photon counting mode, one based on Si semiconductor (Medipix-2, range 5-30 keV) and the other one having a CdTe sensor (Pixirad, range 2-100 keV) have been characterized in laboratory. C-MOS imagers have features and performances thoroughly complementary to the GEM detector and, thanks to their higher pixel density, could be used as remote imaging detectors coupled to optics. X-ray polycapillary lenses have been therefore studied in the

  15. X-ray diagnostic developments in the perspective of DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Causa, F. [Euratom-ENEA Association, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 45 - 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Murtas, F.; Claps, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Choe, W.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, S.; Jang, J.; Hong, J.; Jeon, T.; Lee, H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-21

    Soft X-ray diagnostics at present are not adequate for a burning plasma experiment, neither in term of hardware nor as diagnostic conception. Detectors have to be radiation tolerant, easily shielded, with low sensitivity to neutrons and gammas and with energy discrimination. Layout and viewing capability should be more flexible, thanks to the use also of optical devices, going toward a configuration intermediate between discrete tomography and pure imaging. The general conception of these diagnostics should therefore evolve in the direction of pattern recognition for a real time feedback. This work is focused on the diagnostic developments undertaken at the ENEA- Frascati X-ray Laboratory, following in particular three directions: gas detector for fast and advanced high density tomography, C-MOS solid state imaging detectors for slow control and X-ray polycapillary optics. GEM gas detectors in photon counting mode (noise free) were developed in the range 1-30 keV having high efficiency, high time resolution (up to microseconds), energy discrimination in bands and optical flexibility. Discrimination of X-rays, neutrons and gammas has been demonstrated, thanks to the combination of intrinsic gain and discrimination thresholds, at neutron fluxes (10{sup 7} n/s*cm{sup 2}) comparable with the expected ones at the ports of ITER. GEM detectors are also extremely flexible in the design, allowing optimization of the measurements and solutions for shielding or minimization of the effect of background radiation. Two solid state C-MOS imagers working in photon counting mode, one based on Si semiconductor (Medipix-2, range 5-30 keV) and the other one having a CdTe sensor (Pixirad, range 2-100 keV) have been characterized in laboratory. C-MOS imagers have features and performances thoroughly complementary to the GEM detector and, thanks to their higher pixel density, could be used as remote imaging detectors coupled to optics. X-ray polycapillary lenses have been therefore

  16. OPTICAL AND X-RAY PROPERTIES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AT INTERMEDIATE RESHIFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Carrasco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the cluster properties and investigate the galaxy population of a sample of low-luminosity X-ray galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts (z = 0:2-0:5. The study is based on deep imaging and spectroscopic observations and X-ray archival data. We discuss in detail the global cluster properties and galaxy content based on the analysis of the velocity distribution, the galaxy projected distribution, the cluster color-magnitude diagram, and the study of the mass distribution, based on weak lensing and X-ray emission, for one of the cluster located at z = 0:485.

  17. Hard X-ray view of microlensing events in RX J1131-1231

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, A; Walter, R

    2016-01-01

    RX J1131-1231 is a gravitationally lensed system which includes four images of a quasar lensed by an elliptical galaxy. The flux in the individual images is known to be affected by microlensing effect in the visible and X-ray bands. We study the multi-wavelength properties of RX J1131-1231 over a broad energy range, from optical to hard X-ray, during the periods of the microlensing caustic crossings. We aim to constrain the spatial extent of the X-ray emission region at different energies. We combine the data of the source monitoring in the visible band with the X-ray data of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board of SWIFT satellite and Chandra X-ray observatory. Inspecting the broad band spectrum and lightcurves of the source we identify several microlensing caustic crossing events, and study the details of variability of the source during these events. The caustic crossings of image A on MJD 55150 and 55500 produce strong variations of the overall X-ray flux from the source. In the soft X-ray band, the ca...

  18. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  19. X-ray phase contrast imaging at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ghazaly, M.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Kube, G.; Kunz, P.; Sharafutdinov, A.; Weber, T. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Experiments have been performed to explore the potential of the low emittance 855 MeV electron beam of the Mainz Microtron MAMI for imaging with coherent X-rays. Transition radiation from a micro-focused electron beam traversing a foil stack served as X-ray source with good transverse coherence. Refraction contrast radiographs of low absorbing materials, in particular polymer strings with diameters between 30 and 450 {mu}m, were taken with a polychromatic transition radiation X-ray source with a spectral distribution in the energy range between 8 and about 40 keV. The electron beam spot size had standard deviation {sigma}{sub h}=(8.6{+-}0.1) {mu}m in the horizontal and {sigma}{sub v}=(7.5{+-}0.1) {mu}m in the vertical direction. X-ray films were used as detectors. The source-to-detector distance amounted to 11.4 m. The objects were placed in a distance of up to 6m from the X-ray film. Holograms of strings were taken with a beam spot size {sigma}{sub v}=(0.50{+-}0.05) {mu}m in vertical direction, and a monochromatic X-ray beam of 6keV energy. A good longitudinal coherence has been obtained by the (111) reflection of a flat silicon single crystal in Bragg geometry. It has been demonstrated that a direct exposure CCD chip with a pixel size of 13 x 13 {mu}m{sup 2} provides a highly efficient on-line detector. Contrast images can easily be generated with a complete elimination of all parasitic background. The on-line capability allows a minimization of the beam spot size by observing the smallest visible interference fringe spacings or the number of visible fringes. It has been demonstrated that X-ray films are also very useful detectors. The main advantage in comparison with the direct exposure CCD chip is the resolution. For the Structurix D3 (Agfa) X-ray film the standard deviation of the resolution was measured to be {sigma}{sub f}=(1.2{+-}0.4) {mu}m, which is about a factor of 6 better than for the direct exposure CCD chip. With the small effective X-ray spot size

  20. Various clinical application of phase contrast X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Je, Jungho

    2008-02-01

    In biomedical application study using phase contrast X-ray, both sample thickness or density and absorption difference are very important factors in aspects of contrast enhancement. We present experimental evidence that synchrotron hard X-ray are suitable for radiological imaging of biological samples down to the cellular level. We investigated the potential of refractive index radiology using un-monochromatized synchrotron hard X-rays for the imaging of cell and tissue in various diseases. Material had been adopted various medical field, such as apoE knockout mouse in cardiologic field, specimen from renal and prostatic carcinoma patient in urology, basal cell epithelioma in dermatology, brain tissue from autosy sample of pakinson's disease, artificially induced artilrtis tissue from rabbits and extracted tooth from patients of crack tooth syndrome. Formalin and paraffin fixed tissue blocks were cut in 3 mm thickness for the X-ray radiographic imaging. From adjacent areas, 4 μm thickness sections were also prepared for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Radiographic images of dissected tissues were obtained using the hard X-rays from the 7B2 beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). The technique used for the study was the phase contrast images were compared with the optical microscopic images of corresponding histological slides. Radiographic images of various diseased tissues showed clear histological details of organelles in normal tissues. Most of cancerous lesions were well differentiated from adjacent normal tissues and detailed histological features of each tumor were clearly identified. Also normal microstructures were identifiable by the phase contrast imaging. Tissue in cancer or other disease showed clearly different findings from those of surrounding normal tissue. For the first time we successfully demonstrated that synchrotron hard X-rays can be used for radiological imaging of relatively thick tissue samples with great histological details.

  1. X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Scoliosis A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: escoliosis What It Is A scoliosis X-ray is a relatively safe and painless test ...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) A A A ... español Radiografía: fémur What It Is A femur X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  4. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  5. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  6. Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2010-08-04

    The experimental results described in this thesis demonstrate the successful synergy between the research fields described above: the development of an undulator source driven by laser-plasma accelerated electron beams. First efforts in this new field have led to the production of radiation in the visible to infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum [Schlenvoigt et al., 2008]. In contrast to these early achievements, the experiment described here shows the successful production of laser-driven undulator radiation in the soft-X-ray range with a remarkable reproducibility. The source produced tunable, collimated beams with a wavelength of {proportional_to}17 nm from a compact setup. Undulator spectra were detected in {proportional_to}70% of consecutive driver-laser shots, which is a remarkable reproducibility for a first proof-of-concept demonstration using ultra-high intensity laser systems. This can be attributed to a stable electron acceleration scheme as well as to the first application of miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with laseraccelerated beams. The lenses significantly reduce the electron beam divergence and its angular shot-to-shot fluctuations The setup of this experiment is the foundation of potential university-laboratory-sized, highly-brilliant hard X-ray sources. By increasing the electron energy to about 1 GeV, X-ray pulses with an expected duration of {proportional_to}10 fs and a photon energy of 1 keV could be produced in an almost identical arrangement. It can also be used as a testbed for the development of a free-electron laser of significantly smaller dimension than facilities based on conventional accelerators [Gruener et al., 2007]. Such compact sources have the potential for application in many fields of science. In addition, these developments could lead to ideal sources for ultrafast pump-probe experiments due to the perfect synchronization of the X-ray beam to the driver laser. (orig.)

  7. X-Ray Visions of SS Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory is the most sophisticated X-ray observatory launched by NASA. Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from highenergy regions of the universe, such as X-ray binary stars. On September 14, 2000, triggered by alerts from amateur astronomers worldwide, Chandra observed the outburst of the brightest northern dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of hundreds of amateur variable star astronomers and the Chandra X-Ray scientists and spacecraft specialists provided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena.

  8. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.R.; /SLAC; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  9. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  10. Perfect X-ray focusing via fitting corrective glasses to aberrated optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiboth, Frank; Schropp, Andreas; Scholz, Maria; Wittwer, Felix; Rödel, Christian; Wünsche, Martin; Ullsperger, Tobias; Nolte, Stefan; Rahomäki, Jussi; Parfeniukas, Karolis; Giakoumidis, Stylianos; Vogt, Ulrich; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Garrevoet, Jan; Falkenberg, Gerald; Galtier, Eric C; Ja Lee, Hae; Nagler, Bob; Schroer, Christian G

    2017-03-01

    Due to their short wavelength, X-rays can in principle be focused down to a few nanometres and below. At the same time, it is this short wavelength that puts stringent requirements on X-ray optics and their metrology. Both are limited by today's technology. In this work, we present accurate at wavelength measurements of residual aberrations of a refractive X-ray lens using ptychography to manufacture a corrective phase plate. Together with the fitted phase plate the optics shows diffraction-limited performance, generating a nearly Gaussian beam profile with a Strehl ratio above 0.8. This scheme can be applied to any other focusing optics, thus solving the X-ray optical problem at synchrotron radiation sources and X-ray free-electron lasers.

  11. The role of EBIT in X-ray laser research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J

    2007-01-25

    Back in the early 1980's the X-ray laser program required a new level of understanding and measurements of the atomic physics of highly charged ions. The electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was developed and built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the effort to understand and measure the cross sections and wavelengths of highly charged ions. In this paper we will discuss some of the early history of EBIT and how it was used to help in the development of X-ray lasers. EBIT's capability was unique and we will show some of the experimental results obtained over the years that were done related to X-ray lasers. As X-ray lasers have now become a table-top tool we will show some new areas of research that involve understanding the index of refraction in partially ionized plasmas and suggest new areas where EBIT may be able to contribute.

  12. X-ray phase imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2013-04-22

    A novel approach for hard x-ray phase contrast imaging with a laboratory source is reported. The technique is based on total external reflection from the edge of a mirror, aligned to intercept only half of the incident beam. The mirror edge thus produces two beams. The refraction x-rays undergo when interacting with a sample placed before the mirror, causes relative intensity variations between direct and reflected beams. Quantitative phase contrast and pure absorption imaging are demonstrated using this method.

  13. Differential X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a grating interferometer using a laboratory X-ray micro-focus tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Jung, Chang-Won [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Young-Jo; Kwon, Young-Man [Jeonbuk Technopark, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mi-Ran; Cho, Seung-Ryong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chon, Kwon-Su [Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide images with much greater soft-tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based images. In this paper, we describe differential X-ray phase-contrast images of insect specimens that were obtained using a grating-based Talbot interferometer and a laboratory X-ray source with a spot size of a few tens of micrometers. We developed the interferometer on the basis of the wavelength, periods, and height of the gratings; the field of view depends on the size of the grating, considering the refractive index of the specimen. The phase-contrast images were acquired using phase-stepping methods. The phase contrast imaging provided a significantly enhanced soft-tissue contrast compared with the attenuation data. The contour of the sample was clearly visible because the refraction from the edges of the object was strong in the differential phase-contrast image. Our results demonstrate that a grating-based Talbot interferometer with a conventional X-ray tube may be attractive as an X-ray imaging system for generating phase images. X-ray phase imaging obviously has sufficient potential and is expected to soon be a great tool for medical diagnostics.

  14. X-rays from solar system objects

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G Randall; Cravens, Thomas E; Lisse, Carey M; Dennerl, Konrad; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wargelin, Bradford J; Waite, J Hunter; Robertson, Ina; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Snowden, Steven L; Kharchenko, Vasili; 10.1016/j.pss.2006.11.009

    2010-01-01

    During the last few years our knowledge about the X-ray emission from bodies within the solar system has significantly improved. Several new solar system objects are now known to shine in X-rays at energies below 2 keV. Apart from the Sun, the known X-ray emitters now include planets (Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn), planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede), all active comets, the Io plasma torus (IPT), the rings of Saturn, the coronae (exospheres) of Earth and Mars, and the heliosphere. The advent of higher-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories has been of great benefit in advancing the field of planetary X-ray astronomy. Progress in modeling X-ray emission, laboratory studies of X-ray production, and theoretical calculations of cross-sections, have all contributed to our understanding of processes that produce X-rays from the solar system bodies. At Jupiter and Earth, both auroral and non-auroral disk X-ray emissions have been observed. X-ray...

  15. Photonic crystals at visible, x-ray, and terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Tushar

    Photonic crystals are artificial structures with a periodically varying refractive index. This property allows photonic crystals to control the propagation of photons, making them desirable components for novel photonic devices. Photonic crystals are also termed as "semiconductors of light", since they control the flow of electromagnetic radiation similar to the way electrons are excited in a semiconductor crystal. The scale of periodicity in the refractive index determines the frequency (or wavelength) of the electromagnetic waves that can be manipulated. This thesis presents a detailed analysis of photonic crystals at visible, x-ray, and terahertz frequencies. Self-assembly and spin-coating methods are used to fabricate colloidal photonic crystals at visible frequencies. Their dispersion characteristics are examined through theoretical as well as experimental studies. Based on their peculiar dispersion property called the superprism effect, a sensor that can detect small quantities of chemical substances is designed. A photonic crystal that can manipulate x-rays is fabricated by using crystals of a non-toxic plant virus as templates. Calculations show that these metallized three-dimensional crystals can find utility in x-ray optical systems. Terahertz photonic crystal slabs are fabricated by standard lithographic and etching techniques. In-plane superprism effect and out-of-plane guided resonances are studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, and verified by numerical simulations.

  16. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Lab.

    1996-08-01

    X-ray transmission imaging that creates image contrast from the distribution of the X-ray absorption coefficient is not sensitive to materials consisting of light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. On the other hand, the X-ray phase shift caused by the light elements is substantial enough to be detected even when absorption is almost zero. Hence, phase-contrast X-ray imaging is a promising technique for observing the structure inside biological soft tissues without the need for staining and without serious radiation exposure. Using fringe scanning X-ray interferometry, the X-ray phase shift caused by an object was measured. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of cancerous tissues using the measured phase shifts was enabled under tomographic configuration phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT). (author)

  17. A New Generation of X-ray Baggage Scanners Based on a Different Physical Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Speller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available X-ray baggage scanners play a basic role in the protection of airports, customs, and other strategically important buildings and infrastructures. The current technology of baggage scanners is based on x-ray attenuation, meaning that the detection of threat objects relies on how various objects differently attenuate the x-ray beams going through them. This capability is enhanced by the use of dual-energy x-ray scanners, which make the determination of the x-ray attenuation characteristics of a material more precise by taking images with different x-ray spectra, and combining the information appropriately. However, this still has limitations whenever objects with similar attenuation characteristics have to be distinguished. We describe an alternative approach based on a different x-ray interaction phenomenon, x-ray refraction. Refraction is a familiar phenomenon in visible light (e.g., what makes a straw half immersed in a glass of water appear bent, which also takes place in the x-ray regime, only causing deviations at much smaller angles. Typically, these deviations occur at the boundaries of all objects. We have developed a system that, like other “phase contrast” based instruments, is capable of detecting such deviations, and therefore of creating precise images of the contours of all objects. This complements the material-related information provided by x-ray attenuation, and helps contextualizing the nature of the individual objects, therefore resulting in an increase of both sensitivity (increased detection rate and specificity (reduced rate of false positives of baggage scanners.

  18. Hard-X-ray Zone Plates: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syue-Ren Wu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The technology to focus hard-X-rays (photon energy larger than 1–2 keV has made great progress in the past three years. The progress was particularly spectacular for lenses based on the Fresnel zone plate concept. The spatial resolution notably increased by a factor of three, opening up entirely new domains of application, specifically in biomedical research. As we shall see, this evolution is the result of a painstaking optimization of many different aspects rather than of a single technical breakthrough.

  19. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianxi; Macdonald, C A

    2013-02-07

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  20. Peripheral refraction and higher-order aberrations with cycloplegia and fogging lenses using the BHVI-EyeMapper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaraju, Ravi Chandra; Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Thomas, Varghese; Holden, Brien Anthony

    2016-01-01

    To determine if a fogging lens ameliorates accommodative effects driven by the closed-view design of the BHVI-EyeMapper (EM) instrument. We compared cycloplegic refraction and higher-order aberration measurements of the EM with those obtained with a fogging lens. Twenty-six, young, participants (15F, 25±5 years, range: 18-35 years, SE: +0.25 D and -3.50 D) with good ocular health were recruited. Five independent measurements of on- and off-axis refraction and higher-order aberrations were recorded across the horizontal visual field, under two conditions: non-cycloplegic measurements with +1.00 D fogging lens and cycloplegia, always in the same sequence. The contralateral eye was occluded during the measurements. Two drops of 1% Tropicamide delivered within 5 min facilitated cycloplegic measurements. All participants were refracted 30 min after installation of the second drop. Mean spherical equivalent measures of the non-cycloplegic condition were significantly more myopic than their cycloplegic counterparts (p<0.05); approximately by 0.50 D centrally, increasing to 1.00 D towards the periphery. The horizontal astigmatic component, J180, demonstrated small but statistically significant differences between the test conditions. Differences were predominant for eccentricities greater than 30°, in both nasal and temporal meridians. The oblique astigmatic component, J45, was not significantly different between the test conditions. The primary spherical aberration coefficient C(4, 0) was significantly less positive for the non-cycloplegic state than its cycloplegic counterpart. This result held true across the entire horizontal visual field. The horizontal coma and trefoil coefficients C(3, 1) and C(3, 3) were not significantly different between the two conditions. The use of +1.00 D fogging lens without cycloplegia did not provide complete relaxation of accommodation. The discrepancies between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic EM measurements were found to be more

  1. X-ray Absorption Towards The Einstein Ring Source PKS1830-211

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, S D; Mathur, Smita; Nair, Sunita

    1997-01-01

    PKS1830-211 is an unusually radio-loud gravitationally lensed quasar. In the radio, the system appears as two compact, dominant features surrounded by relatively extended radio emission which forms an Einstein Ring. As the line of sight to it passes close to our Galactic center, PKS1830-211 has not been detected in wave-bands other than the radio and X-ray so far. Here we present X-ray data of PKS1830-211 observed with ROSAT PSPC. The X-ray spectrum shows that absorption in excess of the Galactic contribution is highly likely, which at the redshift of the lensing galaxy ($z_l=0.886$) corresponds to N$_H=3.5^{+0.6}_{-0.5}\\times 10^{22}$ atoms cm$^{-2}$. The effective optical extinction is large, A$_V$(observed)\\gax5.8. When corrected for this additional extinction, the two point optical to X-ray slope \\aox\\ of PKS1830-211 lies just within the observed range of quasars. It is argued here that both compact images must be covered by the X-ray absorber(s) which we infer to be the lensing galaxy(galaxies). The dust...

  2. X-Ray Attenuation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D.; Toor, A.

    2000-03-03

    To minimize the pulse-to-pulse variation, the LCLS FEL must operate at saturation, i.e. 10 orders of magnitude brighter spectral brilliance than 3rd-generation light sources. At this intensity, ultra-high vacuums and windowless transport are required. Many of the experiments, however, will need to be conducted at a much lower intensity thereby requiring a reliable means to reduce the x-ray intensity by many orders of magnitude without increasing the pulse-to-pulse variation. In this report we consider a possible solution for controlled attenuation of the LCLS x-ray radiation. We suggest using for this purpose a windowless gas-filled cell with the differential pumping. Although this scheme is easily realizable in principle, it has to be demonstrated that the attenuator can be made short enough to be practical and that the gas loads delivered to the vacuum line of sight (LOS) are acceptable. We are not going to present a final, optimized design. Instead, we will provide a preliminary analysis showing that the whole concept is robust and is worth further study. The spatial structure of the LCLS x-ray pulse at the location of the attenuator is shown in Fig. 1. The central high-intensity component, due to the FEL, has a FWHM of {approx}100 {micro}m. A second component, due to the undulator's broad band spontaneous radiation is seen as a much lower intensity ''halo'' with a FWHM of 1 mm. We discuss two versions of the attenuation cell. The first is directed towards a controlled attenuation of the FEL up to the 4 orders of magnitude in the intensity, with the spontaneous radiation halo being eliminated by collimators. In the second version, the spontaneous radiation is not sacrificed but the FEL component (as well as the first harmonic of the spontaneous radiation) gets attenuated by a more modest factor up to 100. We will make all the estimates assuming that the gas used in the attenuator is Xenon and that the energy of the FEL is 8.25 keV. At

  3. Modern Developments in X-Ray and Neutron Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Erko, Alexei; Krist, Thomas; Michette, Alan G

    2008-01-01

    This volume describes modern developments in reflective, refractive and diffractive optics for short wavelength radiation as well as recent theoretical approaches to modelling and ray-tracing the X-ray and neutron optical systems. It is based on the joint research activities of specialists in X-ray and neutron optics from 11 countries, working together under the framework of the European Programme for Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST, Action P7) in the period 2002--2006. The chapters are written by leading specialists from European laboratories, universities and large facilities. In addition to new ideas and concepts, the contents provide a large amount of practical information about recently implemented devices and methods.

  4. X-ray beam splitting design for concurrent imaging at hard X-ray FELs and synchrotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberta, P., E-mail: peter.oberta@rigaku.com [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, Praha 8, CZ-18221 (Czech Republic); Rigaku, Novodvorská 994, Praha 4, CZ-14221 (Czech Republic); Mokso, R. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-11-21

    A new configuration of diffractive–refractive optics for beam splitting is investigated. The set-up can be applied to perform imaging with two beams simultaneously. It brings advantages toward dynamic studies using image guided diffraction or fluorescence spectroscopy. The optimal energy range of operation for the beam-splitter is between 7 keV and 24 keV, reaching best efficiency at an energy of 10 keV. Due to the long focusing distances (several tens of meters) created by the diffractive–refractive optics and the higher refraction efficiency in the softer energy range, the presented set-ups are ideal for hard X-ray FEL sources.

  5. Controlling X-rays With Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  6. Development of a CZT spectroscopic 3D imager prototype for hard X ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auricchio, N.; Caroli, E.; Basili, A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of focusing optics based on wide band Laue lenses operating from ∼60 keV up to several hundreds of keV is particularly challenging. This type of hard X-ray or gamma ray optics requires a high performance focal plane detector in order to exploit to the best its intrinsic capabiliti...

  7. Comparing the relative peripheral refraction effect of single vision and multifocal contact lenses measured using an autorefractor and an aberrometer: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaraju, Ravi C; Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Ho, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    To compare the contributions of single vision (SVCL) and multifocal contact lenses (MFCL) to the relative peripheral refraction (RPR) profiles obtained via an autorefractor and an aberrometer in a pilot study. Two instruments, Shin-Nippon NVision K5001 (SN) and COAS-HD, were modified to permit open field PR measurements. Two myopic adults (CF, RB) were refracted (cycloplegia) under eight conditions: baseline (no CL); three SVCLs: Focus Dailies(®) (Alcon, USA), PureVision(®) (Bausch & Lomb, USA) and AirOptix(®) (Alcon, USA); and four MFCLs: AirOptix(®) (Alcon, USA), Proclear(®) Distant and Near (Cooper Vision, USA), and PureVision(®) (Bausch & Lomb, USA). CLs had a distance prescription of -2.00D and for MFCLs, a +2.50D Add was selected. Five independent measurements were performed at field angles from -40° to +40° in 10° increments with both instruments. The COAS-HD measures were analyzed at 3mm pupil diameter. Results are reported as a change in the relative PR profile, as refractive power vector components: M, J180, and J45. Overall, at baseline, M, J180 and J45 measures obtained with SN and COAS-HD were considerably different only for field angles ≥±30°, which agreed well with previous studies. With respect to M, this observation held true for most SVCLs with a few exceptions. The J180 measures obtained with COAS-HD were considerably greater in magnitude than those acquired with SN. For SVCLs, the greatest difference was found at -40° for AirOptix SV (ΔCF=3.20D, ΔRB=1.56D) and for MFCLs it was for Proclear Distance at -40° (ΔCF=2.58D, ΔRB=1.39D). The J45 measures obtained with SN were noticeably different to the respective measures with COAS-HD, both in magnitude and sign. The greatest difference was found with AirOptix Multifocal in subject RB at -40°, where the COAS-HD measurement was 1.50D more positive. In some cases, the difference in the RPR profiles observed between subjects appeared to be associated with CL decentration. For most test

  8. Measurement of coherence length and incoherent source size of hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Yeong; Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jun, E-mail: limjun@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    We measured the spatial coherence length and incoherent source size of a hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II, the stored electron energy of which has been increased from 2.5 GeV to 3 GeV. The coherence length was determined by single-slit measurement of the visibility of the Fresnel diffraction pattern. The correlated incoherent source size was cross-checked for three different optics: the single slit, beryllium parabolic compound refractive lenses, and the Fresnel zone plate. We concluded that the undulator beamline has an effective incoherent source size (FWHM) of 540 μm (horizontal) × 50 μm (vertical)

  9. Measurement of coherence length and incoherent source size of hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Yeong; Hong, Chung Ki; Lim, Jun

    2014-04-01

    We measured the spatial coherence length and incoherent source size of a hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II, the stored electron energy of which has been increased from 2.5 GeV to 3 GeV. The coherence length was determined by single-slit measurement of the visibility of the Fresnel diffraction pattern. The correlated incoherent source size was cross-checked for three different optics: the single slit, beryllium parabolic compound refractive lenses, and the Fresnel zone plate. We concluded that the undulator beamline has an effective incoherent source size (FWHM) of 540 μm (horizontal) × 50 μm (vertical).

  10. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  11. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  12. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; William I. Milne; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://www.nanoconvergencejournal.com/content/2/1/1. Since the discovery of X-rays over a century ago the techniques applied to the engineering of X-ray sources have remained relatively unchanged. From the inception of thermionic electron sources, which, due to simplicity of fabrication, remain central to almost all X-ray applications, there have been few fundamental technological advances. However, with the emergence of ever more d...

  13. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  14. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  15. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  16. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Laboratory; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) enabling the observation of biological soft tissues without contrast enhancement has been developed. The X-ray phase shift caused by an object is measured and input to a standard CT reconstruction algorithm. A thousand times increase in the image sensitivity to soft tissues is achieved compared with the conventional CT using absorption contrast. This is because the X-ray phase shift cross section of light elements is about a thousand times larger than the absorption cross section. The phase shift is detected using an X-ray interferometer and computer analyses of interference patterns. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron X-ray source. Excellent image sensitivity is demonstrated in the observation of cancerous rabbit liver. The CT images distinguish cancer lesion from normal liver tissue and, moreover, visualize the pathological condition in the lesion. Although the X-ray energy employed and the present observation area size are not suitable for medical applications as they are, phase-contrast X-ray CT is promising for investigating the internal structure of soft tissue which is almost transparent for X-rays. The high sensitivity also provides the advantage of reducing X-ray doses. (author).

  17. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  18. The efficacy of x-ray pelvimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, J.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago); Garbaciak, J.A. Jr.; Ryan, G.M., Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Comparison is made of x-ray pelvimetry use on a public and private service in 1974 with experience in 1979, when the clinic service did no x-ray pelvimetry while the private service continued as before. It is concluded that the use of x-ray pelvimetry is inadequate as a predictor of cesarean section because of cephalopelvic disproportion, does not improve neonatal mortality, and poses potential hazards to the mother and fetus. Its use in the management of breech presentations is not currently established by our data. Guidelines are presented for the management of patients in labor without using x-ray pelvimetry.

  19. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  20. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  1. Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fangjun

    2011-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) will be China's first astronomical satellite. On board HXMT there are three kinds of slat-collimated telescopes, the High Energy X-ray Telescope (HE, 20-250 keV, 5000 cm^2), the Medium Energy X-ray Telescope (ME, 5-30 keV, 952 cm^2), and the Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE, 1-15 keV, 384 cm^2).

  2. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  3. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; hide

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  4. X-rays from the youngest stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  5. X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, T E

    2002-05-10

    The discovery of x-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was surprising given that comets are known to be cold. Observations by x-ray satellites such as the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT) indicate that x-rays are produced by almost all comets. Theoretical and observational work has demonstrated that charge-exchange collisions of highly charged solar wind ions with cometary neutral species can explain this emission. X-ray observations of comets and other solar system objects may be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the solar wind.

  6. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  7. Simulating X-ray diffraction of textured films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag W.; Bunk, Oliver; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2008-01-01

    Computationally efficient simulations of grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) are discussed, with particular attention given to textured thin polycrystalline films on supporting substrates. A computer program has been developed for simulating scattering from thin films exhibiting varying...... from the totally substrate-reflected beam ( two-beam approximation) and refraction effects are also included in the program, together with the geometrical intensity corrections associated with GIXD measurements. To achieve 'user friendliness' for scientists less familiar with diffraction......, the mathematically simplest possible descriptions are sought whenever feasible. The practical use of the program is demonstrated for a selected thin-film example, perylene, which is of relevance for organic electronics....

  8. Constraining the X-ray AGN halo occupation distribution: implications for eROSITA

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Priyanka; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Nath, Biman B

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray emission from active galactic nucleus (AGN) is a major component of extragalactic X-ray sky. In this paper, we use the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and halo occupation distribution (HOD) formalism to construct a halo model for the X-ray emission from AGNs. Verifying that the two inputs (XLF and HOD) are in agreement with each other, we compute the auto-correlation power spectrum in the soft X-ray band (0.5-2 kev) due to the AGNs potentially resolved by eROSITA mission and explore the redshift and mass dependence of the power spectrum. Studying the relative contribution of the Poisson and the clustering terms to the total power, we find that at multipoles $l\\lesssim 1000$ (i.e. large scales), the clustering term is larger than the Poisson term. We also forecast the potential of X-ray auto-correlation power spectrum and X-ray-lensing cross-correlation power spectrum using eROSITA and eROSITA-LSST surveys, respectively, to constrain the HOD parameters and their redshift evolution. In addition, we co...

  9. Muonic X-ray spectroscopy: Effect of the presence of protons on X-ray production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamadsalehi, F; Gheisari, R; Rahimi, N

    2016-01-01

    ... . The target has a high efficiency for analyzing characteristic X-rays in ion implantation. To predict the effect of the presence of protons on X-ray production, we have proposed a new kinetic schema...

  10. SMM X-ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith T.; Haisch, Bernhard M. (Compiler); Lemen, James R. (Compiler); Acton, L. W.; Bawa, H. S.; Claflin, E. S.; Freeland, S. L.; Slater, G. L.; Kemp, D. L.; Linford, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The range of observing and analysis programs accomplished with the X-Ray Polychromator (XRP) instruments during the decline of solar cycle 21 and the rise of the solar cycle 22 is summarized. Section 2 describes XRP operations and current status. This is meant as a guide on how the instrument is used to obtain data and what its capabilities are for potential users. The science section contains a series of representative abstracts from recently published papers on major XRP science topics. It is not meant to be a complete list but illustrates the type of science that can come from the analysis of the XRP data. There then follows a series of appendixes that summarize the major data bases that are available. Appendix A is a complete bibliography of papers and presentations produced using XRP data. Appendix B lists all the spectroscopic data accumulated by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS). Appendix C is a compilation of the XRP flare catalogue for events equivalent to a GOES C-level flare or greater. It lists the start, peak and end times as well as the peak Ca XIX flux.

  11. X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, Willi A [Institute of Medical Physics, University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestr. 91, D-91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-07-07

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  12. Microlensing Constraints on Quasar Spins and X-ray Reflection Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2017-08-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides a unique probe of the innermost parts of quasar accretion disks, close to the event horizon of supermassive black holes. Using Chandra monitoring data of six lenses from two Large Programs in Cycles 11 and 14/15, we identified two microlensing effects that can be used to constrain black hole spins and X-ray reflection regions for high redshift quasars. The first effect is the excess iron line equivalent widths of lensed quasars compared to normal AGN, and the second is the distribution of iron line peak energies of lensed quasars. A microlensing analysis of the iron line equivalent widths prefers high spin values and very steep iron line emissivity profiles for quasars at z~2. We will also discuss the prospect of measuring quasar spins with microlensing using the next generation of X-ray telescopes.

  13. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  14. X-ray lasers: Multicolour emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao

    2016-11-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US can now generate multicolour X-ray pulses with unprecedented brightness using the fresh-slice technique. The development opens the way to new forms of spectroscopy.

  15. X-Ray Detection Visits the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana; Pinto, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Film has been used to detect x-rays since the early days of their discovery by Rontgen. Although nowadays superseded by other techniques, film still provides a cheap means of x-ray detection, making it attractive in high-school or undergraduate university courses. If some sort of quantitative result is required, the film's optical absorbance or…

  16. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  17. X-raying clumped stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Oskinova, L M; Feldmeier, A

    2008-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of stellar winds. X-rays originate from optically thin shock-heated plasma deep inside the wind and propagate outwards throughout absorbing cool material. Recent analyses of the line ratios from He-like ions in the X-ray spectra of O-stars highlighted problems with this general paradigm: the measured line ratios of highest ions are consistent with the location of the hottest X-ray emitting plasma very close to the base of the wind, perhaps indicating the presence of a corona, while measurements from lower ions conform with the wind-embedded shock model. Generally, to correctly model the emerging X-ray spectra, a detailed knowledge of the cool wind opacities based on stellar atmosphere models is prerequisite. A nearly grey stellar wind opacity for the X-rays is deduced from the analyses of high-resolution X-ray spectra. This indicates that the stellar winds are strongly clumped. Furthermore, the nearly symmetric shape of X-ray emission line profiles can be explained if t...

  18. X-rays, clumping and wind structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskinova, Lidia; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Ignace, Richard; Feldmeier, Achim

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission is ubiquitous among massive stars. In the last decade, X-ray observations revolutionized our perception of stellar winds but opened a Pandora's box of urgent problems. X-rays penetrating stellar winds suffer mainly continuum absorption, which greatly simplifies the radiative transfer treatment. The small and large scale structures in stellar winds must be accounted for to understand the X-ray emission from massive stars. The analysis of X-ray spectral lines can help to infer the parameters of wind clumping, which is prerequisite for obtaining empirically correct stellar mass-loss rates. The imprint of large scale structures, such as CIRs and equatorial disks, on the X-ray emission is predicted, and new observations are testing theoretical expectations. The X-ray emission from magnetic stars proves to be more diverse than anticipated from the direct application of the magnetically-confined wind model. Many outstanding questions about X-rays from massive stars will be answered when the models and the observations advance.

  19. Cryogenic imaging x-ray spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco J.; van Baar, J.J.J.; de Boer, J.H.; Ridder, M.L.; Bruijn, M.P.; Germeau, A.; Hoevers, H.F.C.

    2005-01-01

    A micro-calorimeter array consisting of superconducting transition-edge sensors is under development for the X-ray imaging spectrometer on board of ESA's XEUS (X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy) mission. An array of 32 /spl times/ 32 pixels with a pixel size of 250 micron square is envisaged. So

  20. Low Energy X-Ray Diagnostics - 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Filtering, and Scattering of Soft X-Rays by Mirrors Victor Rehn Michelson Laboratory, Physics Division Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California...met with in K.Tregidgo, 18, 2003 (1979). the manufacture of X-ray optical components. In 32. W.P.Linnik, C. R. Acad. Sci. URSS ., 5, 210 (1933). general

  1. Phase-contrast microfocus X-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Henrique S.; Pereira, Gabriela R.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mails: henrique@lin.ufrj.br; gabriela@lin.ufrj.br; davi@lin.ufrj.br; ricardo@lin.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    A phase-contrast X-ray system was developed using a microfocus source. This system uses a highly coherent cone-beam with ten micrometers of minimal focal spot size in a free-space propagation method to obtain phase contrast imaging (PCI). The phase contrast technique relies on its ability to record intensity data which contains information on the X-ray's phase shift. In this technique, the contrast is obtained through refraction, differing from the conventional techniques that use the X-ray attenuation. The system was developed at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory (LIN), COPPE/UFRJ, and it utilizes a high-resolution image plate as a detector. This image plate has a high energy-efficiency in low energy. The results showed that the system allows obtaining high contrast images with less than fifty micrometers of resolution for low density samples and it can be used in several areas, mainly in biology, medical physics and in applications with composites materials. (author)

  2. New Insights into X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Casares, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    X-ray binaries are excellent laboratories to study collapsed objects. On the one hand, transient X-ray binaries contain the best examples of stellar-mass black holes while persistent X-ray binaries mostly harbour accreting neutron stars. The determination of stellar masses in persistent X-ray binaries is usually hampered by the overwhelming luminosity of the X-ray heated accretion disc. However, the discovery of high-excitation emission lines from the irradiated companion star has opened new routes in the study of compact objects. This paper presents novel techniques which exploits these irradiated lines and summarises the dynamical masses obtained for the two populations of collapsed stars: neutron stars and black holes.

  3. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberger, J. E-mail: joerg.freudenberger@med.siemens.de; Hell, E.; Knuepfer, W

    2001-06-21

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  4. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  5. An X-ray view of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, K P

    2013-01-01

    I present an overview of observational studies of quasars of all types, with particular emphasis on X-ray observational studies. The presentation is based on the most popularly accepted unified picture of quasars - collectively referred to as AGN (active galactic nuclei) in this review. Characteristics of X-ray spectra and X-ray variability obtained from various X-ray satellites over the last 5 decades have been presented and discussed. The contribution of AGN in understanding the cosmic X-ray background is discussed very briefly. Attempt has been made to provide up-to-date information; however, this is a vast subject and this presentation is not intended to be comprehensive.

  6. LOBSTER - New Space X-Ray telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudec, R. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Pina, L. [Faculty of Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Simon, V. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Sveda, L. [Faculty of Nuclear Science, Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Inneman, A.; Semencova, V. [Center for Advanced X-ray Technologies, Reflex, Prague (Czech Republic); Skulinova, M. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

    2007-04-15

    We discuss the technological and scientific aspects of fully innovative very wide-field X-ray telescopes with high sensitivity. The prototypes of Lobster telescopes designed, developed and tested are very promising, allowing the proposals for space projects with very wide-field Lobster Eye X-ray optics to be considered for the first time. The novel telescopes will monitor the sky with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They are expected to contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc. For example, the Lobster optics based X-ray All Sky Monitor is capable to detect around 20 GRBs and 8 XRFs yearly and this will surely significantly contribute to the related science.

  7. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  8. Globular Cluster X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, F

    2004-01-01

    After a brief historical overview we discuss the luminous X-ray sources in globular clusters of our Galaxy. This is followed by an overview of the very luminous X-ray sources studied in globular clusters of 14 other galaxies, and a discussion of their formation and the relation to X-ray sources outside globular clusters. We describe the discovery and classification of low-luminosity X-ray sources, and end the review with some remarks on the formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters. Observational results are summarized in three tables. Comments are very welcome. Please send them to F.W.M.Verbunt@astro.uu.nl and lewin@mit.edu.

  9. X-Rays from Green Pea Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    X-rays may have contributed to the heating and reionization of the IGM in the early universe. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) within small, low-metallicity galaxies are expected to be the main source of X-rays at this time. Since studying these high-redshift galaxies is currently impossible, we turn to local analogs that have the same properties the galaxies in the early are expected to have. A number of recent studies have shown an enhanced number of HMXBs in nearby low metallicity galaxies. We propose to observe a sample of metal-deficient luminous compact galaxies (LCG) in order to determine if the X-ray luminosity is enhanced relative to SFR, thereby providing further evidence to the importance of X-rays in the early universe.

  10. X-ray diffraction: instrumentation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Udriştioiu, Elena Gabriela; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful nondestructive technique for characterizing crystalline materials. It provides information on structures, phases, preferred crystal orientations (texture), and other structural parameters, such as average grain size, crystallinity, strain, and crystal defects. X-ray diffraction peaks are produced by constructive interference of a monochromatic beam of X-rays scattered at specific angles from each set of lattice planes in a sample. The peak intensities are determined by the distribution of atoms within the lattice. Consequently, the X-ray diffraction pattern is the fingerprint of periodic atomic arrangements in a given material. This review summarizes the scientific trends associated with the rapid development of the technique of X-ray diffraction over the past five years pertaining to the fields of pharmaceuticals, forensic science, geological applications, microelectronics, and glass manufacturing, as well as in corrosion analysis.

  11. X-ray modeling for SMILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, F.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zheng, J.; Yu, X. Z.; Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2016-12-01

    SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer) is a novel mission to explore the coupling of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system via providing global images of the magnetosphere and aurora. As the X-ray imaging is a brand new technique applied to study the large scale magnetopause, modeling of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emissions in the magnetosheath and cusps is vital in various aspects: it helps the design of the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) on SMILE, selection of satellite orbits, as well as the analysis of expected scientific outcomes. Based on the PPMLR-MHD code, we present the simulation results of the X-ray emissions in geospace during storm time. Both the polar orbit and the Molniya orbit are used. From the X-ray images of the magnetosheath and cusps, the magnetospheric responses to an interplanetary shock and IMF southward turning are analyzed.

  12. Fourier transform based iterative method for x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    Biological soft tissues encountered in clinical and pre-clinical imaging mainly consist of light element atoms, and their composition is nearly uniform with little density variation. Thus, x-ray attenuation imaging suffers from low image contrast resolution. By contrast, x-ray phase shift of soft tissues is about a thousand times greater than x-ray absorption over the diagnostic energy range, thereby a significantly higher sensitivity can be achieved in terms of phase shift. In this paper, we propose a novel Fourier transform based iterative method to perform x-ray tomographic imaging of the refractive index directly from differential phase shift data. This approach offers distinct advantages in cases of incomplete and noisy data than analytic reconstruction, and especially suitable for phase-contrast interior tomography by incorporating prior knowledge in a region of interest (ROI). Biological experiments demonstrate the merits of the proposed approach.

  13. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-01-12

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

  14. Hard X-rays for processing hybrid organic-inorganic thick films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Carboni, Davide; Pinna, Alessandra; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Malfatti, Luca; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2016-01-01

    Hard X-rays, deriving from a synchrotron light source, have been used as an effective tool for processing hybrid organic-inorganic films and thick coatings up to several micrometres. These coatings could be directly modified, in terms of composition and properties, by controlled exposure to X-rays. The physico-chemical properties of the coatings, such as hardness, refractive index and fluorescence, can be properly tuned using the interaction of hard X-rays with the sol-gel hybrid films. The changes in the microstructure have been correlated especially with the modification of the optical and the mechanical properties. A relationship between the degradation rate of the organic groups and the rise of fluorescence from the hybrid material has been observed; nanoindentation analysis of the coatings as a function of the X-ray doses has shown a not linear dependence between thickness and film hardness.

  15. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  16. First X-ray fluorescence CT experimental results at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Biao; YANG Qun; XIE Hong-Lan; DU Guo-Hao; XIAO Wi-Qiao

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence CT is a non-destructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen. In this paper, the first experimental results of X-ray fluorescence CT obtained at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline (BL13W1) are described. The test samples were investigated and the 2D elemental image was reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. In the sample the element Cd was observed. Up to now, the X-ray fluorescence CT could be carried out at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline.

  17. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  18. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke's tabulated data.

  19. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao [Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8573 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke’s tabulated data.

  20. Searching for plasmas with anomalous dispersion in the soft X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Cheng, K T

    2007-08-24

    Over the last decade the electron density of plasmas has been measured using X-ray laser interferometers in the 14 to 47 nm wavelength regime. With the same formula used in decades of experiments with optical interferometers, the data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Over the last several years, interferometer experiments in C, Al, Ag, and Sn plasmas have observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 or 47 nm and demonstrated unequivocally that the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction is not always valid as the contribution from bound electrons can dominate the free electrons in certain cases. In this paper we search for other materials with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. An average atom code is used to calculate the plasma properties. This paper discusses the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Ne and Na plasmas near 47 nm and Xe plasmas near 14 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in 2 years the average atom code will be an invaluable tool to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be used to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  1. New Physical Optics Method for Curvilinear Refractive Surfaces and its Verification in the Design and Testing of W-band Dual-Aspheric Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    aspheric ( plano -convex) and (b) optimized dual- aspheric W-band PTFE lenses as needed for a non-paraxial system of Fig. 1 . . 10 3 Profiles of (a) full...is comparable with the given lens diameter Dc = 140mm. Following conventional solutions, non-paraxial lenses of plano -convex type are usually em...optimized by applying more advanced methods, e.g., full-wave approaches, etc. When considering plano -convex lenses by ray-tracing methods, we arrive at

  2. X-Ray Background from Early Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What impact did X-rays from the first binary star systems have on the universe around them? A new study suggests this radiation may have played an important role during the reionization of our universe.Ionizing the UniverseDuring the period of reionization, the universe reverted from being neutral (as it was during recombination, the previous period)to once again being ionized plasma a state it has remained in since then. This transition, which occurred between 150 million and one billion years after the Big Bang (redshift of 6 z 20), was caused by the formation of the first objects energetic enough to reionize the universes neutral hydrogen.ROSAT image of the soft X-ray background throughout the universe. The different colors represent different energy bands: 0.25 keV (red), 0.75 keV (green), 1.5 keV (blue). [NASA/ROSAT Project]Understanding this time period in particular, determining what sources caused the reionization, and what the properties were of the gas strewn throughout the universe during this time is necessary for us to be able to correctly interpret cosmological observations.Conveniently, the universe has provided us with an interesting clue: the large-scale, diffuse X-ray background we observe all around us. What produced these X-rays, and what impact did this radiation have on the intergalactic medium long ago?The First BinariesA team of scientists led by Hao Xu (UC San Diego) has suggested that the very first generation of stars might be an important contributor to these X-rays.This hypothetical first generation, Population III stars, are thought to have formed before and during reionization from large clouds of gas containing virtually no metals. Studies suggest that a large fraction of Pop III stars formed in binaries and when those stars ended their lives as black holes, ensuing accretion from their companions could produceX-ray radiation.The evolution with redshift of the mean X-ray background intensities. Each curve represents a different

  3. X-ray in Zeta-Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, M. A.; López-Santiago, J. L.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-05-01

    Nearby star-forming regions are ideal laboratories to study high-energy emission processes but they usually present high absorption what makes difficult to detect the stellar population inside the molecular complex. As young late-type stars show high X-ray emission and X-ray photons are little absorbed by interstellar material, X-ray dedicated surveys are an excellent tool to detect the low-mass stellar population in optically absorbed regions. In this work, we present a study of the star-forming region Zeta-Ori and its surroundings. We combine optical, infrared and X-ray data. Properties of the X-ray emiting plasma and infrared features of the young stellar objects detected in the XMM-Newton observation are determined. The southern part of the Orion B giant molecular cloud complex harbor other star forming regions, as NGC 2023 and NGC 2024, we use this regions to compare. We study the spectral energy distribution of X-ray sources. Combining these results with infrared, the X-ray sources are classified as class I, class II and class III objects. The X-ray spectrum and ligth curve of detected X-ray sources is analyzed to found flares. We use a extincion-independent index to select the stars with circumstellar disk, and study the relationship between the present of disk and the flare energy. The results are similar to others studies and we conclude that the coronal properties of class II and class III objects in this region do not differ significantly from each other and from stars of similar infrared class in the ONC.

  4. Development of high-resolution x-ray CT system using parallel beam geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Akio, E-mail: akio.yoneyama.bu@hitachi.com; Baba, Rika [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan); Hyodo, Kazuyuki [Institute of Materials Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeda, Tohoru [School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakano, Haruhisa; Maki, Koutaro [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry Showa University, Ota-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu [Kyushu Synchrotron Light Research Center, Tosu, Saga (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    For fine three-dimensional observations of large biomedical and organic material samples, we developed a high-resolution X-ray CT system. The system consists of a sample positioner, a 5-μm scintillator, microscopy lenses, and a water-cooled sCMOS detector. Parallel beam geometry was adopted to attain a field of view of a few mm square. A fine three-dimensional image of birch branch was obtained using a 9-keV X-ray at BL16XU of SPring-8 in Japan. The spatial resolution estimated from the line profile of a sectional image was about 3 μm.

  5. Structural and elemental X-ray microanalysis with synchrotron radiation in confocal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa, Carlos M. [IFEG-CONICET, (X5016LAE) Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba (Argentina); Sánchez, H. Jorge [IFEG-CONICET, (X5016LAE) Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba (Argentina); FAMAF, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, (X5016LAE) Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba (Argentina); Pérez, Carlos A. [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron – LNLS, POB 6192, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Perez, Roberto D., E-mail: danperez@famaf.unc.edu.ar [IFEG-CONICET, (X5016LAE) Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba (Argentina); FAMAF, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, (X5016LAE) Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2014-01-15

    A spectrometer for 3D structural and multielemental X-ray microanalysis with synchrotron radiation is presented in this work. It is based on the combination of the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and diffraction with polycapillary optics. The 3D spatial resolution was achieved by the superposition of the foci of two lenses arranged in confocal geometry. The parameters that affect the performance of the spectrometer were study in detail giving rise to a simplified calibration method for depth profile analysis. Two specific examples were included to illustrate the use of the spectrometer in order to identify their possible application fields.

  6. X-Ray observations of a subhalo associated with the NGC 4839 group infalling toward the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Kosuke; Okabe, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We report $Suzaku$ X-ray observations of the dark subhalo associated with the merging group of NGC 4839 in the Coma cluster. The X-ray image exhibits an elongated tail toward the southwest. The X-ray peak shifts approximately $1'$ away from the weak-lensing mass center toward the opposite direction of the Coma cluster center. We investigated the temperature, normalization, pressure, and entropy distributions around the subhalo. Excluding the X-ray tail, the temperature beyond the truncation radius is 8-10$~\\rm keV$, which is two times higher than that of the subhalo and the X-ray tail. The pressure is nearly uniform excluding southern part of the subhalo at two times of the truncation radius. We computed the gas mass within the truncation radius and the X-ray tail. While the gas fraction within the truncation radius is about 5 times smaller than that of regular groups, the gas mass in the subhalo and the X-ray tail to weak-lensing mass ratio is consistent with that of regular groups. Assuming the infall veloc...

  7. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  8. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  9. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale, design, and importance of an X-Ray Polarimeter. There is a brief discussion of Gamma Ray Bursts, followed by a review of the theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts Polarization. This leads to the question of "How do we measure the polarization?" and a discussion of the GRB x-ray emission, the photoelectric effect and photoelectric polarimetry. The requirements for the work, can only be approached using a gas detector. This leads to a discussion of a Micropattern Gas Polarimeter, and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) X-ray Polarimeter.

  10. Speckle Scanning Based X-ray Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berujon, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray near field speckle scanning concept is an approach recently introduced to obtain absorption, phase and darkfield images of a sample. In this paper, we demonstrate ways of recovering from a sample its ultra-small angle X-ray scattering distribution using numerical deconvolution, and the 2D phase gradient signal from random step scans, the latter being used to elude the flat field correction error. Each feature is explained theoretically and demonstrated experimentally at a synchrotron X-ray facility.

  11. Soft X-Ray Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    AND SUBTrI 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Soft X-ray Laser Development 61102F/2301/A8 L AUTHOR(S) ( Szymon Suckewer 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS...REPORT Report of Progress on Soft X-ray Laser Development submitted to Air Force Office of Scientific Research by Acession For DT!C T.IB Princeton...x-ray laser development by Jaegl6 and coworkers 6, however the present work on aluminium plasmas pumped with a low energy Nd laser was primarily

  12. The Future of X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    The most important next step is the development of X-ray optics comparable to (or better than) Chandra in angular resolution that far exceed Chandra s effective area. Use the long delay to establish an adequately funded, competitive technology program along the lines I have recommended. Don't be diverted from this objective, except for Explorer-class missions. Progress in X-ray optics, with emphasis on the angular resolution, is central to the paradigm-shifting discoveries and the contributions of X-ray astronomy to multiwavelength astrophysics over the past 51 years.

  13. X-rays from Alpha Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, J.; Garmire, G.

    1978-01-01

    HEAO 1 observations of soft X-ray emission from a point source in the vicinity of Alpha Cen are reported. The source, designated H1437-61, is tentatively identified with Alpha Cen, and an X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the sun in an active state is estimated. A temperature of about 500,000 K and an emission integral of 5 x 10 to the 50th per cu cm are obtained. Coronal emission is suggested as the X-ray-producing mechanism.

  14. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method w...

  15. Two methods for studying the X-ray variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Shu-Ping; Ji, Li; Méndez, Mariano; Wang, Na; Liu, Siming; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray aperiodic variability and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) are the important tools to study the structure of the accretion flow of X-ray binaries. However, the origin of the complex X-ray variability from X-ray binaries remains yet unsolved. We proposed two methods for studying the X-ray

  16. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  18. Milli X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Eagle III Micro XRF unit is similar to a traditional XRF unit, with the primary difference being that the X-rays are focused by a polycapillary optic into a spot...

  19. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks;(1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  20. Nonrelativistic quantum X-ray physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P

    2015-01-01

    Providing a solid theoretical background in photon-matter interaction, Nonrelativistic Quantum X-Ray Physics enables readers to understand experiments performed at XFEL-facilities and x-ray synchrotrons. As a result, after reading this book, scientists and students will be able to outline and perform calculations of some important x-ray-matter interaction processes. Key features of the contents are that the scope reaches beyond the dipole approximation when necessary and that it includes short-pulse interactions. To aid the reader in this transition, some relevant examples are discussed in detail, while non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics help readers to obtain an in-depth understanding of the formalisms and processes. The text presupposes a basic (undergraduate-level) understanding of mechanics, electrodynamics, and quantum mechanics. However, more specialized concepts in these fields are introduced and the reader is directed to appropriate references. While primarily benefiting users of x-ray light-sou...

  1. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  2. Cold X-Ray Impulse Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPeso, G.

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this short note is to document comparisons between a simple analytic model and the BUCKL[1]x-ray deposition and impulse code and to briefly demonstrate the effect of deposition time on impulse.

  3. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, A; Kawamoto, S; Hamaishi, Y; Takai, K; Suzuki, Y

    2003-01-01

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  4. X-ray crystallographic studies of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbeda, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins require metals for their physiological function. In combination with spectroscopic characterizations, X-ray crystallography is a very powerful method to correlate the function of protein-bound metal sites with their structure. Due to their special X-ray scattering properties, specific metals may be located in metalloprotein structures and eventually used for phasing the diffracted X-rays by the method of Multi-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion (MAD). How this is done is the principle subject of this chapter. Attention is also given to the crystallographic characterization of different oxidation states of redox active metals and to the complication of structural changes that may be induced by X-ray irradiation of protein crystals.

  5. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  6. Experimental x-ray ghost imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard x-ray energy range. We used a synchrotron x-ray beam that was split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultra-fast imaging camera, we were able to image x-rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam was correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured on the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x-rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in non-destructive structural characterization using Free Electron Lasers.

  7. X-ray source for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  8. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  9. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Durbin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity. Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4, a semiconductor (gallium arsenide, GaAs, and a metal (gold, Au, obtained with ∼100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  10. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  11. Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for X-Ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory works to further science and technology using short wavelength optical systems and techniques....

  12. Silicon Wafer X-ray Mirror Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this one year research project, we propose to do the following four tasks; (1) Design the silicon wafer X-ray mirror demo unit and develop a ray-tracing code to...

  13. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  14. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bones in the back of the neck (cervical vertebrae). During the examination, an X-ray machine sends ... or hand. It can detect fractures in the cervical vertebrae or dislocation of the joints between the vertebrae. ...

  15. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  16. X-ray microtomography in biology

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutani, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Progress in high-resolution x-ray microtomography has provided us with a practical approach to determining three-dimensional (3D) structures of opaque samples at micrometer to submicrometer resolution. In this review, we give an introduction to hard x-ray microtomography and its application to the visualization of 3D structures of biological soft tissues. Practical aspects of sample preparation, handling, data collection, 3D reconstruction, and structure analysis are described. Furthermore, different sample contrasting methods are approached in detail. Examples of microtomographic studies are overviewed to present an outline of biological applications of x-ray microtomography. We also provide perspectives of biological microtomography as the convergence of sciences in x-ray optics, biology, and structural analysis.

  17. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSherry, D.J

    2000-09-01

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The Laser-Produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron Al layer, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, broadly speaking, did not always agree with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron layer of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, where placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays where produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times. (author)

  18. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Declan Joseph

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The laser produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, did not always agree broadly with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, were placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays were produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, that the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times.

  19. Parametric X-rays at FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the generation of parametric X-rays (PXR) in the photoinjector at the new FAST facility at Fermilab. Detailed calculations of the intensity spectrum, energy and angular widths and spectral brilliance with a diamond crystal are presented. We also report on expected results with PXR generated while the beam is channeling. The low emittance electron beam makes this facility a promising source for creating brilliant X-rays.

  20. Lacquer polishing of X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catura, R. C.; Joki, E. G.; Roethig, D. T.; Brookover, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques for polishing figured X-ray optics by a lacquer-coating process are described. This acrylic lacquer coating has been applied with an optical quality of an eighth-wave in red light and very effectively covers surface roughness with spatial wavelengths less than about 0.2 mm. Tungsten films have been deposited on the lacquer coatings to provide highly efficient X-ray reflectivity.

  1. X- rays and matter- the basic interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    In this introductory article we attempt to provide the theoretical basis for developing the interaction between X-rays and matter, so that one can unravel properties of matter by interpretation of X-ray experiments on samples. We emphasize that we are dealing with the basics, which means that we ...... this article: J. Als-Nielsen, C. R. Physique 9 (2008). Udgivelsesdato: 18 April...

  2. Capacitor discharges, magnetohydrodynamics, X-rays, ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology, Volume 1: Capacitor Discharges - Magnetohydrodynamics - X-Rays - Ultrasonics deals with the theoretical and engineering problems that arise in the capacitor discharge technique.This book discusses the characteristics of dielectric material, symmetrical switch tubes with mercury filling, and compensation conductor forms. The transformed discharge for highest current peaks, ignition transformer for internal combustion engines, and X-ray irradiation of subjects in mechanical motion are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the transformed capacitor discharge in w

  3. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  4. Spectroscopy in X-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, R.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed features in cosmic X-ray sources and their associated temporal variation over a wide energy range were studied. Excess emission and absorption at approximately 6 to 7 kiloelectron volts in the spectra of supernova remnants, binary X-ray sources, and clusters of galaxies were observed. A gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) will be used as the detector system. In the gas scintillator the principal limitation is due to the statistics of the initial ionization process only.

  5. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity. Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic featur...

  6. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  7. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  8. X-ray Emission of Hollow Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoYongtao; XiaoGuoqing; ZhangXiaoan; YangZhihu; ChenXimeng; ZhangYanping

    2003-01-01

    We have systematically investigated the X-rays emission of hollow atoms (HA) which formed in the interaction of highly charged ions with a variety of solid surfaces at the atomic physics experimental setup of IMP. The X-ray spectra were measured by Si(Li) detectors with effective energy ranging from 1 keV to 60 keV. The results show that, the X-ray emission from the formed HA is closely correlated with the charge state of the projectile ions, and weakly correlated with the velocity of the projectile ions. For example, it was found that when Ar18+ ions interact with Be-target, the yield of K X-ray with character energy of 3.0 keV is 7.2×10-3 per ion, which is two times and 5 order of magnitude higher than those in the interactions of Ar17+ and Ar16+ ions respectively. When Ar15+ ions interact with the same targets, the Argon K X-ray would be too feeble to be detected. The X-ray yield with single ion in this experiment can be represented by the following equation,

  9. Coherence in X-ray physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengeler, B

    2001-06-01

    Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation sources have opened up the possibility of using coherent X-rays in spectroscopy and imaging. Coherent X-rays are characterized by a large lateral coherence length. Speckle spectroscopy is extended to hard X-rays, improving the resolution to the nm range. It has become possible to image opaque objects in phase contrast with a sensitivity far superior to imaging in absorption contrast. All the currently available X-ray sources are chaotic sources. Their characterization in terms of coherence functions of the first and second order is introduced. The concept of coherence volume, defined in quantum optics terms, is generalized for scattering experiments. When the illuminated sample volume is smaller than the coherence volume, the individuality of the defect arrangement in a sample shows up as speckle in the scattered intensity. Otherwise, a configurational average washes out the speckle and only diffuse scattering and possibly Bragg reflections will survive. The loss of interference due to the finite detection time, to the finite detector pixel size and to uncontrolled degrees of freedom in the sample is discussed at length. A comparison between X-ray scattering, neutron scattering and mesoscopic electron transport is given. A few examples illustrate the possibilities of coherent X-rays for imaging and intensity correlation spectroscopy.

  10. Optics Developments for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    X-ray optics has revolutionized x-ray astronomy. The degree of background suppression that these afford, have led to a tremendous increase in sensitivity. The current Chandra observatory has the same collecting area (approx. 10(exp 3)sq cm) as the non-imaging UHURU observatory, the first x-ray observatory which launched in 1970, but has 5 orders of magnitude more sensitivity due to its focusing optics. In addition, its 0.5 arcsec angular resolution has revealed a wealth of structure in many cosmic x-ray sources. The Chandra observatory achieved its resolution by using relatively thick pieces of Zerodur glass, which were meticulously figured and polished to form the four-shell nested array. The resulting optical assembly weighed around 1600 kg, and cost approximately $0.5B. The challenge for future x-ray astronomy missions is to greatly increase the collecting area (by one or more orders of magnitude) while maintaining high angular resolution, and all within realistic mass and budget constraints. A review of the current status of US optics for x-ray astronomy will be provided along with the challenges for future developments.

  11. Elliptical X-Ray Spot Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Richardson, Roger A.; Sampayan, Stephen; Weir, John T.

    2000-01-01

    The so-called roll bar measurement uses a heavy metal material, optically thick to x-rays, to form a shadow of the x-ray origination spot. This spot is where an energetic electron beam interacts with a high Z target. The material (the "roll bar") is slightly curved to avoid alignment problems. The roll bar is constructed and positioned so that the x-rays are shadowed in the horizontal and vertical directions, so information is obtained in two dimensions. If a beam profile is assumed (or measured by other means), the equivalent x-ray spot size can be calculated from the x-ray shadow cast by the roll bar. Thus the ellipticity of the beam can be calculated, assuming the ellipse of the x-ray spot is aligned with the roll bar. The data is recorded using a scintillator and gated camera. Data will be presented from measurements using the ETA II induction LINAC. The accuracy of the measurement is checked using small elliptical targets.

  12. The X-ray imager on AXO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.

    2001-02-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20×40 cm 2 CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  13. Echoes in X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    O'Brien, K; Hynes, R; Chen, W; Haswell, C; Still, M

    2002-01-01

    We present a method of analysing the correlated X-ray and optical/UV variability in X-ray binaries, using the observed time delays between the X-ray driving lightcurves and their reprocessed optical echoes. This allows us to determine the distribution of reprocessing sites within the binary. We model the time-delay transfer functions by simulating the distribution of reprocessing regions, using geometrical and binary parameters. We construct best-fit time-delay transfer functions, showing the regions in the binary responsible for the reprocessing of X-rays. We have applied this model to observations of the Soft X-ray Transient, GRO j1655-40. We find the optical variability lags the X-ray variability with a mean time delay of 19.3$pm{2.2}$ seconds. This means that the outer regions of the accretion disc are the dominant reprocessing site in this system. On fitting the data to a simple geometric model, we derive a best-fit disk half-opening angle of 13.5$^{+2.1}_{-2.8}$ degrees, which is similar to that observe...

  14. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.

  15. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabashi, Makina, E-mail: yabashi@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tono, Kensuke [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Mimura, Hidekazu [The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ishikawa, Tetsuya [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    Developments of optics for coherent X-ray applications and their role in diffraction-limited storage rings are described. Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed.

  16. Applications of the Generalized X-ray Diffraction Enhanced Imaging in the Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimenko, Anton; Hashimoto, Eiko; Ando, Masami; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) is the analyzer-based X-ray imaging technique which allows extraction of the "pure refraction" and "apparent absorption" contrasts from two images taken on the opposite sides of the rocking curve of the analyzing crystal. The refraction contrast obtained by this method shows many advantages over conventional absorption contrast. It was successfully applied in medicine, technique and other fields of science. However, information provided by the method is rather qualitative than quantitative. This happens because either side of the rocking curve of the analyzer is approximated as a straight line what limits the ranges of applicability and introduces additional error. One can easily overcome this problem considering the rocking curve as is instead of it's Taylor's expansion. This report is dedicated to the application of this idea in medical imaging and especially computed tomography based on the refraction contrast. The results obtained via both methods are presented and compared.

  17. High-resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of non-Bragg diffracting materials using phase retrieval X-ray diffractometry (PRXRD) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikulin, A.Y.; Darahanau, A.V.; Horney, R.; Ishikawa, T

    2004-06-15

    An X-ray diffraction technique has recently been developed and successfully applied to comprehensively, including both phase and amplitude contrast, map the complex refractive index of non-crystalline materials with submicron spatial resolution. The methodology is based on the measurement of a high angular resolution X-ray Fraunhofer diffraction pattern with further application of the phase-retrieval formalism using a logarithmic dispersion relation. The technique is reviewed from the perspective of its ability to deliver ultra-high, order of several nanometres, spatial resolution and to uniquely determine both the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index of the material under analysis. Potential niche of practical applications is discussed in terms of the spatial resolution and field of view achievable by the method.

  18. Advances in understanding the anomalous dispersion of plasmas in the X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R

    2008-09-24

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main computational tool has been the average atom code AVATOMKG that enables us to calculate the index of refraction for any plasma at any wavelength. In the last year we have improved this code to take into account many-atomic collisions. This allows the code to converge better at low frequencies. In this paper we present our search for plasmas with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. We discuss the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Na vapor and Ne plasmas near 47 nm where we predict large effects. We also discuss higher Z plasmas such as Ce and Yb plasmas that look very interesting near 47 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in another year we use the average atom code to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. In particular we look near the K shell lines of near solid carbon plasmas and predict strong effects. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  19. Characterization of germanium linear kinoform lenses at Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alianelli, L; Sawhney, K J S; Tiwari, M K; Dolbnya, I P; Stevens, R; Jenkins, D W K; Loader, I M; Wilson, M C; Malik, A

    2009-05-01

    The unprecedented brilliance achieved by third-generation synchrotron sources and the availability of improved optics have opened up new opportunities for the study of materials at the micrometre and nanometre scale. Focusing the synchrotron radiation to smaller and smaller beams is having a huge impact on a wide research area at synchrotrons. The key to the exploitation of the improved sources is the development of novel optics that deliver narrow beams without loss of brilliance and coherence. Several types of synchrotron focusing optics are successfully fabricated using advanced miniaturization techniques. Kinoform refractive lenses are being developed for hard X-ray beamlines, and the first test results at Diamond are discussed in this paper.

  20. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  1. In-laboratory diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging for articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehleman, Carol; Fogarty, Daniel; Reinhart, Benjamin; Tzvetkov, Tochko; Li, Jun; Nesch, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    The loss of articular cartilage characteristic of osteoarthritis can only be diagnosed by joint space narrowing when conventional radiography is used. This is due to the lack of X-ray contrast of soft tissues. Whereas conventional radiography harnesses the X-ray attenuation properties of tissues, Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI), a novel radiographic technique, allows the visualization of soft tissues simultaneous with calcified tissues by virtue of its ability to not only harness X-ray attenuation but also the X-ray refraction from tissue boundaries. Previously, DEI was dependent upon synchrotron X-rays, but more recently, the development of nonsynchrotron DEI units has been explored. These developments serve to elaborate the full potential of radiography. Here, we tested the potential of an in-laboratory DEI system, called Diffraction-Enhanced X-ray Imaging (DEXI), to render images of articular cartilage displaying varying degrees of degradation, ex vivo. DEXI allowed visualization of even early stages of cartilage degeneration such as surface fibrillation. This may be of eventual clinical significance for the diagnosis of early stages of degeneration, or at the very least, to visualize soft tissue degeneration simultaneous with bone changes.

  2. Piezo control for 1 nm spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofron, K. J.; Lauer, K.; Nazaretski, E.; Yan, H.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Greer, A.; Dalesio, B.; Chu, Y. S.

    2014-03-01

    A novel motion control system which utilizes the Power PMAC controller from Delta Tau Data Systems Inc., has been developed for positioning with 1 nm spatial resolution. Present work is a significant step forward towards commissioning of the X-ray microscope which will operate at the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline at the NSLS-II. The control system is capable of performing high-speed / high-accuracy on-the-fly scans of the sample with respect to the nano-focusing optics e.g. Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLL) or Fresnel X-ray Zone Plates (ZP) [1]. The Power PMAC controls piezoelectric-based nano-positioning stages using piezo-expansion for short range motion and stick-slip motion for longer travel distances. An EPICS interface to the Power PMAC has been developed allowing for easy integration into a beamline control environment.

  3. A Monte Carlo study of x-ray fluorescence in x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J M; Seibert, J A; Sabol, J M; Tecotzky, M

    1999-06-01

    Advances in digital x-ray detector systems have led to a renewed interest in the performance of x-ray phosphors and other detector materials. Indirect flat panel x-ray detector and charged coupled device (CCD) systems require a more technologically challenging geometry, whereby the x-ray beam is incident on the front side of the scintillator, and the light produced must diffuse to the back surface of the screen to reach the photoreceptor. Direct detector systems based on selenium have also enjoyed a growing interest, both commercially and academically. Monte Carlo simulation techniques were used to study the x-ray scattering (Rayleigh and Compton) and the more prevalent x-ray fluorescence properties of seven different x-ray detector materials, Gd2O2S, CsI, Se, BaFBr, YTaO4, CaWO4, and ThO2. The redistribution of x-ray energy, back towards the x-ray source, in a forward direction through the detector, and lateral reabsorption in the detector was computed under monoenergetic conditions (1 keV to 130 keV by 1 keV intervals) with five detector thicknesses, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 mg/cm2 (Se was studied from 30 to 1000 mg/cm2). The radial distribution (related to the point spread function) of reabsorbed x-ray energy was also determined. Representative results are as follows: At 55 keV, more (31.3%) of the incident x-ray energy escaped from a 90 mg/cm2Gd2O2S detector than was absorbed (27.9%). Approximately 1% of the total absorbed energy was reabsorbed greater than 0.5 mm from the primary interaction, for 90 mg/cm2 CsI exposed at 100 kVp. The ratio of reabsorbed secondary (fluorescence + scatter) radiation to the primary radiation absorbed in the detectors (90 mg/cm2) (S/P) was determined as 10%, 16%, 2%, 12%, 3%, 3%, and 0.3% for a 100 kVp tungsten anode x-ray spectrum, for the Gd2O2S, CsI, Se, BaFBr, YTaO4, CaWO4, and ThO2 detectors, respectively. The results indicate significant x-ray fluorescent escape and reabsorption in common x-ray detectors. These findings

  4. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  5. Single-shot x-ray differential phase-contrast and diffraction imaging using two-dimensional transmission gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Harold H; Bennett, Eric E; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F; Pai, Vinay

    2010-06-15

    We describe an x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging method based on two-dimensional transmission gratings that are directly resolved by an x-ray camera. X-ray refraction and diffraction in the sample lead to variations of the positions and amplitudes of the grating fringes on the camera. These effects can be quantified through spatial harmonic analysis. The use of 2D gratings allows differential phase contrast in several directions to be obtained from a single image. When compared to previous grating-based interferometry methods, this approach obviates the need for multiple exposures and separate measurements for different directions and thereby accelerates imaging speed.

  6. Handbook of X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Keith A. (Editor); Smith, Randall K.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    X-ray astronomy was born in the aftermath of World War II as military rockets were repurposed to lift radiation detectors above the atmosphere for a few minutes at a time. These early flights detected and studied X-ray emission from the Solar corona. The first sources beyond the Solar System were detected during a rocket flight in 1962 by a team headed by Riccardo Giaccom at American Science and Engineering, a company founded by physicists from MIT. The rocket used Geiger counters with a system designed to reduce non-X-ray backgrounds and collimators limiting the region of sky seen by the counters. As the rocket spun, the field of view (FOV) happened to pass over what was later found to be the brightest non-Solar X-ray source; later designated See X-1. It also detected a uniform background glow which could not be resolved into individual sources. A follow-up campaign using X-ray detectors with better spatial resolution and optical telescopes identified See X-1 as an interacting binary with a compact (neutron star) primary. This success led to further suborbital rocket flights by a number of groups. More X-ray binaries were discovered, as well as X-ray emission from supernova remnants, the radio galaxies M87 and Cygnus-A, and the Coma cluster. Detectors were improved and Geiger counters were replaced by proportional counters, which provided information about energy spectra of the sources. A constant challenge was determining precise positions of sources as only collimators were available.

  7. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  8. Therapeutic effects of rigid gas permeable contact lenses on refractive errors in keratoconus%RGPCL矫治圆锥角膜的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桥; 王菁; 陈谕; 刘虹

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the therapeutic effects of rigid gas permeable contact lenses ( RGPCL ) on the treatment of refractory errors in keratoconus .Methods This was a retrospective study .Thirty-two patients (62 eyes) with keratoconus were included .There were 24 males and 8 females, aged from 15 to 38 years old and averaged at 23.3 years. Subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the severity of keratoconus: phase I group ( n =22), corneal refraction was ≤48.00 D;phase II group ( n =15), corneal refraction ≤53.00 D, no corneal scar, and corneal thickness ≥400μm;phase III group ( n =13), cornealrefraction>53.00 D, the refractive error of myopia or astigmatism was up to -8. 00~-10.00 D, and the corneal thickness was thinned to 200~400μm, but no corneal scar;phase IV group ( n =12), corneal refraction was not measureable and there were corneal scars .Except 3 eyes in phase IV groupthat were waiting for-elective keratoplasty, other 59 eyes were prescribed with RGPCL, and best corrected visual acuity(BCVA) were compared for spectacles and RGPCL wearing using a paired t-test.The follow-up periods were between 3 and 24 months afterwards . Results (1) BCVA achieved with spectacles in phase I , II, III, and IV groups were 0.823 ±0.182, 0.468 ±0.248, 0.289 ±0.178, and 0.151 ±0.147, respectively.Accordingly, BCVA achieved with RGPCL were 0.955 ±0.106, 0.933 ±0.123, 0.831 ±0.197, and 0.678 ±0.277.Both spectacles and RGPCL BCVA generally deteriorated with the severity of keratoconus .BCVA achieved with RGPCL was significantly better than with spectacles at every disease phase .Paired t-test results in phase I, II, III, and IV were t =-3.321, P =0.003;t =-8.882, P =0.000;t =-7.408, P =0.000;and t =-8.262, P =0.000.2) BCVA achieved with RGPCL was significantly better than with spectacles in all 59 eyes as a whole group ( t =-10.218, P =0.000).3) There were 29 eyes (49.2%) prescribed with specially designed RG-PCL and 30 eyes (50.8%) prescribed with regular

  9. New achievements in X-ray optics——the X-ray lens and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An X-ray lens consists of a large number of X-ray capillaries. It can collect divergent X-rays emitted from an X-ray source and form a focused or parallel beam of high intensity. So it is an effective tool for adjusting and controlling wide bandwidth X-ray beams. In this paper, the X-ray lens made by the X-ray Optics Laboratory of Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics at Beijing Normal University and its applications in the field of X-ray analysis are presented.

  10. X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) system, and an X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Source: US2012008736A An X-ray diffraction contrast tomography system (DCT) comprising a laboratory X-ray source (2), a staging device (5) rotating a polycrystalline material sample in the direct path of the X-ray beam, a first X-ray detector (6) detecting the direct X-ray beam being transmitted...... through the crystalline material sample, a second X-ray detector (7) positioned between the staging device and the first X-ray detector for detecting diffracted X-ray beams, and a processing device (15) for analysing detected values. The crystallographic grain orientation of the individual grain...

  11. Manufacturing and testing of X-ray imaging components with high precision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jia-sheng; WU Xü

    2005-01-01

    In the latest 20 years, X-ray imaging technology has developed rapidly in order to meet the needs of X-ray photo-etching,spatial exploration technology, high-energy physics, procedure diagnosis of ICF,etc. Since refractive indices of materials in the X-ray region are lower than 1, and X-ray is strongly absorbed by materials, the characteristics of X-ray increase greatly difficulty to obtain X-ray image. Conventional imaging methods are hardly suitable to X-ray range. In general, grazing reflective imaging and coding aperture imaging methods have been adopted more and more.We have designed a non-coaxial grazing reflective X-ray microscope which is composed of four spherical mirrors, in order to satisfy the requirement of the diagnosis of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The four mirrors have the same radius of curvature. The radius of each mirror is 29 000 mm and the aperture is 30 mm×15 mm. Allowable tolerance of the radius is ≤0.2% and one of surface roughness (rms) is ≤0.6 nm. Evidently it is very difficult to fabricate and test such mirrors. In order to obtain eligible mirrors, we choose 18 mirror roughcasts and array them on a round disk according to format. The combined manufacturing method can ensure high accordant quality. The fabricated mirrors are tested by both templet and double round aperture methods. Radius errors of the mirrors is about 53 mm. The surface roughness (rms) of the mirrors is inspected by the relative interferometric equipment (WYKO) and atomic force microscope. Before and after coating the measured surface roughness is averagely 0.52 nm and 0.4 nm, respectively.

  12. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  13. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di racting properties of a x-ray di racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Bipin K

    1979-01-01

    Rontgen's discovery of X-rays in 1895 launched a subject which became central to the development of modern physics. The verification of many of the predic­ tions of quantum theory by X-ray spectroscopy in the early part of the twen­ tieth century stimulated great interest in thi's area, which has subsequently influenced fields as diverse as chemical physics, nuclear physics, and the study of the electronic properties of solids, and led to the development of techniques such as Auger, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The improvement of the theoretical understanding of the physics underlying X-ray spectroscopy has been accompanied by advances in experimental techniques, and the subject provides an instructive example of how progress on both these fronts can be mutually beneficial. This book strikes a balance between his­ torical description, which illustrates this symbiosis, and the discussion of new developments. The application of X-ray spectroscopic methods to the in­ vestigation of chemical b...

  15. Ultrafast X-ray pulse measurement method

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a measurement technique capable of resolving femtosecond X-ray pulses from XFEL facilities. Since these ultrashort pulses are themselves the shortest event available, our measurement strategy is to let the X-ray pulse sample itself. Our method relies on the application of a "fresh" bunch technique, which allows for the production of a seeded X-ray pulse with a variable delay between seed and electron bunch. The shot-to-shot averaged energy per pulse is recorded. It turns out that one actually measures the autocorrelation function of the X-ray pulse, which is related in a simple way to the actual pulse width. For implementation of the proposed technique, it is sufficient to substitute a single undulator segment with a short magnetic chicane. The focusing system of the undulator remains untouched, and the installation does not perturb the baseline mode of operation. We present a feasibility study and we make exemplifications with typical parameters of an X-ray FEL.

  16. Imaging in Hard X-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Li Ti Pei

    2002-01-01

    The energy range of hard X-rays is a key waveband to the study of high energy processes in celestial objects, but still remains poorly explored. In contrast to direct imaging methods used in the low energy X-ray and high energy gamma-ray bands, currently imaging in the hard X-ray band is mainly achieved through various modulation techniques. A new inversion technique, the direct demodulation method, has been developed since early 90s. With this technique, wide field and high resolution images can be derived from scanning data of a simple collimated detector. The feasibility of this technique has been confirmed by experiment, balloon-borne observation and analyzing simulated and real astronomical data. Based the development of methodology and instrumentation, a high energy astrophysics mission -- Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) has been proposed and selected in China for a four-year Phase-A study. The main scientific objectives are a full-sky hard X-ray (20-200 keV) imaging survey and high signal-to-noi...

  17. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  18. X-ray echo spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, was recently introduced [1] to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-meV and 0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power > 10^8) with broadband 5-13 meV dispersing systems will be presented featuring more than 1000-fold signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. [1.] Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, accepted (2016), arXiv:1511.01526.

  19. X-ray emission processes in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola

    2010-01-01

    A decade of X-ray stellar observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton has led to significant advances in our understanding of the physical processes at work in hot (magnetized) plasmas in stars and their immediate environment, providing new perspectives and challenges, and in turn the need for improved models. The wealth of high-quality stellar spectra has allowed us to investigate, in detail, the characteristics of the X-ray emission across the HR diagram. Progress has been made in addressing issues ranging from classical stellar activity in stars with solar-like dynamos (such as flares, activity cycles, spatial and thermal structuring of the X-ray emitting plasma, evolution of X-ray activity with age), to X-ray generating processes (e.g. accretion, jets, magnetically confined winds) that were poorly understood in the pre-Chandra/XMM-Newton era. I discuss the progress made in the study of high energy stellar physics and its impact in a wider astrophysical context, focusing on the role of spectral diagnostics no...

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jesse; Ollmann, Emily; Maxey, Evan; Finney, Lydia A

    2014-01-01

    Metalloproteins are enormously important in biology. While a variety of techniques exist for studying metals in biology, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is particularly useful in that it can determine the local electronic and physical structure around the metal center, and is one of the few avenues for studying "spectroscopically silent" metal ions like Zn(II) and Cu(I) that have completely filled valence bands. While X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are useful for studying metalloprotein structure, they suffer the limitation that the detected signal is an average of all the various metal centers in the sample, which limits its usefulness for studying metal centers in situ or in cell lysates. It would be desirable to be able to separate the various proteins in a mixture prior to performing X-ray absorption studies, so that the derived signal is from one species only. Here we describe a method for performing X-ray absorption spectroscopy on protein bands following electrophoretic separation and western blotting.

  1. Optics for coherent X-ray applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-09-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed.

  2. Thin Shell, Segmented X-Ray Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Thin foil mirrors were introduced as a means of achieving high throughput in an X-ray astronomical imaging system in applications for which high angular resolution were not necessary. Since their introduction, their high filling factor, modest mass, relative ease of construction, and modest cost have led to their use in numerous X-ray observatories, including the Broad Band X-ray Telescope, ASCA, and Suzaku. The introduction of key innovations, including epoxy replicated surfaces, multilayer coatings, and glass mirror substrates, has led to performance improvements, and in their becoming widely used for X-ray astronomical imaging at energies above 10 keV. The use of glass substrates has also led to substantial improvement in angular resolution, and thus their incorporation into the NASA concept for the International X-ray Observatory with a planned 3 in diameter aperture. This paper traces the development of foil mirrors from their inception in the 1970's through their current and anticipated future applications.

  3. Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, Lara

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenology of a subclass of High Mass X-ray Binaries hosting a blue supergiant companion, the so-called Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs), is reviewed. Their number is growing, mainly thanks to the discoveries performed by the INTEGRAL satellite, then followed by soft X-rays observations (both aimed at refining the source position and at monitoring the source behavior) leading to the optical identification of the blue supergiant nature of the donor star. Their defining properties are a transient X-ray activity consisting of sporadic, fast and bright flares, (each with a variable duration between a few minutes and a few hours), reaching 1E36-1E37 erg/s. The quiescence is at a luminosity of 1E32 erg/s, while their more frequent state consists of an intermediate X-ray emission of 1E33-1E34 erg/s (1-10 keV). Only the brightest flares are detected by INTEGRAL (>17 keV) during short pointings, with no detected persistent emission. The physical mechanism driving the short outbursts is still debated, al...

  4. Review of X-ray Tomography and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    This literature review will focus on both laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray tomography of materials and highlight the inner workings of these instruments. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy will also be reviewed and applications of the tandem use of these techniques will be explored. The real world application of these techniques during the internship will also be discussed.

  5. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (<100 fs) and intense (similar to 10(12) photons) pulses of hard X-rays, making them excellent sources for time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring hi...

  6. X-ray reflection in oxygen-rich accretion discs of ultracompact X-ray binaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madej, O. K.; Garcia, Jeronimo; Jonker, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present spectroscopic X-ray data of two candidate ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs): 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1543-624. We confirm the presence of a broad O viii Ly alpha reflection line (at a parts per thousand 18 angstrom) using XMM-Newton and Chandra observations obtained in 2012 and 2013. The ...

  7. X-ray Polarization from High Mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kallman, T; Blondin, J

    2015-01-01

    X-ray astronomy allows study of objects which may be associated with compact objects, i.e. neutron stars or black holes, and also may contain strong magnetic fields. Such objects are categorically non-spherical, and likely non-circular when projected on the sky. Polarization allows study of such geoemetric effects, and X-ray polarimetry is likely to become feasible for a significant number of sources in the future. A class of potential targets for future X-ray polarization observations is the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a compact object in orbit with an early type star. In this paper ws show that X-ray polarization from HMXBs has a distinct signature which depends on the source inclination and orbital phase. The presence of the X-ray source displaced from the star creates linear polarization even if the primary wind is spherically symmetric whenever the system is viewed away from conjunction. Direct X-rays dilute this polarization whenever the X-ray source is not eclipsed; at mid-eclips...

  8. X-ray Spectral Variation of Eta Carinae through the 2003 X-ray Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, K; Gull, T; Ishibashi, K; Pittard, J M; Hillier, D J; Damineli, A; Davidson, K; Nielsen, K E; Kober, G V; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Gull, Theodore; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Pittard, Julian M.; Damineli, Augusto; Davidson, Kris; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys Vieira

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of an X-ray observing campaign on the massive, evolved star Eta Carinae, concentrating on the 2003 X-ray minimum as seen by the XMM-Newton observatory. These are the first spatially-resolved X-ray monitoring observations of the stellar X-ray spectrum during the minimum. The hard X-ray emission, believed to be associated with the collision of Eta Carinae's wind with the wind from a massive companion star, varied strongly in flux on timescales of days, but not significantly on timescales of hours. The lowest X-ray flux in the 2-10 keV band seen by XMM-Newton was only 0.7% of the maximum seen by RXTE just before the X-ray minimum. The slope of the X-ray continuum above 5 keV did not vary in any observation, which suggests that the electron temperature of the hottest plasma associated with the stellar source did not vary significantly at any phase. Through the minimum, the absorption to the stellar source increased by a factor of 5-10 to NH ~3-4E23 cm-2. The thermal Fe XXV emission line show...

  9. Hard X-ray emission from neutron star X-ray binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salvo, T.; Santangelo, A.; Segreto, A

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we review our current knowledge of the hard X-ray emission properties of accreting X-ray Binary Pulsars and old accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries in light of 7 years of BeppoSAX and RXTE observations. The paper is divided in two parts. In the first part we review the more recent findings on the phase-dependent broad band continua and cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in many systems of the X-ray Binary Pulsar class. In the second part we review the hard X-ray emission of LMXRB focussing on the hard X-ray components extending up to energies of a few hundred keV that have been clearly detected in sources of both the atoll and Z classes. The presence and characteristics of these hard emission components are then discussed in relation to source properties and spectral state. We, also, briefly mention models that have been proposed for the hard X-ray emission of neutron star X-ray binaries.

  10. X-ray Polarization in Relativistic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, Aimee L; Wu, Kinwah

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the polarization properties of Comptonized X-rays from relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) using Monte Carlo simulations. We consider three scenarios commonly proposed for the observed X-ray emission in AGN: Compton scattering of blackbody photons emitted from an accretion disk; scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons; and self-Comptonization of intrinsically polarized synchrotron photons emitted by jet electrons. Our simulations show that for Comptonization of disk and CMB photons, the degree of polarization of the scattered photons increases with the viewing inclination angle with respect to the jet axis. In both cases the maximum linear polarization is approximately 20%. In the case of synchrotron self-Comptonization (SSC), we find that the resulting X-ray polarization depends strongly on the seed synchrotron photon injection site, with typical fractional polarizations of approximately P = 10 - 20% when synchrotron emission is localized near the jet base, while ...

  11. X-Ray Wakes in Abell 160

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, N; Sakelliou, I; Pinkney, J C; Drake, Nick; Merrifield, Michael R.; Sakelliou, Irini; Pinkney, Jason C.

    2000-01-01

    `Wakes' of X-ray emission have now been detected trailing behind a few (at least seven) elliptical galaxies in clusters. To quantify how widespread this phenomenon is, and what its nature might be, we have obtained a deep (70 ksec) X-ray image of the poor cluster Abell 160 using the ROSAT HRI. Combining the X-ray data with optical positions of confirmed cluster members, and applying a statistic designed to search for wake-like excesses, we confirm that this phenomenon is observed in galaxies in this cluster. The probability that the detections arise from chance is less than 0.0038. Further, the wakes are not randomly distributed in direction, but are preferentially oriented pointing away from the cluster centre. This arrangement can be explained by a simple model in which wakes arise from the stripping of their host galaxies' interstellar media due to ram pressure against the intracluster medium through which they travel.

  12. The quantum X-ray radiology apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Hilt, B; Prevot, G

    2000-01-01

    The paper entitled 'New Quantum Detection System for Very Low Dose X-ray Radiology', presented at the talk session, discusses the preliminary data obtained using a new quantum X-ray radiology system with a high-efficiency solid-state detector and highly sensitive electronics, making it possible to reduce significantly the dose administered to a patient in X-ray radiology examinations. The present paper focuses more on the technological aspects of the apparatus, such as the integration of the detector with the two Asics, and the computer system. Namely, it is shown how the computer system calibrates the detection system, acquires the data in real time, and controls the scan parameters and image filtering process.

  13. X-ray optics developments at ESA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavdaz, M.; Wille, E.; Wallace, K.;

    2013-01-01

    ) in collaboration with research institutions and industry, enabling leading-edge future science missions. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) [1 to 21] and Slumped Glass Optics (SGO) [22 to 29] are lightweight high performance X-ray optics technologies being developed in Europe, driven by applications in observatory class......Future high energy astrophysics missions will require high performance novel X-ray optics to explore the Universe beyond the limits of the currently operating Chandra and Newton observatories. Innovative optics technologies are therefore being developed and matured by the European Space Agency (ESA...... reflective coatings [30 to 35]. In addition, the progress with the X-ray test facilities and associated beam-lines is discussed [36]. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only....

  14. Contact x-ray microscopy using Asterix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Aldo; Batani, Dimitri; Botto, Cesare; Masini, Alessandra; Bernardinello, A.; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Moret, M.; Poletti, G.; Piccoli, S.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia Donin, C.; Stead, Anthony D.; Marranca, A.; Eidmann, Klaus; Flora, Francesco; Palladino, Libero; Reale, Lucia

    1997-10-01

    The use of a high energy laser source for soft x-ray contact microscopy is discussed. Several different targets were used and their emission spectra compared. The x-ray emission, inside and outside the Water Window, was characterized in detail by means of many diagnostics, including pin hole and streak cameras. Up to 12 samples holders per shot were exposed thanks to the large x-ray flux and the geometry of the interaction chamber. Images of several biological samples were obtained, including Chlamydomonas and Crethidia green algae, fish and boar sperms and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells. A 50 nm resolution was reached on the images of boar sperm. Original information concerning the density of inner structures of Crethidia green algae were obtained.

  15. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.F.; Kahn, S.M.; Lepson, J.K.; Savin, D.W.; Utter, S.B.

    2000-03-02

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in it's ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, XMM, ASCA and EUVE.

  16. Filtered fluorescer x-ray detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, H.C.; Emig, J.A.; Thoe, R.S.; Springer, P.T.; Hernandez, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, an instrument capable of measuring x-rays between 8 and 90 keV was conceived to help understand conditions pertaining to pulsed power research. This resulted in the development of a versatile device that would incrementally detect x-rays emitted at predetermined energy bands over this range. To accomplish this, an array of well characterized filter-fluorescer combinations were produced which would allow fluoresced x-rays to be observed by time resolved electro-optical devices. As many as sixteen channels could be utilized with each channel having a corresponding background channel. Upon completion of the device, a three week series of experiments was then successfully carried out.

  17. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  18. Bone diagnosis by X-ray techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo, 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, Zip Code: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br; Anjos, M.J. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo, 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, Zip Code: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Physics Institute, UERJ (Brazil); Farias, M.L.F. [University Hospital, UFRJ (Brazil); Parcegoni, N.; Rosenthal, D. [Biophysics Institute, UFRJ (Brazil); Duarte, M.E.L. [Histologic and Embriology Department, UFRJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo, 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, Zip Code: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    In this work, two X-ray techniques used were 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and X-ray microfluorescence (micro-XRF) in order to investigate the internal structure of the bone samples. Those two techniques work together, e.g. as a complement to each other, to characterize bones structure and composition. Initially, the specimens were used to do the scan procedure in the microcomputer tomography system and the second step consists of doing the X-ray microfluorescence analysis. The results show that both techniques are powerful methods for analyzing, inspecting and characterizing bone samples: they are alternative procedures for examining bone structures and compositions and they are complementary.

  19. Supernova remnants: the X-ray perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco

    2012-12-01

    Supernova remnants are beautiful astronomical objects that are also of high scientific interest, because they provide insights into supernova explosion mechanisms, and because they are the likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. X-ray observations are an important means to study these objects. And in particular the advances made in X-ray imaging spectroscopy over the last two decades has greatly increased our knowledge about supernova remnants. It has made it possible to map the products of fresh nucleosynthesis, and resulted in the identification of regions near shock fronts that emit X-ray synchrotron radiation. Since X-ray synchrotron radiation requires 10-100 TeV electrons, which lose their energies rapidly, the study of X-ray synchrotron radiation has revealed those regions where active and rapid particle acceleration is taking place. In this text all the relevant aspects of X-ray emission from supernova remnants are reviewed and put into the context of supernova explosion properties and the physics and evolution of supernova remnants. The first half of this review has a more tutorial style and discusses the basics of supernova remnant physics and X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas they contain. This includes hydrodynamics, shock heating, thermal conduction, radiation processes, non-equilibrium ionization, He-like ion triplet lines, and cosmic ray acceleration. The second half offers a review of the advances made in field of X-ray spectroscopy of supernova remnants during the last 15 year. This period coincides with the availability of X-ray imaging spectrometers. In addition, I discuss the results of high resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Chandra and XMM-Newton gratings. Although these instruments are not ideal for studying extended sources, they nevertheless provided interesting results for a limited number of remnants. These results provide a glimpse of what may be achieved with future microcalorimeters that will be available on board future X-ray

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency for x rays

    CERN Document Server

    Buth, Christian; Young, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is predicted for x rays in laser-dressed neon gas. The x-ray photoabsorption cross section and polarizability near the Ne K edge are calculated using an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. The laser wavelength is tuned close to the transition between 1s^-1 3s and 1s^-1 3p (approximately 800nm). The minimum laser intensity required to observe EIT is of the order of 10^12 W/cm^2. The ab initio results are discussed in terms of an exactly solvable three-level model. This work opens new opportunities for research with ultrafast x-ray sources.