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Sample records for refractions cycloplegic refractions

  1. Comparison of objective refraction in darkness to cycloplegic refraction: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Meehan, Kelly; Grk, Dejana; Cox, Misty

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to assess non-cycloplegic objective refraction in darkness using an open-field auto-refractor, and furthermore to compare it with distance cycloplegic subjective refraction and distance cycloplegic retinoscopy in the light, in children and young adults. Twenty-three, visually-normal, young-adults (46 eyes) ages 23 to 31 years, and five children (10 eyes) ages five to 12 years, participated in the study. The spherical component of their refraction ranged from -2.25 D to +3.75 D with a mean of +1.80 D, and a mean cylinder of -0.70 D. Three techniques were used to assess refractive error. An objective measure of the non-cycloplegic refractive state was obtained using an open-field autorefractor (WAM-5500) after five minutes in the dark to allow for dissipation of accommodative transients and relaxation of accommodation. In addition, both distance retinoscopy and subjective distance refraction were performed following cycloplegia (Cyclopentolate, 1%) using conventional clinical procedures. All measurements were obtained on the same day within a single session. The spherical component of the refraction was compared among the three techniques in both the children and adults. There was no significant difference in spherical refraction among the three techniques: non-cycloplegic objective refraction in the dark, distance cycloplegic retinoscopy and distance cycloplegic subjective refraction, in either the adults [F(2, 137) = 0.79, p = 0.45] or the children [F(2, 27) = 0.47, p = 0.62]. Mean difference in the spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance retinoscopy was -0.34 D (r = 0.89) in the adults and +0.14 D (r = 0.96) in the children. The mean difference in spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance subjective refraction was -0.25 D (r = 0.92) in the adults and -0.05 D (r = 0.95) in the children. Comparison of the spherical refractive component between the three techniques was not

  2. Cycloplegic refraction is the gold standard for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ian G; Iribarren, Rafael; Fotouhi, Akbar; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Many studies on children have shown that lack of cycloplegia is associated with slight overestimation of myopia and marked errors in estimates of the prevalence of emmetropia and hyperopia. Non-cycloplegic refraction is particularly problematic for studies of associations with risk factors. The consensus around the importance of cycloplegia in children left undefined at what age, if any, cycloplegia became unnecessary. It was often implicitly assumed that cycloplegia is not necessary beyond childhood or early adulthood, and thus, the protocol for the classical studies of refraction in older adults did not include cycloplegia. Now that population studies of refractive error are beginning to fill the gap between schoolchildren and older adults, whether cycloplegia is required for measuring refractive error in this age range, needs to be defined. Data from the Tehran Eye Study show that, without cycloplegia, there are errors in the estimation of myopia, emmetropia and hyperopia in the age range 20-50, just as in children. Similar results have been reported in an analysis of data from the Beaver Dam Offspring Eye Study. If the only important outcome measure of a particular study is the prevalence of myopia, then cycloplegia may not be crucial in some cases. But, without cycloplegia, measurements of other refractive categories as well as spherical equivalent are unreliable. In summary, the current evidence suggests that cycloplegic refraction should be considered as the gold standard for epidemiological studies of refraction, not only in children, but in adults up to the age of 50. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Optimal dosage of cyclopentolate 1% for cycloplegic refraction in hypermetropes with brown irides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwar Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To find the optimal dosage of cyclopentolate 1% for cycloplegic refraction in hypermetropes with brown irides, we investigated the difference in cycloplegic auto-refractions obtained after one, two, and three instillations in the same patient. The mean hypermetropia found after three instillations was statistically significantly more compared to that found after one instillation. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean hypermetropia between two and three instillations. There was no significant effect of gender, age, and the presence and type of horizontal deviation. These observations suggest that two drops of cyclopentolate 1% 10 min apart are sufficient for cycloplegic refraction in hypermetropes.

  4. Cyclopentolate as a cycloplegic drug in determination of refractive error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolinovska Sofija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycloplegia is loss of the power of accommodation with inhibition of a ciliary muscle. We obtain in this way the smallest refraction of the lens and make it possible to determine the presence and size of the particular refractive error in cycloplegia by using cyclopentolate. Cyclopentolate is a synthetic anticholinergic drug and antagonist of the muscarine receptors. If applied in the eye, it blocks the effect of cholinergic stimulation on the sphincter pupillae muscle and ciliary muscle. It provokes severe mydriasis (dilation of the pupil and cycloplegia (paralysis of the accommodation. Cyclopentolate has been used occasionaly in diagnostic purposes: defining ocular refraction and in ophthalmoscopy. This is the prospective study which included 200 children (400 eyes aged 3-18 years, carried out in one ambulatory ophthalmological examination. The results were analysed using standard statistical methods. The most often refractive error in the examined group of children is hyperopia with hyperopic astigmatism, then myopia with myopic astigmatism and mixtus astigmatism are the most often in the oldest group of children. The mean value of corneal astigmatism on the right eye was 1.24 D, on the left eye 1.23 D. Anisometropy was found in 40% children. The presence of myopia, myopic and astigmatism mixtus tended to increase, and hyperopia and hyperopic astigmatism tended to decrease toward older groups of children. Refractive error could result in a poor development of visual acuity, causing amblyopia and strabismus, and because of that represents an important public health problem. As one of amblyogenic risk factors in children, it can be prevented with screening program and appropriate treatment, thus providing prevention of amblyopia as one form of blindness.

  5. Non-cycloplegic spherical equivalent refraction in adults: comparison of the double-pass system, retinoscopy, subjective refraction and a table-mounted autorefractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Meritxell; Arjona, Montserrat; Pujol, Jaume; Peris, Elvira; Martínez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of spherical equivalent (SE) estimates of a double-pass system and to compare it with retinoscopy, subjective refraction and a table-mounted autorefractor. Non-cycloplegic refraction was performed on 125 eyes of 65 healthy adults (age 23.5±3.0 years) from October 2010 to January 2011 using retinoscopy, subjective refraction, autorefraction (Auto kerato-refractometer TOPCON KR-8100, Japan) and a double-pass system (Optical Quality Analysis System, OQAS, Visiometrics S.L., Spain). Nine consecutive measurements with the double-pass system were performed on a subgroup of 22 eyes to assess repeatability. To evaluate the trueness of the OQAS instrument, the SE laboratory bias between the double-pass system and the other techniques was calculated. The SE mean coefficient of repeatability obtained was 0.22D. Significant correlations could be established between the OQAS and the SE obtained with retinoscopy (r=0.956, Prefraction (r=0.955, Prefraction -0.23±0.50D; More myopic values were achieved by means of autorefraction 0.24±0.49D. The double-pass system provides accurate and reliable estimates of the SE that can be used for clinical studies. This technique can determine the correct focus position to assess the ocular optical quality. However, it has a relatively small measuring range in comparison with autorefractors (-8.00 to +5.00D), and requires prior information on the refractive state of the patient.

  6. Cycloplegic Refraction in Hyperopic Children: Effectiveness of a 0.5% Tropicamide and 0.5% Phenylephrine Addition to 1% Cyclopentolate Regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seul Gi; Cho, Myung Jin; Kim, Ungsoo Samuel; Baek, Seung Hee

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a cycloplegic regimen using 0.5% tropicamide and 0.5% phenylephrine (Tropherine, Hanmi Pharm), in addition to 1% cyclopentolate, in hyperopic children. The medical records of hyperopic patients below the age of 14 years who had undergone cycloplegic retinoscopy were retrospectively reviewed. Cycloplegic refractions were performed using one of two cycloplegic regimens. Regimen 1 was a Tropherine-added regimen comprising the administration of one drop of 1% cyclopentolate followed by two to three drops of Tropherine added at 15-minute intervals. Regimen 2 was a cyclopentolate-only regimen comprising the administration of three to four drops of 1% cyclopentolate at 15-minute intervals. The mean difference between noncycloplegic and cycloplegic refraction was compared between the two regimens. A total of 308 eyes of 308 hyperopic children were included. The mean difference (±standard deviation) in the spherical equivalent (SE) between cycloplegic and noncycloplegic refraction was significantly larger in regimen 2 than in regimen 1, with values of +1.70 ± 1.03 diopters (D) and +1.25 ± 0.89 D, respectively (p=0.001). The SE change after cycloplegia was significantly different between the two regimens only in patients aged 5 years or younger (p=0.001), particularly in those with high hyperopia with an SE ≥5 D (p=0.005) or fully accommodative esotropia (p=0.009). There was no significant difference between the two regimens in patients older than 5 years, regardless of the presence of high hyperopia or fully accommodative esotropia. The Tropherine-added regimen exerted a weaker cycloplegic effect than the cyclopentolate-only regimen, particularly in children under the age of 5 years with high hyperopia or fully accommodative esotropia. However, the difference in refraction between the two regimens was small. A Tropherine-added regimen can be effective in hyperopic children, with less associated discomfort than the instillation of

  7. Refractive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does the eye focus light? In order to see clearly, light rays from an object must focus onto the ... The refractive errors are: myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism [See figures 2 and 3]. What is hyperopia (farsightedness)? Hyperopia occurs when light rays focus behind the retina (because the eye ...

  8. Refraction test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that measures a person's prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses. ... can be done as part of a routine eye exam. The purpose is to determine whether you have a refractive error (a need for glasses or contact lenses). For people over age 40 who have normal ...

  9. Atmospheric Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere which assumes that the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate from sea level up to a height equal to eleven km, and that afterwards it remains constant. In this model, the temperature divided by the lapse rate determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes less than this height. But daily balloon measurements across the U.S.A. reveal that in some cases the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height of about one km, and only after reaching a plateau, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Moreover, in three examples considered here, the temperature does not remain constant at eleven km , but continues to decreases to a minimum at about sixteen kilometers , and then increases at higher altitudes at a lower rate. Calculations of atmospheric refraction based on this atmospheric data is compared with the results of simplified models.

  10. Uniform Refraction in Negative Refractive Index Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, Cristian E

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of constructing an optical surface separating two homogeneous, isotropic media, one of which has a negative refractive index. In doing so, we develop a vector form of Snell's law, which is used to study surfaces possessing a certain uniform refraction property, both in the near and far field cases. In the near field problem, unlike the case when both materials have positive refractive index, we show that the resulting surfaces can be neither convex nor concave.

  11. Uniform refraction in negative refractive index materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E; Stachura, Eric

    2015-11-01

    We study the problem of constructing an optical surface separating two homogeneous, isotropic media, one of which has a negative refractive index. In doing so, we develop a vector form of Snell's law, which is used to study surfaces possessing a certain uniform refraction property, in both the near- and far-field cases. In the near-field problem, unlike the case when both materials have positive refractive indices, we show that the resulting surfaces can be neither convex nor concave.

  12. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  13. Refraction near the horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  14. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  15. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of un

  16. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of

  17. Iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hagan, Ola

    2014-05-02

    In refraction tomography, the low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) can be a major obstacle in picking the first-break arrivals at the far-offset receivers. To increase the S/N, we evaluated iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry (ISVI), which is an extension of the supervirtual refraction interferometry method. In this method, supervirtual traces are computed and then iteratively reused to generate supervirtual traces with a higher S/N. Our empirical results with both synthetic and field data revealed that ISVI can significantly boost up the S/N of far-offset traces. The drawback is that using refraction events from more than one refractor can introduce unacceptable artifacts into the final traveltime versus offset curve. This problem can be avoided by careful windowing of refraction events.

  18. Comparison of non-cycloplegic photorefraction,cycloplegic photorefraction and cycloplegic retinoscopy in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozdemir; Ozdemir; Zuhal; ?zen; Tunay; Ikbal; Seza; Petrili; Damla; Ergintürk; Acar; Muhammet; Kazim; Erol

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the results of noncycloplegic photorefraction, cycloplegic photorefraction and cycloplegic refraction in preschool and non-verbal children.METHODS: One hundred and ninety-six eyes of 98children(50 females, 48 males) were included in the study. Firstly, non-cycloplegic photorefraction was achieved with Plusoptix A09; secondly, cycloplegic photorefraction was carried out with Plusoptix A09 after10 min cyclopentolate. Finally, 30 min after instillation of twice cyclopentolate, cycloplegic refraction was obtained with autorefraction and/or standard retinoscopy. Spheric equivalent, spheric power, cylindric power and cylindrical axis measurements were statistically compared.RESULTS: The mean age was 28.8±18.5mo(range12-72mo). The differences in spherical equivalent, spheric power and cylindrical power measured by the three methods were found statistically significant(P <0.05).The spherical equivalent and spheric power measured by cycloplegic photorefraction were statistically higher than the measurements of the other methods(P <0.05). The cylindrical power measured by cycloplegic refraction was statistically lower than the measurements of the photorefraction methods(P <0.05). There was no significant difference in cylindrical axis measurements between three methods(P >0.05).CONCLUSION: For the determination of refractive errors in children, the Plusoptix A09 measurements give incorrect results after instillation of cyclopentolate.Additionally, the cylindrical power measured by Plusoptix A09 with or without cycloplegia is higher. However, the non-cycloplegic Plusoptix A09 measures spheric equivalent and spheric power similar to cycloplegic refraction measurements in preschool and non-verbal children.

  19. Uncorrected refractive errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin S Naidoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC, were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  20. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  1. Myopia onset and role of peripheral refraction

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    Rotolo M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Maurilia Rotolo,1,2 Giancarlo Montani,2 Raul Martin1,3 1Optometry Research Group, IOBA Eye Institute, School of Optometry, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain; 2Optics and Optometry, Corso di Ottica e Optometria, Universita del Salento, Lecce, Italy; 3Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, School of Health Professions, Plymouth University, Peninsula Allied Health Centre, Plymouth, UK Background: To determine the peripheral refraction characteristics related to 18-month changes in refraction in Caucasian (Mediterranean children.Methods: Non-cycloplegic peripheral refraction at 10° intervals over the central ±30° of horizontal visual field over 18 months (baseline, 12 months, and 18 months of follow-up was conducted in 50 healthy children who were 8 years old. Axial length (AL was also recorded. Relative peripheral refraction (RPR was calculated and eyes were divided into three study groups: non-myopic eyes, myopic eyes, and eyes that develop myopia.Results: Myopic eyes showed hyperopic RPR and emetropic and hyperopic eyes showed myopic RPR. Univariate analysis of variance did not find any statistically significant effect of peripheral refraction (F36=0.13; P=1.00 and RPR (F36=0.79; P=0.80 on myopia onset (eyes that developed myopia along the study. All the studied groups showed an increase of AL, without statistically significant differences between the studied groups (F6=0.09; P=0.99.Conclusion: Hyperopic relative peripheral shift change in eyes that develop myopia has been found with differences in RPR between myopic (hyperopic RPR and hyperopic or emmetropic eyes (with myopic RPR. The results suggest that RPR cannot predict development or progression of myopia in Caucasian (Mediterranean children and the efficacy in slowing myopia progression obtained with treatments that manipulate the peripheral refraction is not just driven with RPR. Keywords: myopia, refractive errors, myopia onset, peripheral refraction, relative peripheral

  2. The child self-refraction study results from urban Chinese children in Guangzhou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingguang; Congdon, Nathan; MacKenzie, Graeme; Zeng, Yangfa; Silver, Joshua D; Ellwein, Leon

    2011-06-01

    To compare visual and refractive outcomes between self-refracting spectacles (Adaptive Eyecare, Ltd, Oxford, UK), noncycloplegic autorefraction, and cycloplegic subjective refraction. Cross-sectional study. Chinese school-children aged 12 to 17 years. Children with uncorrected visual acuity ≤ 6/12 in either eye underwent measurement of the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity, habitual correction, self-refraction without cycloplegia, autorefraction with and without cycloplegia, and subjective refraction with cycloplegia. Proportion of children achieving corrected visual acuity ≥ 6/7.5 with each modality; difference in spherical equivalent refractive error between each of the modalities and cycloplegic subjective refractive error. Among 556 eligible children of consenting parents, 554 (99.6%) completed self-refraction (mean age, 13.8 years; 59.7% girls; 54.0% currently wearing glasses). The proportion of children with visual acuity ≥ 6/7.5 in the better eye with habitual correction, self-refraction, noncycloplegic autorefraction, and cycloplegic subjective refraction were 34.8%, 92.4%, 99.5% and 99.8%, respectively (self-refraction versus cycloplegic subjective refraction, Prefraction and noncycloplegic autorefraction (which was more myopic) was significant (-0.328 diopter [D]; Wilcoxon signed-rank test Prefraction and self-refraction did not differ significantly (-0.009 D; Wilcoxon signed-rank test P = 0.33). Spherical equivalent differed by ≥ 1.0 D in either direction from cycloplegic subjective refraction more frequently among right eyes for self-refraction (11.2%) than noncycloplegic autorefraction (6.0%; P = 0.002). Self-refraction power that differed by ≥ 1.0 D from cycloplegic subjective refractive error (11.2%) was significantly associated with presenting without spectacles (P = 0.011) and with greater absolute power of both spherical (P = 0.025) and cylindrical (P = 0.022) refractive error. Self-refraction seems to be less

  3. Refraction corrections for surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  4. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  5. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid is measured in an apparatus comprising a variable wavelength coherent light source (16), a sample chamber (12), a wavelength controller (24), a light sensor (20), a data recorder (26) and a computation apparatus (28), by - directing...

  6. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature by observing an apparent angular shift in an interference fringe pattern produced by back or forward scattering interferometry, ambiguities in the measurement caused...

  7. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature, a chirp in the local spatial frequency of interference fringes of an interference pattern is reduced by mathematical manipulation of the recorded light intensity...

  8. Probing Superluminal Neutrinos Via Refraction

    OpenAIRE

    Stebbins, Albert

    2011-01-01

    One phenomenological explanation of superluminal propagation of neutrinos, which may have been observed by OPERA and MINOS, is that neutrinos travel faster inside of matter than in vacuum. If so neutrinos exhibit refraction inside matter and should exhibit other manifestations of refraction, such as deflection and reflection. Such refraction would be easily detectable through the momentum imparted to appropriately shaped refractive material inserted into the neutrino beam. For NuMI this could...

  9. Refraction in adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Barbara E K; Lee, Kristine E; Klein, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    To examine refraction, change in refraction, and risk factors for change in refraction in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Population-based study. Modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study refractions and a standard history were obtained for all participants. Baseline and 10-year follow-up data were available. Age and education were significantly associated with refraction in persons with younger-onset diabetes (T1D) and in those with older-onset diabetes (T2D); refractions were similar for both groups. Persons of similar age with T1D were likely to be more myopic than were those with T2D (P refraction in 10 years. Those with longer duration of diabetes and proliferative retinopathy were more likely to have hyperopic shifts in refraction. In persons with T2D, there was, on average, a +0.48-D change in refraction during the 10 years, but there was little consistency in the amount of change by age at baseline. In persons of similar age, those with T1D were likely to be slightly more myopic than were those with T2D. Overall, mean refraction and the important risk factors of age and education were similar to those reported in nondiabetic populations.

  10. [Peripheral refraction: cause or effect of refraction development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarutta, E P; Iomdina, E N; Kvaratskheliya, N G; Milash, S V; Kruzhkova, G V

    to study peripheral refraction and the shape of the eyeball in children with different clinical refraction. Using an original method, peripheral refraction was measured at 10-12 degrees temporally and nasally from the fovea in 56 right eyes with different clinical, or axial, refraction of 20 boys and 36 girls aged 7 to 16 years (11.9±1.17 years on average). The shape of the eyeball was judged of by the ratio of its anterior-posterior axial length (AL) to horizontal diameter (HD). The incidence and value of peripheral myopic defocus in children appeared to decrease with clinical refraction increasing from high hyperopia to high myopia. This was the first time, mixed peripheral refraction was found in children, occurring more frequently in higher myopia. This mixed peripheral defocus, shown to be a transitional stage between relative peripheral myopia and relative hyperopia, indicates non-uniform stretching of posterior pole tissues in the course of refraction development and myopia progression. As ocular refraction increases from high hyperopia to high myopia, the growth of AL outpaces that of HD. Obviously, natural peripheral defocus results from changes in size and shape of the eyeball in the course of refraction development.

  11. Negative refractive index metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willie J. Padilla

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Engineered materials composed of designed inclusions can exhibit exotic and unique electromagnetic properties not inherent in the individual constituent components. These artificially structured composites, known as metamaterials, have the potential to fill critical voids in the electromagnetic spectrum where material response is limited and enable the construction of novel devices. Recently, metamaterials that display negative refractive index – a property not found in any known naturally occurring material – have drawn significant scientific interest, underscoring the remarkable potential of metamaterials to facilitate new developments in electromagnetism.

  12. Metamaterials: Beyond of Refraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thanh Tung

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available When D. R. Smith, in 2000, for the first time observed the negative refraction in a metamaterial medium, the understanding of wave-matter interaction changed forever. The word “meta” means “beyond” in Greek, and in this sense, “metamaterials” refers to “beyond conventional materials”. Metamaterials are usually artificial and have properties which do not occur in natural materials. So, what is exciting about such artificial metamaterials which is attracting so much attention of current interest for the physicists, today?

  13. Negative refraction in photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Asatsuma, T.

    2008-01-01

    Photonic crystals are multidimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the crystals. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell’s law, can be tailored based on photonic band theory. Negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because photonic crystals usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at...

  14. Causality, Nonlocality, and Negative Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcella, Davide; Prada, Claire; Carminati, Rémi

    2017-03-31

    The importance of spatial nonlocality in the description of negative refraction in electromagnetic materials has been put forward recently. We develop a theory of negative refraction in homogeneous and isotropic media, based on first principles, and that includes nonlocality in its full generality. The theory shows that both dissipation and spatial nonlocality are necessary conditions for the existence of negative refraction. It also provides a sufficient condition in materials with weak spatial nonlocality. These fundamental results should have broad implications in the theoretical and practical analyses of negative refraction of electromagnetic and other kinds of waves.

  15. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  16. Negative refraction and positive refraction are not Lorentz covariant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackay, Tom G., E-mail: T.Mackay@ed.ac.u [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)] [NanoMM - Nanoengineered Metamaterials Group, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6812 (United States); Lakhtakia, Akhlesh, E-mail: akhlesh@psu.ed [NanoMM - Nanoengineered Metamaterials Group, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6812 (United States)

    2009-12-28

    Refraction into a half-space occupied by a pseudochiral omega material moving at constant velocity was studied by directly implementing the Lorentz transformations of electric and magnetic fields. Numerical studies revealed that negative refraction, negative phase velocity and counterposition are not Lorentz-covariant phenomenons in general.

  17. Effect of cycloplegia on the refractive status of children: the Shandong children eye study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan Hu

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of 1% cyclopentolate on the refractive status of children aged 4 to 18 years.Using a random cluster sampling in a cross-sectional school-based study design, children with an age of 4-18 years were selected from kindergardens, primary schools, junior and senior high schools in a rural county and a city. Auto-refractometry was performed before and after inducing cycloplegia which was achieved by 1% cyclopentolate eye drops.Out of 6364 eligible children, data of 5999 (94.3% children were included in the statistical analysis. Mean age was 10.0±3.3 years (range: 4-18 years. Mean difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error (DIFF was 0.78±0.79D (median: 0.50D; range: -1.00D to +10.75D. In univariate analysis, DIFF decreased significantly with older age (P<0.001;correlation coefficient r:-0.24, more hyperopic non-cycloplegic refractive error (P<0.001;r = 0.13 and more hyperopic cycloplegic refractive error (P<0.001;r = 0.49. In multivariate analysis, higher DIFF was associated with higher cycloplegic refractive error (P<0.001; standardized regression coefficient beta:0.50; regression coefficient B: 0.19; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.18, 0.20, followed by lower intraocular pressure (P<0.001; beta: -0.06; B: -0.02; 95%CI: -0.03, -0.01, rural region of habitation (P = 0.001; beta: -0.04; B: -0.07; 95%CI: -0.11, -0.03, and, to a minor degree, with age (P = 0.006; beta: 0.04; B: 0.009; 95%CI: 0.003, 0.016. 66.4% of all eyes with non-cycloplegic myopia (≤-0.50D remained myopic after cycloplegia while the remaining 33.6% of eyes became emmetropic (18.0% or hyperopic (15.7% under cycloplegia. Prevalence of emmetropia decreased from 37.5% before cycloplegia to 19.8% after cycloplegia while the remaining eyes became hyperopic under cycloplegia.The error committed by using non-cycloplegic versus cycloplegic refractometry in children with mid to dark-brown iris color decreased with older age, and in parallel

  18. Evaluation of the auto-refraction function of the Nidek OPD-Scan III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnigle, Samantha; Naroo, Shehzad A; Eperjesi, Frank

    2014-03-01

    The aim was to evaluate the validity and repeatability of the auto-refraction function of the Nidek OPD-Scan III (Nidek Technologies, Gamagori, Japan) compared with non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. The Nidek OPD-Scan III is a new aberrometer/corneal topographer workstation based on the skiascopy principle. It combines a wavefront aberrometer, topographer, autorefractor, auto keratometer and pupillometer/pupillographer. Objective refraction results obtained using the Nidek OPD-Scan III were compared with non-cycloplegic subjective refraction for 108 eyes of 54 participants (29 female) with a mean age of 23.7 ± 9.5 years. Intra-session and inter-session variability were assessed on 14 subjects (28 eyes). The Nidek OPD-Scan III gave slightly more negative readings than results obtained by subjective refraction (Nidek mean difference -0.19 ± 0.36 DS, p refraction. There was high intra-session and inter-session repeatability for all parameters; 90 per cent of inter-session repeatability results were within 0.25 D. The Nidek OPD-Scan III gives valid and repeatable measures of objective refraction when compared with non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  19. Refractive Index of Fly Rhabdomeres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    1974-01-01

    The refractive index reported previously for the rhabdomeres of flies (1.349) has been corrected for waveguide effects. The presented correction method has yielded n1 = 1.365 ± 0.006. It is argued that an acceptable estimate for the refractive index of the inhomogeneous surroundings of fly

  20. Diplopia associated with refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Burton J

    2012-01-01

    When diplopia occurs after refractive surgery, a systematized approach to diagnosis and treatment is useful. First, determine if the problem is monocular or binocular. Monocular diplopia usually is caused by anterior segment complications and should be referred to an anterior segment surgeon. If the problem is binocular, determine if there is iatrogenic monovision. If monovision was created by the refractive surgery, determine if the double vision is due to fixation switch diplopia. If so, the monovision state needs to be reversed. If fixation switch is not the cause of the symptoms, try "optical rescue". If monovision is not present, check old refraction and motility records, and correct any residual refractive error. Strabismus may need to be treated with surgery, orthoptic exercises, or prisms.

  1. Metamaterials and Negative Refractive Index

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. R. Smith; J. B. Pendry; M. C. K. Wiltshire

    2004-01-01

    .... Artificial magnetism and negative refractive index are two specific types of behavior that have been demonstrated over the past few years, illustrating the new physics and new applications possible...

  2. The uncorrected refractive error challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin Naidoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Refractive error affects people of all ages, socio-economic status and ethnic groups. The most recent statistics estimate that, worldwide, 32.4 million people are blind and 191 million people have vision impairment. Vision impairment has been defined based on distance visual acuity only, and uncorrected distance refractive error (mainly myopia is the single biggest cause of worldwide vision impairment. However, when we also consider near visual impairment, it is clear that even more people are affected. From research it was estimated that the number of people with vision impairment due to uncorrected distance refractive error was 107.8 million,1 and the number of people affected by uncorrected near refractive error was 517 million, giving a total of 624.8 million people.

  3. Refraction of light in media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Tao

    2007-01-01

    The roles of the magnetic field and electric field of the light are investigated when the light is refracted in the medium. The model of the electron cloud conductor is presented. Electron cloud in a molecule is treated as a conductor and the Faraday's Law is applied to this conductor that is in the alternating magnetic field of the light. dBM/dt of the light gives rise to an alternating induced current on the electron cloud conductor, and the light exchanges energy, i.e. the refractive energy, with the electron cloud conductor. Formulas of refractive index, which is the ratio of light speed in vacuum to that in the medium, are derived with this model. These formulas are tested with several mediums and Langevin's diamagnetic susceptibility of helium gas, and the results are in good agreement with the measured data. The anisotropy and the nonlinearity of the refractive index are explained with the theory described in this work.

  4. Negative Refraction at Visible Frequencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henri J. Lezec; Jennifer A. Dionne; Harry A. Atwater

    2007-01-01

    .... We demonstrate an experimental realization of a two-dimensional negative-index material in the blue-green region of the visible spectrum, substantiated by direct geometric visualization of negative refraction...

  5. Parsimonious Refraction Interferometry and Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2017-02-04

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry and tomography where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from two reciprocal and several infill shot gathers. The assumptions are that the refraction arrivals are head waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers and several infill shot gathers are recorded over the line of interest. Refraction traveltimes from these shot gathers are picked and spawned into O(N2) virtual refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. The virtual traveltimes can be inverted to give the velocity tomogram. This enormous increase in the number of traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the many fewer traveltimes from the reciprocal and infill shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and a better condition number with the system of normal equations. A significant benefit is that the parsimonious survey and the associated traveltime picking is far less time consuming than that for a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  6. [Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, H-J; Schmidt, O; Ritsche, A

    2014-11-01

    Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement is limited by various factors. The main factors affecting reproducibility include the characteristics of the measurement method and of the subject and the examiner. This article presents the results of a study on this topic, focusing on the reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes. The results of previous studies are not all presented in the same way by the respective authors and cannot be fully standardized without consulting the original scientific data. To the extent that they are comparable, the results of our study largely correspond largely with those of previous investigations: During repeated subjective refraction measurement, 95% of the deviation from the mean value was approximately ±0.2 D to ±0.65 D for the spherical equivalent and cylindrical power. The reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes is limited, even under ideal conditions. Correct assessment of refraction results is only feasible after identifying individual variability. Several measurements are required. Refraction cannot be measured without a tolerance range. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under supplemental).

  7. Refractive change following pseudophakic vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danjoux Jean-Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the occurrence and magnitude of refractive change in pseudophakic eyes undergoing 20 gauge pars plana vitrectomy without scleral buckling and to investigate possible aetiological factors. Methods Retrospective case note review of 87 pseudophakic eyes undergoing 20 gauge pars plana vitrectomy for a variety of vitreo-retinal conditions over a three-year period. Anterior chamber depth (ACD was measured before and after vitrectomy surgery in 32 eyes. Forty-three pseudophakic fellow eyes were used as controls. Results Eighty-seven eyes (84 patients were included in the study. Mean spherical equivalent refraction prior to vitrectomy was -0.20 dioptres, which changed to a mean of -0.65 dioptres postoperatively (standard deviation of refractive change 0.59, range-2.13 to 0.75 dioptres (p Mean ACD preoperatively was 3.29 mm and postoperatively 3.27 mm (p = 0.53 (n = 32 and there was no significant change in ACD with tamponade use. Regression analysis revealed no statistically significant association between changes in anterior chamber depth, as well as a wide variety of other pre-, intra and postoperative factors examined, and the refractive change observed. Conclusion Significant refractive changes occur in some pseudophakic patients undergoing 20 g pars plana vitrectomy. The mean change observed was a small myopic shift but the range was large. The aetiology of the refractive change is uncertain.

  8. Effect of cycloplegia on the refractive status of children: the Shandong children eye study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan Yuan; Wu, Jian Feng; Lu, Tai Liang; Wu, Hui; Sun, Wei; Wang, Xing Rong; Bi, Hong Sheng; Jonas, Jost B

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of 1% cyclopentolate on the refractive status of children aged 4 to 18 years. Using a random cluster sampling in a cross-sectional school-based study design, children with an age of 4-18 years were selected from kindergardens, primary schools, junior and senior high schools in a rural county and a city. Auto-refractometry was performed before and after inducing cycloplegia which was achieved by 1% cyclopentolate eye drops. Out of 6364 eligible children, data of 5999 (94.3%) children were included in the statistical analysis. Mean age was 10.0±3.3 years (range: 4-18 years). Mean difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error (DIFF) was 0.78±0.79D (median: 0.50D; range: -1.00D to +10.75D). In univariate analysis, DIFF decreased significantly with older age (Peyes with non-cycloplegic myopia (≤-0.50D) remained myopic after cycloplegia while the remaining 33.6% of eyes became emmetropic (18.0%) or hyperopic (15.7%) under cycloplegia. Prevalence of emmetropia decreased from 37.5% before cycloplegia to 19.8% after cycloplegia while the remaining eyes became hyperopic under cycloplegia. The error committed by using non-cycloplegic versus cycloplegic refractometry in children with mid to dark-brown iris color decreased with older age, and in parallel manner, with more myopic cycloplegic refractive error. Non-cycloplegic refractometric measures lead to a misclassification of refractive error in a significant proportion of children.

  9. Self-refraction accuracy with adjustable spectacles among children in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilechie, Alex Azuka; Abokyi, Samuel; Owusu-Ansah, Andrew; Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Denkyira, Andrew Kofi; Abraham, Carl Halladay

    2015-04-01

    To determine the accuracy of self-refraction (SR) in myopic teenagers, we compared visual and refractive outcomes of self-refracting spectacles (FocusSpecs) with those obtained using cycloplegic subjective refraction (CSR) as a gold standard. A total of 203 eligible schoolchildren (mean [±SD] age, 13.8 [±1.0] years; 59.1% were female) completed an examination consisting of SR with FocusSpecs adjustable spectacles, visual acuity with the logMAR (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) chart, cycloplegic retinoscopy, and CSR. Examiners were masked to the SR findings. Wilcoxon signed rank test and paired Student t test were used to compare measures across refraction methods (95% confidence intervals [CIs]). The mean (±SD) spherical equivalent refractive error measured by CSR and SR was -1.22 (±0.49) diopters (D) and -1.66 (±0.73) D, respectively, a statistically significant difference of -0.44 D (p refraction offers acceptable visual and refractive results for young people in a rural setting in Ghana, although myopic inaccuracy in the more negative direction occurred in some children.

  10. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  11. Effect of Cycloplegia on the Refractive Status of Children: The Shandong Children Eye Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan Yuan; Wu, Jian Feng; Lu, Tai Liang; Wu, Hui; Sun, Wei; Wang, Xing Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of 1% cyclopentolate on the refractive status of children aged 4 to 18 years. Methods Using a random cluster sampling in a cross-sectional school-based study design, children with an age of 4–18 years were selected from kindergardens, primary schools, junior and senior high schools in a rural county and a city. Auto-refractometry was performed before and after inducing cycloplegia which was achieved by 1% cyclopentolate eye drops. Results Out of 6364 eligible children, data of 5999 (94.3%) children were included in the statistical analysis. Mean age was 10.0±3.3 years (range: 4–18 years). Mean difference between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refractive error (DIFF) was 0.78±0.79D (median: 0.50D; range: -1.00D to +10.75D). In univariate analysis, DIFF decreased significantly with older age (Prefractometry in children with mid to dark-brown iris color decreased with older age, and in parallel manner, with more myopic cycloplegic refractive error. Non-cycloplegic refractometric measures lead to a misclassification of refractive error in a significant proportion of children. PMID:25658329

  12. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  13. Characterising Conical Refraction Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Craig; Rafailov, Edik; McGloin, David

    2014-01-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focussing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focussing on the trap stiffness and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot but benefit from rotational control.

  14. The Optics of Refractive Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Newly recognized effects of refractive scattering in the ionized interstellar medium have broad implications for very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at extreme angular resolutions. Building upon work by Blandford & Narayan (1985), we present a simplified, geometrical optics framework, which enables rapid, semi-analytic estimates of refractive scattering effects. We show that these estimates exactly reproduce previous results based on a more rigorous statistical formulation. We then derive new expressions for the scattering-induced fluctuations of VLBI observables such as closure phase, and we demonstrate how to calculate the fluctuations for arbitrary quantities of interest using a Monte Carlo technique.

  15. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  16. Negative refraction in outer space?

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2004-01-01

    Mediums which do not support the propagation of plane waves with negative phase velocity (NPV) when viewed at rest can support NPV propagation when they are viewed in a reference frame which is uniformly translated at sufficiently high velocity. Thus, relativistic negative refraction may be exploited in astronomical scenarios.

  17. Solution to reverse refraction problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, A. G.

    1985-04-01

    The reverse refraction problem (determination of radial profile of refractive index in planetary atmospheres, such as Earth, from radio probe measurements) is formulated as a bistatic radar problem for a spherically symmetric medium. The modified refractive index n(r)r (a-radius at which the refraction angle as function of relative distance is measured) is assumed to reach extreme values at the upper boundary r sub 1 or at observation level. Before the corresponding Fredholm equation of the first kind can be solved, it must be well-conditioned in the Tikhonov sense. This is done here by two quasi-optimum integral transformation variants with respect to the measurement function and subsequent simplified regularization. The first method is two successive Fourier cosine transformations followed by an Abel transformation, with the possibility of discrete Fourier transformations and numerical Abel transformation. The second method is twofold discrete Fourier transformation. Both yield solutions readily evaluated by simple algorithms. Regularization is effected by approximating functions satisfying the two fundamental conditions for convergence required of the measurement function.

  18. Emmetropisation and the aetiology of refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flitcroft, D I

    2014-02-01

    The distribution of human refractive errors displays features that are not commonly seen in other biological variables. Compared with the more typical Gaussian distribution, adult refraction within a population typically has a negative skew and increased kurtosis (ie is leptokurtotic). This distribution arises from two apparently conflicting tendencies, first, the existence of a mechanism to control eye growth during infancy so as to bring refraction towards emmetropia/low hyperopia (ie emmetropisation) and second, the tendency of many human populations to develop myopia during later childhood and into adulthood. The distribution of refraction therefore changes significantly with age. Analysis of the processes involved in shaping refractive development allows for the creation of a life course model of refractive development. Monte Carlo simulations based on such a model can recreate the variation of refractive distributions seen from birth to adulthood and the impact of increasing myopia prevalence on refractive error distributions in Asia.

  19. Past and present of corneal refractive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anders Højslet

    Surgical correction of refractive errors is becoming increasingly popular. In the 1990s, the excimer laser revolutionized the field of corneal refractive surgery with PRK and LASIK, and lately refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx) of intracorneal tissue, using only a femtosecond laser, has become...

  20. Super-Virtual Refraction Interferometric Redatuming: Enhancing the Refracted Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2012-02-26

    onshore seismic data processing. Refraction tomography is becoming a common way to estimate an accurate near surface velocity model. One of the problems with refraction tomography is the low signal to noise ration in far offset data. To improve, we propose using super-virtual refraction interferometry to enhance the weak energy at far offsets. We use Interferometric Green\\'s functions to redatum sources by cross-correlating two traces recorded at receiver stations, A and B, from a source at location W. The result is a redatumed trace with a virtual source at A and a receiver at B, which can also be obtained by correlating two traces recorded at A and B from different shots. Stacking them would enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of this "virtual" trace. We next augment redatuming with convolution and stacking. The trace recorded at B from a virtual source at A is convolved with the original trace recorded at A from a source at W. The result is a "super-virtual" trace at B in the far-offset from a source at W. Stacking N traces gives a vN-improvement. We applied our method to noisy synthetic and field data recorded over a complex near-surface and we could pick more traces at far offsets. It was possible to accommodate more picks resulting in a better subsurface coverage

  1. Modification of Low Refractive Index Polycarbonate for High Refractive Index Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Suri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycarbonates and polythiourethanes are the most popular materials in use today, for optical applications. Polycarbonates are of two types which fall in the category of low refractive index and medium refractive index. The present paper describes the conversion of low refractive index polycarbonates into high refractive index material by the use of a high refractive index monomer, polythiol, as an additive. Novel polycarbonates, where the properties of refractive index and Abbe number can be tailor made, have been obtained. Thermal studies and refractive index determination indicate the formation of a new polymer with improved properties and suitable for optical applications.

  2. Negative refraction and Negative refractive index in an optical uniaxial absorbent medium

    OpenAIRE

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates the existence of both negative refraction and a negative refractive index in an optical uniaxial absorbent medium that can be characterized by ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices. Negative refraction occurs in any absorbent uniaxial medium if the real part of the extraordinary index is less than its imaginary part. The refractive index is negative when the incident medium is sufficiently dense and the incident angle exceeds a critical angle that is defined here.

  3. Refractive keratoplasty. Keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1982-01-01

    Early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of José Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis is presented. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, Barraquer's techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's cornea and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be performed by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory, and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  4. Refractive keratoplasty: keratophakia and keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, R C; Swinger, C

    1978-01-01

    We have presented our early experience with the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Doctor Jose Barraquer--keratophakia and hypermetropic keratomileusis. In contradistinction to the alloplastic lens substitutes currently being employed for the integral correction of aphakia, his techniques would seem to offer a more permanent, more physiologic, full-time optical correction of the aphakic state. Their use is limited only by the condition of the patient's corneaa and, in fact, may be applied not only in aphakia but also in phakic eyes with higher degrees of hyperopia or myopia. In the opinion of the authors, the refractive keratoplasty techniques of Barraquer can be perfored by any well-instructed ophthalmic surgeon. These techniques offer to many patients a satisfactory and potentially a physiologically superior alternative to alloplastic lens substitute for aphakic correction.

  5. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  6. Incidence and management of suction loss in refractive lenticule extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chee Wai; Chan, Cordelia; Tan, Donald; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2014-12-01

    To describe the incidence, management, and outcomes of suction loss in refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx). Tertiary eye hospital. Retrospective case series. All patients who experienced suction loss during refractive lenticule extraction from March 9, 2010, to August 5, 2013, were evaluated preoperatively, including slitlamp biomicroscopy, fundoscopy, corneal topography, ultrasound pachymetry, manifest and cycloplegic refractions, and measurement of uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities. Patients were followed at predetermined timepoints. At each follow-up visit, the UDVA and CDVA were measured and slitlamp biomicroscopy was performed. Manifest refraction was measured 1 and 3 months postoperatively. During the study period, 340 refractive lenticule extractions were performed. The overall cumulative incidence of suction loss was 3.2%. The incidence of suction loss was 4.3% (2/46) for femtosecond lenticule extraction, 4.4% (8/183) for small-incision lenticule extraction, and 0.9% (1/109) for pseudo small-incision lenticule extraction. Of the 11 eyes in which suction loss occurred, 8 (72.7%) had a UDVA of 20/30 or better and 9 (81.8%) had a spherical equivalent within ± 0.5 diopter of emmetropia at 3 months. Suction loss occurred in 4 eyes during the posterior lenticule cut, in 5 eyes during the anterior lenticule cut, and in 2 eyes during the lamellar flap cut. In 9 of these (81.8%), suction was reapplied and the procedure was completed without further complications. The incidence of suction loss during refractive lenticule extraction was relatively low. Good visual outcomes were achieved with appropriate management. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Seismic reflection and refraction methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.

    of the subsurface, but this comes at a relatively high economic cost. Thus, when selecting the appropriate geophysical survey, one must determine whether increased resolution of the survey is justified in terms of the cost of conducting and interpreting... of the time-distance segments from the respective layers when such zone, called as a blind zone, presents as an intermediate layer. Therefore, it is important to take such zones into account for proper accuracy in shallow refraction investigations...

  8. Refractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anna Katrine; Søberg, Martin; Lorentsen, Elise

    2016-01-01

    The book focuses on new directions in architectural research, how architects develop new knowledge through their artistic design practice, working in a field between Art and Science. What new digital potentials are there in architectural media like models and drawings and how to put words on arti...

  9. Negative refraction in a laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is concerned with the reflection and transmission of waves at a plane interface between a homogeneous elastic half-space and a half-space of elastic material that is periodically laminated. The lamination is always in the direction of the x1-coordinate axis and the displacement is always longitudinal shear, so that the only non-zero displacement component is u3(x1 ,x2 , t). After an initial discussion of Floquet-Bloch waves in the laminated material, brief consideration is given to the reflection-transmission problem, when the interface between the two media is the plane x1 = 0. Nothing unusual emerges: there are just a single reflected wave and a single transmitted wave, undergoing positive group-velocity refraction. Then, the problem is considered when the interface between the two media is the plane x2 = 0. The periodic structure of the interface induces an infinite set of reflected waves and an infinite set of transmitted waves. All need to be taken into account, but most decay exponentially away from the interface. It had previously been recognized that, if the incident wave had appropriate frequency and angle of incidence, a propagating transmitted wave would be generated that would undergo negative group-velocity refraction - behaviour usually associated with a metamaterial. It is established by an example in this work that there is, in addition, a propagating transmitted wave with smaller wavelength but larger group velocity that undergoes positive group-velocity refraction. The work concludes with a brief discussion of this finding, including its implications for the utility (or not) of "effective medium" theory.

  10. Minimal dispersion refractive index profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feit, M D

    1979-09-01

    The analogy between optics and quantum mechanics is exploited by considering a 2-D quantum system whose Schroedinger equation is closely related to the wave equation for light propagation in an optical fiber. From this viewpoint, Marcatili's condition for minimal-dispersion-refractive-index profiles, and the Olshansky- Keck formula for rms pulse spreading in an alpha-profile fiber may be derived without recourse to the WKB approximation. Besides affording physical insight into these results, the present approach points out a possible limitation in their application to real fibers.

  11. Theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces is often prevented. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry where the SNR of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to; here, N is the number of receiver or source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with supervirtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals recorded by the geophones. Results with both synthetic traces and field data demonstrate the feasibility of this method. There are at least four significant benefits of supervirtual interferometry: (1) an enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of the data, (2) the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive later than the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by later-arrival traveltime tomography, (3) common receiver-pair gathers can be analysed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary, and (4) the source statics term is eliminated in the correlation operations so that the timing of the virtual traces is independent of the source excitation time. This suggests the

  12. Negative refractive index in chiral metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Park, Yong-Shik; Li, Jensen; Lu, Xinchao; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Xiang

    2009-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a chiral metamaterial exhibiting negative refractive index at terahertz frequencies. The presence of strong chirality in the terahertz metamaterial lifts the degeneracy for the two circularly polarized waves and allows for the achievement of negative refractive index without requiring simultaneously negative permittivity and negative permeability. The realization of terahertz chiral negative index metamaterials offers opportunities for investigation of their novel electromagnetic properties, such as negative refraction and negative reflection, as well as important terahertz device applications.

  13. Negative refraction in natural ferromagnetic metals

    OpenAIRE

    Engelbrecht, Sebastian; Shuvaev, Alexey Mikhailovich; Luo, Y.; Moshnyaga, V.; Pimenov, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    It is generally believed that Veselago's criterion for negative refraction cannot be fulfilled in natural materials. However, considering imaginary parts of the permittivity ({\\epsilon}) and permeability ({\\mu}) and for metals at not too high frequencies the general condition for negative refraction becomes extremely simple: Re({\\mu}) Re(n) < 0. Here we demonstrate experimentally that in such natural metals as pure Co and FeCo alloy the negative values of the refractive index are achi...

  14. Emmetropisation and the aetiology of refractive errors

    OpenAIRE

    Flitcroft, D I

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of human refractive errors displays features that are not commonly seen in other biological variables. Compared with the more typical Gaussian distribution, adult refraction within a population typically has a negative skew and increased kurtosis (ie is leptokurtotic). This distribution arises from two apparently conflicting tendencies, first, the existence of a mechanism to control eye growth during infancy so as to bring refraction towards emmetropia/low hyperopia (ie emmet...

  15. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Virtual Subjective Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    To establish the repeatability and reproducibility of a virtual refraction process using simulated retinal images. With simulation software, aberrated images corresponding with each step of the refraction process were calculated following the typical protocol of conventional subjective refraction. Fifty external examiners judged simulated retinal images until the best sphero-cylindrical refraction and the best visual acuity were achieved starting from the aberrometry data of three patients. Data analyses were performed to assess repeatability and reproducibility of the virtual refraction as a function of pupil size and aberrometric profile of different patients. SD values achieved in three components of refraction (M, J0, and J45) are lower than 0.25D in repeatability analysis. Regarding reproducibility, we found SD values lower than 0.25D in the most cases. When the results of virtual refraction with different pupil diameters (4 and 6 mm) were compared, the mean of differences (MoD) obtained were not clinically significant (less than 0.25D). Only one of the aberrometry profiles with high uncorrected astigmatism shows poor results for the M component in reproducibility and pupil size dependence analysis. In all cases, vision achieved was better than 0 logMAR. A comparison between the compensation obtained with virtual and conventional subjective refraction was made as an example of this application, showing good quality retinal images in both processes. The present study shows that virtual refraction has similar levels of precision as conventional subjective refraction. Moreover, virtual refraction has also shown that when high low order astigmatism is present, the refraction result is less precise and highly dependent on pupil size.

  16. Negative Index of Refraction in Optical Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Shalaev, V M; Chettiar, U; Yuan, H K; Sarychev, A K; Drachev, V P; Kildishev, A V; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Cai, Wenshan; Chettiar, Uday; Yuan, Hsiao-Kuan; Sarychev, Andrey K.; Drachev, Vladimir P.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2005-01-01

    An array of pairs of parallel gold nanorods is shown to have a negative refractive index in the optical range, close to a wavelength of 1 micron. Such behavior results from the plasmon resonance in the pairs of nanorods for both the electric and magnetic components of light. The metal rods act as inductive elements whereas the dielectric gaps perform as capacitive elements, forming an optical LC-circuit. Our experiments and simulations demonstrate the resonant behavior for an index of refraction. Above the resonance, the refractive index becomes negative. Paired metal nanorods open new opportunities for developing negative-refraction materials in optics.

  17. Causality, Non-Locality and Negative Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Forcella, Davide; Carminati, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    The importance of spatial non-locality in the description of negative refraction in electromagnetic materials has been put forward recently. We develop a theory of negative refraction in homogeneous and isotropic media, based on first principles, and that includes non-locality in its full generality. The theory shows that both dissipation and spatial non-locality are necessary conditions for the existence of negative refraction. It also provides a sufficient condition in materials with weak spatial non-locality. These fundamental results should have broad implications in the theoretical and practical analyses of negative refraction of electromagnetic and other kinds of waves.

  18. Accuracy of the WASCA aberrometer refraction compared to manifest refraction in myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Archer, Timothy J; Couch, Darren

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of myopic refraction by a single measurement using the Wavefront Supported Custom Ablation (WASCA) aberrometer (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany). We retrospectively compared the refractive errors obtained by manifest refraction and wavefront refraction (WASCA) in 50 eyes of 25 consecutive myopic patients undergoing laser refractive surgery. The sphere ranged from -1.00 to -8.25 diopters (D) and cylinder from 0 to -3.75 D. WASCA measurements under cycloplegia were made and WASCA refractions calculated for a 6-mm analysis zone using the Seidel method within the WASCA. We used the manifest refraction as our best estimate of the true refractive error, therefore accuracy was defined as the difference between manifest refraction and that of the WASCA. Correlation coefficients and mean vector errors between manifest and WASCA refraction were calculated. High correlation was shown between manifest and WASCA refractions, with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.97, 0.85, and 0.79 for M, J180, and J45, respectively. Mean power vector error (standard deviation) was 0.22 D (0.39), +0.03 D (0.21), and +0.03 D (0.13) for M, J180, and J45, respectively. Total dioptric power vector error was 0.43 D with 74% eyes within 0.50 D. When measuring normal myopic eyes, the concordance between manifest and WASCA refractions was found on average to be high; however, outlier measurements occurred.

  19. Relative peripheral refraction in children: twelve-month changes in eyes with different ametropias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsui-Tsui; Cho, Pauline

    2013-05-01

    To determine the peripheral refraction of children with different types of ametropias and to evaluate the relationship between central refractive changes, baseline relative peripheral refraction (RPR) and changes in RPR over a 12-month monitoring period. Cycloplegic central and peripheral refraction were performed biannually on the right eyes of children aged 6-9 for 12 months, using an open-view autorefractor. Peripheral refraction were measured along 10°, 20° and 30° from central fixation in both nasal and temporal fields. Refractive data were transposed into M, J0 and J45 vectors for analyses. RPR was determined by subtracting the central measurement from each peripheral measurement. Hyperopic eyes showed relative peripheral myopia while myopic eyes had relative hyperopia across the central 60° horizontal field at baseline. Emmetropic eyes had relative myopia within but showed relative hyperopia beyond the central 30° field. However, there was no significant correlation between central refractive changes and baseline RPR or between changes in central refraction and RPR over twelve months in any refractive groups. Correlations between changes in PR and central myopic shift were found mainly in the nasal field in different groups. In the subgroup analysis on the initially emmetropic and the initially myopic groups, the subgroups with faster myopic progression did not have significantly different RPR from the subgroups with slower progression. The RPR pattern of the initially emmetropic and the initially myopic groups became more asymmetric at the end of the study period with a larger increase in relative hyperopia in the temporal field. RPR patterns were different among hyperopic, emmetropic and myopic eyes. However, baseline RPR and changes in RPR cannot predict changes in central refraction over time. Our results did not provide evidence to support the hypothesis of RPR as a causative factor for myopic central refractive changes in children. Ophthalmic

  20. Negative refractive index in artificial metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, A N

    2006-08-15

    We discuss optical constants in artificial metamaterials showing negative magnetic permeability and electric permittivity and suggest a simple formula for the refractive index of a general optical medium. Using the effective-field theory, we calculate the effective permeability and the refractive index of nanofabricated media composed of pairs of identical gold nanopillars with magnetic response in the visible spectrum.

  1. Achieving target refraction after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Shira S; Chee, Yewlin E; Haddadin, Ramez I; Veldman, Peter B; Borboli-Gerogiannis, Sheila; Brauner, Stacey C; Chang, Kenneth K; Chen, Sherleen H; Gardiner, Matthew F; Greenstein, Scott H; Kloek, Carolyn E; Chen, Teresa C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the difference between target and actual refraction after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation at an academic teaching institution's Comprehensive Ophthalmology Service. Retrospective study. We examined 1275 eye surgeries for this study. All consecutive cataract surgeries were included if they were performed by an attending or resident surgeon from January through December 2010. Postoperative refractions were compared with preoperative target refractions. Patients were excluded if they did not have a preoperative target refraction documented or if they did not have a recorded postoperative manifest refraction within 90 days. The main outcome measure was percentage of cases achieving a postoperative spherical equivalent ± 1.0 diopter (D) of target spherical equivalent. We performed 1368 cataract surgeries from January through December of 2010. Of these, 1275 (93%) had sufficient information for analysis. Of the included cases, 94% (1196 of 1275) achieved ± 1.0 D of target refraction by 90 days after cataract surgery. This paper establishes a new benchmark for a teaching hospital, where 94% of patients achieved within 1.0 D of target refraction after cataract surgery. The refractive outcomes after cataract surgery at this academic teaching institution were higher than average international benchmarks. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show...

  3. Magnifying perfect lens with positive refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Tyc, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    We propose a device with a positive isotropic refractive index that creates a magnified perfect real image of an optically homogeneous three-dimensional region of space within geometrical optics. Its key ingredient is a new refractive index profile that can work as a perfect lens on its own, having a very moderate index range.

  4. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show that sel...

  5. Headache and refractive errors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Zachary; Pandolfo, Katie R; Simon, John; Zobal-Ratner, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between uncorrected or miscorrected refractive errors in children and headache, and to determine whether correction of refractive errors contributes to headache resolution. Results of ophthalmic examination, including refractive error, were recorded at initial visit for headache. If resolution of headache on subsequent visits was not documented, a telephone call was placed to their caregivers to inquire whether headache had resolved. Of the 158 patients, 75.3% had normal or unchanged eye examinations, including refractions.Follow-up data were available for 110 patients. Among those, 32 received new or changed spectacle correction and 78 did not require a change in refraction.Headaches improved in 76.4% of all patients, whether with (71.9%) or without (78.2%) a change in refractive correction. The difference between these two groups was not statistically significant (P = .38). Headaches in children usually do not appear to be caused by ophthalmic disease, including refractive error. The prognosis for improvement is favorable, regardless of whether refractive correction is required. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  7. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radko, Ilya P; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2008-03-17

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive index increases inside the array by a factor of approximately 1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase deduced from the SPP refraction by triangular arrays. The SPP refractive index is found to decrease slightly for longer wavelengths within the wavelength range of 700-860 nm. Modeling based on the Green's tensor formalism is in a good agreement with the experimental results, opening the possibility to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation.

  8. Refractive error study in young subjects: results from a rural area in Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Signes-Soler

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the distribution of refractive error in young subjects in a rural area of Paraguay in the context of an international cooperation campaign for the prevention of blindness. METHODS: A sample of 1466 young subjects (ranging from 3 to 22 years old, with a mean age of 11.21±3.63 years old, were examined to assess their distance visual acuity (VA and refractive error. The first screening examination performed by trained volunteers, included visual acuity testing, autokeratometry and non-cycloplegic autorefraction. Inclusion criteria for a second complete cycloplegic eye examination by an optometrist were VA <20/25 (0.10 logMAR or 0.8 decimal and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D. RESULTS: An uncorrected distance VA of 0 logMAR (1.0 decimal was found in 89.2% of children. VA <20/25 and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D was found in 3.9% of children (n=57, with a prevalence of hyperopia of 5.2% (0.2% of the total in this specific group. Furthermore, myopia (spherical equivalent ≤-0.5 D was found in 37.7% of the refracted children (0.5% of the total. The prevalence of refractive astigmatism (cylinder ≤-1.50 D was 15.8% (0.6% of the total. Visual impairment (VI (0.05≤VA≤0.3 was found in 12/114 (0.4% of the refracted eyes. Main causes for VI were refractive error (58%, retinal problems (17%, 2/12, albinism (17%, 2/12 and unknown (8%, 1/12. CONCLUSION: A low prevalence of refractive error has been found in this rural area of Paraguay, with higher prevalence of myopia than of hyperopia.

  9. Postoperative refraction in the second eye having cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Wilkes, Martin; Reeves, Juliana; Mahmood, Muneera A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Previous cataract surgery studies assumed that first-eye predicted and observed postoperative refractions are equally important for predicting second-eye postoperative refraction. Methods. In a retrospective analysis of 173 patients having bilateral sequential phacoemulsification, multivariable linear regression was used to predict the second-eye postoperative refraction based on refractions predicted by the SRK-T formula for both eyes, the first-eye postoperative refraction, and the difference in IOL selected between eyes. Results. The first-eye observed postoperative refraction was an independent predictor of the second eye postoperative refraction (P refraction. Compared with the SRK-T formula, this model reduced the root-mean-squared (RMS) error of the predicted refraction by 11.3%. Conclusions. The first-eye postoperative refraction is an independent predictor of the second-eye postoperative refraction. The first-eye predicted refraction is less important. These findings may be due to interocular symmetry.

  10. Reproducibility of manifest refraction between surgeons and optometrists in a clinical refractive surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Yap, Timothy E; Carp, Glenn I; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2014-03-01

    To measure and compare the interobserver reproducibility of manifest refraction according to a standardized protocol for normal preoperative patients in a refractive surgery practice. Private clinic, London, United Kingdom. Retrospective case series. This retrospective study comprised patients attending 2 preoperative refractions before laser vision correction. The first manifest refraction was performed by 1 of 7 optometrists and the second manifest refraction by 1 of 2 surgeons, all trained using a standard manifest refraction protocol. Spherocylindrical data were converted into power vectors for analysis. The dioptric power differences between observers were calculated and analyzed. One thousand nine hundred twenty-two consecutive eyes were stratified into a myopia group and a hyperopia group and then further stratified by each surgeon-optometrist combination. The mean surgeon-optometrist dioptric power difference was 0.21 diopter (D) (range 0.15 to 0.32 D). The mean difference in spherical equivalent refraction was 0.03 D, with 95% of all refractions within ±0.44 D for all optometrist-surgeon combinations. The severity of myopic or hyperopic ametropia did not affect the interobserver reproducibility of the manifest refraction. There was close agreement in refraction between surgeons and optometrists using a standard manifest refraction protocol of less than 0.25 D. This degree of interobserver repeatability is similar to that in intraobserver repeatability studies published to date and may represent the value of training and the use of a standard manifest refraction protocol between refraction observers in a refractive surgery practice involving co-management between surgeons and optometrists. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  12. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  13. [Objective refraction in black children: cyclopentolate and tropicamide combination, a reliable alternative to atropine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, A M; De Medeiros, M E; Sow, A S; Ndiaye, P A; Weladji, C; Diallo, H M; Wane, A M; Diagne, J P; Kane, A; Ndiaye, J M M; Ndoye Roth, P A; Ba, E A; Ndiaye, M R

    2014-11-01

    Cycloplegia allows for an objective refraction in children. Atropine is the gold standard but causes prolonged blurred vision. Cyclopentolate is less effective but less disabling. Tropicamide is a weak cycloplegic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a cyclopentolate and tropicamide combination (CTA) versus atropine for refraction in black children. We performed a prospective study between October 2011 and July 2012 on all children seen in consultation. Objective refraction was performed after cycloplegia with cyclopentolate 0.5% combined with tropicamide 0.5%, and then after cycloplegia with atropine. Thirty-three patients were recruited, 14 boys and 19 girls. The average age was 9.9 years. The mean age of the patients was 9.9 years. Astigmatism was found in 96.9% of cases. It was 1.34±1.32 diopters with CTA and 1.35±1.22 diopters with atropine. The mean axis was 98.15 and 99.8, respectively. Hyperopia and myopia were found in 39 and 27 eyes, respectively with ACT (average 1.73 and 5.37 diopters), and in 41 and 19 eyes with atropine (average 2.06 and 6.11 diopters). There is a good correlation of results with regards to cylindrical and spherical refractive error between the two protocols. Atropine is the best cycloplegic, however ACT provides reliable results. The cyclopentolate-tropicamide combination is satisfactory for routine cycloplegia in children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Calculations of mean refraction and variation of refraction using a dioptric space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzeau, O; Costantini, E; Gaujoux, T; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-11-01

    Polar notations (sphere, cylinder, and axis) of refraction perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis or graphic representation. While the spherical component of refraction can be easily analyzed by the spherical equivalent, statistical analysis of astigmatism requires non-polar expressions of refraction. Indeed, the cylinder and axis of astigmatism are not independent data. In addition, axis is a directional data including a non-trigonometric cycle. Refraction can be written in a non-polar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x, y, z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three coordinates constitute three independent (orthogonal) variables that correspond to a sphere-equivalent component and a pair of Jackson cross-cylinder components, oriented at 0°/90° (WTR/ATR astigmatism) and 45°/135° (oblique astigmatism). Statistical analysis and graphical representation become less complicated when using rectangular coordinates of refraction. Rectangular coordinates of the mean refraction are obtained by average rectangular coordinates. Similarly, rectangular coordinates of refraction change are obtained by a single subtraction of rectangular coordinates between the final and initial refractions. After statistical analysis, the rectangular coordinates obtained can be converted into a polar form for a more easily understood result. Finally, non-polar notations including rectangular coordinates are useful for statistical and graphical analysis, which would be difficult with only conventional polar notations of refraction.

  15. Negative refraction in Möbius molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y. N.; Shen, Yao; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show the negative refraction existing in Möbius molecules. The negative refractive index is induced by the nontrivial topology of the molecules. With the Möbius boundary condition, the effective electromagnetic fields felt by the electron in a Möbius ring is spatially inhomogeneous. In this regard, the DN symmetry is broken in Möbius molecules and thus the magnetic response is induced through the effective magnetic field. Our findings provide an alternative architecture for negative refractive index materials based on the nontrivial topology of Möbius molecules.

  16. Critique of Optical Negative Refraction Superlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Christou, George

    2010-01-01

    Has the ten-year old quest for the optical superlens, based on Veselago's hypothesis of negative refraction, been a chimera? We argue that Pendry's alternative prescription of the silver superlens is nothing more than an application of the natural phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance that occurs in the noble metal films. This phenomenon does not predict the reality of Veselago's negative refractive index materials. We give a simple explanation of how this resonance achieves a field intensity enhancement at the interface of silver and air without involving the concept of negative refraction.

  17. Refractive index of TlGaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, K.; Shiba, M.; Yamakage, M.; Kajikawa, Y. [Department of Electric and Control Systems Engineering, Interdisciplinary Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Refractive index has been determined from reflectance measurements at 77-300 K for Tl{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As samples with x{<=}0.077 prepared by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy. A very high refractive index of around 4.5 at room temperature in the transparent wavelength region has been revealed for Tl{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As with x=0.077. The temperature coefficient of the refractive index was found to increase with Tl content. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Formation of bulk refractive index structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons; Wheeler, David R.; Jamison, Gregory M.

    2003-07-15

    A method of making a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure in photosensitive materials using photo-patterning where first determined is the wavelength at which a photosensitive material film exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation, a portion of the surfaces of the photosensitive material film is optically irradiated, the film is marked to produce a registry mark. Multiple films are produced and aligned using the registry marks to form a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure.

  19. Refractive Indices of Semiconductors from Energy gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathy, S K

    2015-01-01

    An empirical relation based on energy gap and refractive index data has been proposed in the present study to calculate the refractive index of semiconductors. The proposed model is then applied to binary as well as ternary semiconductors for a wide range of energy gap. Using the relation, dielectric constants of some III-V group semiconductors are calculated. The calculated values for different group of binary semiconductors, alkali halides and ternary semiconductors fairly agree with other calculations and known values over a wide range of energy gap. The temperature variation of refractive index for some binary semiconductors have been calculated.

  20. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Evlyukhin, A.B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive...... index increases inside the array by a factor of ~1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase...

  1. Application of statistical contrasts to mean refractive state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abelman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing  for  differences  between  specific groups  or  combinations  of  groups  is  referred to as comparison or contrast testing. Statistical significance of comparisons can be assessed by first forming contrasts and then testing for their significance. A contrast essentially tests wheth-er or not two means are significantly different, where each mean could be a weighted average of two or more means. Gillan  investigated  whether  the  instillation of a cycloplegic (Mydriacyl 1% (tropicamide into the right eye of a 30-year-old female sub-ject would affect the variability of her distance refractive state as measured by an autorefractor.The  purpose  of  this  paper  is  to  introduce mutually orthogonal linear contrasts of sample data  to  optometric  research.  By  constructing particular contrasts, mean refractive states are compared  before  instillation,  before  and  after instillation, and after instillation.

  2. Nonlinear Negative Refraction by Difference Frequency Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Jianjun; Feng, Yaming; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Negative refraction has attracted much interest for its promising capability in imaging applications. Such an effect can be implemented by negative index meta-materials, however, which are usually accompanied by high loss and demanding fabrication processes. Recently, alternative nonlinear approaches like phase conjugation and four wave mixing have shown advantages of low-loss and easy-to-implement, but associated problems like narrow accepting angles can still halt their practical applications. Here we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a new scheme to realize negative refraction by nonlinear difference frequency generation with wide tunability, where a thin BBO slice serves as a negative refraction layer bending the input signal beam to the idler beam at a negative angle. Furthermore, we realize optical focusing effect using such nonlinear negative refraction, which may enable many potential applications in imaging science.

  3. Nonlinear negative refraction by difference frequency generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianjun; Shen, Dongyi; Feng, Yaming; Wan, Wenjie

    2016-05-01

    Negative refraction has attracted much interest for its promising capability in imaging applications. Such an effect can be implemented by negative index meta-materials, however, which are usually accompanied by high loss and demanding fabrication processes. Recently, alternative nonlinear approaches like phase conjugation and four wave mixing have shown advantages of low-loss and easy-to-implement, but associated problems like narrow accepting angles can still halt their practical applications. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a scheme to realize negative refraction by nonlinear difference frequency generation with wide tunability, where a thin Beta barium borate slice serves as a negative refraction layer bending the input signal beam to the idler beam at a negative angle. Furthermore, we realize optical focusing effect using such nonlinear negative refraction, which may enable many potential applications in imaging science.

  4. Studies on Negative Refractive Index without Absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Rajapakse, R M; Yelin, S F

    2012-01-01

    Which systems are ideal to obtain negative refraction with no absorption? Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a method to suppress absorption and make a material transparent to a field of a given frequency. Such a system has been discussed in [1]; however the main limitations for negative refraction introduced are the necessity of resonant electric and magnetic dipole transitions, and the necessity of very dense media. We suggest using frequency translators in a composite system that would provide negative refraction for a range of optical frequencies while attempting to overcome the limitations discussed above. In the process of using frequency translators, we also find composite systems that can be used for refractive index enhancement.

  5. Isaac Newton and the astronomical refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Waldemar H

    2008-12-01

    In a short interval toward the end of 1694, Isaac Newton developed two mathematical models for the theory of the astronomical refraction and calculated two refraction tables, but did not publish his theory. Much effort has been expended, starting with Biot in 1836, in the attempt to identify the methods and equations that Newton used. In contrast to previous work, a closed form solution is identified for the refraction integral that reproduces the table for his first model (in which density decays linearly with elevation). The parameters of his second model, which includes the exponential variation of pressure in an isothermal atmosphere, have also been identified by reproducing his results. The implication is clear that in each case Newton had derived exactly the correct equations for the astronomical refraction; furthermore, he was the first to do so.

  6. 37 REFRACTIVE ERROR BLINDNESS IN YENAGOA, BAYELSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E-mail: doctorazonobi2002@yahoo.com. Address: ... study is to determine the prevalence and causes of ... of cases. Health education is needed to create awareness on the availability of refractive .... studies conducted in Kenya, China and the.

  7. Hybrid high refractive index polymer coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubao; Flaim, Tony; Mercado, Ramil; Fowler, Shelly; Holmes, Douglas; Planje, Curtis

    2005-04-01

    Thermally curable hybrid high refractive index polymer solutions have been developed. These solutions are stable up to 6 months under room temperature storage conditions and can be easily spin-coated onto a desired substrate. When cured at elevated temperature, the hybrid polymer coating decomposes to form a metal oxide-rich film that has a high refractive index. The resulting films have refractive indices higher than 1.90 in the entire visible region and achieve film thicknesses of 300-900 nm depending on the level of metal oxide loading, cure temperature being used, and number of coatings. The formed films show greater than 90% internal transmission in the visible wavelength (400-700 nm). These hybrid high refractive index films are mechanically robust, are stable upon exposure to both heat and UV radiation, and are currently being investigated for microlithographic patterning potential.

  8. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  9. The refractive index of relic gravitons

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the refractive index of the tensor modes of the geometry produces a specific class of power spectra characterized by a blue (i.e. slightly increasing) slope which is directly determined by the competition of the slow-roll parameter and of the rate of variation of the refractive index. Throughout the conventional stages of the inflationary and post-inflationary evolution, the microwave background anisotropies measurements, the pulsar timing limits and the big-bang nucleosythesis constraints set stringent bounds on the refractive index and on its rate of variation. Within the physically allowed region of the parameter space the cosmic background of relic gravitons leads to a potentially large signal for the ground based detectors (in their advanced version) and for the proposed space-borne interferometers. Conversely, the lack of direct detection of the signal will set a qualitatively new bound on the dynamical variation of the refractive index.

  10. Critique of optical negative refraction superlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, George; Mias, Christos

    2011-01-01

    Has the ten-year old quest for the optical superlens, based on Veselago's hypothesis of negative refraction, been a chimera? We argue that Pendry's alternative prescription of the silver superlens is nothing more than an application of the natural phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance that occurs in the noble metal films. This phenomenon does not predict the reality of Veselago's negative refractive index materials. We give a simple explanation of how this resonance achieves a field intensi...

  11. Survey of Radar Refraction Error Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Science Laboratory. “Data Systems Manual, Meteorology and Timing.” Prepared for White Sands Missile Range under contract DAAD07-76-0007, September, 1979...reflect the different meteorological layers within the troposphere. Atmospheric Modeling Parameters 5.1 Earth Model Refraction correction models use...Reference Atmosphere. Washington: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards, 1959. Survey of Radar Refraction Error Corrections, RCC 266

  12. Exploded representation of a refracting surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Heath

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the exploded refracting sur-face is useful in the optics of contact lenses and vision underwater. The purpose of this paper is to show how to represent a refracting surface as an exploded pair of surfaces separated by a gap of zero width.  The analysis is in terms of linear optics and allows for astigmatic and non-coaxial cases.

  13. [Polar and non polar notations of refraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzeau, O; Gaujoux, T; Costantini, E; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-01-01

    Refraction can be expressed by four polar notations which correspond to four different combinations of spherical or cylindrical lenses. Conventional expressions of refraction (plus and minus cylinder notation) are described by sphere, cylinder, and axis. In the plus cylinder notation, the axis visualizes the most powerful meridian. The axis usually corresponds to the bow tie axis in curvature maps. Plus cylinder notation is also valuable for all relaxing procedures (i.e., selective suture ablation, arcuate keratotomy, etc.). In the cross-cylinder notation, two orthogonal cylinders can describe (without the sphere component) the actual refraction of both the principal meridians. This notation must be made before performing the vertex calculation. Using an association of a Jackson cross-cylinder and a spherical equivalent, refraction can be broken down into two pure components: astigmatism and sphere. All polar notations of refraction may perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis, which requires nonpolar expression. After doubling the axis, a rectangular projection breaks down the Jackson cross-cylinder, which has a polar axis, into two Jackson cross-cylinders on the 0 degrees /90 degrees and 45 degrees /135 degrees axis. This procedure results in the loss of the directional nature of the data. Refraction can be written in a nonpolar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x,y,z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three independent (orthogonal) variables have a concrete optical significance: a spherical component, a direct/inverse (WTR/ATR) component, and an oblique component of the astigmatism. Finally, nonpolar notations are useful for statistical analysis and graphical representation of refraction.

  14. Refraction during incipient presbyopia: The Aston Longitudinal Assessment of Presbyopia (ALAP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughton, Deborah S; Sheppard, Amy L; Davies, Leon N

    2017-06-06

    To investigate non-cycloplegic changes in refractive error prior to the onset of presbyopia. The Aston Longitudinal Assessment of Presbyopia (ALAP) study is a prospective 2.5 year longitudinal study, measuring objective refractive error using a binocular open-field WAM-5500 autorefractor at 6-month intervals in participants aged between 33 and 45 years. From the 58 participants recruited, 51 participants (88%) completed the final visit. At baseline, 21 participants were myopic (MSE -3.25±2.28 DS; baseline age 38.6±3.1 years) and 30 were emmetropic (MSE -0.17±0.32 DS; baseline age 39.0±2.9 years). After 2.5 years, 10% of the myopic group experienced a hypermetropic shift (≥0.50 D), 5% a myopic shift (≥0.50 D) and 85% had no significant change in refraction (refraction (refraction during incipient presbyopia does not appear to be as large as previously indicated by retrospective research. The changes in axis indicate ocular astigmatism tends towards the against-the-rule direction with age. The structural origin(s) of the reported myopic shift in refraction during incipient presbyopia warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Comparison of refraction with or without cycloplegia using Retinomax(®) or Plusoptix(®) devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui Quoc, E; Guilmin Crepon, S; Tinguely, S; Lavallee, G; Busquet, G; Angot, M; Vera, L

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the refraction in children measured with Plusoptix(®) without cycloplegia vs. Retinomax(®) apparatus with cycloplegia. Measure of refraction with Plusoptix(®) in children>1year old referred for systematic vision screening, then measurement after cycloplegia with cyclopentolate by the Retinomax(®) device. Thirty-three children were included, i.e. 66eyes. Mean age was 40.7months (minimum 12; maximum 114). The Spearman correlation coefficient for the spherical equivalent was 0.52 (Plusoptix(®) vs. Retinomax(®) comparison; Prefraction was 57%, 43% and 43% respectively for spherical equivalent, sphere and astigmatism. The correlation of astigmatism values is strong, whereas the correlation of sphere values is moderate. Plusoptix(®) seems to be unable to measure the exact refraction, because there is too large a dispersion of refraction measurements with Plusoptix(®), compared to the exact refraction measured with the Retinomax(®). Moreover, the sensitivity of Plusoptix(®) is low. Cycloplegic refraction remains indispensable in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Refractive index contrast in porous silicon multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, R.; Mora, M.B. de la; Tagueena-Martinez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Rio, J.A. del [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Centro Morelense de Innovacion y Transferencia Tecnologica, Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnologia del Estado de Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-07-15

    Two of the most important properties of a porous silicon multilayer for photonic applications are flat interfaces and a relative large refractive index contrast between layers in the optical wavelength range. In this work, we studied the effect of the current density and HF electrolyte concentration on the refractive index of porous silicon. With the purpose of increasing the refractive index contrast in a multilayer, the refractive index of porous silicon produced at low current was studied in detail. The current density applied to produce the low porosity layers was limited in order to keep the electrolyte flow through the multilayer structure and to avoid deformation of layer interfaces. We found that an electrolyte composed of hydrofluoric acid, ethanol and glycerin in a ratio of 3:7:1 gives a refractive index contrast around 1.3/2.8 at 600 nm. Several multilayer structures with this refractive index contrast were fabricated, such as dielectric Bragg mirrors and microcavities. Reflectance spectra of the structures show the photonic quality of porous silicon multilayers produced under these electrochemical conditions. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne [Department of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Western State Colorado University, 128 Hurst Hall, Gunnison, CO 81230 (United States); McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Pier, Jeffrey R., E-mail: mstaylor@western.edu [Division of Astronomical Sciences, NSF 4201 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  18. On the Source of Astrometric Anomalous Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-01

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed "anomalous refraction" by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale (~2°) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  19. Reflective and refractive objects for mixed reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Martin; Traxler, Christoph; Winklhofer, Christoph; Wimmer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rendering method which integrates reflective or refractive objects into a differential instant radiosity (DIR) framework usable for mixed-reality (MR) applications. This kind of objects are very special from the light interaction point of view, as they reflect and refract incident rays. Therefore they may cause high-frequency lighting effects known as caustics. Using instant-radiosity (IR) methods to approximate these high-frequency lighting effects would require a large amount of virtual point lights (VPLs) and is therefore not desirable due to real-time constraints. Instead, our approach combines differential instant radiosity with three other methods. One method handles more accurate reflections compared to simple cubemaps by using impostors. Another method is able to calculate two refractions in real-time, and the third method uses small quads to create caustic effects. Our proposed method replaces parts in light paths that belong to reflective or refractive objects using these three methods and thus tightly integrates into DIR. In contrast to previous methods which introduce reflective or refractive objects into MR scenarios, our method produces caustics that also emit additional indirect light. The method runs at real-time frame rates, and the results show that reflective and refractive objects with caustics improve the overall impression for MR scenarios.

  20. Peripheral refraction and higher-order aberrations with cycloplegia and fogging lenses using the BHVI-EyeMapper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaraju, Ravi Chandra; Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Thomas, Varghese; Holden, Brien Anthony

    2016-01-01

    To determine if a fogging lens ameliorates accommodative effects driven by the closed-view design of the BHVI-EyeMapper (EM) instrument. We compared cycloplegic refraction and higher-order aberration measurements of the EM with those obtained with a fogging lens. Twenty-six, young, participants (15F, 25±5 years, range: 18-35 years, SE: +0.25 D and -3.50 D) with good ocular health were recruited. Five independent measurements of on- and off-axis refraction and higher-order aberrations were recorded across the horizontal visual field, under two conditions: non-cycloplegic measurements with +1.00 D fogging lens and cycloplegia, always in the same sequence. The contralateral eye was occluded during the measurements. Two drops of 1% Tropicamide delivered within 5 min facilitated cycloplegic measurements. All participants were refracted 30 min after installation of the second drop. Mean spherical equivalent measures of the non-cycloplegic condition were significantly more myopic than their cycloplegic counterparts (p<0.05); approximately by 0.50 D centrally, increasing to 1.00 D towards the periphery. The horizontal astigmatic component, J180, demonstrated small but statistically significant differences between the test conditions. Differences were predominant for eccentricities greater than 30°, in both nasal and temporal meridians. The oblique astigmatic component, J45, was not significantly different between the test conditions. The primary spherical aberration coefficient C(4, 0) was significantly less positive for the non-cycloplegic state than its cycloplegic counterpart. This result held true across the entire horizontal visual field. The horizontal coma and trefoil coefficients C(3, 1) and C(3, 3) were not significantly different between the two conditions. The use of +1.00 D fogging lens without cycloplegia did not provide complete relaxation of accommodation. The discrepancies between cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic EM measurements were found to be more

  1. Refractive errors in 3-6 year-old Chinese children: a very low prevalence of myopia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Lan

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the prevalence of refractive errors in children aged 3-6 years in China. METHODS: Children were recruited for a trial of a home-based amblyopia screening kit in Guangzhou preschools, during which cycloplegic refractions were measured in both eyes of 2480 children. Cycloplegic refraction (from 3 to 4 drops of 1% cyclopentolate to ensure abolition of the light reflex was measured by both autorefraction and retinoscopy. Refractive errors were defined as followed: myopia (at least -0.50 D in the worse eye, hyperopia (at least +2.00 D in the worse eye and astigmatism (at least 1.50 D in the worse eye. Different definitions, as specified in the text, were also used to facilitate comparison with other studies. RESULTS: The mean spherical equivalent refractive error was at least +1.22 D for all ages and both genders. The prevalence of myopia for any definition at any age was at most 2.5%, and lower in most cases. In contrast, the prevalence of hyperopia was generally over 20%, and declined slightly with age. The prevalence of astigmatism was between 6% and 11%. There was very little change in refractive error with age over this age range. CONCLUSIONS: Previous reports of less hyperopic mean spherical equivalent refractive error, and more myopia and less hyperopia in children of this age may be due to problems with achieving adequate cycloplegia in children with dark irises. Using up to 4 drops of 1% cyclopentolate may be necessary to accurately measure refractive error in paediatric studies of such children. Our results suggest that children from all ethnic groups may follow a similar pattern of early refractive development, with little myopia and a hyperopic mean spherical equivalent over +1.00 D up to the age of 5-6 years in most conditions.

  2. Is an objective refraction optimised using the visual Strehl ratio better than a subjective refraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Gareth D; Marsack, Jason D; Nguyen, Lan Chi; Cheng, Han; Applegate, Raymond A

    2017-05-01

    To prospectively examine whether using the visual image quality metric, visual Strehl (VSX), to optimise objective refraction from wavefront error measurements can provide equivalent or better visual performance than subjective refraction and which refraction is preferred in free viewing. Subjective refractions and wavefront aberrations were measured on 40 visually-normal eyes of 20 subjects, through natural and dilated pupils. For each eye a sphere, cylinder, and axis prescription was also objectively determined that optimised visual image quality (VSX) for the measured wavefront error. High contrast (HC) and low contrast (LC) logMAR visual acuity (VA) and short-term monocular distance vision preference were recorded and compared between the VSX-objective and subjective prescriptions both undilated and dilated. For 36 myopic eyes, clinically equivalent (and not statistically different) HC VA was provided with both the objective and subjective refractions (undilated mean ± S.D. was -0.06 ± 0.04 with both refractions; dilated was -0.05 ± 0.04 with the objective, and -0.05 ± 0.05 with the subjective refraction). LC logMAR VA provided by the objective refraction was also clinically equivalent and not statistically different to that provided by the subjective refraction through both natural and dilated pupils for myopic eyes. In free viewing the objective prescription was preferred over the subjective by 72% of myopic eyes when not dilated. For four habitually undercorrected high hyperopic eyes, the VSX-objective refraction was more positive in spherical power and VA poorer than with the subjective refraction. A method of simultaneously optimising sphere, cylinder, and axis from wavefront error measurements, using the visual image quality metric VSX, is described. In myopic subjects, visual performance, as measured by HC and LC VA, with this VSX-objective refraction was found equivalent to that provided by subjective refraction, and was typically preferred

  3. Linkage analysis of quantitative refraction and refractive errors in the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P; Duggal, Priya; Lee, Kristine E; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Klein, Ronald; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Klein, Barbara E K

    2011-07-13

    Refraction, as measured by spherical equivalent, is the need for an external lens to focus images on the retina. While genetic factors play an important role in the development of refractive errors, few susceptibility genes have been identified. However, several regions of linkage have been reported for myopia (2q, 4q, 7q, 12q, 17q, 18p, 22q, and Xq) and for quantitative refraction (1p, 3q, 4q, 7p, 8p, and 11p). To replicate previously identified linkage peaks and to identify novel loci that influence quantitative refraction and refractive errors, linkage analysis of spherical equivalent, myopia, and hyperopia in the Beaver Dam Eye Study was performed. Nonparametric, sibling-pair, genome-wide linkage analyses of refraction (spherical equivalent adjusted for age, education, and nuclear sclerosis), myopia and hyperopia in 834 sibling pairs within 486 extended pedigrees were performed. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found for hyperopia on chromosome 3, region q26 (empiric P = 5.34 × 10(-4)), a region that had shown significant genome-wide evidence of linkage to refraction and some evidence of linkage to hyperopia. In addition, the analysis replicated previously reported genome-wide significant linkages to 22q11 of adjusted refraction and myopia (empiric P = 4.43 × 10(-3) and 1.48 × 10(-3), respectively) and to 7p15 of refraction (empiric P = 9.43 × 10(-4)). Evidence was also found of linkage to refraction on 7q36 (empiric P = 2.32 × 10(-3)), a region previously linked to high myopia. The findings provide further evidence that genes controlling refractive errors are located on 3q26, 7p15, 7p36, and 22q11.

  4. Negative Refractive Index in Optics of Metal-Dielectric Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Kildishev, A.V.; Cai, W; Chettiar, U K; Yuan, H.-K.; Sarychev, A. K.; Drachev, V. P.; Shalaev, V. M.

    2005-01-01

    Specially designed metal-dielectric composites can have a negative refractive index in the optical range. Specifically, it is shown that arrays of single and paired nanorods can provide such negative refraction. For pairs of metal rods, a negative refractive index has been observed at 1.5 micrometer. The inverted structure of paired voids in metal films may also exhibit a negative refractive index. A similar effect can be accomplished with metal strips in which the refractive index can reach ...

  5. Cryogenic Refractive Index of Heraeus Homosil Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.343.16 m and temperature range of 120335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a field-widened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitivity performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dndT) and dispersion relation (dnd) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in literature.

  6. Refractive Secondary Concentrators for Solar Thermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing technologies that utilize solar energy for various space applications including electrical power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces. Common to all of these applications is the need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the innovative single crystal refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. The refractive secondary offers very high throughput efficiencies (greater than 90%), and when used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, enables very high concentration ratios (10,0(X) to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the refractive secondary concentrator development effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including optical design and analysis techniques, thermal modeling capabilities, crystal materials characterization testing, optical coatings evaluation, and component testing. Also presented is a discussion of potential future activity and technical issues yet to be resolved. Much of the work performed to date has been in support of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Thermal Propulsion Program. The many benefits of a refractive secondary concentrator that enable efficient, high temperature thermal propulsion system designs, apply equally well to other solar applications including furnaces and power generation systems such as solar dynamics, concentrated thermal photovoltaics, and thermionics.

  7. Refractive error sensing from wavefront slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The problem of measuring the objective refractive error with an aberrometer has shown to be more elusive than expected. Here, the formalism of differential geometry is applied to develop a theoretical framework of refractive error sensing. At each point of the pupil, the local refractive error is given by the wavefront curvature, which is a 2 × 2 symmetric matrix, whose elements are directly related to sphere, cylinder, and axis. Aberrometers usually measure the local gradient of the wavefront. Then refractive error sensing consists of differentiating the gradient, instead of integrating as in wavefront sensing. A statistical approach is proposed to pass from the local to the global (clinically meaningful) refractive error, in which the best correction is assumed to be the maximum likelihood estimation. In the practical implementation, this corresponds to the mode of the joint histogram of the 3 different elements of the curvature matrix. Results obtained both in computer simulations and with real data provide a close agreement and consistency with the main optical image quality metrics such as the Strehl ratio.

  8. Prevalence of refractive errors in Villa Maria, Córdoba, Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria M Snchez; Claudio P Juarez; Rafael Iribarren; Santiago G Latino; Victor E Torres; Ana L Gramajo; Mara N Artal; Mara B Yadarola; Patricia R Garay; Jos D Luna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Refractive errors are among the most frequent reasons for demand of eye-care services. Publications on refractive errors prevalence in our country are few. This study has the purpose to assess the prevalence of refractive errors in an adult population of Villa Maria, Córdoba, Argentina. Methods: The Villa Maria Eye Study is a population-based cross-sectional study conducted in the city of Villa Maria, Córdoba, Argentina from May 2008 to November 2009. Subject’s aged 40+ received a demographic interview and complete ophthalmological exam. Visual acuity was obtained with an ETDRS chart. Cycloplegic auto refraction was performed. The spherical equivalent was highly correlated between right and left eyes, so only data of right eyes are presented. Myopia and hyperopia were defined with a ±0.50 diopters (D) criterion and astigmatism >1 D. Results: This study included 646 subjects, aged 40 to 90 (mean age: 59.6±10.3 years old). Four hundred and sixty two (71.5%) were females. The mean spherical equivalent was +0.714±2.41 D (range, −22.00 to+8.25 D) and the power of the cylinder was, on average, −0.869±0.91 D (range, 0 to −6.50 D). In this sample, 61.6% subjects were hyperopic, and 13.5% were myopic. Myopia prevalence was lower in men (9.8% versus 14.9%) but this difference among genders was not statistically signiifcant. There were 141 subjects (21.8%) with anisometropia greater than 1 D, and 168 subjects (26.0%) with astigmatism greater than 1 D. Conclusions: The present study shows the prevalence of cycloplegic refractive errors in an adult population of Argentina. The prevalence of hyperopia was high, while myopia prevalence was very low.

  9. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  10. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  11. Fiber optic liquid refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this present work we report fabrication of fiber optic liquid refractive index (RI) measurement sensor based on Michelson Interferometer method. This sensor was assembled by using graded index multimode (MM) fiber with core diameter 50 µm and the cladding of fiber was removed by simple chemical method. To perform this experiment a 2×2 3dB coupler is used. The fiber ends are then immersed in solvent and solution to provide reference and refractive index measurements, respectively. This method was successfully used to measure refractive index of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)-Water solution at different concentrations. The fringe contrast sensitivity of device is 92.90 dB/RIU measured in the RI range from 1.34 to 1.42 which is better than Mach-Zehnder Interferometer sensor [1] and Fabry perot based sensor [2]. The fabrication of sensor is simple, low cost and highly sensitive.

  12. Variable refractive index in environment matte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming-tian; XIAO Shuang-jiu; YANG Xu-bo; MA Li-zhuang

    2006-01-01

    Environment matting and compositing is a technique to extract a foreground object, including color, opacity, reflective and refractive properties, from a real-world scene, and synthesize new images by placing it into new environments. The description of the captured object is named environment matte. Recent matting and compositing techniques can produce quite realistic images for objects with complex optical properties. This paper presents an approximate method to transform the matte by simulating variation of the foreground object's refractive index. Our algorithms can deal with achromatous-and-transparent objects and the experimental results are visually acceptable. Our idea and method can be applied to produce some special video effects, which could be very useful in film making, compared with the extreme difficulty of physically changing an object's refractive index.

  13. Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise

    CERN Document Server

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01

    A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases to zero when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. The presented results would be useful in practical applications to give a quick estimate of the effect of refraction on wind turbine noise.

  14. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Lugo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  15. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-04-06

    Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs. By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone. Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  16. Finite checkerboards of dissipative negative refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Ramakrishna, S Anantha; Guenneau, S

    2006-12-25

    The electromagnetic properties of finite checkerboards consisting of alternating rectangular cells of positive refractive index (epsilon= +1, micro= +1) and negative refractive index (epsilon= -1, micro= -1) have been investigated numerically. We show that the numerical calculations have to be carried out with very fine discretization to accurately model the highly singular behaviour of these checkerboards. Our solutions show that, within the accuracy of the numerical calculations, the focusing properties of these checkerboards are reasonably robust in the presence of moderate levels of dissipation. We also show that even small systems of checkerboards can display focussing effects to some extent.

  17. Refractive Index Enhancement in Atomic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proite, Nicholas; Sikes, Daniel; Yavuz, Deniz

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a scheme where a laser beam experiences refractive index enhancement with vanishing absorption. The essential idea is to excite two Raman resonances with appropriately chosen strong laser beams in a far-off resonant atomic system. We have performed our experiments both in vapor cells and in ultracold atomic clouds. Additionally, we discuss a new scheme that achieves giant Kerr nonlinearities using refractive index enhancement. This scheme does not require an intense coupling laser and has the potential to produce all-optical switches and distributed Bragg reflectors at a total energy requirement of tens of photons per atomic cross section.

  18. Refractive index of air: 3. The roles of CO2, H2O, and refractivity virials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciddor, Philip E

    2002-04-20

    The author's recent studies of the refractive index of air are extended, and several assumptions made therein are further examined. It is shown that the alternative dispersion equations for CO2, which are due to Edlen [Metrologia 2, 71 (1966)] and Old et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 89 (1971)] result in differences of less than 2 x 10(-9) in the phase refractive index and less than 3 x 10(-9) in the group refractive index for current and predicted concentrations of CO2. However, because the dispersion equation given by Old et al. is consistent with experimental data in the near infrared, it is preferable to the equation used by Edlen, which is valid only in the ultraviolet and the visible. The classical measurement by Barrell and Sears [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 238, 1 (1939)] on the refractivity of moist air is shown to have some procedural errors in addition to the one discussed by Birch and Downs [Metrologia 30, 155 (1993)]. It is shown that for normal atmospheric conditions the higher refractivity virial coefficients related to the Lorentz-Lorenz relation are adequately incorporated into the empirically determined first refractivity virial. As a guide to users the practical limits to the calculation of the refractive index of the atmosphere that result from the uncertainties in the measurement of the various atmospheric parameters are summarized.

  19. Accuracy of refractive outcomes in myopic and hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis: Manifest versus aberrometric refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Morral, Merce; Gobbe, Marine; Archer, Timothy J

    2012-11-01

    To compare the achieved refractive accuracy of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) performed based on manifest refraction with the predicted accuracy that would have been achieved using WASCA aberrometric refraction with and without Seidel correction factor for sphere. London Vision Clinic, London, United Kingdom. Comparative case series. Myopic eyes and hyperopic eyes had LASIK based on manifest refraction. Two aberrometric refractions were obtained preoperatively: Seidel, which includes spherical aberration in the sphere calculation, and non-Seidel. Bland-Altman plots were used to show the agreement between aberrometric and manifest refractions. Predicted LASIK outcomes had aberrometric refraction been used were modeled by shifting the postoperative manifest refraction by the vector difference between the preoperative manifest and aberrometric refractions. This study included 869 myopic eyes and 413 hyperopic eyes. The mean differences (manifest minus aberrometric) in spherical equivalent were +0.03 diopters (D) ± 0.48 (SD) (Seidel aberrometric) and +0.45 ± 0.42 D (non-Seidel aberrometric) for myopia and -0.20 ± 0.39 D and +0.39 ± 0.34 D, respectively, for hyperopia. The mean differences in cylinder magnitude were -0.10 ± 0.27 D and 0.00 ± 0.25 D, respectively. The percentage of eyes within ±0.50 D of the attempted correction was 81% (manifest), 70% (Seidel), and 67% (non-Seidel) for myopia and 71% (manifest), 61% (Seidel), and 64% (non-Seidel) for hyperopia. The achieved refractive accuracy by manifest refraction was better than the predicted accuracy had Seidel or non-Seidel aberrometric refractions been used for surgical planning. Using the Seidel method improved the accuracy in myopic eyes but not in hyperopic eyes. Dr. Reinstein is a consultant to Carl Zeiss Meditec AG and has a proprietary interest in the Artemis technology (Arcscan Inc., Morrison, Colorado, USA) through patents administered by the Cornell Center for Technology Enterprise and

  20. Refractivity estimation from radar sea clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Si-Xun; Zhao Xiao-Feng; Sheng Zheng

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating lower atmospheric refractivity under the nonstandard propagation conditions frequently encountered in low altitude maritime radar applications. The vertical structure of the refractive environment is modeled by using a five-parameter model, and the horizontal structure is modeled as range-independent. The electromagnetic propagation in the troposphere is simulated by using a split-step fast Fourier transform based on parabolic approximation to the wave equation. A global search marked as a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) for the 5 environmental parameters is performed by using a genetic algorithm (GA) integrated with a simulated annealing technique. The retrieved results from simulated runs demonstrate the ability of this method to make atmospheric refractivity estimations. A comparison with the classical GA and the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (Bayesian-MCMC) technique shows that the MGA can not only shorten the inverse time but also improve the inverse precision. For real data cases, the inversion values do not match the reference data very well. The inverted profile, however, can be used to synoptically describe the real refractive structure.

  1. Validation of Ray Tracing Code Refraction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; McAninch, Gerry L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's current predictive capabilities using the ray tracing program (RTP) are validated using helicopter noise data taken at Eglin Air Force Base in 2007. By including refractive propagation effects due to wind and temperature, the ray tracing code is able to explain large variations in the data observed during the flight test.

  2. Refractive index of the fly rhabdomere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, D.G.M.; Hoenders, B.J.; Huiser, A.M.J.; Toorn, P. van

    1982-01-01

    The refractive index and the diameter of the fly rhabdomere were determined by comparing the experimental results derived from interference microscopy with the results of a theoretical study on the scattering of plane waves by a homogeneous, isotropic cylindrical dielectric rod. It was found that

  3. Reflection, refraction, and the Legendre transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E

    2011-02-01

    We construct in dimension two a mirror that reflects collimated rays into a set of directions that amplify the image and an optical lens so that collimated rays are refracted into a set of directions with a prescribed magnification factor. The profiles of these optical surfaces are given by explicit formulas involving the Legendre transformation.

  4. Wave refraction studies off Agonda beach (Goa)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Pathak, M.C.; Kotnala, K.L.

    Analysis of wave refraction and longshore current has been carried out for a narrow strip off the shores of Agonda (Goa, India). Zones with high wave energy and rip currents have been demarcated. It is found from the analysis that the southern part...

  5. A Mechanical Analogue of the Refracting Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Molesini, Giuseppe; Sordini, Andrea; Straulino, Samuele

    2011-01-01

    The recent celebration of the discoveries made by Galileo four centuries ago has attracted new attention to the refracting telescope and to its use as an instrument for the observation of the night sky. This has offered the opportunity for addressing in the classroom the basic principles explaining the operation of the telescope. When doing so, a…

  6. Subjective refraction: the mechanism underlying the routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, W F

    2007-11-01

    The routine of subjective refraction is usually understood, explained and taught in terms of the relative positions of line or point foci and the retina. This paper argues that such an approach makes unnecessary and sometimes invalid assumptions about what is actually happening inside the eye. The only assumption necessary in fact is that the subject is able to guide the refractionist to (or close to) the optimum power for refractive compensation. The routine works even in eyes in which the interval of Sturm does not behave as supposed; it would work, in fact, regardless of the structure of the eye. The idealized subjective refraction routine consists of two steps: the first finds the best sphere (the stigmatic component) and the second finds the remaining Jackson cross-cylinder (the antistigmatic component). The model makes use of the concept of symmetric dioptric power space. The second part of the refraction routine can be performed with Jackson cross-cylinders alone. However, it is usually taught and practiced using spheres, cylinders and Jackson cross-cylinders in a procedure that is not easy to understand and learn. Recognizing that this part of the routine is equivalent to one involving Jackson cross-cylinders only allows one to teach and understand the procedure more naturally and easily.

  7. Is Noncycloplegic Photorefraction Applicable for Screening Refractive Amblyopia Risk Factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the accuracy of noncycloplegic photorefraction (NCP with that of cycloplegic refraction (CR for detecting refractive amblyopia risk factors (RARFs and to determine cutoff points. Methods: In this diagnostic test study, right eyes of 185 children (aged 1 to 14 years first underwent NCP using the PlusoptiX SO4 photoscreener followed by CR. Based on CR results, hyperopia (≥ +3.5 D, myopia (≥ -3 D, astigmatism (≥ 1.5 D, and anisometropia (≥ 1.5 D were set as diagnostic criteria based on AAPOS guidelines. The difference in the detection of RARFs by the two methods was the main outcome measure. Results: RARFs were present in 57 (30.8% and 52 (28.1% of cases by CR and NCP, respectively, with an 89.7% agreement. In contrast to myopia and astigmatism, mean spherical power in hyperopic eyes was significantly different based on the two methods (P < 0.001, being higher with CR (+5.96 ± 2.13 D as compared to NCP (+2.37 ± 1.36 D. Considering CR as the gold standard, specificities for NCP exceeded 93% and sensitivities were also acceptable (≥ 83% for myopia and astigmatism. Nevertheless, sensitivity of NCP for detecting hyperopia was only 45.4%. Using a cutoff point of +1.87 D, instead of +3.5 D, for hyperopia, sensitivity of NCP was increased to 81.8% with specificity of 84%. Conclusion: NCP is a relatively accurate method for detecting RARFs in myopia and astigmatism. Using an alternative cutoff point in this study, NCP may be considered an acceptable device for detecting hyperopia as well.

  8. Specific features of measuring the optical power of artificial refractive and diffractive-refractive eye lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkova, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Methods for monitoring the optical power of artificial refractive eye lenses (intraocular lenses) based on measuring focal lengths in air and in medium are analyzed. The methods for determining the refraction of diffractive-refractive lenses (in particular, of MIOL-Akkord type), with allowance for the specific features of the diffractive structure, are considered. A computer simulation of the measurement of the focal length of MIOL-Akkord lenses is performed. The effective optical power of the diffractive component of these lenses is shown to depend on the diaphragm diameter. The optimal diaphragm diameter, at which spherical aberrations do not affect the position of foci, is found to be 3 mm. Possible errors in measuring the focal lengths are analyzed, and the necessary corrections that must be introduced into measurement results and calculations of refractions are determined.

  9. Effects of myopic spectacle correction and radial refractive gradient spectacles on peripheral refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Juan; Vazquez, Daniel; Seidemann, Anne; Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Schaeffel, Frank

    2009-08-01

    The recent observation that central refractive development might be controlled by the refractive errors in the periphery, also in primates, revived the interest in the peripheral optics of the eye. We optimized an eccentric photorefractor to measure the peripheral refractive error in the vertical pupil meridian over the horizontal visual field (from -45 degrees to 45 degrees ), with and without myopic spectacle correction. Furthermore, a newly designed radial refractive gradient lens (RRG lens) that induces increasing myopia in all radial directions from the center was tested. We found that for the geometry of our measurement setup conventional spectacles induced significant relative hyperopia in the periphery, although its magnitude varied greatly among different spectacle designs and subjects. In contrast, the newly designed RRG lens induced relative peripheral myopia. These results are of interest to analyze the effect that different optical corrections might have on the emmetropization process.

  10. Law of refraction for generalised confocal lenslet arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Oxburgh, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We derive the law of generalised refraction for generalised confocal lenslet arrays, which are arrays of misaligned telescopes. We have implemented this law of refraction in TIM, a custom open-source ray tracer.

  11. Goos-Hänchen shift in negatively refractive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P R

    2002-12-01

    The Goos-Hänchen shift is calculated when total internal reflection occurs at an interface between "normal" and negatively refractive media. The shift is negative, consistent with the direction of energy flow in the negatively refractive medium.

  12. [Results of refractive surgery in hyperopic and combined astigmatism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaicu, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    The refractive surgery includes a lot of procedures for changing the refraction of the eye to obtain a better visual acuity with no glasses or contact lenses. LASIK is the most commonly performed laser refractive surgery today. The goal is to present the postoperative evolution of the refraction and visual acuity after LASIK for Mixed and Hyperopic Astigmatism. The results show that LASIK is safe and predictible if we have well performed interventions and well-selected patients.

  13. A new class of negative refractive index transmission line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new class of negative refractive index transmission line in which ideal operational amplifiers are applied to form the periodically loaded negative-impedance-converted inductors and capacitors. The phase response of the new transmission line is opposite to that of a positive refractive index conventional transmission line. Unlike the existing negative refractive index transmission line, the new negative refractive index transmission line is non-dispersive and thus can lead to many novel applications such as designing new broadband devices.

  14. Negative Refraction Angular Characterization in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus Eduardo Lugo; Rafael Doti; Jocelyn Faubert

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity d...

  15. Prevalence of visual impairment and refractive errors among different ethnic groups in schoolchildren in Turpan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Man Pan; Siong, Kar Ho; Chan, Ka Ho; Do, Chi Wai; Chan, Henry Ho Lung; Cheong, Allen Ming Yan

    2015-05-01

    There is currently limited information about ethnic differences in myopia prevalence within mainland China, especially in rural or semi-rural areas. We examined the prevalence of refractive errors, visual impairment and spectacle coverage in school children of varying ethnicity in Turpan, Xinjiang province. A community eye care service was provided for five schools. Presenting monocular distance and near visual acuity (VA), and ocular alignment were assessed. Retinoscopy and cycloplegic subjective refraction were performed for participants with presenting visual impairment (distance VA worse than 0.3 logMAR; Snellen 6/12 or 20/40) or abnormal binocular vision. Questionnaires administered prior to the eye examinations were used to collect information regarding personal lifestyle and parental myopia. A total of 646 out of 690 (94%) subjects aged four to 19 years (11.9 ± 2.6; mean ± S.D.) completed the eye examination. Three hundred and eighty-two (59%) of participants were of Uyghur ethnicity, followed by Han, 176 (27%) and Hui, 74 (12%). The mean age of Uyghur, Han and Hui students was 12.3 ± 2.7, 11.4 ± 2.6 and 11.4 ± 2.3 years respectively, in which the Uyghur students were significantly older than the Han and Hui students (F(3,631) = 5.58 p visual impairment was not significantly different among the ethnic groups (p = 0.26). After cycloplegic refraction, most subjects' VA (98%) improved to better than 0.3 logMAR (Snellen 6/12 or 20/40). The prevalence of "clinically-significant myopia" (≤-0.50 dioptres) was 27%, 18% and 13% in Han, Hui and Uyghur children, respectively (p Hui > Uyghur). As reported previously, uncorrected/under-corrected refractive error was the main cause of presenting visual impairment. © 2015 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2015 The College of Optometrists.

  16. Refractivity Statistics For Two Countries In The Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Kheirallah, H. N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents and compares the results of refractive index studies for Mersa Matrouh, Egypt, and Doha, Qatar. Statistics for surface refractivity and refractivity gradients at different heights from the surface are computed. The analysis indicate that these two locations suffer from nonstandard propagation conditions which persist even through the day time, particularly during the summer months.

  17. Assessment of refractive astigmatism and simulated therapeutic refractive surgery strategies in coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Wen; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2016-01-01

    ...) on power and orientation of refractive astigmatism (RA) and to explore how to account for that influence in the planning of topography-guided refractive surgery in eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics...

  18. Refractive index of liquid mixtures: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, João Carlos R; Lampreia, Isabel M S; Santos, Angela F S; Moita, Maria Luísa C J; Douhéret, Gérard

    2010-12-03

    An innovative approach is presented to interpret the refractive index of binary liquid mixtures. The concept of refractive index "before mixing" is introduced and shown to be given by the volume-fraction mixing rule of the pure-component refractive indices (Arago-Biot formula). The refractive index of thermodynamically ideal liquid mixtures is demonstrated to be given by the volume-fraction mixing rule of the pure-component squared refractive indices (Newton formula). This theoretical formulation entails a positive change of refractive index upon ideal mixing, which is interpreted in terms of dissimilar London dispersion forces centred in the dissimilar molecules making up the mixture. For real liquid mixtures, the refractive index of mixing and the excess refractive index are introduced in a thermodynamic manner. Examples of mixtures are cited for which excess refractive indices and excess molar volumes show all of the four possible sign combinations, a fact that jeopardises the finding of a general equation linking these two excess properties. Refractive indices of 69 mixtures of water with the amphiphile (R,S)-1-propoxypropan-2-ol are reported at five temperatures in the range 283-303 K. The ideal and real refractive properties of this binary system are discussed. Pear-shaped plots of excess refractive indices against excess molar volumes show that extreme positive values of excess refractive index occur at a substantially lower mole fraction of the amphiphile than extreme negative values of excess molar volume. Analysis of these plots provides insights into the mixing schemes that occur in different composition segments. A nearly linear variation is found when Balankina's ratios between excess and ideal values of refractive indices are plotted against ratios between excess and ideal values of molar volumes. It is concluded that, when coupled with volumetric properties, the new thermodynamic functions defined for the analysis of refractive indices of liquid

  19. Holographic Refraction and the Measurement of Spherical Ametropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nicholas Hoai Nam

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the performance of a holographic logMAR chart for the subjective spherical refraction of the human eye. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the level of agreement between subjective spherical refraction using the holographic logMAR chart and conventional autorefraction and subjective spherical refraction. The 95% limits of agreement (LoA) were calculated between holographic refraction and the two standard methods (subjective and autorefraction). Holographic refraction has a lower mean spherical refraction when compared to conventional refraction (LoA 0.11 ± 0.65 D) and when compared to autorefraction (LoA 0.36 ± 0.77 D). After correcting for systemic bias, this is comparable between autorefraction and conventional subjective refraction (LoA 0.45 ± 0.79 D). After correcting for differences in vergence distance and chromatic aberration between holographic and conventional refraction, approximately 65% (group 1) of measurements between holography and conventional subjective refraction were similar (MD = 0.13 D, SD = 0.00 D). The remaining 35% (group 2) had a mean difference of 0.45 D (SD = 0.12 D) between the two subjective methods. Descriptive statistics showed group 2's mean age (21 years, SD = 13 years) was considerably lower than group 1's mean age (41 years, SD = 17), suggesting accommodation may have a role in the greater mean difference of group 2. Overall, holographic refraction has good agreement with conventional refraction and is a viable alternative for spherical subjective refraction. A larger bias between holographic and conventional refraction was found in younger subjects than older subjects, suggesting an association between accommodation and myopic over-correction during holographic refraction.

  20. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  1. Negative Refraction Does Not Make Perfect Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    The widely-accepted theoretical treatment of the electromagnetic boundary problem of evanescent wave transfer at an interface between a normal medium of n=1 and an ideal negative index medium of n=-1 neglects the non-zero induced surface current and charge densities at the interface and is self-inconsistent. We re-solve the electromagnetic boundary problem by taking into account the non-zero induced surface current and charge densities that have been neglected so far by others. We give the exact induced surface current and charge distributions for this special case and solve the refracted and reflected fields analytically using Green's function method. The self-consistent solution yields a transmission coefficient of 1 and reflection coefficient of 0 for all evanescent waves. Accordingly, we found that, on the contrary to the popular belief, negative index of refraction does not make perfect lenses.

  2. Analytical properties of the effective refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzko, R. S.; Merzlikin, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a plane wave through a periodic layered system is considered in terms of the effective parameters. The problem of introduction of effective parameters is discussed. It was demonstrated that although the effective admittance cannot be introduced, it is possible to introduce the effective refractive index, which tends toward the Rytov value when the system size increases. It was shown that the effective wave vector derivative is an analytical function of frequency. In particular, the Kramers-Kronig-like relations for real and imaginary parts of the effective wave vector derivative were obtained. The Kramers-Kronig-like relations for the effective refractive index were also considered. The results obtained numerically were proved by exact solution of Maxwell's equations in the specific case of an "equi-impedance" system.

  3. Refraction and wave matching in hyperbolic thermoelasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Rafa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the publication concerns the propagation of thermoelastic waves with a particular emphasis on the refraction of waves at the boundary of a layer laying (resting on a halfspace. Analogously to the effect of wave matching, which appears in the case of acoustic and electromagnetic waves, the impedance of a thermoelastic wave has been introduced and its influence and the reflection andrefraction on the boundary at media has been investigated. The model of the medium describes a mutual coupling of mechanical and thermalinteractions with a wave type propagation of heat in media taken into account.[b]Keywords[/b]: hyperbolic thermoelasticity, wave impedance of a thermoelastic medium,refraction and wave matching

  4. Reflection and Refraction on Implicit Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Kai-Huai Qin; Hua-Wei Wang; Ya-Feng Li

    2006-01-01

    Implicit surfaces are often used in computer graphics. They can be easily modeled and rendered, and many objects are composed of them in our daily life. In this paper, based on the concept of virtual objects, a novel method of real-time rendering is presented for reflection and refraction on implicit surface. The method is used to construct virtual objects from real objects quickly, and then render the virtual objects as if they were real objects except for one more step of merging their images with the real objects' images. Characteristics of implicit surfaces are used to compute virtual objects effectively and quickly. GPUs (Graphics Processing Units) are used to compute virtual vertices quickly and further accelerate the computing and rendering processes. As a result, realistic effects of reflections and refractions on implicit surfaces are rendered in real time.

  5. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  6. Neutrino refraction by the cosmic neutrino background

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, J S

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the dispersion relation of a neutrino test particle propagating in the cosmic neutrino background. Describing the relic neutrinos and antineutrinos from the hot big bang as a dense medium, a matter potential or refractive index is obtained. The vacuum neutrino mixing angles are unchanged, but the energy of each mass state is modified. Using a matrix in the space of neutrino species, the induced potential is decomposed into a part which produces signatures in beta-decay experiments and another part which modifies neutrino oscillations. The low temperature of the relic neutrinos makes a direct detection extremely challenging. From a different point of view, the identified refractive effects of the cosmic neutrino background constitute an ultralow background for future experimental studies of nonvanishing Lorentz violation in the neutrino sector.

  7. Visual acuity measures do not reliably detect childhood refractive error--an epidemiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa O'Donoghue

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the utility of uncorrected visual acuity measures in screening for refractive error in white school children aged 6-7-years and 12-13-years. METHODS: The Northern Ireland Childhood Errors of Refraction (NICER study used a stratified random cluster design to recruit children from schools in Northern Ireland. Detailed eye examinations included assessment of logMAR visual acuity and cycloplegic autorefraction. Spherical equivalent refractive data from the right eye were used to classify significant refractive error as myopia of at least 1DS, hyperopia as greater than +3.50DS and astigmatism as greater than 1.50DC, whether it occurred in isolation or in association with myopia or hyperopia. RESULTS: Results are presented from 661 white 12-13-year-old and 392 white 6-7-year-old school-children. Using a cut-off of uncorrected visual acuity poorer than 0.20 logMAR to detect significant refractive error gave a sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 92% in 6-7-year-olds and 73% and 93% respectively in 12-13-year-olds. In 12-13-year-old children a cut-off of poorer than 0.20 logMAR had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 91% in detecting myopia and a sensitivity of 41% and a specificity of 84% in detecting hyperopia. CONCLUSIONS: Vision screening using logMAR acuity can reliably detect myopia, but not hyperopia or astigmatism in school-age children. Providers of vision screening programs should be cognisant that where detection of uncorrected hyperopic and/or astigmatic refractive error is an aspiration, current UK protocols will not effectively deliver.

  8. Anomalous Positive Refraction in an Anisotropic Left-Handed Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wei; LUO Hai-Lu; CAO Jing-Xiao

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the refraction phenomena of extraordinary light at a planar interface associated with a uniaxial left-handed medium. It is found that the anomalous positive refraction can occur at the interface from anisotropic right-handed medium to a uniaxially anisotropic left-handed medium. When the optical axis of a uniaxial left-handed medium is not normal or parallel to the interface, the refraction of the Poynting vector for the extraordinary waves can be either positive or negative depending on the incident angles, while the refraction of the wave vector is always negative. The physical essential of the anomalous positive refraction results from the anisotropy of uniaxial crystals.

  9. Lens Design Using Group Indices of Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to lens design is described in which the ratio of the group velocity to the speed of light (the group index) in glass is used, in conjunction with the more familiar phase index of refraction, to control certain chromatic properties of a system of thin lenses in contact. The first-order design of thin-lens systems is illustrated by examples incorporating the methods described.

  10. Nonlinear refraction and reflection travel time tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiahua; ten Brink, U.S.; Toksoz, M.N.

    1998-01-01

    We develop a rapid nonlinear travel time tomography method that simultaneously inverts refraction and reflection travel times on a regular velocity grid. For travel time and ray path calculations, we apply a wave front method employing graph theory. The first-arrival refraction travel times are calculated on the basis of cell velocities, and the later refraction and reflection travel times are computed using both cell velocities and given interfaces. We solve a regularized nonlinear inverse problem. A Laplacian operator is applied to regularize the model parameters (cell slownesses and reflector geometry) so that the inverse problem is valid for a continuum. The travel times are also regularized such that we invert travel time curves rather than travel time points. A conjugate gradient method is applied to minimize the nonlinear objective function. After obtaining a solution, we perform nonlinear Monte Carlo inversions for uncertainty analysis and compute the posterior model covariance. In numerical experiments, we demonstrate that combining the first arrival refraction travel times with later reflection travel times can better reconstruct the velocity field as well as the reflector geometry. This combination is particularly important for modeling crustal structures where large velocity variations occur in the upper crust. We apply this approach to model the crustal structure of the California Borderland using ocean bottom seismometer and land data collected during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment along two marine survey lines. Details of our image include a high-velocity zone under the Catalina Ridge, but a smooth gradient zone between. Catalina Ridge and San Clemente Ridge. The Moho depth is about 22 km with lateral variations. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Negative refraction by a virtual photonic lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Budko, Neil V.; Raghunathan, Shreyas B.

    2008-01-01

    Research on photonics and metamaterials constantly challenges our intuitive understanding of the behaviour of light. In recent years we have seen negative refraction, focusing of light by a flat slab, a ``perfect'' prism, and an ``invisibility cloak'' [1-6]. It is generally understood that the cause of this unusual behaviour is the strong (anomalous) dispersion, i.e., dependence of the material properties on the frequency of light. Dispersion can be either due to a natural microscopic resonan...

  12. Characterising refractive index dispersion in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Y.; Sojka, L.; Jayasuriya, D.

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of glasses that contain the chalcogen elements (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) for photonics' applications out to MIR wavelengths. In this paper we describe some techniques for determining the refractive index dispersion characteristics of these glasses....... Knowledge of material dispersion is critical in delivering step-index fibres including with high numerical aperture for mid-infrared supercontinuum generation....

  13. 3D super-virtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai

    2014-08-05

    Super-virtual refraction interferometry enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of far-offset refractions. However, when applied to 3D cases, traditional 2D SVI suffers because the stationary positions of the source-receiver pairs might be any place along the recording plane, not just along a receiver line. Moreover, the effect of enhancing the SNR can be limited because of the limitations in the number of survey lines, irregular line geometries, and azimuthal range of arrivals. We have developed a 3D SVI method to overcome these problems. By integrating along the source or receiver lines, the cross-correlation or the convolution result of a trace pair with the source or receiver at the stationary position can be calculated without the requirement of knowing the stationary locations. In addition, the amplitudes of the cross-correlation and convolution results are largely strengthened by integration, which is helpful to further enhance the SNR. In this paper, both synthetic and field data examples are presented, demonstrating that the super-virtual refractions generated by our method have accurate traveltimes and much improved SNR.

  14. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 μm which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  15. Refraction contrast in X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Keyrilaeinen, J; Suortti, P

    2002-01-01

    A two-crystal diffractometer in the non-dispersive configuration is used for measurement of the effects of refraction in weakly absorbing test objects. Characteristic K alpha sub 1 radiation from a fine-focus X-ray tube with Mo anode is used. The probing beam is about 70 mu m wide and 3 mm high. The sample is placed between the monochromator and analyzer, and it is scanned through the beam. The analyzer is tuned to reflect at the low-angle slope, at the top, or at the high-angle slope of the rocking curve, when the sample is not in the beam. Refraction changes the angle of incidence on the analyzer causing changes in intensity. The observed intensity distributions are exactly reproduced by a calculation, where only the effects of refraction are included. The effects of in-beam interference are negligible or very small, which is also verified by changing the distance between the object and the detector.

  16. Telescope resolution using negative refractive index materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jack L.; Jennetti, Tony

    2004-02-01

    Concepts are presented for using negative refractive index (NRI) materials to design parabolic reflector telescopes and antennas with resolutions significantly better than the diffractions limit. The main question we are attempting to answer is can negative refractive material be used to improve performance of parabolic systems even when the signal or light source is far away and no evanescent fields are present when they arrive at the parabolic reflector. The main approach is to take advantage of any knowledge that we have to recreate the evanescent fields. Fields are then adapted to improve a performance measure such a sharper focus or antenna rejection of interference. A negative refraction index lens is placed between the conventional reflector and focal plane to shape the point spread function. To produce telescope resolutions that are better than the diffraction limit, evanescent fields created by the reflection off of the parabolic surface are amplified and modified to generate fields that sharpen the focus. A second approach use available knowledge of an emitting aperture to synthesize a field at a distance that matches as closely as possible the field of the emitting aperture. The yet unproven conclusion is that techniques can be developed that will improve antenna and telescopes resolution that is better than the diffraction limit.

  17. Surgical options for correction of refractive error following cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, Ahmed A; Alio, Jorge L

    2014-01-01

    Refractive errors are frequently found following cataract surgery and refractive lens exchange. Accurate biometric analysis, selection and calculation of the adequate intraocular lens (IOL) and modern techniques for cataract surgery all contribute to achieving the goal of cataract surgery as a refractive procedure with no refractive error. However, in spite of all these advances, residual refractive error still occasionally occurs after cataract surgery and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) can be considered the most accurate method for its correction. Lens-based procedures, such as IOL exchange or piggyback lens implantation are also possible alternatives especially in cases with extreme ametropia, corneal abnormalities, or in situations where excimer laser is unavailable. In our review, we have found that piggyback IOL is safer and more accurate than IOL exchange. Our aim is to provide a review of the recent literature regarding target refraction and residual refractive error in cataract surgery.

  18. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-02-05

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  19. EDITORIAL: Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Refractive index effects using nanoscale systems are frequently applied in new imaging, sensing and even visibility cloaking technology. In this issue, researchers in Japan use simulations and experiments to describe the confinement of optical vortices in nanoscale fin structures and the sensitivity of these systems to the refractive index of the surrounding media [1]. The effects of refraction as light rays pass between different media were recorded as long ago as the first century AD, by Ptolemy [2]. Over the following centuries the phenomena inspired Ibn Sahl in 984 [3], Thomas Harriot in 1602 [4], Willebrord Snellius in 1621 [5] and Rene Descartes in 1637 [6] to independently derive the more accurate and elegant equation for refraction so familiar to us today. Recent studies of the interactions between light and matter continue to reveal a wealth of phenomena that originate in the effects of the refractive indices of materials. Nanostructures can be used to manipulate conditions that affect the refractive indices of materials, such as temperature. A E Aliev et al at the University of Texas reported a striking demonstration of temperature-dependent refractive index effects using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet [7]. They used the extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of transparent carbon nanotube sheets to enable high-frequency modulation of the sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range. The resulting sharp, rapidly changing gradient of the refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas makes objects seem to disappear and can be used for visibility cloaking. Light-matter interaction resonances, where light is confined at the nanoscale, can be extremely sensitive to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media [8], even allowing single-molecule detection [9]. Plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons in response to incident light, are a typical example. Researchers at Rice

  20. Influence of accommodation and refractive status on the peripheral refractive profile

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Leon Nicholas; Mallen, Edward Arthur Harry

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: To determine, objectively and non-invasively, whether changes in accommodative demand modify differentially the peripheral refraction in emmetropic and myopic human eyes. Methods: Forty subjects (19 male, 21 female) aged 20 to 30 years (mean?SD: 22.7?2.8 years), twenty-one emmetropes (mean spherical equivalent refractive error [MSE]?SD: -0.13?0.29D) and 19 myopes (MSE?SD: -2.95?1.76D) participated in the study. Ametropia was corrected with soft ...

  1. Influence of accommodation and refractive status on the peripheral refractive profile

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Leon Nicholas; Mallen, Edward Arthur Harry

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: To determine, objectively and non-invasively, whether changes in accommodative demand modify differentially the peripheral refraction in emmetropic and myopic human eyes. Methods: Forty subjects (19 male, 21 female) aged 20 to 30 years (mean?SD: 22.7?2.8 years), twenty-one emmetropes (mean spherical equivalent refractive error [MSE]?SD: -0.13?0.29D) and 19 myopes (MSE?SD: -2.95?1.76D) participated in the study. Ametropia was corrected with soft ...

  2. Super-virtual refraction interferometry: Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan

    2011-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so prevents accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to N; here, N is the number of receiver and source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with super-virtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals. There are at least three significant benefits to this methodology: 1). enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of data, 2). the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive after the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by traveltime tomography, and 3). common receiver-pair gathers can be analyzed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  3. Refractive Index of Black and Green Liquors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Avramenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of reliable data on the optical properties of black and green liquors complicates control of their composition in technological process of sulphate cellulose production. In this regard the paper presents measurement results of refraction index of black liquors n (k,t at concentration in solutions of bone-dry solids up to k = 70% and at temperatures t = 10-90 °C, as well as in green liquors n(C,t at the total alkalinity of C = 0-250 g/l and in the same temperature range. All samples of solutions of black and green liquors were provided by Segezha Pulp and Paper Mill and certified in factory laboratory. Measurements were taken by means of the laboratory Abbe refractometer (URL-1, digital refractometer "Expert pro", goniometer spectrometer GS-5, and ultra-violet spectrophotometer as well. The work also presents optical D density spectra in the ultra-violet region of the wavelengths for the samples of a green liquor and main mineral component to form it, i.e. Na2S (sodium sulphide. To calculate dispersion of n (λ in the visible spectral range, here a Lorentz single-oscillator model was used. The paper discusses study results of dispersive dependence of refraction index in green liquors with various concentration and chemical components of n (λ, C forming them at t = 20°C. Computing and experimental dependences of n (λ had not only good qualitative, but also quite satisfactory quantitative compliance. The work also describes main mineral components defining optical properties in these liquors. Given here data on concentration and temperature dependences of a refraction index in black n(k,t and green n(C,t liquors have been never published before. These data are of essential interest to control soda recovery technologies in manufacturing sulphate cellulose. The received results can be also used to tune and calibrate modern domestic and foreign industrial refractometers.

  4. [Refractive regression after intraocular lens implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z Z; Momose, A

    1991-05-01

    Study of refractive changes after IOL implantation in 147 eyes revealed that astigmatism tended to increase, and the natural regressive course followed a negative exponential function, with the steep phase within 3 weeks for spherical, and 5 weeks for cylindrical errors. One (1) week after surgery, the axis of astigmatism was predominantly with the rule, and 2 months after operation, patients with preoperative WRA changed into various astigmatic axial directions, while 76.4% of the patients with preoperative ARA reverted to ARA. Those eyes in which the astigmatic axis was not horizontal 1 week after operation ended with stronger astigmatism in 2 months.

  5. Measurement of refractive index of single microparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Knoener, G; Nieminen, T A; Heckenberg, N R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H; Knoener, Gregor; Parkin, Simon; Nieminen, Timo A.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2006-01-01

    The refractive index of single microparticles is derived from precise measurement and rigorous modeling of the stiffness of a laser trap. We demonstrate the method for particles of four different materials with diameters from 1.6 to 5.2 microns and achieve an accuracy of better than 1%. The method greatly contributes as a new characterization technique because it works best under conditions (small particle size, polydispersion) where other methods, such as absorption spectroscopy, start to fail. Particles need not be transferred to a particular fluid, which prevents particle degradation or alteration common in index matching techniques. Our results also show that advanced modeling of laser traps accurately reproduces experimental reality.

  6. Refraction and reflection of diffusion fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remhof, A; Wijngaarden, R J; Griessen, R

    2003-04-11

    Diffusion waves form the basis of several measurement technologies in materials science as well as in biological systems. They are, however, so heavily damped that their observation is a real challenge to the experimentalist. We show that accurate information about the refraction-like and reflection-like behavior of diffusion waves can be obtained by studying diffusion fronts. For this we use hydrogen in a metal as a model system and visualize its 2D migration with an optical indicator. The similarities between classical optics and diffusion, in particular, the applicability of Snell's law to diffusive systems are discussed. Our measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  7. Femtosecond laser in refractive and cataract surgeries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Han; Liu; Ying; Hu; Hong-Ping; Cui

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, 9 unique laser platforms have been brought to the market. As femtosecond(FS) laserassisted ophthalmic surgery potentially improves patient safety and visual outcomes, this new technology indeed provides ophthalmologists a reliable new option. But this new technology also poses a range of new clinical and financial challenges for surgeons. We provide an overview of the evolution of FS laser technology for use in refractive and cataract surgeries. This review describes the available laser platforms and mainly focuses on discussing the development of ophthalmic surgery technologies.

  8. Near-zero refractive index photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2017-03-01

    Structures with near-zero parameters (for example, media with near-zero relative permittivity and/or relative permeability, and thus a near-zero refractive index) exhibit a number of unique features, such as the decoupling of spatial and temporal field variations, which enable the exploration of qualitatively different wave dynamics. This Review summarizes the underlying principles and salient features, physical realizations and technological potential of these structures. In doing so, we revisit their distinctive impact on multiple optical processes, including scattering, guiding, trapping and emission of light. Their role in emphasizing secondary responses of matter such as nonlinear, non-reciprocal and non-local effects is also discussed.

  9. Prevalence of refractive errors among primary school children in a tropical area,Southeastern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monireh Mahjoob; Samira Heydarian; Jalil Nejati; Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam; Nahid Ravandeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of refractive errors among primary school children in Zahedan District, Southeastern Iran, as a tropical area.Methods: In this cross sectional study, a total of 400 students were selected randomly using multi-stage sampling technique. Myopia was defined as spherical equivalent(SE)of-0.5 diopter(D) or more, hyperopia was defined as SE of +2.00 D or more and a cylinder refraction greater than 0.75 D was considered astigmatism. Anisometropia was defined as a difference of 1 D or more between two eyes. Cycloplegic refractive status was measured using auto-refractometer(Topcon 8800). Data were analyzed using SPSS,version 22 software program.Results: Mean ± SD of SE was(1.71 ± 1.16) D. A total of 20 students [6.3%, 95%confidence interval(CI): 3.96%–9.64%] were myopic(-0.5 D), 186 students(58.1%,95% CI: 52.50%–63.56%) were hyperopic( +2.00 D) and 114 students(35.6%, 95%CI: 30.43%–41.18%) were emmetropic. The prevalence of astigmatism( 0.75 D)among students was 3.4%(95% CI: 1.82%–6.25%). Anisometropia of 1 D or more was found in 21.3%(95% CI: 16.98%–26.23%) of the studied population. The prevalence of refractive errors was higher among girls than boys(73.1% vs. 55.6%, P = 0.001), but it was not significantly different among different age groups(P = 0.790).Conclusions: Refractive errors affect a sizable portion of students in Zahedan. Although myopia is not very prevalent, the high rate of hyperopia in the studied population emphasizes its need for attention.

  10. Nonlinear Absorption and Refraction in Multilevel Organic Molecular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-Fei; DENG Xiao-Xu; WANG Yu-Xiao

    2000-01-01

    The nonlinear absorption and refraction in a multilevel organic molecular system is described by using the density matrix theory. The total absorptive coefficient of the system in the low-density case is equal to a linear sum of contributions from each energy level. Similarly, the total refractive index is equal to a linear sum of contributions from each energy level plus the refractive index of the vacuum. The absorption coefficient or refractive index due to each level is proportional to the population of that level, where the constant of proportionality is called the absorption cross-section or the refraction volume, respectively. The relation between the absorption cross-section and the refraction volume for each level is also given.

  11. A POPULATION BASED STUDY OF REFRACTIVE ERRORS IN CHILDREN AMONG AGE GROUP OF 7-15 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Refractive error is the most common cause of visual impairment around the world and the second leading cause of treatable blindness. Very early detection and treatment of visual impairment in children results in a reduction in the number of school children with poor sight being uncorrected. AIM To study the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors among children of 7-15 years of age group. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 958 children of age group 7-15 years were examined during a time period of 1 year from June 2014 to May 2015. The examination included visual acuity, slit lamp examination, auto refractometer, keratometry, A-Scan Biometry and fundoscopic examination. Patients were then taken to assess the refractive error under the cycloplegic effect of 1% homatropine by streak retinoscopy. Hyperopia was defined as spherical power of >+2.00 D, Myopia as -0.50 D. RESULTS Visual impairment (VA of 6/12 or worse in better eye was present in 8.14% of the children examined. The prevalence of myopia, hypermetropia and astigmatism was 4.70%, 1.24%, 2.2% respectively, Myopia was commonly seen in older age group children. CONCLUSION Refractive error was the main cause of visual impairment in children between 7-15 years. Myopia was the most common refractive error particularly in older children. Uncorrected refractive errors among children have a considerable impact on learning and their academic achievement. Diagnosis and correction of refractive error is the most effective form of eye care. As it is an easily treatable cause of visual impairment, effective strategies should be developed to eliminate refractive error in children.

  12. Negative refraction at deep-ultraviolet frequency in monocrystalline graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jingbo; Zhou, Ji; Kang, Lei; Wang, Rui; Meng, Xianguo; Li, Bo; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Longtu

    2010-01-01

    Negative refraction is such a prominent electromagnetic phenomenon that most researchers believe it can only occur in artificially engineered metamaterials. In this article, we report negative refraction for all incident angles for the first time in a naturally existing material. Using ellipsometry measurement of the equifrequency contour in the deep-ultraviolet frequency region (typically 254 nm), obvious negative refraction was demonstrated in monocrystalline graphite for incident angles ra...

  13. Effect of single vision soft contact lenses on peripheral refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Fan, Yvonne; Oh, Kelly; Trac, Kevin; Zhang, Frank; Swarbrick, Helen

    2012-07-01

    To investigate changes in peripheral refraction with under-, full, and over-correction of central refraction with commercially available single vision soft contact lenses (SCLs) in young myopic adults. Thirty-four myopic adult subjects were fitted with Proclear Sphere SCLs to under-correct (+0.75 DS), fully correct, and over-correct (-0.75 DS) their manifest central refractive error. Central and peripheral refraction were measured with no lens wear and subsequently with different levels of SCL central refractive error correction. The uncorrected refractive error was myopic at all locations along the horizontal meridian. Peripheral refraction was relatively hyperopic compared to center at 30 and 35° in the temporal visual field (VF) in low myopes and at 30 and 35° in the temporal VF and 10, 30, and 35° in the nasal VF in moderate myopes. All levels of SCL correction caused a hyperopic shift in refraction at all locations in the horizontal VF. The smallest hyperopic shift was demonstrated with under-correction followed by full correction and then by over-correction of central refractive error. An increase in relative peripheral hyperopia was measured with full correction SCLs compared with no correction in both low and moderate myopes. However, no difference in relative peripheral refraction profiles were found between under-, full, and over-correction. Under-, full, and over-correction of central refractive error with single vision SCLs caused a hyperopic shift in both central and peripheral refraction at all positions in the horizontal meridian. All levels of SCL correction caused the peripheral retina, which initially experienced absolute myopic defocus at baseline with no correction, to experience absolute hyperopic defocus. This peripheral hyperopia may be a possible cause of myopia progression reported with different types and levels of myopia correction.

  14. Volume Phase Masks in Photo-Thermo-Refractive Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-06

    2014 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Volume phase masks in photo- thermo -refractive glass The views, opinions and/or findings...in photo- thermo -refractive glass Report Title In many applications such as beam shaping, mode conversion, and phase encoding it is necessary to alter...requiring a new means of producing phase masks. In this dissertation a method for producing robust phase masks in the bulk of photo- thermo - refractive

  15. Training to meet the need for refractive error services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Faal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In many low- and middle-income countries, there are inadequate refractive error services for the many people who are currently either blind or visually impaired because they lack a pair of spectacles.The prioritisation of refractive error and low vision services within VISION 2020: The Right to Sight has provided an impetus and framework for the development of refractive error programmes to meet this need for services.

  16. Fiber in-line Michelson Interferometer for refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C. R.; Wang, D. N.; Wang, Min; Yang, Minghong; Wang, Yiping

    2013-09-01

    A fiber in-line Michelson interferometer based on open micro-cavity is demonstrated, which is fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining and thin film coating technique. In refractive index sensing, this interferometer operates in a reflection mode of detection, exhibits compact sensor head, good mechanical reliability, wide operation range and high sensitivity of 975nm/RIU (refractive index unit) at the refractive index value of 1.484.

  17. Retinal evaluation and treatment after refractive corneal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, C A; Kraushar, M F

    1985-08-01

    Refractive corneal surgery (a collective term used to describe a variety of surgical procedures that alter the refractive status of the eye through the surgical modification of corneal curvature) shows promise for use in situations where current methods of optical correction do not meet the patient's needs. This article reviews our experiences with the retinal evaluation of patients who have undergone corneal refractive surgery and offers recommendations for the treatment of retinal pathology after such surgery.

  18. Calculation of electron wave functions and refractive index of Ne

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The radial wave functions of inner electron shell and outer electron shell of a Ne atom were obtained by the approximate analytical method and tested by calculating the ground state energy of the Ne atom. The equivalent volume of electron cloud and the refractive index of Ne were calculated. The calculated refractive index agrees well with the experimental result. Relationship between the refractive index and the wave function of Ne was discovered.

  19. Multiple-View Geometry of the Refractive Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Chari, Visesh; Sturm, Peter

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Transparent refractive objects are one of the main problems in geometric vision that have been largely unexplored. The imaging and multi-view geometry of scenes with transparent or translucent objects with refractive properties is relatively less well understood than for opaque objects. The main objective of our work is to analyze the underlying multi-view relationships between cameras, when the scene being viewed contains a single refractive planar surface separating ...

  20. Negative refraction by a virtual photonic lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Budko, Neil V

    2008-01-01

    Research on photonics and metamaterials constantly challenges our intuitive understanding of the behaviour of light. In recent years we have seen negative refraction, focusing of light by a flat slab, a ``perfect'' prism, and an ``invisibility cloak'' [1-6]. It is generally understood that the cause of this unusual behaviour is the strong (anomalous) dispersion, i.e., dependence of the material properties on the frequency of light. Dispersion can be either due to a natural microscopic resonance of the material as with surface plasmons-polaritons, or due to an effective resonance (band-gap) of the periodic lattice as in photonics [7-9]. Metamaterials take the better of the two approaches representing a periodic array of designer subwavelength particles tuned to resonate at a specific frequency-band. At present, however, we have only a very basic understanding of the effect which a finite size of a sample of a periodic photonic crystal or metamaterial has on the macroscopic properties such as refraction. Yet ev...

  1. Wave measurement based on light refraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hequan; QIU Dahong; SHEN Yongming; WANG Yongxue

    2004-01-01

    Some authors have developed a few methods of measuring wave slopes based on light refraction, including the measurement method via the distribution of light intensity or color under water. A new method based on light refraction is specified for the measurement of wave surface elevation in wave flume via imaging technology. A plane painted with black and white stripes is put on the flume floor as an indication plane, which can be arranged easily and cheaply. Compared with the previous methods, the present method is less sensitive to the noise and nonlinear effects of optical process, which can be taken as a digital method. The CCD camera is fixed above the flume with its optical axis arranged vertically to grab the images of stripes modulated by the wave surface. The modulated value can be calculated from the Hilbert transform, and then the wave surface elevation can be obtained. The algorithm and experimental procedure are specified in detail, and some experimental results are provided to show the validity of the present method.

  2. IOL Power Calculation after Corneal Refractive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena De Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the different formulas that try to overcome the problem of calculating the intraocular lens (IOL power in patients that underwent corneal refractive surgery (CRS. Methods. A Pubmed literature search review of all published articles, on keyword associated with IOL power calculation and corneal refractive surgery, as well as the reference lists of retrieved articles, was performed. Results. A total of 33 peer reviewed articles dealing with methods that try to overcome the problem of calculating the IOL power in patients that underwent CRS were found. According to the information needed to try to overcome this problem, the methods were divided in two main categories: 18 methods were based on the knowledge of the patient clinical history and 15 methods that do not require such knowledge. The first group was further divided into five subgroups based on the parameters needed to make such calculation. Conclusion. In the light of our findings, to avoid postoperative nasty surprises, we suggest using only those methods that have shown good results in a large number of patients, possibly by averaging the results obtained with these methods.

  3. Ultrarefraction and negative refraction in metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystre, Daniel R.; Enoch, Stefan; Tayeb, Gerard

    2004-07-01

    In the recent years, many experimental and theoretical achievements have shown that meta-materials can simulate homogeneous materials with optical index less than unity or even negative. For example, a dielectric photonic crystal, used at the edge of a band gap, can generate phenomena of ultra-refraction (positive index less than unity) or negative refraction (negative index). Some applications of these phenomena will be shown, specially the design of directive antenna in the microwaves region. More recently, experimental and theoretical studies have been published on left-handed materials. These materials, which have a permittivity and a permeability equal to -1, have been the subject of controversies about their alleged property of making perfect lenses. It will be shown that such a perfect lens cannot exist. However, this kind of meta-material could be used for making better lenses than the best classical ones, a fact which could explain some experimental results. The vital influence of the size of the elementary cell on the performance of the lens will be pointed out. Finally, it will be shown that surprisingly, a left-handed material can be interpreted as a means to go through the mirror, as Alice in the novel of Lewis Carrol...

  4. Influence of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive error on visual impairment in a Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Fabio H; Corrente, José E; Opromolla, Paula; Schellini, Silvana A

    2014-06-25

    The World Health Organization (WHO) definitions of blindness and visual impairment are widely based on best-corrected visual acuity excluding uncorrected refractive errors (URE) as a visual impairment cause. Recently, URE was included as a cause of visual impairment, thus emphasizing the burden of visual impairment due to refractive error (RE) worldwide is substantially higher. The purpose of the present study is to determine the reversal of visual impairment and blindness in the population correcting RE and possible associations between RE and individual characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted in nine counties of the western region of state of São Paulo, using systematic and random sampling of households between March 2004 and July 2005. Individuals aged more than 1 year old were included and were evaluated for demographic data, eye complaints, history, and eye exam, including no corrected visual acuity (NCVA), best corrected vision acuity (BCVA), automatic and manual refractive examination. The definition adopted for URE was applied to individuals with NCVA > 0.15 logMAR and BCVA ≤ 0.15 logMAR after refractive correction and unmet refractive error (UREN), individuals who had visual impairment or blindness (NCVA > 0.5 logMAR) and BCVA ≤ 0.5 logMAR after optical correction. A total of 70.2% of subjects had normal NCVA. URE was detected in 13.8%. Prevalence of 4.6% of optically reversible low vision and 1.8% of blindness reversible by optical correction were found. UREN was detected in 6.5% of individuals, more frequently observed in women over the age of 50 and in higher RE carriers. Visual impairment related to eye diseases is not reversible with spectacles. Using multivariate analysis, associations between URE and UREN with regard to sex, age and RE was observed. RE is an important cause of reversible blindness and low vision in the Brazilian population.

  5. Ultrasensitive twin-core photonic bandgap fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Town, Graham; Bang, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We propose a microfluidic refractive index sensor based on new polymer twin-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF). The sensor can achieve ultrahigh detection limit, i.e. >1.4times10-7RIU refractive index unit (RIU), by measuring the coupling wavelength shift.......We propose a microfluidic refractive index sensor based on new polymer twin-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBGF). The sensor can achieve ultrahigh detection limit, i.e. >1.4times10-7RIU refractive index unit (RIU), by measuring the coupling wavelength shift....

  6. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  7. Effect of magnetic field of light on refractive index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Tao

    2004-01-01

    Light refraction in a medium results from energy exchange between the medium and the magnetic field of the light. Formulas of refractive index, that is, the ratio of light speed in vacuum to light speed in the medium, were derived with the inductor model of electron cloud and the law of energy conservation. Refractive indices of several media were calculated using the formulas derived, and the calculated results are in agreement with the results measured. The anisotropy and the nonlinearity of the refractive index are explained with the theory described in this work.

  8. Empirical formula for the refractive index of freezing brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2009-01-01

    The refractive index of freezing brine is important for example in order to estimate oceanic scattering as sea ice develops. Previously, no simple continuous expression was available for estimating the refractive index of brine at subzero temperatures. I show that extrapolation of the empirical...... formula for the refractive index of seawater by Quan and Fry [Appl. Opt. 34(18), 3477-3480 (1995)] provides a good fit to the refractive index of freezing brine for temperatures above -24 degrees celsius and salinities below 180 parts per thousand....

  9. Choroidal and Retinal Thickness in Children With Different Refractive Status Measured by Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peiyao; Zou, Haidong; Zhu, Jianfeng; Xu, Xun; Jin, Jiali; Chang, Ta Chen; Lu, Lina; Yuan, Hong; Sun, Sifei; Yan, Bo; He, Jiangnan; Wang, Mingjin; He, Xiangui

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the choroidal and retinal thickness in myopic, emmetropic, and hyperopic Chinese children by swept-source longer-wavelength optical coherence tomography. Cross-sectional study. Two-hundred and seventy-six schoolchildren aged 7-13 years underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations, including cycloplegic refraction, and swept-source optical coherence tomography measurements. The thickness of the choroid, retina, ganglion cell layer, and nerve fiber layer were compared among children of different refractive status. The topographic variation and factors related to the thickness of the choroid and retinal layers were analyzed. Compared to emmetropic subjects, those with myopia had a significantly thinner choroid in all regions (P choroid in most regions (P .05). The axial length and refractive diopters were independently related to central foveal choroidal thickness (R(2) = 0.17, P thicknesses (R(2) = 0.10, P choroidal and retinal thickness were unrelated in children of different refractive status (P > .05). Choroidal thickness, but not retinal thickness, correlated closely with axial length and refractive diopters in Chinese children. Choroid thinning occurs before retina thinning early in myopic progression. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A terahertz metamaterial with unnaturally high refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Muhan; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kim, Yushin; Kang, Seung Beom; Shin, Jonghwa; Kwak, Min Hwan; Kang, Kwang-Young; Lee, Yong-Hee; Park, Namkyoo; Min, Bumki

    2011-02-17

    Controlling the electromagnetic properties of materials, going beyond the limit that is attainable with naturally existing substances, has become a reality with the advent of metamaterials. The range of various structured artificial 'atoms' has promised a vast variety of otherwise unexpected physical phenomena, among which the experimental realization of a negative refractive index has been one of the main foci thus far. Expanding the refractive index into a high positive regime will complete the spectrum of achievable refractive index and provide more design flexibility for transformation optics. Naturally existing transparent materials possess small positive indices of refraction, except for a few semiconductors and insulators, such as lead sulphide or strontium titanate, that exhibit a rather high peak refractive index at mid- and far-infrared frequencies. Previous approaches using metamaterials were not successful in realizing broadband high refractive indices. A broadband high-refractive-index metamaterial structure was theoretically investigated only recently, but the proposed structure does not lend itself to easy implementation. Here we demonstrate that a broadband, extremely high index of refraction can be realized from large-area, free-standing, flexible terahertz metamaterials composed of strongly coupled unit cells. By drastically increasing the effective permittivity through strong capacitive coupling and decreasing the diamagnetic response with a thin metallic structure in the unit cell, a peak refractive index of 38.6 along with a low-frequency quasi-static value of over 20 were experimentally realized for a single-layer terahertz metamaterial, while maintaining low losses. As a natural extension of these single-layer metamaterials, we fabricated quasi-three-dimensional high-refractive-index metamaterials, and obtained a maximum bulk refractive index of 33.2 along with a value of around 8 at the quasi-static limit.

  11. Microwave gain medium with negative refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dexin; Chang, Kihun; Ran, Lixin; Xin, Hao

    2014-12-19

    Artificial effective media are attractive because of the fantastic applications they may enable, such as super lensing and electromagnetic invisibility. However, the inevitable loss due to their strongly dispersive nature is one of the fundamental challenges preventing such applications from becoming a reality. In this study, we demonstrate an effective gain medium based on negative resistance, to overcompensate the loss of a conventional passive metamaterial, meanwhile keeping its original negative-index property. Energy conservation-based theory, full-wave simulation and experimental measurement show that a fabricated sample consisting of conventional sub-wavelength building blocks with embedded microwave tunnel diodes exhibits a band-limited Lorentzian dispersion simultaneously with a negative refractive index and a net gain. Our work provides experimental evidence to the assertion that a stable net gain in negative-index gain medium is achievable, proposing a potential solution for the critical challenge current metamateiral technology faces in practical applications.

  12. Negative refractive index in coaxial plasmon waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, René; Burgos, Stanley P; Atwater, Harry A; Polman, Albert

    2010-06-07

    We theoretically show that coaxial waveguides composed of a metallic core, surrounded by a dielectric cylinder and clad by a metal outer layer exhibit negative refractive index modes over a broad spectral range in the visible. For narrow dielectric gaps (10 nm GaP embedded in Ag) a figure-of-merit of 18 can be achieved at lambda(0) = 460 nm. For larger dielectric gaps the negative index spectral range extends well below the surface plasmon resonance frequency. By fine-tuning the coaxial geometry the special case of n = -1 at a figure-of-merit of 5, or n = 0 for a decay length of 500 nm can be achieved.

  13. Microwave gain medium with negative refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dexin; Chang, Kihun; Ran, Lixin; Xin, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Artificial effective media are attractive because of the fantastic applications they may enable, such as super lensing and electromagnetic invisibility. However, the inevitable loss due to their strongly dispersive nature is one of the fundamental challenges preventing such applications from becoming a reality. In this study, we demonstrate an effective gain medium based on negative resistance, to overcompensate the loss of a conventional passive metamaterial, meanwhile keeping its original negative-index property. Energy conservation-based theory, full-wave simulation and experimental measurement show that a fabricated sample consisting of conventional sub-wavelength building blocks with embedded microwave tunnel diodes exhibits a band-limited Lorentzian dispersion simultaneously with a negative refractive index and a net gain. Our work provides experimental evidence to the assertion that a stable net gain in negative-index gain medium is achievable, proposing a potential solution for the critical challenge current metamateiral technology faces in practical applications.

  14. Quantum Electrodynamics in Media with Negative Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    K"astel, J; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We consider the interaction of atoms with the quantized electromagnetic field in the presence of materials with negative index of refraction. Spontaneous emission of an atom embedded in a negative index material is discussed. It is shown furthermore that the possibility of a vanishing optical path length between two spatially separated points provided by these materials can lead to complete suppression of spontaneous emission of an atom in front of a perfect mirror even if the distance between atom and mirror is large compared to the transition wavelength. Two atoms put in the focal points of a lens formed by a parallel slab of ideal negative index material are shown to exhibit perfect sub- and superradiance. The maximum length scale in both cases is limited only by the propagation distance within the free-space radiative decay time. Limitations of the predicted effects arising from absorption, finite transversal extension and dispersion of the material are analyzed.

  15. Nonlinear refractive index of optical crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Robert; Chase, L. L.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1989-02-01

    The nonlinear refractive indices (n2) of a large number of optical crystals have been measured at a wavelength near one micrometer with use of nearly degenerate three-wave mixing. The measurements are compared with the predictions of an empirical formula derived by Boling, Glass, and Owyoung. This formula, which relates n2 to the linear refractive index and its dispersion, is shown to be accurate to within about 30% for materials with nonlinear indices ranging over 3 orders of magnitude. Measurements for a number of binary oxide and fluoride crystals have been analyzed under the assumption that the hyperpolarizability of the anion is much larger than that of the cation. It is found that the hyperpolarizability of oxygen varies by a factor of 10, and that of fluorine varies by a factor of 7, depending on the size of the coordinating cation. This behavior is similar to that of the linear polarizability, although the hyperpolarizability is much more sensitive than the linear polarizability to the identity of the cation. The measured halide ion hyperpolarizabilities for several alkali-halide crystals are in reasonable agreement with recent self-consistent calculations. A semiempirical model was proposed by Wilson and Curtis to account for the dependence of the linear anionic polarizability on the radius of the cation. This model also accounts quite well for the variation of the hyperpolarizability of both fluorine and oxygen, except for cation partners that have filled or unfilled d-electron shells. The nonlinear indices of a number of complex oxides (i.e., those with more than one cation) have been calculated from the partial hyperpolarizabilities deduced from the data for the binary oxides. The calculated and measured values of n2 agree to within an average error of 13%.

  16. Refractive beam shapers for focused laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-09-01

    Focusing of laser radiation is most often used approach in various industrial micromachining applications like scribing, PCB drilling, and is important in scientific researches like laser heating in geophysics experiments with diamond anvil cells (DAC). Control of intensity distribution in focal spot is important task since optimum intensity profiles are rather flat-top, doughnut or "inverse-Gauss" than typical for lasers Gaussian profile. Because of high intensity of modern CW and pulsed lasers it is advisable to use refractive beam shaping optics with smooth optical surfaces providing high radiation resistance. Workable optical solutions can be built on the base of diffraction theory conclusion that flat-top intensity profile in focal plane of a lens is created when input beam has Airy-disk intensity distribution. It is suggested to apply refractive beam shapers converting, with minimum wavefront deformation, Gaussian profile of TEM00 beam to a beam with Airy disk intensity distribution, thereby optimizing conditions of interference near the focal plane of a lens after the beam shaper and providing flat-top, doughnut, "inverse-Gauss" profiles. This approach allows operation with CW and ultra-short pulse lasers, using F-theta lenses and objectives, mirror scanners, provides extended depth of field similar to Rayleigh length of comparable TEM00 beam, easy integration in industrial equipment, simple adjustment procedure and switching between profiles, telescope and collimator implementations. There will be considered design basics of beam shapers, analysis of profile behaviour near focal plane, examples of implementations in micromachining systems and experimental DAC setups, results of profile measurements and material processing.

  17. Inhomogeneous waves in lossy metamaterials and negative refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, Vladimir Yu

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of inhomogeneous waves at the interface of a lossy metamaterial. We show that negative refraction can be interpreted as the formation of an inhomogeneous wave with the obtuse angle between equiamplitude and equiphase planes. Additionally we show that the refractive index and attenuation coefficient of a lossy metamaterial depend on an incident angle even if this metamaterial is isotropic.

  18. Why is the refractive index cannot be negative

    CERN Document Server

    Davidovich, Michael V

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that for left-handed metamaterials and generally for negative refraction media the refraction index cannot be entered unequivocally and cannot be considered as real, and especially as negative. This index for above referred media is not expedient

  19. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  20. Comment on "Negative refractive index in artificial metamaterials".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildishev, Alexander V; Drachev, Vladimir P; Chettiar, Uday K; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Werner, Douglas H; Kwon, Do-Hoon

    2007-06-01

    We dispute Grigorenko's statement [Opt. Lett. 31, 2483 (2006)] that measuring only the reflection intensity spectrum is sufficient for determining the effective refractive index. In addition, our simulations do not confirm his conclusions regarding the negative refractive index and the negative permeability of the nanopillar sample in the visible range.

  1. Refraction in Terms of the Deviation of the Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Fred M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses refraction in terms of the deviation of light. Points out that in physics courses where very little mathematics is used, it might be more suitable to describe refraction entirely in terms of the deviation, rather than by introducing Snell's law. (DH)

  2. Helping Secondary School Students Develop a Conceptual Understanding of Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmann, Scott; Anderson, Charles W.; Boeckman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Using real-world examples, ray diagrams, and a cognitive apprenticeship cycle, this paper focuses on developing students' conceptual (not mathematical) understanding of refraction. Refraction can be a difficult concept for students to comprehend if they do not have well-designed opportunities to practice explaining situations where reflection and…

  3. Negative Refraction in a Uniaxial Absorbent Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    Refraction of light from an isotropic dielectric medium to an anisotropic dielectric material is a complicated phenomenon that can have several different characteristics not usually discussed in electromagnetics textbooks for undergraduate students. With a simple problem wherein the refracting material is uniaxial with its optic axis normal to the…

  4. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  5. Measurement of Refractive Index Using a Michelson Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendley, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a novel and simple method of measuring the refractive index of transparent plates using a Michelson interferometer. Since it is necessary to use a computer program when determining the refractive index, undergraduates could be given the opportunity of writing their own programs. (Author/JN)

  6. Determining the Thickness and Refractive Index of a Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    When a laser beam reflects from a back surface glass mirror and falls on a screen, a pattern of discrete bright spots is created by partial reflection and refraction of the light at the air-glass interface and reflection at the mirror surface (Fig. 1). This paper explains how this phenomenon can be used to determine the refractive index and the…

  7. Negative Refraction in a Uniaxial Absorbent Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    Refraction of light from an isotropic dielectric medium to an anisotropic dielectric material is a complicated phenomenon that can have several different characteristics not usually discussed in electromagnetics textbooks for undergraduate students. With a simple problem wherein the refracting material is uniaxial with its optic axis normal to the…

  8. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  9. Characterization of refractive index distribution of polymer optical fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A focusing method is developed to characterize the refractive index profile of polymer optical fiber (POF). Based on the refractive index profile the theoretical bandwidth and the core index exponentα (α > 0) of POF are calculated. The results show that the value of theoretical bandwidth agrees well with the experimental data.

  10. Large negative lateral shifts due to negative refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Benedicto, Jessica; Moreau, Antoine; Centeno, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    When a thin structure in which negative refraction occurs (a metallo-dielectric or a photonic crystal) is illuminated by a beam, the reflected and transmitted beam can undergo a large negative lateral shift. This phenomenon can be seen as an interferential enhancement of the geometrical shift and can be considered as a signature of negative refraction.

  11. Refractive shift of silicone oil tamponade in pseudophakic eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Li, Jiuke; Jin, Xiaohong; Zhai, Jing; Dai, Yuanmin; Li, Yumin

    2016-08-16

    Refraction change of silicone oil (SO) tamponade in phakic and aphakic eye has been studied thoroughly; however, it is rarely studied in pseudophakic eye. In this paper we aimed to deduce a theoretical formula predicting refractive shift of silicone oil tamponade in pseudophakic eye and compared it with clinical findings. A theoretical formula was deduced through strict geometric optical principles under the Helmholtz Schematic eye model. Pre/postoperative refractive status of patients who previously underwent phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implant, vitrectomy, SO tamponade and required SO extraction was studied. Twenty-six patients (27 eyes, 13 males and 13 females) were studied. Refractive error of SO-off was -1.88 ± 2.73D, and of SO-in was 2.02 ± 3.90. Refractive shift of SO tamponade was -3.90 ± 1.74D. Refractive shift was significantly associated with refractive power of IOL (r = -0.7903, p tamponade in pseudophakic eye correlates with refractive power of implanted IOL and ACD, and strong correlation between theoretical formula and clinical findings was detected.

  12. Comparison of atmospheric refraction at radar and optical wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.; Heemskerk, E.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2005-01-01

    A study is carried out to classify possible combinations of refractivity conditions for RF and IR over a wide range of meteorological conditions using different micrometeorological bulk models. The calculated refractivity profiles are analyzed for evaporation duct height (EDH), mainly relevant for

  13. Refractive error and visual functions in children with special needs compared with the first grade school students in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vora Urmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We evaluated the refractive status and visual function of children with special needs (other handicap in 2010 and compared them with healthy 1 st grade school students in Oman. Materials and Methods: This was a cohort study. Optometrists recorded vision using a logarithm of minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR chart. Preferential looking method was used for testing 31 children. Cycloplegic refraction was performed on all children. Contrast sensitivity was tested using 2.5%, 10%, and 100% contrast charts. Ocular movement, alignment, and anterior segment were also assessed. A pediatrician reviewed the health records of all the children at the time of their enrollment in this study to determine if the child had been diagnosed with a systemic condition or syndromes. The visual functions were assessed by study investigators. We estimated the rates and the risk of different visual function defects in children with special needs. Result: The prevalence of refractive error in 70 children (4.7 ± 0.8 years with special needs (group 1 and 175 normal healthy first grade students (group 2 were 58.5% and 2.9%, respectively. The risk of refractive error was significantly higher in children with special needs [relative risk, 48.1 (95% confidence interval, 17.54-131.8]. Hyperopia (>1.00 D, myopia (≥ 1.00D and astigmatism (≥ ±1.00 D were found in 18.6%, 24.3%, and 27.1%, respectively, in group 1. Six children in this group had defective near vision. Sixteen (80% children with Down syndrome had refractive error. Seven (50% children with developmental disorder showed decreased contrast sensitivity. Conclusion: Prevalence of uncorrected refractive error was much higher in children with special needs. Prevalence of strabismus, nystagmus, and reduced contrast sensitivity was also higher in children with special needs. Early vision screening, visual function assessment, correction of refractive error, and frequent follow-up are recommended.

  14. Human resources for refraction services in Central Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Himal; Murthy, G V S; Bascaran, Covadonga

    2015-07-01

    Uncorrected refractive error is a public health problem globally and in Nepal. Planning of refraction services is hampered by a paucity of data. This study was conducted to determine availability and distribution of human resources for refraction, their efficiency, the type and extent of their training; the current service provision of refraction services and the unmet need in human resources for refraction in Central Nepal. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All refraction facilities in the Central Region were identified through an Internet search and interviews of key informants from the professional bodies and parent organisations of primary eye centres. A stratified simple random sampling technique was used to select 50 per cent of refraction facilities. The selected facilities were visited for primary data collection. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with the managers and the refractionists available in the facilities using a semi-structured questionnaire. Data was collected in 29 centres. All the managers (n=29; response rate 100 per cent) and 50 refractionists (Response rate 65.8 per cent) were interviewed. Optometrists and ophthalmic assistants were the main providers of refraction services (n=70, 92.11 per cent). They were unevenly distributed across the region, highly concentrated around urban areas. The median number of refractions per refractionist per year was 3,600 (IQR: 2,400 - 6,000). Interviewed refractionists stated that clients' knowledge, attitude and practice related factors such as lack of awareness of the need for refraction services and/or availability of existing services were the major barriers to the output of refraction services. The total number of refractions carried out in the Central Region per year was 653,176. An additional 170 refractionists would be needed to meet the unmet need of 1,323,234 refractions. The study findings demand a major effort to develop appropriately trained personnel when planning

  15. Software for teaching refraction of light with the semicircle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Software is presented for teaching elementary optics using a transparent semicircle. We demonstrate the use of the semicircle to investigate Snell’s lawand students can are presented with the difficulties involved in experiments. An Excel spreadsheet can show to students that small errors in positioning of the semicircle can result in a non-constant index of refraction. Students can study the effect of changing some of the parameters of placement of a semicircle on the accuracy of the experimental results. They can see from the analysis of data that much better results are obtained by doing regression analysis rather than by just taking the average value of the index of refraction. Measuring the critical angle also gives a method of calculating the index of refraction. Another way to measure the index of refraction is the use of the semicircle as a lens and from its focal length we can deduce the index of refraction.

  16. Atmospheric Refractive Electromagnetic Wave Bending and Propagation Delay

    CERN Document Server

    Mangum, Jeffrey G

    2014-01-01

    In this tutorial we summarize the physics and mathematics behind refractive electromagnetic wave bending and delay. Refractive bending and delay through the Earth's atmosphere at both radio/millimetric and optical/IR wavelengths are discussed, but with most emphasis on the former, and with Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) applications in mind. As modern astronomical measurements often require sub-arcsecond position accuracy, care is required when selecting refractive bending and delay algorithms. For the spherically-uniform model atmospheres generally used for all refractive bending and delay algorithms, positional accuracies $\\lesssim 1^{\\prime\\prime}$ are achievable when observing at zenith angles $\\lesssim 75^\\circ$. A number of computationally economical approximate methods for atmospheric refractive bending and delay calculation are presented, appropriate for astronomical observations under these conditions. For observations under more realistic atmospheric conditions, for zenith angles $\\gtrsim 75^...

  17. Refractivity estimations from an angle-of-arrival spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xiao-Feng; Huang Si-Xun

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the probability of atmospheric refractivity estimation by using field measurements at an array of radio receivers in terms of angle-of-arrival spectrum. Angle-of-arrival spectrum information is simulated by the ray optics model and refractivity is expressed in the presence of an ideal tri-linear profile. The estimation of the refractivity is organized as an optimization problem and a genetic algorithm is used to search for the optimal solution from various trial refractivity profiles. Theoretical analysis demonstrates the feasibility of this method to retrieve the refractivity parameters. Simulation results indicate that this approach has a fair anti-noise ability and its accuracy performance is mainly dependent on the antenna aperture size and its positions.

  18. Refractive changes following corrective surgery for thyroid-related orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinori, Michael; Godfrey, Kyle J; Whipple, Katherine M; Kikkawa, Don O; Granet, David B

    2017-02-01

    Thyroid-related orbitopathy (TRO) is a common and recognizable manifestation of Graves' disease, caused by an increase in orbital fat volume, increased extraocular muscle diameter, and fibrosis. Together, within the bony confines of the orbit, these changes might alter the shape and position of the globe, potentially inducing refractive shifts. These refractive changes may then be affected by corrective surgical interventions for TRO such as orbital decompression and strabismus surgery. We studied refractive changes in patients with TRO who underwent strabismus surgery with or without orbital decompression. Manifest refraction was performed preoperatively and postoperatively in 33 patients who met inclusion criteria. Statistically significant postoperative refractive changes were found for cylinder, axis, and spherical equivalent. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Distribution of Binocular Vision Anomalies and Refractive Errors in Iranian Children With Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yekta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Visual problems in children contribute to learning disorders, which are one of the most influential factors in learning. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of refractive and binocular vision errors in children with learning disorders. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 406 children with learning disorders with a mean age of 8.56 ± 2.4 years were evaluated. Examinations included the determination of refractive errors with an auto-refractometer and static retinoscopy, measurement of visual acuity with a Snellen chart, evaluation of ocular deviation, and measurement of stereopsis, amplitude of accommodation, and near point of convergence. Results Of the 406 participants, 319 (78.6% were emmetropic in the right eye, 14.5% had myopia, and 6.9% had hyperopia according to cycloplegic refraction. Astigmatism was detected in 75 (18.5% children. In our study, 89.9% of the children had no deviation, 1.0% had esophoria, and 6.4% had exophoria . In addition, 2.2% of the children had suppression. The near point of convergence ranged from 3 to 18 cm, with a mean of 10.12 ± 3.274 cm. Moreover, 98.5 and 98.0% of the participants achieved complete vision with the best correction in the right and left eye, respectively. The best corrected visual acuity in the right and left eye was achieved in 98.5 and 98.0% of the children, respectively. Conclusions The pattern of visual impairment in learning-impaired children is not much different from that in normal children; however, because these children may not be able to express themselves clearly, lack of correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment has resulted in a marked defect in recognizing visual disorders in these children. Therefore, gaining knowledge of the prevalence of refractive errors in children with learning disorders can be considered the first step in their treatment.

  20. The effect of multifocal soft contact lenses on peripheral refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Fan, Yvonne; Oh, Kelly; Trac, Kevin; Zhang, Frank; Swarbrick, Helen A

    2013-07-01

    To compare changes in peripheral refraction with single-vision (SV) and multifocal (MF) correction of distance central refraction with commercially available SV and MF soft contact lenses (SCLs) in young myopic adults. Thirty-four myopic adult subjects were fitted with Proclear Sphere and Proclear Multifocal SCLs to correct their manifest central refractive error. Central and peripheral refraction were measured with no lens wear and subsequently with the two different types of SCL correction. At baseline, refraction was myopic at all locations along the horizontal meridian. Peripheral refraction was relatively hyperopic compared with center at 30 and 35 degrees in the temporal visual field (VF) in low myopes, and at 30 and 35 degrees in the temporal VF, and 10, 30, and 35 degrees in the nasal VF in moderate myopes. Single-vision and MF distance correction with Proclear Sphere and Proclear Multifocal SCLs, respectively, caused a hyperopic shift in refraction at all locations in the horizontal VF. Compared with SV correction, MF SCL correction caused a significant relative myopic shift at all locations in the nasal VF in both low and moderate myopes and also at 35 degrees in the temporal VF in moderate myopes. Correction of central refractive error with SV and MF SCLs caused a hyperopic shift in both central and peripheral refraction at all positions in the horizontal meridian. Single-vision SCL correction caused the peripheral retina, which initially experienced absolute myopic defocus at baseline with no correction to experience an absolute hyperopic defocus. Multifocal SCL correction resulted in a relative myopic shift in peripheral refraction compared with SV SCL correction. This myopic shift may explain recent reports of reduced myopia progression rates with MF SCL correction.

  1. Radio Refractivity Study in Akure-Owo Digital Microwave Link in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radio Refractivity Study in Akure-Owo Digital Microwave Link in South Western Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... Sub refraction is a situation in which the radio signal beam is refracted upwards in the link thereby resulting in ...

  2. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second of a set of two papers in which we study the inverse refraction problem. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," studies and classifies the types of nonuniqueness that exist when solving inverse problems depending on the participation of a priori information required to obtain reliable solutions of inverse geophysical problems. In view of the classification developed, in this paper we study the type of nonuniqueness associated with the inverse refraction problem. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined by using a simple three-layer model. Like many other inverse geophysical problems, the inverse refraction problem does not have a unique solution. Conventionally, nonuniqueness is considered to be a result of insufficient data and/or error in the data, for any fixed number of model parameters. This study illustrates that even for overdetermined and error free data, nonlinear inverse refraction problems exhibit exact-data nonuniqueness, which further complicates the problem of nonuniqueness. By evaluating the nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem, this paper targets the improvement of refraction inversion algorithms, and as a result, the achievement of more realistic solutions. The nonuniqueness of the inverse refraction problem is examined initially by using a simple three-layer model. The observations and conclusions of the three-layer model nonuniqueness study are used to evaluate the nonuniqueness of more complicated n-layer models and multi-parameter cell models such as in refraction tomography. For any fixed number of model parameters, the inverse refraction problem exhibits continuous ranges of exact-data nonuniqueness. Such an unfavorable type of nonuniqueness can be uniquely solved only by providing abundant a priori information

  3. Refractive change after vitrectomy for epiretinal membrane in pseudophakic eyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamoudi, Hassan; Kofod, Mads; La Cour, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose:  To report the change in refraction in pseudophakic eyes following 23-gauge vitrectomy for epiretinal membrane (ERM), without use of silicone oil, intraocular gas or scleral buckling. Methods:  Retrospective review of the records of 28 pseudophakic eyes in 28 patients undergoing 23-gauge...... pars plana vitrectomy for ERM. All 28 eyes had a measured preoperative refraction in their records and were seen minimum 2 months after vitrectomy for measuring their refraction. Fellow eyes (28 eyes) were used as controls. Results:  The mean preoperative refraction was -0.15 ± 0.85 dioptre (D......), and the mean postoperative refraction was -0.41 ± 0.93 D. Thus, a myopic shift was observed following vitrectomy with a mean change in refraction of -0.26 ± 0.60 D (range +0.75 to -2.13 D, p = 0.032). The postoperative change in refraction was within ±0.25, ±0.50 and ±1.00 D in 39%, 68% and 96% of the eyes...

  4. Refractive Errors in State Junior High School Students in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabila Tasyakur Nikmah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncorrected refractive error is one of the avoidable causes of vision impairment in children and adults. Vision problem in children has been shown to affect their psychological and academic performance. This study aims at identifying and gaining more insights on the characteristic of the refractive errors in state junior high school students in Bandung to avoid uncorrected refractive errors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in September–November 2015 in state junior high schools in Bandung, West Java, Indonesia. Sample was selected using multistage random sampling technique. Children were examined using tumbling E examination; then students with visual acuity worse than 6/12 underwent Snellen Chart test, refractometry without pupil dilatation, correction with trial lens, then was followed by direct ophthalmoscopy. Results: From a total of 435 children who completed all the examination, 80 children (18.39% had refractive errors; consisted of 151 eyes (94.38% with myopia and 9 eyes (5.62% with astigmatism. Refractive errors were found to be more common in female children (73.7% than male children (26.3%. Among those with refractive errors, 45 children (56.3% did not use any corrective glasses before the examination. Conclusions: Routine refractive error test in vision screening examination is needed for students. It is equally important to raise more awareness toward eye disease in community.

  5. Visual function of police officers who have undergone refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, Jeffery K; Ramaswamy, Shankaran

    2006-11-01

    The visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of police recruits and officers was evaluated in both normal and dim illumination conditions to determine whether officers who have had refractive surgery have compromised night vision. The control group consisted of 76 officers and recruits who have not had refractive surgery and the refractive surgery group consisted of 22 officers and recruits who had refractive surgery. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured under both room illumination and dim illumination. The room illumination test series included high contrast acuity, low contrast acuity and Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity. The dim illumination test series included high contrast acuity, low contrast acuity, Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity, license plate number acuity (with and without glare) and the Mesotest. The general findings were that the refractive surgery group had lower acuity scores on low contrast targets in both room and dim light levels along with a reduction in the Mesotest scores with a glare source compared to the control group. Although refractive surgery police recruits and officers had reduced performance on some vision tests, these reductions were small and it is unlikely that their performance on vision related tasks would be compromised, on average. The major concern is the small number of refractive surgery candidates whose results were well outside the range of the non-surgical candidates. Their vision may be unacceptable for policing. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Refractive Errors Affect the Vividness of Visual Mental Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Piccardi, Laura; Zeri, Fabrizio; Babino, Antonio; Giusberti, Fiorella; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that visual perception and mental imagery are equivalent has never been explored in individuals with vision defects not preventing the visual perception of the world, such as refractive errors. Refractive error (i.e., myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism) is a condition where the refracting system of the eye fails to focus objects sharply on the retina. As a consequence refractive errors cause blurred vision. We subdivided 84 individuals according to their spherical equivalent refraction into Emmetropes (control individuals without refractive errors) and Ametropes (individuals with refractive errors). Participants performed a vividness task and completed a questionnaire that explored their cognitive style of thinking before their vision was checked by an ophthalmologist. Although results showed that Ametropes had less vivid mental images than Emmetropes this did not affect the development of their cognitive style of thinking; in fact, Ametropes were able to use both verbal and visual strategies to acquire and retrieve information. Present data are consistent with the hypothesis of equivalence between imagery and perception. PMID:23755186

  7. Negative Refraction Induced by M\\"{o}bius Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Y N; Ai, Qing; Sun, C P

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically show the negative refraction existing in M\\"{o}bius molecules. The negative refractive index is induced by the non-trivial topology of the molecules. With the M\\"{o}bius boundary condition, the effective electromagnetic fields felt by the electron in a M\\"{o}bius ring is spatially inhomogeneous. In this regard, the $D_{N}$ symmetry is broken in M\\"{o}bius molecules and thus the magnetic response is induced through the effective magnetic field. Our findings open up a new architecture for negative refractive index materials based on the non-trivial topology of M\\"{o}bius molecules.

  8. The refractive index in the viscous quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Li, Jia-rong; Gao, Yan-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Under the framework of the viscous chromohydrodynamics, the gluon self-energy is derived for the quark-gluon plasma with shear viscosity. The viscous electric permittivity and magnetic permeability are evaluated from the gluon self-energy, through which the refraction index %in the %viscous quark-gluon plasma is investigated. The numerical analysis indicates that the refractive index becomes negative in some frequency range. The start point for that frequency range is around the electric permittivity pole, and the magnetic permeability pole determines the end point. As the increase of $\\eta/s$, the frequency range for the negative refraction becomes wider.

  9. Absorption and refractive index dynamics in waveguide semiconductor electroabsorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal

    2002-01-01

    with 9.6 dB of extinction ratio can be realized. Teh sign of the refractive index change, induced by optical generation of carriers in the active region, is seen to depend both on the optical power and on the reverse bias applied to the saturable absorber. The trends of the observed refractive index...... with 10 shallow quantum wells and a component with 5 deep quantum wells shows that the shallow 10 quantum wells component is preferable with respect to chirp, extinction ratio and potentially also the insertion loss. Calculations of the refractive indes change confirms the measurements and show...

  10. Multistep ion exchange processes of gradient refractive index rod lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hao; Liu, Aimei; Tong, Jufang; Yi, Xunong; Li, Qianguang; Wang, Xinmin; Ding, Yaoming

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for research on the refractive index profile (RIP) of multistep ion exchange processes (IEPs) of gradient refractive index rod lenses (GRINs) is established by the different initial condition and boundary condition, based on the Fickian diffusion equation. GRIN rod lenses have been fabricated using the three-step IEPs. Research results indicate that the experimental deviations of refractive index (DRI) are in good agreement with the theoretical data. The DRI of three-step IEPs is superior to the one- and two-step IEPs and smaller than 10(-5).

  11. Analyzing refractive index changes and differential bending in microcantilever arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, François; Lang, Hans Peter; Hegner, Martin; Despont, Michel; Drechsler, Ute; Gerber, Christoph

    2008-08-01

    A new microcantilever array design is investigated comprising eight flexible microcantilevers introducing two solid bars, enabling to subtract contributions from differences in refractive index in an optical laser read out system. Changes in the refractive index do not contribute undesirably to bending signals at picomolar to micromolar DNA or protein concentrations. However, measurements of samples with high salt concentrations or serum are affected, requiring corrections for refractive index artifacts. Moreover, to obtain a deeper understanding of molecular stress formation, the differential curvature of cantilevers is analyzed by positioning the laser spots along the surface of the levers during pH experiments.

  12. Studies of atmospheric refraction effects on laser data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P. J.; Pearce, W. A.; Johnson, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    The refraction effect from three perspectives was considered. An analysis of the axioms on which the accepted correction algorithms were based was the first priority. The integrity of the meteorological measurements on which the correction model is based was also considered and a large quantity of laser observations was processed in an effort to detect any serious anomalies in them. The effect of refraction errors on geodetic parameters estimated from laser data using the most recent analysis procedures was the focus of the third element of study. The results concentrate on refraction errors which were found to be critical in the eventual use of the data for measurements of crustal dynamics.

  13. Fractional Fourier transform of apertured paraboloid refracting system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiannong Chen; Jinliang Yan; Defa Wang; Yongjiang Yu

    2007-01-01

    The limitation of paraxial condition of paraboloid refracting system in performing fractional Fourier transform acts like an aperture, which makes the system different from ideal systems. With aperture expanded as the sum of finite complex Gaussian terms, a more practical approximate analytical solution of fractional Fourier transform of Gaussian beam in an apertured paraboloid refracting system is obtained and also numerical investigation is presented. Complicated and practical fractional Fourier transform systems can be constructed by cascading several apertured paraboloid refracting systems which are the simplest and the most basic units for performing more precise transform.

  14. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Ning, E-mail: npei@iastate.edu; Bond, Leonard J., E-mail: npei@iastate.edu [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D 'water-steel' model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  15. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D "water-steel" model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  16. Negative Refractive Index Metasurfaces for Enhanced Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review some metasurfaces with negative values of effective refractive index, as scaffolds for a new generation of surface plasmon polariton-based biological or chemical sensors. The electromagnetic properties of a metasurface may be tuned by its full immersion into analyte, or by the adsorption of a thin layer on it, both of which change its properties as a plasmonic guide. We consider various simple forms of plasmonic crystals suitable for this purpose. We start with the basic case of a freestanding, electromagnetically symmetrical plasmonic slab and analyze different ultrathin, multilayer structures, to finally consider some two-dimensional “wallpaper” geometries like split ring resonator arrays and fishnet structures. A part of the text is dedicated to the possibility of multifunctionalization where a metasurface structure is simultaneously utilized both for sensing and for selectivity enhancement. Finally we give an overview of surface-bound intrinsic electromagnetic noise phenomena that limits the ultimate performance of a metasurfaces sensor.

  17. Choosing and Using a Refracting Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    English, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The refracting telescope has a long and illustrious past. Here’s what the author says about early telescopes and today’s refractors: “Four centuries ago, a hitherto obscure Italian scientist turned a home-made spyglass towards the heavens. The lenses he used were awful by modern standards, inaccurately figured and filled with the scars of their perilous journey from the furnace to the finishing workshop. Yet, despite these imperfections, they allowed him to see what no one had ever seen before – a universe far more complex and dynamic than anyone had dared imagine. But they also proved endlessly useful in the humdrum of human affairs. For the first time ever, you could spy on your neighbor from a distance, or monitor the approach of a war-mongering army, thus deciding the fate of nations. “The refractor is without doubt the prince of telescopes. Compared with all other telescopic designs, the unobstructed view of the refractor enables it to capture the sharpest, highest contrast images and the wides...

  18. Refractive error and ocular motility in plagiocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, D; Genitori, L; Bolufer, A; Lena, G; Saracco, J B; Choux, M

    1994-05-01

    Plagiocephaly, which is caused by premature closure of one of the coronal sutures, leads to fronto-orbital asymmetry. The aim of this work was to study the repercussions of orbital deformation on the visual system. Twenty-one patients presenting with plagiocephaly at birth and operated on by the same craniofacial technique (bilateral approach with translation and advancement of the entire involved orbits) were included in the study. All of the patients were examined by clinical anthropometry with three-dimensional reconstruction and underwent complete eye examination by the same observer. Follow-up after craniofacial surgery ranged from 15 months to 4 years. In the last few years, three-dimensional reconstruction has shown that the anatomic region affected by the deformation is the frontozygomatic region and has thus made it possible to advance to another theory on the origins of ocular problems. The severe effect of orbital anomalies on the development of the visual system (binocular vision, strabismus with amblyopia, refractive errors) has been emphasized in the literature. The present study shows that the scheduling of reconstructive surgery is fundamental and must not exceed 6 months, given the immaturity of the visual system up until this time. This means that the ophthalmologist must be able to recognize the various craniostenoses in order to schedule reconstructive surgery as soon as possible. Cooperation between the neurosurgeon and the ophthalmologist is of paramount importance if the pathogenic effects of this bone deformation are to be stopped and proper visual development preserved.

  19. Refractive cylinder outcomes after calculating toric intraocular lens cylinder power using total corneal refractive power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison JA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available James A Davison,1 Richard Potvin21Wolfe Eye Clinic, Marshalltown, IA, USA; 2Science in Vision, Akron, NY, USAPurpose: To determine whether the total corneal refractive power (TCRP value, which is based on measurement of both anterior and posterior corneal astigmatism, is effective for toric intraocular lens (IOL calculation with AcrySof® Toric IOLsPatients and methods: A consecutive series of cataract surgery cases with AcrySof toric IOL implantation was studied retrospectively. The IOLMaster® was used for calculation of IOL sphere, the Pentacam® TCRP 3.0 mm apex/ring value was used as the keratometry input to the AcrySof Toric IOL Calculator and the VERION™ Digital Marker for surgical orientation. The keratometry readings from the VERION reference unit were recorded but not used in the actual calculation. Vector differences between expected and actual residual refractive cylinder were calculated and compared to simulated vector errors using the collected VERION keratometry data.Results: In total, 83 eyes of 56 patients were analyzed. Residual refractive cylinder was 0.25 D or lower in 58% of eyes and 0.5 D or lower in 80% of eyes. The TCRP-based calculation resulted in a statistically significantly lower vector error (P<0.01 and significantly more eyes with a vector error ≤0.5 D relative to the VERION-based calculation (P=0.02. The TCRP and VERION keratometry readings suggested a different IOL toric power in 53/83 eyes. In these 53 eyes the TCRP vector error was lower in 28 cases, the VERION error was lower in five cases, and the error was equal in 20 cases. When the anterior cornea had with-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was more likely to suggest a higher toric power and when the anterior cornea had against-the-rule astigmatism, the VERION was less likely to suggest a higher toric power.Conclusion: Using the TCRP keratometry measurement in the AcrySof toric calculator may improve overall postoperative refractive results

  20. Precise determination of the refractive index of suspended particles: light transmission as a function of refractive index mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClymer, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Many fluids appear white because refractive index differences lead to multiple scattering. In this paper, we use safe, low-cost commercial index matching fluids to quantitatively study light transmission as a function of index mismatch, reduce multiple scattering to allow single scattering probes, and to precisely determine the index of refraction of suspended material. The transmission profile is compared with Rayleigh-Gans and Mie theory predictions. The procedure is accessible as a student laboratory project, while providing advantages over other standard methods of measuring the refractive index of an unknown nanoparticle, making it valuable to researchers.

  1. Prevalence of Visual Impairment and Refractive Errors in Children of South Sinai, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamah, Gamal Abdel Naser; Talaat Abdel Alim, Ahmed Ahmed; Mostafa, Yehia Salah El Din; Ahmed, Rania Ahmed Abdel Salam; Mohammed, Asmaa Mahmoud; Mahmoud, Asmaa Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and causes of visual impairment in children of South Sinai, and to evaluate outcomes of rehabilitation programs. Population-based, cross-sectional analysis of 2070 healthy school children screened for visual impairment from 2009 through 2010 in cities of South Sinai and their surrounding Bedouin settlements. Visual acuity (VA) was tested using Snellen charts followed by cycloplegic autorefractometry for cases with presenting VA ≤ 6/9. Appropriate eyeglasses were prescribed and VA re-evaluated. This study included 1047 boys and 1023 girls, mean age 10.7 ± 3.1 years. Visual impairment (uncorrected VA ≤ 6/9) was detected in 29.4% of children, while 2.0% had moderate-severe visual impairment (uncorrected VA ≤ 6/24). There were statistically significant differences in prevalence of visual impairment between the studied cities (p visual impairment was significantly higher among girls (p visual impairment. Only age was a reliable predictor of visual impairment (odds ratio 0.94, p visual impairment, 90.32% of which comprised refractive errors (mainly astigmatism) which were significantly corrected with eyeglasses. VA screening and correction of refractive errors are of the utmost importance for ensuring better visual outcomes and improved school performance.

  2. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials’ refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science. PMID:26149952

  3. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to ‘untouchable’ quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves. PMID:26857266

  4. On the performance quantification of resonant refractive index sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ian M. White; Xudong Fan

    2008-01-01

    Refractive index (RI) sensors based on optical resonance techniques are receiving a high degree of attention because of the need to develop simple, low-cost, high-throughput detection technologies for a number of applications...

  5. An Analogue Model for Teaching Reflection and Refraction of Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Harry E.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a concrete model for teaching the concepts of reflection and refraction without the use of formal mathematics. The model has been tested in five sections of a physics course for nonscience majors at Towson State University, Baltimore, Maryland. (HM)

  6. Index of refraction of molecular nitrogen for sodium matter waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loreau, J; Dalgarno, A

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the index of refraction of sodium matter waves propagating through a gas of nitrogen molecules. We use a recent ab initio potential for the ground state of the NaN_2 Van der Waals complex to perform quantal close-coupling calculations and compute the index of refraction as a function of the projectile velocity. We obtain good agreement with the available experimental data. We show that the refractive index contains glory oscillations, but that they are damped by the averaging over the thermal motion of the N_2 molecules. These oscillations appear at lower temperatures and projectile velocity. We also investigate the behavior of the refractive index at low temperature and low projectile velocity to show its dependence on the rotational state of N_2, and discuss the advantage of using diatomic molecules as projectiles.

  7. Refractive and diffractive neutron optics with reduced chromatic aberration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Bentley, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    by the use of optics for focusing and imaging. Refractive and diffractive optical elements, e.g. compound refractive lenses and Fresnel zone plates, are attractive due to their low cost, and simple alignment. These optical elements, however, suffer from chromatic aberration, which limit their effectiveness...... path to focus and image a time-of-flight beam, and (2) a passive optical element consisting of a compound refractive lens, and a Fresnel zone plate, which may focus and image both continuous and pulsed neutron beams....... to highly monochromatic beams. This paper presents two novel concepts for focusing and imaging non-monochromatic thermal neutron beams with well-known optical elements: (1) a fast mechanical transfocator based on a compound refractive lens, which actively varies the number of individual lenses in the beam...

  8. Resolving controversy of unusually high refractive index of a tubulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivosudský, O.; Dráber, P.; Cifra, M.

    2017-02-01

    The refractive index of a tubulin is an important parameter underlying fundamental electromagnetic and biophysical properties of microtubules – protein fibers essential for several cell functions including cell division. Yet, the only experimental data available in the current literature show values of the tubulin refractive index (n=2.36\\text{--}2.90) which are much higher than what the established theories predict based on the weighted contribution of the polarizability of individual amino acids constituting the protein. To resolve this controversy, we report here modeling and rigorous experimental analysis of the refractive index of a purified tubulin dimer. Our experimental data revealed that the refractive index of the tubulin is n=1.64 at wavelength 589 nm and 25 °C, that is much closer to the values predicted by the established theories than what the earlier experimental data provide.

  9. Atmospheric stability index using radio occultation refractivity profiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Jagadheesha; B Manikiam; Neerja Sharma; P K Pal

    2011-04-01

    A new stability index based on atmospheric refractivity at ∼500 hPa level and surface measurements of temperature, pressure and humidity is formulated. The new index named here as refractivity based lifted index (RLI) is designed to give similar results as traditionally used lifted index derived from radiosonde profiles of temperature, pressure and humidity. The formulation of the stability index and its comparison with the traditional temperature profile based lifted index (LI) is discussed. The index is tested on COSMIC radio occultation derived refractivity profiles over Indian region. The forecast potential of the new index for rainfall on 2° × 2° latitude–longitude spatial scale with lead time of 3–24 hours indicate that the refractivity based lifted index works better than the traditional temperature based lifted index for the Indian monsoon region. Decreasing values of RLI tend to give increasing rainfall probabilities.

  10. Refractive Index Measurement of Fibers Through Fizeau Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    15. SUBJECT TERMS composite, transparent, refractive index, refractometry , interferometer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...transparent fibers has long presented a significant challenge. Abbe refractometry , the typical measurement technique for bulk materials and liquids

  11. Dielectric Optical-Controlled Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Jianjun; Zheng, Yuanlin; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive index. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens, hyperlens, Luneburg lens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designing materials' refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano/micro engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applicat...

  12. Dynamics of galaxies and clusters in \\textit{refracted gravity}

    CERN Document Server

    Matsakos, Titos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the proof of concept and the implications of \\textit{refracted gravity}, a novel modified gravity aimed to solve the discrepancy between the luminous and the dynamical mass of cosmic structures without resorting to dark matter. Inspired by the behavior of electric fields in matter, refracted gravity introduces a gravitational permittivity that depends on the local mass density and modifies the standard Poisson equation. The resulting gravitational field can become more intense than the Newtonian field and can mimic the presence of dark matter. We show that the refracted gravitational field correctly describes (1) the rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation of disk galaxies; and (2) the observed temperature profile of the X-ray gas of galaxy clusters. According to these promising results, we conclude that refracted gravity deserves further investigation.

  13. Wave refraction and littoral currents off Colva Beach, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerayya, M.; Murty, C.S.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    Wave refraction studies have been carried out for waves of different periods approaching the coast at Colva, with directions of approach lying between180 degrees and 340 degrees, to obtain a qualitative picture of littoral flows along the beach...

  14. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2015-11-23

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  15. Refractive index of K9 Glass under Shock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changming; Wang, Xiang; Cai, Lingcang; Liu, Cangli

    2013-06-01

    We study K9 glass refraction index under shock loading conducted on powder gun,all experimental tests are plate impact loading. The impact veceloty range from 300m/s to 1200m/s, and the measure method is laser interferometer Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) to measure the particle velocity both at the impact interface and free surface, The shock pressure from 2 GPa to 8 GPa, values for refraction are found from velocity corrections that must be made to account for refraction-index changes in the K9 glass due to shock wave motion. Experiment results show that refraction-index of K9 glass changes with the shock pressure in line relations, it can be as measure window to study the interesting materials under 10 GPa during the shock loading.

  16. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  17. Prevalence of refractive errors among junior high school students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) ... Among school children, uncorrected refractive errors have a considerable impact ... Multivariate logistic regression models showed no substantial confounding effects between near work, sex, and ...

  18. Helping secondary school students develop a conceptual understanding of refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmann, Scott; Anderson, Charles W.; Boeckman, Heather

    2016-07-01

    Using real-world examples, ray diagrams, and a cognitive apprenticeship cycle, this paper focuses on developing students’ conceptual (not mathematical) understanding of refraction. Refraction can be a difficult concept for students to comprehend if they do not have well-designed opportunities to practice explaining situations where reflection and refraction occur. The use of ray diagrams can be useful in (a) the teacher modelling a correct explanation to a situation where refraction occurs and (b) for students to create as they practice other examples. This paper includes eight examples of increasing complexity that use a cognitive apprenticeship cycle approach to scaffold student learning. The first examples (rock fish, floating penny) are shown and a solution is modeled using a ray diagram. Three more examples (bent pencil, dropping an item in water, sunrise/sunset) are presented for students to practice, with each becoming more sophisticated. Three assessment exercises are then provided (two dots, three coins, broken tube).

  19. Research on Complex Refraction Indices of Expanded Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    豆正伟; 李晓霞; 赵纪金

    2011-01-01

    The expanded graphite (EG) with a low density and better extinction performance can be used in military as passive jamming material in IR and MMW bands. Its complex refractive index is a significant parameter for the extinction property. This paper presents a method to calculate the complex refractive index of EG. The reflection spectra of EG pellets were measured in the 0. 24 - 2.6 μm and 2.5 - 25 μm bands, respectively. Based on the measurement results, the complex refractive index of EG in 5 - 10 μm band was calculated by using Kramers-Kronig(K-K) relation and Bruggeman effective medium theory, and then the errors were analyzed. The results indicate that it is feasible to calculate the complex refractive index of EG based on its IR reflection spectra data.

  20. Refractive eye surgery - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about refractive eye surgery; Nearsightedness surgery - what to ask your doctor; LASIK - what to ... Will this surgery help my type of vision problem? Will I still need glasses or contact lenses after the surgery? Will ...

  1. The nature of the refractive granules in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, N.P. Jr.; Hempelmann, L.H. [Los Alamos Scientific Lab., NM (United States)

    1949-04-19

    The number of refractive bodies in human lymphocytes increases in persons chronically exposed to low level doses of ionizing radiation. The observations of the optical properties, the histochemistry, and the method of formation of these bodies are described.

  2. Flat lens imaging does not need negative refraction

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Chao-Hsien; Ye, Zhen

    2003-01-01

    In a recent communication, Parimi et al. (Nature 426, 404 (2003)) reported the experimental results on imaging by a flat lens made of photonic crystals. They attributed the observed focusing to the negative refraction expected for the Left-Handed-Materials (LHMs). Here we demonstrate that the experimental observation is irrelevant to the negative refraction of LHMs. Rather, the phenomenon is a natural result of the anisotropic scattering by an array of scatterers.

  3. Can manipulation of orthokeratology lens parameters modify peripheral refraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Gifford, Paul; Swarbrick, Helen

    2013-11-01

    To investigate changes in peripheral refraction, corneal topography, and aberrations induced by changes in orthokeratology (OK) lens parameters in myopes. Subjects were fitted with standard OK lenses that were worn overnight for 2 weeks. Peripheral refraction, corneal topography, and corneal surface aberrations were measured at baseline and after 14 nights of OK lens wear. Subsequent to a 2-week washout period, subjects were refitted with another set of lenses where one eye was randomly assigned to wear an OK lens with a smaller optic zone diameter (OZD) and the other eye with a steeper peripheral tangent. Measurements were taken again at a second baseline and after 14 days of overnight wear of the second OK lens set. Standard OK lenses with a 6-mm OZD and 1/4 peripheral tangent caused significant changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography. Significant hyperopic shift occurred in the central visual field (VF) while a myopic shift was found at 35 degrees in the nasal VF. OK induced significant reductions in corneal power at all positions along the horizontal corneal chord except at 2.4 mm nasal where there was no significant change and at 2.8 mm nasal where there was an increase in corneal refractive power. A positive shift in spherical aberration was induced for all investigated lens designs except for the 1/2 tangent design when calculated over a 4-mm pupil. Reducing OZD and steepening the peripheral tangent did not cause significant changes in peripheral refraction or corneal topography profiles across the horizontal meridian. OK lenses caused significant changes in peripheral refraction, corneal topography, and corneal surface aberrations. Modifying OZD and peripheral tangent made no significant difference to the peripheral refraction or corneal topography profile. Attempting to customize refraction and topography changes through manipulation of OK lens parameters appears to be a difficult task.

  4. Effect of Pupil Size on Wavefront Refraction during Orthokeratology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Navarro, Rafael; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    It has been hypothesized that central and peripheral refraction, in eyes treated with myopic overnight orthokeratology, might vary with changes in pupil diameter. The aim of this work was to evaluate the axial and peripheral refraction and optical quality after orthokeratology, using ray tracing software for different pupil sizes. Zemax-EE was used to generate a series of 29 semi-customized model eyes based on the corneal topography changes from 29 patients who had undergone myopic orthokeratology. Wavefront refraction in the central 80 degrees of the visual field was calculated using three different quality metrics criteria: Paraxial curvature matching, minimum root mean square error (minRMS), and the Through Focus Visual Strehl of the Modulation Transfer Function (VSMTF), for 3- and 6-mm pupil diameters. The three metrics predicted significantly different values for foveal and peripheral refractions. Compared with the Paraxial criteria, the other two metrics predicted more myopic refractions on- and off-axis. Interestingly, the VSMTF predicts only a marginal myopic shift in the axial refraction as the pupil changes from 3 to 6 mm. For peripheral refraction, minRMS and VSMTF metric criteria predicted a higher exposure to peripheral defocus as the pupil increases from 3 to 6 mm. The results suggest that the supposed effect of myopic control produced by ortho-k treatments might be dependent on pupil size. Although the foveal refractive error does not seem to change appreciably with the increase in pupil diameter (VSMTF criteria), the high levels of positive spherical aberration will lead to a degradation of lower spatial frequencies, that is more significant under low illumination levels.

  5. Peripheral Refraction, Peripheral Eye Length, and Retinal Shape in Myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkicharla, Pavan K; Suheimat, Marwan; Schmid, Katrina L; Atchison, David A

    2016-09-01

    To investigate how peripheral refraction and peripheral eye length are related to retinal shape. Relative peripheral refraction (RPR) and relative peripheral eye length (RPEL) were determined in 36 young adults (M +0.75D to -5.25D) along horizontal and vertical visual field meridians out to ±35° and ±30°, respectively. Retinal shape was determined in terms of vertex radius of curvature Rv, asphericity Q, and equivalent radius of curvature REq using a partial coherence interferometry method involving peripheral eye lengths and model eye raytracing. Second-order polynomial fits were applied to RPR and RPEL as functions of visual field position. Linear regressions were determined for the fits' second order coefficients and for retinal shape estimates as functions of central spherical refraction. Linear regressions investigated relationships of RPR and RPEL with retinal shape estimates. Peripheral refraction, peripheral eye lengths, and retinal shapes were significantly affected by meridian and refraction. More positive (hyperopic) relative peripheral refraction, more negative RPELs, and steeper retinas were found along the horizontal than along the vertical meridian and in myopes than in emmetropes. RPR and RPEL, as represented by their second-order fit coefficients, correlated significantly with retinal shape represented by REq. Effects of meridian and refraction on RPR and RPEL patterns are consistent with effects on retinal shape. Patterns derived from one of these predict the others: more positive (hyperopic) RPR predicts more negative RPEL and steeper retinas, more negative RPEL predicts more positive relative peripheral refraction and steeper retinas, and steeper retinas derived from peripheral eye lengths predict more positive RPR.

  6. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周爱芝; 吴鑫基; 艾力·伊沙木丁

    2003-01-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys.J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  7. Recent developments in refractive concentrators for space photovoltaic power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Oneill, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    Since SPRAT 11, significant progress has been made in the development of refractive concentrator elements and components designed specifically for space applications. The status of the mini-dome Fresnel lens concentrator array is discussed and then the results of work recently completed in the area of prismatic cell covers for concentrator systems are summarized. This is followed by a brief discussion of some work just starting in the area of line-focus refractive concentrators for space.

  8. Dependence of Physical Parameters of Compound Semiconductors on Refractive Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Reddy

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Interesting relationships have been found between refractive index, plasmon energy, electronic polarisability, bond length, microhardness, bulk modulus, force constants and lattice energy. An attempt has been made for the first time to correlate only one physical parameter with others. The calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental values as well as with the values reported in the literature. Refractive index data is the only one parameter required to estimate all the above parameters.

  9. Making refractive error services sustainable: the International Eye Foundation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M Sheffield

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The International Eye Foundation (IEF believes that the most effective strategy for making spectacles affordable and accessible is to integrate refractive error services into ophthalmic services and to run the refractive error service as a business – thereby making it sustainable. An optical service should be able to deal with high volumes of patients and generate enough revenue – not just to cover its own costs, but also to contribute to ophthalmic clinical services.

  10. The influence of a novel simulated learning environment upon student clinical subjective refraction performance: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman-Pieterse, Emily C; De Souza, Neilsen J; Vincent, Stephen J

    2016-07-01

    Optometry students are taught the process of subjective refraction through lectures and laboratory-based practicals before progressing to supervised clinical practice. Simulated leaning environments (SLEs) form part of an emerging technology used in a range of health disciplines; however, there is limited evidence regarding the effectiveness of clinical simulators as educational tools. Forty optometry students (20 fourth year and 20 fifth year) were assessed twice by a qualified optometrist (two examinations separated by four to eight weeks), while completing a monocular non-cycloplegic subjective refraction on the same patient with an unknown refractive error, simulated using contact lenses. Half of the students were granted access to an online simulated learning environment, The Brien Holden Vision Institute (BHVI) Virtual Refractor, and the remaining students formed a control group. The primary outcome measures at each visit were; accuracy of the clinical refraction compared to a qualified optometrist and relative to the Optometry Council of Australia and New Zealand (OCANZ) subjective refraction examination criteria. Secondary measures of interest included descriptors of student SLE engagement, student self-reported confidence levels and correlations between performance in the simulated and real-world clinical environment. Eighty per cent of students in the intervention group interacted with the simulated learning environment (for an average of 100 minutes); however, there was no correlation between measures of student engagement with the BHVI Virtual Refractor and speed or accuracy of clinical subjective refractions. Fifth year students were typically more confident and refracted more accurately and more quickly than fourth year students. A year group by experimental group interaction (p = 0.03) was observed for accuracy of the spherical component of refraction and post hoc analysis revealed that less experienced students exhibited greater gains in

  11. Incidence of the refractive errors in children 3 to 9 years of age, in the city of Tetovo, Macedonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ejup Mahmudi; Vilma Mema; Nora Burda; Brikena Selimi; Sulejman Zhugli

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of refractive errors at children 3 to 9 years of age in the area of Tetovo, Macedonia in rural and urban population. Methods: Population-based cross-sectional samples of children 3 to 9 years in rural and urban population were obtained through full ophthalmologic examination, and they underwent slit-lamp examination, ocular motility and refraction. They were presenting uncorrected and best-corrected visual acuity, along with refractive error under topical cycloplegia. Children 3 to 6 years of age with a visual acuity of 20/40 or worse and those 6 to 9 years of age with a visual acuity of 20/30 or worse underwent a complete ophthalmic examination to determine the cause of visual impairment. A spherical equivalent of-0.5 diopter (D) or worse was defined as myopia, +2.50 D or more was defined as hyperopia and a cylinder refraction greater than 0.75 D was considered astigmatism plus or minus. Results:The uncorrected visual acuity was 20/45 or worse in the better eye of 119 children, 59 male / 60 female (5.1% of participants). According to results of cycloplegic refraction, 1.6% of the children were myopic, 7.3% were hyperopic and the incidence rate of astigmatism was approximately 0.7%. In the multivariate logistic regression myopia and hyperopia were correlated with age (P = 0.040 and P < 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: The study showed a considerable prevalence rates of refractive errors myopia , hypermethropia , astigmatism and amblyopia at children of 3-9 years of age in Tetovo. There was no correlation between sex of the children’s and the refractive errors founds. There was a correlation with the need for corrective spectacles and the refractive errors they represent. Refractive errors was registered in high percentage at rural area than in urban area. Although with best corrected vision the prevalence of impairment was less in urban than in rural populations, blindness remained nearly twice as high in the rural

  12. Responses of the Ocular Anterior Segment and Refraction to 0.5% Tropicamide in Chinese School-Aged Children of Myopia, Emmetropia, and Hyperopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhu, Jianfeng; He, Xiangui; Du, Ergang; Jiang, Kelimu; Zheng, Wenjing; Ke, Bilian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the changes of anterior segment after cycloplegia and estimate the association of such changes with the changes of refraction in Chinese school-aged children of myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia. Methods. 309 children were recruited and eligible subjects were assigned to three groups: hyperopia, emmetropia, or myopia. Cycloplegia was achieved with five cycles of 0.5% tropicamide. The Pentacam system was used to measure the parameters of interest before and after cycloplegia. Results. In the myopic group, the lenses were thinner and the lens position was significantly more posterior than that of the emmetropic and hyperopic groups in the cycloplegic status. The correlations between refraction and lens thickness (age adjusted; r = 0.26, P refraction, ACD, ACV, and ACA were significantly different among the three groups (P refraction were correlated with changes of ACD (r = 0.41, P refraction after cycloplegia when compared to emmetropia and hyperopia. Changes of anterior chamber depth were correlated with refraction changes. This may contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between anterior segment and myopia.

  13. Responses of the Ocular Anterior Segment and Refraction to 0.5% Tropicamide in Chinese School-Aged Children of Myopia, Emmetropia, and Hyperopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the changes of anterior segment after cycloplegia and estimate the association of such changes with the changes of refraction in Chinese school-aged children of myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia. Methods. 309 children were recruited and eligible subjects were assigned to three groups: hyperopia, emmetropia, or myopia. Cycloplegia was achieved with five cycles of 0.5% tropicamide. The Pentacam system was used to measure the parameters of interest before and after cycloplegia. Results. In the myopic group, the lenses were thinner and the lens position was significantly more posterior than that of the emmetropic and hyperopic groups in the cycloplegic status. The correlations between refraction and lens thickness (age adjusted; r=0.26, P<0.01, and lens position (age adjusted; r=-0.31, P<0.01 were found. After cycloplegia, ACD and ACV significantly increased, while ACA significantly decreased. Changes in refraction, ACD, ACV, and ACA were significantly different among the three groups (P<0.05, all. Changes of refraction were correlated with changes of ACD (r=0.41, P<0.01. Conclusions. Myopia presented thinner lenses and smaller changes of anterior segment and refraction after cycloplegia when compared to emmetropia and hyperopia. Changes of anterior chamber depth were correlated with refraction changes. This may contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between anterior segment and myopia.

  14. Peripheral refraction and retinal contour in stable and progressive myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Queirós, António; Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To compare the patterns of relative peripheral astigmatic refraction (tangential and sagittal power errors) and eccentric eye length between progressing and stable young-adult myopes. Sixty-two right eyes of 62 white patients participated in the study, of which 30 were nonprogressing myopes (NP group) for the last 2 years and 32 were progressing myopes (P group). Groups were matched for mean spherical refraction, axial length, and age. Peripheral refraction and eye length were measured along the horizontal meridian up to 35 and 30 degrees of eccentricity, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between groups (p refraction. The P group presented a hyperopic relative sagittal focus at 35 degrees in the nasal retina of +1.00 ± 0.83 diopters, as per comparison with a myopic relative sagittal focus of -0.10 ± 0.98 diopters observed in the NP group (p refraction. Thus, steeper retinas presented a more hyperopic trend in the periphery. Stable and progressing myopes of matched age, axial length, and central refraction showed significantly different characteristics in their peripheral retinal shape and astigmatic components of tangential and sagittal power errors. The present findings may help explain the mechanisms that regulate ocular growth in humans.

  15. Effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emine; Kalkan; Akcay; Fatih; Canan; Huseyin; Simavli; Derya; Dal; Hacer; Yalniz; Nagihan; Ugurlu; Omer; Gecici; Nurullah; Cagil

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties using Cloninger’s psychobiological model of personality.METHODS: Using the Temperament and Character Inventory(TCI), the temperament and character profiles of 41 participants with refractive errors(17 with myopia,12 with hyperopia, and 12 with myopic astigmatism) were compared to those of 30 healthy control participants.Here, temperament comprised the traits of novelty seeking, harm-avoidance, and reward dependence, while character comprised traits of self-directedness,cooperativeness, and self-transcendence.RESULTS: Participants with refractive error showed significantly lower scores on purposefulness,cooperativeness, empathy, helpfulness, and compassion(P <0.05, P <0.01, P <0.05, P <0.05, and P <0.01,respectively).CONCLUSION: Refractive error might have a negative influence on some character traits, and different types of refractive error might have different temperament and character properties. These personality traits may be implicated in the onset and/or perpetuation of refractive errors and may be a productive focus for psychotherapy.

  16. Laser beam refraction traversely through a graded-index preform to determine refractive index ratio and gradient profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, L S

    1979-07-01

    A technique is described which permits the determination of geometric and refractive index characteristics of graded-index preforms from measurements of the refraction of rays traced through the preform perpendicular to the preform axis. A computer program was developed to trace rays through graded-index preforms to display the refracting effect of the index properties and relate the ray incidence angle to its deflection in traversing the preform. An experimental apparatus has been developed in which a narrow beam of laser radiation is directed at the preform and its deflection angle measured. Comparison between the experimental results and the ray trace calculations using an interative curve-fitting procedure gave nondestructive determinations of the refractive index ratio Delta and index gradient profile parameter alpha as well as measurement of the core dimensions.

  17. Identifying Children at Risk of High Myopia Using Population Centile Curves of Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxian; Zhang, Jian; Morgan, Ian G; He, Mingguang

    2016-01-01

    To construct reference centile curves of refraction based on population-based data as an age-specific severity scale to evaluate their efficacy as a tool for identifying children at risk of developing high myopia in a longitudinal study. Data of 4218 children aged 5-15 years from the Guangzhou Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC) study, and 354 first-born twins from the Guangzhou Twin Eye Study (GTES) with annual visit were included in the analysis. Reference centile curves for refraction were constructed using a quantile regression model based on the cycloplegic refraction data from the RESC. The risk of developing high myopia (spherical equivalent ≤ -6 diopters [D]) was evaluated as a diagnostic test using the twin follow-up data. The centile curves suggested that the 3rd, 5th, and 10th percentile decreased from -0.25 D, 0.00 D and 0.25 D in 5 year-olds to -6.00 D, -5.65D and -4.63 D in 15 year-olds in the population-based data from RESC. In the GTES cohort, the 5th centile showed the most effective diagnostic value with a sensitivity of 92.9%, a specificity of 97.9% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 65.0% in predicting high myopia onset (≤-6.00D) before the age of 15 years. The PPV was highest (87.5%) in 3rd centile but with only 50.0% sensitivity. The Mathew's correlation coefficient of 5th centile in predicting myopia of -6.0D/-5.0D/-4.0D by age of 15 was 0.77/0.51/0.30 respectively. Reference centile curves provide an age-specific estimation on a severity scale of refractive error in school-aged children. Children located under lower percentiles at young age were more likely to have high myopia at 15 years or probably in adulthood.

  18. Assessment of refractive astigmatism and simulated therapeutic refractive surgery strategies in coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Wen; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to raise the awareness of the influence of coma-like higher-order aberrations (HOAs) on power and orientation of refractive astigmatism (RA) and to explore how to account for that influence in the planning of topography-guided refractive surgery in eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics. Methods Eleven eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics and with low lenticular astigmatism (LA) were selected for astigmatism analysis and f...

  19. Prevalence of refractive errors in Mexican patients with keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Becerril A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aníbal Cruz-Becerril,1 Alejandra Valdivia,1 Raúl Peralta,2 Ruth N Domínguez-Fernández,1 Marco A Castro-Reyes1 1Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Centro Interdisciplinario en Ciencias de la Salud, Unidad Milpa Alta, 2Centro de Investigación en Dinámica Celular, Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Básicas y Aplicadas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of refractive errors in Mexican patients with keratoconus (KCN and to describe their clinical characteristics.Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the records of Mexican patients with KCN for the year 2012. Criteria for classifying refractive errors included the following: emmetropia -0.25 to +0.25 sphere, myopia >-0.25 sphere, hyperopia >+0.25 sphere, and astigmatism >-1.00 cylinder. Patient information was collected on refraction results, refractive diagnosis, slit-lamp examination, keratometry values, contact lens features, and best visual acuity with a contact lens. The prevalence of refractive errors was estimated by dividing the total number of eyes in the study by the number of refractive errors found.Results: The study population comprised 426 patients, including 785 eyes with KCN. KCN was found more frequently in males (55.6% than in females. The mean patient age was 28.1±10.3 years, and there was a greater frequency of moderate KCN. Compound myopic astigmatism had a prevalence of 87.3% and was present in all grades, although there are other types of refractive errors. The spherical rigid contact lens was the most frequently adapted lens (96%, and the contact lens parameters varied with disease progression.Conclusion: The most common refractive error is compound myopic astigmatism, although there are many refractive errors that have not been described to date in the KCN population. The main lens used for

  20. Assembly and alignment of infrared refractive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Lin, Jian-chun; Wang, Ya-jing; Chen, Fan-sheng

    2013-09-01

    Optical systems for scientific instrumentation frequently include lens or mirrors with critical mechanical requirements. Position issues of those components are inextricably bound to the efficiency of the instrument. The position referring to the lens system mainly means spacer and rotation of all elements concerned. Instrument could not be completed without the accuracy assembly even the previous design was top one. The alignment of infrared optical system always is a tough thing due to the IR material being opaque to visible light which hardly effect on the imaging ability of the system. In this paper a large-aperture IR refractive system was described in details and the alignment of this system was presented. The brief work describes the assembly and integration of the camera barrel in lab. First of all, all the mechanical elements must be manufactured with high accuracy requirements to meet alignment tolerances and minimum errors mostly could be ignored. The rotations relative to the optical axis were hardy restricted by the space between barrel and cells. The lens vertex displacements were determined through high accuracy titanium alloy spacer. So the actual shape data of the optical lenses were obtained by coordinate measuring machining (CMM) to calculate the real space between lenses after alignment1 done. All the measured results were critical for instruction of the practical assemble. Based on the properties and tolerances of the system, the camera barrel includes sets of six lenses with their respective supports and cells which are composed of two parts: the flied lens group and the relay lenses group. The first one was aligned by the geometry centering used CMM. And the relay lenses were integrated one by one after centered individually with a classical centering instrument. Then the two separate components were assembled under the monitor of the CMM with micron precision. Three parameters on the opti-mechanical elements which include decenter, tilt and

  1. Femtolaser refractive autokeratoplastic: first results and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Sitnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of a new method of autokeratoplasty using of femtosecond laser in patients with advanced keratoconus and evaluation of early results of treatment.Patients and methods. 17 patients with advanced stable keratokonus were included in the study (15 men, 2 women mean age 33±8.4 years old. Stage III of keratokonus was diagnosed in 3 eyes, stage IV was revealed in 14 eyes. Minimal corneal thickness was 381±33.82 μм, keratometric indices Ks 60.1±5.7 D, Kf 54.8±5.8 D, cylinder 9.1±3.8 D. Femtolaser-assisted refractive autokeratoplasty (FRAK was performed with the use of «IntraLase 60 kHz». The idea of our method consists in performing of 2‑step resection of corneal stroma using femtosecond laser. Firstly, circular corneal cut should be made at an angle to the surface is fulfilled on distance 1.5‑2.0 mm from the limbus to a depth of up to 90 % of stroma thickness. Secondy, a second circular corneal cut — perpendicular to the surface, on distance from 150 to 300 mm from the first one, is performed so that the cuts intersected at a predict depth and the circular corneal flap with wedge-shaped profile was formed. After flap removal corneal wound is suturing with the single buried sutures 10‑0.Results. Operation and early post-op period were uneventful. MeanUCVA significantly improved from 0.07±0.03 to 0.26±0.13 to 3 months after surgery. Between 3 to 6 months after surgery, we observed the increasing of visual functions (like UCVA and BCVA. The improvement of BCVA was observed in 94.1 %, and in 76.5 % of cases the increase was more than 3 lines. The cylindrical component decreased from 9.1±3.8 to 5.4±2.5 D.Conclusions. FRAK is a new method for the treatment of stable advanced keratoconus, which helps to improve optical capacity of cornea, allows to save the patient’s own cornea, improves both UCVA and BCVA. Non-penetrating nature of the operation helps to minimize the complications. Femtosecond laser

  2. Three-dimensional optical metamaterial with a negative refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Jason; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Genov, Dentcho A; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2008-09-18

    Metamaterials are artificially engineered structures that have properties, such as a negative refractive index, not attainable with naturally occurring materials. Negative-index metamaterials (NIMs) were first demonstrated for microwave frequencies, but it has been challenging to design NIMs for optical frequencies and they have so far been limited to optically thin samples because of significant fabrication challenges and strong energy dissipation in metals. Such thin structures are analogous to a monolayer of atoms, making it difficult to assign bulk properties such as the index of refraction. Negative refraction of surface plasmons was recently demonstrated but was confined to a two-dimensional waveguide. Three-dimensional (3D) optical metamaterials have come into focus recently, including the realization of negative refraction by using layered semiconductor metamaterials and a 3D magnetic metamaterial in the infrared frequencies; however, neither of these had a negative index of refraction. Here we report a 3D optical metamaterial having negative refractive index with a very high figure of merit of 3.5 (that is, low loss). This metamaterial is made of cascaded 'fishnet' structures, with a negative index existing over a broad spectral range. Moreover, it can readily be probed from free space, making it functional for optical devices. We construct a prism made of this optical NIM to demonstrate negative refractive index at optical frequencies, resulting unambiguously from the negative phase evolution of the wave propagating inside the metamaterial. Bulk optical metamaterials open up prospects for studies of 3D optical effects and applications associated with NIMs and zero-index materials such as reversed Doppler effect, superlenses, optical tunnelling devices, compact resonators and highly directional sources.

  3. The Influence of Different OK Lens Designs on Peripheral Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Swarbrick, Helen

    2016-09-01

    To compare peripheral refraction changes along the horizontal and vertical meridians induced by three different orthokeratology (OK) lens designs: BE, Paragon CRT, and Contex lenses. Nineteen subjects (6M, 13F, mean age 28 ± 7 years) were initially fitted with BE OK lenses in both eyes which were worn overnight for 14 days. Central and peripheral refraction and corneal topography were measured at baseline and after 14 nights of lens wear. After a minimum 2-week washout period, one randomly selected eye was re-fitted with a Paragon CRT lens and the other eye with a Contex OK lens. Measurements were repeated before and after 14 nights of lens wear. The three different OK lenses caused significant changes in peripheral refraction along both the horizontal and vertical visual fields (VFs). BE and Paragon CRT lenses induced a significant hyperopic shift within the central ±20° along the horizontal VF and at all positions along the vertical meridian except at 30° in the superior VF. There were no significant differences in peripheral refraction changes induced between BE and Paragon CRT lenses. When comparing BE and Contex OK lens designs, BE caused greater hyperopic shifts at 10° and 30° in the temporal VF and at center, 10°, and 20° in the superior VF along the vertical meridian. Furthermore, BE lenses caused greater reduction in Flat and Steep K values compared to Contex OK. OK lenses induced significant changes in peripheral refraction along the horizontal and vertical meridians. Despite the clinically significant difference in central corneal flattening induced by BE and Contex OK lenses, relative peripheral refraction changes differed minimally between the three OK lens designs. If the peripheral retina influences refractive error development, these results suggest that myopia control effects are likely to be similar between different OK lens designs.

  4. Under-correction of human myopia--is it myopigenic?: a retrospective analysis of clinical refraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Esposito, Christina; Peterson, Cody; Coronado, Cory; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    To investigate retrospectively, based on routine clinical records in an optometric office, the effect of refractive under-correction of the myopic spectacle prescription on myopic progression in children and young adults. Patient records of children and young-adult myopes in a private optometric practice in Glendale, Arizona, USA, were initially reviewed to identify those that met the criteria. Information collected from the patient records included: age, gender, the dates and number of their visits (more than one visit was required for use of the data), final prescription, and non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. For each patient visit, the difference in spherical equivalent (SE) between the subjective refraction for maximum visual acuity and the final prescription was calculated for both the left and right eyes. Myopia progression was defined as the difference in SE between the final subjective refraction of the previous visit and that of the subsequent visit. Based on the study criteria, a total of 275 patient visits were obtained from the data collected in 76 patients. A significant positive correlation was found between the magnitude of under-correction of the refractive error and myopic progression (r=0.301, prefraction (r=0.166, p=0.006); that is, the greater the degree of myopia, the greater the effect of under-correction. However, there was no significant correlation between myopia progression and either age (r=-0.11, p=0.86) or gender (r=-0.82, p=0.17). Under-correction of myopia produced a small but progressively greater degree of myopic progression than did full correction. The present finding is consistent with earlier clinical trials and modeling of human myopia. Copyright © 2013 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling refractive metasurfaces in series as a single metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Fatima; Guneratne, Ananda C.

    2016-03-01

    Metasurfaces are boundaries between two media that are engineered to induce an abrupt phase shift in propagating light over a distance comparable to the wavelength of the light. Metasurface applications exploit this rapid phase shift to allow for precise control of wavefronts. The phase gradient is used to compute the angle at which light is refracted using the generalized Snell's Law. [1] In practice, refractive metasurfaces are designed using a relatively small number of phaseshifting elements such that the phase gradient is discrete rather than continuous. Designing such a metasurface requires finding phase-shifting elements that cover a full range of phases (a phase range) from 0 to 360 degrees. We demonstrate an analytical technique to calculate the refraction angle due to multiple metasurfaces arranged in series without needing to account for the effect of each individual metasurface. The phase gradients of refractive metasurfaces in series may be summed to obtain the phase gradient of a single equivalent refractive metasurface. This result is relevant to any application that requires a system with multiple metasurfaces, such as biomedical imaging [2], wavefront correctors [3], and beam shaping [4].

  6. Optofluidic whispering gallery mode microcapillary lasers for refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Alexandre; Riesen, Nicolas; Gardner, Kristy; Monro, Tanya M.; Meldrum, Al

    2016-12-01

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) allow for remarkable refractive index sensing performance with extremely low detection limits, and thus have found use in various emerging label free biosensing applications. Among the different types of resonators which have been studied, microcapillaries have the unique property of having the evanescent fields extend into and sample the medium inside the resonator, which is particularly interesting because the resonator itself serves as a microfluidic channel. Here, lasing of the WGMs in fluorescent microcapillaries is demonstrated for the first time, and their application to refractive index sensing is investigated. The laser gain medium used here is embedded inside a high refractive index polymer coating deposited onto the inner surface of the capillary. Lasing can only be realized for thick polymer coatings (in this case >= 800 nm), with higher Q factor but also stronger confinement of the propagating wave, which lowers the refractive index sensitivity compared to non-lasing capillaries which can have thinner polymer coatings. We however find that the large improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and Q factor realized upon lasing more than compensates for the reduced sensitivity, resulting in an order-of-magnitude improvement in the detection limit for refractive index sensing.

  7. Analysis of refractive state in 708 children with ametropic amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Fen Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the refractive state and explore the epidemiologic feature of children with ametropic amblyopia.METHODS: This study retrospectively analyzed 708 children(1 416 eyeswith amblyopia from January 2012 to December 2013 in Special Department of Strabismus and Amblyopic and Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology in our hospital, who were diagnosed as ametropic amblyopia and accepted centrally comprehensive training. The refractive state were given epidemiologic analyze.RESULTS: In the 708 cases(1 416 eyes, there were 190 eyes with hyperopia(13.42%,612 eyes with hyperopia astigmatism(43.22%,18 eyes with myopia(1.27%,134 eyes with myopia astigmatism(9.46%,462 eyes with mixed astigmatism(32.63%. The distributions of refractive state in children at different age were different, and the difference was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: Hyperopia ametropia and mixed astigmatism are the main types of refractive errors in amblyopia children. The level of amblyopia is related to refractive state and astigmatism axial.

  8. Results of radial and astigmatic keratotomy by beginning refractive surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, M L; Imperia, P S; Elander, R; Alcala, P L; Maloney, R K; Holland, G N

    1993-05-01

    There is little information available on the results of radial and astigmatic keratotomy surgery that is performed by beginning refractive surgeons. A retrospective review of all refractive keratotomies performed by Corneal Fellows in the University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Ophthalmology between October 1985 and October 1991 was performed. Data from all eyes with at least 3 months of follow-up were analyzed. Visual acuity, refractive error, and complication rates were compared with published case series. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent for the 79 eyes analyzed was -3.97 diopters (D) (range, -0.75 to -8.50 D). The mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.44 D (range, +1.50 to -3.88 D). The postoperative spherical equivalent was within 1.00 D of emmetropia in 85% of eyes, and uncorrected visual acuity was 20/40 or better in 94% of eyes. There were no vision-threatening complications. No patient lost more than one line of best-corrected visual acuity. Radial and astigmatic keratotomies that are performed by beginning refractive surgeons in a supervised setting can be safe and effective procedures with results comparable with those obtained by experienced refractive surgeons.

  9. Reflection and Refraction of Acoustic Waves by a Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillouin, J.

    1957-01-01

    The presence of sound waves in one or the other of the fluid regions on either side of a shock wave is made apparent, in the region under superpressure, by acoustic waves (reflected or refracted according to whether the incident waves lie in the region of superpressure or of subpressure) and by thermal waves. The characteristics of these waves are calculated for a plane, progressive, and uniform incident wave. In the case of refraction, the refracted acoustic wave can, according to the incidence, be plane, progressive, and uniform or take the form of an 'accompanying wave' which remains attached to the front of the shock while sliding parallel to it. In all cases, geometrical constructions permit determination of the kinematic characteristics of the reflected or refractive acoustic waves. The dynamic relationships show that the amplitude of the reflected wave is always less than that of the incident wave. The amplitude of the refracted wave, whatever its type, may in certain cases be greater than that of the incident wave.

  10. Imaging of subsurface faults using refraction migration with fault flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, Ahmed; Hanafy, Sherif; Guo, Bowen; Kosmicki, Maximillian

    2017-08-01

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except that it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  11. Transient Thermal Analysis of a Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Steven M.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    A secondary concentrator is an optical device that accepts solar energy from a primary concentrator and further intensifies and directs the solar flux. The refractive secondary is one such device; fabricated from an optically clear solid material that can efficiently transmit the solar energy by way of refraction and total internal reflection. When combined with a large state-of-the-art rigid or inflatable primary concentrator, the refractive secondary enables solar concentration ratios of 10,000 to 1. In support of potential space solar thermal power and propulsion applications, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a single-crystal refractive secondary concentrator for use at temperatures exceeding 2000K. Candidate optically clear single-crystal materials like sapphire and zirconia are being evaluated for this application. To support this evaluation, a three-dimensional transient thermal model of a refractive secondary concentrator in a typical solar thermal propulsion application was developed. This paper describes the model and presents thermal predictions for both sapphire and zirconia prototypes. These predictions are then used to establish parameters for analyzing and testing the materials for their ability to survive thermal shock and stress.

  12. Imaging of Subsurface Faults using Refraction Migration with Fault Flooding

    KAUST Repository

    Metwally, Ahmed

    2017-05-31

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  13. Clinical refraction in three-dimensional dioptric space revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, T

    1997-06-01

    The traditional clinical designation of spherocylindrical power unambiguously specifies the refractive properties of a thin lens or refractive surface. This representation of dioptric power is not, however, optimum in mathematical terms, as is apparent when, for example, two spherocylindrical lens powers are added. Alternative systems have been described which are not subject to this same type of difficulty, and the essential feature of these other systems is that spherocylindrical power is defined in terms of a three-dimensional dioptric space in which the axes are usually orthogonal. The advantages of this orthogonality can be exploited in the practice of clinical refraction, provided lens powers in these three dimensions can be physically implemented. Systems using these characteristics have been introduced in the past, but the clinical community has not adopted them on a widespread basis. However, systems which take advantages of these features do have unique advantages relative to traditional clinical refraction procedures. These characteristics, and refractive procedures which exploit their advantages, are described.

  14. Application of multivariate analysis of vari-ance (MANOVA to distance refractive vari-ability and mean distance refractive state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abelman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractive state can be regarded as a dynam-ic quantity. Multiple measurements of refractive state can be determined easily and rapidly on a number of different occasions using an autore-fractor. In an experimental trial undertaken by Gillan, a 30-year-old female was subjected to 30 autorefractor measurements each taken at vari-ous intervals before and after the instillation of Mydriacyl 1% (tropicamide into her right eye. The purpose of this paper is to apply multivar-iate analysis of variance (MANOVA to Gillan’s sample data in order to assess whether instillation of Mydriacyl into the eye affects variability of distance refractive state as well as mean distance refractive state as measured by an autorefractor. In  five  of  the  seven  cases  where  pairwise hypotheses  tests  were  performed,  it  is  con-cluded that at a 99% level of confidence there is no difference in variability of distance refrac-tive state before and after cycloplegia. In two of the three cases where MANOVA was applied, there is a significant difference at a 95% and at a 99% level of confidence in both variability of distance refractive state and mean distance refractive  state  with  and  without  cycloplegia.

  15. Eye size and shape in newborn children and their relation to axial length and refraction at 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Laurence Shen; Chua, Sharon; Tan, Pei Ting; Cai, Shirong; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Gluckman, Peter D; Fortier, Marielle V; Ngo, Cheryl; Qiu, Anqi; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2015-07-01

    To determine if eye size and shape at birth are associated with eye size and refractive error 3 years later. A subset of 173 full-term newborn infants from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the dimensions of the internal eye. Eye shape was assessed by an oblateness index, calculated as 1 - (axial length/width) or 1 - (axial length/height). Cycloplegic autorefraction (Canon Autorefractor RK-F1) and optical biometry (IOLMaster) were performed 3 years later. Both eyes of 173 children were analysed. Eyes with longer axial length at birth had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes with larger baseline volumes and surface areas had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes which were more oblate at birth had greater increases in axial length at 3 years (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eye size and shape at birth and refraction, corneal curvature or myopia at 3 years. Eyes that are larger and have prolate or spherical shapes at birth exhibit smaller increases in axial length over the first 3 years of life. Eye size and shape at birth influence subsequent eye growth but not refractive error development. © 2015 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2015 The College of Optometrists.

  16. Enhanced nonlinear refractive index in epsilon-near-zero materials

    CERN Document Server

    Caspani, L; Clerici, M; Ferrera, M; Roger, T; Di Falco, A; Kim, J; Kinsey, N; Shalaev, V M; Boltasseva, A; Faccio, D

    2016-01-01

    New propagation regimes for light arise from the ability to tune the dielectric permittivity to extremely low values. Here we demonstrate a universal approach based on the low linear permittivity values attained in the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) regime for enhancing the nonlinear refractive index, which enables remarkable light-induced changes of the material properties. Experiments performed on Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films show a six-fold increase of the Kerr nonlinear refractive index ($n_2$) at the ENZ wavelength, located in the 1300 nm region. This in turn leads to light-induced refractive index changes of the order of unity, thus representing a new paradigm for nonlinear optics.

  17. Refractive sectors in the visual field of the pigeon eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzke, F W; Hayes, B P; Hodos, W; Holden, A L; Low, J C

    1985-12-01

    Scheiner's principle has been used in electroretinographic optometry to refract the photoreceptor plane in different regions of the visual field of the pigeon eye. Along the horizon and in the upper visual field the eye is emmetropic, or nearly so. Below the horizon the eye becomes progressively more myopic at more negative elevations, refractive state falling to -5D at -90 deg. Lower field myopia is not an artifact of oblique astigmatism, nor of an aberration symmetrical about the optical axis. It is suggested that lower field myopia is a biological adaptation suited to keep the photoreceptors in the upper retina conjugate with the ground. Refractive state below the horizon can be fitted with a sine function by varying a parameter H (eye-ground height). The value of H agrees well with directly measured eye-ground height.

  18. Refraction effects on the Galileo probe telemetry carrier frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T. R.

    1991-01-01

    As the Galileo probe relay radio link (RRL) signal propagates outward through the Jovian atmosphere, the atmosphere will manifest itself in two ways. First, the geometric path length of the signal is increased, resulting in a small change of the RRL signal departure angle from the proble (transmitter). Secondly, the velocity of the signal is decreased. For a spherical, static atmosphere with a known profile of refractivity versus altitude the effects of refraction on the RRL frequency can be found using a variation of standard ray-tracing techniques, whereby the ray departure angle is found by an iterative process. From the dispersive characteristics of a mixture of hydrogen and helium with trace amounts of methane and ammonia a simple model of the Jovian atmosphere is constructed assuming spherical symmetry and uniform mixing. The contribution to the RRL Doppler frequency arising from refraction is calculated, and its effect on the Doppler wind measurements is discussed.

  19. Development of refractively matched hydrogels for PIV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Margaret; Variano, Evan

    2012-11-01

    We present a technique for fabricating models whose refractive indices are close to that of water, using two hydrogel polymers. The models' transparency and matched refractive index makes them useful for experiments in Refractive-Index-Matched Particle Image Velocimetry (RIM-PIV). The materials used - polyacrylamide and agarose hydrogel - are inexpensive and can be cast into a variety of desired shapes using injection molding. The models' utility is demonstrated with sets of vector fields, calculated with standard PIV algorithms; vectors can be obtained from the surrounding flowfield and from interior points within the model. Using these data, we calculate solid-body rotation and translation in combination with fluid-phase velocities, and investigate coupling between the two.

  20. Integrated Microfibre Device for Refractive Index and Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman W. Harun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A microfibre device integrating a microfibre knot resonator in a Sagnac loop reflector is proposed for refractive index and temperature sensing. The reflective configuration of this optical structure offers the advantages of simple fabrication and ease of sensing. To achieve a balance between responsiveness and robustness, the entire microfibre structure is embedded in low index Teflon, except for the 0.5–2 mm diameter microfibre knot resonator sensing region. The proposed sensor has exhibited a linear spectral response with temperature and refractive index. A small change in free spectral range is observed when the microfibre device experiences a large refractive index change in the surrounding medium. The change is found to be in agreement with calculated results based on dispersion relationships.

  1. Refractive Index Sensor Using a Two-Hole Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Cortes, D; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J [Photonics and Optical Physics Laboratory, Optics Department, INAOE Apdo. Postal 51 and 216, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Margulis, W [Department Fiber Photonics, ACREO, Electrum 236, 16440 Stockholm (Sweden); Dominguez-Cruz, R; May-Arrioja, D A, E-mail: darrioja@uat.edu.mx [Depto. de Ingenieria Electronica, UAM Reynosa Rodhe, Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Carr. Reynosa-San Fernando S/N, Reynosa, Tamaulipas 88779 (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    We propose to use a twin-hole fiber to measure refractive index of liquids. The key idea is to have a single mode fiber (SMF) having two large air-holes running along the fiber length, the holes do not interact with the core. However, using wet chemical etching we can have access to the hole around the fiber, and further etching increases the holes diameter. The diameter is increased until the fiber exhibits a specific birefringence. Since the holes are open, by immersing the fiber in different liquids (n=1.33 to n=1.42) the value of the birefringence is modified and the refractive index of the liquid can be estimated from the change on the beat length. This process provides a very simple and highly sensitive mechanism for sensing refractive index in liquids, and can also be used for other applications.

  2. SH-wave refraction/reflection and site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Street, R.L.; Woolery, E.W.; Madin, I.P.

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, nonintrusive techniques used to characterize soils have been based on P-wave refraction/reflection methods. However, near-surface unconsolidated soils are oftentimes water-saturated, and when groundwater is present at a site, the velocity of the P-waves is more related to the compressibility of the pore water than to the matrix of the unconsolidated soils. Conversely, SH-waves are directly relatable to the soil matrix. This makes SH-wave refraction/reflection methods effective in site characterizations where groundwater is present. SH-wave methods have been used extensively in site characterization and subsurface imaging for earthquake hazard assessments in the central United States and western Oregon. Comparison of SH-wave investigations with geotechnical investigations shows that SH-wave refraction/reflection techniques are viable and cost-effective for engineering site characterization.

  3. Optical sensors of bulk refractive index using optical fiber resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryürek, M.; Karadag, Y.; Ghafoor, M.; Bavili, N.; Cicek, K.; Kiraz, A.

    2017-05-01

    Optical fiber resonator (OFR) sensor is presented for bulk liquid refractive index (RI) sensing. The sensing mechanism relies on the spectral shifts of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of OFRs which are excited using a tapered fiber. OFR liquid RI sensor is fully characterized using water solutions of ethanol and ethylene glycol (EG). A good agreement is achieved between the analytical calculations and experimental results for both TE and TM polarizations. The detection limit for bulk RI is calculated to be between 2.7 - 4.7 × 10-5 refractive index unit (RIU). The OFR sensor provides a robust, easy-to-fabricate and sensitive liquid refractive index sensor which can be employed in lab-on-a-chip applications.

  4. Interpretation of the Faust equation for a conventional refracting prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, R. D.; Ghodgaonkar, A. M.; Gokhale, V. D.

    1995-10-01

    The Faust formula for a conventional refracting prism is interpreted in terms of the angle of incidence ( i1) and the angle of deviation (δ). Three new possibilities emerge, namely: (a) keeping the angle of incidence ( i1) constant and varying the angle of deviation (δ); (b) keeping the angle of deviation constant and varying the angle of incidence ( i1); (c) modification of the closed forms of Murty's expression and its equivalence to (b). Using paraxial approximation and keeping the angle of incidence ( i1) and angle of deviation (δ) constant we obtain a relation between the refractive index and the base length ( b) of a prism and, in principle, this is equivalent to the Marcuse variation for optical fibres. The condition for a Littrow prism, as well as for polarized radiation is derived. An expression to estimate the spectral bandwidth (SBW) of the instrument is also derived. Experimental values of refractive index at different wavelengths are within confidence limits.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of a Bioinspired Refractive Index Based Gas Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao; Qi Xia; Guanglan Liao; Tielin Shi

    2011-01-01

    It was found out that the change of refractive index of ambient gas can lead to obvious change of the color of Morpho butterfly's wing. Such phenomenon has been employed as a sensing principle for detecting gas. In the present study, Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) was described briefly, and the partial derivative of optical reflection efficiency with respect to the refractive index of ambient gas, i.e., sensitivity of the sensor, was derived based on RCWA. A bioinspired grating model was constructed by mimicking the nanostructure on the ground scale of Morpho didius butterfly's wing. The analytical sensitivity was verified and the effect of the grating shape on the reflection spectra and its sensitivity were discussed. The results show that by tuning shape parameters of the grating, we can obtain desired reflection spectra and sensitivity, which can be applied to the design of the bioinspired refractive index based gas sensor.

  6. Observations of Anomalous Refraction with Co-housed Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Malinda S.; McGraw, J. T.; Zimmer, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous refraction is described as a low frequency, large angular scale motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by previous astrometric catalogs. These motions of typically several tenths of an arcsecond with timescales on the order of ten minutes are ubiquitous to drift-scan ground-based astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to meter scale slowly evolving coherent dynamical structures in the boundary-layer below 60 meters. The localized nature of the effect and general inconsistency of the motions seen by even closely spaced telescopes in individual domes has led to the hypothesis that the dome or other type of telescope housing may be responsible. This hypothesis is tested by observing anomalous refraction using two telescopes housed in a single roll-off roof observatory building with the expected outcome that the two telescopes will see correlated anomalous refraction induced motions.

  7. Refractive-Index Sensing with Ultrathin Plasmonic Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Toscano, Giuseppe; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2013-01-01

    We study the refractive-index sensing properties of plasmonic nanotubes with a dielectric core and ultrathin metal shell. The few nanometer thin metal shell is described by both the usual Drude model and the nonlocal hydrodynamic model to investigate the effects of nonlocality. We derive an analy......We study the refractive-index sensing properties of plasmonic nanotubes with a dielectric core and ultrathin metal shell. The few nanometer thin metal shell is described by both the usual Drude model and the nonlocal hydrodynamic model to investigate the effects of nonlocality. We derive...... an analytical expression for the extinction cross section and show how sensing of the refractive index of the surrounding medium and the figure of merit are affected by the shape and size of the nanotubes. Comparison with other localized surface plasmon resonance sensors reveals that the nanotube exhibits...

  8. Super-virtual refraction interferometry: an engineering field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2012-10-01

    The theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry (SVI) was recently developed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of far-offset traces in refraction surveys. This enhancement of the SNR is proportional to √N and can be as high as N if an iterative procedure is used. Here N is the number of post-critical shot positions that coincides with the receiver locations. We now demonstrate the SNR enhancement of super-virtual refraction traces for one engineering-scale synthetic data and two field seismic data sets. The field data are collected over a normal fault in Saudi Arabia. Results show that both the SNR of the super-virtual data set and the number of reliable first-arrival traveltime picks are significantly increased. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  9. Iris recognition: a biometric method after refractive surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Iris recognition, as a biometric method, outperforms others because of its high accuracy. Iris is the visible internal organ of human, so it is stable and very difficult to be altered. But if an eye surgery must be made to some individuals, it may be rejected by iris recognition system as imposters after the surgery, because the iris pattern was altered or damaged somewhat during surgery and cannot match the iris template stored before the surgery. In this paper, we originally discuss whether refractive surgery for vision correction (LASIK surgery) would influence the performance of iris recognition. And experiments are designed and tested on iris images captured especially for this research from patients before and after refractive surgery. Experiments showed that refractive surgery has little influence on iris recognition.

  10. Anomalous refraction of guided waves via embedded acoustic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongfei; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    We illustrate the design of acoustic metasurfaces based on geometric tapers and embedded in thin-plate structures. The metasurface is an engineered discontinuity that enables anomalous refraction of guided wave modes according to the Generalized Snell's Law. Locally-resonant geometric torus-like tapers are designed in order to achieve metasurfaces having discrete phase-shift profiles that enable a high level of control of refraction of the wavefronts. Results of numerical simulations show that anomalous refraction can be achieved on transmitted anti-symmetric modes (A0) either when using a symmetric (S0) or anti-symmetric (A0) incident wave, where the former case clearly involves mode conversion mechanisms.

  11. Creating Materials with Negative Refraction Index using Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, Ole

    We apply topology optimization along with full modeling of the electromagnetic (acoustic) field to create metamaterials with negative refraction index. We believe that our approach can be used in the design of metamaterials with specific effective permittivity and permeability e.g. by adapting...... is on the order of the wavelength. We seek a distribution of solid and air in the design cell yielding a prescribed negative refraction index for the slab. Our objective is to minimize the difference in amplitude between the solution to the model problemand a prescribed modulated plane wave behind the slab....... The direction of propagation for the prescribed wave is chosen to match the angle of incidence of the incoming plane wave and its position isused to select the refraction index for the slab. We introducing a continuous design field and apply The Method of Moving Asymptotes to perform the optimization. A filter...

  12. [Influence of wearing long wavelength filter glasses on refractive development of children's hyperopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Yu, Z Q; Chu, R Y; Qian, Y S; Xu, Y; Wang, X Q

    2017-01-11

    Objective: To investigate the effect of wearing long wavelength filter glasses on refractive development of children's hyperopia. Methods: Case control study. Seventeen 5-7 years' old children with high hyperopia from optometry clinic of Eye and ENT Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University were enrolled in this research. The experiment design was self-control between right and left eye, 3 children were lost during two years' period of observation, all the children's hyperopic refraction were more than +6.00 D, cycloplegic by 1% atropine. All the children were required to wear long wavelength filter glasses for 6 hours after waking up, the rest of the time with the conventional glasses. Refraction, axis and red/green match point were tested before the intervention and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months, after the intervention. Results: After two years' intervention, hyperopia decreased, eye axis increased, the best corrected visual acuity increased both in experimental eyes and control eyes, but there were no statistically significant difference between the two groups at each time point. All children were with normal color vision, compared to the long-wavelength light, the hyperopic eyes were more sensitive to middle-wavelength light, no significant difference was found between two groups, red/green match points were 42.802±1.216 and 42.889±1.560 respectively. After wearing long wavelength filter, red/green match point were significant decreased in the experimental group in 6 months and 12 months time points (6 months: 0.995±0. 543 vs. 0.104±0.143, t=3.04, P=0.005, 12 months: 1.096±0.392 vs. 0.17±0.248, t=2.725, P=0.008). The experiment eyes were more sensitive to long-wavelength light than the control eyes. But in later time, there was no significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: Wearing long wavelength filter glasses two years has no effect on refractive development on children with high hyperopia, but it can cause short-term chromatic adaptation, making

  13. The BHVI-EyeMapper: peripheral refraction and aberration profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedtke, Cathleen; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Bakaraju, Ravi C; Holden, Brien A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this article was to present the optical design of a new instrument (BHVI-EyeMapper, EM), which is dedicated to rapid peripheral wavefront measurements across the visual field for distance and near, and to compare the peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration profiles obtained in myopic eyes with and without accommodation. Central and peripheral refractive errors (M, J180, and J45) and higher-order aberrations (C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0]) were measured in 26 myopic participants (mean [±SD] age, 20.9 [±2.0] years; mean [±SD] spherical equivalent, -3.00 [±0.90] diopters [D]) corrected for distance. Measurements were performed along the horizontal visual field with (-2.00 to -5.00 D) and without (+1.00 D fogging) accommodation. Changes as a function of accommodation were compared using tilt and curvature coefficients of peripheral refraction and aberration profiles. As accommodation increased, the relative peripheral refraction profiles of M and J180 became significantly (p 0.05). The peripheral aberration profiles of C[3, 1], C[3, 3], and C[4, 0] became significantly (p refraction and higher-order aberration profiles occurred during accommodation in myopic eyes. With its extended measurement capabilities, that is, permitting rapid peripheral refraction and higher-order aberration measurements up to visual field angles of ±50 degrees for distance and near (up to -5.00 D), the EM is a new advanced instrument that may provide additional insights in the ongoing quest to understand and monitor myopia development.

  14. Variability in Objective Refraction for Persons with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsack, Jason D; Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Benoit, Julia S; Anderson, Heather A

    2017-05-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is associated with ocular and cognitive sequelae, which both have the potential to influence clinical measures of refractive error. This study compares variability of autorefraction among subjects with and without DS. Grand Seiko autorefraction was performed on 139 subjects with DS (age: 8-55, mean: 25 ± 9 yrs) and 138 controls (age: 7-59, mean: 25 ± 10 yrs). Subjects with three refraction measures per eye (DS: 113, control: 136) were included for analysis. Each refraction was converted to power vector notation (M, J0, J45) and a difference in each component (ΔM, ΔJ0, ΔJ45) was calculated for each refraction pairing. From these quantities, average dioptric strength ((Equation is included in full-text article.): square root of the sum of the squares of M, J0, and J45) and average dioptric difference ((Equation is included in full-text article.): square root of the sum of the squares of ΔM, ΔJ0, and ΔJ45) were calculated. The DS group exhibited a greater median (Equation is included in full-text article.)(1Q: 1.38D M: 2.38D 3Q: 3.41D) than control eyes (1Q: 0.47D M: 0.96D 3Q: 2.75D) (P refraction (1Q: 0.27D M: 0.42D 3Q: 0.78D) than control eyes (1Q: 0.11D M: 0.15D 3Q: 0.23D) (P refraction for this population. The analysis demonstrates that J45 is highly contributory to the observed variability.

  15. Evaluations of refraction competencies of ophthalmic technicians in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kajal; Naidoo, Kovin; Chagunda, Margarida; Loughman, James

    2016-01-01

    Ophthalmic technicians (OT) work at health facilities in Mozambique and are trained to provide primary and secondary eye care services including basic refraction. This study was designed to assess OT competence and confidence in refraction, and investigate whether an upskilling programme is effective in developing their competence and confidence at refraction. Thirty-one trainee OTs and 16 qualified OTs were recruited to the study. A background questionnaire was administered to determine the demographic profile of the OTs. A confidence levels questionnaire explored their self-reported skills. Clinical competencies were assessed in relation to knowledge (theory exam) and clinical skills (patient exams). 11 OTs were upskilled and the clinical evaluations carried out post training. Initial evaluations demonstrated that confidence and competence levels varied depending on the OTs training (location and duration), and their location of work (clinical load, availability of equipment and other eye care personnel). The qualified OTs were more competent than trainee OTs in most of the evaluations. Post upskilling results demonstrated significant positive impact on confidence and competence levels. These evaluations identified factors affecting the refraction competencies of the OTs and demonstrated that upskilling is effective in improving confidence and competence levels for refraction. They demonstrate the need for a refraction competency framework. The overarching aim of this research was to inform the development of a nationwide programme of OT mentoring, upskilling and leading to the establishment of clinical competency standards for the new OT curricula, relevant to the professional demands. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. [Evaluation of predictability and refractive changes in pediatric pseudophakia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arámbulo de Borin, O; Paz, M; González, K

    2013-09-01

    Evaluate the predictability of the postoperative refraction and refractive changes in pediatric pseudophakia. Prospective, longitudinal follow-up on patients under the age of 15 years operated on for a cataract with intraocular lens, with 5 continuous years of follow-up. The patients were divided into 4 groups according to age at the time of the surgery: group from 0 to 2 years old, from 3 to 5 years old, from 6 to 8 years old, and 9 years and over. Error prediction and refractive change were studied. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t and ANOVA test. A total of 60 eyes were included (44 patients). No significant differences were found between the unilateral and bilateral group. The prediction error in the 0 to 2 years group was 1.5±1.8 D, significantly higher than in the other groups (ANOVA P=.01). Refractive change in 5 years of the group of 0 to 2 years was -4.7±3.4 D (ANOVA P=.0002), while in the other groups it was significantly lower, with no differences between them. The 0 to 2 years group was less hyperopic than expected, 100% within the accepted of 2 standard deviations, but with a high variability. The refractive change observed in this group coincides with previous reports that the largest growth and increase in axial length occurs during the first 2 years. The calculation and use of an IOL in children has a better immediate refractive prediction, and at long term in those older than 2 years of age. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Barriers to use of refractive services in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen; Naidoo, Kovin; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Carmen; Harris, Geoff; Chinanayi, Farai; Loughman, James

    2015-01-01

    Uncorrected refractive error remains a leading cause of visual impairment (VI) across the globe with Mozambique being no exception. The establishment of an optometry profession in Mozambique that is integrated into the public health system denotes significant progress with refractive services becoming available to the population. As the foundations of a comprehensive refractive service have now been established, this article seeks to understand what barriers may limit their uptake by the general population and inform decision making on improved service delivery. A community-based cross-sectional study using two-stage cluster sampling was conducted. Participants with VI were asked to identify barriers that were reflective of their experiences and perceptions of accessing refractive services. A total of 4601 participants were enumerated from 76 clusters in Nampula, Mozambique. A total of 1087 visually impaired participants were identified (884 with near and 203 with distance impairment). Cost was the most frequently cited barrier, identified by more than one in every two participants (53%). Other barriers identified included lack of felt need (20%), distance to travel (15%), and lack of awareness (13%). In general, no significant influence of sex or type of VI on barrier selection was found. Location had a significant impact on the selection of several barriers. Pearson χ analysis indicated that participants from rural areas were found to feel disadvantaged regarding the distance to services (p ≤ 0.001) and adequacy of hospital services (p = 0.001). For a comprehensive public sector refractive service to be successful in Mozambique, those planning its implementation must consider cost and affordability. A clear strategy for overcoming lack of felt need will also be needed, possibly in the form of improved advocacy and health promotion. The delivery of refractive services in more remote rural areas merits careful and comprehensive consideration.

  18. Refração e seus componentes em anisometropia Refraction and its components in anisometropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Tayah

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Em anisométropes comparar os valores médios individuais dos componentes oculares de ambos os olhos, correlacionar as diferenças dos componentes com as diferenças de refração; e identificar o menor número de fatores que contenham o mesmo grau de informações expressas no conjunto de variáveis que influenciam a diferença refrativa. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se estudo transversal analítico em população de 77 anisométropes de 2 D ou mais, atendida no ambulatório de Oftalmologia do Hospital Universitário da Faculdade de Medicina Nilton Lins, Manaus. RESULTADOS: Os anisométropes foram submetidos à refração estática objetiva e subjetiva, ceratometria e biometria ultrassônica A-scan. A análise dos dados foi feita por meio dos seguintes modelos estatísticos: análise univariada, multivariada, de regressão múltipla e fatorial. CONCLUSÕES: Não houve diferenças significativas na comparação dos valores médios individuais dos componentes oculares entre os olhos. Houve correlação negativa média entre a diferença refrativa e a diferença de comprimento axial (r= -0,64 (pPURPOSE: To compare the individual means of ocular components of both eyes in patients with anisometropia; to correlate the differences of the components with refractive differences; and to identify the smallest number of factors that contain the same level of information expressed in the set of variables that influence refractive difference. METHODS: An analytical transversal study was carried out in 77 patients with anisometropia of two or more dioptres seen at the Ophthalmologic Clinic, University Hospital, Nilton Lins Medical School, Manaus. RESULTS: All participants were submitted to ophthalmologic examination which included objective and subjective cycloplegic refractometry, keratometry and ultrasound biometry. Data analysis comprised the following statistical models: univariate, multivariate, multiple and factorial regression analyses. CONCLUSIONS

  19. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices.

  20. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The focus of the research presented in this ph.d. thesis is refractive index structures photoinduced in germanonsilica waveguides with ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The physical mechanisms involved in photosensitivity and applications of a wide range of UV induced refractive index structures in both...... bulk optics. Finally, I have developed a new method for direct UV writing of planar waveguide devices using a focussed continuous wave UV laser beam which is scanned across a photosensitive thin film deposited on a silicon wafer. Contrary to other waveguide fabrication techniques this method requires...

  1. Overcoming losses with gain in a negative refractive index metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuestner, Sebastian; Pusch, Andreas; Tsakmakidis, Kosmas L; Hamm, Joachim M; Hess, Ortwin

    2010-09-17

    On the basis of a full-vectorial three-dimensional Maxwell-Bloch approach we investigate the possibility of using gain to overcome losses in a negative refractive index fishnet metamaterial. We show that appropriate placing of optically pumped laser dyes (gain) into the metamaterial structure results in a frequency band where the nonbianisotropic metamaterial becomes amplifying. In that region both the real and the imaginary part of the effective refractive index become simultaneously negative and the figure of merit diverges at two distinct frequency points.

  2. Broadband negative refractive index obtained by plasmonic hybridization in metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien T.; Bui, Tung S.; Yan, Sen; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.; Lievens, Peter; Vu, Lam D.; Janssens, Ewald

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a broadband negative refractive index (NRI) behavior in combined dimer and fishnet dimer metamaterials operating in the GHz frequency range. The observations can be well explained by a hybridization model and are in agreement with numerical modelling results. Hybridization of the magnetic resonances is obtained by reducing the distance between the layers in the dimer structures. A ratio of the double negative refractive index bandwidth to operational frequency of approximately 10% was achieved in the fishnet dimer. The applicable frequency range of the broadband NRI was shown to scale with the size of the structures from the microwave to the far infrared.

  3. Refraction of sound by a shear layer - Experimental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the refraction angle and amplitude changes associated with sound transmission through a circular, open jet shear layer. Both on-axis and off-axis acoustic source locations were used. Source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz while freestream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. The experimental results were compared with an existing refraction theory which was extended to account for off-axis source positions. A simple experiment was also conducted to assess the importance of turbulence scattering between 1 kHz and 25 kHz.

  4. Silicon photonic crystal nanostructures for refractive index sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorfner, Dominic; Hürlimann, T.; Zabel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The authors present the fabrication and optical investigation of Silicon on Insulator photonic crystal drop-filters for use as refractive index sensors. Two types of defect nanocavities (L3 and H1-r) are embedded between two W1 photonic crystal waveguides to evanescently route light at the cavity...... mode frequency between input and output waveguides. Optical characterization of the structures in air and various liquids demonstrate detectivities in excess of n=n = 0:018 and n=n = 0:006 for the H1-r and L3 cavities, respectively. The measured cavity-frequencies and detector refractive index...

  5. Experimental Verification of Doppler Effect with the Refraction Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lie FENG; Jia-bi CHEN; Jing-bin HU; Song-lin ZHUANG

    2010-01-01

    The traditional methad of measuring Dopplr Effect is either reflection or dispersion.This article clarifies that it can also verify the Doppler Effect with the refraction method.We have designed the experimental system with the method of optical heterodyne,using the refraction light beam from a prism,and made the experiment.The experimental results are in accordance with the theoreticai calculation.It is very useful in some particular case,such as in Negative-Index Materials(NIM),to verify the Doppler Effect with this method.

  6. Modified refractive index of zinc sulfide nanoparticles doped glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moussaoui

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ZnS nanoparticles (NPs embedded in an oxide glass have been achieved in the present work by melting process. The UV-visible absorption and fluorescence properties of these doped and undoped glasses have been evaluated and compared. Studies on absorption spectra showed that the size of the ZnS NPs was near to 2 nm. Doped glass fluorescence characterized by laser confocale microscopy is centered at about 620 nm. We measured also the refractive index of ZnS doped glasses. The maximum refractive index difference between the undoped and ZnS doped glasses was found about 0.1 (l = 632.8 nm.

  7. Studying of refractive index measurements in reflected light

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhonov, E A

    2010-01-01

    Two methods of refractometry in reflected light from optical surface of samples are considered and studied experimentally. Methods are grounded on results of Fresnel theory of concerning light reflectivity at near normal incidence and Brewster angle. Sources of errors for both methods were considered and possibility of measuring of the refractive index with application of laser radiation with accuracy to within 4th sign was shown. Advantages of described methods concerning requirements to preparation of samples to refractive index measurement of solid, thin-film and absorbing materials are scored.

  8. Rainbow refractometry on particles with radial refractive index gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saengkaew, Sawitree [CNRS/Universite et INSA de Rouen, UMR 6614/CORIA, BP12, 76 800, Saint Etienne du Rouvray CEDEX (France); Chulalongkorn University, Center of Excellence in Particle Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand); Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Vanisri, Hathaichanok; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut [Chulalongkorn University, Center of Excellence in Particle Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand); Biscos, Yves; Garcia, Nicolas; Lavergne, Gerard [ONERA/DMAE, Toulouse (France); Mees, Loic; Gouesbet, Gerard; Grehan, Gerard [CNRS/Universite et INSA de Rouen, UMR 6614/CORIA, BP12, 76 800, Saint Etienne du Rouvray CEDEX (France)

    2007-10-15

    The rainbow refractrometry, under its different configurations (classical and global), is an attractive technique to extract information from droplets in evaporation such as diameter and temperature. Recently a new processing strategy has been developed which increases dramatically the size and refractive index measurements accuracy for homogeneous droplets. Nevertheless, for mono component as well as for multicomponent droplets, the presence of temperature and/or of concentration gradients induce the presence of a gradient of refractive index which affects the interpretation of the recorded signals. In this publication, the effect of radial gradient on rainbow measurements with a high accuracy never reached previously is quantified. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of ionospheric refraction error corrections for GRARR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.; Parker, H. C.; Berbert, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    A determination is presented of the ionospheric refraction correction requirements for the Goddard range and range rate (GRARR) S-band, modified S-band, very high frequency (VHF), and modified VHF systems. The relation ships within these four systems are analyzed to show that the refraction corrections are the same for all four systems and to clarify the group and phase nature of these corrections. The analysis is simplified by recognizing that the range rate is equivalent to a carrier phase range change measurement. The equation for the range errors are given.

  10. Negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths through plasmon-photon hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalusniak, Sascha; Sadofev, Sergey; Henneberger, Fritz

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths through plasmon-photon hybridization on a simple microcavity with metallic mirrors. Instead of using conventional metals, the plasmonic excitations are provided by a heavily doped semiconductor which enables us to tune them into resonance with the infrared photon modes of the cavity. In this way, the dispersion of the resultant hybrid cavity modes can be widely adjusted. In particular, negative dispersion and negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths on an all-ZnO monolithical cavity are demonstrated.

  11. Negative Refraction Using Frequency-Tuned Oxide Multilayer Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An oxide-based multilayer structure was proposed to realize negative refraction. The multilayer composes of alternative layers having negative permittivity and negative permeability, respectively. In order to realize negative refraction, their dielectric and magnetic resonances of layers will be tuned to the frequency as close as possibly via changing their temperature, composition, structure, and so forth. Such oxide-based NIMs are attractive for their potential applications as optical super lenses, imagers, optical cloaking, sensors, and so forth, those are required with low-loss, low-cost, and good fabrication flexibility.

  12. Measurements of photoinduced refractive index changes in bacteriorhodopsin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravinder Kumar Banyal; B Raghavendra Prasad

    2007-03-01

    We report the pump-probe measurements of nonlinear refractive index changes in photochromic bacteriorhodopsin films. The photoinduced absorption is caused by pump beam at 532 nm and the accompanying refractive index changes are studied using a probe beam at 633 nm. The proposed technique is based on a convenient and accurate determination of optical path difference using digital interferometry-based local fringe shift. The results are presented for the wild-type as well as genetically modified D96N variant of the bacteriorhodopsin.

  13. Dispersion of the nonlinear refractive index of optical crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Robert; Chase, L. L.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-09-01

    The nonlinear refractive indices of several important optical materials have been measured at the second and third harmonic wavelengths of the Nd laser using nearly degenerate four-wave mixing. Measurements made relative to the nonlinear index of fused silica have the highest accuracy. Absolute measurements were also made using the Raman cross-section of benzene as a nonlinear reference standard. The relative measurements are compared with a despersion model base on parameters fitted to the linear refractive indicies and also to a recently proposed model based on Kramers-Kronig transformation of the calculated, two-band, two-photon loss spectrum.

  14. Influence of Atmospheric Refraction on Horizontal Angle Surveying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhenglu; DENG Yong; LUO Changlin; MEI Wensheng

    2006-01-01

    Side-refraction is the main error source of horizontal angle surveying, but it has little influence on the sides by analyzing the influence of atmospheric-infraction on the ultrahigh-precision side and angle surveying. Choosing oriented direction is crucial to distance and angle measurement in triangulateration network. How to select the oriented direction during angle measurement is presented, and the means to check the quality of auto-surveying with Georobot is brought forward as well. At last some solutions to reduce the influence of side-refraction while disposing and surveying ultrahigh-precision triangulateration network are put forward.

  15. Screening for significant refractive error using a combination of distance visual acuity and near visual acuity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyao Jin

    Full Text Available To explore the effectiveness of using a series of tests combining near visual acuity (NVA and distance visual acuity (DVA for large-scale screenings for significant refractive error (SRE in primary school children.Each participant underwent DVA, NVA and cycloplegic autorefraction measurements. SREs, including high myopia, high hyperopia and high astigmatism were analyzed. Cycloplegic refraction results were considered to be the gold standard for the comparison of different screening measurements. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curves were constructed to compare the area under the curve (AUC and the Youden index among DVA, NVA and the series combined tests of DVA and NVA. The efficacies (including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of each test were evaluated. Only the right eye data of each participant were analysed for statistical purpose.A total of 4416 children aged 6 to 12 years completed the study, among which 486 students had right eye SRE (SRE prevalence rate = 11.01%. There was no difference in the prevalence of high hyperopia and high astigmatism among different age groups. However, the prevalence of high myopia significantly increased with the age (χ² = 381.81, p<0.01. High hyperopia was the biggest SRE factor associated with amblyopia(p<0.01,OR = 167.40, 95% CI: 75.14∼372.94. The DVA test was better than the NVA test for detecting high myopia (Z = 2.71, p<0.01, but the NVA test was better for detecting high hyperopia (Z = 2.35, p = 0.02 and high astigmatism (Z = 4.45, p<0.01. The series combined DVA and NVA test had the biggest AUC and the highest Youden Index for detecting high hyperopia, myopia, astigmatism, as well as all of the SREs (all p<0.01.The series combined DVA and NVA test was more accurate for detecting SREs than either of the two tests alone. This new method could be applied to large-scale SRE screening of children, aged 6 to 12, in areas that are less

  16. Significant Axial Elongation with Minimal Change in Refraction in 3- to 6-Year-Old Chinese Preschoolers: The Shenzhen Kindergarten Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinxing; Fu, Min; Ding, Xiaohu; Morgan, Ian G; Zeng, Yangfa; He, Mingguang

    2017-07-13

    To document the distribution of ocular biometry and to evaluate its associations with refraction in a group of Chinese preschoolers. Population-based cross-sectional study. A total of 1133 preschoolers 3 to 6 years of age from 8 representative kindergartens. Biometric measurements including axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and corneal radius of curvature (CR) were obtained from partial-coherence laser interferometry (IOL Master; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Oberkochen, Germany) before cycloplegia. Lens power (LP) and AL-to-CR ratio were calculated. Cycloplegic refraction (3 drops of 1% cyclopentolate) was measured using an autorefractor (KR8800; Topcon Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and spherical equivalent refraction (SER) was calculated. Biometric and refractive parameters were assessed as a function of age and gender. Multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the associations between refraction and ocular biometry. Ocular biometric distributions and their relationships to refraction. Among the 1127 children (99.5%) with successful cycloplegic refraction, mean SER was 1.37±0.63 diopters (D). Prevalence of myopia increased from 0% at 3 years of age to 3.7% (95% confidence interval, 1.0%-6.5%) at 6 years of age. Biometric parameters followed Gaussian distributions with means of 22.39±0.68 mm for AL, 7.79±0.25 mm for CR, and 24.61±1.42 D for calculated LP; and non-Gaussian distributions with means of 3.34±0.24 mm for ACD and 2.88±0.06 for AL-to-CR ratio. Axial length, ACD, and AL-to-CR ratio increased from 3 to 6 years of age, CR remained stable, whereas LP declined. Overall, SER declined slightly. For the SER variance, AL explained 18.6% and AL-to-CR ratio explained 39.8%, whereas AL, CR, and LP accounted for 80.0% after adjusting for age and gender. Young Chinese children are predominantly mildly hyperopic, with a low prevalence of myopia by the age of 6 years. An increase of 1 mm in AL was associated with only 0.45 D of myopic change. Decreases in

  17. Prevalence and association of refractive anisometropia with near work habits among young schoolchildren: The evidence from a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Wei; Fang, Shao-You; Huang, Nicole; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Chen, Shing-Yi; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Lifestyle behaviour may play a role in refractive error among children, but the association between near work habits and refractive anisometropia remains unclear. Methods We estimated the prevalence of refractive anisometropia and examined its association with near work activities among 23,114 children in the Myopia Investigation Study in Taipei who were grade 2 elementary school students at baseline in 2013 and 2014. Baseline data on demographics, medical history, parental history and near work habits were collected by parent-administered questionnaire survey. Refractive status was determined by cycloplegic autorefraction. Refractive anisometropia was defined as the spherical equivalent difference ≥ 1.0 diopter between eyes. Results The prevalence of refractive anisometropia was 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.0% to 5.6%). The prevalence and severity of refractive anisometropia increased with both myopic and hyperopic refractive error. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that refractive anisometropia was significantly associated with myopia (odds ratio [OR], 2.98; 95% CI, 2.53–3.51), hyperopia (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.98–2.83), degree of astigmatism (OR, 1.005; 95% CI, 1.005–1.006), amblyopia (OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 2.06–3.12), male gender (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78–0.99) and senior high school level of maternal education (OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52–0.92). Though anisometropic children were more likely to spend more time on near work (crude OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02–1.29) and to have less eye-to-object distance in doing near work (crude OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01–1.30), these associations became insignificant after additional adjustment for ocular, demographic and parental factors. Conclusions The present study provides large-scale, population-based evidence showing no independent association between refractive anisometropia and near work habits, though myopia is associated with refractive anisometropia. PMID:28273153

  18. Self-refraction, ready-made glasses and quality of life among rural myopic Chinese children: a non-inferiority randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongqiang; Chen, Tingting; Jin, Ling; Zheng, Dongxing; Chen, Shangji; He, Mingguang; Silver, Josh; Ellwein, Leon; Moore, Bruce; Congdon, Nathan G

    2017-09-01

    To study, for the first time, the effect of wearing ready-made glasses and glasses with power determined by self-refraction on children's quality of life. This is a randomized, double-masked non-inferiority trial. Children in grades 7 and 8 (age 12-15 years) in nine Chinese secondary schools, with presenting visual acuity (VA) ≤6/12 improved with refraction to ≥6/7.5 bilaterally, refractive error ≤-1.0 D and refraction (SR). Main study outcome was global score on the National Eye Institute Refractive Error Quality of Life-42 (NEI-RQL-42) after 2 months of wearing study glasses, comparing other groups with the U group, adjusting for baseline score. Only one child (0.18%) was excluded for anisometropia or astigmatism. A total of 426 eligible subjects (mean age 14.2 years, 84.5% without glasses at baseline) were allocated to U [103 (24.2%)], RM [113 (26.5%)], R [108 (25.4%)] and SR [102 (23.9%)] groups, respectively. Baseline and endline score data were available for 398 (93.4%) of subjects. In multiple regression models adjusting for baseline score, older age (p = 0.003) and baseline spectacle wear (p = 0.016), but not study group assignment, were significantly associated with lower final score. Quality of life wearing ready-mades or glasses based on self-refraction did not differ from that with cycloplegic refraction by an experienced optometrist in this non-inferiority trial. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Refractivity estimation from radar sea clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Si-Xun; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Sheng, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating lower atmospheric refractivity under the nonstandard propagation conditions frequently encountered in low altitude maritime radar applications. The vertical structure of the refractive environment is modeled by using a five-parameter model, and the horizontal structure is modeled as range-independent. The electromagnetic propagation in the troposphere is simulated by using a split-step fast Fourier transform based on parabolic approximation to the wave equation. A global search marked as a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) for the 5 environmental parameters is performed by using a genetic algorithm (GA) integrated with a simulated annealing technique. The retrieved results from simulated runs demonstrate the ability of this method to make atmospheric refractivity estimations. A comparison with the classical GA and the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (Bayesian-MCMC) technique shows that the MGA can not only shorten the inverse time but also improve the inverse precision. For real data cases, the inversion values do not match the reference data very well. The inverted profile, however, can be used to synoptically describe the real refractive structure.

  20. Pattern of Refractive Errors Among Ophthalmic Outpatients of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [19] This is a hospital‑based study, while the ... Owerri in similar hospital‑based studies and 26.99% .... Genome wide scan in Ashkenazi Jewish families demonstrates evidence of linkage of ocular refraction to a QTL on chromosome. 1p36.

  1. Refraction effects in soft x-ray multilayer blazed gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, D L; Salmassi, F; Meyer-Ilse, J; Gullikson, E M; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2016-05-30

    A 2500 lines/mm Multilayer Blazed Grating (MBG) optimized for the soft x-ray wavelength range was fabricated and tested. The grating coated with a W/B4C multilayer demonstrated a record diffraction efficiency in the 2nd blazed diffraction order in the energy range from 500 to 1200 eV. Detailed investigation of the diffraction properties of the grating demonstrated that the diffraction efficiency of high groove density MBGs is not limited by the normal shadowing effects that limits grazing incidence x-ray grating performance. Refraction effects inherent in asymmetrical Bragg diffraction were experimentally confirmed for MBGs. The refraction affects the blazing properties of the MBGs and results in a shift of the resonance wavelength of the gratings and broadening or narrowing of the grating bandwidth depending on diffraction geometry. The true blaze angle of the MBGs is defined by both the real structure of the multilayer stack and by asymmetrical refraction effects. Refraction effects can be used as a powerful tool in providing highly efficient suppression of high order harmonics.

  2. [Intraoperative Measurement of Refraction with a Hand-Held Autorefractometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesser, C; Küper, T; Richard, G; Hassenstein, A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an intraoperative measurement of objective refraction with a hand-held retinomax instrument. At the end of cataract surgery objective refraction in a lying position was measured with a retinomax instrument. On the first postoperative day the same measurement was performed with a retinomax and a standard autorefractometer. To evaluate the differences between measurements, the spherical equivalent (SE) and Jackson's cross cylinder at 0° (J0) and 45° (J45) was used. 103 eyes were included. 95 of them had normal cataract surgery. Differences between retinomax at the operative day and the standard autorefractometer were 0.68 ± 2.58 D in SE, 0.05 ± 1.4D in J0 and 0.05 ± 1.4D in J45. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Intraoperative measurement of the refraction with a retinomax can predict the postoperative refraction. Nevertheless, in a few patients great differences may occur. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Studies of the Reflection, Refraction and Internal Reflection of Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchester, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive apparatus and associated experiments are described for studying the basic laws of reflection and refraction of light at an air-glass interface, and multiple internal reflections within a glass block. In order to motivate students and encourage their active participation, a novel technique is described for determining the refractive…

  4. Nano-imprint gold grating as refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2016-05-01

    Large scale of fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures has been a challenging task due to time consuming process and requirement of expensive nanofabrication tools such as electron beam lithography system, focused ion beam system, and extreme UV photolithography system. Here, we present a cost-effective fabrication technique so called soft nanoimprinting to fabricate nanostructures on the larger sample area. In our fabrication process, a commercially available optical DVD disc was used as a template which was imprinted on a polymer glass substrate to prepare 1D polymer nano-grating. A homemade nanoimprinting setup was used in this fabrication process. Further, a label-free refractive index sensor was developed by utilizing the properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a gold coated 1D polymer nano-grating. Refractive index sensing was tested by exposing different solutions of glycerol-water mixture on the surface of gold nano-grating. The calculated bulk refractive index sensitivity was found to be 751nm/RIU. We believed that our proposed SPR sensor could be a promising candidate for developing low-cost refractive index sensor with high sensitivity on a large scale.

  5. Wave Refraction During the May 2002 Rarefaction Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.; Mullan, D. J.; Ness, N. F.; Skoug, R. M.

    2002-12-01

    In previous work [Smith et al., 2001] we examined IMF wave refraction during the May 1999 rarefaction interval known as ``The Day The Solar Wind Disappeared.'' On that day, Alfvén speeds remained elevated over an extended region. Analysis of the recorded ACE fields and plasma data revealed depressed magnetic fluctuation levels, reduced compression in the fluctuations, and a reduced wave-like component within the region of elevated Alfvén speed, all consistent with wave refraction. The May 2002 event provides a third such period (the second identified event occured 2 weeks prior to the May 1999 period) and it again demonstrates properties which are consistent with refraction. Smith, C.~W., D.~J. Mullan, N.~F. Ness, R.~M. Skoug, and J.~Steinberg, Day the solar wind almost disappeared: Magnetic field fluctuations, wave refraction and dissipation, J. Geophys. Res., A106, 18,625--18,634, 2001. Efforts at the Bartol Research Institute were supported by CIT subcontract PC251439 under NASA grant NAG5-6912 for support of the ACE magnetic field experiment and by the NASA Delaware Space College Grant. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy with financial support from the NASA ACE program.

  6. Waveguide Modes and Refractive Index in Photoreceptors of Invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The refractive index of visual photoreceptors, if estimated by utilizing waveguide propagation, has to be corrected by a factor depending on the occurring mode. The correction factor is presented graphically for a number of relevant modes. Applied to the honeybee rhabdoms, it is shown that the

  7. The Painful Derivation of the Refractive Index from Microscopical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenders, Bernhard J.; Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-01-01

    The derivation of the refractive index from the microscopical structure of matter is analysed in detail. In particular the many various assumptions leading to the basic Clausius-Mosotti (Lorentz-Lorenz) equation are carefully stated. The most general formulation of the second order correlation

  8. Effect of Effective Refractive Index of Grating in FBG Splitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINESH ARORA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fiber Bragg Gratings have been used extensively in the communication industry. Fiber Bragg grating is written directly into the core of the optical fiber and it is quite an attractive technique for wavelength splitter since it provides high reflectivity at a certain wavelength, with negligible transmission losses for others, providing a wavelength-channel selection with low crosstalk between adjacent channels.In this paper we propose a Fiber Bragg Grating base splitter with alteration of effective refractive index of grating for Ethernet passive optical network. With the increase in the effective refractive index the reflectivity of grating is increased. We analysed the effect of effective refractive index on reflectivity of grating. In our work the Bragg wavelength has been fixed at 1550 nm,length of the grating as 10mm and with effective refractive index as 4.0 it has been found that the reflectivity of the grating or the effectiveness of the grating in extracting the wavelength is 92-93%.

  9. Refractive errors in Cameroonians diagnosed with complete oculocutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eballé AO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available André Omgbwa Eballé1,3, Côme Ebana Mvogo2, Christelle Noche4, Marie Evodie Akono Zoua2, Andin Viola Dohvoma21Faculty of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon, 2Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 3Yaoundé Gynaeco-obstetric and Paediatric Hospital. Yaoundé, Cameroon; 4Faculty of Medicine, Université des Montagnes. Bangangté, CameroonBackground: Albinism causes significant eye morbidity and amblyopia in children. The aim of this study was to determine the refractive state in patients with complete oculocutaneous albinism who were treated at the Gynaeco-Obstetric and Paediatric Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon and evaluate its effect on vision.Methods: We carried out this retrospective study at the ophthalmology unit of our hospital. All oculocutaneous albino patients who were treated between March 1, 2003 and December 31, 2011 were included.Results: Thirty-five patients (70 eyes diagnosed with complete oculocutaneous albinism were enrolled. Myopic astigmatism was the most common refractive error (40%. Compared with myopic patients, those with myopic astigmatism and hypermetropic astigmatism were four and ten times less likely, respectively, to demonstrate significant improvement in distance visual acuity following optical correction.Conclusion: Managing refractive errors is an important way to reduce eye morbidity-associated low vision in oculocutaneous albino patients.Keywords: albinism, visual acuity, refraction, Cameroon

  10. Refractive and diffractive neutron optics with reduced chromatic aberration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, S.O., E-mail: stefan.poulsen@northwestern.edu [NEXMAP, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Anker Engelunds Vej 1, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Poulsen, H.F. [NEXMAP, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Anker Engelunds Vej 1, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bentley, P.M. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-12-11

    Thermal neutron beams are an indispensable tool in physics research. The spatial and the temporal resolution attainable in experiments are dependent on the flux and collimation of the neutron beam which remain relatively poor, even for modern neutron sources. These difficulties may be mitigated by the use of optics for focusing and imaging. Refractive and diffractive optical elements, e.g. compound refractive lenses and Fresnel zone plates, are attractive due to their low cost, and simple alignment. These optical elements, however, suffer from chromatic aberration, which limit their effectiveness to highly monochromatic beams. This paper presents two novel concepts for focusing and imaging non-monochromatic thermal neutron beams with well-known optical elements: (1) a fast mechanical transfocator based on a compound refractive lens, which actively varies the number of individual lenses in the beam path to focus and image a time-of-flight beam, and (2) a passive optical element consisting of a compound refractive lens, and a Fresnel zone plate, which may focus and image both continuous and pulsed neutron beams.

  11. Optical glass: refractive index change with wavelength and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Marion; Hartmann, Peter; Reichel, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    With the catalog of 1992 SCHOTT introduced two formulae each with six parameters for a better representation of the refractive index of optical glasses. The Sellmeier-equation improved the characterization of dispersion at room temperature and the Hoffmann equation that of its temperature dependence. Better representation had been expected because both formulae were derived from general dispersion theory. The original publication of Hoffmann et al. from 1992 contains first results on the accuracy of the fits. The extended use of the formulae has led to a collection of data allowing reviewing the adequacy of the Sellmeier-equation approach on a much broader basis. We compare fitted refractive index values with measured values for all wavelengths used at our precision refractive index goniometer. Data sets are available for specific melts of the four representative glass types N-BK7, N-FK5, LF5 and IRG2. For some materials, the optical glass N-LAF21, the IR glass IRG2 and the crystal CaF2, several sets of data for the temperature dependence of the refractive index are available thus giving evidence for the variation of these properties among melts of the same material.

  12. Refractive index determination in axially symmetric oprtically inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu-Pallas, Nicholas; Vlad, Valentin I.; Bociort, Florian

    The focussing method from transversally light, put forward by Dietrich Marcuse in view of determining the refractive index profile (RIP) in optical fibers and fiber performs, is revised. A more rigorous derivation of the Marcuse formula is given, establishing the conditions of its validity and a simplified version is initially proposed, able to avoid the systematic errors in the processing of light intensity data.

  13. Statistics of the residual refraction errors in laser ranging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model for the range error covariance was derived by assuming that the residual refraction errors are due entirely to errors in the meteorological data which are used to calculate the atmospheric correction. The properties of the covariance function are illustrated by evaluating the theoretical model for the special case of a dense network of weather stations uniformly distributed within a circle.

  14. Measuring Refractive Index Using the Focal Displacement Method (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Dayton, Ohio 45431 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Measuring refractive index using the focal...Corp., Dayton, Ohio 45431 , USA 3Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433, USA Received 25 March 2014; accepted 22 April 2014

  15. COLONIAL LEGACY AND THE REFRACTED STATE: AFRICA IN MOTIONLESS MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Akinmade

    2014-10-01

    The history of African continent has been that of pristine aesthetics, cultural independence, composite values and communalistic disposition. Regrettably, the compelling impact of colonization has refracted the states of Africa and the effect has been monumental as the African states have not recovered from the overwhelming impact of colonization even after independence.

  16. Refraction-contrast bone imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Koichi; Sekine, Norio; Sato, Hitoshi; Shikano, Naoto [Ibaraki Prefectural Univ. of Health Sciences, Ami (Japan); Shimao, Daisuke [Ibaraki Prefectural Univ. of Health Sciences, Ami (Japan). Graduate School of Health Sciences; Shiwaku, Hideaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Mikazuki, Hyogo (Japan). Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Hyodo, Kazuyuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Org., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Material Structure Sciences; Oka, Hiroshi [St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The X-ray refraction-contrast imaging using synchrotron radiation with some X-ray energies is successfully performed at B120B2 of SPring-8. The refraction-contrast images of bone samples such as human dried proximal phalanx, wrist, upper cervical vertebrae and sella turcica and as mouse proximal femur using the synchrotron X-ray are always better in image contrast and resolution than those of the absorption-contrast images using the synchrotron X-ray and/or the conventional X-ray tube. There is much likeness in the image contrast and resolution of trabeculae bone in the human dried proximal phalanx between X-ray energy of 30 keV at sample-to-film distance of 1 m and those of 40, 50 keV at those of 4,5 m, respectively. High-energy refraction-contrast imaging with suitable sample-to-film distance could reduce the exposure dose in human imaging. In the refraction-contrast imaging of human wrist, upper cervcal vertebrae, sella turcica and mouse proximal femur using the synchrotron X-ray, we can obtain better image contrast and resolution to correctly extract morphological information for diagnosis corresponding to each of the clinical field than those of the absorption-contrast images. (author)

  17. Designing Meta Material Slabs Exhibiting Negative Refraction Using Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a topology optimization based approach for designing meta materials exhibiting a desired negative refraction with high transmission at a given angle of incidence and frequency. The approach considers a finite slab of meta material consisting of axis-symmetric designable unit...

  18. Ray tracing and refraction in the modified US1976 atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, SY

    2003-01-01

    A new and flexible ray-tracing procedure for calculating astronomical refraction is outlined and applied to the US1976 standard atmosphere. This atmosphere is generalized to allow for a free choice of the temperature and pressure at sea level, and in this form it has been named the modified US1976

  19. Ocular wavefront aberrations in the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus: effects of age and refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Nancy J; Marcos, Susana; Troilo, David

    2010-11-23

    The common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus, is a primate model for emmetropization studies. The refractive development of the marmoset eye depends on visual experience, so knowledge of the optical quality of the eye is valuable. We report on the wavefront aberrations of the marmoset eye, measured with a clinical Hartmann-Shack aberrometer (COAS, AMO Wavefront Sciences). Aberrations were measured on both eyes of 23 marmosets whose ages ranged from 18 to 452 days. Twenty-one of the subjects were members of studies of emmetropization and accommodation, and two were untreated normal subjects. Eleven of the 21 experimental subjects had worn monocular diffusers and 10 had worn binocular spectacle lenses of equal power. Monocular deprivation or lens rearing began at about 45 days of age and ended at about 108 days of age. All refractions and aberration measures were performed while the eyes were cyclopleged; most aberration measures were made while subjects were awake, but some control measurements were performed under anesthesia. Wavefront error was expressed as a seventh-order Zernike polynomial expansion, using the Optical Society of America's naming convention. Aberrations in young marmosets decreased up to about 100 days of age, after which the higher-order RMS aberration leveled off to about 0.10 μm over a 3 mm diameter pupil. Higher-order aberrations were 1.8 times greater when the subjects were under general anesthesia than when they were awake. Young marmoset eyes were characterized by negative spherical aberration. Form-deprived eyes of the monocular deprivation animals had greater wavefront aberrations than their fellow untreated eyes, particularly for asymmetric aberrations in the odd-numbered Zernike orders. Both lens-treated and form-deprived eyes showed similar significant increases in Z3(-3) trefoil aberration, suggesting the increase in trefoil may be related to factors that do not involve visual feedback.

  20. Age-Specific Prevalence of Visual Impairment and Refractive Error in Children Aged 3-10 Years in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingyan; Qu, Xiaomei; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xun; Zhu, Jianfeng; Sankaridurg, Padmaja; Lin, Senlin; Lu, Lina; Zhao, Rong; Wang, Ling; Shi, Huijing; Tan, Hui; You, Xiaofang; Yuan, Hong; Sun, Sifei; Wang, Mingjin; He, Xiangui; Zou, Haidong; Congdon, Nathan

    2016-11-01

    We assessed changes in age-specific prevalence of refractive error at the time of starting school, by comparing preschool and school age cohorts in Shanghai, China. A cross-sectional study was done in Jiading District, Shanghai during November and December 2013. We randomly selected 7 kindergartens and 7 primary schools, with probability proportionate to size. Chinese children (n = 8398) aged 3 to 10 years were enumerated, and 8267 (98.4%) were included. Children underwent distance visual acuity assessment and refraction measurement by cycloplegic autorefraction and subjective refraction. The prevalence of uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), presenting visual acuity, and best-corrected visual acuity in the better eye of ≤20/40 was 19.8%, 15.5%, and 1.7%, respectively. Among those with UCVA ≤ 20/40, 93.2% could achieve visual acuity of ≥20/32 with refraction. Only 28.7% (n = 465) of children with UCVA in the better eye of ≤20/40 wore glasses. Prevalence of myopia (spherical equivalent ≤-0.5 diopters [D] in at least one eye) increased from 1.78% in 3-year-olds to 52.2% in 10-year-olds, while prevalence of hyperopia (spherical equivalent ≥+2.0 D) decreased from 17.8% among 3-year-olds to 2.6% by 10 years of age. After adjusting for age, attending elite "high-level" school was statistically associated with greater myopia prevalence. The prevalence of myopia was lower or comparable to that reported in other populations from age 3 to 5 years, but increased dramatically after 6 years, consistent with a strong environmental role of schooling on myopia development.

  1. An updated equation for the refractive index of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenchen; Dai, Zuoxiao; Dai, Ning; Chen, Ren; Sun, Xiaojie; Xia, Xiang; Li, Tao; Ma, Bei; Sheng, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Laser has been widely used in spectroscopic and metrological measurement. High-precision laser metrology is affected by the refractive index of air. In order to apply the algorithm for the refractive index of air in some situation where low calculation complexity and high-precision are needed, the algorithm of the refractive index of Rueger is updated. As the errors of Rueger's algorithm are mainly affected by temperature, humidity, and the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as well as laser wavelength, we do some revisions about these effects of the factors of atmosphere in Rueger's algorithm. The conditions of standard air is redefined in this paper because of the average concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been changed in the past few decades. As the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air is not constant, the effect of carbon dioxide on the refractive index of air is taken into consideration in the updated algorithm. The updated algorithm adapts to the real atmosphere well. The effects of dry air and humid air on the algorithm are also corrected, and the refractive index of air calculated by the updated algorithm is much closer to that of Philip E.Ciddor's algorithm defined as reference algorithm in the paper because of its high-precision. The performance of the updated algorithm is also analyzed in this paper. It is compared to that of the reference algorithm and the real measured data. Comparing results show that the performance of the algorithm has been improved after the correction. Comparing to the reference algorithm, the performance of the updated algorithm is a little bit lower, but the updated algorithm is much simpler and easier to be applied. Comparing to Rueger's algorithm, the performance of the updated algorithm is much higher and the complexity of the updated algorithm increases very small. The updated algorithm meets low calculation complexity and high-precision requirements.

  2. Influence of contact lens power profile on peripheral refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Jara, Percy Lazon; Sankaridurg, Padmaja; Ehrmann, Klaus; Holden, Brien A

    2014-06-01

    To measure the power profile across the optic zone (OZ) of four commercially available soft contact lenses and establish the impact on the peripheral refractive error of the eye. The power profiles of a spherical conventional hydrogel contact lens (etafilcon A, J&J Vistakon, Jacksonville, FL USA) and three spherical silicone hydrogel contact lenses (lotrafilcon A and B, CIBA Vision, Duluth, GA USA; enfilcon A, CooperVision, Pleasanton, CA USA) with a labeled power of -3.00 and -6.00 diopters were measured using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor power mapping device. Central and peripheral refraction across the horizontal meridian (nasal and temporal visual field at 20, 30, and 40 degrees) was measured with an open-field autorefractor (Shin Nippon NVision K5001, Osaka Japan) with and without contact lenses in 26 myopic subjects. The relative peripheral refractive error on the eye was estimated and compared with and without contact lenses and between contact lenses. Differences in the distribution of the power profile across the OZ were apparent between contact lens types and powers. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between contact lens types for their effect on on-axis refraction. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found at all peripheral retinal eccentricities between contact lens types. For a given central power, the four contact lenses exhibited variations in optical power across the OZ of the lens. The distribution of optical power across the OZ has an influence on the peripheral refractive error of the eye.

  3. Study on accommodation by autorefraction and dynamic refraction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnacharya, Prabhakar Srinivasapur

    2014-01-01

    Childhood accommodation interferes with accurate diagnosis of the latent refractive errors. Dynamic retinoscopy offers accurate measurements of accommodative response, while an autorefractometer can predict the accommodative system activation in children. A correlation of the accommodative effort with the dynamic refraction has been investigated in emmetropic children, before and after cycloplegia. A prospective clinical study of accommodative effort in 149 emmetropic children, in the age group 3-16 years, has been conducted using TOPCON AR RM-8000B autorefractor. Dynamic refraction was performed by monocular estimation method before and after cycloplegia, using the retinoscope mirror light as target. Retinoscopic reflex produced 'with the motion' was corrected with positive spherical lenses, and that 'against the motion' was corrected with negative spherical lenses, to achieve neutralization. Mean accommodative effort measured for 149 children included in the study was -0.63±0.69D and dynamic refraction was -0.07±0.44D before cycloplegia, while the mean was+0.52D after cycloplegia, irrespective of the method used. Autorefractor measured -0.17D of accommodative effort per unit change in dynamic refraction before cycloplegia and +0.90D after cycloplegia. The performance of TOPCON AR RM-8000B autorefractor was comparable to dynamic retinoscopy. Presence of many children, and in turn, large number of accommodative response data in 11-13 and 14-15 years group is probably linked to prolonged reading/writing. The accuracy and the agreement of the actual accommodative measurements revealed after cycloplegia. Copyright © 2013 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  5. Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator Demonstrated High-Temperature Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2002-01-01

    Space applications that utilize solar thermal energy--such as electric power conversion systems, thermal propulsion systems, and furnaces--require highly efficient solar concentration systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced lightweight primary concentrators, such as inflatable thin films, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios and very high temperatures. Last year, Glenn successfully demonstrated a secondary concentrator throughput efficiency of 87 percent, with a projected efficiency of 93 percent using an antireflective coating. Building on this achievement, Glenn recently successfully demonstrated high-temperature operation of the secondary concentrator when it was used to heat a rhenium receiver to 2330 F. The high-temperature demonstration of the concentrator was conducted in Glenn's 68-ft long Tank 6 thermal vacuum facility equipped with a solar simulator. The facility has a rigid panel primary concentrator that was used to concentrate the light from the solar simulator onto the refractive secondary concentrator. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center provided a rhenium cavity, part of a solar thermal propulsion engine, to serve as the high-temperature receiver. The prototype refractive secondary concentrator, measuring 3.5 in. in diameter and 11.2 in. long, is made of single-crystal sapphire. A water-cooled splash shield absorbs spillage light outside of the 3.5-in. concentrator aperture. Multilayer foil insulation composed of tungsten, molybdenum, and niobium is used to minimize heat loss from the hightemperature receiver. A liquid-cooled canister calorimeter is used to measure the heat loss through the multilayer foil insulation.

  6. Exploiting Lateral Resolution of Near-Surface Seismic Refraction Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Derecke Palmer

    2009-01-01

    The 1D τ-p inversion algorithm is widely employed to generate starting models with most computer programs that implement refraction tomography. However, this algorithm emphasizes the vertical resolution of many layers, and as a result, it frequently fails to detect even large lateral variations in seismic velocities, such as the decreases that are indicative of shear zones. This study presents a case that demonstrates the failure of the 1D τ-p inversion algorithm to define or even detect a major shear zone that is 50 m or ten stations wide. Furthermore, the majority of refraction tomography programs parameterize the seismic velocities within each layer with vertical velocity gradients. By contrast, the 2D generalized reciprocal method (GRM) inversion algorithms emphasize the lateral resolution of individual layers. This study demonstrates the successful detection and definition of the 50-m wide shear zone with the GRM inversion algorithms. The existence of the shear zone is corroborated by a 2D analysis of the head wave amplitudes and by numerous closely spaced orthogonal seismic profiles carried out as part of a later 3D refraction investigation. Furthermore, a 1D analysis of the head wave amplitudes indicates that a reversal in the seismic velocities, rather than vertical velocity gradients, occurs in the weathered layers. While all seismic refraction operations should aim to provide as accurate depth estimates as is practical, the major conclusion reached in this study is that refraction Inversion algorithms that emphasize the lateral resolution of individual layers generate more useful results for geotechnical and environmental applications. The advantages of the Improved lateral resolution are obtained with 2D profiles in which the structural features can be recognized from the magnitudes of the variations in the seismic velocities. Furthermore, the spatial patterns obtained with 3D investigations facilitate the recognition of structural features that do not

  7. Variations of refraction angles from observations of the Moon from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, S V; Sokolovskiy, S V

    1994-12-20

    We present the results of measurements of optical refraction angles from photographs of the Moon taken from the orbital station Mir. We made estimations of rms fluctuations of refraction angles and of the characteristics of multipath propagation.

  8. Refractive error change and vision improvement in moderate to severe hyperopic amblyopia after spectacle correction: Restarting the emmetropization process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji Woong

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the study were to develop guidelines for prescribing spectacles for patients with moderate to severe hyperopic amblyopia and to demonstrate how emmetropization progresses. Children with hyperopic amblyopia who had a spherical equivalent of ≥ +4.0 diopters (D) or more were included, while those who had astigmatism of > 2.0 D or anisometropia of > 2.0 D were excluded. The patients were divided into a full correction group and an under-correction group according to the amount of hyperopia correction applied. The under-correction group was further subdivided into a fixed under-correction group and a post-cycloplegic refraction (PCR) under-correction group. The duration of amblyopia treatment and changes in initial hyperopia were compared between the groups. In total, 76 eyes of 38 patients were analyzed in this study. The full correction group and under-correction group were subjected to 5.5 months and 5.9 months of amblyopia treatment, respectively (P = 0.570). However, the PCR under-correction group showed more rapid improvement (2.9 months; P = 0.001). In the under-correction group, initial hyperopia was decreased by -0.28 D and -0.49 D at 6 months and 12 months, respectively, after initial cycloplegic refraction. Moreover, the amount of hyperopia under-correction was correlated with the amount of hyperopia reduction (P = 0.010). The under-correction of moderate to severe hyperopic amblyopia has beneficial effects for treating amblyopia and activating emmetropization. PCR under-correction can more rapidly improve visual acuity, while both fixed under-correction and PCR under-correction can induce emmetropization and effectively reduce initial hyperopia.

  9. Wide-angle beam splitting by use of positive-negative refraction in photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ye; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Zhao, Jianhui; Peng, Jiangde

    2004-12-15

    We present a positive-negative refraction effect in which, under certain conditions, an incident plane wave launched into a photonic crystal excites a positive-refracted Bloch wave and a negative-refracted Bloch wave simultaneously, both of which maintain the polarization. By utilizing this phenomenon, wide-angle beam splitting can be realized at the microscale level. Numerical simulations are employed to demonstrate this anomalous refraction behavior.

  10. Sensitivity Dependence of Surface Plasmon Resonance Based Sensors on Prism Refractive Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that refractive index of the prism used toload metal film has significant influence on sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance based sensors. Theprism with lower refractive index gives the sensors a higher sensitivity in detecting refractive index varia-tions of a sample. We attribute this effect to the fact that a prism with low refractive index will increasecoupling distance between surface plasmons and the medium under investigation.

  11. Photorefractive keratectomy in the management of refractive accommodative esotropia in young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Elena; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Mollo, Roberto; Mazzeo, Luigi; Pacella, Fernanda; Mazzeo, Francesco; Gabrieli, Corrado Balacco

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the visual, motor, and sensory outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in the treatment of purely refractive accommodative esotropia in young adult patients. Policlinico Umberto I, Department of Ophthalmology, Rome, Italy. This prospective study comprised patients with hyperopia and purely accommodative hyperopic esotropia. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed preoperatively and 1, 3, and 12 months postoperatively. The examination included uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities and orthoptic and sensory tests. All patients also had keratometry, pachymetry, and corneal topography assessment before and after treatment. Treatment was performed using a Technolas 217 excimer laser. Thirty eyes of 15 patients (mean age 30.8 years) were treated. Preoperatively, the CDVA was 20/30 or better in all eyes and the mean cycloplegic spherical equivalent (SE) was +3.50 diopters (D). One year postoperatively, the UDVA was 20/30 or better in all eyes and the mean SE was -0.01 D. The mean esotropic deviation for distance vision without correction preoperatively was 8.7 prism diopters. At 1 year of follow-up, 12 patients achieved orthophoria and 3 patients had a reduction in the angle of deviation. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Stereopsis was unaffected by treatment in all patients. Photorefractive keratectomy was effective in the treatment of purely accommodative esotropia in young adult patients at a follow-up of 1 year. There were no cases of visual acuity loss or complications from the laser treatment.

  12. An exact Riemann-solver-based solution for regular shock refraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delmont, P.; Keppens, R.; van der Holst, B.

    2009-01-01

    We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest. When the shock impinges on the density discontinuity, it refracts, and in the hydrodynamical case three signals arise. Regular refraction means that these signals meet at a si

  13. An exact Riemann-solver-based solution for regular shock refraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delmont, P.; Keppens, R.; van der Holst, B.

    2009-01-01

    We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest. When the shock impinges on the density discontinuity, it refracts, and in the hydrodynamical case three signals arise. Regular refraction means that these signals meet at a

  14. Precision measurements of gas refractivity by means of a Fabry-Perot interferometer illustrated by the monitoring of radiator refractivity in the DELPHI RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Filippas-Tassos, A; Fokitis, E; Maltezos, S; Patrinos, K

    2002-01-01

    With an updated, flexible, highly efficient and easily installed system we obtained accurate refractivity (n-1) values. This system is a refractometer based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer and was used to monitor the refractivity of DELPHI RICH Cherenkov radiators near the VUV region. By using a Pt-Ne spectral lamp and improved alignment and temperature control, the refractivities of C//5F//1//2 and C//4F//1 //0 have been monitored since 1996. With this light source, selected to have large coherence lengths, we can extract the refractivity at several wavelengths from one data set only. The estimated errors of the refractivity measurements are less than 1.2%, and depend on wavelength and the type of gas used. The various parameters affecting the accuracy of the refractometer are also discussed. Finally, results from special sample refractivity measurements of the liquid radiator (C//6F//1//4) in its gas phase, are presented.

  15. Study of all-angle negative refraction of light in metal-dielectric-metal multilayered structures based on generalized formulas of reflection and refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangwei; Liu, Jun; Xu, Weidong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, refraction behaviors of light in both metal single-layered film and metal-dielectric-metal multilayered films are investigated based on the generalized formulas of reflection and refraction. The obtained results, especially, dependence of power refractive index on incident angles for a light beam traveling through a metal-dielectric-metal multilayered structure, are well consistent with the experimental observations. Our work may offer a new angle of view to understand the all-angle negative refraction of light in metal-dielectric-metal multilayered structures, and provide a convenient approach to optimize the devised design and address the issue on making the perfect lens.

  16. Imaging based refractometer for hyperspectral refractive index detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S.; Boudreaux, Philip R.

    2015-11-24

    Refractometers for simultaneously measuring refractive index of a sample over a range of wavelengths of light include dispersive and focusing optical systems. An optical beam including the range of wavelengths is spectrally spread along a first axis and focused along a second axis so as to be incident to an interface between the sample and a prism at a range of angles of incidence including a critical angle for at least one wavelength. An imaging detector is situated to receive the spectrally spread and focused light from the interface and form an image corresponding to angle of incidence as a function of wavelength. One or more critical angles are identified and corresponding refractive indices are determined.

  17. Effective negative refractive index in ferromagnet-semiconductor superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkanyan, Roland H; Niarchos, Dimitris G

    2006-06-12

    Problem of anomalous refraction of electromagnetic waves is analyzed in a superlattice which consists of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and nonmagnetic semiconductor. Effective permittivity and permeability tensors are derived in the presence of an external magnetic field parallel to the plane of the layers. It is shown that in the case of the Voigt configuration, the structure behaves as a left-handed medium with respect to TE-type polarized wave, in the low-frequency region of propagation. The relative orientation of the Poynting vector and the refractive wave vector is examined in different frequency ranges. It is shown that the frequency region of existence for the backward mode can be changed using external magnetic field as tuning parameter.

  18. Refractive index of silicon at γ ray energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D; Günther, M M; Jentschel, M; Urban, W

    2012-05-04

    For x rays the real part of the refractive index, dominated by Rayleigh scattering, is negative and converges to zero for higher energies. For γ rays a positive component, related to Delbrück scattering, increases with energy and becomes dominating. The deflection of a monochromatic γ beam due to refraction was measured by placing a Si wedge into a flat double crystal spectrometer. Data were obtained in an energy range from 0.18 MeV to 2 MeV. The data are compared to theory, taking into account elastic and inelastic Delbrück scattering as well as recent results on the energy dependence of the pair creation cross section. Probably a new field of γ optics with many new applications opens up.

  19. Chiral Swiss rolls show a negative refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, M C K; Pendry, J B; Hajnal, J V

    2009-07-22

    Chiral Swiss rolls, consisting of a metal/dielectric laminate tape helically wound on an insulating mandrel, have been developed to form the basis of a highly chiral metamaterial. We have fabricated these elements using a custom-built machine, and have characterized them. We find that the permeability, permittivity, and chirality are all resonant in the region of 80 MHz. The chirality is so strong that it can be directly measured by observing the magnetic response to an applied electric field, and is larger than either the permeability or the permittivity. We have estimated the refractive indices from these data, and find both strong circular dichroism and a wide frequency range where the refractive index is negative.

  20. Wet Refractivity Tomography with an hnproved Kalman-Filter Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An improved retrieval method, which uses the solution with a Gaussian constraint as the initial state variables for the Kalman Filtering (KF) method, was developed to retrieve the wet refractivity profiles from slant wet delays (SWD) extracted by the double-differenced (DD) GPS method. The accuracy of the GPS-derived SWDs is also tested in this study against the measurements of a water vapor radiometer (WVR) and a weather model. It is concluded that the GPS-derived SWDs have similar accuracy to those measured with WVR and are much higher in quality than those derived from the weather model used. The developed method is used to retrieve the 3D wet refractivity distribution in the Hong Kong region. The retrieved profiles agree well with the radiosonde observations, with a difference of about 4 mm km-1 in the low levels. The accurate profiles obtained with this method are applicable in a number of meteorological applications.

  1. Discriminating Between Cloudy, Hazy and Clearsky Exoplanets Using Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy and clearsky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detectio...

  2. Interstellar Refractive Scintillation and Intraday Polarization Angle Swings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Jie Qian; Xi-Zhen Zhang; A. Kraus

    2005-01-01

    Intraday polarization angle swings of ~180° observed in two sources (QSO 0917+624 and QSO 1150+812) are discussed in the framework of refractive interstellar scintillation by a continuous interstellar medium. Model-fits to the I-,Q- and U- light curves were made for both sources. It is shown that for the case of 0917+624 both the intraday intensity variations and the polarization angle swing of ~180° could be explained consistently in terms of a four-component model, which comprises one steady and two scintillating polarized components and one further non-polarized scintillating component. The polarization angle swing of ~180° observed in 1150+812, which occurred when the polarized flux density was almost constant, could not be explained in terms of refractive scintillation by a continuous medium and might be due to other mechanisms (e.g., scintillation by interstellar clouds).

  3. Perfect control of reflection and refraction using spatially dispersive metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Asadchy, V S; Tcvetkova, S N; Díaz-Rubio, A; Ra'di, Y; Tretyakov, S A

    2016-01-01

    Non-uniform metasurfaces (electrically thin composite layers) can be used for shaping refracted and reflected electromagnetic waves. However, known design approaches based on the generalized refraction and reflection laws do not allow realization of perfectly performing devices: there are always some parasitic reflections into undesired directions. In this paper we introduce and discuss a general approach to the synthesis of metasurfaces for full control of transmitted and reflected fields and show that perfect performance can be realized. The method is based on the use of an equivalent impedance matrix model which connects the tangential field components at the two sides on the metasurface. With this approach we are able to understand what physical properties of the metasurface are needed in order to perfectly realize the desired response. Furthermore, we determine the required polarizabilities of the metasurface unit cells and discuss suitable cell structures. It appears that only spatially dispersive metas...

  4. Refractive Index Compensation in Over-Determined Interferometric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Buchta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an interferometric technique based on a differential interferometry setup for measurement under atmospheric conditions. The key limiting factor in any interferometric dimensional measurement are fluctuations of the refractive index of air representing a dominating source of uncertainty when evaluated indirectly from the physical parameters of the atmosphere. Our proposal is based on the concept of an over-determined interferometric setup where a reference length is derived from a mechanical frame made from a material with a very low thermal coefficient. The technique allows one to track the variations of the refractive index of air on-line directly in the line of the measuring beam and to compensate for the fluctuations. The optical setup consists of three interferometers sharing the same beam path where two measure differentially the displacement while the third evaluates the changes in the measuring range, acting as a tracking refractometer. The principle is demonstrated in an experimental setup.

  5. Correction of group refraction index based on pulse trains interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Aketagawa, Masato

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new concept for an unconventional type of two-color method for interferometry-based length measurements based on the adjacent pulse repetition interval length (APRIL), which is the physical length associated with the pulse repetition period. We demonstrate by numerical simulations that if the wavelength-based two-color method can eliminate the inhomogeneous disturbance of effects caused by the phase refractive index, then the APRIL-based two-color method can eliminate the air turbulence of errors induced by the group refractive index. We show that our analysis will benefit the pulse-laser-based two-color method, which secures traceability to the definition of the meter.

  6. Atmospheric refractivity effects on mid-infrared ELT adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kendrew, S; Mathar, R J; Stuik, R; Hippler, S; Brandl, B

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the effect of atmospheric dispersion on the performance of a mid-infrared adaptive optics assisted instrument on an extremely large telescope (ELT). Dispersion and atmospheric chromaticity is generally considered to be negligible in this wavelength regime. It is shown here, however, that with the much-reduced diffraction limit size on an ELT and the need for diffraction-limited performance, refractivity phenomena should be carefully considered in the design and operation of such an instrument. We include an overview of the theory of refractivity, and the influence of infrared resonances caused by the presence of water vapour and other constituents in the atmosphere. `Traditional' atmospheric dispersion is likely to cause a loss of Strehl only at the shortest wavelengths (L-band). A more likely source of error is the difference in wavelengths at which the wavefront is sensed and corrected, leading to pointing offsets between wavefront sensor and science instrument that evolve with time over a long e...

  7. Refractive errors and visual anomalies in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, J; Koslowe, K

    2001-07-01

    A comparatively high incidence of ocular and orbital abnormalities has been reported in persons with Down syndrome. Eighty six children (50% male, 50% female) with Down syndrome in several institutions for individuals with learning difficulties (age range 5-18 years, mean 12.5) were examined for visual impairment in order to relate the ocular impairment to the level of learning difficulty. 6% had mild, 7% moderate, 45% severe and 42% profound learning difficulty. 9% of the children had no refractive errors. A significant (P ocular pathology with increasing amount of learning difficulty. On the other hand no correlation was found between refractive errors and the level of learning difficulty. Due to the significant number of ocular disorders found it is recommended that all children with Down syndrome should have an eye examination during the first six months of life and annually thereafter.

  8. Optofluidic refractive index sensor based on partial reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Zhang; Wang, Yichuan; Ye, Meiying; Fang, Wei; Tong, Limin

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a novel optofluidic refractive index (RI) sensor with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range based on partial reflection. Benefited from the divergent incident light and the output fibers with different tilting angles, we have achieved highly sensitive RI sensing in a wide range from 1.33 to 1.37. To investigate the effectiveness of this sensor, we perform a measurement of RI with a resolution of ca. 5.0×10-5 refractive index unit (RIU) for ethylene glycol solutions. Also, we have measured a series of liquid solutions by using different output fibers, achieving a resolution of ca. 0.52 mg/mL for cane surge. The optofluidic RI sensor takes advantage of the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, small footprint, and low sample consumption, as well as the efficient fluidic sample delivery, making it useful for applications in the food industry.

  9. Measurements of complex refractive indices of photoactive yellow protein

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, KyeoReh; Jung, JaeHwang; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    A novel optical technique for measuring the complex refractive index (CRI) of photoactive proteins over the wide range of visible wavelengths is presented. Employing quantitative phase microscopy equipped with a wavelength swept source, optical fields transmitted from a solution of photoactive proteins were precisely measured, from which the CRIs of the photoactive proteins were retrieved with the Fourier light scattering technique. Using the present method, both the real and imaginary RIs of a photoactive yellow protein (PYP) solution were precisely measured over a broad wavelength range (461 - 582 nm). The internal population of the ground and excited states were switched by blue light excitation (445 nm center wavelength), and the broadband refractive index increments of each state were measured. The significant CRI deviation between in the presence and absence of the blue excitation was quantified and explained based on the Kramers-Kronig relations.

  10. Image distortion due to refraction by planar surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arizaga, R; Cap, N; Rabal, H; Trivi, M [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC) and OPTIMO Dto de Ciencias Basicas, Fac. de Ingenieria UNLP, PO Box 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-01-15

    The term 'apparent depth' is commonly treated in textbooks as an issue easily understandable from the point of view of paraxial optical geometrical optics. Nevertheless, everyday life tells us that most of the time the observation of objects immersed in water is made under a great range of visual angles where the paraxial approximation is not valid. Here we developed a non-paraxial treatment to calculate the position and shape of the image of objects immersed in liquids of different refractive indices. The approach was focused on the parametric positions of the images of a single point at different viewing angles. Then we calculated how the image of an extended object is distorted. By using the Matlab software, it is possible to visualize the images for different geometrical conditions. We also include the analysis for refractive index with negative values as is the case of metamaterials.

  11. Cataract Surgery with a Refractive Corneal Inlay in Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Stojanovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present a case of cataract surgery performed in a patient with a refractive corneal inlay in place. Methods. A 48-year-old female patient presented to our institute with bilateral cataract. The patient had undergone refractive corneal inlay implantation three years ago in her right, nondominant eye for presbyopia correction. Biometry and intraocular lens (IOL power calculation were performed without removing the inlay. Phacoemulsification and IOL insertion were carried out in both eyes in a usual manner. Results. On day one postoperatively, the patient achieved binocular uncorrected distance visual acuity 20/20 and uncorrected near visual acuity J1. The vision remained stable during the one-year follow-up period. Conclusion. Cataract surgery was performed in a standard manner in a patient with Presbia Microlens corneal inlay in place. Visual outcomes for both near and distance vision were satisfactory.

  12. A surface refractive index scanning system and method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to a surface refractive index scanning system for characterization of a sample. The system comprises a grating device for holding or receiving the sample, the device comprising at least a first grating region having a first grating width along a transverse direction, and a s......The invention relates to a surface refractive index scanning system for characterization of a sample. The system comprises a grating device for holding or receiving the sample, the device comprising at least a first grating region having a first grating width along a transverse direction...... a grating period Λ2 in the longitudinal direction, where the longitudinal direction is orthogonal to the transverse direction. A grating period spacing ΔΛ = Λ1 - Λ2 is finite. Further, the first and second grating periods are chosen to provide optical resonances for light respectively in a first...

  13. Resolving the wave vector in negative refractive index media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, S Anantha; Martin, Olivier J F

    2005-10-01

    We address the general issue of resolving the wave vector in complex electromagnetic media including negative refractive media. This requires us to make a physical choice of the sign of a square root imposed merely by conditions of causality. By considering the analytic behavior of the wave vector in the complex plane, it is shown that there are a total of eight physically distinct cases in the four quadrants of two Riemann sheets.

  14. Refraction data survey: 2nd generation correlation of myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Peter R; Medina, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The objective herein is to provide refraction data, myopia progression rate, prevalence, and 1st and 2nd generation correlations, relevant to whether myopia is random or inherited. First- and second-generation ocular refraction data are assembled from N = 34 families, average of 2.8 children per family. From this group, data are available from N = 165 subjects. Inter-generation regressions are performed on all the data sets, including correlation coefficient r, and myopia prevalence [%]. Prevalence of myopia is [M] = 38.5 %. Prevalence of high myopes with |R| >6 D is [M-] = 20.5 %. Average refraction is  = -1.84 D ± 3.22 (N = 165). For the high myopes, |R| >6 D, prevalence for the parents is [M-] = 25 %, for the 2nd generation [M-] = 16.5 %. Average myopia level for the high myopes, both generations, is  = -7.52 D ± 1.31 D (N = 33). Regression parameters are calculated for all the data sets, yielding correlation coefficients in the range r = 0.48-0.72 for some groups of myopes and high myopes, fathers to daughters, and mothers to sons. Also of interest, some categories show essentially no correlation, -0.20 refractive errors occur randomly. Time series results show myopia diopter rates = -0.50 D/year.

  15. Peripheral refraction with eye and head rotation with contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela P; Neves, Helena I F; Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel; Queirós, António; Fernandes, Paulo R B; González-Méijome, José M

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of eye and head rotation in the measurement of peripheral refraction with an open-field autorefractometer in myopic eyes wearing two different center-distance designs of multifocal contact lenses (MFCLs). Nineteen right eyes from 19 myopic patients (average central M ± SD = -2.67 ± 1.66 D) aged 20-27 years (mean ± SD = 23.2 ± 3.3 years) were evaluated using a Grand-Seiko autorefractometer. Patients were fitted with one multifocal aspheric center-distance contact lens (Biofinity Multifocal D(®)) and with one multi-concentric MFCL (Acuvue Oasys for Presbyopia). Axial and peripheral refraction were evaluated by eye rotation and by head rotation under naked eye condition and with each MFCL fitted randomly and in independent sessions. For the naked eye, refractive pattern (M, J0 and J45) across the central 60° of the horizontal visual field values did not show significant changes measured by rotating the eye or rotating the head (p > 0.05). Similar results were obtained wearing the Biofinity D, for both testing methods, no obtaining significant differences to M, J0 and J45 values (p > 0.05). For Acuvue Oasys for presbyopia, also no differences were found when comparing measurements obtained by eye and head rotation (p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis did not showed a significant interaction between testing method and lens type neither with measuring locations (MANOVA, p > 0.05). There were significant differences in M and J0 values between naked eyes and each MFCL. Measurements of peripheral refraction by rotating the eye or rotating the head in myopic patients wearing dominant design or multi-concentric multifocal silicone hydrogel contact lens are comparable. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A parallel architecture for interactively rendering scattering and refraction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Daniele; Hakke-Patil, Ajit; Banterle, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Marco; Ganovelli, Fabio; Pattanaik, Sumanta; Scopigno, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    A new method for interactive rendering of complex lighting effects combines two algorithms. The first performs accurate ray tracing in heterogeneous refractive media to compute high-frequency phenomena. The second applies lattice-Boltzmann lighting to account for low-frequency multiple-scattering effects. The two algorithms execute in parallel on modern graphics hardware. This article includes a video animation of the authors' real-time algorithm rendering a variety of scenes.

  17. Fiber Optic-Based Refractive Index Sensing at INESC Porto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Pedro A. S.; Silva, Susana O.; Gouveia, Carlos; Tafulo, Paula; Coelho, Luis; Caldas, Paulo; Viegas, Diana; Rego, Gaspar; Baptista, José M.; Santos, José L.; Frazão, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    A review of refractive index measurement based on different types of optical fiber sensor configurations and techniques is presented. It addresses the main developments in the area, with particular focus on results obtained at INESC Porto, Portugal. The optical fiber sensing structures studied include those based on Bragg and long period gratings, on micro-interferometers, on plasmonic effects in fibers and on multimode interference in a large spectrum of standard and microstructured optical fibers. PMID:22969405

  18. Simultaneous Phacoemulsification and Graft Refractive Surgery in Penetrating Keratoplasty Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Sepehr; Zare, Mohammad; Einollahi, Bahram

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To report outcomes of graft refractive surgery (GRS) along with clear-cornea phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) eyes. Methods. Fourteen eyes of 13 patients who had received PKP underwent simultaneous GRS (relaxing incisions with or without counter-quadrant compression sutures) and clear-cornea phacoemulsification with IOL implantation. To calculate IOL power, preoperative keratometry readings and the SRK-T formula were used. Results. Mean patient age and follow-up period were 50.5 ± 14.4 years and 14.6 ± 7.1 months, respectively. A significant increase was observed in best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (from 0.55 ± 0.18 logMAR to 0.33 ± 0.18 logMAR, P = 0.001). There was a significant decrease in vector keratometric astigmatism by 6.22 D (P = 0.03). Spherical equivalent refraction was reduced from −3.31 ± 3.96 D to −1.69 ± 2.38 D (P = 0.02) which did not significantly differ from the target refraction (−0.76 ± 0.14 D, P = 0.20). No complications developed and all the grafts remained clear at the final examination. Conclusion. Simultaneous phacoemulsification and GRS is a safe and effective method to address post-PKP astigmatism and lens opacity. IOL power can be calculated from preoperative keratometry readings with an acceptable accuracy. However, patients should be informed about the possibility of high refractive errors postoperatively. PMID:24527227

  19. A RICH with aerogel: a study of refractive index uniformity

    CERN Document Server

    Alemi, M; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Perego, D L; Easo, S

    2004-01-01

    The use of aerogel as a radiator in the RICH detectors of LHCb is a challenge due to the hot environment of the hadron collider LHC. Large size tiles of silica aerogel were recently produced with unprecedented optical quality for such dimensions. Results of laboratory measurements and beam tests are briefly reported. A description of a method to measure the uniformity of the index of refraction within the tile is given.

  20. Focusing on Plates: Controlling Guided Waves using Negative Refraction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Elastic waves are guided along finite structures such as cylinders, plates, or rods through reflection, refraction, and mode conversion at the interfaces. Such wave propagation is ubiquitous in the world around us, and studies of elastic waveguides first emerged in the later part of the 19th century. Early work on elastic waveguides revealed the presence of backward propagating waves, in which the phase velocity and group velocity are anti-parallel. While backward wave propagation exists natu...

  1. Measurement of the Kerr nonlinear refractive index of Cs vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Araújo, Michelle O; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; de Silans, Thierry Passerat; Castro, Romeu; Moretti, Danieverton

    2014-01-01

    Atomic vapors are systems well suited for nonlinear optics studies but very few direct measurements of their nonlinear refractive index have been reported. Here we use the z-scan technique to measure the Kerr coefficient, $n_2$, for a Cs vapor. Our results are analyzed through a four-level model, and we show that coherence between excited levels as well as cross-population effects contribute to the Kerr-nonlinearity.

  2. Tropospheric Refraction Modeling Using Ray-Tracing and Parabolic Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pechac

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Refraction phenomena that occur in the lower atmospheresignificantly influence the performance of wireless communicationsystems. This paper provides an overview of corresponding computationalmethods. Basic properties of the lower atmosphere are mentioned.Practical guidelines for radiowave propagation modeling in the loweratmosphere using ray-tracing and parabolic equation methods are given.In addition, a calculation of angle-of-arrival spectra is introducedfor multipath propagation simulations.

  3. Directly patternable high refractive index ferroelectric sol–gel resist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garoli, D., E-mail: denis.garoli@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 16, 16136 Genova (Italy); Della Giustina, G. [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Padova and INSTM, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The development of a ferroelectric negative tone sol–gel resist for Ultraviolet (UV) and Electron Beam (EB) lithography is presented. A new system based on Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT, with formula PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3}) was synthesized by sol–gel method. The lithographic performances were investigated and several structures spanning from the micron range down to less than 50 nm have been achieved by UV and EB lithography. The system interaction with UV light and Electron beam was thoroughly characterized by FT-IT spectroscopy. The exposed PZT was annealed at high temperatures in order to study the crystalline phase evolution, the optical constants values and stability of patterned structures. After exposure and annealing, the refractive index of the material can vary from 1.68 up to 2.33 (@400 nm), while the ferroelectric behaviour seems to be maintained after high temperature annealing. These results suggest a possible application of PZT resist not only as ferroelectric but also as nanopatternable high refractive index material. Moreover, direct nanopatterning by means of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) lithography was verified and the potentiality for the preparation of high aspect ratio hollow nanostructures will be presented. - Highlights: • A new formula directly patternable PZT high refractive index resist is presented. • The gel is sensitive to both UV and electron beam exposure. • The refractive index can vary from 1.68 up to 2.33 (@400 nm). • Direct nanopatterning by means of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) lithography was verified. • High aspect ratio hollow nanostructures will be presented.

  4. Polymer Compund Refractive Lenses for Hard X-ray Nanofocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Krywka, Christina; Last, Arndt; Marschall, Felix; Markus, Otto; Georgi, Sebastian; Mueller, Martin; Mohr, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Compound refractive lenses fabricated out of SU-8 negative photoresist have been used to generate a nanofocused, i.e. sub-μm sized X-ray focal spot at an X-ray nanodiffraction setup. X-ray microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have conceptually different demands on nanofocusing optical elements and so with the application of X-ray nanodiffraction in mind, this paper presents the results of an initial characterization of polymer lenses used as primary focusin...

  5. A STUDY ON PREVALENCE OF REFRACTIVE ERRORS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Kolli Sree Karuna

    2014-01-01

    ‘’Sarvendriya nam nayanam pradhanam” Of all the organs in the body, eyes are the most important. The blindness or defect in vision decreases the productivity of the nation in addition to increased dependability. The refractive errors in the school children throw them in to defective future. Nutrition deficiency, mental strain, wrong reading habits etc are some of the causes for this defect in these children. Vision is essential for all the children, for the academic and overal...

  6. Negative refraction and spatial echo in optical waveguide arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2013-01-01

    The special symmetry properties of the discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation allow a complete revival of the initial wavefunction. That is employed in the context of stationary propagation of light in a waveguide array. As an inverting system we propose a short array of almost isolated waveguides which cause a relative pi phase shift in the neighboring waveguides. By means of numerical simulations of the model equations we demonstrate a novel mechanism for the negative refraction of spatial solitons.

  7. Development of optical devices based on neutron refractive optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oku, T.; Morita, S.; Moriyasu, S. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (JP)] [and others

    2001-03-01

    We have been developing neutron optical devices based on neutron refractive optics, such as a neutron lens and prism to improve neutron scattering methods. Prototypes of a compound Fresnel lens, a magnetic lens and prism for neutrons have been developed. The functions of each devices were verified by experimental and numerical simulation studies, and their improvement and applications are still being investigated. The recent progress in our work is reviewed and perspective of their application to neutron scattering experiments is described. (author)

  8. Computed estimation of visual acuity after laser refractive keratectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rol, Pascal O.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Hanna, Khalil

    1991-06-01

    A number of surgical techniques has been developed to correct ametropia (refractive defaults) of the eye by changing the anterior corneal radius. Because the air-cornea interface makes up for about two-third of the refractive power of the eye, a refractive correction is obtained by a suitable photoablation of the cornea. For this purpose, e.g., an ArF excimer laser which emits a wavelength of 193 nm is being used. After a mechanical removal of the epithelium, the Bowman's layer and the corneal stroma are photoablated on typically 50% of the central surface of the cornea with various precomputed shapes. Methods using a variable diaphragm1 or a scanning slit2 are being utilized. After regrowth of the epithelium, a smooth interface with air develops itself, which can be attributed to a mechanical equilibration. Yet, SEM studies have shown that with such kind of treatments, irregularities can remain in the new stromal surface (Fig. 1). A possible explanation for this effect is associated with an inhomogeneous energy distribution of the laser beam profile3. To some extent, the stromal surface is equalized by the epithelial layer during healing& However, as the corneal epithelium and stroma have different refractive indices, a scatter of the incident light may result causing a haze in the cornea and a blur of the image at the retina. In such a case the resolution and the contrast performance of the eye which is expected from a successful operation, may be reduced. This study is an attempt to quantify the vision blur as a function of the deformation observed at the epithelium-stroma interface.

  9. Refraction of VHF radio waves in artificial plasma formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashirin, A. I.; Kliueva, N. M.; Mikhailik, P. P.; Chkalov, V. G.

    1991-09-01

    The defocusing refraction of VHF waves during the radio occultation of artificial plasma clouds in the ionosphere is calculated in the framework of the geometrical-optics approximation. The possibility of determining the main cloud parameters from characteristic power variations of the received radio waves in the case of a monotonic change in the sighting parameter during the experiment is demonstrated. Results of a rocket experiment implementing this method are presented.

  10. Ocular Changes during Pregnancy and Their Effects on Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    such 3,4 changes. Another study followed 51 women , sampling the refractive status by static retinoscopy 5 times during the course of pregnancy . The study...and 18 smoked . The subjects were asked whether they had experienced visual changes during the study or during previous pregnancies . Five reported...to examine pregnant women or to change their prescriptions on the basis of data obtained during pregnancy . The answers to these questions seem quite

  11. Origami with negative refractive index to generate super-lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenneau, Fanny; Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Guenneau, Sebastien; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2014-10-08

    Negative refractive index materials (NRIM) enable unique effects including superlenses with a high degree of sub-wavelength image resolution, a capability that stems from the ability of NRIM to support a host of surface plasmon states. Using a generalized lens theorem and the powerful tools of transformational optics, a variety of focusing configurations involving complementary positive and negative refractive index media can be generated. A paradigm of such complementary media are checkerboards that consist of alternating cells of positive and negative refractive index, and are associated with very singular electromagnetics. We present here a variety of multi-scale checkerboard lenses that we call origami lenses and investigate their electromagnetic properties both theoretically and computationally. Some of these meta-structures in the plane display thin bridges of complementary media, and this highly enhances their plasmonic response. We demonstrate the design of three-dimensional checkerboard meta-structures of complementary media using transformational optics to map the checkerboard onto three-dimensional corner lenses, the only restriction being that the corresponding unfolded structures in the plane are constrained by the four color-map theorem.

  12. Focusing on Plates: Controlling Guided Waves using Negative Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Franck D.; Murray, Todd W.; Prada, Claire

    2015-06-01

    Elastic waves are guided along finite structures such as cylinders, plates, or rods through reflection, refraction, and mode conversion at the interfaces. Such wave propagation is ubiquitous in the world around us, and studies of elastic waveguides first emerged in the later part of the 19th century. Early work on elastic waveguides revealed the presence of backward propagating waves, in which the phase velocity and group velocity are anti-parallel. While backward wave propagation exists naturally in very simple finite elastic media, there has been remarkably little attention paid to this phenomenon. Here we report the development of a tunable acoustic lens in an isotropic elastic plate showing negative refraction over a finite acoustic frequency bandwidth. As compared to engineered acoustic materials such as phononic crystals and metamaterials, the design of the acoustic lens is very simple, with negative refraction obtained through thickness changes rather than internal periodicity or sub-wavelength resonant structures. A new class of acoustic devices, including resonators, filters, lenses, and cloaks, may be possible through topography optimization of elastic waveguide structures to exploit the unique properties of backward waves.

  13. Refraction and scattering of sound by a shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The angle and amplitude changes for acoustic waves refracted by a circular open jet shear layer were determined. The generalized refraction theory was assessed experimentally for on axis and off axis acoustic source locations as source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz and free stream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. Angle and amplitude changes across the shear layer show good agreement with theory. Experiments confirm that the refraction theory is independent of shear layer thickness, acoustic source frequency, and source type. A generalized theory is, thus, available for correcting far field noise data acquired in open jet test facilities. The effect of discrete tone scattering by the open jet turbulent shear layer was also studied. Scattering effects were investigated over the same Mach number range as frequency varied from 5 kHz to 15 kHz. Attenuation of discrete tone amplitude and tone broadening were measured as a function of acoustic source position and radiation angle. Scattering was found to be stronger at angles close to the open jet axis than at 90 deg, and becomes stronger as the acoustic source position shifts downstream. A scattering analysis provided an estimate of the onset of discrete tone scattering.

  14. Refraction Correction in 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first correction of refraction in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging using an iterative approach that traces propagation paths through a two-layer planar tissue model, applying Snell’s law in 3D. This approach is applied to real-time 3D transcranial ultrasound imaging by precomputing delays offline for several skull thicknesses, allowing the user to switch between three sets of delays for phased array imaging at the push of a button. Simulations indicate that refraction correction may be expected to increase sensitivity, reduce beam steering errors, and partially restore lost spatial resolution, with the greatest improvements occurring at the largest steering angles. Distorted images of cylindrical lesions were created by imaging through an acrylic plate in a tissue-mimicking phantom. As a result of correcting for refraction, lesions were restored to 93.6% of their original diameter in the lateral direction and 98.1% of their original shape along the long axis of the cylinders. In imaging two healthy volunteers, the mean brightness increased by 8.3% and showed no spatial dependency. PMID:24275538

  15. The effect of refractive blur on postural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vijay; Buckley, John; Scally, Andy; Elliott, David B

    2002-11-01

    The effect of refractive blur upon postural stability was investigated under three conditions: normal standing, standing with input from the somatosensory system disrupted and standing with input from the somatosensory and vestibular systems disrupted. Standing stability was assessed using the centre of pressure (COP) signal from force plate data in four young subjects (mean 23.9+/-3.1 years) and five repeated sets of measurements were taken. The subjects looked straight ahead at a horizontal and vertical square wave pattern of 2.5 cycles (degree)(-1). Under each of the three test conditions, standing stability was measured with the optimal refractive correction and under binocular blur levels of 0, + 1, + 2, + 4, and + 8 D and with eyes closed. In the normal standing condition, dioptric blur had only a mild effect on postural stability. However refractive blur produced large increases in postural instability when input from one or both of the other two sensory systems were disrupted. We hypothesized that dioptric blur would have an even great effect on postural stability if the visual target used was of higher spatial frequency. This was confirmed by repeated measurements on one subject using a target of 8 cycles (degree)(-1). The study highlights the possible importance of an optimal correction to postural stability, particular in situations (or people) where input from the somatosensory and/or vestibular systems are disrupted, and where the visual surrounds are of high spatial frequency.

  16. Piggybacking intraocular implants to correct pseudophakic refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, J L; Sanders, V; Van der Karr, M; Raanan, M G

    1999-01-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of implanting a second intraocular lens (IOL) to correct pseudophakic refractive error. Noncomparative, prospective, consecutive case series. Eight eyes of eight normal pseudophakes and seven eyes of seven postpenetrating keratoplasty (PK) pseudophakes were included in the study. A second intraocular lens (IOL) was implanted anterior to the first in each eye in the study. Efficacy was determined based on the achieved refractive correction and Snellen uncorrected visual acuity measurements. Safety was determined based on loss of best-corrected visual acuity and operative and postoperative complications. Before surgery, spherical equivalents ranged from -5.12 diopters (D) to 7.5 D, with a mean absolute deviation from emmetropia of 3.38 D (1.62). After surgery, spherical equivalents ranged from -2.75 D to 0.5 D, with a mean absolute deviation from emmetropia of 1.21 D (0.90). Before surgery, only 7% of patients had 20/40 or better uncorrected vision, whereas after surgery, 50% had that level of vision. Implanting a second IOL is a viable option for correcting pseudophakic refractive error.

  17. Prevalence of refractive errors in Möbius sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Fialho Cronemberger

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the prevalence of refractive errors in Möbius sequence. METHODS: This study was carried out during the Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Möbius Society in November 2008. Forty-four patients diagnosed with the Möbius sequence were submitted to a comprehensive assessment, on the following specialties: ophthalmology, neurology, genetics, psychiatry, psychology and dentistry. Forty-three patients were cooperative and able to undertake the ophthalmological examination. Twenty-two (51.2 % were male and 21 (48.8% were female. The average age was 8.3 years (from 2 to 17 years. The visual acuity was evaluated using a retro-illuminated logMAR chart in cooperative patients. All children were submitted to exams on ocular motility, cyclopegic refraction, and fundus examination. RESULTS: From the total of 85 eyes, using the spherical equivalent, the major of the eyes (57.6% were emmetropics (>-0.50 D and <+2.00 D. The prevalence of astigmatism greater than or equal to 0.75 D was 40%. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of refractive errors, by the spherical equivalent, was 42.4% in this studied group.

  18. A new iterative algorithm to reconstruct the refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y J; Zhu, P P; Chen, B; Wang, J Y; Yuan, Q X; Huang, W X; Shu, H; Li, E R; Liu, X S; Zhang, K; Ming, H; Wu, Z Y

    2007-06-21

    The latest developments in x-ray imaging are associated with techniques based on the phase contrast. However, the image reconstruction procedures demand significant improvements of the traditional methods, and/or new algorithms have to be introduced to take advantage of the high contrast and sensitivity of the new experimental techniques. In this letter, an improved iterative reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum likelihood expectation maximization technique is presented and discussed in order to reconstruct the distribution of the refractive index from data collected by an analyzer-based imaging setup. The technique considered probes the partial derivative of the refractive index with respect to an axis lying in the meridional plane and perpendicular to the propagation direction. Computer simulations confirm the reliability of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the comparison between an analytical reconstruction algorithm and the iterative method has been also discussed together with the convergent characteristic of this latter algorithm. Finally, we will show how the proposed algorithm may be applied to reconstruct the distribution of the refractive index of an epoxy cylinder containing small air bubbles of about 300 micro of diameter.

  19. 3D refractive index measurements of special optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cheng; Huang, Su-Juan; Miao, Zhuang; Chang, Zheng; Zeng, Jun-Zhang; Wang, Ting-Yun

    2016-09-01

    A digital holographic microscopic chromatography-based approach with considerably improved accuracy, simplified configuration and performance stability is proposed to measure three dimensional refractive index of special optical fibers. Based on the approach, a measurement system is established incorporating a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer and lab-developed supporting software for data processing. In the system, a phase projection distribution of an optical fiber is utilized to obtain an optimal digital hologram recorded by a CCD, and then an angular spectrum theory-based algorithm is adopted to extract the phase distribution information of an object wave. The rotation of the optic fiber enables the experimental measurements of multi-angle phase information. Based on the filtered back projection algorithm, a 3D refraction index of the optical fiber is thus obtained at high accuracy. To evaluate the proposed approach, both PANDA fibers and special elliptical optical fiber are considered in the system. The results measured in PANDA fibers agree well with those measured using S14 Refractive Index Profiler, which is, however, not suitable for measuring the property of a special elliptical fiber.

  20. Deep-water bedforms induced by refracting Internal Solitary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, Federico; Droghei, Riccardo; Casalbore, Daniele; Martorelli, Eleonora; Mosetti, Renzo; Sannino, Gianmaria; Santoleri, Rosalia; Latino Chiocci, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Subaqueous bedforms (or sand waves) are typically observed in those environments that are exposed to strong currents, characterized by a dominant unidirectional flow. However, sand-wave fields may be also observed in marine environments where no such current exists; the physical processes driving their formation are enigmatic or not well understood. We propose that internal solitary waves (ISWs), induced by tides, can produce an effective, unidirectional boundary flow filed that forms asymmetric sand waves. We test this idea by examining a sand-wave field off the Messina Strait, where we hypothesize that ISWs formed at the interface between intermediate and surface waters are refracted by topography. Hence, we argue that the deflected pattern (i.e., the depth-dependent orientation) of the sand-wave field is due to refraction of such ISWs. Combining field observations and numerical modelling, we show that ISWs can account for three key features: ISWs produce fluid velocities capable of mobilizing bottom sediments; the predicted refraction pattern resulting from the interaction of ISWs with bottom topography matches the observed deflection of the sand waves; and predicted migration rates of sand waves match empirical estimates. This work shows how ISWs may contribute to sculpting the structure of continental margins and it represents a promising link between the geological and oceanographic communities.

  1. Observation of negative refraction of Dirac fermions in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Park, Geon-Hyoung; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-11-01

    Half a century ago, Veselago proposed `left-handed’ materials with negative permittivity and permeability, in which waves propagate with phase and group velocities in opposite directions. Significant work has been undertaken to attain this left-handed response, such as establishing a negative refractive index in so-called metamaterials, which consist of periodic sub-wavelength structures. However, an electronic counterpart has not been demonstrated owing to difficulties in creating repeated structures smaller than the electronic Fermi wavelength of the order ~10 nm. Here, without needing to engineer sub-wavelength structures, we demonstrate negative refractive behaviour of Dirac fermions in graphene, exploiting its unique relativistic band structure. Analysis of both electron focusing through an n-p-n flat lens and negative refraction across n-p junctions confirms left-handed behaviour in the electronic system. This approach to electronic optics is of particular relevance to the on-going efforts to develop novel quantum devices with emerging layered materials.

  2. Comet plasma densities deduced from refraction of occulted radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.S. (Commonwealth Department of Science, Ionospheric Prediction Service, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia); Nelson, G.J. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Div. of Radiophysics, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia)

    1979-04-01

    Observations of the occultation of radio sources by comet plasma tails are used to derive the electron density and density gradients in the tails. Occultations of source Culgoora-1 0300+16 by Comet Kohoutek and of Culgoora-1 2313-14 by Comet West were measured by radioheliograph at 80 MHz. After corrections for ionospheric refraction, a 2 arcmin anomaly was observed in the declination of 0300+16, attributed to refraction by the tail of Comet Kohoutek, while none was observed for Comet West. The maximum electron density in the tail of Comet Kohoutek is calculated to be 2 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, while that of Comet West is 5 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm, with density gradients of about 0.05 per cu cm per km. The direction of refraction observed suggests that the tail of Kohoutek is either highly asymmetric about its axis or has the form of a hollow, cylindrical plasma sheath. The high electron densities observed in Kohoutek may indicate the presence of undetected ion species or a low ionization loss rate.

  3. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  4. Towards a Negative Refractive Index in an Atomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Zach; Brewer, Nick; Yavuz, Deniz

    2014-05-01

    The goal of our experiments is to obtain a negative index of refraction in the optical region of the spectrum using an atomic system. The concept of negative refraction, which was first predicted by Veselago more than four decades ago, has recently emerged as a very exciting field of science. Negative index materials exhibit many seemingly strange properties such as electromagnetic vectors forming a left-handed triad. A key potential application for these materials was discovered in 2000 when Pendry predicted that a slab with a negative refractive index can image objects with a resolution far better than the diffraction limit. Thus far, research in negative index materials has primarily focused on meta-materials. The fixed response and often large absorption of these engineered materials motivates our efforts to work in an atomic system. An atomic media offers the potential to be actively modified, for example by changing laser parameters, and can be tuned to cancel absorption. A doped crystal allows for high atomic densities compared to other atomic systems. So far we have identified a transition in such a material, Eu:YSO, as a candidate for these experiments and are performing spectroscopy on this material.

  5. Differential measurement of atmospheric refraction with a telescope with double fields of view

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yong; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Luo, Hao; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    For the sake of complete theoretical research of atmospheric refraction, the atmospheric refraction under the condition of lower angles of elevation is still worthy to be analyzed and explored. In some engineering applications, the objects with larger zenith distance must be observed sometimes. Carrying out observational research of the atmospheric refraction at lower angles of elevation has an important significance. It has been considered difficult to measure the atmospheric refraction at lower angles of elevation. A new idea for determining atmospheric refraction by utilizing differential measurement with double fields of view is proposed. Taking the observational principle of HIPPARCOS satellite as a reference, a schematic prototype with double fields of view was developed. In August of 2013, experimental observations were carried out and the atmospheric refractions at lower angles of elevation can be obtained by the schematic prototype. The measured value of the atmospheric refraction at the zenith dista...

  6. Virtual and super - virtual refraction method: Application to synthetic data and 2012 of Karangsambung survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Adisatrio, Philipus Ronnie

    2013-09-01

    Seismic refraction survey is one of geophysical method useful for imaging earth interior, definitely for imaging near surface. One of the common problems in seismic refraction survey is weak amplitude due to attenuations at far offset. This phenomenon will make it difficult to pick first refraction arrival, hence make it challenging to produce the near surface image. Seismic interferometry is a new technique to manipulate seismic trace for obtaining Green's function from a pair of receiver. One of its uses is for improving first refraction arrival quality at far offset. This research shows that we could estimate physical properties such as seismic velocity and thickness from virtual refraction processing. Also, virtual refraction could enhance the far offset signal amplitude since there is stacking procedure involved in it. Our results show super - virtual refraction processing produces seismic image which has higher signal-to-noise ratio than its raw seismic image. In the end, the numbers of reliable first arrival picks are also increased.

  7. Material Made of Artificial Molecules and Its Refraction Behavior under Microwave

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Focal-plane imaging with microwave and millimeter wave has many potential applications. The bad resolution is a main shortcoming of this technique at present. In this paper, influence of frequency of electromagnetic wave on the refractive energy is analyzed. According to the refractive mechanism of electromagnetic induction, the principle for designing artificial materials with enough refractive ability is proposed. The material of artificial molecules is fabricated with cage-shaped granules of conductor (CGC). The refractive index of CGC material to microwave was measured by assembling CGC prism with PS (polystyrene) prism or SGC (solid granule of conductor) prism. The assemblies greatly eliminate displacement of the outgoing microwave caused by diffraction. This is a key point to achieve direct measurement of the refractive index under the microwave. CGC material shows a considerable refractive ability. SGC material and PS show little refractive ability. The results are useful in promoting image technique o...

  8. Comparison of the VISX wavescan and OPD-scan III with the subjective refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, R; Long, K-L; Wu, X-M; Li, Q-D

    2016-07-01

    To compare the refractive errors measured by the VISX WaveScan, OPD-Scan III and the subjective refraction. The optometry accuracy of computer operated aberrometer used before refractive surgery has been debatable. Hence, a clear study on the role of such automated equipment in optometry is the need of the hour as compared to subjective refraction. Seventy-six patients (152 eyes) were recruited from January 2013 to December 2013. All patients were measured with subjective refraction by the phoropter (NIDEK, RT-5100), objective refraction by the WaveScan (AMO Company, USA), OPD-Scan III (Nidek Technologies, Japan). The sphere, cylinder, axis of the three methods were compared and analyzed. The diopter of sphere power measured by WaveScan was lower than that of the subjective refraction and the difference was 0.13 ± 0. 30D (t = 3. 753, p refraction (p >0. 05). The value of the difference between WaveScan and subjective refraction was 5.87°±6.19°on average, while the difference between OPD-Scan III and subjective refraction was 3.82°±3.95°on average. The differences between the two were statistically significant (t =2. 817, p =0. 006). The results of sphere and cylinder measured by WaveScan and subjective refraction were different. As the latest integrated equipment, the Nidek OPD-Scan III gives a more accurate measurement of objective refraction when compared with subjective refraction. The latest Nidek OPD-Scan III may prove to be an useful tool for preoperative optometry deviation based on objective refraction.

  9. Heritability of peripheral refraction in Chinese children and adolescents: the Guangzhou Twin Eye study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaohu; Lin, Zhi; Huang, Qunxiao; Zheng, Yingfeng; Congdon, Nathan; He, Mingguang

    2012-01-10

    To estimate the heritability of peripheral refraction in Chinese children and adolescents. The authors examined 72 monozygotic (MZ) twins and 48 dizygotic (DZ) twins aged 8 to 20 years from a population-based twin registry. Temporal and nasal peripheral refraction, each 40° from the visual axis, and axial refraction were measured using an autorefractor. Relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) was defined as the peripheral refraction minus the axial refraction. Heritability was assessed by structural equation modeling after adjustment for age and sex. The mean and SD of temporal refraction (T(40)), nasal refraction (N(40)), RPRE-T(40), RPRE-N(40), and T(40)-N(40) asymmetry were -0.27 ± 2.0 D, 0.36 ± 2.19 D, 1.18 ± 1.39 D, 1.80 ± 1.69 D, and -0.62 ± 1.58 D, respectively. The intraclass correlations for T(40) refraction, N(40) refraction, RPRE-T(40), RPRE-N(40), and T(40)-N(40) asymmetry were 0.87, 0.83, 0.65, 0.74, and 0.58 for MZ pairs and 0.49, 0.42, 0.30, 0.41, and 0.32 for DZ pairs, respectively. A model with additive genetic and unique environmental effects was the most parsimonious, with heritability values estimated as 0.84, 0.76, 0.63, 0.70, and 0.55, respectively, for the peripheral refractive parameters. Additive genetic effects appear to explain most of the variance in peripheral refraction and relative peripheral refraction when adjusting for the effects of axial refraction.

  10. Polymeric nanolayered gradient refractive index lenses: technology review and introduction of spherical gradient refractive index ball lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shanzuo; Yin, Kezhen; Mackey, Matthew; Brister, Aaron; Ponting, Michael; Baer, Eric

    2013-11-01

    A nanolayered polymer films approach to designing and fabricating gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses with designer refractive index distribution profiles and an independently prescribed lens surface geometry have been demonstrated to produce a new class of optics. This approach utilized nanolayered polymer materials, constructed with polymethylmethacrylate and a styrene-co-acrylonitrile copolymer with a tailorable refractive index intermediate to bulk materials, to fabricate discrete GRIN profile materials. A process to fabricate nanolayered polymer GRIN optics from these materials through thermoforming and finishing steps is reviewed. A collection of technology-demonstrating previously reported nanolayered GRIN case studies is presented that include: (1) the optical performance of a f/# 2.25 spherical GRIN plano-convex singlet with one quarter (2) the weight of a similar BK7 lens and a bio-inspired aspheric human eye GRIN lens. Original research on the fabrication and characterization of a Luneburg inspired GRIN ball lens is presented as a developing application of the nanolayered polymer technology.

  11. Investigative Studies of Refractive Indices of Liquids and a Demonstration of Refraction by the Use of a Laser Pointer and a Lazy Susan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu Ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2008-01-01

    We describe the design of a simple homemade apparatus for the measurement of the refractive indices of liquids and demonstration of refraction. A circular transparent plastic tank and a lazy Susan are held concentrically. A laser pointer is mounted on the lazy Susan with its laser beam pointing radially through the centre of the plastic tank.…

  12. The prediction of zenith range refraction from surface measurements of meteorological parameters. [mathematical models of atmospheric refraction used to improve spacecraft tracking space navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the last two decades, increasingly sophisticated deep space missions have placed correspondingly stringent requirements on navigational accuracy. As part of the effort to increase navigational accuracy, and hence the quality of radiometric data, much effort has been expended in an attempt to understand and compute the tropospheric effect on range (and hence range rate) data. The general approach adopted has been that of computing a zenith range refraction, and then mapping this refraction to any arbitrary elevation angle via an empirically derived function of elevation. The prediction of zenith range refraction derived from surface measurements of meteorological parameters is presented. Refractivity is separated into wet (water vapor pressure) and dry (atmospheric pressure) components. The integration of dry refractivity is shown to be exact. Attempts to integrate wet refractivity directly prove ineffective; however, several empirical models developed by the author and other researchers at JPL are discussed. The best current wet refraction model is here considered to be a separate day/night model, which is proportional to surface water vapor pressure and inversely proportional to surface temperature. Methods are suggested that might improve the accuracy of the wet range refraction model.

  13. Peripheral refraction in 7- and 14-year-old children in central China: the Anyang Childhood Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Ming; Li, Si-Yuan; Liu, Luo-Ru; Zhou, Yue-Hua; Yang, Zhou; Kang, Meng-Tian; Li, He; Yang, Xiao-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Peng; Zhan, Si-Yan; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Ningli; Atchison, David A

    2015-05-01

    To determine the distribution of peripheral refraction, including astigmatism, in 7- and 14-year-old Chinese children. 2134 7-year-old and 1780 14-year-old children were measured with cycloplegic central and horizontal peripheral refraction (15° and 30° at temporal and nasal visual fields). 7- and 14-year-old children included 9 and 594, respectively, with moderate and high myopia (≤-3.0 D), 259 and 831 with low myopia (-2.99 to -0.5 D), 1207 and 305 with emmetropia (-0.49 to +1.0 D), and 659 and 50 with hyperopia (>1.0 D), respectively. Myopic children had relative peripheral hyperopia while hyperopic and emmetropic children had relative peripheral myopia, with greater changes in relative peripheral refraction occurring in the nasal than the temporal visual field. The older group had the greater relative peripheral hyperopia and higher peripheral J180. Both age groups showed positive slopes of J45 across the visual field, with greater slopes in the older group. Myopic children in mainland China have relative peripheral hyperopia while hyperopic and emmetropic children have relative peripheral myopia. Significant differences exist between 7- and 14-year-old children, with the latter showing more relative peripheral hyperopia, greater rate of change in J45 across the visual field, and higher peripheral J180. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Refractive Outcomes of Three-Port Lens-Sparing Vitrectomy for Retinopathy of Prematurity (An AOS Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the refractive outcomes of 3-port lens-sparing vitrectomy (LSV) for subtotal retinal detachments due to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Lens-sparing vitrectomy may provide superior refractive outcomes by limiting induced myopia of prematurity. Methods: This is a retrospective, consecutive, nonrandomized, comparative (paired eye) study. Entrance criteria were previous complete ablative laser for threshold ROP in both eyes, followed by LSV in one eye for stage 4A traction retinal detachment. Both eyes then maintained complete retinal attachment. Main outcome variables were cycloplegic refraction, keratometry, and biometric values for axial length, lens thickness, and anterior chamber depth. Results: Nine patients met inclusion criteria. Lens-sparing vitrectomy eyes were significantly less myopic than control eyes (−6.78 D vs −10.33 D, P < .005). The reduction in myopia in LSV eyes was predominantly due to increased anterior chamber depth (3.81 mm ± 0.217 vs 2.96 mm ± 0.232, P < .005). There was a minor contribution from reduced corneal power in LSV eyes (43.89 D ± 0.253 vs 44.20 D ± 0.265, P < .005). There was a minor negative impact from increased lens thickness in LSV eyes (3.85 ± 0.32 mm vs 3.74 ± 0.31, P < .005). There was no significant difference in axial length or lens power between the LSV and control groups. Conclusions: The data demonstrate that infant eyes undergoing 3-port LSV for stage 4A ROP develop less myopia than fellow eyes treated with laser alone. The difference is due to posterior displacement of the lens-iris diaphragm with a smaller contribution from reduced corneal power. The reduction in myopia may improve functional outcomes following 3-port LSV for stage 4A ROP. PMID:20126504

  15. Análise comparativa entre a refração clínica subjetiva e a automatizada obtida por sensor de frentes de onda Comparative analyses between clinical refraction and automatic refraction obtained through a wave front sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson de Freitas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar e comparar os resultados obtidos da refração estática clínica com a obtida por sensor de frentes de onda. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo, não seqüencial, de 279 olhos de 147 pacientes. Todos os pacientes foram examinados sob cicloplegia. Primeiro realizamos a refração clínica e a seguir a automatizada por sensor de frentes de onda. Os dados refracionais obtidos foram decompostos para análise vetorial. Foram analisados separadamente os dados de um olho por paciente e dos dois olhos. RESULTADOS: A diferença entre a refração clínica e a automatizada foi de -0,19 DE combinada com -0,06 DC no eixo de 15º para os dados de um olho por paciente e -0,17 DE combinada com -0,05 DC no eixo de 3º para todos os olhos da amostra. CONCLUSÃO: Os dados da refração clínica são comparáveis com os da refração obtida por um sensor de frentes de onda.PURPOSE: To evaluate and compare refractive errors obtained through clinical subjective and automatized wavefront refraction analyses in eyes under cycloplegia. METHODS: Prospective study of 147 patients, 279 eyes, undergoing preoperative examination for refractive surgery. Clinical subjective refraction was performed first followed by wavefront refraction. Results on astigmatism obtained from refraction were decomposed in power vectors for statistical analyses. Data were first analyzed in one eye and then in both eyes. RESULTS: The mean difference between clinical subjective refraction and automatized wavefront refraction on cycloplegic eyes was of -0.19 SD combined with -0.06 CD in the 15º axis for data in one eye, and -0.17 SD combined with -0.05 CD in the 3º axis for data in both eyes of the same patient. CONCLUSION: In the present study clinical subjective refraction and automatized wavefront refraction under cycloplegia had similar numerical values.

  16. Effect of Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy on refraction in multifocal apodized diffractive pseudophakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijman, Violette; van der Linden, Jan Willem; Nieuwendaal, Carla P; van der Meulen, Ivanka J E; Mourits, Maarten P; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect on refraction of neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy for posterior capsule opacification (PCO), and to evaluate the correlation between automated and subjective refraction in multifocal apodized diffractive pseudophakia. A retrospective study of 75 pseudophakic eyes (50 patients) with multifocal apodized diffractive pseudophakia, treated for PCO with Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy, was performed. Pre- and postintervention values of refractive and visual parameters were compared. The outcomes of autorefraction and subjective refraction were also compared. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity improved significantly after Nd:YAG capsulotomy (Prefraction and autorefraction. Spherical equivalent changed significantly in autorefraction (P=.008), but not in subjective refraction. Autorefraction and subjective refraction were highly correlated in spherical equivalent, defocus equivalent, and blurring strength (r(2)>0.59). In approximately 7% of eyes, a change of more than 0.50 diopters in spherical equivalent in subjective refraction occurred. In most cases, Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in patients with multifocal pseudophakia did not result in a change in refraction. However, 7% of eyes experienced a significant change in subjective refraction. Autorefraction correlated well with subjective refraction in apodized diffractive multifocal IOLs. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Comparison of Subjective Refraction under Binocular and Monocular Conditions in Myopic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Hidenaga; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Handa, Tomoya; Ando, Wakako; Kawamorita, Takushi; Igarashi, Akihito; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2015-07-28

    To compare subjective refraction under binocular and monocular conditions, and to investigate the clinical factors affecting the difference in spherical refraction between the two conditions. We examined thirty eyes of 30 healthy subjects. Binocular and monocular refraction without cycloplegia was measured through circular polarizing lenses in both eyes, using the Landolt-C chart of the 3D visual function trainer-ORTe. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to assess the relations among several pairs of variables and the difference in spherical refraction in binocular and monocular conditions. Subjective spherical refraction in the monocular condition was significantly more myopic than that in the binocular condition (p refraction (p = 0.99). The explanatory variable relevant to the difference in spherical refraction between binocular and monocular conditions was the binocular spherical refraction (p = 0.032, partial regression coefficient B = 0.029) (adjusted R(2) = 0.230). No significant correlation was seen with other clinical factors. Subjective spherical refraction in the monocular condition was significantly more myopic than that in the binocular condition. Eyes with higher degrees of myopia are more predisposed to show the large difference in spherical refraction between these two conditions.

  18. Time course of the effects of orthokeratology on peripheral refraction and corneal topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Swarbrick, Helen

    2013-05-01

    To describe the time course of changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography in myopic adults wearing myopic orthokeratology (OK) lenses. Nineteen adult myopes were fitted with OK lenses in both eyes for overnight wear. Central and peripheral refraction and corneal topography were measured along the horizontal meridian at baseline and after 1, 4, 7 and 14 nights of lens wear. At baseline, refraction was myopic at all positions along the horizontal meridian. Two weeks of OK lens wear caused a significant change in refraction where the general trend was a hyperopic shift in spherical equivalent (M) except at 35° in the nasal visual field where there was instead a myopic shift in M. The most significant change in M occurred between baseline and after 1 night of OK lens wear and the effect became less dramatic across subsequent days of OK treatment. Similarly, OK caused significant change in corneal refractive power at all positions along the horizontal corneal chord. There was a reduction in corneal power or flattening of the cornea at all positions except at 2.4 mm and 2.8 mm on the nasal cornea where there was an increase in corneal refractive power or steepening of the cornea. This change was most apparent after 1 night of OK lens wear and, similar to changes in peripheral refraction, changes in corneal refractive power on subsequent days of OK treatment became less marked. Orthokeratology caused significant changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography. The greatest change in refraction and corneal refractive power across the horizontal corneal meridian occurred during the first night of OK lens wear. Subsequent changes in both peripheral refraction and corneal topography were less dramatic, in the same manner as reported changes in apical radius and central refraction after OK. This study confirms that with OK treatment, the peripheral retina experiences myopic defocus, which is conjectured to underlie the observed slowing of myopia

  19. Topography-modified refraction (TMR): adjustment of treated cylinder amount and axis to the topography versus standard clinical refraction in myopic topography-guided LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and contralateral eye comparison of topography-guided myopic LASIK with two different refraction treatment strategies. Private clinical ophthalmology practice. A total of 100 eyes (50 patients) in consecutive cases of myopic topography-guided LASIK procedures with the same refractive platform (FS200 femtosecond and EX500 excimer lasers) were randomized for treatment as follows: one eye with the standard clinical refraction (group A) and the contralateral eye with the topographic astigmatic power and axis (topography-modified treatment refraction; group B). All cases were evaluated pre- and post-operatively for the following parameters: refractive error, best corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), topography (Placido-disk based) and tomography (Scheimpflug-image based), wavefront analysis, pupillometry, and contrast sensitivity. Follow-up visits were conducted for at least 12 months. Mean refractive error was -5.5 D of myopia and -1.75 D of astigmatism. In group A versus group B, respectively, the average UDVA improved from 20/200 to 20/20 versus 20/16; post-operative CDVA was 20/20 and 20/13.5; 1 line of vision gained was 27.8% and 55.6%; and 2 lines of vision gained was 5.6% and 11.1%. In group A, 27.8% of eyes had over -0.50 diopters of residual refractive astigmatism, in comparison to 11.7% in group B (Prefractive astigmatism of more than -0.5 diopters. Topography-modified refraction (TMR): topographic adjustment of the amount and axis of astigmatism treated, when different from the clinical refraction, may offer superior outcomes in topography-guided myopic LASIK. These findings may change the current clinical paradigm of the optimal subjective refraction utilized in laser vision correction.

  20. Comment on "Total Negative Refraction in Real Crystals for Ballistic Electrons and Light" (Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 157404 (2003))

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, H. -F.; Liu, J.-P.; Ke, B; Kuo, C. -H.; Ye, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Zhang et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 157404 (2003)) have demonstrated that an amphoteric refraction, i. e. both positive and negative refraction, may prevail at the interface of two uniaxial anisotropic crystals when their optical axes are in different directions. The authors subsequently made a correspondence between such a refraction with the negative refraction expected for Left Handed Materials (LHMs). Here we comment that the amphoteric refraction can be observed even with one un...

  1. Electromagnetic origins of negative refraction in coupled plasmonic waveguide metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghanejad, Iman; Chau, Kenneth J.; Markley, Loïc

    2016-10-01

    A metamaterial composed of stacked plasmonic waveguides which support backward propagation along the layers has been shown to exhibit a nearly spherical equifrequency contour (EFC) in which the Floquet-Bloch wave vector kFB and Poynting vector S point in opposite directions everywhere on this surface. Experiments performed on this structure have also shown that polarized light beams incident from free space refract to the same side of normal over a wide range of incidence angles. Together, these observations have led researchers to describe this structure as a homogeneous medium with three-dimensionally isotropic negative refractive index; however, a close inspection of the fields throughout the structure as provided in this paper would suggest otherwise. Here, we rigorously analyze the relationship between phase and power flow within the structure by introducing a method to calculate the power flow of all Floquet-Bloch harmonics, information which cannot be obtained from either conventional analysis of EFCs or effective medium theory. Access to power flow of all harmonics enables us to demonstrate the origin of backward power (defined with respect to the direction of kFB), and in doing so, verify the validity of the claimed three-dimensionally isotropic left-handed response and the validity of describing the medium by a simple negative effective index of refraction n =-1 . Knowledge regarding the distribution of power flow across the harmonics can also be used to design highly efficient methods to couple light into and out of these structures. As an example, we show that tailored wave excitation can achieve coupling efficiencies of up to 96%, over 5 times greater than that achieved by normal-incidence plane-wave excitation.

  2. Square shaped flat-top beam in refractive beam shapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2015-08-01

    Lossless transformation of round Gaussian to square shaped flat-top collimated beam is important in building highpower solid state laser systems to improve optical pumping or amplification. There are industrial micromachining applications like scribing, display repair, which performance is improved when a square shaped spot with uniform intensity is created. Proved beam shaping solutions to these techniques are refractive field mapping beam shapers having some important features: flatness of output phase front, small output divergence, high transmittance, extended depth of field, operation with TEM00 and multimode lasers. Usual approach to design refractive beam shapers implies that input and output beams have round cross-section, therefore the only way to create a square shaped output beam is using a square mask, which leads to essential losses. When an input laser beam is linearly polarized it is suggested to generate square shaped flat-top output by applying beam shaper lenses from birefringent materials or by using additional birefringent components. Due to birefringence there is introduced phase retardation in beam parts and is realized a square shaped interference pattern at the beam shaper output. Realization of this approach requires small phase retardation, therefore weak birefringence effect is enough and birefringent optical components, operating in convergent or divergent beams, can be made from refractive materials, which crystal optical axis is parallel to optical axis of entire beam shaper optical system. There will be considered design features of beam shapers creating square shaped flat-top beams. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  3. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalgaard, M.

    1997-03-01

    The focus of the research presented in this ph.d. thesis is refractive index structures photoinduced in germanonsilica waveguides with ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The physical mechanisms involved in photosensitivity and applications of a wide range of UV induced refractive index structures in both optical fibers and planar wavguides have been explored. This work includes fabrication of fiber Bragg gratings and design of equipment intended for enhancement of photosensitivity by indiffusion of molecular hydrogen. New insight regarding UV induced reactions in germanosilica has been provided through application of a scanning near-field optical microscope to obtain high resolution images of UV induced refractive index structures and by monitoring the dynamics of UV induced index changes and luminescence. During part of my ph.d. project I have worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technolgy in Colorado (USA) under supervision of Dr. Sarah L. Gilbert, fabricating and characterizing erbium doped fiber lasers incorporating UV written Bragg gratings. Due to their compact structure, such devices are shown to exhibit a frequency stability several orders of magnitude better than lasers incorporating bulk optics. Finally, I have developed a new method for direct UV writing of planar waveguide devices using a focussed continuous wave UV laser beam which is scanned across a photosensitive thin film deposited on a silicon wafer. Contrary to other waveguide fabrication techniques this method requires no additional wafer processing. By demonstrating a wide variety of integrated devices it is shown that the performance of this method in terms of waveguide loss, flexibility and fabrication yield rivals or surpasses that currently obtainable with other more elaborate techniques.

  4. Superlens Biosensor with Photonic Crystals in Negative Refraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Dorrani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have presented the study on one structure fabricated with photonic crystals for use as biosensors with superlensing property in dimensions of nano and micro with negative refractive index. In a special frequency, this type of photonic crystal acts as Left-Handed Metamaterial (LHM. It is shown that by a suitable choice of design parameters, such as, dimensions of bars, it is possible to reach sensing property by this structure in two-dimensional triangular photonic crystals. The structure investigated in three size and results shows the slab of photonic crystals prosperous process that, with sensing applications can has imaging applications.

  5. Negative refractive index metamaterials aided by extraordinary optical transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Meca, C; Ortuño, R; Rodríguez-Fortuño, F J; Martí, J; Martínez, A

    2009-04-13

    We study under which conditions extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) structures can be used to build negative refractive index media. As a result, we present a metamaterial with superimposed EOT and negative index at visible wavelengths. The tailoring process starting from a simple hole array until achieving the negative index is detailed. We also discuss the so-called fishnet metamaterial (previously linked to EOT) under the same prism. Using the ideas put forward in this work, other structures with negative index could be engineered in the optical or visible spectrum.

  6. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SHOCK WAVE REFRACTION ON INCLINED CONTACT DISCONTINUITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider numerical simulation of shock wave refraction on plane contact discontinuity, separating two gases with different density. Discretization of Euler equations is based on finite volume method and WENO finite difference schemes, implemented on unstructured meshes. Integration over time is performed with the use of the third-order Runge–Kutta stepping procedure. The procedure of identification and classification of gas dynamic discontinuities based on conditions of dynamic consistency and image processing methods is applied to visualize and interpret the results of numerical calculations. The flow structure and its quantitative characteristics are defined. The results of numerical and experimental visualization (shadowgraphs, schlieren images, and interferograms are compared.

  7. Signicalreflection and refraction in arendt’spublic space: interference bakhtinian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gião Bortolotti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to analyze and characterize the importance of the word as action unfolded in the public space. For this, we used the Bakhtinian notions of reflection and refraction, applied to the issue of communication in the common world, very important for Bakhtin and Arendt. In fact, we assume that these concepts can provide elements to think about the act of enunciation of judgment, without affectingits particular characteristic, since they seem to contribute to the breakdown of fossilized ways of thinking.

  8. Metasurfaces for perfect and full control of refraction and reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Asadchy, V; Tcvetkova, S; Ra'di, Y; Tretyakov, S A

    2016-01-01

    In this talk we present and discuss a new general approach to the synthesis of metasurfaces for full control of transmitted and reflected fields. The method is based on the use of an equivalent impedance matrix which connects the tangential field components at the two sides on the metasurface. Finding the impedance matrix components, we are able to synthesize metasurfaces which perfectly realize the desired response. We will explain possible alternative physical realizations and reveal the crucial role of bianisotropic coupling to achieve full control of transmission through perfectly matched metasurfaces. This abstract summarizes our results on metasurfaces for perfect refraction into an arbitrary direction.

  9. Reflection and refraction of flexural waves at geometric boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur A; Levine, Alex J

    2013-07-19

    We present a theory of flexural wave propagation on elastic shells having nontrivial geometry and develop an analogy to geometric optics. The transport of momentum within the shell itself is anisotropic due to the curvature, and as such complex classical effects such as birefringence are generically found. We determine the equations of reflection and refraction of such waves at boundaries between different local geometries, showing that waves are totally internally reflected, especially at boundaries between regions of positive and negative Gaussian curvature. We verify these effects by using finite element simulations and discuss the ramifications of these effects for the statistical mechanics of thin curved materials.

  10. Refractive Turbulence, Transient Propagation Disturbances, and Space Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, O.; Wroblewski, D.; Hacker, J.

    This paper examines the proposition that mission limiting space situational awareness (SSA) has important and fundamental turbulence and propagation physics issues to be investigated. We propose to call these aspects, propagation situational awareness (PSA). Transient disturbances can be present in communication to and from ground stations and satellites and in the performance of ground based and space based optical and infra-red imaging and tracking systems. Propagation frequency is important in characterizing whether the source of the disturbance lay in the electron density fluctuations of ionosphere or the refractive turbulence of the neutral atmosphere. Over the past ten years high altitude airborne measurements of clear air and refractive turbulence were made in Australia to support design and performance evaluations of the Airborne Laser. More recently in collaboration with the Australian Defence Science & Technology Organization (DSTO) smaller aircraft were used to investigate the effect of ducting layers on the signal strength of an airborne emitter as a low cost simulation of potential for loss of track in the coverage pattern of an airborne radar. From 2002 onward we were also tasked to do fundamental investigations of clear air turbulence for flight safety evaluations of both manned and unmanned high altitude surveillance aircraft. These investigations covered a wide spread in frequency, from infra-red to microwave. Most of these investigations were confined to measurement days and altitudes where strong turbulence was expected. The decision to measure was based on predictions of the location of jet streams relative to the measurement area as well as bulk gradient Richardson (Ri) vertical profiles derived from radio sound measurements from stations surround the potential measurement location. We will show how all these analyses and decision aids, including the Ri profiles, can be used to estimate potential for propagation disturbances to SSA. Current DOD

  11. Refractive index of nanoscale thickness films measured by Brewster refractometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhonov, E A; Malyukin, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that reflective laser refractometery at Brewster angle can be usefull for precision measurements of refractive indexes (RI) in the transparency band of various films of nanoscale thickness. The RI measurements of nanoscale porous film on the basis of gadolinium orthosilicate and quartz have been carried out as first experience. It is shown that surface light scattering in such films that is connected with clustering of nanoscale pores can decrease the accuracy of the RI measurements at Brewster angle. Estimated physical dependence RI stipulated by the film thickness reduction (3D-2D transition) in the range of (20-160)nm has not been not detected.

  12. Strip Waveguide Directional Coupling Modulator with Equivalent Refractive Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-tao; HE Dui-yan

    2004-01-01

    The equivalent refractive index(ERI) method is employed to analyze the function of the strip waveguide directional coupling modulator(SWM). Through deducing the diagnostic equation of the Exmn mode of the four-layer media film waveguide equivalent to the SWM,the transmission constant of the symmetrical mode of the positive phase and negative one and the coupling length of powerful transference are obtained. The veracity of ERI is validated with the example of Ex11 basal mode under the condition of comparing the three results of ERI,EIM and Marcatili.

  13. Negative refractive index induced by percolation in disordered metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Slovick, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    An effective medium model is developed for disordered metamaterials containing a spatially random distribution of dielectric spheres. Similar to effective medium models for ordered metamaterials, this model predicts resonances in the effective permeability and permittivity arising from electric- and magnetic-dipole Mie resonances in the spheres. In addition, the model predicts a redshift of the electric resonance with increasing particle loading. Interestingly, when the particle loading exceeds the percolation threshold of 33\\%, the model predicts that the electric resonance overlaps with the magnetic resonance, resulting in a negative refractive index.

  14. Negative refractive index induced by percolation in disordered metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovick, Brian A.

    2017-03-01

    An effective medium model is developed for disordered metamaterials containing a spatially random distribution of dielectric spheres. Similar to effective medium models for ordered metamaterials, this model predicts resonances in the effective permeability and permittivity arising from electric- and magnetic-dipole Mie resonances in the spheres. In addition, the model predicts a redshift of the electric resonance with increasing particle loading. Interestingly, when the particle loading exceeds the percolation threshold of 33%, the model predicts that the electric resonance overlaps with the magnetic resonance, resulting in a negative refractive index.

  15. Interference Imaging of Refractive Index Distribution in Thin Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Tarjanyi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are three versions of interference imaging of refractive index distribution in thin samples suggested in this contribution. These are based on imaging of interference field created by waves reflected from the front and the back sample surface or imaging of interference field of Michelson or Mach-Zehnder interferometer with the sample put in one of the interferometers arm. The work discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques and presents the results of imaging of refrective index distribution in photorefractive record of a quasi-harmonic optical field in thin LiNbO3 crystal sample.

  16. Planoconcave lens by negative refraction of stacked subwavelength hole arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beruete, M; Navarro-Cía, M; Sorolla, M; Campillo, I

    2008-06-23

    This work presents the design of a planoconcave parabolic negative index metamaterial lens operating at millimeter wavelengths fabricated by using stacked subwavelength hole arrays. A staircase approximation to the ideal parabola profile has been done by removing step by step one lattice in each dimension of the transversal section. Theory predicts power concentration at the focal point of the parabola when the refractive index equals -1. Both simulation and measurement results exhibit an excellent agreement and an asymmetrical focus has been observed. The possibility to design similar planoconcave devices in the terahertz and optical wavelengths could be a reality in the near future.

  17. Sunspot seismic halos generated by fast MHD wave refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E

    2009-01-01

    We suggest an explanation for the high-frequency power excess surrounding active regions known as seismic halos. The idea is based on numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic waves propagation in sunspots. We propose that such an excess can be caused by the additional energy injected by fast mode waves refracted in the higher atmosphere due to the rapid increase of the Alfven speed. Our model qualitatively explains the magnitude of the halo and allows to make some predictions of its behavior that can be checked in future observations.

  18. Science Letters: Lattice type transmission line of negative refractive index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, we introduce a novel passive transmission line of negative refractive index (i.e., left-handedness) based on identical symmetrical lattice type structures [thus called "lattice type transmission line" (LT-TL)]. The dispersion characteristic and the transmission response of the proposed LT-TL are analyzed. While all the other left-handed passive transmission lines are of high pass, the present passive left-handed transmission line is of low pass. Compared with a conventional transmission line, the LT-TL has a phase shift of 180° in the entire wide pass-band.

  19. Refractive Index of Humid Air in the Infrared: Model Fits

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, R J

    2006-01-01

    The theory of summation of electromagnetic line transitions is used to tabulate the Taylor expansion of the refractive index of humid air over the basic independent parameters (temperature, pressure, humidity, wavelength) in five separate infrared regions from the H to the Q band at a fixed percentage of Carbon Dioxide. These are least-squares fits to raw, highly resolved spectra for a set of temperatures from 10 to 25 C, a set of pressures from 500 to 1023 hPa, and a set of relative humidities from 5 to 60%. These choices reflect the prospective application to characterize ambient air at mountain altitudes of astronomical telescopes.

  20. Polarization tailored novel vector beams based on conical refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Turpin, A; Peinado, A; Lizana, A; Campos, J; Kalkandjiev, T K; Mompart, J

    2014-01-01

    Coherent vector beams with involved states of polarization (SOP) are widespread in the literature, having applications in laser processing, super-resolution imaging and particle trapping. We report novel vector beams obtained by transforming a Gaussian beam passing through a biaxial crystal, by means of the conical refraction phenomenon. We analyze both experimentally and theoretically the SOP of the different vector beams generated and demonstrate that the SOP of the input beam can be used to control both the shape and the SOP of the transformed beam. We also identify polarization singularities of such beams for the first time and demonstrate their control by the SOP of an input beam.

  1. Refractive effects in 9Be scattering and nuclear rainbow ghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchler, G. R.; Fulmer, C. B.; Auble, R. L.; Ball, J. B.; Bertrand, F. E.; Erb, K. A.; Gross, E. E.; Hensley, D. C.

    1983-08-01

    Data for the elastic scattering of 9Be on 12C and 16O at 158 MeV provide evidence of refractive effects that allow the optical potentials to be determined with little ambiguity. The real potentials are deep. Large angle data indicate dominance of negative-angle scattering from the far side of the target nucleus. The analysis also implies a residual rainbow phenomenon, contrary to what has been seen previously in heavy-ion scattering. We suggest this be called a rainbow ghost. Operated by Union Carbide Corporation under contract W-7405-eng-26 with the US Department of Energy.

  2. A STUDY ON PREVALENCE OF REFRACTIVE ERRORS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolli Sree Karuna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available ‘’Sarvendriya nam nayanam pradhanam” Of all the organs in the body, eyes are the most important. The blindness or defect in vision decreases the productivity of the nation in addition to increased dependability. The refractive errors in the school children throw them in to defective future. Nutrition deficiency, mental strain, wrong reading habits etc are some of the causes for this defect in these children. Vision is essential for all the children, for the academic and overall development of the now children who are the future Indian Citizens. An attempt was made to study the prevalence of refractive errors in school children. The Lions clubs International has come forward to present the spectacles to all the needy children to correct the refractive errors. MATERIALS & METHODS: By Quantitative method--History taking from all the students by questionnaire method using a preformed structural format and all the visual acuity was clinically examined thoroughly using Snellen’s chart, pinhole occlude for all the students. Colour vision was also tested using Ishihara chart.500 students participated in cross sectional study. The results were analyzed using Microsoft excel. 21.4% eat carrot daily, 15.9% eat weekly one, 20.2% eat weekly twice, 27.1% eat monthly once, 23.8% eat monthly twice, and 26.4% do not eat carrot at all. Defective vision is more prevalent in children eating carrot once in a month. 6.7% eat green leafy vegetables daily, 21% eat weekly once, 21.9% eat weekly twice, 13.6% eat monthly once, 27.3% eat monthly twice, and 33.3% do not eat at all. Defective vision is more common in children who do not eat green leafy vegetables at all.19.9% eat fruits daily, 24.9% eat weekly once, 21.3% eat weekly twice, 20% eat monthly once, 6.7% eat monthly twice and the remaining 50% do not eat fruits at all. Defective vision is more common in children who do not eat fruits at all. All the students with refractive errors were provided with

  3. Topography-modified refraction (TMR: adjustment of treated cylinder amount and axis to the topography versus standard clinical refraction in myopic topography-guided LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John Kanellopoulos1,2 1LaserVision Clinical and Research Institute, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, NYU Medical School, New York, NY, USA Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and contralateral eye comparison of topography-guided myopic LASIK with two different refraction treatment strategies. Setting: Private clinical ophthalmology practice. Patients and methods: A total of 100 eyes (50 patients in consecutive cases of myopic topography-guided LASIK procedures with the same refractive platform (FS200 femtosecond and EX500 excimer lasers were randomized for treatment as follows: one eye with the standard clinical refraction (group A and the contralateral eye with the topographic astigmatic power and axis (topography-modified treatment refraction; group B. All cases were evaluated pre- and post-operatively for the following parameters: refractive error, best corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, topography (Placido-disk based and tomography (Scheimpflug-image based, wavefront analysis, pupillometry, and contrast sensitivity. Follow-up visits were conducted for at least 12 months. Results: Mean refractive error was -5.5 D of myopia and -1.75 D of astigmatism. In group A versus group B, respectively, the average UDVA improved from 20/200 to 20/20 versus 20/16; post-operative CDVA was 20/20 and 20/13.5; 1 line of vision gained was 27.8% and 55.6%; and 2 lines of vision gained was 5.6% and 11.1%. In group A, 27.8% of eyes had over -0.50 diopters of residual refractive astigmatism, in comparison to 11.7% in group B (P<0.01. The residual percentages in both groups were measured with refractive astigmatism of more than –0.5 diopters. Conclusion: Topography-modified refraction (TMR: topographic adjustment of the amount and axis of astigmatism treated, when different from the clinical refraction, may offer superior outcomes in topography-guided myopic LASIK. These findings

  4. Fully interferometric controllable anomalous refraction efficiency using cross modulation with plasmonic metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaocheng; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Jianxiong; Cheng, Hua; Li, Zhancheng; Liu, Wenwei; Yu, Ping; Xia, Ji; Tian, Jianguo

    2014-12-01

    We present a method of fully interferometric, controllable anomalous refraction efficiency by introducing cross-modulated incident light based on plasmonic metasurfaces. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations indicate that the anomalous and ordinary refracted beams generated from two opposite-helicity incident beams and following the generalized Snell's law will have a superposition for certain incident angles, and the anomalous refraction efficiency can be dynamically controlled by changing the relative phase of the incident sources. As the incident wavelength nears the resonant wavelength of the plasmonic metasurfaces, two equal-amplitude incident beams with opposite helicity can be used to control the anomalous refraction efficiency. Otherwise, two unequal-amplitude incident beams with opposite helicity can be used to fully control the anomalous refraction efficiency. This Letter may offer a further step in the development of controllable anomalous refraction.

  5. 3-D photo-patterning of refractive index structures in photosensitive thin film materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a three-dimensional refractive index structure in a photosensitive material using photo-patterning. The wavelengths at which a photosensitive material exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation is first determined and then a portion of the surface of the photosensitive material is optically irradiated at a wavelength at which the photosensitive material exhibits a change in refractive index using a designed illumination system to produce a three-dimensional refractive index structure. The illumination system can be a micro-lenslet array, a macroscopic refractive lens array, or a binary optic phase mask. The method is a single-step, direct-write procedure to produce a designed refractive index structure.

  6. Atmospheric refraction corrections of radiowave propagation for airborne and satellite_borne radars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric refraction corrections of radiowave propagation for airborne and satellite_borne radars for the spherically stratified (horizontally homogeneous) atmosphere (including lower atmosphere and ionosphere) are discussed. First, the critical apparent depression angle for radar and the perigee of ray are found using the refractive index profile close to the lowest point of the ray as the refractive index profile of spherically stratified atmosphere, and strict expressions of line_of_sight distance for radar that take account of refraction are presented. Then, to which condition the atmospheric refraction to be corrected belongs is determined, and the positioning corrections for all the twelve atmospheric refractive conditions are made using ray_tracing method. At last, the velocity_measuring corrections are made.

  7. Refraction-compensated motion tracking of unrestrained small animals in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre; Meikle, Steven; Baldock, Clive; Fulton, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of fully conscious rodents represents an important paradigm shift for preclinical investigations. In such studies, if motion tracking is performed through a transparent enclosure containing the awake animal, light refraction at the interface will introduce errors in stereo pose estimation. We have performed a thorough investigation of how this impacts the accuracy of pose estimates and the resulting motion correction, and developed an efficient method to predict and correct for refraction-based error. The refraction model underlying this study was validated using a state-of-the-art motion tracking system. Refraction-based error was shown to be dependent on tracking marker size, working distance, and interface thickness and tilt. Correcting for refraction error improved the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of motion-corrected positron emission tomography images. Since the methods are general, they may also be useful in other contexts where data are corrupted by refraction effects.

  8. Interferometric investigation and simulation of refractive index in glass matrixes containing nanoparticles of varying sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feeney, Michael Gerard; Ince, Rabia; Yukselici, Mehmet Hikmet; Allahverdi, Cagdas

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between refractive index and nanoparticle radii of cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles embedded within glass matrixes was investigated experimentally and by simulations. A homemade automated Michelson interferometer arrangement employing a rotating table and a He-Ne laser source at a wavelength of 632.8 nm determined the refractive index versus nanoparticle radii of embedded cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles. The refractive index was found to decrease linearly with nanoparticle radius increase. However, one sample showed a step increase in refractive index; on spectroscopic analysis, it was found that its resonant wavelength matched that of the He-Ne source wavelength. The simulations showed that two conditions caused the step increase in refractive index: low plasma frequency and matched sample and source resonances. This simple interferometer setup defines a new method of determining the radii of nanoparticles embedded in substrates and enables refractive index tailoring by modification of exact annealing conditions.

  9. Refractive index insensitive temperature sensor based on waist-enlarged few mode fiber bitapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Si-wen; Fu, Xing-hu; Fu, Guang-wei; Jin, Wa; Bi, Wei-hong

    2017-01-01

    A refractive index insensitive temperature sensor based on waist-enlarged few mode fiber (FMF) bitapers is presented. The first section of FMF is spliced between two single-mode fibers. In fusion process, the waist-enlarged FMF bitapers can be obtained by large current discharging repeatedly. The refractive index and temperature sensing mechanisms are analyzed. For the sensors with different sizes, the refractive index and temperature experiments have been performed. The results show that in the refractive index ranges of 1.335 0—1.346 6 and 1.348 2—1.419 3, the refractive index insensitivity is verified. In a temperature range of 31.9—90 °C, the sensor sensitivity can be up to 85.57 pm/°C. In addition, it has a compact structure. Therefore, the sensor can avoid the cross sensitivity for measuring the refractive index and temperature simultaneously.

  10. Highly tunable refractive index visible-light metasurface from block copolymer self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Hyowook; Kim, Bong Hoon; Chang, Taeyong; Lim, Joonwon; Jin, Hyeong Min; Mun, Jeong Ho; Choi, Young Joo; Chung, Kyungjae; Shin, Jonghwa; Fan, Shanhui; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2016-01-01

    The refractive index of natural transparent materials is limited to 2–3 throughout the visible wavelength range. Wider controllability of the refractive index is desired for novel optical applications such as nanoimaging and integrated photonics. We report that metamaterials consisting of period and symmetry-tunable self-assembled nanopatterns can provide a controllable refractive index medium for a broad wavelength range, including the visible region. Our approach exploits the independent control of permeability and permittivity with nanoscale objects smaller than the skin depth. The precise manipulation of the interobject distance in block copolymer nanopatterns via pattern shrinkage increased the effective refractive index up to 5.10. The effective refractive index remains above 3.0 over more than 1,000 nm wavelength bandwidth. Spatially graded and anisotropic refractive indices are also obtained with the design of transitional and rotational symmetry modification. PMID:27683077

  11. Extraordinary refraction and self-collimation properties of multilayer metallic-dielectric stratified structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei, E-mail: zlwhpu@hotmail.com [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Chen, Liang [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Zhang, Zhengren [School of Science, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Wusong [Guizhou Aerospace Institute of Measuring and Testing Technology, Guiyang 550009 (China); Zhao, Yuhuan; Song, Kechao; Kang, Chaoyang [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The extraordinary refraction with negative or zero refraction angle of the layered metamaterial consisting of alternating dielectric and plasmonic layers is theoretically studied. It is shown that the electromagnetic properties can be tuned by the filling factor, the permittivity of the dielectric layer and the plasma frequency of the metallic layer. At different frequency, the layered structures possess different refraction properties with positive, zero or negative refraction angle. By choosing appropriate parameters, positive-to-zero-to-negative-to positive refraction at the desired frequency can be realized. At the frequency with flat equal frequency contour, self-collimation and slow light properties are also found. Such properties can be used in the performance of negative refraction, subwavelength imaging and information propagation.

  12. Experimental validation of systematically designed acoustic hyperbolic meta material slab exhibiting negative refraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    This Letter reports on the experimental validation of a two-dimensional acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial slab optimized to exhibit negative refractive behavior. The slab was designed using a topology optimization based systematic design method allowing for tailoring the refractive behavior....... The experimental results confirm the predicted refractive capability as well as the predicted transmission at an interface. The study simultaneously provides an estimate of the attenuation inside the slab stemming from the boundary layer effects—insight which can be utilized in the further design...... of the metamaterial slabs. The capability of tailoring the refractive behavior opens possibilities for different applications. For instance, a slab exhibiting zero refraction across a wide angular range is capable of funneling acoustic energy through it, while a material exhibiting the negative refractive behavior...

  13. Visual acuity and refraction by age for children of three different ethnic groups in Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa Janine Carter

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To characterize refractive errors in Paraguayan children aged 5-16 years and investigate effect of age, gender, and ethnicity. METHODS:The study was conducted at 3 schools that catered to Mennonite, indigenous, and mixed race children. Children were examined for presenting visual acuity, autorefraction with and without cycloplegia, and retinoscopy. Data were analyzed for myopia and hyperopia (SE ≤-1 D or -0.5 D and ≥2 D or ≥3 D and astigmatism (cylinder ≥1 D. Spherical equivalent (SE values were calculated from right eye cycloplegic autorefraction data and analyzed using general linear modelling. RESULTS: There were 190, 118, and 168 children of Mennonite, indigenous and mixed race ethnicity, respectively. SE values between right/left eyes were nonsignificant. Mean visual acuity (VA without correction was better for Mennonites compared to indigenous or mixed race children (right eyes: 0.031, 0.090, and 0.102 logMAR units, respectively; P<0.000001. There were 2 cases of myopia in the Mennonite group (1.2% and 2 cases in the mixed race group (1.4% (SE ≤-0.5 D. The prevalence of hyperopia (SE ≥2 D was 40.6%, 34.2%, and 46.3% for Mennonite, indigenous and mixed race children. Corresponding astigmatism rates were 3.2%, 9.5%, and 12.7%. Females were slightly more hyperopic than males, and the 9-11 years age group was the most hyperopic. Mennonite and mixed race children were more hyperopic than indigenous children. CONCLUSIONS: Paraguayan children were remarkably hyperopic and relatively free of myopia. Differences with regard to gender, age, and ethnicity were small.

  14. Targeted alteration of real and imaginary refractive index of biological cells by histological staining

    OpenAIRE

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Subramanian, Hariharan; Stoyneva, Valentina; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Yang, Seungmoo; Damania, Dhwanil; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Various staining techniques are commonly used in biomedical research to investigate cellular morphology. By inducing absorption of light, staining dyes change the intracellular refractive index due to the Kramers-Kronig relationship. We present a method for creating 2-D maps of real and imaginary refractive indices of stained biological cells using their thickness and absorptance. We validate our technique on dyed polystyrene microspheres and quantify the alteration in refractive index of sta...

  15. Refraction of extraordinary rays and ordinary rays in the Savart polariscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jun-Fang; Zhang Chun-Min; Zhang Ying-Tang; Liu Han-Chen; Zhai Xue-Jun

    2008-01-01

    The refraction of rays in the Savart polariscope is different from the isotropic medium. We have analysed and discussed the refraction of rays in the Savart polariscope on the basis of the Snell law. The refraction formulae of the extraordinary rays and ordinary rays were derived. Results obtained may provide theoretical and practical guide lines for studying, developing and engineering of polarization interference imaging spectrometer.

  16. Complex refractive index of starch acetate used as a biodegradable pigment and filler of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvinen, Petri; Oksman, Antti; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Mikkonen, Hannu

    2007-05-01

    Complex refractive index of strongly depolarizing starch acetate is investigated as a function of bulk package density, which is compulsory parameter in analysis of light scattering from nanoscale starch acetate pigments and fillers. The measurements were made using a laser-goniometer and spectrophotometer to gain data for refractive index analysis according to the Brewster's law and Fresnel equations. The real part of refractive index was verified by microscopic immersion method.

  17. Broad Angle Negative Refraction in Lossless all Dielectric Multilayer Asymmetric Anisotropic Metamaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Mahdy, Mahdy Rahman Chowdhury; Rahman, Md. Saifur

    2015-01-01

    In this article, it has been theoretically shown that broad angle negative refraction is possible with asymmetric anisotropic metamaterials constructed by only dielectrics or loss less semiconductors at the telecommunication and relative wavelength range. Though natural uniaxial materials can exhibit negative refraction, the maximum angle of negative refraction and critical incident angle lie in a very narrow range. This notable problem can be overcome by our proposed structure. In our struct...

  18. Negative refraction and sub-wavelength imaging using transparent metal-dielectric stacks

    OpenAIRE

    Scalora, Michael; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Akozbek, Neset; Centini, Marco; de Ceglia, Domenico; Cappeddu, Mirko; Mattiucci, Nadia; Haus, Joseph W.; Bloemer, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    Negative refraction is known to occur in materials that simultaneously possess a negative electric permittivity and magnetic permeability; hence they are termed negative index materials. However, there are no known natural materials that exhibit a negative index of refraction. In large part, interest in these materials is due to speculation that they could be used as perfect lenses with superresolution. We propose a new way of achieving negative refraction with currently available technology,...

  19. Tunable plasmon lensing in graphene-based structure exhibiting negative refraction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Shifeng; Lu, Yanxin; Li, Chao; Xu, Haixia; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve tunable plasmon focusing in graphene/photonic-crystal hybrid structure exhibiting all-angle negative refraction at terahertz frequencies. A two-dimensional photonic crystal composed of a square lattice of dielectric rods is constructed on the substrate of a graphene sheet to provide the hyperbolic dispersion relations of the graphene plasmon, giving rise to the all-angle plasmonic negative refraction. Plasmon lensing induced from the negative refraction is...

  20. Holographic Recording and Applications of Multiplexed Volume Bragg Gratings in Photo-Thermo-Refractive Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-06

    applications of multiplexed volume bragg gratings in photo- thermo -refractive glass Volume Bragg grating (VBG) structures are capable of diffracting...research in the holographic recording of volume Bragg gratings in photo- thermo -refractive (PTR) glass has shown that these gratings are extremely...ABSTRACT Holographic recording and applications of multiplexed volume bragg gratings in photo- thermo -refractive glass Report Title Volume Bragg grating (VBG